The East Carolinian, April 27, 1999






Tuesday
High: 78
Low: 65
Wednesday
High: 74
Low: 56
rofi
Online Survey
Do you feel Wa.ier Williams did the right,
thing by resigning?
Do you think that something like the
Littleton tragedy could happen at ECU?
Yes: 97 No: 2
www.tec.ecu.edu
fcarolinian
Visit the sites and experiences of Malawi
See Features page 6
TUESDAY. APRIL 27 .1999 VOLUME 74. ISSUE 43
Student falls victim
to armed robbery
Police have no firm
leads on suspects
Holly Harris
NEWS EDITOR
A Garret Hall resident was robbed
at gunpoint in the parking lot west
of Aycock Hall last Thursday night.
According to a police report, two
young white males in a teal car
stopped 18-year-old Shaun Foran
around 9:15 p.m. under the pre-
tense that they needed directions.
Capt. Frank Knight of the ECU
police department said that after
Foran provided the directions and
began to walk away, the men called
him back to the car, and the passen-
ger brandished a 9 mm handgun
and demanded F'oran's watch.
After Foran gave the perpetrator
his watch, the men backed out of
the parking lot and drove away.
Though Foran reported the inci-
dent to campus police, the Highway
Patrol, local authorities have been
notified to be on the look out for the
car and the two men. Knight said
there were no witnesses other than
the victim and no progress has been
made in the case.
Foran was not available for com-
ment.
"At this time we don't have any
firm leads on the suspects or the
suspects' car Knight said. "We
have an investigator on the case
According to Knight, this is the
only armed robbery that has
occurred on campus in about two
years.
"We don't think there is any big
concern, but everyone should be
careful Knight said. "If anyone
drives up to you, do not approach
the vehicle. The safest thing would
be to go directly into a dormitory
The police department has
increased the number of officers cir-
culating on foot and bike patrols for
the College Hill and the residence
hall area of west side of campus.
Three stabbed at
downtown night club
Bouncers attacked
atPantana Bobs
Amy Wagner
assistant news editor
A man was arrested early Sunday
morning for stabbing three bounc-
ers in a local night club.
According to a police report,
William Donald Poland Jr 24, was
arrested for three felony counts of
assault with a deadly weapon with
intent to kill inflicting serious
injury. The incident happened in
Pantana Bob's night club, located
on Cotanche Street, a downtown
night spot frequented by ECU stu-
dents.
A news release said that after
Poland was removed from the club
for disruptive behavior, his friends
began fighting with the bouncers.
Poland went back inside the club,
where the bouncers again grabbed
him. He then stabbed the victims
with a folding blade knife.
According to Ja.son Blackman, a
sophomore who was at the club that
night, it was obvious that something
was going on, but the crowd pre-
vented him from seeing anything.
"A fight broke out, but that's not
uncommon Blackman said. "The
next thing I knew people were
talking about the bouncers getting
stabbed
A representative from Pantana
Bob's would not comment on the
incident.
"I didn't get a look at any
bouncers, but I saw a lot of blood
on the sidewalk outside
Blackman said.
The police report also said that
Poland had used alcohol and drugs
prior to the stabbing.
Poland, who is currently living
in Rocky Mount was secured under
SEE STABBING PAGE2
Community walks for life
PHOTOS BY AMANOA AUSTIN
Relay For Life Chair says organization wants to continue to incorporate
campus community into annual event held at Harringon Field track.
Erica S i k e s
Last Friday, the city of
Greenville gathered at Harrington
Field to raise money and walk for
cancer, a disease that has taken the
lives of many and changed the
lives of survivors. The 24-hour
walk around the track began at
3:30 on Friday afternoon. It con-
tinued throughout the entire night.
At 7:00 p.m tents were pitched
and grills were fired up to accom-
modate the walkers with hamburg-
ers and hot dogs.
"We had a very big turnout this
year said Amy Beach, 1999 Relay
Chair. "We had teams partici-
pate in the activities
"We would, however like to see
more ECU faculty and Student
Professional Organizations next
year Beach said. "We would also
like to invite ECU entertainment
to participate
As the candles were lit at 9:00
p.m. for the luminaire ceremony,
the mood was distinctively solemn
as people gathered to remember
those who had lost the battle to
cancer, to pray for the ones stricken
SEE RELAY FOR LIFE PAGE 2
Students rally to discuss, protest racial slur
Gathering kicked off
Heritage Festival
A Mv Wagner
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
ECU students held a rally
Thursday to protest and discuss a
racial slur made by former Board of
Trustees member Walter Williams.
According to Marcus Fredrick of
The Ledonia Wright Center, 250-
300 students gathered on campus
for the annual Heritage Festival at
the amphitheater on west campus.
The rally was held at the start of the
festival.
Fredrick said he and Na'im
Akbar, Gillian Thompson and
Adrian Cox started the rally under
the umbrella of the Minority
Student Coalition.
"We took the opportunity of the
gathering of students to inform
them about the B.O.T members'
comments Akbar said. "We want-
ed to explain exactly what the com-
ment meant.
Williams said in an address to the
Cape Fear chapter of the pirate
club that there was a "nigger in the
woodpile" if the men's basketball
team does not begin to win with
new coach Bill Herrion
Groups present at the rally
included the ECU chapter of the
NAACP, the Black Student Union,
A.B.L.E Alpha Kappa Alpha and
the National Pan Hellenic Council,
among others, according to
Fredrick.
"We basically wanted to inform
everybody of what had happened
Fredrick said. "Not everyone on
campus is aware of Mr. Williams'
remarks
Fredrick also said that the rally
was held to let people know what
the minority leaders on campus
were doing about Williams' com-
ment.
Some students that attended the
Heritage Festival said they were
pleasantly surprised by the rally.
"I wasn't expecting it said Brad
Calhoun, sophomore. "But I was
glad to see that people cared about
Building construction slated to
in summer
New projects will
include coffee bar
Amy Elliott
news writer
Pantana Bob's was the sits of a triple stabbing last Sunday.
PHOTO Bf MICHAEL SMITH
Campus is preparing for the begin-
ning of several new construction
projects slated to begin as early as
this summer.
Preparation work on the new
249,000 square-foot Science and
Technology Building begins this
summer and will result in the clos-
ing of Founder's Drive from
Christenbury to the English Annex.
A temporary road servicing con-
struction and maintenance vehicles
as well as emergency vehicles will
connect East Tenth Street to
Founder's Drive. No other traffic
will be permitted. This will result
in the loss of 42 resident parking
spaces east of Umstead. However,
the 17 staff parking spaces behind
Flanagan will be changed into resi-
dent. The private lot located at the
General Classroom Building will
SEE CONSTRUCTION PAGE2
A new strength and conditioning center is one of the new buildings planned.
ARTIST RENDERING





