The East Carolinian, April 22, 1999







Thursday
High: 87
Low: 58
Friday
High: 89
Low: 61
Online Survey
Do you think that something like the
Littleton tradgedy could happen at ECU?
Do you think campus police should carry guns?
yes 57 no 42
www.tec.ecu.edu
Carolinian
Chal rooms. Are they- the new
way to meet, communicate?
Scerage6
THURSDAY. APRIL 22 .1999 VOLUME 74. ISSUE 42
BOT member makes racial slur, resigns
NCGovernorsays
comment inexcusable
Ami Waqne-r
ASSISTANT SEWS EDITOR
Two weeks after making a racist
remark in a n address to the Cape
Fear chapter of the Pirate Club in
Wilmington, an ECU Board of
Trustees member resigned.
Walter L. Williams, 69, resigned
over the telephone to Gov. Jim
Hunt Tuesday evening, Sean Walsh
of the governor's
office said.
According to
the Wimington
Morning Star, on
April 7 the for-
mer Pirate Club
president said
that if the men's
basketball team
does not start
wining with the
new coach it is because of a "nigger
in the woodpile The room, filled
Students react
to shootings
16 dead in
Littleton massacre
Holly Harris
NEWS EDITOR
At least 16 people were killed in the
deadliest school-related rampage on
record. On Tuesday, two teenagers
in black trench coats opened fire on
classmates at Columbine High
School in Littleton, Colo, and then
took their own lives.
Experts say that while the
motive is still unclear, the incident
appeared to be a suicide mission.
Witnesses identified the two gun-
men as Eric Harris and Dylan
Klebold, members of a group
called the "Trench Coat Mafia
The group is composed of outcasts
who constantly spoke about guns,
bombs and their hatred for African
Americans, Hispanics and athletes.
Students said the group was
obsessed with World War II and
the Nazi party. Tuesday was
Hitler's birthday.
Residents of the town have said
they were shocked that such a hor-
rific event could happen in the
small suburb of Littleton; the pop-
ulation is only 35,000. However,
on the heels of other school
tragedies like the one in
Joncsboro, Ark many say they
SEE RAMPAGE PAGE 2
Bill reprimands
student drug
Offenders losefinadal
aid after conviction
Ami Elliott
s F. W s IV H I I E H
Some students may find receiving
financial aid a little more difficult as
a result of the implementation of
new amendments signed into law
by the President.
Under the Higher Education
Amendments of 1998, any student
convicted of a drug offense, either
possession or sale, can lose their
financial aid. However, the amend-
ments do not include any other
criminal conviction.
"A student has to be convicted
of a drug offense before losing
financial aid eligibility said Rose
Mary Stclma, director of Student
Financial Aid.
First time offenders of posses-
sion lose one year of financial aid.
Second time offenders of posses-
sion and first time convictions of
sailing, lose two years of aid. Third
time convictions of possession and
second time convictions of sale
SEE FINANCIAL AID PAGE 2
with nearly 150 Pirate Club mem-
bers, reportedly fell silent after
Williams made
the comment.
Walsh said
that the gover-
nor thinks
William's com-
ment was inex-
cusable. Hunt
accepted
Williams' resig-
nation and
thanked
Williams for his long service on the
board.
Williams was not available for and thoughtless when making this
comment yesterday. statement.
Students say that such a com- "I think the comment was quite
"7 think it is a good idea that
he resigned he displayed
unnecessary hatred
Emanuelle Guidi
Junior
ment calls for his
resignation.
"I think it is a
good idea that
he resigned
because he dis-
played unneces-
sary hatred
said Emanuelle
Guidi, junior.
According to
"In this day of nationwide
race relations, we must be
of good deed and good word
Taffye Clayton
Director ol Ledonia Wright Center
frankly a reck-
less disregard of
the numerous
contributions of
African-
American staff,
students, facul-
ty, athletes and
alumni to the
university
everyday
Taffye Clayton, director of Ledonia Clayton said.
Wright, Williams was irresponsible Williams was appointed to the
board in 19 to complete Louis
Sewell's term. Sewell resigned
early because of his wife's failing
health. Williams was reappointed
in 1997 to a full four-year term.
Williams attended both under-
graduate and graduate programs at
ECU. He is a long-term member of
the ECU Alumni Association and
the Pirate Club. He has also served
on the ECU Board of Visitors.
Williams Arena at Minges
Coliseum is named after Williams
and his wife Marie. The Williamses
SEE WILLIAMS PAGE 2
Masters next step
for many students
Jessica Reed
staff writer
The semester is drawing to a
close and those taking the walk
during graduation must face the
most daunting question of their
entire four years � what next?
According to ECU Associate
Dean of Graduate School, Max
Poole, for many students, the
answer is graduate school. Students
give many reasons for pursuing a
higher degree, but the most fre-
quent answers are to gather more
information in their field and to
make more money. Some students,
called non-traditional students
even come back after having
already been out in the work force.
"We find a large number of peo-
ple in our grad-
uate school that
have come
back Poole
said.
Sr. Associate
Dean of
Graduate
School Paul
Tschetter said
graduate school
may not be
appropriate for sen
some students
when they first
graduate with their undergraduate
degree. Many students change
their mind when they enter the
work force. Because of this,
English Education graduate
graduate student, tips in
student Jennifer Glasser gives Junghwan, Lee-Kim, a speech therapy
the writing center located in the General Classroom Building.
PHOTO BY MICHAEL SMITH
" was afraid that after going
out to work I wouldn 't be in
the mode to come back to
graduate school
Mike Mcnally
Tschetter said, grad students are
much more diverse than under-
graduate students.
Tschetter also
reported that
graduate school
program at ECU
has a higher per-
centage of stu-
dents that grad-
uate then the
undergraduate
school.
A survey
done in the fall
ii of 1998 by the
ECU graduate
program shows
that 66 percent of master's degrees
students were ECU undergradu-
ates. This is due to the fact that
most programs require only 30-50
semester hours to obtain a master's
degree. A full-time graduate stu-
dent could complete those require-
ments in two
years.
The
Graduate
School program
at ECU
requires all
applicants to
have a bac-
c a 1 a u r e a t e
degree from an
accredited four
year institution,
and most pro-
grams require
that this degree
be in an area
related to the graduate program to
which they are applying.
"We are glad to help students
explore graduate school
through our internet link,
and materials on graduate
schools
James Westmoreland
Director of Career Services
To be considered for admission,
applicants must have a minimum
overall GPA of 2.5 or a senior year
GPA of 3.0. A
satisfactory
score on the
GRE, MAT or
GMAT stan-
dardized tests
are also
required. This
i n formation
along with other
program-specif-
ic requirements
must be pre-
sented on an
application and
returned to the
Graduate
SEE GRADUATES PAGE 2
CIS takes measures against computer viruses
Any student convicted of a drug offense can lose their financial aid.
PHOTO BY MICHAEL SMITH
Deptartmentoffers
24-hour protection
Terra Steinbeiser
staff writer
Experts say that one of the greatest
disadvantages of the internet is that
it provides an open door for com-
puter viruses to come in and
destroy any number of things on
your computer.
Fortunately for ECU students,
the university has a program that
provides campus-wide 24-hour
virus protection.
"ECU recognizes viruses as a
significant threat said Ernest
Marshburn, director of strategic
initiatives at CIS. "Years ago, the
university strategically entered
into a contract with Symantec and
SEE VIRUS PAGE 3
Students working in labs, like the Austin computer lab, must be careful of viruses.
PHOTO BV MARK CRIPPEN






