The East Carolinian, April 6, 1999







Tuesday
Hgh: 68
Low: 45
Wednesd
ay
High: 72
Gf
Online Surve
Has your lite been personally affected fay
sexual assault of someone you know?
Would you vote for Elizabeth Dole?
33 yes 66 no
www.tec.ecu.edu
the!
easti- �
Carolinian
sf
Don't forget to vote in the Student
Government Association election tomorrow!
For profiles of the candidates see Jage 2.
TUESDAY, APRIL 8.1999 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 37
Y2K team readies for millennium
End of summer tests
planned for campus
Lisa Stokes
news writkr
. East Carolina University has estab-
: lished a Y2K Response Team to
! recognize campus problems and
implement solutions associated
! with the upcoming millennium.
The team, led by Richard
Brown, vice chancellor for
Administration and Finance, meets
frequently to regulate Y2K devel-
opments and plan for possible cam-
pus problems.
Brown said in a press release that
campus officials are confident that
the computer hardware and soft-
ware at ECU are mainly Y2K com-
patible- or will be soon- but that dif-
ficulties associated with various
utilities, other vendors and suppli-
ers could set off cascading prob-
lems.
The worse case scenario could
result in failure of major utility sys-
tems that could leave the campus
without electricity, water, or phone
service for a period of time.
"While we will plan for such
occurrences, we do not expect that
will be necessary Brown said .
Don Dunlap, director of
Software Development Services,
said he is confident that ECU is in
good shape for the new year.
"There will be a number of peo-
ple working and we have a very lim-
ited holiday schedule. People will
be working on New Years's Eve and
New Year's Day Dunlap said.
Because Jan. 1, 2000, falls on a
Saturday and because the first day
of spring semester classes does not
begin until Jan. 10, officials will
have several days to recover from
the problems that may occur.
Dunlap said the Y2K team will
be conducting major tests between
the second summer session and
August.
"We will try to fool the comput-
ers by changing the date to see if
they will work said Dunlap. "Our
student system has been ready
since 1995. I think the university is
in really good shape. We have been
ahead of most universities since
the beginning
Other universities in North
Carolina are also hard at work on
the Y2K problem. UNC-Chapel
Hill has also created an Academic
and Technology Network team
dedicated to the Y2K problem.
They are assessing equipment and
departments within the academic
community, while raising aware-
ness of the problem.
Dunlap suggest that students
interested in checking the compat-
ibility of the personal computers
for the millennium check out the
ECU web page at y2k.ecu.edu,
where students can download soft-
V
ECUPD offers crime prevention tips
Officers say being
aware most important
T A H V N S I K K E M A
NEWS WRITER
They are ready for you. But are you
ready for them?
Criminals are always ready to
pounce on unsuspecting victims,
according to Officer Kip Gaskins of
the Greenville Police Department.
He warned that anyone could be a
prime target for a crime, especially
if you are unaware and insecure.
"Criminals are
opportunists.They're going to take
the path of least resistance said
Gaskins.
The police department offers
crime prevention tips to reduce
your chances of becoming a victim.
"One of the most important
things is to stay alert when walk-
ing said Gaskins. Fie advises stu-
dents to use the buddy system.
"It's just like a sober driver. You
need a sober friend said Gaskins.
Officers also suggest that stu-
dents walk in well-lighted areas.
Do not take shortcuts through park-
ing lots and yards, but instead stay
in populated areas. Also, if you carry
a purse, hold it close to your body.
According to Gaskins, the strap may
be used as a tool for the perpetrator.
If it is around your neck and the
purse is jerked, you too will go
down.
Other tips include using auto-
mated teller machines in the day-
, SEE PREVENTION PAGE 3
Students can check the compatibility of their personal computers at y2k.ecu.edu.
PHOTO BY MIKE JAC06SEN
State issues campus
five alco-sensors
Ringold incident raises awareness
Problems exist after
Cotten Hall rape
Rachel Hia d o n
STAFF WRITER
o
ver a year has passed since a
student was raped on campus in
Cotten Hall. Another student was
sexually assaulted at knife-point in
Ringold Towers less than a month
ago. In the United States 1.3
women are raped every minute �
that's 78 rapes each hour, 1872
rapes each day, 56160 rapes each
month and 638,380 rapes each year.
