The East Carolinian, April 8, 1999







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Thursday
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Have you filed your tax return yet?
www.tec.ecu.edu
Carolinian
Cats have been giving squirrels a run for
their money on campus lately.
See page 7.
THURSDAY APRIL 8.1999 VOLUME 74. ISSUE 38
Webster wins by
landslide withl,274
Amy Wagner
assistant news editor
The SGA election results came in
late Wednesday night to the high-
ly anticipating crowd of candi-
dates and supporters.
Cliff Webster won the uncon-
tended spot for president, John
Meriac won the scat of vice presi-
dent, Overton Harper was elected
treasurer and Jessica Dowdy was
elected to SGA secretary.
There are over 16,000 current-
ly enrolled students at ECU. Of
this number, only 1416 voted in the
elections Wednesday.
According to the SGA elections
committee, out of the total 1416,
Webster received 1274 of these
Election Results
Cliff Wefcster:
Vfce-pres
John Meriac:
Na'lm Akbar:
Tref surer Rac
Overton Harper:
Jason Evans:
Sec retary Rac
I Je
Shondell Jones:
votes in the election.
"I'm not only excited, but I'm
also proud to be SGA president to
serve and represent the over 17,000
students at ECU he said.
John Meriac received 885 votes
for the office
of vice presi-
dent, over
N a ' i m
Akbar, who
only
received 522.
" i: m
proud to be
the represen-
tative for
vice presi-
dent of your
student
body
Meriac said.
"I know we
were the
1274
885
522
191
509
best qualified candidates for the
job and I look forward to serving
the ECU student body to the best
of my ability
Overton Harper received 891
votes for the office of treasurer, and
Jason Evans only received 509.
"I'm glad experience pays off,
and I feel like it's an honor and a
privilege to represent the students
here, and I'm glad they have the
faith in us Harper said. "We hope
to work very hard and fulfill all
they're expecting
Last but not least, Jessica
Dowdy received 906 votes for the
office of secretary, over Shodell
Jones, who received 4.
"I'm very exited about the elec-
tion results Dowdy said. "I'm
glad our hard work paid off. I know
our whole routine will work to the
best of our ability to serve our cam-
pus well
IRS help
available
online
Computer assisted
returns
Lisa Stokes
news writer
It's April again, time to get out,
enjoy the sun, take in a baseball
game and pay your taxes!
April 15 is the deadline for filing
your income taxes and this year
the Internal Revenue Service
(IRS) is trying to make it easier for
you.
The IRS has taken the initia-
tive to implement a electronic fil-
ing program, a phone filing service
and a credit card and debit card
payment plan.
'The IRS is hoping to make
the entire electronic filing experi-
ence more convenient while
simultaneously trying to meet a
congressional mandate to increase
the number of electronically filed
forms said a statement on the
IRS web page.
The pilot programs were
launched from long-standing
SEE TAXES PAGE 2
Open house unites
with minority visitation
Spring Open House and
Minority Visitation Weekend will
kick off April 16-17, but this will be
a unique year. For the first time,
these events will be held in con-
junction with one another in order
to increase potential students'
exposure to university services.
"These two events were previ-
ously seen as two different open
houses and they are not said
Elola Moore, assistant director of
Undergraduate Admissions.
The reason for the merger of
the events into one weekend was
for convenience sake. It was felt
that incoming minority students
could benefit from the services
that Open House provided.
"The academic fair during the
spring) open house is outstanding.
I could not provide the same
opportunities for minority stu-
dents Moore said.
In past years, the Minority
Family Weekend occurred two to
three weeks previous to the spring
open house. Officially, the spring
open house is just Saturday, while
the minority weekend starts on
Friday.
"We'll see how it goes this time,
but I think that putting them
together will work well said
Velvet Reynolds, assistant director
of Undergraduate Admissions.
"We thought that combing the
SEE OPEN HOUSE PAGE 4
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Medical School to
air health updates
Channel 99 broadcasts
to be�n April IS
Terra Steinbeiser
staff writer
ECU'S Medical School recently
made an arrangement with
America's Health Network to begin
broadcasting its signal at designated
times daily on Multimedia Cable
Channel 99.
Channel 99 is owned and operat-
ed by the Center of Health
Sciences Communication (CHSC)
and is used to educate people about
current health issues as well as to
provide other information to the
local community. The Radio
Reading Service also uses this chan-
nel to provide the blind community
with readings of the top news sto-
ries.
Although broadcasting for
America's Health Network is not
scheduled to begin until April 15,
CHSC has been working on it for
some time.
"When I began here two years
ago, my bosses told me that we
owned Channel 99 and that we
needed to get more health-oriented
broadcasting on the air said Marc
Krein, CHSC TV Media Services
coordinator. "It's been a big project
since then
America's Health Network is a
24-hour cable-TV channel empha-
sizing medical and health aware-
ness.
"As far as I know, we're the only
one carrying the America's Health
Network signal in North Carolina
said Krein.
Some of America's Health
Network programs that Channel 99
will rebroadcast include "Ask the
"As far as I know, we're the
only one carrying the
Americas Health Network
signal in North Carolina
Marc Krein
CHSC TV Media Services Coordinator
Veterinarian "O.R Behind the
Mask which shows operations
from the view of the surgeon; "Ask
the Pediatrician "Women and
Children First which focuses on
women's health concerns; and "Ask
the Family Doctor
"This is really a great service to
the community said David Balch,
director of CHSC. "It's going to
help consumers rake more responsi-
bility for their own wellness and
increase health awareness in the
community





ThiEiit Ciro
2 THufUiy, Airtl 8, 1999
news
Tbi East Carolinian
news
briefs
Autopsy to be
performed on man who
fired on deputies
WASHINGTON, N.C. (AP) An
autopsy will be performed on a man
who allegedly fired at Beaufort
County sheriffs deputies Sunday
and was found dead near his home
a day later.
Deputies had tried to serve
involuntary commitment papers on
James Robert Bright, 46, when they
were fired upon, sheriff's investiga-
tors said. The deputies weren't
injured. Bright couldn't be located
after the shooting.
Store clerk kills
would-be robber
ASHEVILLE (AP) A man who
tried to rob a convenience store
was shot and killed by the store
clerk, police said.
Police said a man with a bandana
over his face walked into a Servco
gas station about 9:45 p.m. Sunday
and showed the clerk a large knife.
The man demanded money and
started to come around the counter,
said Police Capt. Ted Lambert. But
he was foiled by the manager on
duty, who pulled a large handgun
and shot the suspect in the stom-
ach.
11-year-old held in
death of infant cousin
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) An 11-
year-old giri who was baby-sitting
her 14-month-old cousin was
charged with murdering the boy
Monday.
A neighbor called authorities
after hearing screams from the
home. The boy, Joshua Parker,
went into cardiac arrest and died
later in a hospital.
Police said the girl hit the boy
several times. Coroner Frank
Barren said the boy had bruises
on his head and face and died
from internal bleeding.
The girl was ordered by a fam-
ily court judge to undergo a men-
tal evaluation.
Under state law, the girl can be
charged as an adult. If convicted,
she could be sentenced to life in
prison.
Spam e-mail policy to cut junk mail
Unwanted messages
clog, slow Exchange
Anisa Ghrairi
staff writer
The university has instituted a new
policy prohibiting the distribution
of unwanted spam e-mail.
Spam e-mail can' be any unwant-
ed messages, advertisements, chain
letters, broadcast announcements,
or any other message sent via e-mail
to a group of persons not requesting
the message unless the e-mail is for
official university business.
"This policy has been instituted
because it has become an annoy-
ance to not only students, but facul-
ty and staff as well said Blake
Price, director of Computing and
Information Systems in charge of
writing up the spam e-mail policy.
"The spam e-mail impacts the sys-
tems by causing them to slow down
e-mail
Many students believe that the
policy is a good idea if it is imple-
mented correctly. Sophomore Todd
Stewart is in favor of the policy.
"At one point someone sent out
a list to probably half the school,
and of course most people reply to
it, which immediately sends a for-
ward message to everyone on the
list and sometimes this can severely
clog up the systems he said.
Price agrees with Stewart about
this problem.
"When you get unwanted mes-
sages do not use the 'reply to all'
function to respond to the sender
he said. 'This will resend the mes-
sage to every address in the original
e-mail and only makes the problem
worse
Students have been complaining
about this for awhile as the spam e-
mail problem fluctuates.
"It is very frustrating when I
open my e-mail account and there
are a lot of nonsense messages that
have been sent to me that take up
space on my file said Alison
Lewis, junior. "I think the policy
will help because it will reduce the
amount of messages being sent to
one's e-mail account that just takes
up space
Mary Ellen Faulk, sophomore,
also thinks the policy is a good idea,
but sees a problem.
"Some people might be msjd
because they can not use fre
advertising on students e-mail any-
more she said.
Former seventh-grade
teacher pleads guilty
to Internet porn
charges
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) A former mid-
dle school teacher has admitted that
he received child pornography over
the Internet.
William Comicz, 32, of New
Paltz pleaded guilty Monday in
Federal Court in Albany to one
count of possessing child pornogra-
phy. In his plea, Comicz said
between September 1997 and
November 1997 he received several
pictures of minors engaged in sexu-
ally explicit acts.
Up to 76 dead in
Indonesian religious
riots
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP)
Outnumbered Indonesian security
forces fired Wednesday on thou-
sands of angry Borneo villagers,
who rioted to demand the release of
relatives jailed for earlier racial
fighting.
Witnesses claimed more than a
dozen people, mosdy indigenous
Malay and Dayak villagers, were �
killed in street battles outside of
Singkawang, a town near the west-
ern coast.
Earthquake rattles
central Turkey
SrVAS, Turkey (AP) An earthquake
shook the central Turkish city of
Sivas Tuesday, waking residents in
panic and collapsing houses officials
said. There
were no reports of casualties.
The quake, with a preliminary
magnitude of 5.2, struck at 3:08 a.m.
(0008 GMT) near the town of
Divrigi, according to the Kandilli
observatory in Istanbul. It was fol-
lowed by a mild quake of magni-
tude 3.2 minutes later and some 20
aftershocks.
Bill to track age, race,
gender of motorists
Designed to prevent
disproportionate stops
Jessica Reed
staff whiter
A bill recendy introduced in the
legislation by Sen. Ed Warren and
Sen. Frank Ballance will call for all
state law enforcement agencies to
track information on the race, gen-
der and age of motorists who are
stopped.
The goal of the bill is to deter-
mine if the state Highway Patrol
and other law enforcement officials
are stopping a disproportionate
number of black drivers.
'This legislation is intended to
help address the perception that
some folks are stopped because of
their race, and real numbers are the
only way to monitor this said
Ballance, in a recent press release.
This act becomes effective Oct.
I, and is for actions occurring on or
after that date.
Highway Patrol officials said
their policy does not allow any
unfair or improper enforcement and
believes that this study will show
Correction
In the April 6 issue of TEC, we left Jason Evans, candidate for treasurer
and Shondell Jones, candidate for secretary out of our coverage. We oper-
ated on incorrect information that was furnished to us and deeply regret
any adverse effects. Also, the wrong quote was attributed to Overton
Harper. The quote should have read: "As SGA treasurer I would like to
address two issues: simplified funding of organizations and better commu-
nications between the treasurer's office and organizations
that targeting motorists by race is
not a practice.
"We support the bill, but
because we can, we are doing our
own pilot study to track all stops
said Rencc Hoffman, director of
Public Affairs for the Department
of Crime Control and Public Safety.
"We want to know for ourselves
what our officers are doing
This study will analyze statistics
on traffic stops as set forth in legis-
lation. Mobile Data Computers
(MDC) will be installed in every
patrol car to conduct the study of
traffic enforcement stops made by
troopers.
Three hundred sixty-four MDC
units have already been installed in
law enforcement vehicles in 59
counties across the state. By the
end of 2000, 520 more MDC units
will be installed and activated, cov-
ering all counties in the state. Some
African-American ECU students do
not understand the purpose of the
bill.
"I don't think this is bill is nec-
essary said Amee Terlinden,
sophomore. "When you get pulled
over on the road it's because you've
done something wrong, not because
of the color of your skin
Taxes
continued from page I
"I found that filing over the
phone is much quicker, it only
took about five minutes
Freshman Lisa Kanupp, 18
request by both individual tax-
payers and preparers who wanted
the IRS to accept credit card pay-
ments.
Taxpayers who wish to save
time filing and receive their
refund faster can file through
their personal computer or over
the phone. Both pilot programs
are for the 1998 tax year and for
1040 forms only.
Freshman Lisa Kanupp, 18,
was happy with the time she
saved but not the refund she got.
"I found that filing over the
phone is much quicker, it only
took about five minutes
Kanupp said. "I only got back
$255 for federal taxes because I had
to pay $92, which doesn't even
cover one of my car payments. It
only took about three weeks for the
refund though
The IRS will even allow some-
one else to pay your taxes with their
credit card, should you be lucky
enough to find such a person. Your
parent or spouse can make a pay-
ment with their credit card or debit
card for you. The IRS accepts
DiscoverNovus, American Express
and Mastercard. Sorry, Visa is not
accepted and you may have to pay a
merchant fee on your Mastercard if
you use it If you pay by credit card,
beware that you can only make a
maximum of two payments (to
avoid lots of fees and potential
fraud), however, you can pay up to
$99,999.
Should you want to avoid tech-
nology, the standard paper process
of filing is still available, but
beware of the time and money it
takes.
H&R Block will gladly file your
taxes for you, but they may charge
you at least $50 for a 1040, depend-
ing on your status. Other forms
may need to be filed as well,
depending on your income, depen-
dents, expenses and deductions.
H&R Block also offers a rapid
refund program, where a patron can
get their refund in two to four days,
but they have to have a refund of
$200 to qualify and there is a fee.
"We have a very small percent-
age of students who come through,
probably less than five percent
said George Sauls, of H&R Block
Want to avoid that professional
fee? It could cost you time in the
long run, according to Rebecca
Wharton, 19.
"I filed through the mail, it's
been over a month and I am still
waiting for a refund said Wharton,
who planned on buying clothes and
making a car payment.
The good news for taxpayers this
year is that you or your parents can
take credit for college tuitivn
expenses. Under Publication 970
Tax Benefits for Higher Education,
with form 8863, qualifying appli-
cants can receive a dollar for dollar
credit on tuition. Applicants may
also qualify to deduct interest paid
on student loans.
All tax forms and publications
can be downloaded from the IRS
web page at www.irs.ustreas.gov, or
can be picked up at Joyner Library
or Greenville Post Office.
TPS TaY Infnrmarinn
Line: 1-800-929-
Talk: 1-919-731X1
r 'oj jjpy taxes w credit
2PAY-TAX
321-1666
Page: www.irs.ustreas'
�'
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ail
: messages that
ne that take up
said Alison
hink the policy
will reduce the
s being sent to
t that just takes
ilk, sophomore,
y is a good idea,
might be mad
not use free
ints e-mail any-
ying clothes and
int.
'or taxpayers this
our parents can
college tuition
Publication 970
gher Education,
lualifying appli-
dollar for dollar
Applicants may
net interest paid
nd publications
J from the IRS
rs.ustreas.gov, at
t Joyner Library
Dffice.
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Honeydew Campbell's Home
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20 ct. Silk Glide
Playtex
Tampons
2 Liter
Mountain Dew,
Diet Pepsi or Pepsi
S8S9 oz. Powder or 100 oz. Liq.
Ultra Purex
Laundry Detergent
I
Prices Effective Through April 13,1999
Ordinance keeps cars off lawns
Supporters of policy
saycars ruin aesthetics
Christina Arnold
contrjiutino writer
ECU students who find parking on
campus difficult may find it even
more difficult to park in their own
yards.
The Greenville City Council
recently passed a new city ordi-
nance making it illegal for
Greenville City residents to park
on their front lawns. Yet many
ECU students are unaware of ordi-
nance No. 99-6, which went into
effect Jan. 14,1999.
Tracy Cross, senior, was sur-
prised to leam that she could be
fined for parking in her own front
yard.
"I wasn't aware of such an ordi-
nance Cross said. "How can they
enforce a law that I didn't even
know about?"
According to the ordinance, it is
unacceptable to use grass and bare
earth areas "to maneuver, park or
store any vehicle, camper, trailer or
boat within any front andor side
yard area Residents who do not
comply with the ordinance may be
cited for the violation.
Citations will include a $50 fine
to either the owner of the property,
the owner of the car or the lease of
the property said Blair Carr, city
attorney for the Greenville Police
Department
Carr said repeat violations of the
ordinance could lead to a court
injunction to stop the behavior.
The judge can then decide what
fine to set, she said.
Parking area standards add to
the beautification, safety and con-
formity of a neighborhood Can-
noted.
"It (parking on the lawn) ruins
the aesthetics of a neighborhood,
damages the property and causes a
depreciation of property value
she said.
Complaints about certain
Greenville areas led to them being
zoned for parking enforcement,
while other areas have not adopted
the new citywidc ordinance said
Carl Rees, city of Greenville zoning
enforcement planner.
Many ECU students find the
new ordinance to be problem as
shared housing forces them to park
in their front yards.
"I don't know where the govern-
ment gets off telling us what we
can do with our own property said
Susann Matthews, senior.
Devin Hetley, junior, agrees
with Matthews.
"I don't understand how the
government can regulate private
property. If you own the house,
you should be able to park wherev-
er you want he said.
"I can understand people not
making junk piles out of their yard,
but when you live with other peo-
ple, it's easier to pull your car up
next to the other car Matthews
said. "It just makes it easier when
you're backing out of the drive-
way
"Zoning ordinances allow the
city to regulate land use Carr said.
She suggested students who may
find the new regulation trouble-
some should "take it up with their
landlords
All parking areas (inclu
weather material.
All parking areas shal
Grass and bare
camper, trailer
p. 99-6
approved hard-surface, all'
be clearly marked,
or store any vehicle,
Parking
Parking are
that 40
For more information
Call 329-4498, or write to the
city of Greenville Planning and
Community Development
"Department, P.O. Box 7207,
Greenville, N.C. 27835.
crime
April 5
Larceny - A staff member
reported the larceny of food items
from a room in Whichard Annex.
99-0232
Larceny - A wallet belonging to
a student was turned into the
Police Department after it had
been found in a bathroom in the
Brewster Building. When the stu-
dent inspected the wallet, she
found that a credit card was miss-
ing. 99-0233
Underage Possession of Alcohol
- A resident of Scott Hall was
issued a campus appearance ticket
for possession of alcohol on the
third floor of Scott Hall. 99-020736
Possession of Marijuana and
Drug ParaphernaliaPossession of a
Weapon on Campus - Officers
responded to a report of a strong
odor of marijuana coming from a
suite in Scott Hall. Upon arrival,
officers seized four grams of mari-
juana, several items of drug para-
phernalia and a set of brass knuck-
les. The students were issued state
citations for possession of marijua-
na and drug paraphernalia.
Off Campus Sexual Assault - A
subject reported that she had been
sexually assaulted at an off campus
location. The Greenville Police was
notified and will be handling the
case.
Trespassing - An officer
observed a subject in an area of
campus that he had been banned
from. The officer drew a warrant
charging the subject with trespass-
ing. The warrants have not yet
been served.
April 6
Larceny - A student reported
the larceny of her wallet from the
Student Recreation Center.
Trespassing - A non-student
was arrested after an officer found
him unescorted on the fourth floor
of White Hall; Three witnesses
identified the man as a suspect who
had been propositioning students
in a female bathroom in Clement
Hall just prior to his arrest The
man was also banned from campus.
Harassing Phone Calls - A resi-
dent of Jones Hall reported receiv-
ing harassing phone calls in her
room.
Provisional Driving While
ImpairedDriving While License
Revoked - A non-student was
arrested for provisional driving
while impaired and driving while
license revoked. An officer
observed him driving the wrong
way on Reade Street
Driving While
ImpairedPossession of
MarijuanaDriving While License
Revoked - A non-student was
arrested after an officer observed
him spinning tires and speeding on
College Hill Drive.
Dam Herring and Courtney Metk
wearing election shirts, help to publicize the SGA election for
RH0T0 BY HICHMl SMITH
Meriac, Harper and DowoY