ThB Eitt Cirolii
2 Thurifry, April 22, 1989
news
The East Carolinian
Graduates
continued from page 1
School.
Mike Mcnally graduates in May
and has been accepted into the
School of Business Graduate
Program. He said he reccomends
that students go on to grad school
after graduation.
"I was afraid that after going out
to work I wouldn't be in the mode
to come back to graduate school
McNally said.
Career Services offers a program
twice every semester called
"Getting into Graduate School
This program is designed to intro-
duce and inform students about
graduate schools throughout the
state and country.
James Westmoreland, Director
of Career Services, said he encour-
ages students to explore the gradu-
ate school option.
"We are glad to help students
explore graduate school through
our internet link, and materials on
graduate schools Westmoreland
said.
Senior Shannon Smith plans to
attend graduate school in the fall.
She said she believes that today a
baccalaureate degree is as easy to
obtain as a high school diploma.
Smith said graduate school is the
edge you need when entering the
job market.
"The money that you can make
after the first two years that you
obtain your master's degree can
pay for the degree itself Smith
Financial Aid
continued from page I
result in loss of financial aid indefi-
nitely.
Stelma says that students can
regain their financial aid if they
complete a rehabilitation program
approved through the Secretary of
Education.
"Since the Secretary of
Education has not yet approved any
rehab programs, the Dept. of
Education has determined that
schools cannot begin to implement
the penalties. The student doesn't
have a way to fix the problem
Selma said.
Another complication is the lack
of a running data base that compiles
all of the drug convictions. This
makes it difficult for the financial
aid office to know about them.
Some students said that they are
concerned about the bill because it
targets non-violent offenders and
fails to mention other serious crimes
such as rape or murder.
"Since when are criminals
denied an education? The people
receiving financial aid are already
struggling for their education. To
rob them of it over a personal
offense is ridiculous said sopho-
more sociology major Kristen
Kochekian.
"Under the Higher Education
Act a convicted murderer or rapist is
more likely to receive federal finan-
cial aid then a person charged with
a non-violent drug possession said
freshman Joshua LePree.
However, according to Stelma
there are benefits to the amend-
ments.
"Loans that are for periods of
one semester or less can be dis-
bursed in one check Selma said.
"Previously, we had to disburse one
semester loans in two or more dis-
bursements, which meant students
received half of their money at the
beginning of the semester and half
mid-way through the semester
She also said that schools with a
low default rate no longer have to
delay disbursement of first year stu-
dent loans until 30 days into the
first semester. This allows fresh-
men students to be able to access
their funds earlier than in the past.
But many are still not convinced
the advantages outweigh the costs.
"The amendments are limiting
people who want to change them-
selves said Leslie Bailey an
English major, "People may make
one mistake and their whole lives
are changed
Williams
continued liom page 1
also sponsor the Spirit of the East
Post-Eligibility Scholarship and
another student-athlete scholarship
for men's basketball. The couple
also gave a $1 million gift to ECU
athletics through Trade Oil Co
which he founded.
Despite his generous efforts, stu-
dents said they feel that Williams
undermined the basketball team in
his comment.
Rampage
continued from page I
believe that the problem is spread-
ing nationwide.
"I think it could happen any-
where said Stephanie Statham,
freshman. "I think there are trou-
bled people everywhere, but you
always think it will happen some-
where else
Students at local high schools
said they are afraid that an event
like this could occur in their school.
"I think that it's scary, but it's a
possibility anywhere said Katie
Abbott, a junior at D H Conley
High School in Greenville.
"Everyone at school is looking over
their shoulders
School Officials in the Pitt
County School System were
instructed not to comment on the
killings.
"Our position is we will not
respond to any inquires about this
said Barry Gaskins, chief informa-
tion officer for the Pitt County
System. "We're not going to per-
petuate this tragedy in Colorado
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"I feel that the whole basketball
program deserves an apology
Guidi said. "All the money and
gifts in the world can't make a state-
ment like that right
Clayton said she recognizes
Williams' generosity to the univer-
sity, but thinks this is no excuse for
the comment.
"In this day of nationwide race
relations, initiative training and a
seemingly attempt to close the
racial chasm, we must be of good
deed and good word Clayton said.
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purchased the Norton AntiVirus
program, which, in the opinion of
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software available
The program works by scanning
and cleansing e-mail attachments,
providing a "safe zone" where the
computer can store infected files
before getting rid of them, and it
prevents new and unknown viruses
from entering the server, and
detects and repairs polymorphic
viruses, which account for about 22
percent of today's viruses and often
elude standard methods of virus
detection.
The Norton AntiVirus program
is available to all students, faculty
and staff for their personal comput-
ers on campus as well as off. The
program can be downloaded off the
ECU network or one can req jest a
copy from the MTC computer lab
in Austin 208.
"ECU was the first university in
the state to grant site-licensed virus
protection to anyone enrolled in or
employed by the school
Marshburn said.
The Melissa Virus is responsible
for the most recent scare among
computer users everywhere. This
particular virus travels by way of e-
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to degrade the host computer's
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According to Marshburn, stu-
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enced few, if any, problems with
the virus because of the excellent
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UNC-Chapc! Hill is another
university that has made virus pro-
tection a priority.
"We use the Norton AntiVirus
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and are in the process of purchasing
a site-license so that students off
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said Sherry Graham, UNC director
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response UNC-CH provides a
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problems with their computers.
"Any time a virus is suspected,
the student is directed to come
down to our walk-in service so that
we can scan their disks and deter-
mine if they need immediate virus
protection Graham said.
NC State uses another program
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Change can come through many avenues. In the case of the floor of the black box
studio in Messick Theater, change came through student action. When the poor
conditions and decrepit floors became too big a problem, the students circulated a
petition that got the attention of school administrators.
The administrators got the wheels in motion to fix the floors. This story has a happy
ending and all the parties involved got what they wanted. The dance students got
their floors, and the administrators got the job done.
The dance department should be proud that their students had the motivation to
see the problem and find a successful way to remedy it. The students took matters
into their own hands and effectively got the attention of the school administration.
Through a unified effort, the students found a way to get their grievances heard and
their problems fixed. However, questions remain.
Why is it that to get needed repairs to a campus building, students must form a peti-
tion and capture the attention of the school brass? Why weren't the students' griev-
ances heard before the petition? Why weren't their needs addressed earlier?
The fact that the students had to get a petition to get the problems with their build-
ing addressed raises questions about the process used to allocate maintenance and
funding.
The ECU football team practices with state-of-the-art equipment and their pro-
gram is housed in one of the campus' newest buildings. The Pirate basketball team
plays in the newly renovated Minges Coliseum. However our dance students were
dancing on dangerous floors and in old buildings whose design included columns
in the middle of their dance floors. And may we remind you that dance is actually
a major here, as opposed to football.
The students showed great determination in getting their floors fixed. They should
be applauded for their successful effort to remedy their poor working conditions.
However their problems should have been fixed before they had gone through the
trouble of getting a petition.
OPINION
OPINION
Christopher
Coppedge
Prepare for finals now or pay
Finals are almost here and it's
about that time for everyone to
start procrastinating. Putting off
these things is not a smart idea,
believe me. However, there is still
time and many things to do for
relaxation. Barefoot on the Mall
will be here soon. Barefoot is a
great time to relax and have fun
with everyone. Another activity
that relieves stress is going under-
cover as a secret agent (see last
week's column.) Being a secret
agent is hard work. All you do is
dodge bullets and spies and uncov-
er tilings people don't want uncov-
ered all while saving the worid. But
all that hard work can make you
hungry.
Why is food at the various cam-
pus eateries so expensive? The
only selling point to these places is
the use of the ECU One Card. Sure
the swipe of the card is easy, but do
you realize you are being ripped
off? Check out the prices next time
you go into The Spot or The
Galley. Of course, since we are all
broke college students we are
going to complain, but we are justi-
fied in our whining. The prices for
food on campus are crazy.
I believe that the students living
on campus have been fricked by
the meal plan and declining bal-
ance. University Dining Services is
taking advantage of us. Walking to
a campus dining facility is easy
because it is on campus. But, if stu-
dents walk off campus to one of the
fast food places they find the cost is
the same and sometimes even
cheaper than our own dining facili-
ties. I'm not even going to mention
the taste of the food because there
is a difference in servings. Our din-
ing halls must cook the same thing
for hundreds of students while
other places cook to your order. I
think the dining halls should offer a
buffet line like Ryan's or Golden
Corral This way may be easier for
both students and the dining staff.
The One Card is also appealing
to parents and students because it
keeps from having to carry around
cash. This is a good thing. But the
problem is that many do not realize
how much they're actually paying
for these meals. Dinner in Todd or
Mendenhall usually costs $6.10.
When you try to get a meal equiva-
lency it does not come out to $6.00,
more like $4.50. Besides the meals,
I know some.products in The Spot
have been jacked up in price
almost 30 to 50 cents. That adds up
after awhile.
It looks like students on campus
are doomed to be cheated out of
money while using the ever-so-con-
venient dining facilities. I think
campus dining is a great service,
but the prices are making students
broke. Quite simply the meal plan
and declining balance are too much
for too little. I think University
Dining Services should reevaluate
their pricing system and quit trying
for profit. I know that feeding hun-
dreds of students a day is expen-
sive, but in order to keep the cus-
tomers the price must be right.
Marvelle
Sullivan
Presidential race ho-hum
The real shock is Dan Quayle.
Docs he really think that after say-
ing something like "it's a shame
when people lose their minds"
instead of "a mind is a terrible
thing to waste" he can ever be
taken seriously?
As the summer of 1999 nears, the
presidential race is emerging as a
prime topic for national media
attention. The events that have
taken place at this stage in the pres-
idential election of 2000 are reason-
ably consistent with campaigning
trends of the past. So far, the nomi-
nation hopefuls are speaking, but
not too definitively yet. The
rhetoric is forming, but not too
tersely yet and the money is being
raised, but not too illegally yet.
Though most factors are very much
the same, the one prominent differ-
ing feature is the most substantial
for the campaigns themselves. This
feature would be the type of people
vying for the party nominations.
The usual crowd consists of an
incumbent or his vice-president,
extremists from both parties, a reli-
gious radical or two and a candidate
that is the better of the evils.
Never before has there been a
woman, a former basketball player,
an ex-president's son and a former
vice-president. To be sure, a really
boring and stiff vice-president has
run before though. It is just an odd
crowd, but then again it is an odd
time for American politics in gener-
al. One just has to wonder what has
deluded some of these candidates
into believing they have a chance.
Elizabeth Dole is a nice lady. She
even does nice things like running
the American Red Cross, but this
does not make her presidential
material. It is a novel occurrence
that she is representing the
Republican party, but her total lack
of experience in an elected office
would make for a frightening expe-
rience as the President of the
United States. Besides, one Dole
has already tried.
Even though Bill Bradley has
served as a Senator, for a former
basketball player to be running
against Al Gore for the Democratic
nomination is absurd. Someone
needs to tell him to stop. There is
no need for the Democrats to waste
money in the primary level of the
election. Besides, after the Clinton
fiascoes, the parry needs all the
help that it can get. Bradley will
most likely serve to be a nuisance
to Gore.
The real shock is Dan Quayle.
Does he really think that after say-
ing something like "it's a shame
when people lose their minds"
instead of "a mind is a terrible thing
to waste" he can ever be taken seri-
ously? Quayle is a good man, but he
needs to face the fact that he will
never, ever, ever be elected presi-
dent.
George W. Bush, the governor of
Texas and son of former president
George Bush, is a reasonable candi-
date. While he lacks a lot of experi-
ence, he has gained the support of
Republican governors and national
political figures. His main test will
be how his public approval ratings
fare when he actually leaves Texas
to campaign and outlines what he
stands for. He alone with
Republican nomination hopeful,
the scandalous Senator John
McCain, are the most qualified and
make the most sense for the
Republican party and for the office
of president.
Despite his struggle to gain favor-
able public opinion ratings due to a
lack of personality and claims of
creating the Internet (yes, he said ;
that), Vice-President Gore is the;
obvious choice for the Democratic;
party. As the year progresses, Gore
will be stepping into leadership,
roles as Clinton slowly fades in'
order for the vice-president to
amass respect.
No candidate presently is absolute-
ly ludicrous or laughable, but nev-
ertheless, no candidate is exacdy
logical or excitingly capable either.
I guess it's just another case of pol-
ides imitates life.
OPINION
Stephen
Kleinshmitt
Wounded kids strike back
There was definitely
a method to the madness.
A frightening new trend has arisen
in America's schools in the past few
years.
Children killing children. In the
past, there were the shootings in
Kentucky, Mississippi and
Arkansas, but those attacks com-
bined did not equal the devastation
of the attack at Columbine High
School in Littleton.Colorado on
Tuesday.
While most people would just like
to dismiss this attack as just an iso-
lated incident of crazed teen vio-
lence, I am inclined to think differ-
ently. After watching hours of news
coverage and interviews of the kids
from the school, this is what I theo-
rized was the motive behind the
carnage. Because there was defi-
nitely a method to the madness.
When the kids were being inter-
viewed, they usually referred to the
suspects as "scum" or "weirdos
One particularly emotional girl who
was interviewed stated that that the
two boys explained to the victims
how they had been harassed and
belittled for years by students at
the schools, and they had finally
had enough-of the cynicism.
The kids had evidently been
thrown into a harrowing depres-
sion, and being taunted daily by
their fellow class mates had pushed
them over the edge. During the
attack, it seemed evident that the
shooters were targeting specific
students. Several students had
been spared, and in one case, while
passing a fellow student on the way
to his car, a suspect told the student
to leave because he liked him.
And we ask ourselves, what are the
causes of this madness? It seems
that our society is sowing the seeds
of our own undoing. Violence is
pervasive on TV a very impres-
sionable medium to our youth.
Kids resort to fatalistic death rock
as an escape from reality, where
they can harbor their resentment
and lack of tolerance for normal
society. Motivated by scenes of
"glorious retribution" in movies
such as "The Basketball Diaries"
and "Natural Bom Killers the.
gradual value of human life dimin
ishes to zero.
And while we go to home at night
to comfortable homes and good
families, these kids may have noth-
ing to return to but an alcoholic or
abusive parent. These kids soon
become suicidal, and then things
like this happen.
I saw Sarah Brady of Handgun
Control Inc on CNN Tuesday
night urging for tighter gun control
laws. I don't care how many ridicu-
lous or erroneous laws you want to !
propose. There are plenty of laws
against guns, bombs and murder at
school, but when it comes down to
it, a suicidal gunman could give a
damn about the law. Laws are only
subject to those who follow them.
The solution lies not in the law, but
in ourselves. When we can start to
accept people as they are, and learn
not to ignore the warning signs of
troubled youth, we may make
some progress in eliminating these.
horrible attacks.
5 Thunday, April j
Four Seats
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5 Ttiundiy. April 22, 1998
Four Seats Left
Tin Em Ctf otoi�n
Jason Latour
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For details and applications, please
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If you are interested, please apply by
April 30, 1999.