Statistics like these and the
shocking instance of such a brutal
crime occurring to ECU students
has some women saying that they
are becoming increasingly con-
cerned about safety issues on cam-
pus.
"I was surprised and shocked, I
felt like it could have happened to
me said Cotten Hall resident
Bridgette Flynn. "It made me a lot
more cautious
Although awareness was height-
ened after the incident, many say
feel that time has caused stu-
dents to fall back into care-
lessness. According to offi-
cials, unlocked doors and
unescorted guests pose the
greatest danger to residents.
"A lot of times in the
beginning everyone is con-
cerned, but in time that con-
cern dwindles said
Stephanie Anthony, Sgt. of
Crime Prevention with
ECUPD. "We still find resi-
dence hall doors propped
open and doors unlocked
Some students who live
in residence halls said they
think that access to resi-
dence halls should be more
of a concern
"It is so easy to get into
the halls said sophomore
Jennifer Zinn.
"People realize that it can
happen or that it could hap-
pen again said freshman
Ann Vogel
Officials on campus said
that incidents that involve
students always raise aware-
ness and incite many to take
extra precautions. However,
according to director of
Rape Statistics
- One out of every three American women will .
be sexually assaulted in her lifetime.
- One in seven women will be reped by her
husband.
- 6 percent of all reps cases are victims less
118 years c o between
One year after a rape occurred in Cotten Hall end weeks after an assault in Ringold Towers,
sexual assault remains a concern to many in the campus community.
PHOTO DRAMATIZATION
Housing Manny Amaro, the only remained the same, as well as poli
way that students can really stay
protected is to show active concern
by participating in safety measures
like traveling in groups, making
sure that doors are closed and
locked, and refusing to let anyone
into residence halls who is not
escorted by a resident.
"Nothing has changed as far as
security in the residence halls said
Manny Amaro, director of housing.
According to Amaro, the locked
inner and outer doors have
cies that forbid visitors to walk
unescorted through the halls.
"If you are not careful and aware
you can jeopardize not only your
own safety, but the safety of oth-
ers Amaro said. "You have to take
responsibility for your own
actions
"Law enforcement cannot be in
all places at all times, everyone
here is an adult
SEE ASSAULT PAGE 3
Devices to save
officers, suspects time
James Poe
staff write!
Magistrate's office to be tested on
the Intoxilozer, the only machine
admissible in court. Campus police
officers said they expect this to save
both officers' and suspects' time.
"It's going to help us speed along
the process said Capt. Frank
Knight of the ECUPD. "It's going
to let those that are 21 and over
from having to go down to the
detention center because we can
see how low the BAC that they arc
blowing is
For those that are under 21 and
The ECU Police Department is
armed and ready � to stop drunk
driving.
The Governor's Highway Safety
Program (GHSP) has issued five
new portable breath-testing devices register any alcohol at all, the out-
to ECU to further aid the universtf�
ty's efforts to prevent drinking and
driving.
These hand-held devices, better
known as alco-sensors, are used in
conjunction with
field sobriety
tests, such as
walking a straight
line or counting
to five on your
fingers, to estab-
lish probable
cause for arrest.
The blood
alcohol reading
the machine reg-
isters can work
for or against a
suspect. If the
person blows
around a .08, the
legal limit for
intoxication, then
they must be
taken to the Pitt
County
Detention
Center.
However, If the reading is lower
than .08, it can mean that the per-
son does not have to go to the
look is more grim. Those that vio-
late the underage drinking statutes
and get caught run the risk of
receiving a provisional DWI, which
carries a mandatory court appear-
ance and many
fees including
the cost of an
alcohol assess-
ment, commu-
nity service
fees, court
costs, and any
fines the judge
sets. It also car-
ries up to six
months in jail.
"We want to
increase the
probability of
catching peo-
ple who drink
and drive
Knight said.