4 Thurdiy, April 8, 1999
Open House
continiud from page 1
In past yean, the Minority
Family Weekend occurred two to
three weeks previous to the spring
open house. Officially, the spring
open house is just Saturday, while
the minority weekend starts on
Friday.
"We'll see how it goes this rime,
but I think that putting them
together will work well said
Velvet Reynolds, assistant director
of Undergraduate Admissions. "We
thought that combing the weekend
might encourage more people to
�0106
"This is an exciting time for all
of us said Taffye Clayton, director
of Ledonia Wright African-
American Culture Center. "There
will be maximum exposure to all
students to what the university has
available for them
Minority students who will be
visiting the campus can look for-
ward to many activities and pro-
grams during the open house
weekend. There will be mentor
workshops available for students
to get information.
"Faculty members and stu-
dents will be connecting with
new students, showing them dif-
ferent things to look out for at
ECU. Basic information will be
given about classes, syllabi and
other topics Moore said.
There will be a display of vari-
ous minority performances during
the weekend. Performances
scheduled for April 16 include the
ECU Gospel Choir, Thespians of
The Eflt Carolinian
diversity, a Greek Step Show and
the Revelation Steppers. These
events will take place between
Mendenhall Student Center and
the Recreation Center from 8:30
p.mlO p.m.
"The activities and various
things hold during minority week-
end are not the same as Open
House, but students still get the
special opportunities that minori-
ties need Moore said.
Sixteen minority organizations
will set up tables on April 17 for a
Minority Student Fair. Clubs like
the ECU Chapter of the NAACP
and Allied Blacks for Leadership
and Equality (ABLE) will be pre-
sent.
All students coming during the
open house weekend will be able
to take part in the academic and
student life fairs, which will be held
in the General Classroom Building
April 17, 9:30 a.m. to noon.
Representatives of ECU's various
degree programs will be present to
answer questions from students
and parents. Campus clubs and ath-
letic organizations will also be there
to sign up potential students and
provide information.
Special sessions will take place
from 9:45 a.mll:15 a.m. These
programs will last 30 minutes each
and will present information about
orientation, general degree require-
ments, transfersreturning students
and will include a minority student
panel.
Walking and bus tours will be
taking place all day, and residence
halls will be opened for potential
students to inspect.
The Spring Open House invites
high school juniors and rising
seniors, as well as students who
have been accepted by the univer-
sity, to tour the campus and find
out more information about what
the university provides. It is cur-
rendy estimated that 3,000 poten-
tial students and parents will be
attending this year.
Milosevic announces
cease-fire, NATO calls sham
of Events
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BELGRADE, Yugoslavia (AP)
Yugoslav President Slobodan
Milosevic declared a unilateral
cease-fire Tuesday in his campaign
to crush rebels in Kosovo, saying he
wanted to honor the Orthodox
Easter holiday this weekend.
Western leaders called the move a
sham and pledged to press ahead
with airstrikes.
Moments after the cease-fire
took effect at 8 p.m. (2 p.m. EDT),
air-raid sirens wailed in Belgrade,
heralding new NATO attacks.
Government media said a fuel
storage facility at the airport near
Kosovo's capital Pristina was target-
ed early Wednesday, and state tele-
vision said a garage, and a ware-
house at an oil refinery in Novi Sad,
Serbia's second largest city, were
destroyed.
At least six explosions could be
heard late Tuesday in the direction
of the Batajnica military airport just
north of Belgrade and tracer rounds
from anti-aircraft were seen in the
night sky.
Yugoslav television stations
reported further attacks at Uzice,
75 miles southwest of Belgrade;
near Kraljevo, 75 miles south of
Belgrade; and at Pancevo and
Cacak, two industrial towns. U.S.
officials say a munitions plant is
located at Cacak.
Another missile struck a resi-
dential district in Podgorica, capital
of the tiny Yugoslav republic
Montenegro. There were no
injuries but several buildings were
damaged, according to Associated
Press reporters on the scene.
A group of professors from
Belgrade University mostly mem-
bers of the neo-Communist
Yugoslav Left led by Milosevic's
wife stood on a Belgrade bridge
through the night to serve as a
"human shield" against attack.
The Yugoslav cease-fire declara-
tion was clearly aimed at staving off
further NATO attacks and at pre-
senting Milosevic's government as
a champion of peace.
President Clinton and NATO
insisted that half-measures would
not end the NATO air campaign
that began March 24, and British
Prime Minister Tony Blair's
office said Milosevic's announced
truce "doesn't go nearly far
enough
A rebel spokesman also rejected
the cease-fire, which was
announced on Belgrade television
stations, and said the only way the
group would agree to a truce would
be if NATO troops enforced it
The statement also pledged the
government would work for the
return of ethnic Albanian refugees.
However, it wasn't clear if that
meant an immediate halt to mili-
tary actions forcing them to flee.
Russia alone welcomed the
cease-fire. "Any peace initiative
must be useful spokesman
Dmitry Yakushkin quoted
President Boris Yeltsin as saying.
On the refugee front, NATO
nations and others rushed in tons of
aid Tuesday for the400,000 ethnic
Albanians who have been driven
out of Kosovo and into poor neigh-
boring states.
Armies of aid workers and sol-
diers set up row upon row of mili-
tary tents and latrines for the
refugees, while aid flights clogged
nearby airports, including the one
at Tirana, the capital of Albania.
Some doctors were on hand, but
the squalid conditions and lack of
sanitation left many refugees sick
with diarrhea.
Conditions were most desperate
at frontier enclave at Blace on the
Macedonian border, where some
refugees have died.
In order to relieve the refugee
pressure on Macedonia, Western
countries began an airlift to evacu-
ate thousands of refugees from the
former Yugoslav republic. Several
thousand left on flights late
Monday and Tuesday for Norway
and Turkey.
Meanwhile, the Clinton admin-
istration announced that its naval
base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba,
would be a temporary "safe haven"
for up to 20,000 Kosovar refugees
in the coming days.
In its statement, the Yugoslav
leadership said the cessation of hos-
tilities against the ethnic Albanian
Kosovo Liberation Army in
advance of Sunday's Orthodox
Easter was a "gesture of good will
Neither the cease-fire declara-
tion nor statements from Yugoslav
officials said anything about hold-
ing fire against NATO forces'
which mounted their most inten-
sive strikes of the two-week-old ait1
campaign late Monday and early
Tuesday, and promised heavier
firepower to come.
The allies demand that
Milosevic withdraw military and
paramilitary troops from Kosovo
and accept an international military
force to police a settlement tha1!
grants autonomy to Kosovo, a
province of the main Yugoslav-
republic of Serbia.
But in a sign of deteriorating
relations, unknown assailants
hurled a hand grenade at Belgrade
only mosque Tuesday. The blast
injured no one, but shattered wirP
dows and slightly damaged the
building, Beta news agency report-
ed.
In Washington, Defense
Secretary William Cohen said the
Serb cease-fire offer is "not only
completely unacceptable, but it's
absurd
He said accepting a cease-fire
now would be an "abdication of
responsibility" by NATO.
J
Many students gathered at the Wright place to support the candidates running for the executive SGA offices.
PH0T0 ST MICHAEL SMITH
The Eist Carol!
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students. I
chances are
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On even
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As a studi
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Reside you.
Remember,
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ALETTE
Vjfell, the Unit,
again involved ii
and this time it's
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phrase that the
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it Carolinian
iam
airlift to evacu-
fugees from the
:public. Several
i flights late
jay for Norway
Clinton admin-
i that its naval
mo Bay, Cuba,
iry "safe haven"
osovar refugees
t, the Yugoslav
cessation of hos-
ethnic Albanian
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ise-fire declara-
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ing about hold-
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mised heavief
demand that
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national military
settlement thit
to Kosovo, a
main YugoslaV
of deteriorating
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ide at Belgrade!
sday. The blast
t shattered wirP
i damaged the
s agency report-
on, Defence
Cohen said the
"er is "not only
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ing a cease-fire
I "abdication of
MATO.
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Till m Carolinian
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opinion
TtirHlTrMfllt, tttl g
eastcarolinian
Am v L.Rovster Editor
AMANDA G. AUSTIN MuHmito
HOLLV habris Nn Editor
AMr Wagner Aairam Km Editor
Nina Dry FmmUinr
Cory Phoenix Ctrarpitci Dttigrwi
Stephen Schramm SpraMw
Kristy Daniel awima Store-Etta
Chris Knotts SuHI
Michael smith I
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ouwiew
Tae-Bo fanatic, Billy Blanks, has become a large part of the lives of many college
students. If you don't know who Billy Blanks is or have never heard of Tae-Bo,
chances are you aren't keeping that New Year's resolve to get physically fit Tae-Bo
is the latest in a fitness craze that continues to gain momentum and spring is a per-
fect time to catch the wave.
On every channel someone is hawking the latest flexi-do-dad. The most preva-
lent infomercial, features Blanks and his Tae-Bo family kicking and punching their
way to fitness. Such big name people as Carmen Electra, Sinbad, Farrah Fawcett,
Goldie Hawn and Neve Campbell, just to name a few, have helped in advertising
for Banks and his new type of fitness training. We've even heard people say they
didn't want to go on spring break because they would miss their Tai-Bo workouts!
Tae-Bo is not the only way to go. There are weighted balls, weighted polls, steps,
slides, rubber bands and elastic bands too. Not to mention the underwater boxing,
self-defensine and voeo-cizing available at campus and area gyms.
As a student or faculty member, you have a unique environment in which to get
into the best shape of your life. Of course, the multi-million dollar Student Rec
Center is an obvious advantage, but there are many more reasons why you may
never have a better opportunity to get fit. Being surrounded by thousands of other
Jbung bodies caught up in the fitness craze should lend you momentum. Don't get
rjtiscouraged by the ever present beautiful hard body in an itsy-bitsy jogging bra
Reside you. Instead, let those who are ahead of you in their fitness goals inspire you.
Remember, obtaining a certain fitness goal my give you biceps to brag about, but
0ie best reason to get fit is for your health.
I Whether you purchase the latest Tae-Bo series of videos and punch your way to
fitness in the privacy of your home, or you join the throngs of other like minds at
the Rec Center, now is a great time to shape up.
lUETTER
Old enough to fight, too young to drink
yfell, the United States is once
again involved in another skirmish,
and this time it's not with Iraq! The
'ferisis in Kosovo" (a catchy little
phrase that the media came up
wjth, no doubt to increase their rat-
ifies) has the United States military
ajfeng with NATO forces (or the
rj&w World Order) putting the
lljjjes of their soldiers on the line.
JjWith the loss of one American
bfynber, and American soldiers
taken prisoner by the Serbs, it
appears that we may be at the brink
o�something more serious than the
l�S. government had initially
expected.
lWhile the Russian Navy posi-
ttsrns itself near the coast of Kosovo,
a show of support for the Serbs,
may be witnessing the begin-
of an all out war.
with all major wars, there
ays comes an incredible loss of
life�tragic indeed. Who
these wars? I'll tell you who
i these wars. The old men who
� safely behind desks pushing
is, while deciding the fete of
ands. But you don't see them
, there on the battle fields with
ijr faces in the mud, stopping
bullets with their chests. No, they
sit behind their desks, wearing
their three piece suits, while
America's youth is being crippled
and killed because of some war
they didn't suit.
This brings me to the point of
my letter. Being 19 years old, I am
extremely angered of the feet that I
am not allowed rights that certain
other Americans enjoy and yet, I
am expected to die for my country
at the whim of some corrupt draft
dodging government official, the
rights I refer to are those rights that
people who have graced the earth
with their presence for at least 21
years are allowed, (such as, the
right to buy alcohol or rent a car)
while adults only three years
younger are not
I must question the logic behind
this. An 18 year old is mature
enough to handle a gun in combat
situations, but is not mature
enough to handle a beer if he
chooses to do so? Does this make
the least bit of sense? I should say it
does not.
Since the government is led by
middle-aged people who could
give a sweet rat's ass about the
rights of America's 18-20 year olds,
such that this law has not been
changed.
Furthermore, most government
positions require one to be at least
21 years of age to even be consid-
ered. America's 18-20 year olds do
not deserve to be treated like
pawns, they deserve equal rights. If
they are not given equal rights,
they should not be expected to
engage in military combat.
The government has the right to
send us 18-20 year olds to early
graves in the name of some
trumped up cause, when we don't
even enjoy the same rights as the
people who send us to the early
graves. There is some serious error
in reasoning here. If we allow this
to continue, we shall remain the
governments' pawns, and they
shall continue to manipulate as
they please.
Well, all this writing has made
me thirst, so I think I'll go get me a
cold one. Since, at any given time
America decides to go to war, I'll be
expected to give up my life, I'm
going to enjoy a brew whenever the
mood strikes mc�regardless of the
ridiculous law.
OPINION!
Stephen
Kleinshmitt
Cartoons wrong about Greeks
For the past year, this columnist
has had to endure the unfounded
opinions of staff illustrator Chris
Knotts in our very own East
Carolinian. It is obvious that Knotts
is not a Greek student, and tends to
label what he does not understand
a bad thing. In one of his often
recurring "Life on Tuesday" car-
toons, the main character Tuesday
laughs at the concepts of fraterni-
ties while he is standing in front of
the fictional Tri-Pi fraternity house
during a party. So what are his con-
cepts of fraternities (and to a
greater extent, the entire Greek
system?)
Entirely bogus. Sure, the 10 per-
cent Greek population here at
ECU likes to have a good time like
the other 90 percent of the students
on Friday nights. But, let's look at
the whole truth. The concept of
fraternities are brotherhood and
service. People come to ECU unfa-
miliar with their surroundings.
Fraternities and sororities give stu-
dents direction. They have some-
where to go in times of need. They
have someone encouraging them to
do their best in their schoolwork.
They have the opportunity to meet
many people and grow connec-
tions. And then there is the coveted
Greek social life. People always
like talking to Greeks because they
always have something interesting
going on. What's your idea of fun?
And then there is our service
aspect. Many Greek organizations
donate thousands of dollars and
hundreds of hours doing service to
better the community for all stu-
dents. My own fraternity, Phi
Kappa Psi does a yearly benefit for
the Greenville Community Shelter,
and have been named as their
biggest donor each year. Theta Chi
has their annual see-saw marathon
that has donated over $10,000 in
the last five years to the Pitt
County Special Olympics. And let's
not forget the sororities! Alpha
Omicron Pi has a bone marrow
drive every year, and there are a
host of sororities that hold various
benefits each year that rake in the
cash for North Carolina's most
neediest charities. What are these
charities supposed to rely on?
Canned food and clothing drives
run by the residence halls? Please.
These things yield about 20 bucks
worth of creamed com and dirty
socks. Without Greek organizations
at this campus, there would be a lot
more starving people out there.
The concepts of brotherhood
and service have been taught to us
since we were children. Maybe it
was the Boy Scouts that taught yon
the value of friendship and cama
raderie. Maybe it was all the friends
you had at camp that made your
first trip from home a little less hec-
tic. It could be the times in your
church's youth group when you col-
lected toys for foster children for
Christmas, and it felt good to do
something for someone other than
yourself.
When I came to ECU, I was
stuck in the dorms with druggies,
alcoholics, thieves, all sorts of
weirdos and undesirables. Why
criticize me for wanting to disasso-
ciate myself with these loons? I
know several people who said they
would never go Greek, and have,
and now they'll never go back.
They have obviously dispelled the
Greek notion that Knott's cartoons
try to play up because they lack
creativity and important subject
matter.
Why am I speaking out for the
Greek system? Because I believe in
what it stands for, and since I hap-
pen to have a voice, my message is
that all the Greek community asks
from you is that you should at least
do some research on us before you
bad mouth us. Everybody hates a
know-it-all that criticizes some-
thing they know nothing about
LETTER
to the Editor
Some professors lack professionalism
This is my junior year at ECU. I
have gone through my program of
study without so many "bumps"
along the way. Many of my profes-
sors have been so great! I have truly
enjoyed studying under the profes-
sional teachers I have had here at
this university. However, at the
beginning of this semester, I met
severe disappointment
I walked into the class my second
day back from Christmas vacation
and was subjected to overbearing,
verbal abuse. The professor of the
class used very rude, vulgar lan-
guage which deeply offended my
soul. He used curse word after
curse word, without any logical rea-
soning. He proceeded to use
extremely vulgar sexual slang in
class.
The ultimate sorrow was felt when
he told the class to use one of the
curse words�to say it out loud. As
the room echoed with that nasty
word, proceeded by laughter, my
heart sank. I could not believe what
I was in the midst of. I came to
ECU seeking professionalism. I
received an hour full of lewdness.
As I write this now, the emotions
are still very powerful and sad.
That this son of behavior is allowed
to take place at a doctoral universi-
ty is unbelievable. I dropped the
class and complained about the sit-
uation, but nothing really can be
done unless others take a stand and
put common courtesy and decency
in their proper place.
Students have impressionable
minds. We are supposed to be able
to look up to our professors.
Professors should be guiding role
models. Students should not go to
class and be subject to language
worse than that in rated R movies.
In fact, we should not even be sub-
jected to that type of language. If
this type of language is going to be
allowed, maybe the university
should restrict what ages can enter
into certain classes. Some students
do start college at age 17.
Shame on the slackness of the peo-
ple around me who laughed at the
profanity that day, and shame on
the professor who used the lan-
guage. What is the world coming
to? Should we not set distinguished
goals? Should we not value virtue?
This sort of letter is not enjoyable
to write. I would like to say that I
am truly satisfied with my experi-
ence here, but I am not. This is an
issue that has been bothering me
ever since the fust day of class this
semester, and I believe that this is
the best way to voice my disap-
pointment. I would like to leave a
message to anyone who is placed in
the situation I was in: Stand up for
what you believe in and follow your
integrity. Make sure someone at
the upper level of the university
knows about the situation.
Christopher Modlin
Write & Letter
. ���-�
Bring your letter to the eastcarolinian located on the
2nd floor of The Student Publications Building or
drop a line to Amy Royster at www.editor@student-
media.ecu.edu
-i