2 Tun��y, April 27, 1998
news
The East Carolinian
New
masters
Many required classes
to be offered online
program offers
of science degree
Tkrra Si kinbkiskr
STAff WIITKI
Recently, the UNC Board of
Governors approved a new degree
program for ECU's School of
Industry and Technology. Starting
next month, the school will offer a
master of science degree in occupa-
tional safety and health.
The program began four years
ago as a concentration in a masters
in industrial technology. Since
then, it has generated a lot of stu-
dent interest and has grown rapidly
� much to the delight of the
School of Industry and Technology.
Rape suspect indicted
on firearms charge
CHARLOTTE (AP) A
Charlotte man serving prison time
" in Virginia for molesting a girl and
awaiting trial on child kidnapping
and rape charges has been charged
with federal firearms violations.
A federal grand jury charged
Robin Wayne Martin, 42, of pos-
sessing machine guns, submachine
guns and silencers. He also is
charged in the indictment.
"It was obvious very early on
that the program was going to be
popular, so we began the adminis-
trative process of turning it into its
own degree program said Darryl
Davis, dean of the School of
Industry and Technology.
Many of the classes required for
this new degree will be offered on-
line.
"This is an important part of the
program because we'll have people
from all over North Carolina and
the United States taking these
courses Davis said. "There will
still be some required lab compo-
nents that students will have to
complete, but a lot of the require-
ments will-be done on-line
Courses available on-line will
range from such basics as
Introduction to Safety
Management, all the way up to
more specific classes like Fire
.news
briefs
unsealed Wednesday, of attempt-
ing to manufacture, transfer or pos-
sess assault-style weapons.
Martin was convicted in Virginia
in September 1997 of molesting an
8-year-old girl.
Safety and Hazardous
Communication.
ECU will join Murray State
University, Indiana University of
Pennsylvania, West Virginia State
University and Indiana University
as the only schools in the nation to
offer an accredited program in
occupational safety and health at
the master's level, according to
John Durham, director of news and
communication services.
"Making this program into a
degree that stands alone is going to
benefit both students and prospec-
tive employers because occupa-
tional health and safety is such a
broad field Davis said.
Graduates typically pursue
careers as insurance loss control
representatives, safety program
directors in medium to large indus-
tries and safety consultants.
Construction
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
also be closed. If students would
like to find out more about parking
and traffic changes this summer,
information can be found at
www.ecu.eduservicesparkadjust.h
tm.
The Board of Governors has also
approved three other construction
projects to enlarge campus offer-
ings. The first of these is a $2.9 mil-
lion materials warehouse that will
be built on Dickinson Avenue. The
warehouse will handle shipping
and receiving as well as store some
materials.
Bruce Flye, director of Facilities
Planning said that the new facility
will be larger and better than the
current warehouse. This building
will satisfy the need to get the facil-
ity off of central camps, and the
location on Dickinson will conve-
niently serve both the School of
Medicine and the main body of
campus.
Jones Hall will also undergo
extensive renovations. As part of a 2
12 piece, $18.5 million project, the
first phase will include renovations
to the old dining hall. The changes
will include a slight expansion that
will affect the dimensions of the
Galley. The second phase of the
Jones renovations will include
equipping the entire building with
air conditioning. There will also be
a juice and desert bar, a fitness cen-
ter, an online coffee bar, study areas
and activity areas which will give
students an entertainment alterna-
tive to going downtown.
Students say they will have to
see what the new facilities have to
offer before deciding if they will
spend their recreation time there.
"It may be a nice place, but it
depends on what they have to
offer said freshman Colleen
Sherrill. "It depends on how enter-
taining it will be There will also
be a new chiller plant installed on
College Hill. The chiller plant will
allow all halls on College Hill to
eventually be equipped with air
conditioning.
"One chiller plant will result in
huge energy savings Flye said
"The plant will ensure that a hall
doesn't go without air condition-
ing
If the chiller mechanically failed
in any way, the hall would lose its
air conditioning. With the addition
of the new plant which will have
several chillers, no one hall would
lose its air conditioning.
The third project is the con-
struction of a $10.6 million strength
and conditioning center between
Minges and Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium. The 20,000 square-foot
facility will have a recruit dining
area, kitchen, study areas, a track,
an agility area, a plyometric training
area, a large area for free-form lift-
ing, a number of aerobic training
units, as well as a 500-seat banquet
hall.
"It is one of the biggest spaces
in the country Flye said.
He also said that the banquet
hall will be a much needed asset to.
the city of Greenville.
"All of the different types of-
training we can do will be con-
tained to that facility said Jeff
Connors, director of strength and
conditioning.
Students said they think the
complex is a good idea as long as
numerous people can take advan-
tage of the facilities.
"There are more important
things to spend $10.6 million on.
Hopefully it will be open to all stu-
dents said Kmily Miller, junior
science education major.
The East Carolini
Female jail guard gets
probation for having
sex with inmate
SPRINGFIELD, Ga. (AP) A
former Effingham jailer has been
sentenced to two years probation
for having sex with an inmate at the
Effingham Countyjail.
Kay C. Stone, 50, of Springfield,
was convicted Friday of sexual
assault against a person in custody
by Superior Court Judge Faye
Sanders Martin, who also handed
down the sentence.
Ms. Stone was also fined $2,000
in lieu of a 90-day sentence in a
women's detention center.
Two of Ms. Stone's former
coworkers are accused of taking
bribes of as little as $20 to allow
male inmates to visit female
inmates. Former jailers Jerry W.
Hall, 47, and Toby Lee Tittle, 24,
both of Guyton, face bribery
charges.
Stabbing
continued liom page 1
$300,000 bond.
Officers arrested Poland in the
Chico's parking lot. He cooperat-
ed, leading police to the knife
which was hidden in the bushes
behind the club, a news release
said.
Students say that they are used
to seeing fights downtown, but this
stabbing is on a whole other level.
"It's really scary that people
think it's necessary to bring a knife
downtown said Brad Calhoun,
sophomore. "I hope 1 don't give
the wrong look to some crazy per-
son that will stab me. It makes me
think twice about going downtown
There was also a stabbing this
weekend at Tar River Estates.
According to a police report, an
altercation erupted between five-
individuals. Three of the individu-
als suffered cut wounds and were
treated at University Medical
Center. The incident, which
involved knives, is still under
investigation.
Relay For Life
continued liom page I
with the disease and to support
those who had overcome the dis-
ease.
Aaron Harris, Student Patrol
Supervisor, who worked the
entire night of the event feels that
this event holds many benefits for
the City of Greenville.
"It shows that a community can
still come together for a common
cause said I larris. "I take pride in
knowing that I attend a school in
such a tight-knit community
Brian Bradshaw, Director of
Student Patrol who joined I larris
on the next morning was also elat-
ed to be part of the Relay for I ,ife.
"Relay for Life is a very worth-
while endeavor Bradshaw said. "I
am proud to be a part of it this year
and plan to do it again next year
campus
nets
Tuesday
Benefits Fair � Faculty and
staff can attend an afternoon pro-
gram in Mendenhall Student
Center to learn more about issues
such as retirement planning, health
insurance and physical fitness. The
annual ECU Benefits fair starts at
noon and continues until 4 p.m.
Medical Conference �
"Morbidity and Mortality" will be
the topic of a presentation at 12:30
p.m. in the Family Practice Center
Classroom in the Brody Building.
Softball � The women's Softball
. team will play Hampton at 2 p.m It
' will be a doubleheader.
Baseball � ECU and UNC play
tonight at 7 p.m. at Harrington
Field.
Playhouse � "HOT'L
Baltimore" is on stage for its final
performance at 8 p.m. in McGinnis
Theater. For tickets call the
Playhouse Box Office at 328-6829.
Wednesday
Benefits Fair�The exhibits and
information booths for the ECU
Benefits Fair continue from 9 a.m
4 p.m. at Mendenhall Student
Center. The fair provides informa-
tion to faculty and staff about finan-
cial planning, health insurance,
retirement benefits and physical fit-
ness.
Lecture � Dr. Jerome Hanley, a
clinical psychologist, will deliver a
lecture titled "A Different
Perspective of Systems of Care" at
11 a.m. in Room 129 of the Speight
Building. His lecture is about men-
tal health treatment for children
and families of color. Hanley is the
director of the Division of Children,
Adolescents and Their Families for
the South Carolina Department of
Mental Health.
Lecture � a public lecture
about the medical condition known
as incontinence will be given by Dr.
Shekar Chakravarthi at 12:30 p.m.
in the Family Practice Center
Classroom of the Brody Building.
Medical Issues � Dr. Paige
Fisher will give a presentation of
"Postoperative Complications" at
1:30 p.m. in the PCMH
Auditorium.
Features editor &
writers needed
for summer
�Must be creative, responsible self-motivated,
and elile to meet deadlines. Also have good
grammar & editing skills.
'Apply at the second floor of Student Publications
Building or call 3284366 ;
,
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102B East. Victc
Bedford Park, Gi
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The East Carolinian
news
Tut.div, Aaril 27,1999 3
BOG approves new system growth plan
Greenville's
Best Kept Secret
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STAFF v�i 11:�
A new proposal to increase growth
over a ten-year span at some of
North Carolina's smaller universi-
ties was recently approved by the
Board of Governors.
The plan, approved on April 19,
consists of initiating 2 five-year
periods of growth to increase
enrollment at smaller universities
like Western Carolina, while
restraining growth at the larger
institutions like NC State and
Chapel Mill. Board members and
Earn Some Money.
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'No lees lo applicants'
April 20
Breaking & Entering of Motor
Vehicle - A staff member reported
the breaking and entering of his
state van. Several tools were taken
from the van that was parked at the
south loading dock of the Mowell
Science Building.
Driving While Impaired - A stu-
dent was arrested for driving while
impaired. An officer observed her
driving erratically at Ninth and
Cotanche Streets.
April 21
Possible Controlled Substance -
A staff member turned in a plastic
bag containing a brown paper sub-
stance that he found in a parking lot
near Tenth Street and College Mill
Drive. Officers determined that the
substance was not a controlled sub-
M
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For i good lint all:
KUStaoVolUotaHotitiic
officials feel that the plan will result
in a more effective use of space
throughout the 16 campuses of the
UNC system.
So far, representatives at the tar-
get schools said they arc generally
excited about the prospect of
increasing their enrollment.
"We feel very good about the
proposal said Frank Prochaska,
Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs
at Western Carolina University. "Of
course, when you plan to grow like
that you will encounter problems,
but we feel confident that we can
handle them There are currently
6,200 students enrolled at Western
Carolina.
Officials at Elizabeth City State
University, which has 1,950 current
students, feel much the same way.
"We're very supportive of the
system's growth plan and feel that it
will be beneficial to the system as a
whole said Marsha McLean,
director of university relations at
ECSU.
Since ECU is the third largest
university in the state, this particu-
lar plan will have only a small effect
in enrollment, despite the fact that
the school hopes to increase growth.
Earlier this year, ECU expressed
the desire to increase enrollment to
anywhere between 25,000 and
27,000 students in the next ten
years. Under the BOG plan, ECU
will eventually increase up to
24,000 students in 2008.
"The general administration is
aware of our goals, but it isn't the
highest priority right now said
John Durham, director of news and
communication services.
One of the greatest problems in
implementing the plan will be
building sufficient facilities and
financing the estimated $7.4 billion
price tag that will go along with it
"Before any significant growth
can take place, we need to get the
facilities Durham said. "We're
maxed out right now
"We need to start building resi-
dence halls now if Western Carolina
is going to grow as planned
Prochaska said.
BOG members will review the
plan each year to evaluate its effec-
tiveness to ensure that future
needs are not undermined by the
program.
s a 1 � i j$�
SCSI 16
stance and disposed of the same.
Solicitation - A non-student was
banned from campus for employing
students to solicit credit card appli-
cants. He attempted to hold a meet-
ing in the basement of Belk I kill to
obtain the completed credit card
applications.
Harassing Phone Calls - The res-
idents of a room in Fletcher I kill
reported receiving harassing phone
calls in their room.
Lost Bracelet - A resident of
Jones 1 hill reported that she lost her
bracelet sometime in March. She
reported she saw another student
wearing it in the computer lab at
Aycock Mall. Officers were unable
to determine if the bracelet was that
of the complainant.
Larcenv - A resident of Clement
I kill reported the larceny of his One
Card from a locker in the Student
Recreation Center.
April 22, 1999 from 7:00 am until
April 2.1, 1999 at 7:00 am
1 larassing Phone Calls - Two res-
idents of Scott Hall were issued
campus appearance tickets for mak-
ing harassing phone calls.
Armed Robbery - A resident of
Garrctt Mall reported that he was
robbed at gunpoint in the parking
lot north of Aycock Mall. Two males
in a teal Mitsubishi Eclipse stopped
the victim to ask directions. One
suspect pointed a 9 mm handgun
and demanded the victim's watch.
Damage to Property - A resident
of Aycock I lull was issued a campus
appearance ticket for injury to real
property and underage consump-
r
tion of alcohol after he was seen
falling into and damaging a tree
north of the International House.
April 23
Driving While Impairedl
Provisional Licensee! One Way Street
Violation - A student was stopped
for a one way street violation on
Reade Street. During the traffic
stop an odor of alcohol was detect-
ed, which lead to his arrest.
Intoxicated & DisruptiveResist
Officer by Running - A non-student
was issued a trespass warning after
he was observed yelling at students
as they walked by him. As an officer
approached him the subject
attempted to flee. The subject was
apprehended east of the Erwin u j
Building where the warning was
issued.
appening
at ECU?"
Two-thirds of ECU students
consume Pour or Fewer
drinks when they drink.
More than half oF ECU
students drink alcohol
twice a month or less.
One-third oF ECU students
preFer to attend parties
where alcohol is NOT served.
What's happening with
m
BAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
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The East Ciroli
outnew
As we all know, long time Board of Trustees member, Walter Williams recently
resigned from his position. Williams made a comment in reference to this seasons
basketball team and its new coach, later saying his comment was mistakenly taken
as a racial slur.
The comment, "nigger in the woodpile is an old saying from an old era. If it ever
was acceptable, then aren't we thankful we are not of that era. In a time when peo-
ple used wood to heat buildings, did they assume that if wood was found missing,
an African-American was stealing the wood?
Williams may have lived most of his life in an era when this comment would have
been acceptable, but in the late 90's this is inexcusable. Just because the 69-year-
old Williams was raised in an age when African-Americans were not allowed to
drink from the same fountain, use the same bathroom, eat at the same restaurants
or sit together on the bus with whites, does not excuse the comment. People who
grew up before the Civil Rights Movement should embrace changes, not hold on
to a way of life that was wrong and is no more .
We shudder to think Williams may have made comments of this nature before in
private crowds where no one raised an eyebrow. We hope the lesson to administra-
tors and the community alike is not merely to be careful of where they make com-
ments, but to evaluate their fundamental attitudes and behaviors toward minorities.
This university is composed of 2,159 African-Americans whose presence must be
embraced. Shame on any administrator who merely tolerates minorities or worse,
never stops to evaluate the positive attributes which increasing multi-culturalism
brings to our cajnpus.
We not only have an opinion, we would like to suggest a solution. We recognize
and appreciate the tireless efforts of Williams over the years. We understand his
heartache over loosing a leadership position at an institution to which he clearly has
devoted himself. Instead of stripping his name from the collesium or dismantling
the scholarship fund he and his wife recently established, let's give him an oppor-
tunity to continue giving and help in the healing of a campus hurt by his words. We
suggest Williams continues to contribute � this time, in the name ofcultural diver-
sity and racial healing.
Obviously, racial issues can divide the spirit of East Carolina University. This inci-
dent should be a catalyst for programs which challenge students of all races to com-
bat the legacies of bygone era.
LETTER
to the Editor
Chancellor calls for healing of community
The events that culminated in the
resignation of Walter Williams from
the East Carolina Board of Trustees
this week serve as a stark reminder
of the power of words to divide us.
I hope that as we move to put this
incident behind us, we can use it as
a lesson on the need for thoughtful-
ness, for consideration and for
mutual respect.
This is a situation that has no
winners. Many are hurt because of
Mr. Williams' words. Others are
saddened because his talents will
no longer be available in a leader-
ship position at the university. The
fabric of our community has been
torn.
I am sorry for the hurt that has
been caused. I regret that the state-
ment was made. It was wrong. But
it cannot be unmade. Words once
spoken or written cannot be unspo-
ken or unwritten. It is important
now that we move ahead together,
that we embrace a healing in our
community.
I hope that as we move ahead
we can all take to heart the truths
that these events have reminded us
of: Our words can have tremendous
effect. They can uplift, inspire,
teach and motivate. And they can
injure, insult, degrade and divide.
We should choose and use our
words carefully, ever mindful of
how they might be heard and seen
by others.
This incident, as painful as it is,
offers us an opportunity to grow as
an academic community. If we can
recommit to strength in diversity
and to the need to treat others with
dignity and courtesy, then we will
have taken a critical step in that
direction.
Sincerely,
Richard R. Eakin
Chancellor
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OPINION
Phillip
Gilfus
Three zeros, no cause to cheer
Fact: The year 2000 is next year.
Fact: The new millennium,
a.k.a. the 21st century, is NOT next
year.
Opinion: Anyone who says that
next year is the beginning of the
new millennium is a poo-poo head.
I'm sorry, folks, but it's true. I
know two-thirds of this campus has
the craziest notion that three zeros
is a cause of big celebration, but 1
scoff at all of you that follow that
line of reasoning. Don't get me
wrong, though, I like all of you, I
really do. After all, the only reason I
write this column is just so I can to
bring a little sunshine into all of
your
lives
(mustkeepstraightface).
Which brings me to today's sub-
ject: Why ECU is the best darn
school in the Carolina of the North.
Now 1 know what y'all are think-
ing, "But what about the parking,
those crazy professors and the blan-
kety-blank rising tuition?" Oh sure,
we have some slight annoyances,
the ones that every other university
has, but in the end, ECU is an oasis
in the land of UNC-system desert.
Don't believe me? Just look at
LETTER
all of the things we offer here. We
have over 200 clubs on campus.
Anyone can get involved in such
fine organizations as Student
Government, the Lullaby League,
the Lollipop GuikL.no wait, this is
the list for UNC. But this brings up
another point, where else are you
going to go to school? UNC? Sure,
go ahead. Be an elitist, sell-out. NC
State? Well, I can't pick on NCSU
too much. Those technical schools
are a little bit "different At State,
they work on something called tex-
tiles. Ask anyone there what a tex-
tile is, and you will get a lengthy
explanation involving polymers
and plastics.
In other words, they are basical-
ly building strategic doomsday
weapons in Raleigh under the
guise of a manufacturing school.
And why do you think they are so
good at football? They aren't just
using those hormones on the cows
in their agricultural college, I'll tell
ya that.
But we all know that ECU gets
a bad rap across the state. The infa-
mous E-ZU, that dern party school.
There are some people who say
that if you drive through
Greenville, someone will throw a
diploma in your car. Now that's not
true, you have to stop first. But seri-
ously, this is not some second-rate
university with a bunch of easy
classes. As evidence, I would like to
present defense exhibit A, my
report card. Lousy, bloody math
course.
To those who say that our
admission standards let just about
anyone in, I won't argue with them.
Color me crazy, but I like going to
an university that has a diverse
group of about 18,000 people from
all walks of life. They might not
have all scored a 1300 on their SAT,
but they're working just as hard as
everyone else, if not harder.
You can have your UNC-G and
Appalachian State. Go ahead, apply
to Duke and UNC-W. But I'll stay
a Pirate until they kick me out or I
graduate, whichever comes first.
I'm the first to admit that I usually
don't go all out with the school
pride thing, but I'll defend my pur-
ple and gold to any and all critics.
Williams should play no role on campus
I would like to respond to the
recent events that have taken place
regarding our university over the
last couple weeks. First, I would
like to say that for the first time in
my life, I am ashamed to call myself
a Pirate Club member. I can not
believe I am a part of an organiza-
tion that allows its officials to make
openly racist comments and still be
allowed to remain as a university
spokesperson. This makes a major
statement about our university sys-
tem, and it is a disgrace to the good
people of our organization and to
the people of Eastern North
Carolina. Not to mention the ulti-
mate embarrassment of having
Governor Jim Hunt call to ask for
his resignation. Mr. Williams needs
to resign immediately as Executive
President of the Pirate Club and
relinquish his representation as a
university spokesperson. He does
not represent me, nor does his
name portray any type of positive
image for himself, his company or
our university. He should have
been immediately asked to step
down from all university positions
and should not have been allowed
to speak at any other university
associated functions. No apology
can make up for such a horrific
error in judgment. When you
assume a position of power or as an
authority figure, you are held to a
much higher set of moral and ethi-
cal standards, and there is no room
for error. Allowing him to remain
only condones his behavior, and it
means you are thinking only with
your wallet rather than with your
head.
ECU has always been treated as
the red-headed step-child of our
state. We have enough enemies try-
ing to push us down, so why shoot
ourselves in the foot by keeping
him around to further damage our
image? We don't need any more
help in that area. Raleigh and the
News & Observer are already try-
ing their best to promote a negative
image of us. So why perpetuate it
further by allowing him to continue
as a university spokesperson?
I actually would like to see you
give him his million dollars back
and then have his name removed
from the basketball arena. His
name, from this point on, will be
associated with racism; every time
it is mentioned , that's the first
thing that will come to people's
minds. That's not an association
that our university needs. We
should only address the arena by its
proper name from here on out�
Minges Coliseum.
If I were Coach Gibson or any
ECU basketball player, I would
never want to set foot in that stnic-
ture as long as it contains the
Williams name. "Racist" Arena is
not a place where we will be able to
build a positive legacy and tradi-
tion, as long as we have it associat-
ed with Mr. Williams and his racial
image.
I do not want Walter Williams
representing ECU in any capacity,
whether Executive President, or
even Chapter Representative. If he
wishes to remain a Pirate Club
member, that's his choice, but he
should do so as a silent, nonactive
member.
I will seriously have to reconsid-
er whether to renew my Pirate
Club membership next year if he
remains as Executive President,
but I do plan to boycott all Trade
Mart convenience stores as a result
of his actions. I no longer want to
associate or contribute to the efforts
of anything associated with Mr;
Williams. The only honorable thing
for him to do would be to remove
himself from all university posi-
tions. He has already ruined his
reputation, so why allow him to fur-
ther damage ECU's? It doesn't
matter when he grew up and how
things were back then, that's no
excuse, this is the 1990s, not the
1890s. :
Allowing him to remain is eveni
tually going to effect our university
funding by those in Raleigh. This
not only affects our athletic pro-
gram but our university as a whole.
Is he going to reimburse the uni-
versity for all funds it is denied as a
result of the fallout of his actions? I
don't think so. Had this occurred at
UNC-Chapel Hill, Duke or NC
State, he would have been
removed immediately. So why
haven't we done that yet? Had a
member of the coaching staff made
a similar remark they would have
been forced to resign immediately:
Instead we have let it get so out of
hand that the Governor has had to
step in and take action. You are only
perpetuating the image that
Eastern North Carolinians are
backward.
Todd Horton
Charleston, SC ;
Class of'90 &'98
LETT!
You do not ha
American to b
BOT membt
racial remark.
All that is
gence, integr
yourself and t
this university
ity to voice o
comes to our i
However, '
11 did not res
opinions and
dents. I belie
LETT
As a Africa n-A
East Carolin;
express my o
situation. Beir
Pirate Club Hi
nity to meet N
believe that '
comments at t
in Wilmington
UTIL
FUL1
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199 4
The East Carolinian
:heer
re through
will throw a
tow that's not
first. But seri-
5 second-rate
inch of easy
would like to
liibit A, my
bloody math
ay that our
et just about
je with them.
like going to
las a diverse
) people from
ey might not
on their SA7,
ust as hard as
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UNC-G and
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. But I'll stay
:k me out or I
comes first,
that 1 usually
:h the school
;fend my pur-
nd all critics.
mpus
ve to reconsid-
ew my Pirate
lext year if he
ive President,
ycott all Trade
ores as a result
longer want to
te to the efforts
ited with Mr
wnorable thing
i be to remove
niversity posi-
idy ruined his
How him to fur-
l's? It doesn't
w up and how
hen, that's no
1990s, not the
remain is eveni
t our university
i Raleigh. This
ir athletic pro-
sify as a whole,
iburse the uni-
it is denied as a
of his actions? I
this occurred at
Duke or NC
have been
itely. So why
lat yet? Had a
hing staff made
ey would have
;n immediately:
it get so out of
mor has had to
on. You are only
image that
larolinians are
opinion
Tutiday. April 20 1919 S
LETTER
Racism a problem for all students
You do not have to be an African-
American to he appalled by former
BOT member Walter Williams
racial remark.
All that is required is intelli-
gence, integrity and respect for
your self and others. As students of
this university, it is our responsibil-
ity to voice our concerns when it
comes to our universities' leaders.
However, TEC article on April
11 did not respect or represent the
opinions and concerns of all stu-
dents. I believe that because this
highly publicized issue is targeted
at African-Americans, TEC took
the safe approach by predominant-
ly providing comments from the
African-American population. In
doing so, TEC could be doing
more harm than good.
Just because Williams' ignorant
and racist remark was directed
toward African-Americans, it does
not make it their problem. Racism
is everyone's problem. To combat
racial problems on this campus and
everywhere, it cannot be presented
as only a problem of the wronged
and discriminated.
We will all be negatively affect-
ed by racism if we do not speak up
about it now. I encourage anyone
who values the integrity of this
school, anyone who is disgusted at
Williams' comments and its reper-
cussions to speak out, write letters,
and make a difference in our uni-
versity and community.
Stephanie Marshall
Junior
LETTER
to the Editor
African-American accepts apology
As a African-American alumnus of
East Carolina, I would like to
express my opinion on the entire
situation. Being a member of the
Pirate Club I have had the opportu-
nity to meet Mr. Williams and truly
believe that when he made the
comments at the Pirate Club event
in Wilmington that he didn't mean
anything to offend anyone or hurt
the image of the university he has
supported so long. Mr. Williams
admitted that he made a mistake,
apologized and resigned from the
Board of Trustees. In a world of
where we have the 3-strikes you're
out laws, Mr. Williams deserves to
use his remaining strikes. I hope
from Mr. Williams and continues to
support the businesses of Mr.
Williams, as he has always support-
ed East Carolina University. The
school I'm proud to be a graduate
of.
Anthony Shanks
Class of'88
Photo Editor Needed
Photoshop � Illustrator � QuarkXPress
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Own transportation � Photography skills
2nd floor Student
Publications Building
or call 328-6366
NOW LEASING FOR AUGUST 1 999
utilities included
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Free Cable 4 Bedroom 4 Bathroom
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MM ��� Bs
Life's Meanings
.
Kevin Jordan
THE ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC AND
ECU STUDENT UNION PRESENT
EMERALD CITY
3AZZ FESTIVAL
VOLUME TWO
8PA IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
FRIDAY, APRIL 30TH
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SATURDAY, MAY 1ST
YELLOW JACKETS
fOR TICKfiT INfOWWTION CALL 1.800.KUJWIS.
For a good time call the Student Union
Hotline at 2S2.328.6004, or visit our
website at www.ecu.edustudentunion.