"With the over-
whelming
majority of peo-
ple who die in a
car accident,
one or more people have been
drinking
"We want to increase the
probability of catching
people who drink and
drive "With the over-
whelming majority of
people who die in a car
accident, one or more people
have been drinking
Capt. Frank Knight
ECU Police Department
These hand-held devices, better known as alco-sensors, are used with sobriety tests.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU POLICE DEPARTMENT
V





2 T�Mdty, April 8. 1988
news
The Eitt CirollnliB
Secretary
Jessica Dowdy
"As SGA secretary my main
focus would be communication
between SGA and the Student
Body. I would like to make informa-
tion about what's going on in SGA,
more readily available to all stu-
dents using the university's e-mail
system and a newsletter in the
school's newspaper
Treasurer
Overtoil Harper
"The most important issue in
this year's SGA election is diversity.
Our ticket is composed of three
African Americans and one Native
American. As a candidate for the
treasurer position, I am looking at
streamlining the system
President
Cliff Webster
"The most important issue per-
taining to this election is the experi-
ence of our ticket. We have 8 years
of experience we know how to go to
and how to get things done when it
comes to student issues. As SGA
president I would like to see stu-
dent workers get paid twice a
month. I'd like to do anything pos-
sible to make ECU a safer place for
us all. Through better lighting,
more rapid transit and increased
police patrols we can all feel a litde
safer in our home away from home,
ECU
��
Vice President
John Meriac
"My main focus is to set and
reach goals which focus on the
enhancement of the welfare of the
entire student body as a whole
Vice President
Nairn Akbar
The most important issue to be
addressed by me as vice president
is the promoting of better human
relationships among the diverse
population of ECU students. We
need to be a real ECU family by
being sensitive to the needs of
every student and seeking to know
and understand each other.
Must hav
ecu on
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poll Locations
Mendenhall
���.��.�. ��:�:��� vv�vk

Wright Place
ioyner Library
inges
Todd Dining Hall
Rec Center
polls are open from
9 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.
wriht place closes @ 7:00 p.m.





Thi East Carolinian
Tuttdty, April 6. I9B9 3 ;
irolinian
e informa-
n in SGA,
o all stu-
b's e-mail
:r in the
:
Ifare of the
whole
ems. We
family by
needs of
; to know
news
briefs
Search boats, crews
looking for missing
fisherman
MANNS HARBOR, N.C. (AP) �
A Coast Guard helicopter and sev-
eral boats searched today for a fish-
erman reported missing from his
boat since Sunday night.
Paul Brickhousc, 35, of Manns
Harbor, was last seen about 6 p.m.
Sunday in the Croatan Sound just
south of the Manns Harbor Bridge
on his 18-foot boat, the Coast
Guard in Portsmouth, Va. said in a
release.
"Twins weren't my
sons" during shooting,
mother says
KITTRELL, N.C. (AP) � A
mother told a friend that her twin
11-year-olds "weren't my sons"
during the terrifying moments of
gunfire that wounded her, killed
her husband and seriously injured
her daughter.
"They had this look on their
faces family friend Darlynn
Oxendine said Debbie Bawcum
told her. "They weren't my boys.
Assault
continued Irom page I
There are resources on campus
to help students learn more about
sexual assault awareness. The stu-
dent health center, the student
mental health department and the
center for health and wellbeing can
They had these blank looks. For a
few minutes, they weren't my
Police say suspect had
more than 500 stolen
credit cards
NORFOLK, Va. (AP) � Police
said a Chesapeake man had more
than 500 stolen credit card num-
bers with him when he was arrest-
ed on charges of forgery, obtaining
money under false pretenses and
presenting stolen checks under
false pretenses.
Robert S. Chase, 23, was arrest-
ed Friday at the Greyhound Bus
station in Norfolk, said Chesapeake
Police spokeswoman Jody
Armentrout.
Former postal worker
sentenced for stealing
tax refund checks
EAST ST. LOUIS, 111. (AP) � A
U.S. District Court judge judge has
sentenced a former postal worker
to eight months in prison for steal-
ing more than
$12,000 in federal income tax
refund checks.