6 Tlmmliv. April 22, 1999
features
7 Thursday, April
The Em Carolinian
T ROOM ADDICTIONS
OMMON ON CAMPUS
encourage caution
Brooke Potts
staff writkr
You've just had the most miser-
able day of your college career.
Your computer lost that 15-page
research paper you have been
working on since February, the
bank called and said you just
unced three
checks and your boss is
asking you to work tonight
when you had planned to host the
party of the semester. All you want
to do is sit down with your best
friends and vent your frustration.
So you go home and turn on the
computer. Within seconds, you
have found a group of several peo-
ple who listen and help you sort out
your rotten day. Sounds perfect,
doesn't it? That is what many peo-
ple think about chat rooms. You can
instantly meet people, tell them
what is going on in your life and
sign off. Yet it really is not as simple
Many campus computer labs do not allow students to tie up lines with chat rooms.
PHOTO BY JACOB GABM0H
as it sounds.
"People think that this is a safe.
way to meet people said Lissa
Griffin, junior. "That is what makes
it so dangerous
Lissa, who no longer visits chat
rooms, stumbled into chatting one
day while surfing the net her fresh-
man year. She decided to give it a
try.
"1 thought to myself, 'this is
pretty cool Griffin said.
Since her first experience was a
positive one, she began chatting
more frequently. Her time spent
on the computer became more fre-
quent, and before long, she was
hooked.
"I didn't know at the time 1 was
addicted said Griffin. "I was
spending anywhere from four to
seven hours a day in chat rooms
She decided to give up chatting
when she realized that it was
becoming a major part of her life�
a part that had few real benefits.
Other students on campus also
spend a great deal of time on the
Internet. Danielle Custis, senior,
currently spends at least four hours
a day chatting.
"The people that operate the
chat rooms make it easy for you to
get hooked Custis said. "1 don't
think that I'm hooked, but I can
see how it could easily happen
Custis subscribes to a service
that lets her know when people
online are looking for her
like wearing a pager for
a chat room.
She has a regular
group of people she
usually chats with, who
live as dote as Raleigh
and New England, and
as far away as New
Zealand. '
"I would encourage
others to try this, but to
be aware that it take a
lot of self control
Custis said. She com-
pares it to being in any
other kind of relation-
ship, where you have to set bound-
aries and priorities. "You have to be
strong and not let it run your life
Griffin takes a more negative
view. "It's like talking to a prank
caller�you have no way of know-
ing who is on the other end of the
line she said.
The truth is, when you meet
people over the internet, some-
thing is missing. Without that per-
sonal involvement, deception
becomes easy. It is a lot easier to lie
to someone that you have never
seen than to sit down and fab-
ricate stories to someone's
face.
The computer staff on
campus has recognized this as
a problem.
Aaron Lucier, assistant
director of Housing for
Technology, works with his
department on finding solu-
tions to this problem and
offering addict-
Students spend time making new friends from all over ttte world in chit rooms
PHOTO IV JACOB GARMON
ed students information.
This is just as serious as any
other addiction Lucier said.
"People miss out on other opportu-
nities because they are spending
too much time chatting
The warning signs for chat room
addiction are similar to any other
type of addictive behavior. People
withdraw from their normal day-to-
day activities, and abandon friends
and responsibilities. Addicts will
also typically lie about their use or
the
number of hours they spend in chat
rooms.
"The best way to deal with chat
room addiction is to help people set
rules and boundaries for them-
selves Lucier said. "As a school,
we are trying to make people aware
that help does exist, and encourage
people to seek counseling before
chatting becomes a serious
problem
Some of the best internet chat rooms
� AT&T Chat 'n Talk Home Page,
- Chat O The Globe
-IRC Chat
- OnNow.Com
TalkCfcy
� The Palace
-Tribal Vtrfea
Ultimate Chatlist
- Make new friends
� Boredom
- Curiosity
-Find out information
Talk to long distance friends
boyfriendsgirlfriend:
1
Web site makes
hooking up easy
Services on internet increase
People can purchase,
banking from home
Find out if someone you i
. likes you �vf'?� - 'tjeciv lly FREE!
eCRUSH.com assists
in professing ones love
Erica Sikhs
staff whits
As you gaze longingly at the person
you would love to spend the rest of
the semester with, a variety of sce-
narios run through your mind.
Does heshe feel the same way?
: Should you take the chance even
though it could end up backfiring
in your face? There has to be a bet-
ter way to pop the big question
besides a 'Do-you-likc-me?
Check-yes-or-no' letter.
Clark Benson and Karen
DeMars have come up with a web
site that can find out all the infor-
mation you always wondered but
were afraid to ask. The web site is
called eCRUSH, which also helps
alleviate the awkwardness of being
rejected or asked out during a
phone conversation or vise versa.
There had to be a better way to
meet people and break the ice
DeMars said. "Since our launch of
the web site on February 14, we
have had over 500 matches
Most would agree that the
ecrush.corn's official web site logo
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WORLD WIDE WEB
chances of 500 people meeting
someone they like and who likes
them back are very slim.
"I have dated many people
where the feelings between us
were not mutual and quite the
opposite said Cindy Horrcll,
freshman. "It's a good way for you
to find a relationship that is mutu-
al
" think this web site is
a good idea that helps you
overcome, nervousness within
relationships
Mary Beth Fleming
Irathman
Participating in eCRUSH is
quite simple. You enter the web
site at www.ecrush.com, register
yourself with your stats, which
takes about five minutes. You then
submit a list of names and e-mail
addresses of who you arc interested
in dating. eCRUSH then sends
your list of potential people an
anonymous e-mail encouraging
them to register. When they do reg-
ister, if they submit your name to
the web site, then both parties are
notified. Where you go from there
is entirely up to you.
Many students who are intimi-
dated by the idea of asking some-
one out are willing to try the web
site out and also encourage others
to as well.
"It's a good way for the guy to
chicken out and still get the girl
said Alan Riggs, sophomore.
"1 think this web site is a good
idea that helps you overcome ner-
vousness within relationships said
Mary Beth Fleming, freshman.
"The confidence that you have
allows you to find out if your crush
likes you back
"I think it's a good idea because
the person you like doesn't know
you like them unless the feelings
are mutual said Kierstcn Hansen,
junior. "That way your feelings
aren't in jeopardy
Although the idea may sound
perfect, there are setbacks. For
instance, in order for the connec-
tion to actually work, both parties
must be willing to log on, and that
isn't always guaranteed.
"The idea is fine, but in all real-
ity I doubt most guys would actual-
si r. iCRUIH.COM PAGE 8
Phillip Gilkus
SKMOK WHITER
Finally, proof that the Internet is
not just for playing games and chat
rooms.
People throughout the world,
including many ECU students, are'
learning that more and more every-
day services can be done over the
computer.
"I bought one graphics book
from Amazon.com said Russ
Blackburn, senior. "I looked there
after checking out the prices at bar-
� �
nesandnoble.com. It was real easy
to find
Most students have heard about
buying books through the Internet
these days. Opened in June 1995,
Amazon.com now offers over 4 mil-
lion books, CDs, audio books and
computer games.
"With Amazon.com and go.com,
one can buy just obour anything
said Dr. Michael McLc , profes-
sor at the School of Busii s. "With
the Internet, there is mo election
and prices are lower
Barnes and Noble is i ookstore
that has also made th nove to
online shopping.
"Our web site em ;s us to
have global reach, as ie Web
opens our doors to the v id said
Steve Riggio, Barnes ai Noble's
chief operating officer.
Premiering in May 1997, barne-i
sandnoble.com offers over 750,000 '�
titles that are ready for immediate �
delivery. As of January 1999, over;
one million customers have pur-
chased books from the web site.
"The Internet is a big commer
cial market said Dr. William'
Collins, professor from the School;
of Business. "More and more corn
panies will be taking advantage or!
it. Almost anything can be done
over the Internet - J-
Banking services can also nowf
be taken care of using the comput-i j
er. BB&T Onl.ine allows cus
tomers to pay their bills, track their
account activity, transfer money
and find their account balances all
over the Internet. At
Sll ONLINE PAGE B
Arthritic grandmother beaten,
robbed while buying pot
Sullivan says
marijuana eases pain
W1NNABOW, N.C. (AP) - Tinkey
Mac Sullivan usually traveled alone
from her home in rural Brunswick
County into Wilmington to buy her
marijuana, a frail 53-year-old
trolling the dangerous streets for a
score.
Mrs. Sullivan is a regular around
one of Wilmington's most notorious
drug supermarkets.
"They wave at me when I go in
there Mrs. Sullivan said Thursday
while sitting in her double-wide
mobile home that's kept neat as a
pin. "All of them wave and say
hello. They all call me Grandma
Since 1994, Mrs. Sullivan has
smoked marijuana regularly to alle-
viate the pain caused by her many
illnesses, including rheumatoid
arthritis.
Until Friday, she has always
gone alone to make her buys, which
usually range from one-quarter to
an ounce, she said. -
But on that day, accompanied by
her 13-year-old grandson, Chris,
things took a nasty turn.
Mrs. Sullivan, who with her hus-
band has taken care of Chris since
he was 3 days old, was watching
him Friday because he had been
suspended from the alternative
school he attends.
She went to the bank to deposit
her husband's paycheck from his
job as a tugboat captain. "I left the
bank, and it hit my mind, 'why
don't I just ride by there and see if
I can get some stuff she said.
Chris, who can't even abide the
smoke from his grandmother's ciga-
rettes, didn't know why she was
there, she said.
She circled through the neigh-
borhood, then parked when two
men indicated they had something
to sell. Instead, they jumped in the
back scat and attacked Mrs.
Sullivan and Chris with their bare
hands, taking more than $100 in
cash, her grandson's wallet and her
purse, wallet and credit cards.
She was hit in the face and arm;
Chris says the attackers just got him
once on the head. "I was fighting
back. I couldn't let Grandma get
beat up and not fight back said
Chris. When the men ran, Mrs.
SEE BAKED PAGE 7
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7 Thuridiy, April 22,1999
lit Carolinian
:y spend in chat
a deal with chat
help people set
rics for them-
1. "As a school,
tc people aware
, and encourage
unseling before
a serious
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Talk Horn Page.
Th� Globe
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from the School;
: and more com
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lg can be done
ss can also nowj;
sing the comput
me allows cus-
r bills, track their
transfer money
mm balances all
Internet. At
IE PAGE B
iten,
ot
stuff she said.
even abide the
ndmother's ciga-
w why she was
atigh the neigh-
rked when two
y had something
:y jumped in the
attacked Mrs.
i with their bare
re than $100 in
's wallet and her
redit cards.
he face and arm;
kers just got him
"I was fighting
:t Grandma get
ight back said
men ran, Mrs.
I PAGE 7
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continued front paga 6
Sullivan didn't hesitate: she called
911 from her cell phone.
Even though she was trying to
buy marijuana, it didn't occur to
Mrs. Sullivan not to call police.
"If I can't get it, I am going to
burn it she said. "If I had one
right now, I'd smoke it And that's
exactly what I told the detective
Now police are weighing
whether to charge her with con-
tributing to the delinquency of a
minor.
Wilmington police Detective
O.D. Horton said police were
shocked when they learned Mis.
Sullivan had been routinely driving
into Wilmington's dangerous
neighborhoods to buy marijuana.
"This is the first rime I've heard
of this he said.
Worse, he said, was taking her
grandson with her. "That's the
issue I'm going to address first of
all he said.
But Mrs. Sullivan said she's not
worried about losing custody of
Chris because she smokes marijua-
na and could be charged in the inci-
dent. She said Chris didn't know
why his grandmother was driving
around in the neighborhood.
When she smokes at home -
usually she smokes half a joint a
day she goes to an outside porch or
to her bathroom, where she lights
up beside an open window.
She's also quick to point out sev-
eral reasons for smoking marijuana:
it eases her ceaseless pain; it relax-
es her, it allows to keep food on her
stomach; and it doesn't affect her
mind the way her more than two
dozen' pain-killing drugs do, she
said. "Right now, my joints are
hurting so bad I can't hardly stand
it she said.
When asked if she has any mar-
ijuana now, she shook her head
sadly. And when will she buy
more? "The first chance I get
� f
East Carolina Paintball
LIMIT
rwfch
VIC
Card
Excludes
with Meat
��ioarf3�����w�
on 2
il
01
1!

ITS A
BLAST!
14.75-15 oz.
Franco American
Kids Plain
Pastas
g-20 oz.
Harris Teeter
Frosted or
Corn Flakes
With
VIC Card
l�oz.
Harris Teeter
Strawberry
Preserves
ARM.
With
VIC Card
Take Hwy 33 West from Greenville. 8 miles
past the airport. Turn right at the Belvoir
Cornerstop, on to Porter Rd. Go 2.5 miles
and turn left at the yellow signs. Park
iL in front of our Army tent.
110skident Discount CaH
OPEN EVERY SAT SUN, 11:00AM TILL 5:30PM T CA
OR MAKE RESERVATIONS DURING THE WEEK WT
Checkyyour phone book for
WWW.F
$5 mask rental
$5 gun rental
�8 field fee
'acq.fee
for 100 pain tballs
coupons
.com
6 pack
4 oz. cups
White House
Applesauce
With
VIC Card
The East Carolina University
Student Union presents
An evening with
s?!&fe
fc.
4 pack AA or AAA
Energizer
Batteries
With
VIC Card
28 oz.
Heinz
Ketchup
With
VIC
Card
14-16 oz. Keebler
Pecan Sandies
or Club Crackers
With
VIC
Card
2 liter

Diet Pepsi
or Pt
Monday, April 26th, 1999
8 PM in Wright Auditorium
Doors open at 7 PM
Tickets on sale Monday, April 5th at
Central Ticket Office, CD Alley, and East
Coast Music & Video.
Special ECU student discount for
one week only from Monday,
April 5th through Friday, April
9th at Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center.
Limit two per ID.
For more Information contact
www.ticketslive.com or call the Central
Ticket Office at 252.328.4788 or
1.800.Eqj.ARTS.
?ri
-Ttor kgood time call The ECU Student
Uniori Hotline at 252.328.6004, or visit
our website at www.ecu.edustudentunion.
Prices Effective Through April 27,1999
Prices tn Thia Ad Effajeth WUnNdty, April 21 Through April 27. �99� OuH3r�awrill�
storeordy. V Rawrv Tha Right lb LimH Quantities. Nona Sold To Daalara.
We Gladly Accept Federal Food Stamps.






8 Thursday. April 22. 1999
eCRUSH.com
continued from page fi '
ly take pan in that since it goes
against the macho style they like
said Mckenzie Thompson, senior.
So the next time you spot your
crush in class, consider eCRUSH
as a new option of letting them
know just how you feel.
features
The Eilt Carolinian
Student
Online
continued from page 6
www.bbandt.com, the software to
download BB&T OnLine promis-
es that every transaction is "private
and secure
"Security over the Internet is
improving. It's no different from
using your credit card at a restau-
rant McLeod said.
First Union is also starting to
provide online services on its web
site, www.firstunion.com.
"We provide different options,
like paying bills and checking
account information said Todd
Baumgardner, online access cus-
tomer relations personnel repre-
sentative of First Union. "One can
log on and check their information
without making a trip to their local
branch. It saves time and money
for the customer and the bank
First Union uses a 128-bit
encryption code on its site, as well
as a number of access codes a cus-
tomer must type in.
"People will become more
comfortable with Windows and
the Internet, so online businesses
will probably improve in the next
three to four years McLeod said.
for Storag
Rent for Summer and Receive $10.00 off4
(Must Bring Coupon In)
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needs of individuals with disabilities
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Attention Returning Students
Planning to live off campus? If so, you can eliminate at least one long line by arranging your utility service in
advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuable time-and possibly money. These options are available:
Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parents' request, your utility service may be put in
their name. Just pick up a "Request for Utility Service"
application from the University Housing Office in Jones
Hall; at Greenville Utilities' Main Office, 200 Martin Luther
King, Jr. Drive; or at GUC Express, our satellite office
located at 509 S.E. Greenville Blvd.
Have your parents complete the application (which must be
notarized) and mail itto GUC, P.O. Box 1847, Greenville,
N.C. 27835-1847, att: Customer Service.
�Remember to attach a "letter of credit" from your parents'
power company.
(P Greenville
k& Utilities
Option B: Deposit Required
If you wish to have the utility service put in your name,
a deposit will be required. Residential deposits are as follows:
Water only S 25
Electric only S100
Electric & water $125
Electric, water & gas J175
Electric & gas SI50
You can save time by mailing the deposit in advance. Be sure to
include your name, where service will be required, when service
is to be cut on and a phone number where we may reach you
prior to your arrival at the service address.
The service charge oj $20.00 for electric and water, andor
$30.00 for gas will be on your first bilL
GUC requires you to be home when natural gas is cut on.
While we do not require you to be home when electric or water
service is cut on, it is your responsibility to ensure that all
electrical appliances and water faucets are OFF during the cut
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Thi Ent Cirolinii
Sc
Polom
Englandn
Kristy
assistant si
The ECU At
named and hone
student-athletes
Phosphate Breal
Saturday.
. The breakfas
16th annual
PurpleGold Pig
; The breakfa:
Greenville Cour
J Isonette Polo
de ECU Outst
dent-athlete an
Was named
Outstanding m;
for the 1998-99;
Along witr
England, the P
Academic Tean
at the breakfast.
The awards
Linebacker F
H
the
Smith, Coi
fiveoik
2&C&&C&
Frank I
It is hard to beli
native Troy
Smith once had
to be talked out
of quitting foot-
ball, but during
his high school
days at J.H.
Rose, it hap-
pened.
Coach Steve
Logan had to
convince Smith
to .stay home
and play for the
Pirates, selling
the school ovei
big names such
as Notre Dame.
Sunday, in
the 6th round ol
the NFL draft,
Troy Smith was
selected by the
Philadelphia
Eagles with the
201st overall
pick!
Earlier in the
day. Smith's
roommate, de:
Coleman was ta
overall pick
Raiders.
"We're bot
Smith. "We bo
that's all we can
up another lev
school to collegi