6TMjdav. April 27. 1999
features
7 Tuiidty. April
The East Carolinian
Prank Calls become Popular
Jokers run
rampant on campus
Krica Sikks
stm-i- hbit��
It's twelve o'clock and you've
jeen cramming for that "mil Ck
jbout two hours now. All of a sud-
den the phone rings, breaking your
concentration. You pick it up and
the voice on the other line asks if
your refrigerator is running. When
you say yes, they then inform you
that you need to go catch it.
On another night, you are sitting
in your room with absolutely noth-
ing to do. The phone rings and you
answer it. Someone is trying to sell
you a collection of 80s hit records.
You, being just as bored as they are,
play along. By the end of the con-
versation, you have talked them
down in the price of the records and
will be receiving a tree i-shirt, mug
and keychain.
The next night, your phone
rings and you pick it up. The per-
son on the other end is breathing
hard and asking you what your
Top Terl Pranks used by the
telecommunications entertainment team
1. The classic: Is your refrigerator running?
2. Hi, this is Papa John's. I've got your pizza out
front.
3. I'd like to buy some o' dam tractors you adver-
tised in the newspaper.
4. I'm calling on behalf of the Zanadu sex toy col-
lection.
5. This is t-900-HOT-STUD. You forgot to call us
tonight, so we decided to call you.
SCadand ask if someone paged you. Become -
� enraged when they say rio.
7. Call Rock's lounge and schedule a fraternity
social.
8. Dial 7577 and proceed to order a pizza.
19 Call arid leave � messagewit
'someone else's num-
ber.
10. Call and accuse
someone of prank
calling you.
Vv

favorite horror movie is, saying that
they are going to kill you. Scream
and Scream II scenes run through
your mind, making you afraid to go
to the bathroom down the hall.
Prank calls are popular among
college students. Those who fall
prey to it are the pranker's friends,
enemies, or perhaps some random
victim who's number was chosen
from the phone book.
According to Frank Mann, an
ECU professional telecommunica-
tions entertainment team manager,
prank calls are just calls done with
nothing but a good laugh in mind. A
prank call isn't a form of harass-
ment, it is merely a gift that you
have had the joy of receiving.
"Some people just take prank
calls too seriously Mann said.
With only two weeks left in the
semester, some people still have
not grasped the concept that you
have to dial nine to order a pizza.
"We get at least five calls a day
where someone is trying to order a
pizza said Max Houseworth, a res-
ident of Clement Hall, whose num-
ber is coincidentally 7577.
"Sometimes we just pick up the
phone and say 'Papa John's' and
play along
On a more serious level, there
are threatening phone calls. These
usually occur between ex-
boyfriends and girlfriends who want
nothing but revenge or to hear the
other person's voice. These calls
can be considered threatening and
malicious, deserve to be taken seri-
ously and should ALWAYS be
reported to the proper authorities.
"While most of the unwanted
calls are harmless and non-threaten-
ing, roughly 15 percent are threat-
ening said Captain F. Knight of
the ECU Police Department.
"Most of the threatening calls
made are somewhat sexual in
nature and sexually explicit"
The ECU Police Department
encourages anyone feeling threat-
ened or annoyed by unwanted
calls to contact the department.
"Right now, we do have the
capability to trace calls that are
made from one campus number
to another campus number
Knight said. "We are still working
on the technology to be able to
trace off-campus calls
If you arc a victim of an
unwanted phone call, you should
make the caller aware that the call
is unwanted and
ask them to
please not call you
again. If the calls
continue, you should
alert the campus
police. If the calls can
be traced, the ECU
police will more than
likely confront the
caller and issue
them a campus
appearance ticket.
The caller, accord-
ing to the extent of
the phone call, will
be assigned a fine or
community service.
In extreme cases
your phone number
can be changed.
�Name changed to pr
tect in the event of inves
tigation
Student obtains opportunity
Exam stress contributes
to student burnout
Masters pro-am
changes perspective
I'm mi in (; 11. ii s
SI.MOK U H I I'KH
If the Masters of Arts International
Studies, MAIS, Program has one
promoter, it is Melanie Jolly.
As part of her field study
requirement. Jolly spent four
months traveling through Malawi,
Africa and had a life-changing
experience.
"When I came back, people
would ask, 'I low was Malawi?' And
what do you say, 'It was great?'
There was so much involved, so
much I wanted to say to every-
one) said Jolly, graduate student.
MAIS, which has only been
established for the last two years,
has had an affect on all the students
currently enrolled.
Career
ffties"
ger
ftvider, social
JvorkSttpd human resource
manager
� Administrator of study
abroad program at college or
university
state (
countries or companies
- Administrators in interna-
tional nonprofit or humanitar-
ian relief organizations
"The university created the
program to provide an internation-
al dimension to many disciplines
said Dr. Lester Zeager, director of
the interdisciplinary masters pro-
gram.
"When the program was offered,
I thought this would be something
I wouldn't be limited in Jolly said.
Jolly, who received her under-
graduate degree in anthropology,
took her Field stuffy during the fall
semester. At first she was not sure
"The university I created the
program I to provide an inter-
national dimension to many
disciplines
Dr. Lester Zeager
Director ol ins imerdisciplinaiy masieis program
how would be able to take the trip.
"All of the field study programs
were unbelievably expensive, so I
was about to give up she said.
But luckily. Dr. Sylvia Henning,
member of the board of directors
for this masters program, happened
to meet one Dr. Frank Chipasula.
Dr. Chipasula, professor at
University of Nebraska-Omaha, is
originally from Malawi. Henning
put Chipasula in touch with Jolly.
When Jolly mentioned that her
concentration, which all MAIS stu-
dents must choose, is in environ-
mental degradation, Chipasula said
he had a friend who was the minis-
ter of the department for
Environmental Affairs in Malawi.
"My position was to be an intern or
assistant to the Environmental
Division Officer (EDO) Jolly
said.
Malawi is divided into 24 dis-
tricts, though Jolly would end up
only visiting three. There is an
EDO in each district. The relative-
ly new department of
Environmental Affairs is designed
to be a coordinating body for all of
Malawi's natural resources divi-
sions. Malawi itself is a third world
country with a population over nine
million, which is slightly smaller
than Pennsylvania. The official lan-
guages are English and Chichewa.
Jolly first traveled to the north-
ern district of Nkhata Bay, near
Lake Malawi. From there she visit-
ed Mangochi, which is also on the
lake. The EDO in this district was
attempting to establish environ-
mental clubs in the primary and
secondary schools, so Jolly had the
chance to travel to 11 randomly
chosen schools in the area.
"The kids were probably the
best thing about being there Jolly
said. "The kids are amazing
Americans have it made, we have
no idea
The normal appearance for a
Malawian child is a malnourished
figure, characterized by a swollen
belly, with sores on their arms and
legs.
"Looking at them you could see
how poor they were but the thing
that amazed me was how happy
they were. They always had a smile
on their faces
But the question arose: how
many of those children would last
another year?
"The majority of them won't
Jolly said.
The last district Jolly worked in
was the worst area she had seen yet.
"There was very little water
she said. "The population is so
huge they are farming on marginal
land. A lot of soil erosion is taking
place
SEE MALAWI PAGE 7
Counseling Center
offers solutions
IIkdokk Potts
STAFF U HI I'KK
Even though you have probably
had your fill of exams and quizzes
this semester, take a moment to
answer a few quick questions. How
many of these can you answer yes
to?
1 am forgetful, tired, and bored
with school. I am irritable and snap
at people. I feel sad for no apparent
reason. 1 have trouble sleeping
because 1 worry about school. I get
sick more than I used to.
Communicating with others is a
strain.
If you answered "yes" several of
these questions, you could be hav-
ing a problem with school burnout.
This time of year, with the
abundance of tests, projects and
papers due, it is a wonder that the
downtown bars get any business at
all. Professors trying to wind down
the semester place additional pres-
sure on students to do more work
now than the rest of the year. This
is also the time when all those
assignments that you have known
about since the beginning of the
semester slowly creep up on you.
For some students, burnout is
more than just an end-of-the-
semester phenomenon. They feel
as though school will never end and
that the pressure just keeps build-
ing.
"I'm about to pull my hair out
said Anne Spinicci, junior. "I've
been going to school non-stop since
August of 19, and I am definitely
s
Students hit the books in preparation for linal exams.
PHOTO BY MICHAEL JACOBSEN
burned out
Like many other students, Anne
has encountered some difficulties
during her stay here at ECU. A
change in majors and not enough
seats in the program she wanted to
get into put her into a world of
stress. She feels that the university
could do more to help students
rather than pile on additional pres-
sure.
"There is really no way to get
ahead or graduate early she said.
"The lack of flexibility in the
course load is really frustrating
Neil Boardman, senior, had a
similar experience. He feels that
the university just doesn't put
enough effort into helping students
finish up and graduate on time.
"There's a lot of red tape to go
through to get anything accom
plished Boardman said. "For
example, registering, paying fines;
and dealing with administrators!
There seems to be a shortage ol
people willing to help you accom
plish any task J
All of these hassles can conj
tribute to student burnout. Beforj
you consider doing something dra�
tic, like sabotaging all of the com
puters in Joyner Library (oh, wait
someone's already done that), you
should seek help and just try to
take it easy. The Center foj
Counseling and Student
Development offers services anj
H
ft
Let
Yoi
ss�
10 ft
15 ft
20 ft.
SEE BURNOUT PACE 1
J
25 ft
-1