liEiial





6 Ttwtatv. Airil a. 1989
comics
Tin Eirt CifOllnlm
Four Seats Left
Jason Latour
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Brand New Luxury Apartments
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44-8-OZ.
Cocoa Puffs, Lucky Charms
or Golden Grahams
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Buy One - Get One
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Fresh
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Kroger
Paper
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1-ROLL
Kerns Prices Good Through April 10,1999 In
Greenville. Copyright 1999 Kroger Mid-Atlantic. We
reserve the right to limit quantities. None Mid to
dealers.
ISSC
7Thuriday. April 8,
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7Thursdiy, April 8, 1898
features
Tin em cmWw
"ays make homes for
'kes on campus
Amy Wagner
assistant news editor
I -
Meow, Many students have
p t cats. But, as you may have
nt riced, ECU has their own ver-
sii n of pet cats. Many stray cats
run rampant around campus, mak-
ing; it their home sweet home.
"I've seen them running
artund and I feel so sorry
for them sophomore Chrissy
Buckley said. "There is a whole
family behind my dorm Buckley
lives in Jones Residence Hall.
These cats were not put here by
Chancellor Eakin to add charm or
to chase squirrels. According to
Bobbie Parsons,
shelter direc-
tor of the
Pitt
County
Humane
Society,
the large
number of
stray cats
came from.
irresponsible
students.
"Students
leave behind
cats and they
haven't been
fixed:
Parsons said.
"These cats
go wild after
they
haven't'
been cared
for in a
while
If you
think your
cat will be
taken in
by a kind
neigh-
b o r ,
think
again.
"People think
these cats behind and somebody
will take care of it Parsons said.
"But, that's not the case. They
either get ran over or become wild
Parsons is not happy with the
consequences of these abandoned
cats. For example, she once saw a
stray cat with its head caught in a jar
and she couldn't catch it to help it.
Besides hurting themselves,
these cats can be dangerous to peo-
ple as well. According to Parsons,
many of them have rabies,
leukemia and the FIV virus.
Leukemia and the FIV virus spread
between cats, even cats that live in
people's homes, if they have not
been given the proper shots.
Rabies can spread to unvaccinated
cats, and to humans as well.
"People will try to pick up the
cat to see if it's tame and then get
bit Parsons said. "They need to
realize that we get rabies too
The ECUPD has had no com-
plaints about the cats so far, and
there have not been any incidents
reported to the Student Health
Center this year.
"I've never had any problems
with the cats Buckley said. "I
even leave them some food some-
times. I feel so sorry for them. It is
horrible that someone could just
pack up and leave their pet to fend
for themselves
Buckley leaves food for the cats
in the woods behind her residence
hall.
"They wait in the woods until I
am far away before they come eat
Buckley said. "They are so differ-
ent from pet cats, so scared of
humans, even people trying to help
them
It is not
just kind-
It e a r ted
people like
Buckley
that keeps
the cats fed.
The trash
cans on cam-
Kitties sack refuge from students in the trees
PHOTOS BY LUC BOUCHAGE
Where cats reside
on campus
1. In sewage drains
2. Behind residence hails
3. In bushes between Fletcher music
building and Brewster
4. In shrubbery in front of Joyner
library
5. Beside of campus mail services
Tpes of Cats
1. American shorthair
2, Balinese
3. Cornish Rex
4. Egyptian Mau
5.
6. Manx
T.Persian
8. Russian Blue
9. Siamese
lO.Sphynx
' courtesy of infoseek.com
pus are full of food for the cats.
"I've seen cats eating pizza
right out of the trash can
junior Dave Klop said. "It
makes me mad that there are
cats in students' homes earing
Fancy Feast or something and
these cats have to go through
the trash because of irresponsi-
ble students
Linda Nelson from
Housekeeping Services said
they have not received any
complaints about the cats, but if
the number of cats gets too
large or there are some coat-
plaints then Animal Control
will be called.
"Personally, I could not cadi
Animal Control myself because
I wouldn't be able to sleep
Nelson said. "But, if we have
to do it, then we will because
students may get hurt. Many
people do not realize how dan-
gerous wild cats are
According to Nelson, during
last summer a housekeeping
employee tried to pet a stray cat
outside of the Housekeeping
Services office which is located
in the Old Cafeteria where
there are a large number of
strays. The cat bit him, but he
was not hurt. Housekeeping
sent him to the hospital to get
rabies shots just in case. But, that is
the only incident ai Nelson
knows of.
"I'm not scared of them, but I've
kept my distance since he got bit
Nelson said. "But, I've seen some
people trying to feed them and they
need to know not to try to pet
them
Parson wants students to help
avoid more stray cats in the future.
"First of all, don't take an animal
if you don't know if you can keep
it she said. "Second of all, if you
can not take it when you leave, try
to find it a home. If you can't,
either call us at the Humane
Society or call the pound. They kill
the animals at the pound, but that's
better than leaving them to become
wild and a danger to themselves
and to us
Buckley and Klop want students
to take more responsibility for their
cats.
"It makes me so angry that these
cats are running around because
someone is too lazy to call the
Humane Society or put an ad in the
paper Klop said. "They really
need to think
I
tae-Bo sweeps nation
as exercise trend
Students kick it up a notch
Nina M. Drv
FEATURES EDITOR
1
' jujt when you thought it was safe
;to�upersize that Extra Value Meal,
i'refticmber swimsuit season is just
! around the corner. Translation: it's
jtirhe to shed any pounds you
(trussed before Spring Break or rid
�Jyojirself of the ones you gained
;afijerward. What better way to do it
; ;thjn join the workout that's sweep-
lint the nation: Tae-Bo.
j"Tae-Bo is a trademarked
! Iliocnsed name of a martial arts fit-
n�ss class said Sam Combs, fit-
inejss coordinator at the Student
'1 Recreation Center. "It's basically a
m�rtial arts, boxing-styled work-
;jouV
i JTae-Bo's claim to fame can be
attributed to Billy Blanks, athlete
! jexraordinaire. This seven-time
! JWbrld Karate champ has done it all,
IlfrJm winning the Golden Gloves
championship in Massachusetts to
starring in hit movies such as The
Last Boy Scout and Blood Fist.
According to Blanks' web site,
while training at his California
hdme, Blanks began to combine
dance music with his Tae Kwon Do
�ves. This soon evolved into
ic-Bo. In 1989, he decided to
luce his new workout to the
wlrld by opening the Billy Blanks
irld Training Center in Sherman
iks,Ca.
Word of mouth brought in the
icljents, but it wasn't until singer
ireographer Paula Abdul attend-
the Tae-Bo classes and began
iwing results that Tae-Bo took
becoming a household word
, with the celebrity population.
' "Blanks does a lot of personal
training in California Combs said.
"It placed him in a great position to
market his product so well
With the help of a few (thou-
sand) infomercials, Tae-Bo became
a household name for us as well.
People have jumped aboard the
Blanks bandwagon, purchasing his
tapes and working out�Tae Kwon
Do-style.
Roberta Ellis, a Greenville resi-
dent, was bombarded like many by
the Tae-Bo infomercials. She liked
what she saw and purchased the
tapes.
"I took notice when celebrities
like Shaquille O'Neal spoke of the
results of Tae-Bo Ellis said. "I do
not think he would endorse some-
thing he didn't believe in
College students also have taken
notice of the rave. But, since we are
Blanks' videos takes world by storm
PHOTO COURTESY WORLD WIDE WEB
living on a college students'
income, not all of us can afford the
"three easy payments of $29.95
"I borrowed the tapes from a
friend said Ryann Harris, senior.
"It's a good workout. You definite-
ly feel it the next day
According to students, the best
thing about it is that it's easy to do
and it's not a workout that you
would do for a week, then allow the
tape to collect dust next to your
VCR.
"Martial arts is something I
enjoy doing Ellis said. "It's a solid
workout with a good background.
Those who are dedicated will
always stick to it
"Besides working out, you learn
defense motions which is good to
learn Harris said. "It definitely
keeps my attention better than
other workout tapes
According to Combs, he
believes the reason so many people
stick with it is because of the repet-
itive motions.
"Ir's fasier ro trirh wirh if VOU do
not have to remember complex toot
patterns or step combinations
Combs said. "It's more sports-spe-
cific and user-friendly for people
looking for less complexity in a
class
Those who take Tae Kwon Do
usually take a great interest in try-
ing out Tae-Bo. Freshman Mike
Caston takes Tae Kwon Do at the
Rec Center and is interested in
Tae-Bo.
"Tae Kwon Do rocks Caston
said. "Thus, Tae-Bo must be at
least the equivalent if not the
greater of the two. It's more than
Tae Kwon Do; it's Tae Kwon Do
and boxing, baby
Not everyone can shell out the
cash for this tape nor do they want
to wait four to six weeks to get the
tapes in the mail. For you impatient
people, there are martial arts kick
boxing classes offered here in
Greenville.
Byung Lee's Tae Kwon Do
Academy offers courses similar to
Tae-Bo called Tae-Kwon
Kickboxing.
According to Lee, owner and
instructor of the academy, it costs
$39 a month and those interested
can come in as often as they like
within that month.
"We offer classes Monday
through Thursday from 8:30 p.m
9:30 p.mLee said. "People can
come in as often as they would
like�usually they come in two to
SEE KICKIN-BUTT PAGE 10
Hop aboard this
summer's Alaskan cruise
Spend the summer on a cruise visiting sites in British Columbia and Alaska
COURTESY OF WORLD WI0E WEB
Event sponsored by
Discovery Place
Brooke Potts
staff writer
The trip combines a cruise of the
coastline with an excursion into the
interior of the state. Both portions
offer many chances to view wildlife
and natural glacier formations.
The entire trip offers typical
cruise features, such as gourmet
food and entertainment, but this
cruise distinguishes itself as being
geared toward learning and explo-
ration.
"We feel that one of the greatest
benefits of offering a trip such as
this is giving people the chance to
vacation with trained museum
staff said Frieda Nicholson,
President and CEO of Discovery
Place.
Representatives from the muse-
um will lead guests on excursions
geared towards their particular age
group and interest. Plus, partici-
pants will have the opportunity to
choose their own activities, which
are different from what the typical
Alaskan vacation offers.
The options for learning are
numerous. The first part of the trip
is the cruise itself. From the
Holland America ship M.S.
Ryndam, guests will sail between
Vancouver, British Columbia and
Seward, Alaska viewing the sights
of Ketchikan, Juneau, Sitka and
Valdez. Along the way, all sorts of
wildlife such as whales and sea
lions can be seen, and the area will
be adrift with glaciers and ice floes.
"Basically, the trip offers some-
thing for everyone said Jim
Hoffman, who handles media for
Discovery Place. "If you arc inter-
ested in learning more about
Alaska, this is ideal
Those guests who wish to
extend their stay have the opportu-
nity to experience even more of the
natural features of this state. A
sightseeing vessel is scheduled to
take passengers to Kenai Fjords
National Park, where visitors will
view bird rookeries and beaches
covered with barking sea lions.
Other trips will be to the Alaska
SeaLife Center and a ski resort.
Also planned are sightseeing trips
in the city of Anchorage and the
shore of Tumagain Arm.
The last leg of the trip takes
guests aboard a private rail car to
the Donnelly National Park and
Mount McKinley, where they will
tour the park and have a chance to
visit Fairbanks. The final day con-
cludes with a river cruise and a tour
of an Alaskan gold mine.
"Alaska is such a unique and dif-
ferent destination, a trip such as
this one practically sells itself said
Carole Mcrriam, who handles trip
registration for Discovery Place.
There are still several spaces
available for anyone who is inter-
ested. The costs range from $1,832
for the cruise alone to $3,820 for the
cruise and tour combination.
Reservations or more information
can be obtained by calling (704)
372-6261, ext. 205.
If you can't make this trip, there
are several other ways that you can
take advantage of the services that
Discovery Place offers. Each sum-
mer, a major trip is planned, and
the museum usually switches off
between their Alaskan vacation and
a trip to Kenya. Both of these trips
are led by museum staff, and all
stress vacation time as well as learn-
ing about the area and its natural
SEE CRUISE PAGE S
� . .
HM
iMk�M
MHi