In passing sentence Friday,
Judge Paul Riley also ordered
Floyd T. Gaston Jr 48, of
Centreville to pay a fine of $700.
offer students information.
"Any time an incident occurs on
campus it can encourage people to
speak out against rape and sexual
assault said Dr. Valerie Kisler,
chair for sexual assault committee.
Awareness week was held Feb. 22-
26 with speakers, presentations,
and "Take Back the Night" march.
"We were impressed with the
turnout for the march Kisler said.
Pan am bombing
suspects handed over
CAIRO, Egypt (AP) � Arab digni-
taries reached Libya on Sunday to
witness the handover of two sus-
pects in the 1988 Pan Am bombing,
a further sign their promised extra-
dition is on track. The Dec. 21,
1988, bombing of the Pan Am jet
over Lockerbie, Scotland, killed
270 people mostly Americans and
Britons on the air and the ground.
The two Libyans, allegedly former
intelligence agents, were suspected
of planting a suitcase bomb on the
plane.
NATO nations absorb
large numbers of
refugees
BLACE, Macedonia (AP) � In
response to the burgeoning human-
itarian crisis, NATO nations pre-
pared to begin taking in large num-
bers of refugees, while stressing it
was only a temporary measure until
they could return to homes in
Kosovo. Germany is ready to accept
40,000; the United States, 20,000;
and Turkey, 20,000, NATO said
Sunday. Macedonia, a former
Yugoslav republic, agreed to let
refugees pass over its border in
return for a promise that nearly all
would go elsewhere.
Also.the ECUPD has a liaison
program in which two officers are
assigned to each dorm. The offi-
'cers give safety programs and free
self defense classes to anyone inter-
ested.
"It opened my eyes and generat-
ed a lot of awareness Flynn said
"I'm glad something positive hap-
pened out of a horrible situation
Prevention
continued from pagel
time, or use one in a well-lighted,
public and busy place. And, if you
feel you are being followed, change
direction. If you still feel threat-
ened officers suggest walking to a
public area and yelling for help.
Gaskins believes that people are
aware of personal safety proce-
dures, but overlook simple proce-
dures that could prevent them from
becoming a victim.
"People are in such a hurry to
get nowhere and forget the funda-
mentals of personal safety said
Gaskins.
crime
March 31
Damage to Property - A student
reported that the window on his
vehicle was broken out while the
vehicle was parked in the Ninth
and Forbes Streets parking lot.
Larceny - A student reported
the larceny of a cello and case from
the instrument locker room at
Fletcher Music Building. Breaking
& Entering Motor Vehicle - A stu-
dent reported the breaking and
entering of her vehicle while
parked south of Joyner Library. Her
wallet was taken from the vehicle.
Resist, Obstruct & Delay - An
Aramark employee, was arrested
for resist, obstruct and delay after
an officer attempted to stop him
south of Mendenhall for an alleged
controlled substance violation.
The man fled on foot off campus,
but was arrested when he returned
to work later in the evening.
Possession of Drug
Paraphernalia - A student reponed
the smell of burning marijuana
coming from a room in Slay Hall.
After a consent search of the room,
three students were issued campus
appearance tickets for being in pos-
session of drug paraphernalia.
Driving While
ImpairedProvisional DWI - A
Greene Hall resident was arrested
for driving while impaired and pro-
Greenville police said the beat
way to avoid becoming a criminal!
prey is to be aware of your sur-
roundings and trust your instincts.
However, safety experts admit
nothing is fool proof, and using tips
like these are simply tools to
reduce the odds.
"They reduce opportunity fir
visional DWI after an officer
observed her run two stop signs.
April 1
Breaking & Entering and
Larceny from Motor Vehicle - Two
vehicles belonging to students
were broken into north of the VIP
lot. The stereo was taken from one
vehicle. This vehicle also had
heavy damage to the steering col-
umn. The other vehicle was
entered, but it is not apparent
whether anything was stolen.