7 Tuiltfiy. April 27. 1899
it Carolinian
H
ltesi
ims.
of red tape to go
anything accom�
Iman said. "For
ring, paying fines;
th administrators
be a shortage oj
help you acconw

hassles can conj
It burnout. Beforj
ng something drasj
ng all of the comff
Library (oh, wait
jy done that), you
Ip and just try to
The Center fo
and Student
ffers services ana
NOUT PAGE I
features
Tht Eitt Carolinian
It's the bi
o
Oi
BESTA
of the year
Cinco de Mayo! (5th of May)
$1.75 Mexican Imports
$6.95 Beef Fajitas for One
$6.95 El Pescador
12 Price Pizza Grande
( After 9 p.m.
dine in only)
:urant hh
"Live remote
w 99x from
5-7 p.m.
Lots off fun.
Lots off prises!
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE & SOON BESIDE PITT COMMUNITY COLLEGE!
'B7
w

� k
Heading Home
for the Summer?
Let Penske Truck Rental Take
You Where You Want To Go.
10 ft. Vans 1-2 Rooms
� Low Rates
� Free Unlimited Mileage on
One-Way Rentals
� AC and Automatic
Transmission Available
� New, Clean, Top-
Maintained Models
� 24-Hour Emergency Road
Service, 7 Days a Week
� Full Line of Moving
Accessories Including:
Tow Equipment, Hand
Truck, Pads, Cartons
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Burnout
continual) from paga B
advice to help students deal.
According to Al Smith, assistant
director, there are four steps stu-
dents should take to cope with
events that cause stress and early
burnout. ,
"First, try to identify symptoms
of stress Smith said. "Do you lose
sleep, eat more than usual, or seem
especially nervous? How do you
react under pressure?"
After you isolate the symptom,
try to understand what specifically
is causing you to feel this way.
Isolating your main stressors can
help you to deal directly with what
seems to be bothering you the
most. The next step is often the
hardest.
"Take the time to relax and
unwind Smith said. "Really, it's a
skill that students need to work on,
especially this time of year
With all the pressures college
entails, that may be easier said than
done. But there are some things
you can do in a short amount of
time to refresh your mind and
body, alt of which will help you to
get through without getting burned
out. Take some time to exercise
and wsich your diet. Stimulants
like caffeine will only excite your
already jittery nerves.
Avoiding stress and burnout
simply takes a little bit of organiza-
tion. Make to-do lists and cross of
items as you complete them. Keep
a day planner and don't try to take
on more than you can reasonably
handle.
If you can't handle it all on your
own, don't be afraid to ask for help.
The Center for Counseling and
Student Development offers work-
shops to help students manage
stress, and counselors can help stu-
dents who need to talk out their
problems one on one.
Students also offer suggestions
on avoiding burnout.
"Make sure you know what is
going on said Boardman. "Don't
rely on other people to do things
for you, or it could backfire
"Take it one day at a time, get
organized, and don't procrasti-
nate Spinicci said.
Malawi
continued from page 8
She also observed the work th:u
Malawian women must endure.
"It's not uncommon to see a
woman walking down the road
with a baby on her back, a baby on
her front, a huge, huge load of
wood strapped on top of her heai'
and carrying something in both
hands. Her husband is walking
ahead of her carrying nothing
After her four month sojourn.
Jolly found it hard to readjust to life
in the States.
"There's just so much guilt. I'm
putting myself through school, I
have a one bedroom apartment, am
a full-time student, I don't make
any money. So by standards here,
I'm relatively poor she said. "But
there, I've never been so wealthy
in all my life
Jolly plans to take off a year
after receiving her masters. She
hopes to either go for her doctorate
or get a job at a non-governmental,
environmental organization.
rfppartij I
QnOQPmpml
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pf� A� im � rv� ivmnkn r�� ; � &
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Langston Park Apartments
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�Ant
a
a
�UM HMkUp
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OMNOAREA
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WasherDryer Hook Ups
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Each Unit Has a Patio or Balcony
Pets Allowed with Pet Fee
All Apartments Just 5 Blocks
from ECU Campus
1 Block from ECU Bus route
24hr Emergency
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Wesley Commons South
OneTwo Bedroom Units
1 bath
Free Water and Sewer
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Wall AC Unit in 1 Bdrms
RefrigeratorStove
WasherDryer Hook Ups
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1st Floor Patio with Fence
2nd Floor Front or Back patio
Pets Allowed with Pet Fee
-�iFTIT
i
All Apartments Just 5 Blocks
from ECU Campus
On Site Laundry Facilities
On ECU Bus route
f





6T�asday. April 27. 1999
7 Tueidiy, April
Tha East Carolinian
Prank Calls b Popular
Jokers run
rampant on campus
Krica Sikks
St U' �IT��
It's twelve o'clock and you've
been cramming fot that final fo
ibout two hours now. All of a sud-
den the phone rings, breaking your
concentration. You pick it up and
the voice on the other line asks if
your refrigerator is running. When
you say yes, they then inform you
that you need to go catch it.
On another night, you are sitting
in your room with absolutely noth-
ing to do. The phone rings and you
answer it. Someone is trying to sell
you a collection of 80s hit records.
You, being just as bored as they are,
play along. By the end of the con-
versation, you have talked them
down in the price of the records and
�Mill be tcctWing a tree t-shirt, mug
and keychain.
The next night, your phone
rings and you pick it up. The per-
son on the other end is breathing
hard and asking you what your
Top Ten Pranks used by the
telecommunications entertainment team
1. The classic: Is your refrigerator running?
2. Hi, this is Paps John's. I've got your piata out
front .
3. I'd like to buy some o dem tractur you adver-
tised ferine newspaper.
4. I'm calling on behalf of ihe Zanadu sax toy col-
lection.
5. Thia is 1-900-HOT-STUD. You forgot to call us
tonight, so we decided to call you.
' CCaBaod ask if someone paged you. Become
' enraged when they say no.
7. Cat) Bock's lounge and schedule a fraternity
social.
.8. Dial 7577 and proceed to order a pm.
19. Call and leave i
' someone else's num-
ber.
10. Call and accuse
someone of prank
calling you.
1
V
favorite horror movie is, saying that
they are going to kill you. Scream
and Scream II scenes run through
your mind, making you afraid to go
to the bathroom down the hall.
Prank calls arc popular among
college students. Those who fall
prey to it are the pranker's friends,
enemies, or perhaps some random
victim who's number was chosen
from the phone book.
According to Frank Mann, an
ECU professional telecommunica-
tions entertainment team manager,
prank calls are just calls done with
nothing but a good laugh in mind. A
prank call isn't a form of harass-
ment, it is merely a gift that you
have had the joy of receiving.
"Some people just take prank
calls too seriously Mann said.
With only two weeks left in the
semester, some people still have
not grasped the concept that you
have to dial nine to order a pizza.
"We get at least five calls a day
where someone is trying to order a
pizza said Max Houseworth, a res-
ident of Clement Hall, whose num-
ber is coincidentally 7577.
"Sometimes we just pick up the
phone and say 'Papa John's' and
play along
On a more serious level, there
are threatening phone calls. These
usually occur between ex-
boyfricnds and girlfriends who want
nothing but revenge or to hear the
other person's voice. These calls
can be considered threatening and
malicious, deserve to be taken seri-
ously and should ALWAYS be
reported to the proper authorities.
"While most of the unwanted
calls are harmless and non-threaten-
ing, roughly 15 percent are threat-
i
i
ening said Captain F. Knight of
the ECU Police Department.
"Most of the threatening calls
made are somewhat sexual in
nature and sexually explicit
The ECU Police Department
encourages anyone feeling threat-
ened or annoyed by unwanted
calls to contact the department.
"Right now, we do have the
capability to trace calls that are
made from one campus number
to another campus number
Knight said. "We are still working
on the technology to be able to
�race off-campus calls
If you arc a victim of an
unwanted phone call, you should
make the caller aware that the call
is unwanted and
ask them to
please not call you
again. If the calls
continue, you should
alert the campus
police. If the calls can
be traced, the ECU
police will more than
likely confront the
caller and issue
them a campus
appearance ticket.
The caller, accord-
ing to the extent of
the phone call, will
be assigned a fine or
community service.
In extreme cases,
your phone number
can be changed.
�Name changed to pro
tect in the event of inves-
tigation
k� m
Bored students use their telecommunication talent when prank calling.
PHOTO BY MICHAEL SMITH
Top names to ask for
DO!
fc
Student obtains opportunity
Exam stress contributes
to student burnout
Masters program
changes perspective
I'll II I I I' (i I 1.1- I S
SkMOR U HI I i:h
If the Masters of Arts International
Studies, MAIS, Program has one
promoter, it is Melanie Jolly.
As part of her field study
requirement, Jolly spent four
months traveling through Malawi,
Africa and had a life-changing
experience.
"When I came back, people
would ask, 'Mow was Malawi?' And
what do you say, it was great?"
There was so much involved, so
much I wanted to say to every-
one) said Jolly, graduate student.
MAIS, which has only been
established for the last two years,
has had an affect on all the students
currently enrolled.
unities"
ger
ftvider, social
nd human resource
"The university created the
program to provide an internation-
al dimension to many disciplines
said Dr. Lester Zcager, director of
the interdisciplinary masters pro-
gram.
"When the program was offered,
I thought this would be something
I wouldn't be limited in Jolly said.
Jolly, who received her under-
graduate degree in anthropology,
took her Field stuy during the fall
semester. At first she was not sure
state
countries or companies
- Administrators in interna-
tional nonprofit or humanitar-
ian relief organizations
"The university created the
program to provide an inter-
national dimension to many
disciplines
Dr. Lester Zeager
Oiiecior ol ihe mieidisciplinary inasiefs program
how would be able to take the trip.
"All of the field study programs
were unbelievably expensive, so I
was about to give up she said.
But luckily. Dr. Sylvia Henning,
member of the board of directors
for this masters program, happened
to meet one Dr. Frank Chipasula.
Dr. Chipasula, professor at
University of Nebraska-Omaha, is
originally from Malawi. Henning
put Chipasula in touch with Jolly.
When Jolly mentioned that her
concentration, which all MAIS stu-
dents must choose, is in environ-
mental degradation, Chipasula said
he had a friend who was the minis-
ter of the department for
Environmental Affairs in Malawi.
"My position was to be an intern or
assistant to the Environmental
Division Officer (EDO) Jolly
said.
Malawi is divided into 24 dis-
tricts, though Jolly would end up
only visiting three. There is an
EDO in each district. The relative-
ly new department of
Environmental Affairs is designed
to be a coordinating body for all of
Malawi's natural resources divi-
sions. Malawi itself is a third world
country with a population over nine
million, which is slightly smaller
than Pennsylvania. The official lan-
guages are English and Chichewa.
Jolly first traveled to the north-
ern district of Nkhata Bay, near
Lake Malawi. From there she visit-
ed Mangochi, which is also on the
lake. The EDO in this district was
attempting to establish environ-
mental clubs in the primary and
secondary schools, so Jolly had the
chance to travel to 11 randomly
chosen schools in the area.
"The kids were probably the
best thing about being there Jolly
said. "The kids are amazing
Americans have it made, we have
no idea
The normal appearance for a
Malawian child is a malnourished
figure, characterized by a swollen
belly, with sores on their arms and
legs.
"Looking at them you could see
how poor they were but the thing
that amazed me was how happy
they were. They always had a smile
on their faces
But the question arose: how
many of those children would last
another year?
"The majority of them won't
Jolly said.
The last district Jolly worked in
was the worst area she had seen yet.
"There was very little water
she said. "The population is so
huge they are farming on marginal
land. A lot of soil erosion is taking
place
SEE MALAWI PAGE
Counseling Center
offers solutions
II it on kk Potts
St.Wf � KITI.H
Even though you have probably
had your fill of exams and quizzes
this semester, take a moment to
answer a few quick questions. How
many of these can you answer yes
to?
I am forgetful, tired, and bored
with school. I am irritable and snap
at people. I feel sad for no apparent
reason. 1 have trouble sleeping
because I worry about school. I get
sick more than I used to.
Communicating with others is a
strain.
If you answered "yes" several of
these questions, you could be hav-
ing a problem with school burnout.
This time of year, with the
abundance of tests, projects and
papers due, it is a wonder that the
downtown bars get any business at
all. Professors trying to wind down
the semester place additional pres-
sure on students to do more work
now than the rest of the year. This
is also the time when all those
assignments that you have known
about since the beginning of the
semester slowly creep up on you.
For some students, burnout is
more than just an end-of-the-
semester phenomenon. They feel
as though school will never end and
that the pressure just keeps build-
ing.
"I'm about to pull my hair out
said Anne Spinicci, junior. "I've
been going to school non-stop since
August of 1996, and I am definitely
Students hit the books in preparation for final exams.
PHOTO BY MICHAEL JACOBSEN
burned out
Like many other students, Anne
has encountered some difficulties
during her stay here at ECU. A
change in majors and not enough
seats in the program she wanted to
get into put her into a world of
stress. She feels that the university
could do more to help students
rather than pile on additional pres-
sure.
"There is really no way to get
ahead or graduate early she said.
"The lack of flexibility in the
course load is really frustrating
Neil Boardman, senior, had a
similar experience. He feels that
the university just doesn't put
enough effort into helping students
finish up and graduate on time.
"There's a lot of red tape to go
through to get anything accom
plished Boardman said. "For
example, registering, paying fines;
and dealing with administrators!
There seems to be a shortage ol
people willing to help you accom.
plish any task J
All of these hassles can conj
tribute to student burnout. BeforJ
you consider doing something drasj
tic, like sabotaging all of the com?
puters in Joyner Library (oh, wait,
someone's already done that), you
should seek help and just try tp
take it easy. The Center fo)
Counseling and Student
Development offers services anj
:
SEE BURNOUT PAGE 7 .
s� -
ii�1

bi Oft.