8 Tkw�4tv. April 8. II
features
Tlii Eiit Carolinian
Mentally challeged
teen faces jail time
� WEST PALM BEACH, Fla.
(AP)�A 15-year-old retarded boy
grabbed $2 in lunch money out of
the pocket of a classmate�and for
that, he could have gotten life in
prison.
For weeks, prosecutors defend-
ed their decision to treat Anthony
Laster as an adult, even though the
boy communicates on the level of a
5-year-old. He spent four weeks,
including Christmas, in a jail for
adults because his sister was
unable to raise the $500 needed to
get him out
Then, last week, two days after
"60 Minutes" arrived to do a story
on the case, the charges were
dropped.
The prosecutor offered no
apologies for his zero-tolerance
stand in the case of Anthony, who
never knew his father and whose
mother died in November.
"You do not cherry-pick the
cases, you do not say you feel sorry
for this person because there's a
developmental disability or this
person has had a bad family life so
we won't charge him as an adult
said Mike Edmondson, a
spokesman for Palm Beach County
State Attorney Barry Krischer.
The decision to drop the
charges of strong-arm robbery,
extortion and petty theft Thursday
had nothing to do with "60
Minutes Edmondson said.
The 14-year-old victim changed
his story and his new version did
not back up the severity of tht
charges, Edmondson explained.
The child originally told police
he felt threatened and in fear of
physical harm when Anthony
demanded his money during an
class Dec. 1 at a Boynton Beach
middle school. Later, he said he
did not feel he was in danger.
State law gives prosecutors
authority to decide which juveniles
are treated as adults. Edmondson
said in Palm Beach County, the
policy is to treat as adults all
offenders who are at least 14 and
have committed a felony.
"If it is automatic, they've got a
lot of holes in their zero-tolerance
policy said John Walsh, an attor-
ney with the Juvenile Advocacy
Project who was appointed by a
court to represent Anthony.
Anthony did not deny taking
the money. He said he was hungry
and used the money to buy candy,
according to police.
Walsh said what was needed in
this case was for someone to take a
look at the child and his circum-
stances.
"Maybe if they had done that
they would have seen that he was
having difficulty dealing with his
mother's death he said. "There
just seemed to be very little atten-
tion to the individual child. No one
seemed to care
Anthony's family did not return
SEE DROPPED PAGE 10
Greenville's
Best Kept Secret
Bedroom
Apartment
Homes
n
' Statd of ttw ort FtliMiB CnMM
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COOL LINE 752.555
casawfcs
k SUNDAYS AM OPEN NHC NIGHTS!)!
Check this week out Music Lovers
9 Thursday, Ap
r
m m
$1.25 Drink specials
The ECU Student Union �
Special Events Committee
PRESENTS:
s
Freak Out
�� From Athens, Georgia
A tribute to Parliament
& Frank Zappa
Over 10 musicians on stage
Umdorico
Latin Bone groove
A Hilarious, Interactive
Murder-Mystery Dinner Theatre
Thursday, April 22, 1999 7:00 p.m. Mendenhall
ECU Student tickets priced at only $5.00
Includes gourmet dinner and ticket to the play.
Capricorn Recording Artist
KINC5 SLENDER
Cruise
continuad from page 7
ECU students can pay $5.00 cash, use a
dinner equivalent off their meal plan, or a
$5.00 debit against their declining balance.
history. In addition, a trip to the
Galapagos Islands is being planned
for next year.
Discovery Place also offers short
trips to North Carolina beaches and
mountains, as well as other local
excursions to areas around
Charlotte. In-house offerings
include an Omnimax theater,
where films on topics such as Egypt
and Mount Everest attract many
visitors. This summer they will also
be hosting a cyber-playground
which explores the history of video
games and computers.
All in all, if you are looking for a
great way to learn about the world
around you, Discovery Place is an
ideal place to start.
ECU FacultyStaff- $13.00 General Public - $15.00
Tickets on sale at the Central Ticket Office-Mendenhall
Monday, April 5 - Tuesday, April 20
Call 252-328-4788, 1-800-ECU-ARTS,
8:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. for more information.
a very
free show
From Portland, Oregon
Come out early for some free
stuff and an incredible Band.
IBIS IS A FREE SHOW FOR YOU
M
4
4
I
1
Crc
I
M
f�
�Copyi





irolinlsn
iwaann�
Al"NDMMUSK-
iguunotul
752.5855
RtS
N MIC NKHTSIII
c Lovers
Ink specials
ut
Georgia
iment
ta
n stage
CO
oovt
ig Artist
PER
how
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Band,
WRYOU
fcv
9 Thundiy, April 8. 16
r
K
features
Tht Ettt Ciroliniin
Winn-Dixie
Marketplace l0fa
Pepsi,
Diet Pepsi
Or ML pew
12 pk.12 oz. cans
LIMIT 2 WITH ADDITIONAL ORDER!
Hot, Lean Or
Croissant Pockets
9 oz. size
HOTPOCKEIS
1
79
Superbrand
Ice Cream
64 oz. ctn.
35
Kraft
Miracle Whip
32 oz. size
1
!
kraft.
irqele
hip
iracle
WhlP
Gumtifteif
Htrdvpg!gnifi'Jia?
.v��, j' "fZ "�� !j
Vircinla Cured Bacon
Gwaltney
Sliced Bacon
12 oz. size Regular
88
c
Wm
Vil
n�&'S&
Prices good Wednesday, April 7, thru
Tuesday April 14,1999. Effective In
Our Greenville, NC Location Only!
fChili
�Copyright 1999. Winn-Dixie Raleigh, Inc. Quantity Rights Reserved, www.winndixie.com
covering the
Woman charwithfirst-degw mun&r far starving aaugfuer
PHILADELPHIA (AP)�A
Philadelphia woman was found
guilty of third-degree murder for
starving her 5-year-old daughter to
death.
Charlene Wise, convicted
Tuesday, was charged with the
first-degree murder of her daughter
Charnae in 1997.
Police found the girl's skeletal
remains in the family's basement
after Ms. Wise's oldest daughter
told investigators her mother had
said the child was dead. The child's
remains weighed just 12 pounds.
Her son Dante Wise, 9, had tes-
tified that his mother beat him with
belt buckles, fists and hair brushes.
Ms. Wise broke down sobbing in
the courtroom as her son spoke.
Ms. Wise's attorney, Anthony
McKnight, contended his client did J
not intend to kill her daughter, but
that she only had been negligent.
fit
EAST
CABOLINA �
UNIVERSITY
ioFiiasaW
Accelerate
toward graduation-
Skate through a semester of credits.
Contact your adviser.
The Division of Continuing Studies
328-6143
An equal opportunityaffirmative action
university, which accommodates the
needs of individuals with disabilities.
Laser Removal
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Mendenhall Multi-Pui
April 13,1999 " "
Participating vendors and a brief description of their presentation are listed below:
Alltel - Demonstrate WirBtess Calling Features that Help Ytw Stay in Tiwch.
Alphanumeric -Showcase of Alphanumeric systems and canabSiues
Apple Corporation and Computer Tree - Showcase tht latest Madntosh Technology
BiackBoard- Demonstrate Course Info; Placing Course Materials on the Web
COECO US Office Products - Demonstrate RtCOH Digital Imaging Systems, rjgonomic Keyboard Trays & Statt
contract Ergonomic Chairs
I Computer Corporation � Showcase Dell Equipment
' Itudent Stores - Demonstrate Rokek Net Mouse. Word Wand Deluxe Scanner and Twmhead laptop
- Showcase Gateway Equipment
ce Computers - Showcase Computer Center Technology
nications - Demonstrate the Next Generation ISP
i Microsoft Office 2000 and Microsoft Windows 2000
cation Solutions
ite New Products: NT 5.0 Office 2000
hnol-tibitSSaridytwniT
" we Supplies; Seating
Vhitlock Group � Demonstrate of LCD Projectors
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1 2 PRICE
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$1.75 Heinekens!
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No Fiesta Could Be Better Than
Chico's!





10t itiinti
features
Th� tut Cirollnisn
Kickin'Butt
contimiid from pigi 7
three times a week
Lee said his courses are
designed better than Blanks' tapes
for beginners since it is easier to
follow
"We try to make our courses
fun and exciting for our clients
Lee said
"Cardio-Box is a course offered
at the Rec Center with a kickbox-
ing style of workout Combs said.
It's similar to Tae-Bo
Some students who participate
in the Rec's Cardio-Box classes
have different opinions of Blanks'
tapes.
"I get more of a workout at the
Rec than I do with the Tae-Bo
tape said Angela Hershberger,
sophomore. "The instructors do a
better job at the Rec increasing
heart rate and giving a complete
muscular workout
But like all good things, they
must come to an end at some
point. Will Billy Blanks and his
ever-famous Tae-Bo tapes go
down as another exercise trend?
"That is the ultimate ques-
tion Combs said. "It might suffer
from overexposure. People will
saturate themselves from it after
awhile
Dropped
continued from page 8
calls for comment.
"You scan the country, you
rarely find cases this outrageous
said Dan Macallair, associate direc-
tor of the Justice Policy Institute in
San Francisco.
f A Cut Above
Tanning Salon
� Student Discounts
� Memberships
� Monthly Unlimited
Specials
� Wolf Beds - new bulbs
Mon-Sat 8-9
Sun 1-6
hours may vary
3197 E. 10th Street, Suite A Greenville. NC 27858 (919) 830-0485
Be a gold Member
Walk-ins Welcome
Next door to A Cut
Above Hair Salon
NewAC
Bring in this ad
for a free visit
One per Customer
, A A
Downtown Greenville
EVERY THURSDAY
LADIES FREEH!
ALL NIGHT
BLOCK PARTY
$1.00 Bud
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$1.25 Mixed Drinks
t Greater Greenville ?
Bikini Open Finals
www.livewireonline.com
f
IPS A
BLAST!
East Carolina Paintball
$5 mask rental
$5 gun rental
s8 field fee
�2 CO, fee
$6 for 100 paintballs
Take Hwy 33 West from Greenville, 8 miles
past the airport. Turn right at the Belvoir
Cornerstop, on to Porter Rd. Go 2.5 miles
and turn left at the yellow signs. Park
in front of our Army tent.
10 Student Discount Call
OPEN EVERY SATB. SUN, 11:00AM TILL 5:30PM mjJ C
OR MAKE RESERVATIONS DURING THE WEEK w
-heckyour phone book for coupons
WWW.ECPB.COM
Attention Returning Students
Planning to live off campus? If so, you can eliminate at least one long line by arranging your utility service in
advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuable time - and possibly money. These options are available:
Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parents' request, your utility service may be put in
their name. Just pick up a "Request for Utility Service"
application from the University Housing Office in Jones
Halt at Greenville Utilities' Main Office, 200 Martin Luther
King, Jr. Drive; or at GUC Express, our satellite office
located at 509 S.E. Greenville Blvd.
Have your parents complete the application (which must be
notarized) and mail it to GUC, P.O. Box 1847, Greenville,
NC. 27835-1847, art: Customer Service.
�Remember to attach a "letter of credit" from your parents'
power company.
IP Greenville
Option B: Deposit Required
If you wish to have the utility service put in your name,
a deposit will be required. Residential deposits are as follows:
Water only
Electric only
Electric & water
Electric, water & gas
Electric & gas
$ 25
$100
$125
$175
$150
You can save time by mailing the deposit in advance. Be sure to
include your name, where service will be required, when service
is to be cut on and a phone number where we may reach you
prior to your arrival at the service address.
The service charge ofS 20.00 for electric and water, andor
SJO.OOor gas will be on your first bill
'GUC requires you to be home when natural gas is cut on.
While we do not require you to be home when electric or water
service is cut on. it is your responsibility to ensure that all
electrical appliances and water faucets are OFF during the cut
on procedure.
G3�
fa
IfD
mmsmrna
Now leasing � (252) 321-7613
lSSeS.ChmUtBhd. CrtnvOU.NC 27S5S
Equil Hauling
Opportunity
NEED AJOB THIS
summe
JNlVERSlTY
Housing
services
rd
University Housing Services will be
hiring student painters($7.50 per hour)
for the paint crew this summer.
Full and part-time positions available.
For details and applications, please
come to Office Suite 100, Jones Hall.
If you are interested, please apply by
April 30, 1999.
Since
being
asked to
step up to
the plate
as the
Pirates'
head
baseball
coach two





Till Eiit Cifolinlin
sports
Ttmrnsy, AsrU �, 19�� 11
MWmMMHWtMW
Baseball coach
LeClair wins honor
Blaise Deniis
senior writer
Since
being
asked to
step up to
the plate
as the
Pirates'
head
baseball
coach two
seasons ago, Keith LeClair has
delivered a grand slam perfor-
mance at ECU.
After polling ECU coaches, stu-
dents, and athletes and researching
individual accomplishments,
LeClair has earned the 1999 TEC
Coach of the Year award. No
stranger to recognition or success,
LeClair is half-way through the '99
season and has already led his team
to their best stan since 1990 with a
28-6 (6-0) record. LeClair enters his
second season at ECU this year and
is coming off a 30-29 record in 1998.
Despite all of his awards and popu-
larity, LeClair remains modest and
is rather surprised at TEC's deci-
sion to name him coach of the year.
"I certainly appreciate it
LeClair said. "It's a little premature
when we've only played half our
season, but I appreciate the fact
that I guess people think we have
done a good job. To me it's not so
much an award for a coach as it is
for a team
Even though coaches often
receive the praise and honor for the
success of a team, LeClair believes
the players are the key. He gives his
players here at ECU the majority of
the credit for the achievements he
has made as the Pirates' frontman.
"I think good
players make up
good teams
LeClair said.
"To me that's
what it's all
about, it's not so
much an individ-
ual award as it is
a team thing.
Good players
make you suc-
cessful and I
think we work
hard, do the right
things and I
think the kids
know what we
are trying to
accomplish
LeClair
began his coach-
ing career in
1992 at his alma
Cheerleaders put
up top performance
Controversial penalty
proves costly
Morgan Hefner
staff writer
The ECU cheerleading squad trav-
eled to Daytona over Easter break
and put on a top 10 performance.
The ECU cheerleaders compet-
ed with 22 other universities for the
national championship, but due to a
penalty, they finished 18th.
Before the penalty was accessed
to trier scores the Pirates had put up
a score well enough to place them
10th and secure them a spot in the
final round. Only the top 10 teams
in the preliminaries advance to the
finals.
The Pirate cheerleaders were
charged with a safety penalty. The
premise of the penalty is that when
having a pyramid of two and a half
or higher, a squad must have a spot
on both the front and back sides.
The ECU squad had only one side
with a spot. This was the cause of
the deduction. However, the pyra-
mid in the routine was only two
high, thus not warranting a spot on
both the front and back.
The cheerleaders and their
coach protested the judges' deci-
sion, but to no avail.
"It was terrible said Russ
Saputo, squad member. "We had a
score good enough to beat Florida
State
Everyone on the team was really
pleased with the overall perfor-
mance of the group.
"We did really well and every-
one was pleased said Mindy
Walker, captain, "It was just that
mater, Western Carolina. In
six seasons at WCU, he
achieved a 229-135
record and never
suffered a los-
ing season. LeClair led
the Catamounts to
three Southern
Conference regular-sea-
son championships (1992,
93, 97) and four Southern
Conference Tournament
championships (1992, 93, 94,
97). He also earned his team at
WCU four NCAA Regional berths
(1992, 93, 94, 97). LeCIair's .
coaching success at WCU did
not go unrecognized as he was
honored with three Southern
Conference coach of the year
awards (1992,94,97).
LeClair was successful
as a coach for the
Catamounts, as well as a
player. From 1985-88,
LeClair was a key player
at WCU and was named
the Southern
Conference
Tournament MVP
in 1988. He was also
named to the All-
Southern
Conference team in I
1988 and holds the
'single-season records
for hits (101) and total
bases (179) at WCU.
"Hard work and
dedication, being
close knit as a group
are important to being
successful in the long
run LeClair said. "I've
never seen an individual
who worked hard and was dedicat-
ed not have good things happen to
them. If we can instill those things
into our players then in the long
run we have a pretty good chance
Clayton has
best season ever
Thrower ends Pirate
career with success
Keith LeClair wins inaugural TEC Coach of the Year
FILE PN0T0
to be a successful team
After nearly a decade, the Pirate
baseball team is back in the nation-
al rankings and this has brought
SEE LECLAIR PAGE 12
Mandy Reltter
staff writer
Fifth year senior, Michelle Clayton
has taken the track world by storm.
Clayton entered what is to be
her last year competing in the
ECU's signature purple and gold
colors and she has
set her goals
accordingly.
"My goals were
to win the ECAC
championship in
the hammer throw
and to qualify for
the NCAAs said
Clayton.
Clayton
achieved her first
goal by winning
the ECAC for the
hammer throw
during the indoor
season and is cur-
rently ranked 14th
in the nation, but plans to surpass
the competition. This season alone,
she has broken three school records
in the hammer, shot and discus, and
has also set the meet record while
at the Duke Invitational for the
hammer.
Clayton has routinely finished in
among the top collegiat competi-
tors at this season's meets. Over the
course of the season she has earned
the respect of her teammates and
her opponents.
i
But Clayton doesn't plan on
stopping here. There is still a lot of I
the season left and when that's
done, preparation begins for the
Olympics.
"I'm focusing on the Olympics
in 2004 for the hammer, that's my
main goal said Clayton. "I plan on.
going to the Olympic trials next.
year, but I realize that realistically
2004 is my best shot
Clayton is definitely going to be j
missed by players and coach'
Charles "Choo" Justice, but no one
will probably miss her more than'
her own sister, Margaret Clayton'
who has been following in her big
sister's footsteps.
"She is con-
stantly motivating
me said Clayton!
"If she wasn't out
there, I wouldn't
be the player that I
am now"
Clayton is not
only a great ath-
lete, but she is also
academically gift-
ed. Clayton is
among the few
who have been
named ECU
scholar athlete of
the year for her
success in the classroom.
"Michelle is one of the most
coachable athletes and the hardest
working said Coach Justice. "She
has committed herself to be the
best in and out of the classroom v
Clayton continues to search for
the goals she has set for herself as
she enters into the last half of the
season. Justice and her teammates;
hope the second half of her senior
year will be as productive as the
first.
Michella Clayton
PHOTO
NC State Wolfpaek
defeats Lady Pirates
Kamthe and Ellbring
notch lone victory
Cheerleaders entertained fans this season
FILE PHOTO
one penalty
Coach Paula Corbet was proud
of her team's performance.
"They did the best they have
ever done said Corbet.
Saputo was extremely energetic
when describing the competition.
"We had a clean routine with no
bobbles or drops Saputo said,
"That's all we could do
"We should be proud of what we
did said Saputo, "Everybody
should realize it is just great to be
picked
Morgan Hefner
staff writer
Monday the Lady Pirates tennis
team lost to a nationally ranked
N.C. State team 8-1.
The Wolfpaek women's tennis
team is ranked No. 64 nationally.
The match was played at the
Wolfpaek Tennis Complex where
the N.C. State team has suffered
few losses this season.
All six singles were swept by the
N.C. State squad. The closest
matches were at No. 1 singles and
No. 4.
Hrushida Kamthe lost 3-6, 3-6
and Meredith Spears went down 4-
6, 4-6. The Wolfpaek has several
players that were nationally ranked
in the juniors and who have had
much big match experience. This
experience proved fatal to the lady
Pirates in the singles competition.
The No. 1 doubles team of
Kamthe and Asa Ellbring, who
have showed great cohesion this
season, posted the only victory for
the lady Pirates. The duo was victo-
rious over the Wolfpaek team of
Pilar Piana and Francie Barragan.
The match was close, but the lady
Pirates stood victorious in the end
with a score of 8-6.
The other two doubles matches
were not as positive for the lady
Pirates, losing at No. 2 and No. 3
doubles to formidable opponents.
The players on the team took
the loss in stride.
"It is good for us to play teams
that are better than us, so we know
what to work on said Catherine
Morgan, senior.
Some students responded to the
match positively as well.
"I am glad that the singles
matches were as close as they
were said Kendra Johnson, fresh
man.
3
"I am glad that the singles