Carolinian
nts
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nee. Be sure to
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Tha Eist Carolinian
sports
TJwrtw.Airiiaa.fcm 1
Scholar athletes honored
Poloniusand
England receive honor
Kristy Daniel
assistant spouts editor
� The ECU Athletic Department
named and honored its outstanding
student-athletes at the annual PCS
Phosphate Breakfast of Champions
Saturday.
! The breakfast was a part of the
16th annual Great Pirate
PurpleGold Pigskin Pig-Out.
The breakfast was held at the
Qrecnville Country Club.
Isonette Polonius was named as
djc ECU Outstanding female stu-
dent-athlete and Justin England
was named as the ECU
Outstanding male student-athlete
for the 1998-99 season.
Along with Polonius and
England, the PCS Phosphate All-
Academic Team was also honored
at the breakfast.
The awards given to the female
and male scholar-athletes of the
year include an athletic grant-in-
aid, which is sponsored by PCS
Phosphate.
The scholar-athletes were cho-
sen based on their academic and
athletic achievement, leadership
qualities and services to the univer-
sity and community.
Polonius, a senior softball "All-
American is a native of Curacao,
Netherlands Antilles. This season
was her final season performing for
the Lady Pirates.
According to sports information,
she ranks in the top two of every
ECU offensive category in the soft-
ball record book, including the top
position in home runs, RBI's and
doubles.
"This award really lets people
see and learn what we are all
about Polonius said.
Also, in 1998, she was a first
team College Sports Information
Directors of America Academic All-
America selection.
Polonius carries a 3.875 GPA in
business management.
"I am so honored in winning this
; Linebacker Roderick Coleman was taken in the third round by the Raiders
f ILE PHOTO
Headed for
the Big Time
&&o
Smith, Coleman taken,
five others sigped
Frank Hendricks
STAFF WRITER
It is hard to believe that Greenville
native Troy
Smith once had
to be talked out
of quitting foot-
ball, but during
his high school
days at J.H.
Rose, it hap-
pened.
Coach Steve
Logan had to
convince Smith
to .stay home
and play for the
Pirates, selling
the school over
big names such
as Notre Dame.
Sunday, in
the 6th round of
the NFL draft,
Troy Smith was
selected by the
Philadelphia
Eagles with the
201st overall
picfc
Earlier in the
day, Smith's
roommate, defensive end Rod
Coleman was taken with the 153rd
overall pick by the Oakland
Raiders.
"We're both excited said
Smith. "We both got a chance and
that's all we can ask for. We're going
up another level, like from high
school to college
The Eagles took split end Troy Smith
FILE PHOTO
Only Smith and Coleman could
understand what this whole thing
was like. They joined each other in
all star game appearances and they
shared the nervous enthusiasm
that came with two days of the
draft.
"We've talked a lot about how
we felt about the draft Colcman
said. "We're just happy to know
where we're going
Coleman,
who rewrote
ECU's sacks
records, admit-
ted he was
upset by not
getting drafted
during
Saturday's first
three rounds.
"It bothered
me a whole lot
Coleman said.
"Now I have an
opportunity. If I
do what I've
done on this
level, it'll pay
off
Smith was
one of only two
receivers select-
ed by the
Eagles, UNC's
Na Brown
being the first.
Though
Coleman and
Smith were the
only two Pirates drafted, they
aren't the only ones with a shot at
making the NFL. Buck Collins,
Mondell Corbett, Travis Darden,
Dwayne Ledford and Kelvin
Suggs all signed free agent con-
tracts.
SEE 116 TIME PAGE 10
everyone. He hat � good character
and he handles himself very welLr
Klepacksaid.
�tte Polonius
Sport; Softball
Hometown: Curacao, Netherlands
Antilles
Major: Business Management
GPA: 3,875
Position; 3rd base
Leads in home runs, RBI's
��
Sport Men's Cross Country
HouMrtwwiuApei.M.C.
Major; Etetciat Physooay
GPA: 3.512
Awards: 198 NC state title
award. It is a great award to be nom-
inated for and win Polonius said.
"I must say I have to thank my
mother for all of her support during
my playing here in the United
States Polonius said.
iiiiii antiisuiu
England also won the 1998 state
title.
"This is great for Justin because
he is an outstanding young man.
This is good recognition for the
team said Leonard Klepack,
miuiuiilft Kf iualii Mipacit,
England is a role model. He stress-
es the importance of academics that
Coach Klepack feels many other
athletes do not focus on.
" It is the way he does things, his
actions. They are what influences
Football wraps up spring practice
Pirates showing steady
improvement
Bl-AINF. DENIL'S
SENIOR WRITER
As spring temperatures are on the
rise, the '99 Pirate football team is
warming up and looking forward to
a winning season.
Saturday, April 24 will conclude
the Pirates' spring football practice
and move the team one step closer
to taking the field again this fall.
The ECU football team began
their spring practices on March 25
with much enthusiasm; adding lots
of young talent as well as new
defensive coordinator Tim Rose to
the program. Since their first prac-
tice session, the team has come on
strong, showing steady improve-
ment and raising expectations for
the fall season.
"We've gotten a lot better offen-
sively dealing with the multiple
looks that our defense is presenting
to us head coach Steve Logan
said. 'I think that our defense on
the other side of the ball is operat-
ing with a lot fewer missed assign-
ments. So we have gotten better on
both sides
Installing the new defensive
alignment'bro.ight in by Rose has
drawn much of the focus of the
spring sessions. Rose, who was the
defensive coordinator at Boston
College the past two seasons, brings
a fast-paced and intense style to the
Pirate team. Logan is optimistic and
pleased with the development of
this new defense during its early
stages.
"I think that it has been a real
positive turn of events Logan
said. "The kids are excited about it
and they are having a lot of fun. It's
a very aggressive style of defense
and they are having fun with it
Pirate players are growing more
comfortable with the new defen-
sive structure and look forward to
utilizing it against the upbeat
offense of teams like Miami (Fla.)
and N.C. State in the fall. All-star
linebacker Pcmell Griffin believes
the defense has come along well
and developed quickly during the
spring. He says he has also grown
more accustomed to Rose's style of
coaching.
"At first I didn't understand him
Rose, but now I've come to enjoy
him a whole lot Griffin said. "He
is very enthusiastic. He likes being
here and I love being here so we are
real compatible
David Garrard, the Pirates
sophomore quarterback, is able to
analyze the defense from the other
side of the ball. According to
Garrard, Pirate players have been
working hard throughout the spring
to get more in sync with one anoth-
er and the defense will be a key fac-
tor come the fall.
"I think everybody really caught
on to what coach Rose has been
talking about Garrard said. "I
know the defense has been giving
me some problems, so I know it's
going to give other teams some
problems
On the offensive side, Garrard
shined in the tail of '98 completing
157-of-255 passes for 2,091 yards
and 14 touchdowns. He broke 16
ECU passing records including best
single-season completion percent-
age and single-game passing
yardage total. Along with Garrard,
senior receiver LaMont Chappell
will help make up the Pirates'
attacking offense. Chappell caught
36 passes in'98 for 584 yards and six
touchdowns.
"We have installed a lot of new
plays Chappell said. "Now that he
Garrard has more experience we
should do a lot more damage than
we did last year
Junior Marcellus Harris and
Delayo Dodd have come on strong
during the spring practices, adding
to the Pirates' offensive arsenal.
Both players will work at the receiv-
er position and Harris may see some
action on special teams during the
'99 season.
SEE WUCTICE PAGE 10
Pirates prepare for Penn Relays
Track teams to travel
to years bigst meet
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
This weekend the brick facade of
Franklin Field is the scene for one
of collegiate track and field's
biggest annual meet, the Penn
Relays.
The Penn Relays are held in
Philadelphia and draw the largest
crowds of any meet.
"If you could imagine what it's
like for those home football games,
that's what it's like at the Penn
Relays said Charles Justice, head
women's track coach.
Justice sends his 4x100 and
4x200 meter relay squads to the
meet. ECU's Michelle Clayton will
compete in the prestigious
"Championship of America" in the
hammer and the shot put. The
ECU women will also send its
sprint medley team to Philadelphia.
The men will send its 4x200 and
4x400 meter relay squads and run-
ner Lynn Stewart will compete in
the intermediate hurdles.
The Pirate distance medley
squad is not heading to the meet.
The team qualified for the meet
but after one runner fell ill, the trip
was scrapped. The team will stay in
town and prepare for next week-
end's USATFC Quadrangular
Meet.
"We're going to train on through
to Baton Rouge said Leonard
Klepack, distance coach.
"It's the meet of the year as to
the fact that there are forty thou-
sand people in the stands said Bill
Carson, head men's track coach.
"It's a very knowledgeable track
crowd
The relays come a week after
the teams competed in the CAA
Championships. This timing makes
preparation for the meet easy
because the teams are already in
good shape coming off of the con-
ference meet.
"We just had conferences a week
ago, so we pray we come out
healthy Carson said.
Tennis teams finish seventh in CAAs
Seniors pace Pirates in
finalevent
Frank Hendricks
STAFF WRITER
Both the ECU men and women's
tennis teams finished seventh in
the CAA Tournament, with the
women holding true to seed and the
guys moving up a place.
The ECU women beat George
Mason in the consolation round to
finish the CAA tournament.
The Pirates, who were seeded
seventh, were beaten by American
5-2 on Saturday, which set up the
match with Mason. The lone victo-
ries against American came from
singles victories by Hrushida
Kamthe and Asa Ellbring.
The Pirates dominated Mason,
sweeping the singles matches in
convincing fashion.
The men placed seventh as well.
The Pirates beat UNC-W 4-0 in the
consolation round to close out their
tournament. The Pirates, the No. 8
seed, fell to No. 1 seed VCU on
Saturday, then got beaten 4-0 by
American.
"Playing VCU was really tough.
They arc obviously, very good said
Oliver Thalen, sophomore.
On Sunday against the
Scahawks, the team was ready to
show off their skills.
"Playing Wilmington always
gives me some competitive incen-
tive said Kenny Kirby,
Wilmington native.
Seniors Roope Kalajo and Kirby
each had a good tournament, both
winning their final collegiate match.
"There was a lot of emotion
involved in that last match. I could-
n't let myself lose that last match
Kalajo said
Kirby and Kalajo both admit that
leaving collegiate tennis has not yet
hit them.
"I have one semester left to
graduate, so it'll realty hit me when
it's time for the season to roll
around Kirby said. Til miss the
guys more than anything, though