Larceny - A student reported
the larceny of his book bag from a
secured locker in the Recreation
Center.
Driving While License
Revoked - A non-student was
arrested for driving while license
revoked. She was driving the
wrong way on Reade Street.
Assist Rescue - A resident of
Scott Hall was issued a campus
appearance ticket for being intoxi-
cated underage and resisting offi-
cers. The student fled on foot on
College Hill Drive when officers
attempted to stop him because he
was bleeding from his head. He
was transported to the hospital for
treatment.
Provisional Driving While
Impaired - A Tyler Hall resident
was issued a state citation for provi-
sional driving while impaired. The
charge came after an officer
observed her run the stop sign west
of Greene Hall.
April 3
Simple Possession of Marijuana
- Two students were issued state
citations for possession of marijua-
na after officers stopped them for
suspicious
activity in the Fourth and Rcade
Streets parking lot. Another stu-
dent was issued a state citation for
possession of spirituous liquor.
Possession with Intent to Scjl
and Deliver MarijuanaSimple
Possession of MarijuanaResist
Officer - A non-student was arrest-
ed for possession with intent to sell
and deliver marijuana and resisting
a police officer. The charges came
after officers discovered the sus-
pect and other subjects smoking
marijuana near a vehicle parked in
the Reade Street lots. The suspect
initially gave false information to
officers.
April 4
Underage Possession of Alcohol
- A Clement Hall resident was
issued a state citation for underage
possession of alcohol after officers
discovered four bottles of beer in
his vehicle during a consent search.
GET YOUR CAM
Give us a canned food
item and we will give
you a free
Aerobics Class!
All donations will go to tho New Dlrecdons ol Pitt County
April 5
It's
About
Fitness
I RECREATIONAL
ERVICES
328-6387
V
-r-





4 TmUiy, April 7, 1989
The Eiit Carolinian
NATO nations move to
relieve refugee pressure
BLACE, Macedonia (AP) - Living
amid squalor and sticky, knee-deep
mud, tens of thousands of refugees
in a miserable no-man's land along
the Macedonian border struggled
Sunday against hunger and freezing
nighttime temperatures.
Their desperate plight - and that
of tens of thousands of other
refugees flooding out of Kosovo - is
spurring NATO nations to offer
temporary refuge in order to take
the pressure off neighbors of the
southern Serbian province that are
overwhelmed by the refugee
influx.
Some of the worst of the suffer-
ing could be seen at a squalid
encampment on the Macedonia-
Yugoslav border. In only days, it has
become a refugee city, with wisps of
smoke wafting over a landscape of
shelters made of plastic or blankets.
With no latrines in the camp,
human feces were ground into the
mud underfoot. Some refugees
walked into a half-empty field near
a river, many washing themselves
in the freezing cold water.
"It is like nothing I have ever
experienced said one woman who
identified herself only as Lora, with
tears in her eyes.
After days of waiting, some aid
was arriving at the squalid camp.
Aid workers distributed heavy
boxes of cookies and canons of
juice. Blankets and plasdc sheeting
were also being supplied.
For some, the help was coming
too late. Julia Taft, U.S. assistant
secretary of state for refugees who
visited the camp on Sunday, said 11
elderly people had died there in the
past few days.
"It is very grim she said.
In response to the burgeoning
crisis, NATO nations prepared to
begin taking in the refugees, while
stressing it was only a temporary
measure. Germany is ready to
accept 40,000; the United States,
20,000; and Turkey, 20,000, NATO
spokesman Jamie Shea said in
Brussels, Belgium on Sunday.
"The NATO operation is a col-
lective one. Those who have partic-
ipated in it must also participate in
the responsibility said Turkish
Prime Minister Bulent Ecevit,
whose country announced plans to
set up a tent camp in northwestern
Turkey for refugees.
NATO is marshaling planes,
food, shelter, medical and other aid
for Macedonia and Albania, which
are dealing with an estimated
135,000 refugees and 190,000
refugees respectively. Montenegro,
the smallerofthe two republics that
make up Yugoslavia, has taken in
another 32,000 Kosovars who say
they are fleeing Serb atrocities.