matches were as close as they
were.
Kendra Johnson
"I am surprised that one of thai
doubles teams won a match said
Sam Jenkins, sophomore, "l
thought a victory would come in
the singles
The lady Pirates still are undent
feared in the conference and overall
are 9-3. Thursday the they will trav-K
el to Washington D.C. to face a�
tough opponent at Georgetown
The match is slated to begin at 2:30
p.m.
Ken Griffey Jr. receives contract offer from Mariners
SEATTLE (AP)�The Mariners
have offered centerfielder Ken
Griffey Jr. an array of contract alter-
natives worth at least $105 million,
a newspaper reported.
Griffey told The Seattle Times
he had not yet responded formally
to the team's multiple offers, all of
which reportedly would reach the
level of Kevin Brown's record
seven-year, $105 million contract
with the Los Angeles Dodgers.
"Just to get it done? I don't think
so, not with two years on my pre-
sent contract he told The Times,
which earned a story Monday about
the offers.
Griffey refused to confirm the
offers to The Associated Press.
"I'm tired of all the questions
about my contract. If I'm not wor-
ried about it, I don't think anyone
else should be Griffey told The
AP just after batting practice before
Monday night's home opener.
"Why don't we just let myself
and Alex Rodriguez, whose con-
tract also ends in 2000 play base-
ball? It's 1999, let's worry about
what happens on the field. All I
want to do is play baseball and not
think about contracts. You guys are
not going to be able to figure me
out because there's nothing to fig-
ure out
Chuck Armstrong, the team
president who has handled the
intermittent negotiations with
agents for Griffey and Rodriguez,
was out of town on family business.
General manager Woody
Woodward would only confirm that
there were ongoing negotiations.
"I've said all along there are
negotiations going on. But I'm not
going to talk about it now. It's open-
ing night Woodward told The AP.
Griffey downplayed the dollar
figure while talking to The Times.
"It ain't about money he said.
He's been in Seattle for 10 years
and still hasn't won the World
Series he dreams about.
"And I'm not getting any
younger he said. "The one thing
you can't buy in this game is that
ring
He said he worries about what
the team will do about other play-
ers: Jay Buhner, Edgar Martinez,
Dan Wilson, David Segui and
Jamie Moyer.
"All of them are up at the end of
this year. If they all go unsigned, I
hope the Mariners don't expect
Alex and I to play with six, seven
guys we don't even know
He said he would object if the
Mariners tried to trade star short-
I
stop Rodriguez at the end of thej-
season.
"Everyone believes I will be thejj
one to stay, that I will be easier to �
sign than Alex That is not neces- J
sarily true Griffey said. "They;
have six or seven other guys to sign J
before they deal with us, and there
isn't one of them who wouldtrt j
defer money to help us win"
And winning is the most impor- j
rant thing to Griffey.
"I want this to be the Mariners
year for so many reasons he said. j
x j 'K ' �'
�ajaaakaaa
mmammmtmammmmammimmmmm





12 Tfc�rtaK Aitll I. t�89
LeClair
continuid (torn pigi It
LeClair much recognition and pop-
ularity around the Greenville area.
After a three game sweep of CAA
conference rival William and Mary
over the weekend, the Pirates
' moved up to 20 in the "Baseball
America" poll and to 26 in the
ESPNUSA Today Coaches poll.
The Pirates were last ranked
nationally when they came in 23rd
in the "Baseball America" poll on
March 29, 1990. Even though the
national ranking spotlight has given
the Pirates much recognition and
boosted attendance at Harrington
Field, LeClair still concentrates on
the big picture.
"I think you have to try and take
it day in and day out and if you're
ranked that's great and if not you
know what you have to do
LeClair said. "Keep everything in
sports
Thi East Carolinian
perspective and don't get caught up
and you can achieve things on an
individual or a daily basis and that is
what you have to do in athletics
Although LeClair tries not to put
too much emphasis on the rank-
ings, he understands what an honor
it is to be included in the national
polls. According to LeClair, it's
good to give the ECU baseball pro-
gram some national notoriety and
he believes that the rankings are a
reward for the outstanding perfor-
mance of this year's Pirate team.
"We've still got a ways to go to
achieve our goals, but I think it's
very deserving for our players and
the time and effort they put into
the program up to this point and
time LeClair said. "Hopefully we
will be ranked at the end of the year
when it really counts
There are many coaches at ECU
who have shared the level of suc-
cess LeClair has and some of these
coaches have nominated him as
their choice for coach of the year.
These coaches are impressed with
LeClair's quick rise to fame in just
his second season at ECU and
women's head basketball coach
Dee Gibson is one of these individ-
uals.
"I think it's the first time we've
been ranked in a long time)"
Gibson said. "He has done a phe-
nomenal job and really turnedthe
program around
LeClair's hard work and effort
have helped to encourage more
ECU students support Pirate base-
ball and follow the team's perfor-
mance this season. The Pirates'
record against their ACC foes under
LeClair's leadership also gained
recognition among ECU's student
population.
"The way he has beat up the
ACC teams this year has been great
for the fans said Christy Pratt, a
senior at ECU. "I am really
impressed with how far the team
has come
Mijatovic fined for boycott
MADRID, Spain (AP) � Real
Madrid has fined Yugoslav striker
Predrag Mijatovic 5 million pesetas
(dlrs 32,000, 30,000 euros) for boy-
cotting Sunday's game to protest
NATO air strikes against his home-
land.
"The club respects and under-
stands Mijatovic's situation, but he
cannot refuse to play team
spokesman Antonio Mendez said.
The fine is the maximum under
Real Madrid rules.
Mijatovic is from Montenegro,
one of the two republics in
Yugoslavia along with Serbia, and
his family lives in Belgrade. He said
he and other Yugoslav players
around the league felt they had to
help their compatriots.
"I respect the sanction fine but
don't agree with it- I'm disappoint-
ed the 30-year-old Mijatovic said.
"I will try to concentrate for the
next game against Cclta, but right
now I don't guarantee I will play
The club warned Mijatovic he
may be thrown off the team if he
continues his sit out
Spanish news reports said Real
Madrid President Lorenzo Sanz
also was irritated by Mijatovic's
presence at a demonstration
Sunday outside the U.S. Embassy
in Madrid, where the player was
seen wrapped in a Yugoslav flag.
Sanz argued that the club should
not get involved in politics.
Five other Yugoslav players,
including Slavisa Jokanovic of
Tenerife, Albert Nadj of Oviedo
and Goran Djorovic of Celta, also
refused to play Sunday. None have
been punished although some are
expected to be in the coming days.
Mijatovic, a member of the
Yugoslav nadonal team who has
been with Real Madrid since 19
and has played in the Spanish first
.division since 1993, scored the only
goal in last year's European
Champions Cup final against
Juventus that gave Real its first tide
since 1966.
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The Em Carolinian
sports
Tjurtssy, April 8,19M 13
i OH I III in S ARMYNAVY

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Wohler's struggles continue
ATLANTA (AP) Mark
Wohlers pitched well enough in
spring training to make Atlanta's
opening-day roster. He still seems a
Ion way from reclaiming his role as
the Braves closer.
Wohlers, trying to rebound from
a disastrous season, walked four and
gave up two runs in two-thirds of an
inning Monday as the Braves lost
their opener to Philadelphia 7-4.
Afterward, he cursed at reporters in
the clubhouse. "I don't want to dis-
sect everything I do he said
before stalking away. That's hardly
a realistic stance. Wohlers, who
saved 97 games for the Braves from
1995-97, inexplicably lost sight of
the strike zone last season. He had
a 10.18 ERA for the Braves, walk-
ing 33 in 20 1-3 innings, and was
even worse after going back to
Triple-A Richmond 36 walks in
12 1-3 innings and a 20.43 ERA.
After struggling in the early
weeks of spring training, Wohlers
seemed to regain in his form as the
season neared, earning a spot on the
25-man roster. He retired the
Cleveland Indians 1-2-3 in the final
exhibition game to earn his second
save of the spring.
In the opener, Atlanta trailed the
Phillies 5-4 going to the ninth when
manager Bobby Cox summoned
Wohlers from the bullpen to keep
the game close. The reliever
received a thunderous, standing
ovation from the 47,522 fans, at
Turner Field.
"I had some goose bumps
Wohlers said. That means a lot.
But I want to get guys out
He needed only one pitch to get
the first out, Mike Lieberthal on a
grounder to short
SEE W0HUERS PAGE 14
ECU Vdive Meal
Available at Greenville 10th Street McDonald's Only
April 9, 1999
All requests for funding must be
turned in to the SGA Office in MSC
255 by 5:00 on Friday, April 9.
Questions? Contact the SGA office at 328-4726
or the SGA treasurer at 328-4720.
Carry your bibleall week everywhere you go
here is a habit to pick up mod it and do what it says, if some one asks
tell them why you carry a bibleremember, what you say may save a soul.
aprilll
rally nite
7:00pm at Baptist Student Union
(beside 10th street Wendy's)
special guests
revelation steppers of praise
AW praise & worship team
fellowship, fun, be there. �
aprilU
prayer at the fountain
an all day prayer
please join in
between your classes
(in front of Wright Aud.)
aprill2
Christian T-shirt day
wear your
Christian paraphernalia
(t-shirts, hats, socks under-
wea uh you get the picture)
aprillS
inspiration day
show the love of Christ
as Jesus would
hold a door open for anyone
give encouragement
make it a habit
apriltt
personal witness day
share how Jesus Christ
has changed your He
(with gentleness and respect)
116
invite someone to church
honQ out with someone) and
take them to church, own Sunday





14 Ttwrtsy, Airil 8. 1988
sports
Wohlers
continusd from pigi 13
Desi Relaford then walked on
four pitches and stole second
before pinch-hitter Kevin Jordan
grounded to third. Chipper Jones
threw out the hitter at first, but
Relaford broke for third and trotted
home when first baseman Ryan
Klesko made a high throw back
across the diamond trying to get the
runner.
The error seemed to unnerve
Wohlers, who walked Doug
Glanvillc before Marlon Anderson
doubled off the center-field wall to
bring home another run. Wohlers
walked the next two hitters, Scott
Rolen and Rico Brogna, and Cox
mercifully emerged from the
dugout to remove the pitcher.
Wohlers threw 31 pitches only
11 were strikes.
"We put him in a very important
situation and the strike zone got
away from him Cox said. "We'll
have to wait and see. He threw so
many good innings during spring
training, I'd hate to say it all went
for naught. We'll get him in some
more situations and hope we can
get him back to where he was dur-
ing spring training
Wohlers muttered several pro-
fanities and stormed away from his
locker.
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Over 2,000 Ross Alumni are currently in
residencies or private practice in the U.S.
School of Medicine
Approximately 90 pass rate on USMLE on last
3 attempts tor first time test takers.
IAffiliated with over 40 teaching hospitals in the U.S.
where clinical programs are conducted.
Approved by N.Y N.J and California
Master's of Physical Therapy Program
Six semester, entry level, post-baccalaureate
professional program.
Clinical Training Sights in the United States.
WtUrri: www.ressmed.edv
I�Ml idealiilieirgtenwedUde
School of Veterinary Medicine
ITraditional US Veterinary School curriculum
I Staffed primarily by DVM or Ph.D Faculty
1�. Low Student to Faculty ratio
IClinical Affiliations with U.S. Veterinary Schools
WttSTO: www.ressvet.edu
B�8: �d�fa�iem�re�vt.ede
Refuse to
pay retail.
See the best selection of your favorite
name brands for men & women at
Greenville's Uptown Outlet.
You drank.
You danced.
Youhadseo
rvu'ssin3
Som
ethinj �
?
Free Pregnancy Tests
Call Carolina Pregnancy Center 757-0003
209-B South Evans Street (downtown near Courthouse)
Mark A.Ward
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� DWL Traffic and Felony Defense
� Assistant Public Defender 1988-1993
� Private practice since June 1993
Has Represented Thousands of Individuals
in District and Superior Criminal Courts
� Member - Pitt County Criminal Defense Bar
� ECU Class of 84, Campbell Law Class of "87
24 hour message service
� Visa and Mastercard welcome
wvvw.GreenvilleNCLarvyer.com
752-7529 �
onnection
Division Of SS&
210 E. 5th St. 758-8612 M-S 10-6 Sun. 1-5
NEW APARTMENT COMPLEX
NOWOPEN
Eastgate Village
On Moseley Drive, off of Greenville Blvd.
Two Bedroom Units
Reserve One Today
Also Ask About
Wyndham Court - Dockside
Apartments
2 Bedroom; 1 Bath & 3 Bedrooms; 2.5 Bath Units;
Kitchen Appliances; Dishwasher, WasherDryer Hookups
Short Term Contracts Available, Pets Okay With Deposit,
Convenient to ECU Campus, On Bus Route, On Site
Management, 24 Hr. Emergency Service
561-RENT or 531-9011
NOW TAKING APPUCAUONS FOR FAIL SEMESTER
Tht East Carolinian
itAKiti
Artington Village � Greenville
756-6670
More Than a Dai
Brighten up your wwtout
with New Spring Arrivals!
Cool Gear for
The EnterSoft Network
1-888-2 7 6-4ESN
INTERNET
ECU Student Special
$18.95lWonth
Available at:
Tlwnittle Computer CoQ
� Located at 106 Trade St. off Memorial Dr. n
(behind Outback Steakhouse)
Unlimited Access � 100 Digital, 100 56K � No Busies
252-355-9105
The ECU Student Media Board invites
applications for the position of
Expressions
The East Carolinian

Rebel
for the 1999-2000 academic year.
Applications are available in the Media Board office.
The deadline for submitting an application is
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14 AT 4 P.M.
For information, call the Media Board office at 328-6009.
SILVER Palls
BULLET
Doors Open: 7:30 p.m.
Stage Time: 9:00 p.m.
'AToucfiGf Class'
756-6278
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TUESDAY
Lingerie Night
JHBHHBAY
Amateur Night and
Silver Bullet Dancers
THURSDAY
Rock-N.Roll Night
FRI&SAT
Silver Bullet Exotic Dancers
tKmitmmmCmmmm1MliklmmillkmtwMkllm)
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. BEDROOI
�to� and w
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�with kitchen
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'$295 par m
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�lease one or
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summer,
ded. Tar I
51.
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1 bedroc
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� for 4 people.
� Large backyi
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SUBLEASE I
J Players Clu
. Summer mon
� for more info.
� ECU AREA t
� bath house. V
tral heat and ;
"rage. Call 83C
PRIVATE ROl
mer or Fall.
'campus. $171
jphone lineci
�erdryer inclui
12879.