10 Ttwriiy. April 22, 1989
Big Time
continued from page 9
Pirate coach Steve Logan said
his time with these guys seemed
West Virginia
tickets
go on sale
Season opener to be
held in Charlotte
short, but each of their careers have Perhaps Smith summed up the
blossomed. entire experience.
" I was happy for the kids said "I don't know if it's a dream
Logan. "It's a great opportunity for come true or something that was
each of these guys supposed to happen Smith said.
Practice
continued from page 9
"I think it's the best spring ball
that we have had up until this
point Chappell said. "We came
out the first few days and practiced
hard and the team looks good. We
are more intense than ever
before
ECU students eager to see
Pirate football in action can get a
jump on the rest of the crowd for
the season's first game. Advance
student tickets for the 1999 East
Carolina football game vs. West
Virginia will go on sale Monday,
April 26. The game will be played
Saturday, Sept. 4 at Charlotte's
Ericsson Stadium and is slated to
begin at 3:30 p.m. Tickets sales
begin at 9 a.m. at the Mingcs
Stafk Reports
Tickets for the 1999 ECU vs. West
Virginia game will go on sale
Monday, April 26.
The game is scheduled for
September 4 at Charlotte's
Ericsson Stadium with a game
time tentatively set for 3:30 p.m.
Student tickets will be available
Monday from 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. at
Minges Coliseum Ticket Office.
An allotment of 2,500 tickets have
been made available for students
at $10.
Tickets will be mailed prior to
the game to students.
Students must present a valid
ECU One Card at the time of pur-
chase to receive this student dis-
count.
Guest tickets are available to
the students for $25. Each student
is allowed one guest ticket.
Advanced ticket prices for the
general public is $35 for lower
level and upper level mid fie Id and
$25 for upper level seats. On
gameday, tickets will raise to $45
for lower level and $35 for upper
level seats.
ELTORO
Men's Hair Styling Shoppe
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Eastgate Shopping Center
Across From Highway Patrol
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Mon Frt. 9-6
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Every time.
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You drank.
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209-B South Evans Street (downtown near Courthouse)
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IE EAST CAROLINIAN
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www.tec.ecu.edu
.
1 2 PRICE
WINGS!
TONITE fir EVERY THURS. NITE
AFTER 9PM DINE IN ONLY
AS ALWAYS, NO COVER CHARGE!
$1.99 Hi Balls!
$1.75 Heinekens!
$2.75 Pink Margaritas!
Every Thursday!
DOWNTOWN
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No Fiesta Could Be Better Than
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91.3 FM
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR THE FOLLOWING
EXECUTIVE STAFF POSITIONS
Program Director
Sports Director
News Director
Production Manager
Grants Manager
Promotions Manager
Music Director
Web Engineer
For Summer Sessions and Fall 1999 Semester
Self-Motivation and Professional Attitudes are a must.
Applications are available at the office of WZMB in
the basement of Mendenhall Student Center
Deadline is April 30,1999
Newton may leave Cowboys
DALLAS (AP) � Guard Nate
Newton, whose future with the
Dallas Cowboys has been especial-
ly uncertain since the NFL draft,
may leave the team after 13 years,
according to a published report
today.
Changes the Cowboys have
made in their offensive line during
the off-season, along with the eco-
nomic impact of those changes,
have also reduced the free agent's
value to the team, according to The
Dallas Morning News. It reports
Communications
Majors
The ECU AtMetic Department's Meofa
Office is seeking to lire enthusiastic
for the 1999-2000
to a pHl opportunity to gahi
communications. It Meres ten, caa me
328-4522 to set up an
experience in the field of
Mini Storage
1020 S.W.Greenville Blvd.
Telephone 355-1444
Summer Student Special
idiscount on Pre-paid 3 month rental w ECU ID
Storage is now
under new
ownership by 2
ECU alumni
MhAin Sizes available:
nour 5x5 5x10
access 10x10,10x15
10x20,10x30
that Newton has asked his agent to
intensify the search for a new team.
"Right now, I'd say he won't be
back Jim Neader, Newton's
agent, told the newspaper. "It's
more from their standpoint than
ours.
Jordan
not sold
on price
CHARLOTTE (AP) � It
appears likely that Michael Jordan
will buy a half interest in the
Charlotte Hornets, but the former
NBA star and Hornets' owner
George Shinn are apart on the
price, a newspaper said Tuesday.
Sources told The Charlotte
Observer that Shinn values the
team at $160 million, and wants
Jordan to pay $80 million. Jordan
wants to pay less, in part because
his presence is likely to raise the
team's value almost immediately.
Jordan's prestige also could a
key clement in local lobbying for a
new basketball arena in down-
town, the newspaper said.
Jordan and Shinn have been
unavailable for comment during
negotiations. However, Jordan
confirmed Saturday, while at a
hockey game, that he's interested.
A Hornets' spokesman Tuesday
declined comment on the report.
"We're not commenting on
negotiations said Harold
Kaufman, the spokesman, who
added Jordan and Shinn agreed
from the start to "have a continu-
ing dialogue" on a deal.
FORT HENRY'S ARMYNAVY
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Bikini Open Finals
1st place $300 � 2nd place $200 � 3rd Place $100
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FRIDAY 23
Slip Joint
Special Guest Cold Truth
Friday
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In the new
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Special Guest Long Stem Daisies �
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12 Thurriiy. April 22, 1999
classifieds
The EM Carolinian
FOR RENT
STUDENTS NEEDED to take over
lease in Tar River! ASAP. Call 758-
7696.
SUBLEASE FOR first Summer ses-
sion or longer. One bedroom avail-
able ASAP at Kings Row Apts. $326
a month. Water, sewer, cable includ-
ed. 329-0592.
MF NEEDED for 2 BR. 1 bath
house 6 min. to any main campus
classroom. Must like pets and be
dean and courteous. Rent $175
12 bills. Call 762-9373.
ECU AREA big three bedroom, one
bath house. Washerdryer with cen-
tral heat and air. Paved drive with ga-
rage. Call 830-9602.
SUBLEASE TWO bedroom, two
bath. Tar River Apartments. Call 830
1369.
TO ALL procrastinators, sublease 1
bedroom. 1 bath fully furnished
apartment at Ringgold Towers start-
ing May. $367 a month. Call ASAP.
830-0161.
3 BR. 1 bath house 4 blocks from
ECU campus. Central heat & AC.
Fenced in yard, pets OK. $650mo.
Call 561-5026.
TOWNHOUSES NEAR ECU. 3 or 4
bedrooms. 2 12 and 3 12 baths,
WD hook-up ample storage, spa-
cios. 752-1899 day (M-F), pager
561-2203 night.
SPACIOUS TWO Bedroom apart-
ment for rent, including pool and
tennis courts. Sublet from end of
May til July 7. Then you can rent it
from there as you wish. Call Holly at
353-5871.
4 BR. 2 bath house 4 blocks from
ECU campus. Central heat and AC,
fenced in yard. Pets OK. Available
Aug. 1. $800mo. Call 651-5025.
ECU AREAI Huge 6 bedroom. 2
bath house. Big common areas. Cen-
tral heat and air downstairs. Pets OK.
$1000 month. Call 830-9502. leave
a message.
DUPLEX 2 BR. 1 bath, heat pump,
washerdryer hook-up. private drive,
close to campus, no pets. $430.
Please call 756-8444 or 356-7799.
Available immediately!
BW-3 Apt. Above BW-3. Available
May thru August. 3 bedrooms. 2
12 baths. Call 523-5360, 526-6930
or 252-240-1194. Furnished if de-
sired.
TAKE OVER apartment lease, 2 bed-
room. 1 12 baths, washerdryer
hook-ups. Driveway, back deck, large
back yard. $485 per month. 110-B
North Elm St. Call for information,
752-1725
2 BR. apartments downtown above
Catalog Connection & Percolator.
Available now, $500-$550 per
month. Call 717-0860, ask for Rick
Smiley
WALK TO ECU - 1 bedroom apt.
$295month available now & Aug.
1st. 705 East 1st St. or 125 Avery
Street, near campus. 758-6596.
2 BR. 1 bath duplex 2 blocks from
ECU campus. Central heat and AC.
Fenced in yard, pets OK. $475mo.
Call 551-5025.
ROOMMATE WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 2 bedroom townhouse in
Stratford Arms Apts. Rent $226
plus half utilities. Call 321-3243.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP. 407
S. Summit. Washer, dryer. (5) five
bedroom right on campus, parking
available. Seeking easy going indi-
vidual. Phone 329-8354.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for May. Du-
plex near campus with fenced yard.
Nonsmoker, must like animals. $200
month. $200 deposit and half bills.
Call Bryan. H758-7625, W763-6465.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share two bedroom townhouse at
Tar River starting mid May. $265
month 12 utilities. Ask for Leah
at 828-266-7100. or leave a mes-
sage.
NON-SMOKER roommate wanted
for Summer sublease at Oakmont
Sq. Apartments. Rent $205 12
utilities. Call Dave. 353-7038.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 2 BR duplex one block from
campus on Library St. Needed by
middle of May. $225 a person. Call
758-7695.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted one
block from campus. $187.50 rent,
water, sewer and cable included.
Call after 5 p.m ask for Amanda or
Kristina, 762-5886.
SUMMER SUBLEASE needed to
share two bedroom apt. located on
downtown 5th St. across from cam-
pus. Prefer female. $237.50 a month
12 bills. Call NatalieRobin, 561-
7895.
FOR SALE
PIONEER 6-disc CD changer. Brand
new in box. $225. Also, CD recorder,
internal, 2X, $100. 752-8383.
NICE LOVESEAT, (This End Up).
Good condition. Asking $100. Phone
754-2944 evenings or leave mes-
sage.
GARY FISHER Taikai mountain bike,
aluminum frame. Rock Shox, 7-
speed grip shift. $500. Call 757-
1587.
6' B- 64" Rusty surfboards. Call me
C 651-1386.
YARD SALE, Saturday April 24th
from 8a.m1p.m. Four seniors will
be selling everything you need for an
apartment. The ydrd sale will take
place on Elm St. Go toward the river
on Elm, crossover 1st St. and it is the
4th house on the left.
BEDROOM FURNITURE: bed, two
night tables, two dressers, and large
mirror for $700 or best offer. Call
356-1521.
GOOD CONDITION bedroom furni-
ture. Must go! Call Stephanie, 754-
2824.
FOR SALE
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
FOR SALE! Window AC unit, very
compact! $85.00. Call Jamie, 329-
8652.
HELP WANTED
SUMMER CHILDCARE needed for
two children (ages 4 & 8) from June
7 through Aug. 13. Prior experience
and own transportation required.
Call 758-5806 between 6p.m. and
10p.m.
OFFICE ASSISTANTLeasing
Agent part-time positions available. I
need 1-2 people with lots of energy
and enthusiasm to answer phones,
give property tours, do campus pre-
sentations, run errands, etc. Hours of
availability need to be 12-6 M-F and
some weekends. Sat. 10-4. Sun 12-
4. Pays min. wage- $6.50 depending
on experience. Call Becky, 752-9995.
NEED SUMMER help at Hatteras
Beach. Free housing. Need two
males or females for retail seafood
market. Bonus offered. Call 252-986-
2215 or e-mail riskyb@interpath.com
LOOKING FOR a summer job? Play
at day and work at night. The ECU
Telefund is hiring students for the
Summer and Fall of 1999 to contact
alumni and parents for the ECU An-
nual Fund Drive. $5.50 hour. Make
your own schedule. If interested, call
328-4212 , M-TH between the hours
of 3-6 p.m
DO YOU love Christian music? Make
a difference sharing your relation-
ship with Jesus Christ through the
relevant vehicle of radio. Crossover, a
local radio program 8-12 a.m. Sat. &
Sun is looking for help to serve as
show head and DJ. Prayerfully con-
sider and call Jeff at 353-7212.
LIFEGUARDS AND beach vendors
needed in North Myrtle Beach for
1999 season. Will train. Housing pro-
vided if needed. For information call
843-272-3259.
MALE QUADRIPLEGIC needs as-
sistance with bathing, dressing, lift-
ing and transportation, a.m. hours re-
quired. Excellent opportunity. Con-
tact Marty at 353-9074.
LIVING AT the beach this summer?
Need a great summer job? If so, call .
Tuition Painters at 757-2623 or 1-
800-393-4521 and ask for Robert
Chesson or Ben Morris. Includes in-
door and outdoor painting in Kill
Devil Hills, Nags Head area with
great pay all while enjoying NC's
beach scenery.
1EARNT0 .
SKYDIVE!
CUIIHUSKYSNITS
(919)496-2224
HELP WANTED
COUNSELORS NEEDED for a
Christian, co-ed residential camp on
Kerr Lake for ages 7 - 16. Contact
Phillip at 919-789-9631 or e-mail:
plpoplinCbellsouth.net
CHILD CARE giver needed in my
home 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Prefer Tues-
days if possible. Must have own
transportation. Call 752-2723 or 356-
1311.
EASTERN CAROLINA'S finest
adult entertainment is now hiring.
Call for interview. Playmates. 252-
747-7686.
HIRING: WAITSTAFF and hoststaff
for new Italian restaurant. Positions
available immediately. Experience
preferred. Please apply in person.
Antonello's Italian Restaurant, 2601
East 10th Street.
CAMP STAFF: accept the challenge
and make a difference in the lives of
girls ages 6-17. Available positions in-
clude: lifeguards, business manager,
counselors, lead counselors, and
program director. Qualifications vary
by position. June to August resident
camp in Johnston County. Programs
include swimming, canoeing, horse-
back riding, arts and crafts, and out-
door skills. Contact Kate Hoppe at
Pines of Carolina Girl Scout Council,
919-782-3021 or 800-284-4475. EOE
WANTED: PAYING $6.50 an hour
plus bonuses for qualified telemar-
keters. No Friday or Saturday work.
Hours: 5:30-9 p.m. Monday-Thurs-
day, 4:30-8 p.m. Sunday. Apply in
person between 5-6 p.m. at Energy
Savers Windows & Siding, Inc
1806 Dickinson Ave Greenville, at
the side door.
CHILDCARE NEEDED for 7 year
old boy (June 1-August 13) Monday-
Thursday. Must have own transporta-
tion - prefer non-smoker. Please call
328-2009 before 2 p.m. or 355-7597
after 3 p.m.
WANTED: STUDENT for retail sales
approx. 30 hoursweek. Interior
design, carpet measuring experience
helpful. Call Debbie at 752-6616
M.W. or F between 10 a.m2 p.m.
for appt.
HELP WANTED
CAMPPIXEWOOD
Summer Camp
COUNSELORS 8. INSTRUCTORS
for private Co-ed youth camp
located in the beautiful mountains of
Western North Carolina. Over 25
activities, including All sports, water
skiing, heated pod, tennis, art horse-
back, Gotals. 615 to 816earn
$1350-$1750 plus room, meals,
laundry S great fun! Non-smokers
calf for applicationbrochure:
800-832-5539 or e-mail
CPPinewood@aol.com anytime!
MOM COMING? Room available in
lovely private home close to cam-
pus. On-site parking. Walk to China
10 and Antonello's restaurants. No
smoking. No pets. 762-6644.
IDEAL RENTAL opportunity! Two
bedroom, one bath, large home one
block from campus. $500 per
month. Available in May. Leave mes-
sage at 353-5310. Neat and respon-
sible a must.
ROOMMATE WANTED
SUMMER ROOMMATE wanted
to share three bedroom apart-
ment near campus. Includes
washer and dryer and outdoor
pool access. 13 rant and utili-
ties. We're clean and friendly.
Call 782-8910.
SUMMER ROOMMATE wanted to
share 4 bedroom house 1 block
from campus. $168 a month 14
utilities. Own room with private full
bath. Call James � 762-9663.
FEMALE. SHARE three bedroom
home with two female students.
Campus three blocks. Prefer gradu-
ate student. Central air, ceiling fans,
washerdryer. $260 plus utilities.
(703) 680-1676.
Work Outdoors !
Want Honest, Reliable Students
Wdependable truckcar
TO MONITOR COTTON
(No experience necessary)
$7.00hr. mileage
mallfax resume
MCSI-Box 370
Cove City, NC 28523
Fax: 252-637-2125
(Nr. Greenville, New Bern, Kinston)
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$�i � � j , We Need TlmbcrLind boot
l�. A J 1 IJ m!lw�sJoodJ���.
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER TIMBERLAND
NAUTICA ABERCROMBIE
POLO EDDIE BAUER
AND OTHER NAME BRAND MEN'S CLOTHING
SHIRTS, PANTS, JEANS, SWEATS, JACKETS, SHOES, ETC.
WE ALSO BUY AND SELL:
GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also J Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TVs, VCRs, CD Players � Home, Portable
QUICK, EASY, HELPFUL
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
414 S. EVANS (UP THE STREET FROM CUBBIES)
752-3866
TUESDAY - SATURDAY, 9:00 - 5:00
(DRIVE TO THE BACK DOOR BEHIND PARK THEATRE)
ONE OF THE FAVORITE STUDENT STORES FOR YEARS
(IF YOU ARE SELLING, ID IS REQUIRED)
S i i i) i i Swap Shop
NEED A PART TIME JOB?
RPSINC.
Ii tooking for mxMi iwMiure to load wins and
unload trailers for the am shift noun 3:00jn) to Sam.
$7.S07houi; tuition assistance available after 30 days.
Kiture career opportunities In operations and manage-
ment possible. Applications can be tilled out at 2410
Untied Drive (near the aquatics cental Greenville
21 Countries in
EUROPE
� Round THp Fight
� 30-eODay
unllmrted fcrvol pel
� All travel costs vvhi
usingtherwtvuark
Euralinos passes available
separately from $249
(338)9097044
NEEDED! ATTRACTIVE girls for re-
gional TV commercial andor video
productions. Actressesmodels pre-
ferred but no experience required.
Call Action Video, 621-1760.
EXOTIC DANCERS $100O-$1500
weekly, no experience needed. 919-
580-7084. Sid's Showgirls, Gold-
sboro.
NEED RELIABLE, periodic care for
2 children. Must have own transpor-
tation. Call 752-2723.
HAVE FUN at the beach and earn
money too. Henry's, a sporting
goods distributor in Morehead City
may be your ticket to a productive
and enjoyable Summer. Work Mon-
day through Friday. 8 till 6 in tee
shirts and shorts and still have the
weekend to. er. study for Fall! Call
Hubert Talley at 800-545-5654 ext.
5289 today.
SOCCER COACH needed for 86
Greenville Stars Fall season. 2 to 3
practicesweek. Saturday games,
some out of town. Salary based on
experience. Call 355-1597 or 792-
3327.
POOL MANAGERS and lifeguards.
Summer. Greenville, Goldsboro. Wit-
son, Rocky Mount, Atlantic Beach,
Raleigh. Cary. Chapel Hill. LGT train-
ingoffcredIJc)3V
LIFEGUARDS NEEDED for Farrrt-
ville Public Swimming Pool. Please
contact Fred Sauls at 753-7020. We
will try to let you work around your
school schedule. EOE
A FEMALE executive with a local
company is seeking an individual to
help with childrens' needs. Children
are 10 and 14. so your own transpor-
tation is needed. Part-time during
school, full-time this summer. Experi-
ence working with children needed,
and references. If interested, please
contact Denise Keel at 752-2111 ext.
297. Potential candidates will be in-
terviewed. Resumes can be faxed to
752-4217.
LIFEGUARDS AND swim instruc-
tors needed in Greenville. Call 355-
5009 or 756-2667.
BW-3. Apt. above BW-3, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 12 baths. Call 523-5360,
526-6930 or 252-240-1194.
NEED A part-time person to work in
a professional office serving as re-
ceptionist for a couple of hours a day
as well as being an assistant to oth-
er personnel in the office. Must en-
joy working with the public and be
easy-going since this is the overall
office atmosphere. Hours are 11:30
to 6:00 Monday through Friday, and
more during the summer, if needed.
Also, position may extend into the
fall, approximately 11:30 to 5 Mon-
day through Friday. Please contact
Polly Piland O 756-8886.
NANNY WANTED for four children
- ages 6 to 12 over Summer. Respon-
sibilities include driving. Previous ex-
perience and references required.
Call Janice. 355-1597.
OTHER
BE SLIM and trim in time to swim
100 natural. Doctor approved. 1
in Europe! Call 757-2292. Free sam-
ples. Limited time offer.
THIS YEAR A
LOT OF COLLEGE
SENIORS WILL
BE GRADUATING
INTO DEBT.
Under the Army's
Loan Repayment
program, you could get
out from under with a
three-year enlistment.
Each year you serve
on active duty reduces
your indebtedness by
one-third or $1,500,
whichever amount is
greater, up to a $65,000
limit The offer applies
to Perkins Loans,
Stafford Loans, and cer-
tain other federally
insured loans, which are
not in default And debt
relief is just one of the
many benefits you'll earn
from the Army. Ask your
Army Recruiter.
ARMY.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE:
www.goarmy.com
252-756-9695
PERSONALS
THE CARD Post Report 323 Defi-
nite Inn. Received via certified mail
ECU'S Vice Chancellor of Academic
Affairs 6 Finance's "appeal hear-
ing's decision that "ban remains in
full force and effect At hearing I
address that prior to the issuing of
"warning" of "warning of trespass
had asked (one present at hearing)
"Is there any question of the sound-
ness of my mind in addressing these'
matters?" That person's response
was "Do not recall Of matters left
unaddressed at hearing (decision to
end hearing was Vice Chancellor's)
one is duration of ban. Issuing offic-
er wrote 'indef A 'warning of tres-
pass' is valid for one year. Informa-
tion that one can appeal decision to
superior court was absent from
Vice Chancellor's decision letter.
Prosper 'n Live Long, Tom Drew
PERSONALS
SVFR WOULD like to show their ap-
preciation to their dedicated volun-
teers at the REAL Crisis Center.
Thank you for all your hard work and
the compassion you show to the
center and our community: Sara
Aderhold, Megan Ayers, Suzanne
Brown, Amanda Canady, Tara Chad-
wick, Nicole Cox. Felichia Davis. Lau-
ra Ann Flick. Christine Harrington.
Bobby Heath. Adrea Heath. Mandy
Johnson. Paayal Mehta. Carly Mel-
lon, Christy Pearson. Mary Pollock.
Adeea Rogers, Christy Rothenberger.
Jennifer Shields. Renee Smith. Ellen
Stephenson. Steve Sumeracki. San-
dy Traynor. Jennifer VanAllen. Jonni
Wainwright. Sally Welker. Gina
West. Amy Whitley. Crystal Wilder.
Michael Walsh. Becky Charny. Ches-
sica Hodges. Shellie Harris, Crystal
McMillion, Jennifer Beat. Katharine
Padin. Brandon Huss.
ADVERTISE IN
THE CLASSIFIEDS.
IT WORKS!
GREEK PERSONALS
THANKS, TRACY Edwards, for
making Founder's Day Tea a suc-
cess. You did a great job! Love, your
Alpha Xi Delta sisters
CONGRATULATIONS TO Sigma Pi
on winning first place in All Sing.
Thanks. Kristi Dixon. for all of your
hard work. Love. Alpha Xi Delta
EPSILON SIGMA Alpha - congratu-
lations to the newly executive board!
We know you'll do a great job next
year. We love you guys!
CONGRATS, MELISSA Foshaw. on
your Delta Chi lavalier to Mike! We're
so happy for you! Love, your Zeta Tau
Alpha sisters
THANKS TO All our dates on Satur-
day! We had a blast! Love, Zeta Tau
Alpha
PI KAPPA Alpha would like to thank
all for coming to Greek Goddess '99
and Breakfast Club with Kappa Al-
pha. Congrats to Shana Maxon, Lisa
O'Conner, Shanna Moore.
SARAH MCCONNELL and Marie
Davis, thank you both so much for
your hard work on Greek Week and
the Alumni Picnic! Love, your Zeta
Tau Alpha sisters
THE THETA Alpha Chapter of Alpha
Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. would like
to invite the East Carolina student
body to Alpha Kappa Alpha Week.
Monday: April 27, 1999: Jolly Ranch-
er Yard Activity (10a.m1p.m.) "Al-
pha Kappa Alpha's Spring Cleaning
Clothing Drive" (7:45p.m9) Tues-
day: April 27: "Alpha Kappa Alpha's
Man of the New Millennium" Pag-
eant � 8p.m. MSC room 244. Wed-
nesday: April 28: "Breast Cancer
Awareness" Program @ 8p.m. Stay
Tuned for more
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ROCKY MOUNT Police Department
Special Olympic Torch Run Golf Tour-
nament at Maccripine Country Club
near Pinetops May 20 at 1 p.m.
$120 per team, Superball format.
Contact Sgt. Sikes 252-972-1425 or
Cpt. Wells 252-972-1485.
PASTOR JAMES D. Corbett of
Community Christian Church will be
ministering at a Rebuilder's Fellow-
ship on Friday, April 23 at 7:30 p.m.
The program provides an avenue for
the divorced, separated or widowed
to rebuild their lives centered around
the Word of God. The fellowship will
be held at Community Christian Aca-
demy, located at 2009 Pactolus
Road in Greenville. 551-9143
THE THETA Alpha Chapter of Alpha
Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. would like
to invite the East Carolina student
body to the remainder of Alpha Kap-
pa Alpha Week: Thursday, April 29
"Bake Sale 9 Barefoot on the Mall"
Mendenhall Student Center lawn
(10a.m2p.m.) Friday, April 30 "Sis-
terly Relations" TBA. Saturday May 1
Party MSC Social room (10p.m
2a.m.)
APPAREL MERCHANDISING Tex-
tile Organization members, our last
meeting will be held on April 29.
This day we will also be doing elec-
tions for new officers. We look for
ward to seeing you there!
APRIL CONTRA Dancel (Last dance
of the year). Music by Bill and Libby
Hicks: caller: Brian Hayes. Willis
Bldg. (comer of 1st and Reade Sts.)
Free beginner lesson 7p.m dance,
7:30-10:30. Students $3; others $6
or $6. Come alone or bring a friend.
Sponsors: ECU Folk 6 Country Danc-
ers. 328-0237