Taft said she had received assur-
ances from President Kiro Gligorov
that Macedonia's border would
remain open to those fleeing
Kovoso, provided other nations
would take them in.
Fearing political instability as a
result of the influx, Macedonia said
it could allow no more than 20,000
refugees to remain. But it agreed
Sunday to allow arrivals to be fer-
ried from the muddy border field to
a tent city being set up by NATO
forces near its capital, Skopje.
At the edge of the encampment,
long lines of buses were taking
away an estimated 300 refugees an
hour, or about 5,000 a day, slowly
shrinking the encampment whose
size had swelled to 70,000 refugees.
A few were already being flown
out of Macedonia on the return legs
of arriving aid flights, and
Macedonia's deputy prime minis-
ter, Radmilla Kiprjanova, said
Sunday that larger-scale airlifts
using military transport would get
under way from the Skopje airport.
f
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s5 mask rental
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52C02fee
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Take Hwy 33 West from Greenville, 8 miles
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jnd turn left at the yellow signs. Park
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10 Student Discount Call d�
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WWW.ECPB.COM
The ECU Student Media Board invites
applications for the position of
Expressions
The East Carolinian
EDITOR
Rebel
for the 1999-2000 academic year.
Applications are available in the Media Board office.
The deadline for submitting an application is
WEDNESDAY, APRI114 AT 4 P.M.
For information, call the Media Board office at 328-6009.
t
Graduating in May??
Need A Job??
The Office of Undergraduate Admissions is
looking for responsible, independent and
enthusiastic 1999 ECU Graduates to recruit new
PIRATES for its freshman class of 2000
� Full-time temporary positions (August-December)
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� Travel Expenses & Automobile Provided
� Great Public RelationsSales Experience
� Excellent Oral & Written Communication Skills Required
� Professional Attitude and Appearance
If interested in learning more about this exciting
opportunity, there will be an informational meeting
on Tuesday, April 6, 1999 at 4:00 pm in the Rawl
Building, Room 130.
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TuMd.vA.rll6 1899 B
eastcarolinian
AMY L.Rovster Editor
AMANDA G. AUSTIN Managing Editor
HOLLV HARRIS News Editor
AMY Wagner Assistant News fdnoi
Nina Dry FuurtiEditor
Cory Phoenix CnmerpracsDesigner
Stephen Schramm SpomEditor
Kristy DANIEL Assistant Spons ErJitor
Chris Knotts Staff llkistrttor
Michael smith Layout Onigiiei
Stephanie Whitlock AdOeugnMonerjer
Janet Respess Advertising Manager
Russ Blackburn LaroutDesigner
Bobby Tlgclf. Wttmastar
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ECU Pirate Football roar of the crowds, tailgating hours before hand, packed
stadium seating every game, fireworks filled pep rally at Mendenhall; ECU Pirate
Basketball crickets chirping. Do you see the problem here?
With this year's basketball season over, it's time for the Pirates to regroup and pre-
pare for next year with new coach, Bill Herrion.
Herrion's impeccable reputation as coach of the Drexel Dragons at Drexel
University in Philadelphia for eight seasons, ranking 15th among active coaches
makes him a useful asset to the Pirates. With his background and passion for the
game, we hope he can use the same magic he did with the Dragons and instill the
same passion within the players on our team.
What we're looking for here is something of the Domino effect.
By building the Pirates morale, this may improve their on court performance -
well, that's what we're hoping for.
And as shallow as it may sound, no one wants to back a mediocre team�school
spirit or no school spirit. As the Pirates improve and strive towards coming togeth-
er �remember, there is no T in team� students may be more apt to coming out
and supporting them. Not to say that we don't support them now. But if Minges can
seat over 8,000 and approximately 3,500 students take the time to actually attend
half the game, we can definitely do better than this. If the team makes a conscien-
tious effort to improve their game, it's almost a given that students will go to the
games and cheer their Pirates on�everyone loves a winning team.