(106 STANCH
Jl bathroom, t
'new central r
Call 353-2717
kendraOesn.m
TOWNHOUSi
ims, 2
icious. 752-18!
2203 night.
: FOR RENT:
apartment on
"Manor Apartm
� watersewer
I Now. Call 758
�I
�I
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RESPONSIBL
'wanted to shai
' blocks from c
Graduate studi
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" to share
per moi
IT754-2572.
SUMMER R(
to share thr
� mint near
� washer and
� pool access,
ties. We're i
Call 752-8910
'SUMMER SL
'Share two bed
'downtown 5th
.pus. Prefer fenr
. 12 bills. Ca
;789B.
-MALE ROOM
Jemester, non-i
urnished. was
month plus 1
cable included.
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are 2 bedroc
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FOR US1
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28-6009.
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;15 Thurtdiy, April 8. 1999
classifieds
L
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE WANTED
HELP WANTED
GREEK PERSONALS ANNOUNCEMENTS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
UMAX 2 BR. 1 bath, heat p
asherdryer hook-up, private t
Available immediately!
5 BEDROOM, house for rei
3 BEDROOM house for rent! Spa-
cious and well-kept. Beautiful hard-
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
I THREE BEDROOM house available
; 2 blocks from campus. Big enough
� for 4 people. Washerdryer hook-up.
� Large backyard area. Call Mike @
762-2879.
j WESLEY COMMONS North. One
bedroom $310 & two bedroom
� $400, near campus. ECU bus stop,
free water and sewer, washer and
; dryer hookup and on site laundry.
� pets considered. Call Wain right
� Property Management LLC 756-
'
� SUBLEASE UP to four bedrooms in
; Players Club Apartments, for
. Summer months. May thru July. Call
� for more info 321-8664.

ECU AREA big three bedroom, one
' bath house. Washerdryer with cen-
l$&&i$&StiFd Jrive ga"
(PRIVATE ROOM available for Sum-
imer or Fall. Walking distance from
Jcampus. $175 per month. Private
jphone linecable in room. Wash-
�erdryer included. Call Mike 9 752-
�2879.

l106 STANCILL DRIVE, 2 bedroom.
J1 bathroom, brick duplex near ECU,
'new central heatair, $425 month.
Call 353-2717 or 756-2766 or e-mail
kendraCesn.net
TOWNHOUSES NEAR ECU. 3 or 4
bedrpoms, 2 12 and 3 12 baths.
vyD �'�jSy'VJffcj0? � ?��'0e sea"
JlSSS'night.
say; pager 561-
! FOR RENT: 1 bedroom. 1 bath
'apartment on 10th Street in Forest
Manor Apartments. $325 per month,
watersewer included. Available
ROOMMATE WANTED
RESPONSIBLE AND fun roommate
'wanted to share 4 bedroom house 2
blocks from campus with parking.
Graduate students and professionals
ted. Available April. Cass,
IALE ROOMMATE needed
" to share 2 bedroom apt. Rent
per month plus 12 utilities,
ill 754-2572, leave a message!
SUMMER ROOMMATE wanted
to share three bedroom apart-
� mant naar campus. Includes
washer and dryer and outdoor
pool access, 13 rant and utili-
ties. We're clean and friendly.
Call 752-8810.
'SUMMER SUBLEASE needed to
share two bedroom apt. located on
i 5th St. ajJiaaS-from cam-
bills. Call NatalieRobin. 561-
MALE ROOMMATE needed after
semester, non-smoker. 2 BR, 2 bath,
furnished, washerdryer, rent $275
MMATE NEEDED ASAP to
are 2 bedroom. 1 12 bath, spa-
is apartment. Furnished wwash-
dryer. Rent $230 per month
and phone. Call
er & dryer. Rent J
BlRaisM
art ras
$2Kmonth. 13
cation! Must aaal
MATE needed in
im townhouse,
OR RENT: 1 room efficiency apt.
�with kitchen and bathroom, on 10th
Street in Forest Manor Apartments.
'$295 per month, utilities included.
Available Now. Call 758-1921.
FOR SALE
one owner, $3700 OBO. '363-1667 '
SLACK MALI prof. PhD wish to
�lease one or two bedroom apt. three
BED 1 12 bath apartment
summer, rent, water, sewage in-
ded. Tar River Estates. Call 830-
Wasliors ft Dryors;
x-large capacity far rait
ar sale. Cheap prices.
call 561-7814
LITTLE CAESAR'S Pizza is looking
for Assistant Managers. Call 757-
1212. ask for William, to set up an
appointment.
HELP WANTED
LOOKING FOR a summer ipbf Play
at day and work at night. The ECU
Telefund is hiring students for the
Summer and Fall of 1999 to contact
alumni and parents for the ECU An-
nual Fund Drive. $5.50 hour. Make
your own schedule. If interested, call
, M-TH between the hour of 3-6
p.m
ACTIVE DISABLED man seeks
physical assistance. Lifting, bathing,
dressing, driving, domestic chores.
Good experience for future health
care professionals. Contact Marty.
THE WASHINGTON High School
soccer program is looking for a
men's Junior Varsity soccer coach
for the upcoming Fall 1999 season.
FRATERNITIES. SORORITIES &
Student Groups: Earn $1000-$2000
with easy 3 hour CIS Fund Raiser
event. No sales required. Fund
Raiser days are filling up. so call
today. Contact Chris 800-829-4777.
EXPERIENCED CHILDCARE pro-
vider. Need person to come to my
home to keep children and run er-
rands. Must have previous experi-
ence; references will be required.
Part-time during school, full-time dur-
ing summer. If interested, send your
resume to Human Resources. PO
1527, Green
ALPHA OMICRON Pi - hope you
had an excellent time on Easter
Break! Love, your sister sorority
CONGRATS TO the Zeta Softball
team on your win last week against
Alpha Phil Love, your sisters
SARA. CONGRATS on your en-
gagement. We are so happy for you!
Love, your Zeta Tau Alpha sisters
SUBLEASE 1 bedroom at Park Vil-
lage, available end of May. Call 329-
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION: 11a.m
12:00 noon. The Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development is of-
fering this workshop, on Thursday,
April 8. If you are interested in this
workshop, please contact the Center
at 328-6661.
LEARN THE basics of Sea Kayaking
while enjoying the Goose Creek
State Park. April 15. Get wet and
paddle the Pamlico River, located a
couple of miles outside of Washing-
ton, NCI Trip departs � 2p.m. Cost is
(9 for students and membersnon-
Box'Tl 2. Greenville. NC 27835; oi
fax to 762-4217.
NEED SUMMER help at Hatteras
Beach. Free housing. Need two
males or females for retail seafood
market. Bonus offered. Call 252-986-
2215 or e-mail riskybOinterpath.com
EASTERN CAROLINA'S finest
adult entertainment is now hiring.
Call for interview. Playmates. 252-
NEEDED: SOFTBALL officials for
Greenville Recreation & Parks De-
partment Adult Spring Softball
League. Clinics will be held to train
new and experienced officials. How-
ever, a basic knowledge and under-
standing of the game is necessary. A
training meeting will be held Wed-
nesday. March 31 at 7:30 p.m. Soft-
ball season will run from May thru
August. For more information,
please call 329-4550 after 2 p.m.
n
CAMP PIS
Summer Camp
COUNSELORS & INSTRUCTORS
for private Co-ed youth camp
located in thebeauMiI mountains of
western North Carolina. Over25
activities, including All sports, water
skiing, heated pod, tonrts, art, horse-
badcfctokats. 15 to 816earn
$1350-$1750 plus room, meals,
laundry & great fun! Non-smokers
calf for applicationbrochure:
800-832-5539 or e-mail
CPPinewood�aol.com anytime!
NEED A PART TIME JOB?
RPSINC.
Is looking far MOWS Htfciras to load vans and
unload trailers for the am shift houis 30am to ten-
$7.SOhour; tuHton assistance available ate 30 (fays.
Future career opportunities In operations and manage-
tnent possible. Applications can he ailed out at 2410
United Drtve (near the aquatics center) Greenville
HIRING: ADULT entertainers and
dancers. Must be at least 18, have
own phone, transportation and be
drug free. Make up to $1500 week-
druo
ly. ft
or interview, call 758-2737.
THE GREENVILLE Recreation and
Parks Department is looking for life-
guards and swim instructors for
summer employment. Lifeguards
must have current lifeguarding, first
aid, and CPR certifications. May also
teach swimming classes, 30-40
hour work week. Salary is $6.00 to
$6.75 per hour. Swim Instructors
must have current WSI certification.
Will teach swim classes Monday
thru Saturday mornings. 20-25 hour
work week. Salary is $7.25 to $8.00
per hour. Apply by Friday, April 16,
1999 to the City of Greenville, Hu-
man Resources, 201 Martin Luther
King Jr. Drive (W. Fifth Street), PO
Box 7207, Greenville, NC 27835-7207.
For more information contact Danny
Bass at 329-4044.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CURIUM SKY SPIRTS
9191496-2224
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER TIMBERLAND
NAUTICA ABERCROMBIE
POLO EDDIE BAUER
AND OTHER NAME BRAND MEN'S CLOTHING
SHIRTS, PANTS, JEANS, SWEATS, JACKETS, SHOES, ETC.
WE ALSO BUY AND SELL:
GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also BroJsfin Gold Pieces
. Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TVs, VCRs, CD Players � Home, Portable
S
B
ft
�a
QUICK, EASY, HELPFUL
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
414 S. EVANS (UP THE STREET FROM CUBBIES)
752-3866
TUESDAY - SATURDAY, 9:00 - 5:00
(DRIVE TO THE BACK DOOR BEHIND PARK THEATRE)
ONE OF THE FAVORITE STUDENT STORES FOR YEARS
(IF YOU ARE SELLING, ID IS REQUIRED)
EXOTIC DANCERS $1000-$ 1500
weekly, no experience needed. 919-
580-7084. Sid's Showgirls, Gold-
sboro.
WANTED: PAYING $6.50 an hour
plus bonuses for qualified telemar-
keters. No Friday or Saturday work.
Hours: 5:30-9 p.m. Monday-Thurs-
day. 4:30-8 p.m. Sunday. Apply in
person between 5-6 p.m. at Energy
Savers Windows Er Siding. Inc
1806 Dickinson Ave Greenville, at
the side door.
UFEGUARDS AND beach vendors
needed in North Myrtle Beach for
1999 season. Will train. Housing pro-
vided if needed. For information call
843-272-3259.
PART-TIME Warehouse Assis-
tantSales Associate needed. 20-25
hours per week. Duties include mer-
chandise transfer, delivery, and cus-
tomer service. Due to the need for
delivery, working experience driving
a large box delivery van and an ex-
cellent driving record are a must.
This position requires heavy lifting.
Applicant chosen will be intelligent
clean cut, and outgoing. Weekend
work required. Trader Kate;s is a
drug free workplace. Apply in person
at Trader Kate s, 714 East Greenville
Blvd outside The Plaza Mall. 355-
6283
PERSONALS
DAWN IS the swirling vortex of in-
explicable.
WILLIAM DAVID, "The Singer of
Tales greets the rosy-fingered dawn
and wants to row her across the
wine dark sea to the sweet Isle of
Ithaca, the home of Oddessius in
Paradisium
GOT TAN- Want Pictures. Want pic-
tures to show off that tan from
Spring break? Or how about that big
smile because Summer break is al-
most here? Reputable amateur pho-
tographer wants young women for
portfolio shots. You get free pictures.
References available. Send note,
phone, and photo (if available - will
be returned). Paul Hroniak, 4413
Pinehurst Drive. Wilson, NC 27896-
9001. (252) 237-8218. hronjak@sim-
flex.com
ZETA TAU Alpha will host an Open
House today from 3:30 to 5:30 for
fnypne interested in sorority life. Call
57-1811 for more information.
PI KAPPA Alpha's Greek Goddess -
Monday night. April 12th at Pantana
Bob's. Are you ready to roll? Caution:
not for the weak or old!
THETA CHI will be having a memo-
rial service for the late Jim Broomall
for anybody who knew him. at the
Theta Chi house, Tuesday, April 13
from 7-9p.m. We thank everybody
for their support.
5on, NC! Trip departs � 2p.m. Cost is
9 for students and membersnon-
members $14. Be sure to register by
April 9, 5 p.m.
PROFESSIONAL RESCUER CPR re-
certification available at the SRC. 3
scheduled sessions to choose from.
Register before April 12. Cost $35
for studentsmembers.
IT HAS been previously published
that students would be able to use
Web registration 24 hours a day. it is
necessary that the system be
brought down from 9 p.m. until 1
a.m. nightly for routine backups of
the system. Students trying to use
the Student Desktop during these
times will get a message that the
system is down and the time it is
scheduled to be available again. Tel-
ephonic registration is also unavail-
able from 9 p.m. until 1 a.m. nightly
as published in the Schedule of
Classes. For your convenience the
scheduled hours of operation follow:
March 29. 1999 through August 24,
1999: Monday through Friday 1 a.m
6 p.m. 9 p.m12 a.m. Saturday 1
a.m12 a.m. Sunday 1 a.m. -4 p.m. 7
p.m12 a.m.
OMEGA PSI Phi Interest Survey.
Persons interested in attending an
interest meeting for Omega Psi Phi
Fraternity, Inc. should go by the
Dean of Students office and com-
plete a questionnaire. (Sign-upRe-
lease Form) Questionnaires will be
accepted to April 15, 1999. If
enough interest is shown, the Intake
Process will be started. James L
Ebron. Jr Area Intake Team Chair
THERE WILL be a free Aqua Fitness
Session. April 5-13 M-Th 5:30-6:30
p.m in the SRC pool. See what all
the talk is about! After all it's free
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING:
11a.m12noon.The Center for Coun-
seling and Student Development is
offering this workshop on Tuesday.
April 13. If you are interested in this
workshop, please contact the Center
at 328-6661.
TEST ANXIETY: 11A.M12N00N.
The Center for Counseling and Stud-
ent Development is offering this
workshop on Tuesday, April 13. If
you are interested in this workshop,
please contact the Center at 328-
6661.
TEST PREPARATION: 3:30-4:30
p.m.The Center for Counseling and
Student Development is offering this
workshop on Monday. April 12. If
you are interested in this workshop,
please contact the Center at 328-
6661.
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: 3:30-5PM. The Center for
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering this workshop on
Thursday. April 8 and April 15. If you
are interested in this program, con-
tact the center at 328-6661.
THERE WILL be a WheelPower
Dance on April 11 from 3-5 p.m. No
registration, it's free Dont miss
out.
THERE WILL be free aerobics April
5-13. Join many others as you burn
your way to feeling great! Meet SRC
COME SEE if you have what it
takes! The Climbing Wall will be
open April 8 from 7-9 p.m. This is
free for all members! $7 for non-
members.
LAST CHANCE to sign up for Golf
Advertise in
The East
Carolinian
classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE$4.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 5f each
STUDENT LINE AD RATE$2.00
for 25 "or fewer words
additional words 5$ each
Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to refuse fhis rate for any ad deemed to be
non-student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE .$1.00
add to above line rate for either BOLD or
ALL CAPS type.
.All classified ads placed by individuals or campus
groups must be prepaid. Classified ads placed by a
business must be prepaid unless credit has been
established. Cancelled ads can be removed from the
paper if notification is made before the deadline, but
no cash refunds are given. No proofs or tearsheets
are available. The Personals section of the classi-
fieds is intended for noncommercial communication
placed by individuals or campus groups. Business
ads will not be placed in this section.
All Personals are subject to editing for indecent or
inflammatory language as determined by the edi-
tors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADUNE
4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue
CANNABIS
LAST CHANCE to sign up for Golf
singles! Show your skins and make a
hole in one Must sign up by April
13 before 5 p.m. SRCT128
Partnership for a Drug-Free
North Carolina �rffi-g
Partnership for a Drug-Free America
1-888-732-3362
www.dnigfreeamerica.otg
NEED A
JOB?
TRY THE CLASSIFIEDS.
Work Outdoors I
Want Honest, Reliable Students
Wdependabls truckcar
TO MONITOR COTTON
(No experience necessary)
$7.oohr. mileage
mallfax resume
MCSI-Box 370
Cove City, NC 28523
Fax: 282-637-2128
(Nr. Greenville, New Bern, Kinston)
�a
Communications
Majors
The ECU Athletic Department's Media HelatIms
Olflee Is saefclM to Hire enthusiastic afcafaat
assistants far the 1H0-MM
preferably freadme aad
It's a treat aaaart�Ity te tale
�f eaiai�leattoaa. If Interested, call the
at 321-4522 lititM
lathaflsM





RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
328-6387
.edu
.