;��� � � Wgm
������fl
Arts & Entertainment Magazine of The East Carolini
Thursday, April 22,1999
. i- -r -����-ii-i-i- - i����.��������.���.����.��.�������������
Lee Howard
StaffWriter
Upon entering the Vtfellington B. Gray Gallery in the Jenkins Building to
witness the graduate thesis exhibition, you'll notice a boundary which
separates the left side of the gallery from the right This segregated
appearance is created by temporary walls which conceal the contents of
all but the front section of the left side. The exposed work on the left is
primarily three-dimensional sculpture.
All the work on the right side is two-dimensional textile and collage
work. The textile display, which is the effort of Joyce Joines Newman, is
full of color and pattern while the sculptural works, that of Jonathan
Bowling, reflect muted earth tones and reveal high-profile, textured sur-
faces.
Each body of work is more distinct than similar from its neighbor.
However, Bowling's Director of Thesis Committee, Carl Billingsley posit -
ed,There is an especially good relationship between the work of the two
exhibiting artists, Joyce Newman and Jonathan Bowling, in terms of
their themes and imagery and it's interesting to see the parallels that
can exist between a sculptor and a fiber (textile) artist"
Both artists hail from Appalachia; associations with a rural, pastoral
See Shed continued on page 6
Shed
The thesis exhibit explores a changing landscape
���������������������������
UULUTITOViTiIViTi WWi
Tom Petty's
Echo belongs in
your CD
changer
CD Review
"Blast From the
Past" not a
stretch for
Frasier
Movie Review
What, exactly,
does "O.G
mean?
Find out
m
Video Review
Beware the
Phair: her stage
performances
are notorious,
but tun
yivskk.
fountainhead � 2nd Floor Student Publications Building Greenville, NC 27858 � Phone 328-6366 � Fax 328-6558 � Advertising 328-2000 �www.fountainhead.ecu.edu





CD Review
Tom Petts still got it
Ryan Kennemur
Butcher, baker, candlestick maker
S3
Tom Petty
Echo
Hey man you know that guy? The
one that's been rocking and rolling
for over twenty years? Cmonyou
gotta know him! Real gawky look-
ing, with blonde hair? Hesangthat
song "Last Dance With Mary Jane"
and had die "allegedly dead" Kim
Basinger in the video. Remember
himnow? Of course you do! Why
dolask? He has a new album out.
How is it, you ask? Have a seat and
I'll tell you.
The new album Echo marks the
twelfth release by 70s rockers Tom
Petty and the Heart breakers, and it's
right on time. Petty, the man who
brought us such gems as "The
Waiting"and"Free Fallinis per-
haps the only rock and roll star with
the staying power to be considered
fiesh after twenty-three years in the
business. Don't even think about
mentioning Aerosmith; they haven't
sounded cool since the late '80s,
what with their focus on the power
ballad since their last good album,
Pump. Sorry about that, get a little
upset when awesome bands get old
and don't have what it takes to play
rock-and-roll music anymore.
That aside, Echo picks up where the
last album, the "She's The One"
soundtrack, left off. The disk found
Petty and Co. doing some of their
finest work to date, using a good mix
of sweet acoustic ditties and stone
cold rockers. So does Echo. The first
songRoom at the Top starts off as
a typical slow ballad, with Petty's
Dylan-esque drawl professing got
a room at the top of the world
tonight, and I ain't coming down
Then, through a miracle of the mix-
ing board, the tune jumps into
crunchin' guitar-mode and stays that
way through the chorus, only to end
up right where it started, drifting
lazily down that river in your head.
A couple songs later comes "Free Girl
Now a flat-out blaster of a song and
probably the best one on the entire
album. If this one doesn't get your
foot tapping, then you don't deserve
the privilege of feet. It's a song about
a girl that has gotten out of a rela-
tionship and now realizes that the
world is her oyster, so to speak.
Lyrics like, "Hey babyyou're a ftee
girl now" pretty much sum up the
record, if not Petty's entire career.
Bear with me here.
In the song "Billy the Kida man
falls down hard, but he still manages
to get up again. All of Petty's songs
have characters that are willing to
push until it gives, and punch until it
breaks. That's what his music has
always done, and I for one admire
him for sticking to his guns.
That said, there are even more
exceptional songs that make up this
great album. Though there are plen-
ty here, the one that screams "hit
See CD REVIEW, continued on page 6
�Mi�I�q lnilTltbTiiiliiiiii
Amy L.Royster Editor in Chief
Amanda G.Austin Managing Editor
Mkoh Smith Editor
CalebRose Assistant Editor
SttphancWNtkxfcO
Russ Blackburn Layout
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2 Thursday, April 22,1999
Vkfco Review
fm gonna git you sucka!
Patrick McMahon
StaffWritcr
Keerun Ivory Wsywi ttirectud
this od� to di ghetto
As I walked the aisles of the
esteemed video rental establishment
that I'll call "Update Video" looking
for just the right title to review, the
idea came to me that maybe I have
wasted my time as well as yours
writing about such frivolous movies
as "Goodfellas� no wait a minute,
"Goodfellas" was kick ass� okay I
got it "UHFrYeahUHFf that movie
was rather pointless now wasn't it?
Anyway, I thought I would review a
movie that was a true art classic, one
that inspired the world such as
"Saving Private Ryan" or
"Casablanca
The difficult decision as to what title
would enlighten you readers the
most came down to three titles: the
tear jerker "Ski School 2 the always
meaningful and insightful "Bikini
Carwash Company and the social
awareness film "I'm Gonna Get You
Sucka
So with these three films conies the
biggest decision I had to make since
I had to decide whether or not pick
the yellow food or the gray food
while eating at Mendenhell, er,
MendenhaLL Will it be the smooth
Aspen slopes? Or maybe the smooth
and supple bre urn, car washes? Or
the long shot candidate "I'm Gonna
Get You Sucka?" When it all came
down to it I chose the heart-wrench-
ing Keenan Ivory Wayans classic "I'm
Gonna Get You Sucka
This gritty urban saga depicts the
horrific inner city exploits of an evil
crime syndicate headed by the ever-
frightening Mr. Big, who kidnaps the
girlfriend of hero Jack Spade (played
by Wayans) and starts a street war
between the gang and the good of
booty-shaking, female-loving Afro-
con Ameri-con supa heroes like
Rung Fu )oe, Flyguy, Hammer (as in
See Sucka. continued on page 3
Its Your Place
To Catch A Free Fitch
APRIL 22-24 AT 8 P.M AND APRIL 25 AT 3
P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Saving Private Ryan (R) In the midst of World War
II, it is found that three casualties are brothers, and
there are in fact four brothers, and one is still alive
deep in enemy territory. A mission is deployed to
find Private James Ryan and send him home. You
and a guest gat in free when you present your valid
ECU One Card.
72? Jam Out
APRIL 24 AT 10 P.M. AT FLETCHER OUTDOOR
AMPHITHEATER
On Saturday, April 24, the Pirate Underground will
present live music in the Fletcher Outdoor
Amphitheater. Two hot local bands. Mordecai, an
alternative rock band, and Deep Fuzz, a heavy metal
juggernaut, will perform. Best of all, its free!
lb Enjoy A Good Laugh
WEDNESDAY. APRIL 28 AT 8 P.M. IN HENDRIX
THEATRE
Celebrity (ft) Woody Allen's 1998 satiric comedy is
a cinematic view of a celebrity-obsessed society,
endlessly fascinated with celebrity actors, super-
models, weathermen, preachers, victims, or anyone
on the cover of a tabloid. You and a guest get in free
when you present your valid ECU One Card.
To Get Work Done
When you have a state-of-the-art facility at your fin-
gertips, you can't help but get your work done!
Located on the ground floor, the computer lab at
Mendenhall features Pentium-based computers.
Power Macs, and color and laser printers. There is
also an assistant on hand waiting to help you.
To Go Barefoot
THURSDAY, APRIL 29. ON THE MALL FROM
12-6 P.M.
Come celebrate the twentieth anniversary of ECU's
Barefoot On The Mall with Battle of the Bands win-
ner Manderico. a high-energy Hispanic band, along
with Lost Boyz, a hip-hop group out of New York.
Far Too Jones, a regular in the Greenville area will
also play, as will Groovelilly, a rock-and-roll violinist
who has won major awards already.
To Hear Jazz
8 P.M. FRIDAY, APRIL 30 AND SATURDAY
MAY 1 IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
Jazz up your spirits with swing music played the
way it's supposed to be played at the Emerald City
Jazz Festival. Proudly presented by the ECU Student
Union and ECU School of Music are the ECU Jazz
Ensemble with special guest Bob Mintzer on April
30 and The Yellow Jackets on May 1. Tickets for
this hip show are on sale now at the Central Ticket
Office, so get yours earlyl
u
MSC Hours: MonThurs 8 a.mll p.m Fri 8 a.mMidnight; Sat Noon-Midnight; Sun Ml p.m.