trrr



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20 ft.
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7 Tuesday. April 27. 1999
Carolinian
ailing-
ites
INOUT PACE I
j
features
The Eait Carolinian
��
It's the bi
HESTA
of the year
Cinco de Mayo! (5th of May)
$1.75 Mexican Imports
$6.95 Beef Fajitas for One
$6.95 El Pescador
12 Price Pizza Grande
m
( After 9 p.m.
dine in only)
Mejfcanltestaurant
-�-
Liwe remote
w 99x from
5-7 p.m.
Lots off fun.
Lots of prizes!
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE & SOON BESIDE PITT COMMUNITY COLLEGE
r� ��v
"�
t of red tape to go
anything accomj
iman said. "For
ring, paying fines;
th administrators!
i be a shortage ol
help you accom�


hassles can conj
nt burnout. BeforJ
ng something dwsj
ing all of the corrfj
r Library (oh, wait,
dy done that), you
:lp and just try tO
The Center fo
and StuderS
jffers services anj
�"t!i-M,V��!pi � J "
Heading Home
for the Summer?
Let Penske Truck Rental Take
You Where You Want To Go.
10 ft. Vans 1-2 Rooms
On
� Low Rates
� Free Unlimited Mileage on
One-Way Rentals
� AC and Automatic
Transmission Available
� New, Clean, Top-
Maintained Models
� 24-Hour Emergency Road
Service, 7 Days a Week
� Full Line of Moving
Accessories Including:
Tow Equipment, Hand
Truck, Pads, Cartons
10 DISCOUNT
with Student I.D.
25 ft. Vans 6-8 Rooms
National Reservations Call
1-800-222-0277
10TH STREET BP
2704 East 10th Street
Greenville, NC 27858
Truck Rental (919) 758-6100
Burnout
continued from pege 8
advice to help students deal.
According to Al Smith, assistant
director, there- are four steps stu-
dents should take to cope with
events that cause stress and early
burnout. ,
"First, try to identify symptoms
of stress Smith said. "Do you lose
sleep, eat more than usual, or seem
especially nervous? How do you
react under pressure?"
After you isolate the symptom,
try to understand what specifically
is causing you to feel this way.
Isolating your main stressors can
help you to deal directly with what
seems to be bothering you the
most. The next step is often the
hardest.
"Take the time to relax and
unwind Smith said. "Really, it's a
skill that students need to work on,
especially this time of year
With all the pressures college
entails, that may be easier said than
done. But there are some things
you can do in a short amount of
time to refresh your mind and
body, all of which will help you to
get through without getting burned
out Take some time to exercise
and wsich your diet. Stimulants
like caffeine will only excite your
already jittery nerves.
Avoiding stress and burnout
simply takes a little bit of organiza-
tion. Make to-do lists and cross of
items as you complete them. Keep
a day planner and don't try to take
on more than you can reasonably
handle.
If you can't handle it all on your
own, don't be afraid to ask for help.
The Center for Counseling and
Student Development offers work-
shops to help students manage
stress, and counselors can help stu-
dents who need to talk out their
problems one on one.
Students also offer suggestions
on avoiding burnout.
"Make sure you know what is
going on said Boardman. "Don't
rely on other people to do things
for you, or it could backfire
'Take it one day at a time, get
organized, and don't procrasti-
nate Spinicci said.
Malawi
continued from page 8
She also observed the work ths;
Malawian women must endure.
"It's not uncommon to see a
woman walking down the road
with a baby on her back, a baby on
her front, a huge, huge load of
wood strapped on top of her heai'
and carrying something in both
hands. Her husband is walking
ahead of her carrying nothing
After her four month sojourn,
Jolly found it hard to readjust to life
in the States.
"There's just so much guilt. I'm
putting myself through school, I
have a one bedroom apartment, am
a full-time student, I don't make
any money. So by standards here,
I'm relatively poor she said. "But
there, I've never been so wealthy
in all my life
Jolly plans to take off a year
after receiving her masters. She
hopes to either go for her doctorate
or get a job at a non-governmental,
environmental organization.
ripperty I
Qnog�m�n'
Aoortmonb & Rentoi Houses
PO R� Kn � VA IVr� Mot ; � 4
r-vio Nrvth Crvnlr� 97IWS-fW
(262) 758-1921 � FAX (252) 757-7722
r�1
T
Langston Park Apartments
Two Bedroom Units
A
0
KITCHEN
feint HMtUji
ASK ABOUT
SECURITY
DESPOSIT
SPECIALS
LIVING ROOM
bath
Free Water and Sewer
Central Heat & Air
Dishwasher
RefrigeratorStove
WasherDryer Hook Ups
Mini-Blinds
Dead bo It Locks
Each Unit Has a Patio or Balcony
Pets Allowed with Pet Fee
All Apartments Just 5 Blocks
from ECU Campus
1 Block from ECU Bus route
24hr Emergency
Maintenance Service
Wesley Commons South
j
OneTwo Bedroom Units
1bath
Free Water and Sewer
Central Heat & Air in 2 Bdrms
Wall AC Unit in 1 Bdrms
RefrigeratorStove
WasherDryer Hook Ups
Mini-Blinds
Deadbolt Locks and Hall Closets
1st Floor Patio with Fence
2nd Floor Front or Back patio
Pets Allowed with Pet Fee
����
"X
EOT
tS
IS
All Apartments Just 5 Blocks
from ECU Campus
On Site Laundry Facilities
On ECU Bus route