Although this is a tall order for one man to face, we believe that Herrion will be
able to fit the bill�that's why the sports department shells out the big bucks. Good
luck to you, Coach Herrion and welcome to Pirate Country!
OPINION
The New
York Times
The public has right to know
"When democracies send their
military forces into combat, citi-
zens need to know as much about
the battles as sensible security pre-
cautions permit. In the case of
Kosovo NATO and the
Pentagon must provide a detailed
account of the effectiveness of the
air war. It is a responsibility they
have so far largely failed to meet.
The decision to limit NATO
briefings to broad generalities
comes from Gen. Wesley Clark,
the American commander of
alliance forces in Europe.
Pentagon briefings have offered
more target and damage informa-
tion but have been frustratingly
short on important specifics. The
air offensive has not gone well in
the first 11 days, and the American
people should not be denied a full
account of the reasons, beyond the
foul weather that has limited
bombing runs.
In the weeks ahead. President
(Bill) Clinton may seek public sup-
port for escalating the air war, or
even introducing ground troops
into combat. It is essential that
citizens have all the information
they need to make informed judg-
ments as these matters arise.
OPINION
The Washington
Post
Tragedy takes shape in Kosovo
"IT WILL NO doubt take
some days, perhaps weeks, to mea-
sure the full impact of the new
surge in NATO bombing against
Serbian targets in Kosovo and in
Serbia proper. But it takes no
time at all to realize that a horren-
dous and somehow unanticipat-
ed human tragedy is taking shape
in Kosovo under the hammer of
ilobodan Milosevic's latest ethnic
cleansing program. Relief for the
refugees is proving complex both
administratively and politically.
Answers are urgent.
It is observed that the people of
Serbia are also under a grave threat
the
threat of allied bombing. But a
key distinction must be main-
tained. The
Serbian population, with which
NATO has no quarrel in any event,
is only the unintended and acci-
dental target of military action, and
a target the allies strain to avoid.
But the Kosovar population is the
intended and chosen target:
Their physical destruction and
removal from their homes and
from their own country are in fact
President Milosevic's principal war
aim. War aim and war crime.
Hundreds of thousands of
Kosovars already have been
uprooted
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LETTER
to the Editor
Do not condemn because of beliefs
Usually I will politely say that
I do not believe in that and
walk off. I do not mind unless
the person says, "Do you know
if you are not saved or if you
don't believe in Jesus Christ
that you will"
In the March 30 issue of TEC, a
student wrote in protest of hearing
about alternative lifestyles. I was
rather angered by this article
because I feel that people often for-
get to look at both sides of the coin.
Often when I walk across campus I
will see religious communities
preaching their faith or certain
activities they are holding. I have
no problem with this, as these
groups are a part of our community.
However, sometimes I am stopped
and asked whether I want to join
and to help "save" others from sin.
Usually I will politely say that I do
not believe in that and walk off. I
do not mind unless that person
says, "Do you know if you are not
saved or you don't believe in Jesus
Christ that you will go to hell?"
Why do people start condemning
how I choose to live? They may not
like it but I am not asking them to
agree with me. I am just asking the
respect that this is what I believe
because I am an individual. When I
see such articles referring to various
groups I may not agree with what
they believe in. But this is our soci-
ety. In this country we have certain
rights, mainly the freedom of reli-
gion and speech. It is from these
articles that we are allowed to see
the many sides of our culture. If we
saw everything we wanted to see
when we opened the paper or
turned on the television, I don't
think we would be learning much. I
ask my fellow students to agree or
condemn the former article. Or to
agree or condemn this one. I ask
that when you read something
about another lifestyle or culture
you take the time and respect that
everyone is different even if you
don't agree with them. I ask you to
think that maybe when you see
something wrong with someone
else they may also feel there is
something just as wrong with you.
Our campus is made up of people
of all colors, races, religious back-
grounds and lifestyles. This is a part
of learning about the world. This is
what makes East Carolina
University an interesting place.
Candice Matelski
LETTER
to the Editor
Is the university stealing our money.?