Phair to blast Wright Auditorium
Lee Howard
StaffWriter
Hey, have you heard the song
"Polyester Bride" or "Uncle Alvarez"
played on WZMB? If you didn't
know who it was then you owe it to
yourself to be informed. The artist is
Liz Phair and she is coming to
Wright Auditorium on Monday, April
26.
Phair is on the road in support of
her latest disc,
Whitechocolatespaceegg. An Evening
With Liz Phair is a good ticket item
and well worth the expense. Wright
( Auditorium will prove to be an
excellent venue for this event.
"I consider it to be an intimate con-
cert and a gateway to ushering in
new, quality entertainment for ECU
said Patrick Edwards, chairperson of
the Student Union Popular
Entertainment Committee.
For those who aren't aware of who
Liz Phair is, she entered the indie
rockscenein'93witha full-length
disc, Exile in Guyville, on Matador
Records. She quickly achieved noto-
riety as an "incendiary impudent"
and "bawdy" singersongwriter due
to the candor of her lyrics. As a new
addition to the growing contribu-
tions of "women in rock Phair's
voice has couched women's issues
rather than cater to the desires of a
male-dominated music scene.
While ribaldry yd brashness are
nothing new to rock lyricists, the
impact appears to be greater when
the artist is female. Using the ideolo-
gy of rock music as a platform for
rebellion, she pushes her own agen-
Tetyoor Uj P1h� Hetott � Mm" CD Alty � Em Coal Video.
da.
Many critics have credited her for
influencing other contemporary
women musicians.
Musically, Phair's early up-tempo
compositions have a janglely, pop-
like sound reminiscent of the 60's
and 70's.fervet Underground influ-
ence is evident. A number of her
songs have a folk rock sound and
she used this style occasionally on
her next two releases, whip-smart
andjuvenilia.
Phair plays guitar and piano, writes
most of her music and all of her
lyrics. Chorus seems to be her guitar
effect of choice and her riffs are typi-
cally rhythm-oriented. She provides
lullaby melodies with her voice,
which nicely compliments her
rhythms and provides an ironic con-
trast to her "biting" lyrics. In addi-
tion to using piano within rock
arrangements, she has written some
ballads with piano accompaniment,
which appear sparsely throughout
her entire opus.
After the 1995 release of juvenilia,
Phair took a three year hiatus from
the music scene before the release of
whitechocolatespaceegg in 1998. In
addition to some recording during
the intervening years, she got mar-
ried and gave birth to a baby boy.
These experiences have definitely
affected her songwriting, and they
show up in her lyrics.
In her earlier work she seems to be
fixated on the pleasurepain aspects
of girlfriendboyfriend relationships.
The most recent songs deal not only
with this type relationship, but also
with ambiguous nature of other
relationships like friends, spouse,
parentchild and extended family.
On the new disc she expresses a
maturity that seems evident not
only lyrically, but musically as welL
The instrumentation is more diverse
and the production quality is more
polished than before. The lean
sound of her early basement tape
compositions has filled out to a rich,
full, high production sound.
Tickets are on sale at the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall, CD
Alley, and East Coast Music & Video.
Ticket prices are: $18 for students,
$22 for the general public, and $25 at
the door. See you there!
Movie Review
Frasier's still out of his element
Ryan Kennemur
Walken Historian
What would you do if you had
locked your family away in a bomb
shelter for years and years to protect
them from the cold war, and all of a
sudden (35 years later) your son says
he wants to go see the world? "Blast
From the Past the new comedy with
Brendan Frasier and Alicia
Silverstone, is based on that ques-
tion.
During the Cold War, Cahrin and
Helen Webber (Christopher Walken
and Sissy Spacek) are looked upon
as total goof balls by all their neigh-
bors. Then again, they did make an
underground bomb shelter in their
backyard that is an exact replica of
their above-ground house. One day,
President Kennedy comes on televi-
sion and tells the world that he is
going to try to put a stop to the
Cuban Missile Crisis, so Calvin
decides that he and his pregnant
-Btoil From e Ptst" in d�t� mow touH
wife should go spend some time in
the shelter, just in case.
The lacker is, on the same day they
decide to go underground, an air-
plane falls from the sky and hits
their home just above the shelter,
causing the submerged couple to
believe that nuclear winter has
begun. So Calvin decides to seal the
shelter and not come out for 35
years, the time at which he believes
the Earth will be habitable again.
During this time, the couple has a
bouncing baby boy named Adam,
played by George of the Jungle him-
self. They raise him just as if they
were still in the 60s, and so Adam
comes out of the shelter more than a
little bit bass-ackwards.
Adam comes to the surface totally
unprepared for the trip he is about to
embark on, which in essence is the
search for true love. Eve (Alicia
Silverstone) is hired to took after him
and teach him the ways of the world.
Along the way, she becomes
enchanted by his childlike inno-
cence, not to mention the fact that he
already knows how to do the newest
craze, swing dancing. Of course.the
two fall in love.yada yada yada.
Don't get the idea that this isn't
worth seeing. For once, there's an
out-of-the-ordinary plot featured in
what would otherwise be a garden
variety romantic comedy.
And at least we know that the actors
are capable of getting the job done,
especially Brendan Frasier. This is
his third "fish out of water" movie he
See BLAST, continued on page 6
Sucka continued from page 2
Isaac Hayes, not the broke-ass rapper)
and a modey crew of other fools who
have no clue as to what the hell is
going on around them, but who fight
the syndicate anyway.
Spade is also fighting a personal side
bank against Mr. Big because he feels
that Big is responsible for the death of
his brother by "QG (as in"over-gold-
ed"himself to death). As the movie
progresses, you really get the feel for
the desolate world which Mr. Big con-
trols: the drugs, the hos and the guns,
all of which are portrayed in a realistic
fashion.
I mean, I had no due that a pimp-
slappin' ho bag can jump out of a
tenth floor window and bounce up to
her feet without a scratch because her
chest is so ample. Go figure.
The story comes together when
Spade, Slade, Pimp G Daddy-Mack
Mack-Daddy, or whatever the hell his
name is, all shoot it out with the forces
of Mr. Big's army of crack heads and
. I won't tell you how it ends because
you really have to see it for yourself. It
nearly brought me to tears. This per-
sonal, inspirational story of inner city
life will have all of you in stitches
from cutting yourself on the door
while running away from this God-
awful movie. Rated "R" for ridiculous.
Swing for charity, win a prize
D. Miccah Smith
Pcnmttmhtad Editor
Calling all swingers: if you're looking
for a chance to show off your best
moves, this Friday night's 1999 Swing
Dance Jubilee is the place to let it all
hangout
ECU'S Wesley Foundation and the East
Carolina Folk and Country Dancers
are sponsoring the dance and contest
for charity which starts at 7 p.m. in the
Willis Building on First Street
The Jubilee will feature free lessons
from 7 to 8 p.nt.a dance with a DJ
and a swing contest to be judged by a
panel of peers and professionals with
prizes for the coolest cats on the floor.
No partner is necessary, and every-
one is invited to enter, regardless of
experience level.
Beverages will be provided by Pepsi,
and prizes include dinner for two at
Ragazzi's and Applebee's and a large
pizza from Pizza Hut
Admission is $5 for non-students,
and $4 for students. All proceeds of
me dance will be donated to relief
efforts for Hurricane Mitch victims in
the Caribbean.
Ttind�Apri22.S99 3






April22
Backdoor The
AggravatorsBlattbox
Cat's Cradle Bare Jr.
The Cellar-Karaoke
9:00-close
Chef's 505-Arvid Ray
Munson
McGinnis Theatre-
East Carolina
Playhouse presents
"Hot 1 Baltimore" (8:00
PM)
Mendenhall Movies
"Saving Private Ryan"
Peasant's Cafe-Rosco
Sports PadSplash-
Karaoke 10:00-close
Stacatto-PaulTardif
AprU23
AJ. Fletcher Recital
Hall-ECU Saxophone
ensembles (8:00 PM)
Backdoor
The Stations The
Spazms Ray Grades
7 Ton DieselKuttphat.
Tix $10 for all week-
end. Call (919) 942-
1995 for more info.
����������������������
Weekly Events &
V Yrtiir rnmnlpfp auiHf to linrnminp events in G
Your complete guide to upcoming events in G
Cars Cradle-PatMcGhee
Cellar-Karaoke 9-close
Chapel Hill-Carolina
NORML presents the
5th Annual Greenfest
featuring Hipbone
Jennyanykind
StarpointGrasshopper
Highway. Tix$10for all
weekend. Call (919)
942-1995 for more
information.
Chefs 505-Arvid Ray
Munson
Hard Times-Desert
Moon
Marshall Park
(uptown Charlotte)-70
bands, 5 stages, 160
Fine Artists in uptown
Charlotte including
Hootie and the
BlowfishWidespread
PanicEverdearAgents
of Good Roots and
moreCall
Ticketmaster (704-522-
6500) or visit online
McGinnis Theatre-
East Carolina Playhouse
presents "Hot 1
Peasant's Cafe-Agents
of Good Roots
Son II Studio-Line
Dancing
Sports PadSplash-
Karaoke 10:00-dose
Willis Building 1999
Swing Dance Jubilee
(lessons start at 7:00
pm, dance starts at
8:00.)
Mendenhall Movies
"Saving Private Ryan"
Saturday
AprU24
Backdoor -Sacade
Burned BlackLegend
of the OverfiendMad
Girl's
LovesongClubhouse
The Episode
Big Jake's Bar-
Karaoke and open
mic
CafsCradle-The
Blue Rags
Cellar-Karaoke 9:00-
dose
Chapel Hill-Carolina
NORML presents the
5th Annual Greenfest
featuring
HipboneJennyanykin
dStarpointGrasshop
per Highway.
��������
�������������������������������������������
Tix $10 for all week-
end. Call (919) 942-
1995 for more infor-
mation.
Chefs 505-Arvid Ray
Munson
Hard Times-Desert
Moon
Marshall Park
(uptown Charlotte)-
70 bands, 5 stages,
160 Fine Artists in
uptown Charlotte
induding Hootie and
the
BlowfishWidespread
PanicEverdearAgent
s of Good Roots and
moreCall
Ticketmaster (704-
522-6500) or visit
online
McGinnis Theatre-
East Carolina
Playhouse presents
"Hot 1 Baltimore"
(8:00 PM)
Mendenhall Movies
"Saving Private Ryan"
Peasant's Cafe-
Quiver
Son II Studio-Sound
of Country
Wright Auditorium-
Combined Choirs:
Chamber Singers,
Concert Choir, and
University Chorale
and the North
Carolina Symphony
(8:00 PM)
Sunday
AprU25
Chapel Hill-Carolina
NORML presents the
5th Annual Greenfest
featuring
HipboneJennyanykin
dStarpointGrasshop
per Highway. Tix $10
for all weekend. Call
(919) 942-1995 for
more information.
Marshall Park
(uptown Charlotte)-
70 bands, 5 stages,
160 Fine Artists in
uptown Charlotte
induding Hootie and
the
BlowfishWidespread
PanicEverclearAgent
s of Good Roots and
moreCall
Ticketmaster (704-
522-6500) or visit
online
McGinnis Theatre-
East Carolina
Playhouse presents
"Hot 1 Baltimore"
(2:00 PM)
Mendenhall Movies
"Saving Private Ryan"
Peasant's Cafe-Open
Mic Night
April26
AJ. Fletcher Recital
Hall-Jazz Bones (8:00
4 Ihurafe April 2J� 899
IrrffljjiliWmtfiJifiii
'aj��ili
.
. i �. -ifr-InfiiiiKiiiiiiriliiiri,iattf'iihratttiiM
. .