gai -ma
Tin East Carolinian
sports
9 Tuaadiy, April
Tuesday. April 27. 1989 8
Pirates fall to Monarchs, drop in rankings
Grip on top
spot loosened
IVmi. Kaplan
SKNIOD WtlTM
The 23rd ranked Pirate baseball
team fell short on Sunday to Old
Dominion University which
dropped them out of first place in
the CAA.
Virginia Commonwealth
stepped up to grab the spot as they
swept William and Mary and
jumped up to take sole possession
of the top spot in the CAA. The
Softball
tops Big
South
Team spirit drives
a winning season
JKAN WlURTON
STAPI WHITI. K
Coming off a non-conference loss
to interstate rival UNC-Chapel
Hill, ECU Softball bounced back
over the weekend to defeat UNC
Charlotte on the road.
There was no home turf advan-
tage on Wednesday as Carolina
snapped ECU's 12 game winning
streak with a set of doubleheader
defeats, 10-3 and 6-5.
After being named Big South
Pitcher of the Week, Denisc
Reagan struggled on the mound
Wednesday. The loss put the star
pitcher at 27-7 on the season.
"I was really disappointed with
today's outing said Tracey Kec,
head coach. "We really struggled at
the plate and stranded numerous
batters
The Pirates managed to pull
out a doubleheader conference
win over UNC Charlotte on the
road this weekend.
Led by senior slugger Isonette
Polonius, ECU beat Charlotte in a
6-0 shutout then again in a 17-9
slamming in game two.
The wins were numbers 40 and
41 for the season, making this the
6th consecutive year that ECU has
notched over 40 victories.
"We have a lot of fun, which
helps us be successful as a team
said Addie Chlebnikow, freshman.
Polonius' 15th and 16th home
runs on the season helped to put
ECU in the standings, out hitting
UNCC11-6.
"We hit the ball well
Chlebnikow said, "We played well
together as a team
Chlebnikow is right. ECU was
leading by six runs in the 7th
SEE SOFTBALL PAGE 8
Pirates' Sunday loss at ODU came
after consecutive wins on Friday
and Saturday. ECU took Friday's
win 14-4 after a rain delay, then
they went on to win on Saturday 9-
2 and finished with the disappoint-
ing loss on Sunday afternoon 6-2.
"We didn't do a very good job
offensively at the plate. We had too
many non-quality outs during the
game which will always get you in
trouble said, Keith LeClair, head
coach. "I thought Foye pitched
well for the most part and the
defense was good
In Sunday's loss the Pirates were
held hitless for the first five innings
of the contest and only managed to
put down four hits the entire game
tying their lowest hit total of the
season. ECU's poor performance
came after two games of over-
whelming hitting displays with 29
hits in the two days combined.
"I was really surprised to see the
Pirates struggling so much at bat.
After the way they played on Friday
and Saturday, either Bailey was a
heck of a pitcher or the Pirates just
did not come to play said Heather
Burgess, senior.
But Monarch starter David
Bailey seemed too much for ECU
as he shut down their first nine bat-
ter straight. He did not allow a hit
until the sixth inning when with
two outs and the bases loaded Chad
Tracy hit a single which scored both
Steve Salargo and John Williamson.
"We are still in good shape.
though LeClair said. "We took
two-of-three from a solid confer-
ence opponent and that is what you
always hope for. Now we just have
to get it back together and get ready
for another game
ECU's overall record fell to 35-
10 and 11-3 and the CAA after the
defeat. With Sunday's win ODU
ended an eight game CAA losing
streak and gave ECU alumni and
ODU head coach his 600th career
coaching win. Foye Minton(7-4)
saw 6.0 innings on the mound and
gave up eight hits, five runs, two
walks with five strikeouts. Adam
Reikowski finished the game for
ECU pitching two scoreless
innings.
Along with losing the top spot in
Prestigious Penn Relay Carnival
Women Me
Hammer Throw
(3) Michelle. Clayton-
Shot Put
(4) Crystal Frye
LongJump
(19)Toshima Dabbs
Tripple Jump
6)nl Kilgore
4x100m Relay
(3) 4x200m Relay
(5) Sprint Medley Relay
85-3
44-2
17-6
(3) 4x400 Relay
(3) 4x200 Relay
400m Hurdles
(27) Lynn Steward
3:06.00
1:23.19
54.43
39-934
47.55
1:39.45
4:15.40
Trmck
Women's tennis loses captain
Catherine Morgan
graduates in summer
Mas in U i:i I I i: k
S I !� I- W H I I i: H
Catherine Morgan, the lone senior
captain, has finished her years of
playing tennis for ECU.
Morgan, who has been involved
with tennis since the age of 10,
played her last and final match dur-
ing the CAA Tournament as the
team placed seventh out of the
nine teams
present.
"I've
enjoyed
this year
the most
said
Morgan. "I
may teach
some
lessons in
the future,
but for the
most part
I'm done
playing
Morgan completed her career
under the new head coach Tom
Morris along with a very young
team consisting of mainly freshmen
and sophomores. Although the sea-
son was not perfect, Morgan did
win a tough three set match against
Georgetown in singles and doubles
as well.
"I think Catherine has shown a
lot of leadership and maturity said
Morris. "She has played hard every
time she's been out there
Coming out of high school in
1995, Morgan brought with her an
overall record 68-2 and was named
Washington High Female Athlete
of-the-Year. In her freshman year,
playing for the first time on colle-
giate courts, Morgan recorded a 11-
6 record and played both the No. 5
and No. 6 positions in singles.
As a sophomore, Morgan com-
Background Info
Name: Catherine Morgan
Hometown: Washington, N.C
Age: 21
Year Senior
Major: Buisness Marketing
Graduations Summer 99
Future Plans; Triangle Bank
TfMMIS
u Itnflair
piled a record of 13-7, played at the
No. 4, 5 and 6 positions, and
teamed with Corissa Cheek and
Rachel Cohen at No. 3 and finished
with a 13-5 record.
In her highlight season as a
junior, Morgan had the team's
longest winning streak in both sin-
gles and doubles before the CAA
Tournament. Morgan played at the
No. 6 position for the entire spring
and was undefeated in both singles
and doubles match play during the
Tournament. Final record for sin-
gles was 16-11 and 10-4 for her dou-
bles play with Gina McDonald.
Fall of this past year began
Morgan's final year with ECU, and
ended with a 9-1 record, the team's
best. Morgan won two tournaments
including Flight 5 at the Lady
Pirate Invitational and Flight 3 at
II N C
Wilmington
Invitational.
"She is a
good cap-
tain said
Carolina
Torres, dou-
bles team-
mate. "We
are a young
group and she
helped work
out some
problems. We
� are going to
miss her
Morgan is scheduled to graduate
in the summer with a B.S. in busi-
ness marketing and already has a
job lined up at Triangle Bank.
Parnevik wins Greensboro Chrysler Classic
GREENSBORO, N.C. (AP) -
Jesper Parnevik's tee shots got so
bad during the final round of the
Greater Greensboro Chrysler
Classic that he started hoping they
would just end up in the rough.
At one point, he told his caddy,
Lance Ten Broeck, that he had no
idea where the next drive might
end up.
Despite the erratic driver,
Parnevik was still finished with a 2-
under 70 and close out a record-set-
ting victory on Sunday.
Parnevik hit just five fairways off
the tee but still finished the tourna-
ment at 23-under par, breaking by
six shots the 72-hole scoring record
for the tournament since it moved
to Forest Oaks Country Club in
1977. Sandy Lyle and Ken Green
set the previous mark of 17-under-
par 271 in 1988. Lyle won that year
in a playoff.
Parnevik's four-day 265 was the
best on the tour this year, beating
by one stroke David Duval's 266 at
the season-opening.
"I really did struggle with my
driving on the weekend Parnevik
said. "Every time I hit a fairway, 1
made birdie. Apart from that, it was
a struggle. The swing that I had on
my irons that worked very well, did
not work very well on my driver
But he wasn't comfortable with his
lead at
"I stood over the ball (on the
16th tee) and just told my caddy, 'I
have no idea where this is going to
end up,� Parnevik said. "I was just
hoping I was going to go anywhere
near the fairway. I was kind of
thinking, the further "And that was
one of the few airways I actually
hit
Jim Furyk, who played with
Parnevik on Sunday, shot a 69 to
leader and made one serious
charge, closing the gap to one with
a 30-foot chip-in for birdie on the
11th hole, fringe on the par-3 12th
and holed a 12-foot birdie putt on
No. 13 to push the lead back to
three. Furyk got no closer
than two shots the rest of the
way. the field by six said Furyk,
who had only three bogeys on the
week to Parnevik's eight. "I can't
control what Jesper does. He just
made more birdies than I did
Jeff Maggert, who started the
SEE GREENSBORO PAGE 10
the CAA the Pirates also slid back
in the polls last week. In
ESPNUSA Today Top 25 Poll and
the Baseball America Top 25 Poll
the Pirates fell back to No. 23 in
the nation. But it was in the
Collegiate Baseball Rankings
where the Pirates were nowhere to
be found as they fell from No. 24
right off the top 30 poll to receive
no ranking for the week.
The Pirates will be taking on
the University of North Carolina
today at 7 p.m. for an expected sell
out game. So if you're planning to
go out and cheer on the Pirates we
at the East Carolinian suggest that
you get out there mighty early.
Steve Salargo
Track teams have I
top finishes at Penn
4x400 squad and
Clayton grab third
StkiIIkn Senkamm
KI'OKTN KIlll'OR
In front of 41,000 fans in rainy
Philadelphia this veckend, ECUs
track teams put on a show.
The Pirates got classic perfor-
mances from the class of each team.
Michelle Clayton and the men's
4x400 squad got
third place fin-
ishes in the pres-
tigious event.
Other Pirate
competitors
such as fresh-
man, Toni
Kilgore and the
women's 4x200
meter relay put
on strong perfor-
mances as well.
The Men's
4x400 squad
came into the
meet with a shot
at taking home
first place. In the
finals the team
started well.
"We had a lead from the begin-
ning said Head Men's Track
Coach Bill Carson. "James
(Alexander) got us the lead,
(Darrick) Ingram got it bigger and
Miller kept it. Damon (Davis) just
got pushed by a real good runner.
He probably should have backed
off, but he just ran out of gas. 300
meters into it he had nothing left
The squad finished third among
college teams.
"It's nice to be in position to win.
We gave the maximum effort and
just got beat Carson said.
The 4x200 squad raced earlier in
the meet. The team of Alexander,
Toni
FILE
Davis, Lawrence, Ward and Ingram
placed sixth.
Throughout the 1999 track sea-
son, there have been few constants.
However, one thing has remained
true. It is that Michelle Clayton will
be at the top of the standings in any
event she is in. 7 �
At the Penn Relays, it was' no
different. Clayton finished third in
the shot put among college com-
petitors.
The women's 4x200 meter relav
squad placed third among ECAC
teams.The team of Nicky Coins,
Rasheca Barrow, Tonya Little and
Carmen Weldon
finished ahead
of seven other
teams.
Freshman,
Toni Kilgore
placed sixth in
the college
triple jump. In
the long jump,
Toshima Dabbs
placed 19th
among college
competitors.
"We did
pretty good
said Head
Women's Track
Coach "Choo"
Justice. "It was a
huge meet. There were thousands
of people there. It was a really big
deal
Next weekend, the teams travel
to the USATF Series in New
Orleans. The event, is a scored
meet. For the first time this season,
the ECU distance runners will com-
pete with the sprinters. The dis-
tance squad missed the Penn;
Relays due to illness. This fact maj!
be beneficial to the Pirates. �
"This will benefit us because we,
have been able to train this week
end and we will be in better shape
said ECU distance coach Leonard
Klepack.
Kilgore
PHOTO
Strawberry suspended
on cocaine charges f
NEW YORK, N.Y. (AP) -Darryl
Strawberry was suspended indefi-
nitely Saturday while baseball
investigates his arrest this month on
a charge of cocaine possession.
Commissioner Bud Selig put the
37-year-old outfielder on "adminis-
trative leave which isn't defined
by baseball's rules but carries the
same penalties as a suspension.
Strawberry can't participate in
workouts or games with the New
York Yankees or their farm teams
until the inquiry is completed.
"It's in the hands of the legal sys-
tem in Florida and it will depend on
what happens there Selig said.
A high-ranking baseball official
familiar with the situation, speaking
' on the condition he not be identi-
fied, said, "This is a suspension
"I don't know how to respond to
this said Yankees pitcher David:
Cone, who played with Strawberry.
on the Mets and is one of his closest, �
friends on the Yankees. "It's pretty
vague V
Baseball's security department is
investigating the circumstances sur
rounding Strawberry's April 14t;
arrest and is talking with Tamp!
prosecutors, the two baseball offn'
cials said.
Strawberry is tested regularly for
drug use as part of the aftercare pro-
gnun stemming from his previous
SEE STRAWBERRY PAGE 9 '�
MODEL
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9 Tuiidiy, April 27. 1899
sports
THE EAST CAROLINA
Softball
continued from page 8
le 1999 track sea-
:en few constants,
ing has remained
:helle Clayton will
c standings in any
Relays, it was no
i finished third in
i�ng college com-
I, the teams travel
Series in New
rent, is a scored
t time this season,
runners will corn-
winters. The disj
issed the Penh;
ess. This fact may.
ic Pirates. �
cfit us because we
o train this week
e in better shape
:e coach Leonard
he not be identi-
a suspension
how to respond to
es pitcher David:
I with Strawberry,
ione of his closest, �
ikees. "It's pretty
rity department i&;
circumstances sur�;
)erry's April 14;
ting with Tamp�;
�wo baseball offi'
:sted regularly for
'the aftercare pro-1
rom his previous
May 1, 1999 from 1pm to 6pm
At The Kappa Sigma House
700 East Tenth Street
757-1005
Capt Cook and The CoconiltS
B-GLAD @ ECU Presents
I mmit uwn w mmmir.
itomiviM or itfi unw.
fl
Hendrix Theater April 27th 7:30 pm
Students, Stafffaculty, and public are welcome
Reception with Timothy Kirkman immediately
following the screening in the Multi-Purpose
Room in Mendenhall Student Center
inning. Reagan notched her 12th
shut out of the season. By the 9th
inning ECU had held off the 49ers
6-0.
Game two proved to be another
round of ECU dominating play.
Polonius' ECU career record for
home runs reached 41. She
showed the team the way home
notching four RBI's, three runs,
two doubles and one homer. She
went 4-for-5 while sophomore Jen
I lalpern was also 4-for-S with a
double, three RBI's and one run.
Freshman Eva Hcrron went 3-
for-5 pm the day. She attributes the
team's winning season to strong hit-
ting but also team spirit.
"We're close. Everybody
respects everybody else and we
bring that out on the field Herron
said.
Regean finished the day on the
mound by improving her re. ord to
29-7.
"We have a great rivalry with
UNCC and our games always turn
into hit tests Kee said.
Coach Kee was proud of their
play but the win put the pressure
on the Pirates for the nest series of
conference play.
The weekend wins put ECU
41-6 overall and 10-2 in the Big
South. ECU is ranked 1 in the
Big South and they hope to finish
strong, said Chlebnikow.
"We've got to stay positive and
give it all we've got Chlebnikow
said. "We make our own destiny
Catch ECU back in action on
Tuesday at 2 pm for a conference
doubleheader against Hampton.
Strawberry
continued from page 8
drug problems. He was
suspended for 60 days in 1995
after testing positive for cocaine
and another positive test would be
cause for another suspension, sev-
eral baseball officials have said
since the arrest.
The two baseball officials said
there was no conclusive agreement
between owners and the players'
association on the results of his
most recent tests. Part of the prob-
lem, one official said, may have
been the timing of the test follow-
ing his arrest the test may have
occurred too late to detect any
cocaine is his urine.
Strawberry has a home in
Tampa, Fla where the arrest
occurred. He has been getting back
into playing shape following colon
cancer surgery last October and has
wanted to resume workouts at the
Yankees' minor league complex
there.
Yankees general manager Brian
Cashman declined comment
before the Yankees 7-4 win against
Toronto. After the game, the
Yankees players and coaches had
little to add.
"I ain't no lawyer, I don't know
anything about it said Don
Zimmcr, interim manager.
In an unusual arrangement
designed to avoid baseball's luxury
tax, the team signed him to a minor
league contract and a consulting
deal during the offseason, a
package worth $2.5 million.
New York advanced Strawberry
money due him under the consult-
ing deal but stopped the advances
after his arrest, several sources
familiar with the arrangement have
said on the condition they not be
identified.
Strawberry's lawyer, Joseph
Ficarrotta, said his client intends to
plead innocent to the charges of
cocaine possession and solicitation
of a prostitute. A hearing date has
not been scheduled.
Strawberry was arrested a few
miles from the Yankees' extended
spring training camp. The eight-
rime All-Star wB charged with pos-
session of 0.3 grams of cocaine and
solicitation for offering an under-
cover female officer $50 for sex. He
was released on a $6,000 bond.
Strawberry said the cocaine
found wrapped in a $20 bill inside
his wallet did not belong to him.
And while he acknowledged dis-
cussing sex with the undercover
officer, he insisted he was joking
and did not intend to meet her at a
motel.
Strawberry has a long history of
drug and alcohol problems and run-
ins with the law, including a convic-
tion on federal tax charges.
He hit .257 with 24 homers in
101 games for the Yankees last sea-
son. Strawberry is not on the 40-
man roster and has not traveled
with the team this season, except in
spring training.
Former bookmaker Doyle
warns athletes on gambling
EUGENE, Ore. (AP) - The mes-
sage to the assembled University of
Oregon athletes -as to the point.
"If you're dumb enough to gam-
ble said former bookmaker Joey
Doyle, "at least le smart enough to
know what you're up against
So in a one-hour session, Doyle
presented his case against gam-
bling, from the inside knowledge of
someone who spent 15 years taking
bets and profiting from the busi-
ness of wagering, whether on sports
or casino games.
"What makes you guys suscepti-
ble is you're very talented, you're
the best at what you do, and you
were taught to win Doyle told the
members of the UO football and
men's basketball team. "Those
same characteristics that make you
successful as an athlete make you
vulnerable to gambling, and that's
why you've got to be more careful
Gamblers assume they can
come out ahead, Doyle said, before
he presented examples of how "the
house" always profits, whether it's
organized crime, corporations that
own casinos or state governments
running the game.
"I can't believe it Doyle said
of the state of Oregon. "You kids
can't go buy a hot dog without trip-
ping over 15 lottery machines
Doyle said that while govern-
ments "tell you state lotteries are
good for education, good for the
economy, good for the environment
what they don't tell you is that fot
every $1 that goes in, 50 cents is
gone immediately" and not paid
out to the gamblers.
He also said that betting on
sports events, whether legal or not,
could be compared to flipping a
coin and trying to predict the out-
come, with money at risk.
"If you call it correctly, I pay you
$10 Doyle said. "If you don't, you
pay me $11
The presentation began with a
short video that included excerpts
from several news reports on gam-
bling by college students, and
Doyle said he had been astonished
when he made a presentation at
Nebraska and found out how wide-
spread betting was among stu-
dents.
"You've got to understand the
risks you take Doyle told the ath-
letes, explaining that even for a $50
wager with an illegal bookie, a bet-
tor could face prosecution. "If you
end up with an arrest record,
understand what that means to
you.
Doyle also spoke about betting
scandals involving teams at
Northwestern and Arizona State.
Most attempts to rig the outcome
of events, he said, are arranged by
"dummies because "the mob
doesn't want fixed games" and
often lielps expose the crime.
While taking bets, Doyle said he
recalled only three athletic events
that he "took off the board mean-
ing he refused to accept more
wagering. His mob boss had infor-
mation that all three had predeter-
mined outcomes, he said, including
a 1988 Olympic men's basketball
game involving the United States.
Mike Bcllotti, the UO football
coach who attended the session
with his players, said the purpose of
the session was to let "athletes hear
our concerns from different
sources. I can't get their attention
the way somebody who has been in
the business can
TH incidents at Northwestern
and ASU and a recent probe of
UCLA athletes allegedly in contact
with possible gamblers show
"those things are there
Bcllotti said. "It's prevalent and
we all need to recognize those
predators are out there. I think it's
our duty to educate our athletes to
the potential harm that can be done
and to the futility of gambling
Collins to plead no contest
on DWI charge, pay $100 fine
(AP) - Quarterback Kerry Collins,
who is starting a new phase 01 his
NFL career with the New York
Giants, plans to plead no contest
Monday to driving while impaired
in November.
Attorney George Laughrun said
Collins doesn't want to fight the
charge.
"Kerry said, 'I made a mistake. I
want to pay my price. And I don't
want to be treated any different
than anybody else. I want to get
this behind me
Laughrun said. "I wanted to try
it. But that's his call not mine
Collins will not be in court for
the trial in Mecklenburg District
Court. Laughrun will enter Collins'
plea.
Defendants pleading no contest
don't admit guilt but also don't
challenge the charges. They are
sentenced as if they pleaded guilty.
Collins, 26, likely faces a $100
fine, the maximum monetary
penalty for a first DWI conviction.
He was signed in February by the
Giants to a four-year, $16.9 million
free-agent contract after being cut
by the New Orleans Saints.
In March, Collins said alcohol
had played too much a part in his
life, though he had not been diag-
nosed an alcoholic.
"My focus right now is to try and
be the best quarterback I can be,
and alcohol plays no part in that
Collins told reporters after signing
with the Giants.
"It's not going to play any role in
my life
Collins has been working at the
Giants mini-camp.
Collins was arrested about 1 a.m.
Nov. 2, just hours after being taunt-
ed by Carolina Panthers fans. The
Panthers' first-ever draft choice in
1995 had returned to Charlotte
with his new team, the Saints. He
had the team's permission to stay in
the city after the Saints' 31-17 loss
to the Panthers.
A state trooper reported that
Collins' car had weaved and
crossed the center line.
Collins refused to take a breath
test at the Mecklenburg County
Jail. He acknowledged his guilt'
later that day.
"I broke the law. It's a matter of'
taking what's coming to me he
told the Charlotte Observer.