April St
7:00 pm
SRC

esta
ight


i
"omcrun 0��
mm m
Adventure
Haw River Kayak
4x April 24 Reg. April 16
I in ville Gorge Climbing Trip 2
5x April 23-25 Reg. April 16
Tar River Sea Kayaking Trip 2
2x April 28 Reg. April 22
Balcony Folk of the James, VA CanoeKayak
4x April30-May2 Reg. April 23
Cape Lookout Sea Kayaking
4x May 1-2 Reg. April 23
Arise
WbeelPower Dance Troupe Practice
April 11 3-5 PM SRC
Aquaexercise and Swim lesson 3
April 12 6:30-7:30 PM SRC Pool
Annual Camping Trip with Kayaking
Workshop at Goose Creek State Park
April 17-18 Weekend Trip SRC
Aquaexercise and Swim lesson 4
April 19 6:30-7:30 pm SRC Pool
"GetYour CAN to Class"
Apr. 5-16 See Schedule SRC 239 & 240 Free
Adult Intermediate Tennis Lessons
Apr.5-21MW 7:30-8:30 PM Minges Tennis Crts.
$15 mem.$25 non-mem. Mar. 22- Apr. 1
CPR-PR Re-Certification
Apr. 7 or 13 6:00-10:00 PM SRC Classroom
$35 mem.$45 non-mem. Mar. 22- Apr. 12
Lifeguard Training 11 � Weekend
Apr. 9-25 SRC Pool
$110 mem.$130 non-mem. Mar. 29-Apr. 8
Lifeguard Training Re-Certification
Apr. 12 & 14 SRC Pool $55 mem.$65 non-mem.
Mar.29-Apr.llMW 6:00 10:00 pm
Lifeguard Training Re-Certification
Apr. 20 & 22 SRC Pool
$55 mem.$65 non-mem. Mar. 2 -Apr. 11
TTH 6:00-10:00 pm
Intramurals
Golf Singles entry deadline
April 13 5:00 pm SRC 128
Softball Home Run Derby
April 14 8:00 pm Blount Fields
Fiesta Night special event
April 22 7:00 pm SRC
HSfcASSn
Recreational Services f
SPRING99
A New Year! A New You!
immmmmmmmmmj�?mimm$i,





Arts & Entertainment Magazine of The East Carolinian
vhhM
"M .
f
Thursday, April 8.1999
D. Miccah Smith
Fountainhead Editor
When you've seen Letter man drop a bowling ball off a building a
thousand times, or when staring at Jay Leno's chin starts lulling
you to sleep, it's time for a drastic change in your late-night view-
ing habits. Ever wish you had another choice?
Students are starting to rune into "The Late News a blatantly off-
color news and comedy show produced by ECU communications
majors, which airs Monday and Wednesday nights at 11:30 on
PCTV, channel 68.
"The Late News" is the brainchild of Adam Owens, Gabriel Lawlis
and Todd Riddick, who may have started started what will
become Greenville's latest media and entertainment trend.
"I've done a little filming, bad acting, says Riddick, who acts as
the show's audio manDuring the show I cue up the commer-
cials and the skits and that type of thing
Lawlis, who produces and directs the show, interacts with Owens
on the air as necessary.
"Adam's the main host; I'm almost like the cohostdirector. 1 just
sit there and remark he says.
"We have a website thafs coming dose to one thousand hits, and
it's only been up there a few weeks says Owens, who hosts the
show.
The website began advertising the news show before the first
scheduled filming on March 1, but word-of-mouth and recogni-
tion is starting to increase viewership.
"We get spotted on campus a lot says Owens.
See 5th Street continued on page 3
This local show is gaining popularity
CD Review
Carrie's legacy
of hot flashes
lives on
ipfl
Movie Review
Before Hanks
was famous, he
was in the Peace
Corps
Video Review
2 Skinnee J's
worked the Attic
crowd into
a frenzy
&2ft
wlwtjkridz
fountainhead � 2nd Floor Student Publications Building Greenville, NC 27858 � Phone 328-6366 � Fax 328-6558 � Advertising 328-2000 �www.fountainhead.ecu.edu





Band Review
2 Skinnee fs throw
down NY style
tan got to
Patrick "Sparkles" McMahon
Staff Writer
Dammit, Dammit, Dammit. Why is
it that every time I go downtown to
review a really good band, they have
to have an opening act that shows
them up? I mean, you would think
that they would at least have the
brains to set up the crowd with a
mediocre band to get the fans in the
mood for music but nooo-oooo.
Live from the venue that Playboy
ranked in the top 100 of the nation's
college bars, the Attic, comes 2
Skinnee J's in all their intcrgalactic,
galaxy-melting glory. But as with all
of my concert reviews, I must give
at least a little ink to the opening
act, Kottonmouth Kings, out of LA.
The Kottonmouths are a coalition of
bas-assed white guys who seem to
have inhaled a few too many bongs
hits of that wacky tobacky. These
guys came out to heatbeat-altering
bass and drums, and threw down
for the entire 40-minute set. Think
Rage Against the Machine with the
political button turned down a cou-
ple of notches combined with
Cypress Hill's love of buddha (the
plant, not the guy) and you can
come to a solid conclusion as to
what the Kings are all about. I have
to admit they put on a great show,
but it's what happened to me after
the show that pissed me off. More
on that later.
So now on to the real band of the
night, the infamous 2 Skinnee J's,
hailing out of good old NYC. As
anyone who has ever been to a 2
Skinnee's show can tell you, the
front row is not a place for the faint
of heart. Rampant moshing and
body slamming is not exactly the
best thing to surround yourself with
if you're good and sober, as I was
(hey, I had to be conscious to review
See Skinnee J, continued on page 7
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Amanda G. Austin Managing Editor
MiccahSmith Editor '
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VicfeoReview
"Volunteers" is classic Hanks material
Ryan Kennemur
StaffWriter
There was a time, albeit long ago,
that Tom Hanks wasn't the superstar
mega-actor that he is today. Now he
plays such memorable characters as
"Forrest Gump the head astronaut
in "Apollo 13 and that military guy
that saved Matt Damon. But I
remember him fondly as the wise-
cracking and cynical funnyman in
such movies as "SplashThe Money
Pit" and "Bachelor Party? The best
of his movies of that era, in my opin-
ion, was the little-seen gem
"Volunteers
Tom Hanks is absolutely great as the
self-centered rich boy who flees to
the Peace Corps to evade being
killed for his gambling debts. He
gets a chance to show off his keen
lorn Hank! stars in this comedy
sense of comic timing, which is one
thing he doesn't get to do these days.
The Tom Hanks we know these days
would never resort to cheap laughs
these days, but lam living proof that
there is an audience for it.
The plot is this: it's the late 60s and
Laurence Bourne HI (Hanks) is
about to graduate from Yale. During
his college career, he has racked up a
gambling debt of $30,000, the whole
while believing that his rich father
would take care of it. Of course, the
father says no, and so Laurence
trades places with his roommate
and goes to Thailand with the Peace
Corps. On the plane trip over, he
meets Tom Turtle from Tacoma
(John Candy) who is a little too
gung-ho about being in the Peace
Corps for Laurence's liking. He
See Hank, continued on page 6
Its Your Place
To Catch a Free Filch
APRIL 8-10 AT 8 P.M. AND APRIL 11 AT 3 P.M
IN HENDRIX THEATRE.
Ringmaster (R) Incest, adultery and love triangles
may be taboo to some, but its all in a day's work for
the producers of the Springer Show. Well, these
same guys decided to leave the tame world of TV
and make a full-length movie that holds no punches
- literally! You and a guest get in free when you pre-
sent your valid ECU One Card.
To Knock Em Down
Give your Monday a boost from 1:00 - 6:00 p.m.
with 50 cent bowling (shoe rental included). Turn
Wednesdays and Fridays into discount days by
rolling 10 frames for just Si (shoe rental included)
between 1:00-6:00 p.m. at the Outer Limitz Bowling
Alley in Mendenhall Student Center's basement.
72? Display Your Creations
FRIDAY, APRIL 9, BETWEEN 9 A.M. AND 7 P.M
IN THE MENDENHALL GREAT ROOM
The lllumina Exhibit will accept j,
entries from students in nine cat-
egories: Communication arts,
printmaking. drawing, painting,
textiles, ceramics, sculpture.
metal design, and foundations.
The entry fee is $3.00. with a maximum of three
entries, but the payoff is very substantial. You must
present you ECU One Card when entering art pieces.
To Shoot Some Pool
Whether you need to unwind from a stressful week
or your competitive juices are flowing, the billiards
room in the Pirate Underground will do the job. Just
bring your valid ECU One Card and a little money and
rack em up. .
To See a Future Classic
APRIL 14 AT 8 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Shakespeare in love (R) The Great Bard finds him-
self with burdened with problems � Writer's block,
no social life, a severe cash flow problem, and his
latest project, which is due. is barely underway.
Sound familiar? Will finally turns things around,
only to encounter a whole different set of problems!
which include cross-dressing and a clandestine,
affair. You and a guest get in free when you present
your valid ECU One Card.
To Be Scared
APRIL 15-18 AT 8 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
I Still Know What You Did Last Summer (H) This one
takes place one year after the original movie by ECU
grad Kevin Williams. Julie and her roommate. Karla.
take their boyfriends to the Bahamas, only to find
they are still being stalked by the hook-wielding
killer who knows what she did last summer You
and a guest get in free when you present your valid
ECU One Card. ,
MSC: Hoorc: MMTpun, 8 i.W-H,p.m1;fri 8 a,m.dr�,ht, Stt, JtoHnMidnight; Sua, Ml �





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Movie Review
"Carrie 2" pleases hardcore fen
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D. Miccah Smith
Fountainhead Editor
Once in a long while a sequel comes
along that is nearly as entertaining
as the original movie. In horror, this
rarely happens. But Carrie 2 is as
close as it's come in years.
Rachel is a teenager with a tattoo, a
basset hound, a best friend and a
terrible secret she possesses the
same mental powers used by Carrie
to destroy her high school more than
20 years ago.
But things are a bit different this
time around: Rachel is at least
socially skilled, and has the ability to
make friends. And instead of a psy-
cho mother who screams, "They're
all going to laugh at you she's got
two laconic foster parents.
Things seem almost normal for our
heroine, until her friend gets deflow-
ered by a crass guy looking to score,
and jumps off the roof of their high
school out of depression.
With the sickeningly realistic crack
of her head shattering a car wind-
shield, this scene jump-starts a plot
filled with intrigue, revenge and ill-
fated love as Rachel's tame existence
takes a sharp slant towards the
macabre.
As the sole survivor of Carrie's fiery
rampage, Sue Snell (played again by
Amy Irving) has become the high
school's guidance counselor. She
tries to help Rachel deal with her
telekinetk powers, and to avert her
anger at the boy whose insensitivity
led to her friend's suicide, but Rachel
will accept no help.
Meanwhile Rachel falls in love with a
recovering sexaholic jock, and his
friends, whose skirt-chasing exploits
have been the ruination of several
freshmen, scheme to degrade her.
As the action intensifies, flashes of
the original "Carrie" movie's final
scenes.combined with surrealistic
black-and-white sequences, prepare
the audience for the bloodbath to
come.
In traditional "Carrie" style, Rachel is
made the belle of a party, then pub-
licly humiliated. Naturally Rachel,
who resembles nothing more than a
pissed young Sigoumey Weaver,
unleashes her powers on the hapless
teenagers. Details like the throbbing
tattoo of a heart on her arm, and a
vine stigmata that pops out around
her neck and face, add an over-the-
top spookiness to her that's no buck-
et of pig's blood, but does the job.
Ill just say that Pve never seen a guy
take that long to drown, and i never
knew spear-guns could be used that
way.
And here's a little reminder in case
you've forgotten how the original
"Carrie" ended: don't take your eyes
off the screen until the credits roll, or
you'll miss the best part.
Sth Street continued from pane 1
In the grand tradition of The Daily
Show and Saturday Night Live news,
Owens and the boys lampoon campus
news, enact tasteless skits and conduct
interviews with unlikely subjects.
"We had a clown, a woman from the
Humane Society, a gospel singer
They end up walking out feeling very
dirty and taken advantage ofT jokes
I Owens.
Recently, Owens interviewedThe
drug czar of East Carolina who may
or may not have been an actual drug,
distributor. He wore a Halloween mask
as a disguise, and later wrestled with
Owens during a Kauffmanesque
moment
Audience response is also important to
Owens and the crew, who willingly air
calls from anyone, including friends
calling to discuss business or personal
matters, or people wanting to sign up
for the show's "Fifth Street Live" soft-
ball team.
Homemade skits are a usual addition
to the off-the-cuff rapport between
Owens and his victim(s): last week, the
group enlisted the help of a female
friend for their "Touched by an.Angel"
send-up, which proved hilariously dis-
gusting, true to form. j-jLj. j 1 i
Every facet of "The Late News" is pro-
duced by the trio, plus one of several
cameramen who drift in and out'of
their employ.
"We do everything: go get our own
advertisers, and do all that work, film
their commercials says Lawlis,who
recalls only one commercial that they
did not produce. Although the com-
mercials are neither funny nor enter-
taining, they add to the show's
"Wayne's Wrld" ambience.
"The Late News" may never compete
on campus for the attention of devoted
Letterman or Leno fans, but for those
or us who enjoy channel-surfing, it's
the perfect show to check in on now
andthen: t � f' VI�
Andifyousurfthewebaswell.you ;
can check out their site at fifth-
streetlive@somewhere.net
Q) Review
NW& hits CD has all
the good stuff
Ryan Kennemur
Rapper
If you were to ask me what rap artist
paved the way for the urban rhyme-
slingers of today, I'd have a hard time
deciding on just one. Of course I'd have
to say Grandmaster Flash and the
Sugarhill Gang, because they got the
ball rolling. Then, I'd go towards Public
Enemy, because they made it into a
statement rather than just a long child-
ish poem. I'd then head on over to see
Run-DMC, for they took rap to a new
level by fusing street-wise lyrics with
rock and roll, all the while keeping it a
style all their own with the Adidas
shoes (which they even wrote a song
about) and suits.
By the late 80s, however, rap had
become stapled to violence and street
crime. What does a good businessman
do? That's right! Rappers went where
the action was, and thus was bom a
new term called "Gangsta Rap The
figurehead of this movement was a
supergroup called N WA, or "Niggaz
With Attitude This "chorale" of sorts
was made up of Dr. Dre, Eazy-E, ice
Cube, MC Ren, and Yella. With their
violent lyrics and profanity, the group
was an instant success. But with this
success came trouble. When their
album was banned in a few states and
many arrests disrupted the group, the
boyz called it quits in just short of four
years.
Disbanded and disengaged from every-
thing around them, the members start-
ed out on their solo work. Priority
Records has just released a new two-
disc set that chronicles their efforts, as
well as their offshoots and prodigies,
apdy titled "The NWA Legacy"
The best person to start with is, of
course. Dr. Dre. His album "The
Chronic" is considered by many to be
the best rap album, not to mention
most influential, to ever grace the CD
racks. On it, he incorporated the help
of the D.O.C, Rage, Bushwick Bill,
Kurupt, Daz, cousin Warren G and the
immortal Snoop Doggy Dogg. He later
produced Snoop's first album
"Doggystyle" and then the soundtrack
to Murder Was the Case.
The latter tide tune is included here, as
Sea NWA, continued on page 6
answers to Tuesday's East Carolinian Crossword
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Thursdav.April8.B99 3






April 8
A.J. Fletcher
Recital Hall
-Faculty Chamber Music Recital
Backdoor
-Gk) Informer Hip-Hop Showcase
Cats Cradle
-Olivia Tremor ControlElf Power
The Cellar
-Karaoke 9fl0-dose
Chef's 505-Arvid Ray Munson
Peasant's Cafe
-Freak OutA Tribute to Parliament
and Zappa
Sports Pad
Splash
-Karaoke l():(X)-closc
Weekly Events Cale
w Yniir comnlete vuue. to uncomine events in Greenville am
Your complete guide to upcoming events in Greenville an
April 9
A.J. Fletcher
Recital Hall
-Horn Ensemble 8.O0PM
The Attic
-Local 420 Records (Phoenix Room)
Backdoor
-Glo Informer Hip-Hop Showcase
Beef Barn
-Cynthia White
Cellar
-Karaoke 9:00-close
Chefs 505
-Arvid Ray Munson
Deadwood
-Stampede
Gray Art Gallery
-School of Art Thesis Exhibit 5 PM
(through May 1)
Hard Times
-Under the Gun
Mendenhall
Movies
Ringmaster"
Peasant's Cafe
-Mandorico
Son II Studio
-Line Dancing
Southern Nites
Nightclub
-Diggerfoot
����������������������������������������������������������
Sports
PadSplash
-Karaoke 10:(KJ-dose
Texas 2 Step
-Sagebrush
Saturday
April 10
The Attic
-Techno Dance (Phoenix Room)
Big Jake's Bar
-Karaoke and open mic
Cat's Cradle
-The Nashville Bluegrass Band
Cellar
-Karaoke 9fl0-dose
Chefs 505
-Arvid Ray Munson
Deadwood
-Stampede
Hard limes
-Under the Gun
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Son II Studio
-Sound of Country
April 11
Courtyard
Tavern
-Groove Riders
Peasant's Cafe
-Open Mic Night
Monday
April 12