& ilendar
events in G Greenville and surrounding areas
nday
ill-Carolina
presents the
al Greenfest
Jennyanykin
ntGrasshop
vay.Tix$10
;kend.Call
-1995 for
rmation.
Park
Zharlotte)-
5 stages,
Artists in
harlotte
Hootie and
Widespread
rclearAgent
Roots and
II
ster(704-
) or visit
sTheatre-
lina
! presents
timore"
I
tall Movies
rivate Ryan"
Cafe-Open
nday
ier Recital
Bones (8:00
PM)
McGinnis Theatre-
East Carolina
Playhouse presents
"Hot 1 Baltimore" (8:00
PM)
Wright Auditorium
ECU Popular
Entertainment
Committee presents
"An Evening with Liz
Phair"
April27
A Matter of Taste
Live Blues
Boli's-lieeHuggers
McGinnis Theatre-
East Carolina
Playhouse presents
"Hot 1 Baltimore" (8:00
PM)
Peasant's Cafe
(Mugnite): Once Hush
with Dear America
Wednesday
April 28
The Attic-Comedy
Zone
Hard Times
Shaggin,mixat6w
Steve Hardy's
Original Beach Party
featuring The Shakers
Mendenhall
MoviesCelebrity"
Sports PadSplash-
Karaoke 10:00-dose
For More Information
The Attic
Greenville, NC 752-7303
Backdoor
Greenville, NC 752-7049
The Beef Barn
Greenville, NC 756-1161
Big lake's Bar
Williamston.NC 799-0022
BW-3
Greenville, NC 758-9191
Cat's Cradle
Carrboro, NC
(252) 967-9053
The Cellar
Greenville, NC 752-4668
Chef's 505
Greenville, NC 355-7505
The Corner
Greenville, NC 329-8050
The Courtyard Tavern
Greenville, NC 321-0202
Deadwood
Greenville, NC 792-8938
The Elbo
Greenville, NC 758-4591
Hard Times
Greenville, NC 758-9922
On-Campus Activities
328-6004
Pantana Bob's
Greenville, NC 757-3778
Peasant's Cafe
Greenville, NC 752-5855
Sports PadSplash
Greenville, NC 757-3658
Son II Studio
Greenville, NC 830-5279
Southern Nites Nightclub
946-5785
Texas 2 Step
Greenville, NC 752-3600
Underwater Cafe
Greenville, NC 754-2207
Wrong Way Corrigan's
Greenville, NC 758-3114
lIIHl
Preview
Liz Phair
Wright Auditorium
Monday, April 26
One of modern rock's most cher-
ished artists, credited with every-
thing from AJanis Morissette to my
love life, Liz Phair takes on Wright
Auditorium on the 26th. After
releasing three albums including the
critically praised debut "Exile in
(iuyville"and 1994's half-million-
selling "Whip-Smart Liz will have
an arsenal of music to play, most of
it coming from her third and latest
effort "Whitechocolatespaceegg
which is at once her most interesting
and assured record.
What to expect a man-hating
aggressive womyn with a guitar in a
mad riff rage.
Agents of Good
Roots
Peasant's Cafe
Friday, April 23
Although Agents of Good Roots are
no stranger to Greenville, each show
they perform is quite memorable.
Where else can you be witness to a
group of the purest white boys play-
ing the most soulful rock-n-roll on
this side of the tracks? I'll tell ya
where
What to expect A white Barry
White style singer with as much hot
buttered soul as Issac Hayes.

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TrusrJay,Apri22,B99 5






ODDITIES
BIRMINGHAM, England (AP) A cou-
ple who married after winning a
blind-date radio competition have
announced they are splitting up less
than three months after tying the
knot.
The Church of England demanded
Wednesday that the radio station apol-
ogize to the couple, who met for the
first time at the altar Jan. 25 after a
team of relationship counselors and
astrologers matched them in what sta-
tion BRMB called a "social experi-
ment
Greg Cordell, 28, and Car la Germaine,
23, blamed intrusions from the news
media for their problems, saying it
had put the relationship under
unbearable pressure. A film crew and
newspaper reporter accompanied
them on their free honeymoon in the
Bahamas.
Besides the wedding and honey-
moon, the salesman and the model
won the use of a sports car and a lux-
ury apartment in this central England
city for a year if they stayed together.
The wedding sparked outrage among
church leaders, who contended it
reduced the sanctity of marriage to a
game show.
"BRMB put temptation in their way
and bear a major responsibility for
what has happened, including the
massive media interest which they
engineered said the Archdeacon of
Aston, John BartonI hope this other-
wise responsible radio station will
now have the courage and decency to
apologize to the couple and the public
for devaluing the institution of mar-
TILLY-LA-CAMPAGNE, France (AP)
Some wrongs burn in the memory for
years until they are finally put right
Hans Kupperfahrenberg traveled from
Germany to a tiny Normandy village
just to return a ham like the one he
stole from a French farmer during
World War II.
Making good on a 54-year-old
promise, the 75-year-old German war
veteran apologized Monday night to
Louise Marie, now 87, saying he was
starving when he stole her ham in the
summer of 1944.
In a ceremony at the town hall of
Tilly-la-Campagne, population 70,
Kupperfahrenberg delivered two hams
� one German, one French � to
make amends for his wartime theft.
"It was war. We were retreating and we
hadn't eaten for several days
Kupperfahrenberg recalled. "It was
wrong to eat your ham, but in the situ-
ation, I felt no remorse. My hunger
was too great, and the hope of finding
food too slim
It was July 1944, only a month after
Allied troops landed on the beaches of
Normandy.
Kupperfahrenberg said Marie had
given him and other soldiers from the
21st armored division some eggs for
an omelette. While he was cooking
them in the fireplace, a ham hidden
high in the chimney crashed down
into the pan.
"We had stashed it there so no one
would steal it Marie said.
Kupperfahrenberg said he'd always
promised himself he would one day
make up for robbing the generous
Frenchwoman.
He returned to Tilly for the first time
last summer, but wasn't able to locate
Marie's farmhouse. Instead, he pre-
sented a ham to the residents of an old
age home.
Marie read about him in the local
paper and contacted officials who
tracked him down at his home in
Essen, Germany.
TEC has teamed up
wilh Barnes and Noble
to bring book reviews to
Wednesday's rbuntainhead
in our new program
easti
mian
Ron.ils McDonald Hr
We arc looking far fallow bock Iovits to mad and review best sellers far
a gmd cause. Each Semester wo will donate these best sellers In the
Honakl McDonald House where they will be available far the family
members of terminally ill children lo read.
If you would like lo write a review pkasc call Mkxah at 328-6386
6 Thursday. Api 22,1999
Shed continued from page 1
heritage are established by the exhibi-
tion's title "Red Shed A sculpture by
the same name is the first construc-
tion to greet you as you begin your
perusal of the art.
While navigating your way through
the gallery, understand that Bowling's
installations are meant to be under-
stood as "house" and "yard in which
the shed rests in a state of decay.
Newman's work is intended to be read
chronologically from left to right like
a book.
Nostalgia is an effective tool use to
relate to the sculptures and wall reliefs
in the "house However, the objects
you encounter in the "yard" are prob-
ably best understood on a subcon-
scious leveL A surreal atmosphere
staged by the sculptures, lighting and
props shows up in Bowling's "Death of
the Family Farm which is a larger-
than-life-size sculpture depicting two
anthropomorphic, skeletal forms en
route a torturous journey. Death,
decay and pain are themes associated
with Bowling's extensive use of found
objects such as bones, syringes,
straight razors, rotting wood, a variety
of rusted steel tools and discarded
appliances. Death can be a strong
metaphor for change, and perhaps
Bowling's work is a statement about
our shift from an agrarian economy
to an industrial or information
exchange economy.
"Both their work seems to be about
the death of something said
Christine .oiler, director of Newman's
thesis committeeThere may be the
death of something in therethe
death of past identity
Newman sided with the idea that her
work was about change and "letting
go not death perse. She draws atten-
tion to societal codes used to establish
and perpetuate gender roles through
techniques associated with "woman-
hood" such as quilting and embroi-
dery. Other signifiers like paper dolls,
garment patterns and quotes from a
nineteenth-century text regarding the
conduct of women help the viewer
understand what she is "letting go
Another apparent common thread
between the two artists is in their
construction of a historical narrative.
These constructions are created with
found objects and manifest as assem-
blage, collage and installation.
However, Bowling's work frames the
viewer in the nostalgic moment and
Newman's work ushers the viewer
through the past and into the present.
The romantic melancholy and
entropy of Bowling's work is poetic in
effect and contrasts with Newman's
compositions which seem to deliver
the viewer through a point of trans-
figuration.
As an aside, Bowling has a number of
large scale, steel sculpture displayed
on the patio of the gallery, which can
be viewed at any time. Another grad-
uate candidate, Kevin Eichner, also
has a sculpture placed outside.
Eichner's "outside" installation of a
piece tided"We"can be found
between the Jenkins Building and
Jarvis Dormitory. The exhibition is on
display until May 1 and can be seen
Monday through Friday, 10 am. to 5
p.m or Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. On
Thursdays the gallery is open until 8
p.m.
flLW7continued from page 3
has done,counting"Encino Man" and
"George of the Jungle The whole
"guy taken out of his surroundings
becomes endearing to those around
him" is old hat for him.
And SUverstone actually brings to her
role something other than spoiled lit-
tle rich brat. Walken and Spacek are
passable, with not much to their roles
to speak of.
But the story isn't about them. The
whole idea here is that love is out
there, even if its been hidden under-
ground for three decades. This is a
great date film, and since its now play-
ing at the Buccaneer, its a cheap date,
to boot1
CD REVIEWatnmwA from page 2
single" is "Swingin This name-
dropping, harmonica-driven tune is
destined to be a classic. During the
background melody, he calls the
names of people who went down
swinginlike Sonny I.iston and
Sammy Davis Jr. Listen to "Stand
Accused of Love" and try telling me
that it wasn't originally on the "She's
the One" soundtrack. Go ahead I
dare you.
In the end, Petty and his band mates
have got themselves another gold
star to put on their homework. May
the good Lord see fit to let them
make another dozen alburns as good
as this one.





ARIES:
(March 21-April 20)
You have a tendency to keep a lot of
good things secret, especially your
accomplishments. Doing some
rather unfavorable chores for a loved
one will result in heartfelt gratitude.
You live in the present and bath
dwelling on the past. Don't whine.
TAURUS:
(April 21-May 21)
You seem to be able to handle just
about anything which may be
thrown your way in regards to sur-
prises. By putting a lot of faith in
those you love, it is a shock when
someone lets you down. Keep your
self-esteem intact and take time out
for yourself too.
GEMINI:
(May 22-June 21)
Ongoing relationships are a little
strained presently, and new ones are
somewhat dubious. Just wait it out
and things will improve soon.
Money is not important to you, but
you enjoy having enough so you can
do the things you want, without
counting the cost.
CANCER
(June22-Juh23)
Being quite a homebody, now would
be an excellent time to capitalize on
any inclinations you have in thai
direction. Your love life is quite
intense lately. It is especially exciting
that your loved one's emotional
intensity matches or even surpasses
your own.
LEO:
(July 24-August 23)
This week you need to capitalize on
your powers of persuasion and
emerge a winner in a business-
financial negotiation - as well as in
your love life. You seem to be happier
in a relationship than you are alone.
But since your standards are incredi-
bly high, expect a few dry spells.
VIRGO:
(August 24 - September 23)
Even at the best of times you have to
guard against a tendency to adopt a
negative attitude toward life in gen-
eral and romance in particular.
Whether you know it or not, you are
very capable of getting by on your
own. Being a fast thinker, you handle
sticky situations well.
LIBRA:
(September 24 - October 23)
You are very good at keeping secrets,
especially about how you feel about
others. Your love relationship may
not always be as harmonious as it
appears to others. Enjoying compan-
ionship and the sharing of ideas is
important, and you tend to focus on
the positive side of everything.
SCORPIO:
(October 24 - November 22)
Beneath your strong, independent
exterior lies a desire for a truly ful-
filling relationship. Resist in the
temptation to indulge in self-
destructive behavior if you become
unhappy. Emotional satisfaction can
also be found in renewing old
friendships.
SAGITTARIUS:
(November 23 - December 21)
Although you usually have a signifi-
cant other, you do much better on
your own. Independence is your
motto. Your real strength lies in your
ever present optimism. Learn to
value those worse moments of your
life and leam from them. You have a
natural athletic ability.
CAPRICORN:
(December 22 - January 20)
The inherent fatalism which seems
to follow you around may stifle any
positive attitudes needed for you to
get ahead Your strength lies in your
ability to move forward, so you need
to work on gaining control over your
negative thoughts. Being practical
and living in the real world are your
strong suits.
AQUARIUS:
(January 21 - February 19)
Feeling dependent on others is the
type of situation you steer dear of,
especially when it comes to any
emotional relationships. Since you
do quite alright on your own, avoid
hermit-like tendencies. Ybur com-
passionate nature will get you into
more trouble than its worth.
PISCES:
(February 20-March 20)
Verbalizing your feelings to a loved
one could be the best way to dear
the air, providing tact is used. You are
feeling quite attractive lately and that
feeling is communicated to everyone
else. You are in touch with the guid-
ing impulses of your nature and
enjoy expressing yourself.
IF THIS WEEK IS YOUR
BIRTHDAY: The main focus for
you right now is on work,
meeting your responsibilities
and health matters.
Relationships are important,
but you must stand on your
own two feet. Your yearly
income will start improving.
wewant
tocover
you
Did you sec news happen? Did you make news happen?
Do you belong between our covers? Call e�stf arotioiio at 328-6366.
Apply at the Student
publications Building
7Tnursday.Apnl22,1999





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Go to our If ll il II" illl1 IM on the calendar link.
Just below I'liyiiMKili 11 I niuaWirin 11 n event submission form.
Or if you want a Tii'uli y, tfl"1 II into y�ur browser.
Then just enter your event onto our camrius calendar.
It's just that easy. And it's one more free service of The East Carolinian.


Title
The East Carolinian, April 22, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 22, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1333
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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