Till Etst Carolinian
Greensboro
continued from page 9
day 10 strokes behind Pamevik,
shot a 68 Sunday and finished at
273. Dudley Hart carded a 72-274,
alone in fourth place in the tourna-
ment sponsored by Chrysler.
The victory was a stunning turn-
around for Pamevik, who was dis-
qualified at last week's MCI Classic
for using his glove to brush away
debris in his putting line. He fired
his longtime caddy, Brocck to carry
his bag this week.
cJlctolilllr-li-lriTHEilSlB
ofinedi s Qaje
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Pasta � Pizza � Salads � Sandwiches � Homemade � Soups � Desserts
Dine In or Take Out � Boxed Lunches Available
Dining Room Open
Mon-Thurs 10:30AM - 9PM Fri k Sat 1030AM - 10PM
Closed Sundays � Full ABC Permits
The Friends of Joyner Library
will hold a booksale in the Mendenhall Multipurpose Room
from 1 p.m. � 5 p.m. on Sunday, May 2, and from 8 a.m.
- 3 p.m. on Monday, May 3. Approximately 5,000 books
of all types will be for sale at prices ranging from 50 cents to
$2.00. Income from the sale goes toward the purchase of
unique library items. Past purchases have included such
diverse items as a standing press to repair fine bindings, musical
scores, and a copy of the rare eighteenth century work
7 Qeneral History o the Pyrates by Charles Johnson.
Mini Storage
1020 S.W.Greenville Blvd.
Telephone 355-1444
Summer Student Special
Safely stoic your items until you return in l an
10 discount on Prepaid 3 month rental w ECU ID
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receive free services & products from nationally
known hairstylists at major trade show to be held:
Date: Saturday, May 1st, 1999
Model Call: 5:00 PM Hotel lobby
Location: Sheraton Oceanfront
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Show. Sunday fe Monday, May 2-3 9:00AM - 4:00 PM
(must be present at model call to participate in show)
Call 752-6178 for more details
Ask For Vebra

Going to be around this
summer?
The East
Carolinian
is looking for summer
advertising representatives
Enjoy working with people?
Want to polish your customer
service skills?
Training provided!
Enthusiasm requiredl
Become a team player at
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Second Floor
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before May 1, 1999
T

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Tuesdiy. April 27. 1999 10
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ECU campus. C(
Fenced in yard.
Call 551-5025.
FEMALE ROOI
share 2 bedroon
at Kingston Pit
rent, cable, wate
clubhouse on sil
mer or Fall. 758-
BW-3 Apt. Abe
May thru Augu
12 baths. Call
or 252-240-119'
sired.
ECU AREA! H
bath house. Big i
tral heat and air
$1000 month. (
a message.
DUPLEX 2 BR.
washerdryer he
close to campi
Please call 756-
Available immec
4 BR. 2 bath h
ECU campus. Ci
fenced in yard.
Aug. 1. $800rr
PRIVATE ROOr
mer and fall. W;
campus. $175
phone linecab
erdryer include
2879.
THREE BEDRO
2 blocks from c
for 4 people. W
Large backyard
762-2879.
MALEFEMALE
2TBR. apt. Non-i
must be neat! f
first week of Ji
0610
3 FEMALE roo
share large, 5 B
from campus, r
plus 15 bills. If
nifer, 561-7600
TOWNHOUSE!
bedrooms, 2 1
vVD hook-up i
(5os. 752-1899
561-2203 night.
IDEAL RENTA
bedroom, one b
block from ci
month. Available
sage at 353-531
sible a must.
RINGGO!
NowTakii
p bedroom
I Efficiencv
r CALL