A.J.Fletcher
Recital Hall
-onternbrary Jazz Ensemble 800
' ' � '� I ! :
Peasant's Cafe
$ubf�ine4fiEREESH0W!
��������������� �����

liiesday
April 13
A Matter of
Taste
-Live Blues
Boli's
-Magic Piper
Peasant's Cafe
-(Mugnite): Homonudeus
ATTIC
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Aprils
TheAtti
-Comedy Zone
HardTii
-Shaggin'mix at 6
Hardy's Original B
luring Holiday Bai
Menden
Movie
"Shakespeare in
Sports!
Splash
-Karaoke lOflO-cl
��-�'�������.��
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-rW�
nts in Greenville and surrounding areas
Wednesday
April 14
The Attic
-Comedy Zone
Hard Times
-Shaggin' mix at 6 w Steve
Hardy's Original Beach Party fea-
turing Holiday Band
Mendenhall
Movie
- "Shakespeare in Love"
Sports Pad
Splash
-Karaoke 10:00-dose
.���M�ja��.�a.��.��w�.����WV ���'��
For More Information
The Attic
Greenville, NC 752-7303
Backdoor
Greenville, NC 752-7049
The Beef Barn
Greenville, NC 756-1161
Big Jake's Bar
Williamston.NC 799-0022
BW-3
Greenville, NC 758-9191
Cat's Cradle
Carrboro, NC
(252) 967-9053
The Cellar
Greenville, NC 752-4668
Chef's 505
Greenville, NC 355-7505
The Corner
Greenville, NC 329-8050
The Courtyard Tavern
Greenville, NC 321-0202
Dcadwood
Greenville, NC 792-8938
The Elbo
Greenville, NC 758-4591
Hard Times
Greenville, NC 758-9922
On-Campus Activities
328-6004
Pantana Bob's
Greenville, NC 757-3778
Peasant's Cafe
Greenville, NC 752-5855
Sports PadSplash
Greenville, NC 757-3658
Son II Studio
Greenville, NC 830-5279
Southern Nites Nightclub
946-5785
Texas 2 Step
Greenville, NC 752-3600
Underwater Cafe
Greenville, NC 754-2207
Wrong Way Corrigan's
Greenville, NC 758-3114
liml
Preview
Cat's Cradle
Saturday April 10
The Nashville Bhiegrass Band
"Don't forget your roots" is a popular
saying these days, lfyouareafirm
believer in this doctrine, and you
like country music, you should take
a liking to bluegrass. The Nashville
Bluegrass band has been stomping
out fine bluegrass since 1984 and
they are still going strong. Their
upbeat music displays an immense
musical talent and lyrical genius.
What to Expect: A group of older
men with guitars, banjos, man-
dolins, fiddles, etc. dressed to the hik
in their Sunday suits singing praises
and songs about getting away with
murder in the typical bluegrass
murder ballad.
Peasant's Cafe
Tuesday April 13
Homonucleus
Tired of the same oT same' oT? In the
mood for an Irish reel?
Homonucleus returns to Peasant's
Cafe with their arsenal of Irish folk
ditties. The musicians display a
multitude of skills by playing man-
dolins, fiddles, pennywhistles, flutes,
and the occasional washboard.
What to Expect One critic
describes Homonucleus as: "A mix-
ture of slightly skewed original
songs and rockin'arrangemwHjTpf. .
jigs, reels,arj other metodiesrjrjm ��
the British isles and beyond A daffi-
er Fairpbrt Convention
PvS
weekly top hits
Top 15 Songs
15. Collective Soul
-Rutf
14. Loudmouth
"By"
13. Gigolo Aunts
The Kg lie
12.Harvey Danger
"Save it For later"
ll.Poster
Children
"Accident Waiting to
Happen"
lO.ImperialTeen
"liprtidrT
9. Michael
8. trinket
"Unbehaved"
7.BooRadleys
"High as Monkeys"
6.MxPx
"Never Learn"
5.Sebadoh
"Flame"
4. Jimmy Eat
World
"Lucky Denver Mint"
3.Big Rude Jake
"Buster Boy"
2.Sparklehorse
"Sick of Goodbyes"
1 .Built to Spill
nbaVfaeWghf
t;
it
u
;
. � � �
Carmikel2
8MM R
Analyze This R
BabyGeniuses PC
lOThingsIHate
AboutYou R
Dougs First Movie C
EoTV PG-13
Forces of Nature PG-13
Never Been Kissed PG-13
TneOutoffowners PG-13
TheMatrix R
TheModSquad R
The Rage Carrie 2 R
True Crime R
Wing Commander PG-13
Located at
1685 East Fire Tower Rd
Greenvilk.NC
Telephone: 3534988
Carolina East 4
Life Is Beautiful
TheCorrupter
The King and)
;lnLove
PG-13
R
G
R
Located at
Carolina East Convenience Center
Memorial Drive
Greenville, NC
Telephone: (252) 756-1449
Buccaneer
A Bug's life
The Prince Of Egypt
feu've Got Mail
G
PG
Located at
Greenville Square Shopping Center
275 Arlington Blvd.
GfqnwafcNC
Telephone: (252) 756-3307
' '
mur�toy, April 8,1999 S
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��� �
erican
ODDITIES
Coyote caught in Central Park
NEW YORK (AP) What sounded like a
April FooTs hoax was no joke: A coyote
was felled by a tranquilizer dart after
roaming Central Park for two days.
Henry Stern, the parks commissioner
known for goofy publicity stunts, had
to persuade skeptics that the animal
sighting was real.
That became evident shortly before
noon Thursday, when after a frantic
flight through part of the 2.5-mile long
park, the frightened coyote got itself
trapped inside the fenced-in Hallett
bird sanctuary, just steps from busy
Fifth Avenue.
After a half-hour pursuit, Officer Steve
Collins zapped the animal with a dart
from about 10 feet away. Still not done,
the quicksilver quadruped escaped by
swimming across a pond, passed
skaters at Wollman rink, and raced
eight blocks north before collapsing in
a grassy area think he was suprised
to see everybody. He's not used to peo-
pleCollins said.
Parks spokesman Edward Skyler said
the coyote was healthy except for the
dart. He said it was sent to the Bronx
Zoo, where it would rest before being
examined today. It will then be
returned to the wild or placed in a zoo,
Skyler said. Its sex and weight were not
immediately known.
Kyle Burkhart, a spokesman for the
Center for Animal Care and Control,
said the coyote posed no threat to
humans but might have attacked a dog
or cat.
Some passersby were blase' about the
coyote caper.
"Up in the country we have coy-dogs
(mixed breeds),but I know animals
and 1 can't picture a coyote choosing
Manhattan as its home base said
Ginny Schroder, who was walking two
Labradors, an Irish setter, a golden
retriever and border collie.
"It's not a big deal - we see them all
the time, crossing the road, in our back
yard said Peter Gordon, a school-
teacher chaperoning a student group
from Palm Springs, Calif.
Audubon magazine says some 400,000
coyotes are killed annually in the
United States, mostly in the West
where they are reviled as livestock
killers. Increasingly, the hardy species
has spread east.
Stern said coyotes have been seen in
Westchester County, on Long Island
and on a couple of occasions in the
Bronx, but this was the first confirmed
sighting in Central Park, which it could
have reached only by crossing a bridge
or traversing a rail tunnel.
Skyler said a parks employee had spot-
ted a coyote two days earlier in
Riverside Park, a mik or more to the
north, but didn't report it until after
the Central Park sighting.
Stern said there were signs the coyote
found shelter under a rock ledge in the
bird sanctuary, a stone's throw from
Fifth Avenue's luxurious Hotel Pierre.
Young elk calls a herd family
OURAY, Cokx (AP) A young elk adopt-
ed by a group of Holstein cows after
he was abandoned by his herd has
quickly become the talk of the town.
The confused yearling caught the
attention ofOuray residents in
October when other elk in his herd
jumped a pasture fence, leaving him
stranded with the cattle.
For weeks he lingered along US. 550,
gazing eastward where the other elk
had last been seen heading towards
the mountains.
But when Jeff Woolston began bring-
ing in hay to feed his cattle, the scruffy
brown elk decided to join the gang -
no matter they were plump, black-
and-white Holsteins.
6 Thursday, April 8.1999
"For a while, he was all stressed out,
but now he sticks right with the cows.
He's one of the crowd Woolston said.
The young elk, named Isabulla by
Ouray residents, now bounds up to
the truck behind the cattk when
Woolston pulls up with hay.
He's started acting like one of the herd
in other ways, as well, nuzzling, licking
and frolicking with the cows, who
have welcomed him in.
Now, everyone in Ouray is keeping an
eye oil the town's new celebrity.
If Isabulla cannot Ik seen from the
highway, the Wooistons' phone starts
ringing with people who want to
know where he is, �. .
The parks boss, who likes to assign
nicknames to everyone, said there
were "several possibilities" for the coy-
ote. "One is "Lucky Pierre because of
where he lived - and he is very fortu-
nate that he escaped injury he said.
r).
Mrtl
Hank, continued from page 2
changes seats and meets Beth
Wexler (Hanks' future wife Rita
Wilson) whom he takes a liking to.
The problem is that she is there
because she wants to be, whereas
Laurence continually makes state-
ments likeIts not that 1 cant help
these peopleits just that I don't
want to
Their mission is to build a bridge to
the other side of the river in a small
waterfront village. What they don't
know, however, is that the Thailand
underground drug-ring is counting
on the bridge to expand their busi-
ness, as they plan to turn the small
village into an airport. At any rate,
Tom and Beth start to build the
bridge, and Laurence teaches the
natives to gamble. He meets a
young native named At Toon, who
learned English while in a Beijing
school. As the bridge begins to look
more and more like a bridge, Tom
Ibttle is kidnapped and brain-
washed by a underground rebel
group determined to overthrow the
government.
As the truth unfolds before the
Peace Corps helpers, a love interest
bubbles up between Beth and
Laurence, as she begins to look past
his cynical and sarcastic exterior. In
the end, all of the conflicts (the drug
ring, the underground rebel alliance,
and the fact that the villagers weren't
too crazy about the idea of a bridge
in the first place) are resolved in a
huge earth-rattling explosion.
Its the little things, like saying I'm
just going by height here, but are you
are in charge here. Though mis isiit,
one of Tom Hanks more memorable
movies, I just can't help but love his
world-weary and spoiled character.
Rent it and see for yoursett
Hm continued from page 3
The latter tide tune is included here, as
well as the songs "Let Me Ride
"California Love"w 2PACKeep Their
Heads RinguTand more. A lew years
later. Dr. Dre moved on to make his own
label called Aftermath. His first album
on the label was a huge disappointment.
His partnership with Snoop ended when
Dre proclaimed "Gangsta Rap is dead
Next, let's talk about Ice Cube. His suc-
cess, arguably, has been the greatestor
at least the longest-lasting. He's made
many solo efforts, all of them great in
their own right. He also started the
group Da Lench Mob in 1992, and
scored a huge radio hit with "Guerillas
In Tha Mist Since then, he's boosted
the career of Mack 10 and made his own
supergroup called the Westside
Connection. Their songs on this disk
indude"It was a good daySteady
MobbinGuerillas In Tha Mist and
more.
The history of Eazy-E ended very
abruptly shortly after his label Ruthless
Records was formed. He launched the
careers of Bone Thugs N' Harmony,
Flesh N'Bone, and Mo Thugs. Then, on
March 20th, 1995, Eazy-E (Eric Wright)
died of AIDS. This sent a Shockwave of
mourning, and in some cases cheer,
through the rap culture. His songs
included are "We Want Eazyand"Boyz-
N-Tha-Hood
MC Ren and Yella are less noteworthy,
though MC Ren had success with his
solo album Kizz My Black Azz. His song
on the disc is "Final Frontier
NWA has a few songs included here, just
so you remember what everything
spawned from. They are "Straight Outta
Comptonthe very controversial
Tha PoliceAfwayz Into Somethin and
a megamix featuring some of their most
famous songs. The set also has songs
from The D.O.C Daz DiUinger, and
Above the Law.
NWA influenced a multitude of artists,
and I'd be willing to bet that one of
them is Master P. The fact that Snoop
Doggy Dogg (now just "Snoop Dogg")
has signed with his No Limit record
label further influences that theory. But
Ihe crazy thing is, I doubt that he will be
the last one to dip from the NWA well.
Their demise was not unlike that of Kurt
Cobain (I'll be killed for saying this) in
that they were the ones that shaped the
music around themand this disc is a
welcome monument to a group that was
right on time.
TEC has teamed up
with Bams and Noble
to bring book reviews to
(Mi.
i oar new program
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n wl and review best sellers ir a gwd
cause. Kadi Sermsler we kill donate these
best sefkrs lo It Ronald MrDnmld House
when' Ihr'v will be avaibbk' far Ihe family
numbers lit tiTiniiull) ill rhikren to mad.
If you would like In wrile a review ' ,
please tall MiuWt at :OH 6.166 : : .

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0
ARIES:
(March 21-April 20)
Keeping secrets won't get you far this
week. Your information could make
or break a situation, so don't with-
hold what you know. There is a
career move for you in the very near
future, but it will be quite a large step
to take, so embark with caution and
optimism.
TAURUS:
(April21-May21)
You have a chance to create a solid
foundation for future security. Be
careful to avoid getting caught up in
getting ahead at the expense of your
peace of mind or creating havoc
within your family. Don't jump to
conclusions with romance, take it a
step at a time.
GEMINI:
(May 22-June 21)
Make sure to not commit yourself to
something that may stifle and hold
you back. Don't stall in your deci-
sions, just say you are not ready and
leave it at that. There seems to be
some tension between you and your
mate, when you kiss and make up,
talk honestly.
CANCER:
(June 22-July 23)
You seem to have a restless sort of
irritability, which may just get you
into trouble. It's important to keep
your anger in check or you may find
yourself cutting off those who are
most important to you. Your current
romantic partner may surprise you
with lots of attention.
LEO:
(July 24- August 23)
You are doing a great job making
finances stretch to their limit, but
enough is enough, ami something
has got to go. If you haw the authori-
ty to make the cut, go for it. Changes
at work may have you feeling like
you have been overlooked, but that is
far from true.
VIRGO:
(August 24-September 23)
A recent investment may prove
much more lucrative than you ever
expected, but getting out early may
not be such a bad idea. Be sure to
take are of all the details though,
however insignificant they may be. If
you are feeling unmotivated, find a
way to psyche yourself up.
LIBRA:
(September 24 - October 23)
Juggle your funds to the best of your
abilities, you might consider consoli-
dating your debts so you have only
one payment to deal with. Any home
repairs now will probably be quite
costly. Emphasize what you have in
your life that brings you enjoyment
and satisfaction.
SCORPIO:
(October 24 - November 22)
Your intuitive hunches are right on,
so don't justify them away. Emotions
which have been held in check for
some time need to be unleashed
now. Allow yourself to express what
you feel inside, striving to maintain a
sense of proportion - things aren't so
bad
SAGITTARIUS:
(November 23 - December 21)
Any risks concerning money this
week will be well worth the effort. Is
there someone trying to hold you
back under the false impression that
it is for your own good? It's time to
make those decisions on your own.
Ifyou are being manipulated by
another, its time to go it alone.
CAPRICORN:
(December 22 - January 20)
This week your passions may get the
best of you and anger your mate. If
you are,at the very least, aware of
this possibility, it can probably fore-
stall any unpleasantness. If stress
has gotten you down, take time for a
rather childlike activity, helping you
to relax.
AQUARIUS:
(January 21 - February 19)
Rethink the reasons for your motiva-
tion in the workplace - you may
need some alterations to previous
plans. Listen to your inner voice for
suggestions. Do the right thing when
watching out for others, especially
family members. What is it you real-
ly want out of life, and how are you
going to get it?
PISCES:
(February 20-March 20)
Someone needs to smooth out the
rough patches created by an argu-
ment, and you are best suited for the
job. Following the rules may make
you seem cold-hearted, so have a lit-
tle compassion for those around you.
Don't keep any secrets if the infor-
mation can be well used.
IF THIS WEEK IS
YOUR BIRTHDAY:
It's a good time to discuss any emo-
tional issues with a significant other.
Clear the air of any obstacles, and
you may be quite surprised at how
easily the conversation flows. Now
that the lines of communication are
open, make every effort to keep
them this way.
SkmttJ, continued from page 2
the show, right?)
Dressed in their red Mork outfits, they
blasted right through their new
album, jamming out hits like "718"
and the uber-motivational
"Champion But for all their hits and
energy, it was actually an old ballad
that made the crowd stop beating
each other to death and stand in
amazement: they broke out the old
Bon Jovi hitWanted Dear or Alive"
before an absolutely stunned crowd.
It was downright amusing to see all
those drunken baboons trying so des-
perately to sing along with the song
without spilling the remainder of their
Bud Lights and burning the people
next to them with their cigarettes. In
all, they put on one hell of a perfor-
mance and are worthy of your cash
the next time they grace us with their
presence.
Now back to those bastards, the
KmtonmouthKings.AllIaskedfor
was a quick little interview with the
band so I could find out a little more
about them so maybe I could scam a
free CD and review it for you guys
right here in The Fountainhead
They were complete asses about the
interview and towards any member of
the male gender they were the same.
They came off to me as cocky bas-
tards who didnt think their poop
stinks. On that note, I say screw
Kottonmouth. But to all the Skinnee's
out there, you guys are truly unique.
Oh, and thank you to Stumpy of i le
Skinnecs for making sure my frit "1
had a sober ride after the show. That
was really decent of you.
7 Thursday. April 8.1





put im IFlhieEast
Go to our wejfljte af Wvwjteea thue calendar link.
Just below teek'CKstinajgtnfto the event subm.ss.on form.
Or if you want aWtp!i���l'��nt� f0 Vour br�WSef'
Then jusfSnter your event onto our campus calendar.
It's just that easy. And it's one more free service of The East Carolinian.


Title
The East Carolinian, April 8, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 08, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1325
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/58839
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