II 27. 1999 10
lications for
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1;1 TutiJiy, April 27. 1PH9
FOR RENT
TO ALL procrastinate s. sublease 1
bedroom. 1 bath fully furnished
apartment at Ringgold Towers start-
ing May. $367 a month. Call ASAP.
8300161.
ECU AREA big three jedroom, one
bath house. Washerdryer with cen-
tral heat and air. Paved drive with ga-
rage Call 830-9502.
MF NEEDED for 2 BR. 1 bath
house 6 min. to any main campus
.classroom. Must like pets and be
clean and courteous. Rent $175
12 bills. Call 752-9373.
WALK TO ECU - 1 bedroom apt.
$295month available now & Aug.
1st. 705 East 1st St. or 125 Avery
Street, near campus. 768-6696.
STUDENTS NEEDED to take over
Lease in Tar River! ASAP. Call 758-
1:7695.
tOM COMING? Room available in
ely private home close to cam-
(us. On-site parking. Walk to China
and Antonello's restaurants. No
fcmoking. No pets. 752-6644.
SPACIOUS TWO Bedroom apart-
ment for rent, inclut ig pool and
tennis courts. Sublet from end of
(May til July 7. Then you can rent it
from there as you wish. Call Holly at
1363-5871.
I TAKE OVER apartment lease. 2 bed-
jjoom, 1 12 baths, washerdryer
hook-ups. Driveway, back deck, large
� iack yard. $485 per month. 110-B
iKlorth Elm St. Call for information.
1752-1726
SUBLEASE FOR first Summer ses-
sion or longer. One bedroom avail-
able ASAP at Kings Row Apts. $325
a month. Water, sewer, cable includ-
ed. 329-0592.
3 BR. 1 bath house 4 blocks from
ECU campus. Central heat & AC.
Fenced in yard, pets OK. $650mo.
Call 551-5025.
2 BR. apartments downtown above
Catalog Connection & Percolator.
Available now, $50O-$550 per
fnonth. Call 717-0860, ask for Rick
Smiley.
2 BR. 1 bath duplex 2 blocks from
ECU campus. Central heat and AC.
Fenced in yard, pets OK. $475mo.
Call 551-5025.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom apartment located
at Kingston Place. Price includes
rent, cable, water. Laundromat, pool,
clubhouse on site. Needed for Sum-
mer or Fall. 758-6344.
BW-3 Apt. Above BW-3. Available
May thru August. 3 bedrooms, 2
12 baths. Call 523-5360, 526-6930
or 252-240-1194. Furnished if de-
sired.
ECU AREA! Huge 6 bedroom, 2
bath house. Big common areas. Cen-
tra) heat and air downstairs. Pets OK.
$1000 month. Call 830-9502, leave
a message.
DUPLEX 2 BR. 1 bath, heat pump,
washerdryer hook-up, private drive,
close to campus, no pets, $430.
Please call 756-8444 or 355-7799.
Available immediately!
4 BR. 2 bath house 4 blocks from
ECU campus. Central heat and AC.
fenced in yard. Pets OK. Available
Aug. 1. $800mo. Call 551-5026.
PRIVATE ROOM available for sum-
mer and fall. Walking distance from
campus. $175 per month. Private
phone linecable in room. 'Wash-
erdryer included. Call Mike O 752-
2879.
THREE BEDROOM house available
2 blocks from campus. Big enough
for 4 people. Washerdryer hook-up.
Large backyard area. Call Mike 0
7i2-2879.
Malefemale needed to share
2BR. apt. Non-smoker, responsible,
must be neatl No pets, to move in
firet week of June. Call John 757-
0610
3 FEMALE roommates needed to
share large, 5 BR. house 12 block
from campus. May-Aug. Rent $190
plus 15 bills. If interested, call Jen-
nifer, 661-7600 or Kim 561-7700.
ROOMMATE WANTED
FEMALE. SHARE three bedroom
home with two female students.
Campus three blocks. Prefer gradu-
ate student. Central air, ceiling fans,
washerdryer. $250 plus utilities.
(703) 680-1676.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 2 BR duplex one block from
campus on Library St. Needed by
middle of May. $225 a person. Call
758-7695.
NON-SMOKER roommate wanted
for Summer sublease at Oakmont
Sq. Apartments. Rent $205 12
utilities. Call Dave. 353-7038.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP. 407
S. Summit. Washer, dryer. (5) five
bedroom right on campus, parking
available. Seeking easy going indi-
vidual. Phone 329-8354.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for May. Du-
plex near campus with fenced yard.
Nonsmoker. must like animals. $200
month. $200 deposit and half bills.
Call Bryan. H758-7525, W753-6465.
SUMMER ROOMMATE wanted
to share three) bedroom apart-
ment near campua. Includes
washer and dryer and outdoor
pool access, 13 rent and utili-
ties. We're clean and friendly.
Call 752-8910.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed be-
ginning Aug. 1st to share 2 bedroom
apt. close to campus. Very large
bedroom with plenty of closet space.
On ECU bus route. Rent $205
month. Cable and water included.
Call Shellie at 329-1342.
1 OR 2 female roommates needed
for summer to sign over lease. 2 BR
2 bath, very spacious and unique.
Can move ASAP. Call 353-8857. Free
tanning beds!
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 2 bedroom townhouse in
Stratford Arms Apts. Rent: $225
plus half utilities. Call 321-3243.
FRIENDLY, FUN, & tidy female
roommates needed for Players Club
townhouse Fall 1999. Prime location
next to pool, tennic courts, club
house. & short walk to shuttle.
$260mo. 14 utilities & cable.
Call Kristen. 353-2665.
TOWNHOUSES NEAR ECU. 3 or 4
bftdrooms. 2 12 and 3 12 baths.
vVD hook-up ample storage, spa-
ces. 752-1899 day (M-F). pager
561-2203 night.
IDEAL RENTAL opportunity! Two
bedroom, one bath, large home one
bjock from campus. $500 per
month. Available in May. Leave mes-
sage at 353-5310. Neat and respon-
sible a must.
RINGGOLD TOWERST
: Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom 8i
Efficiency Apartments.
1 CALL 762-2865
FOR SALE
AIWA STEREO has CDcassette
player remote control in excellent
condition. $120 or best offer. Call
758-6978.
SAVANA MONITOR with large cus-
tom cage. King snake with large
tank. Extra reptile cages and heat
rocks available. Call Scott or Ryan at
329-1205.
GOOD CONDITION bedroom furni-
ture. Must go! Call Stephanie, 754-
2824.
FURNITURE FOR sale: dresser with
mirror and chest of drawers, full size
mattress, lamps. All good condition.
Must be sold by May 16. Will sell for
very cheap! 752-7526.
BEDROOM FURNITURE: head-
board, two dressers, desk, and
shelves. Also for sale, a new fitness
flyer. Call Jill, 758-5350.
1 YEAR old bed plus springs for
sale. $175. Call 931-0663.
GARY FISHER Taikai mountain bike,
aluminum frame. Rock Shox, 7-
speed grip shift. Call 757-1587.
FURNITURE! GRADUATING, sell-
ing everything including: sofa, dou-
ble papazan, coffee table, entertain-
ment center, tables, chairs, end ta-
bles, dresser, desks, TV stands, skis,
fish tank. etc. 752-8093.
HE0 WANTED
NANNY WANTED for four children
- ages 6 to 12 over Summer. Re-
sponsibilities include driving. Previ-
ous experiere and references re-
quired. Call Janice. 355-1597.
classifieds
HELP WANTED
KONSTA mN'S STEAKHOUSE is
looking for individuals who are ener-
getic, professional, cooperative, have
a positive attitude, work well with
the public and as part of a team.
Konstantin's Steakhouse is opening
in the Atlantic Station Shopping Cen-
ter; Atlantic Beach, NC. Now hiring
experienced kitchen managerchief,
line cook , food runners, waitstaff
and hostesses. Earn competitive
wages in a friendly atmosphere. Ap-
ply in person by appointment 252-
240-2224 M-F 11a.m5p.m.
LOOKING FOR a summer job? Play
at day and work at night. The ECU
Telefund is hiring students for the
Summer and Fall of 1999 to contact
alumni and parents for the ECU An-
nual Fund Drive. $5.50 hour. Make
your own schedule. If interested, call
328-4212 , M-TH between the hours
of 3-6 p.m
COUNSELORS NEEDED for a
Christian, co-ed residential camp on
Kerr Lake for ages 7 - 16. Contact
Phillip at 919-789-9631 or e-mail:
plpoplinCbellsouth.net
LIFEGUARDS AND beach vendors
needed ii North Myrtle Beach for
1999 season. Will train. Housing pro-
vided if needed. For information call
843-272-3269.
WANTED: STUDENT for retail sales
approx. 30 hoursweek. Interior
design, carpet measuring experience
helpful. Call Debbie at 752-6616
M.W. or F between 10 a.m2 p.m.
for appt.
EASTERN CAROLINA'S finest
adult entertainment is now hiring.
Call for interview. Playmates. 252-
747-7686.
LIFEGUARDS AND swim instruc-
tors needed in Greenville. Call 355-
5009 or 756-2667.
SOCCER COACH needed for '86
Greenville Stars Fall season. 2 to 3
practicesweek, Saturo .y games,
some out of town. Salary based on
experience. Call 355-1597 or 792-
3327.
SUMMER WORK
J9.75 per liour ippi,
comoftitive schohrthips
irion Conidrf
llfxiMf ii-hfdulf? 10-60 lir.Aveck
Rruil Service Jiid Sales
lUininji provided
Condition Jpnlv
756-7122
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
Student to function part-time in inno-
vative community pharmacy practice
in Greenville serving patient needs
and assisting in patient care. Must
possess excellent people skills, su-
perb telephone etiquette, ability to
multi-task under pressure. Good
computer skills a definite plus. Posi-
tive attitude, willingness to work at
any task, a yearning to tackle new re-
sponsibilities and cooperation with
co-workers definitely a must. No
nights and Sundays. Send resume
and hours available to: Job Opening,
615-B South Memorial Drive, Green-
ville, NC 27834.
EXPERIENCED BABYSITTER want-
ed to care for two girls this summer,
from 8:30 to 5 on Mondays and
Wednesdays (days may be flexible).
Call 756-0941.
RELAXING LOCAL summer job.
Four days a week. Keep our second
grader and seventh grader. They en-
joy being outside and playing in our
pool. Call 752-7398 nights: 355-
4544 days.
UFEGUARDS NEEDED for Farm-
ville Public Swimming Pool. Please
contact Fred Sauls at 753-7020. We
will try to let you work around your
school schedule. EOE
HELP WANTED
POOL MANAGERS and lifeguards.
Summer. Greenville. Goldsboro, Wil-
son Rocky Mount. Atlantic Beach.
Raleigh. Cary. Chapel Hill. LGT train-
ing offered. Call locally 321-1214.
I NEED a babysitter for anywhere
from 3-5 hours a week. Can work ar-
ound your schedule. Must have
transportation. Please call me at
355-0552.
HIRING: WAITSTAFF and hoststaff
for new Italian restaurant. Positions
available immediately. Experience
preferred. Please apply in person.
Antonello's Italian Restaurant. 2601
East 10th Street.
WAREHOUSE HELP needed at The
Carpet Bargain Center. Apply in per-
son. 758-0057.
NEED A part-lime person to work in
a professional office serving as re-
ceptionist for a couple of hours a day
as well as being an assistant to oth-
er personnel in the office. Must en-
joy working with the public and be
easy-going since this is the overall
office atmosphere. Hours are 11:30
to 5:00 Monday through Friday, and
more during the summer, if needed.
Also, position may extend into the
fall, approximately 11:30 to 5 Mon-
day through Friday. Please contact
Polly Piland O 766-8886.
BW-3. Apt. above BW-3. 3 bed-
rooms. 2 12 baths. Call 523-5360.
526-6930 or 252-240-1194.
NEED SUMMER help at Hatteras
Beach. Free housing. Need two
males or females for retail seafood
market. Bonus offered. Call 252-986-
2215 or e-mail riskybOinterpath.com
CHILD CARE help needed for 12
year old. Mornings and afternoons
until. Must have car. Pay neg. 353-
5317.
NEEDED! ATTRACTIVE girls for re-
gional TV commercial andor video
productions. Actressesmodels pre-
ferred but no experience required.
Call Action Video, 521-1760.
A FEMALE executive with a local
company is seeking an individual to
help with childrens' needs. Children
�are 10 and 14, so your own transpor-
tation is needed. Part-time during
school, full-time this summer. Experi-
ence working with children needed,
and references. If interested, please
contact Denise Keel at 752-2111 ext.
297. Potential candidates will be in-
terviewed. Resumes can be faxed to
752-4217.
EXOTIC DANCERS $1000-$ 1500
weekly, no experience needed. 919-
580-7084. Sid's Showgirls. Gold-
sboro.
SUMMER CHILDCARE needed for
two children (ages 468) from June
7 through Aug. 13. Prior experience
and own transportation required.
Call 758-5806 between 6p.m. and
10p.m.
HAM'S RESTAURANTS is now in-
terviewing for immediate openings
for entry level management posi-
tions in our North Carolina locations.
Please fax your resume andor cover
letter to David. 336-855-6688. or
mail to Director of Human Resourc-
es. Chelda Inc 3017 High Point
Road, Greensboro, North Carolina
27403.
SUMMER JOBS! Cooks and bus
staff wanted on Outer Banks. Hous-
ing available. Call Linda. 252-261-
0629.
CAMP EWOOD
Summer Camp
COUNSELORS lrTRUCTORS
for private Co-ed youth camp
located in thebeautiM mountains of
Western North Carolina. Over25
activities, including All sports, water
skiing, heated pod, terns, art, horse-
back; ots. 615 to 816earn
$1350-$1750 plus room, meals,
laundry S great fun! Non-smokers
call tor applicationbrochure:
800-832-5539 or e-mail
CPPinewood�aol.com anytime!
Work Outdoors !
Want Honest, Reliable Students
Wdependable truckcar
TO MONITOR COTTON
(No experience necessary)
$7.00hr. mileage
mallfax rasume
MCSI-Box 370
Cove City, NC 285J
Fax: 252-637-2125
(Nr. Greenville, New Bern, Kinston)
WFRE WOKINGFORA FEW
GOODPBOPLE- WHYNOTYOU?
Wake County, voted one of the best places
to live and work, is seeking successful
candidates for an interesting,challenging
and flexible career as a
CIVILIAN DETENTION OFFICER
Successful candidates must have the
following qualifications:
"US. citizenship
�21 years of age (minimum)
"High School graduate (minimum)
�Good credit and driving history with no
criminal background
Flexibility to work ill shi As
�Successful completion of bask Iraining
within the first year of employment
Salary: $23,500 (Negotiable based on
education and experience). Why not
experience what Wake County has to offer!
Excellent benefits package - health, dental,
5 contribution to 401(k), training
opportunities, and more.
To become a part of our team, visit our office
at the Wake County Public Safety Center,
330 Salisbury SL, Raleigh, NC 27602
or call (919)856900.
Wake County Sheriff's Office
�AO��Li�.L�nvinni'
Ths East O'oliniin
HELP WANTED
WANTED: PAYING $6.50 an hour
plus bonuses for qualified telemar-
keters. No Friday or Saturday work.
Hours: 6:30-9 p.m. Monday-Thurs-
day, 4:30-8 p.m. Sunday. Apply in
person between 5-6 p.m. at Energy
Savers Windows & Siding. Inc
1806 Dickinson Ave Greenville, at
the side door.
WE NEED your experience) The
REAL Crisis Center is recruiting vol-
unteer crisis counselors to help our
community. Training class will begin
June 7. 1999. For more information,
call 758-HELP
HAVE FUN at the beach and earn
money too. Henry's, a sporting
goods distributor in Morehead City
may be your ticket to a productive
and enjoyable Summer. Work Mon-
day through Friday, 8 till 6 in tee
shirts and shorts and still have the
weekend to. er, study for Fall) Call
Hubert Talley at 800545-5654 ext.
5289 today.
OTHER
SUMMER FUN - Free pictures.
Would you like to have special pic-
tures to give to your family or boy-
friend! I enjoy shooting pictures of
young women for my portfolio I If
you model for me, I will give you free
pictures. Reputable amateur photog-
rapher. References available. Please
send a note, phone number, and a
picture (if available - it will be re-
turned) to Paul Hronjak, 4413 Pine-
hurst Dr Wilson. NC 27896-9001 or
call 252-237-8218 or E-mail hron-
ja kCsimflex.com
HABITAT FOR Humanity of ECU
seeks a new president for 1999-
2000. If Interested. Cell Michael
Aho, president and founder, at
328-3663.
BE SUM and trim in time to swimll
100 natur Doctor approved. 1
in Europe! Call 757-2292. Free sam-
ples. Limited time offer.
GREEK PERSONALS
CONGRATS TO Pi Delta's Fall 1990-
Spring 2000 Executive officers: Pres-
ident: Lexi Hasapis. Vice President:
Tina Overbee. Recording Secretary:
Melissa Thomas. Corresponding
Secretary: Heather Goetz. New
Member Educator Tori Johnson. Sar-
gent atArmsBethffall1GoodJ:ucJd
PI DELTA congratulates Tyler Black-
welder for being Panhellenic Schol-
arship chair.
CONGRATS TO Pi Delta's Fall 1999-
Spring 2000 officers and committee
chairs: Social chair: Jennifer Kwiat-
kowski. Fundraiser and Rush: Heath-
er Goetz and Tammy Burkett, Intra-
mural: Tammy Burkett. Ritual: Ta-
bitha Redding. Sister Activity and
Composite Chair: Angela Ridings,
Publicity and Special Events Chair:
Melissa Thomas, Panhellenic Dele-
gate: Linda Wong. Panhellenic Alter-
nate: Tyler Blackwelder. Historian:
Linda Wong. Scholarship: Tammy
Burkett, Philanthropy: Kristen Scrog-
gin and T-Shirt Chair Linda Wong. Pi
Deltas new alumni advisor is Leslie
Garris. Good luck guys.
GREEK PERSONALS
THANKS. KAPPA Alpha Alpha Phi.
and Kappa Sigma, for the quad on
Friday. We had a great time. Love,
Alpha Delta Pi
PI DELTA thanks Sigma Epsilon for
the Greek Week cook-out. We had a
Mast!
PI DELTA thanks Margaret. Nikkie.
and Alicia for participating in the All-
Sing.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
WAY TO go. Tori Johnson, for your
induction into Phi Kappa Phi. Your Pi
Delta sisters are proud of you!
TEST PREPARATION: MONDAY
3:30-4:30 p.m.The Center for Coun-
seling and Student Development is
offering this workshop on Monday.
May 3. If you are interested in this
workshop, please contact the Center
at 328-6661.
TEST ANXIETY: The Center for
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering this workshop on
Tuesday, April 27 at 3:30 p.m. and
Monday, May 3rd at 11d.m. If you
are interested in this workshop,
please contact the Center at 328-
6661.
STRESS MANAGEMENT WORK-
SHOP : WEDNESDAY 3:30-4:30
p.m. The Center for Counseling and
Student Development is offering this
workshop on
April 28. If you are interested in this
program, contact the Center at 328-
6661.
WANT TO hear local speakers talk
about their experiences in radio or
TV? If so. then come to the Media
Society's Forum on May 3. ft will be
held from 1-5 p.m. on the second
floor of Joyner. It's free and refresh-
ments will be served, so be sure to
check ft out!
THE EXERCISE and Sport Science
Motor and Physical Fitness Compet-
ency Test is scheduled as follows:
Minges Coliseum (Williams Arena).
Wednesday. May 5 at 8 a.m. A pass-
ing score on this test is required of
all students prior to declaring Exer-
cise and Sport Science as a major.
Any student with a medical condi-
tion that would contraindicate partic-
ipation in the testing should contact
Mike McCammon or Michelle Brun-
son at 328-4688. A detailed sum-
mary of the test components is avail-
able in the Human Performance Lab-
oratory (Room 371. Sports Medicine
Bldg.) "Students must bring ECU
student I.D.
QOLOEN KEY members would like
to thank Ms. Pretty and all outgoing
officers for their hard work this year.
Our final meeting of the semester
will be today at Ham's at 5:30.
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: 3:30-5PM. The Center for
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering this workshop on
Thursday. April 29. If you are interest-
ed in this program, contact the cen-
ter at 328-6661.
APPAREL MERCHANDISING Tex-
tile Organization members, don't for-
get about our meeting this Thursday.
April 29. This is our last meeting so
let's all try to make ft. Thanks and
we'll see you Thursday.
Advertise in
The East Carolinian
OPEN LINE AD RATE$4.00
for 25 or fewer iordsadditional words 5C each
STUDENT LINE AD RATE$2.00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional words 5t each
Must present a valid ECU ID. to qualify. The East Carolinian reserves
the right to refuse fhis rate for any ad deemed to be non-student or
business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE .$1.00
add to above rate for either BOLD or ALL CAPS type.
All classified ads placed by individuals or campus groups must be
prepaid. Cancelled ads can be removed from the paper if notification
is made before the deadline, but no cash refunds are given. No proofs
or tearsheets are available. All Personals are subject to editing for
indecent or inflammatory language as determined by the editors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADUNE
4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue
We reserve the right to change a deadline for holidays or as
necessitated by other considerations.
r





Cami'ma Awards ForEmlknce
1 , . 7 r - t A -Jo consistently worked and succeeded mrx�
; who were nominated
ExceMi �j2B�MMI reuiDOlu. AmyFaulk
Elena Godbolt
rStudentOrganizanOTAdvisor- Presented to a student organization advisor who has Taiisha Nicole Goins
amied exceptionally over one or more years and has conastentfy attenckJ organization meetings Joseph Aaron Gore, III
nts, motivated members to be success and devdoped leadership GaryHenslcy.II
potopal of the members. Amber James
Chde James Michael Kaltenschnee
Ms. Jfciy R Frank Renee Larson
Ms.YwineJ.Moye Leslie Pulley
Mr.Jefiovak ChristiaRey
Ms. Bedmnne Pretty Sarah Rountree
Dr.JannisMea
Dr. Ron Sp Purple Pride Award Presented to the individual or student organlfttion that has worked to pro-
Dr. MariekenWilligen mote an improvement in cultural understanding at East Carolina Urajprsrry.
Dr. Kenneth IVilson Nairn Akbar
Jason Basden
Unsung Leader Aud Presented to students who have consistently performed B-GLAD
exceptionally in onemany campus organizations without receiving or seeking the notoriety they Dd Burnell IV
deserve. m Kevin Jordan
Marvin Arlington, Jr. James McNulty
Markus Frederick NAACP
SageHunihan Jillian Thompson
BenKky
Raymond Lee Mabry, Jr. � Outstanding Student Organization Leadership Development Award Presenfc
TanoaMardis � registered student organization that promotes leadership among its members throu
James McNulty � developmental workshops, speakers, and activities.
Randy Mills m Alpha Kappa Delta
Jerry Morris � ECU Chapter of the Association for the Education ofYoung Children
RinardoL.Reddick � ECU Gospel Choir
Mary Schubert � ECU Chapter of the NAACP
Alan Stancill Panhellenic Council
Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc.
Outstanding Student Organizat&i Leader - Presented to students who have demonstrated a
superior level of leadership and serifc to the student organization) in which they hold a leadership Student Organization Award for Outstanding Philanthropy Presented to a registeredudent
positioa I organization that makes a significant contribution through consistent and sustained activinM t
Anna Lynn AsbeD � benefit the community.
Joshua Beardsley 1 Epsifon Sigma Alpha, Omega Pi Chapter
Markus Doell Gamma Sigma Sigma
TashaHolt 1 Ladies Elite
Sherry R. Ingram 1 Panhellenic Council
ChristiaRey � National Pan-Hellenic Council
Eric R Rivenbark 1 Phi Sigma Pi National Honor Fraternity
Ayana Smalls 1
Jillian Thompson 1 Outstanding Student Worker Presented to a stuJSHR iwjHUH.W Gpenor abilit
CandiceVoight 1 dirough initiative and responsibility for a minimurrCTj KjfeilOTEzJ Hidentwor
positioa H�X�l&'�
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 27, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 27, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1335
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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