Students, you have forgotten
that you have rights and you
have the right to voice what
you think. Ttme to stand up
and be counted when it comes
to this parking issue.
Dear Editor
So many issues, so little time.
About the cartoons with the gun
issue in mind Hey, why not draw
a canoon of dining services holding
up students for that $125 we must
pay in order to get a room on this
burg for the summer. Those people
are robbing us blind and they dont
even have guns. Let's hope they
never get guns. My question is???
What if I don't want to eat in the
dining hall? What happens to my
money if I do not eat $125 worth if
food? Does the money come back
to me? No it does not Hey, I
think those guys that caught poor
ole Steve speeding are related to
the dining hall services money
grabbers down this way
LAST AND MOST
IMPORTANT:
Would it not be nice to see Ms.
Teel set records at her home track?
Wouldn't be nice if you were a per-
son who put in long hours running
in the cold and heat, rain or shine to
have your photo in the paper? How
long would our baseball players
play ball if all their games were
away games? What is wrong with
track . . . Not enough money?
Could the attendance be any less
chart that of the basketball teams?
The 4x300 men's relay team might
have loved to be cheered on by
their home school and peers.
If they keep taking away the
parking, soon this will be a com-
muter college instead of a walking
college. Dorms will be located in
Vanceboro and Kinston. If you
think you run late now, just wait
until the purple and gold buses
from dowtown Vanceboro and
Kinston.
It is downright shameful. We
have no parking spaces, some
dorms look like something out of
the slums, students are held
hostage by the Dining Services,
and oh yes I know that if I don't
like it here, I should go somewhere
else. Then there's the great quote
"Well I have been to colleges that
are worse BEEP�wrong answer.
I do like it here, but there are
changes that need to be made.
Somewhere along the way, this col-
lege has forgotten who pays their
paychecks. I agree with the editori-
al on parking. Stop selling the $96,
oops, $120 stickers for next year for
parking if there are not enough
spaces. False advertising is what I
call it. If you pay for a service, and
you do not get that service, what do
you do?
If you have X number of stu-
dents, then you should give out X
number of parking stickers.
Number the spaces to go along with
the dorms. Let visitors hunt for a
space. We live here, we pay to
sleep, eat and park here. Oh, did I
leave out that we take classes here?
Well, two ouc of three ain't bad.
Still, we should have a place to park
our cars.
Students, you have forgotten
that you have rights and you have
the right to voice what you think.
Time to stand up and be counted
when it comes to this parking issue.
If you do not speak up and to the
right people, then when you are
wet, cold and late for class, you will
have no voice. Now I see that we
are walking on the grass. Well,
make up your mind. Most grass
paths are made by students dodg-
ing construction. Let's find out
what they do with the money. Let's
find out what they do with the fines
and tickets.
You have 120 reasons to com-
plain about this issue.
In conclusion, it is not hard to
understand why the track team
does not have a track. It is going to
be turned into a parking lot. Then
no one will be able to park there
because it will be turned into a con-
struction site. Then it will be
turned into some state-of-the-art
something that no one will visit.
Why, because they have to ride the
bus from Vanceboro and by the
time the bus reaches it. it will be
closed for repairs, (for example, the
3 million dollar wall of waste, oops,
water.
���





comics
6 Tutidiv. Awril 7. 1999
Th� Ent CiroHnlin
Four Seats Left
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Jason Latour
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Life on Tuesday
Chris Knotts
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Life's Meanings
fyriiNefioti
Kevin Jordan
Life on Tuesday
Chris Knotts
Due to extreme stress, this thought will be a little strange. This week, I'll be
putting my personal biz in the street I will do whatever you vote on. The
number to vote is 252 328 8119 ext 1. The voice will say life's meanings.
You will have unitl April the 11th to vote. I will let you know the results
in next week's spread. Now that the rules are cleared up, here we go
y
YOU KNOW I'VE BEEN
OH A REAL LOSING STREAK
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Brand New Luxury Apartments
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NOW LEASING
752-9995
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Free Cable
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Near ECU Bus Line c,�
ECU CAMPUS
3120 E. 10th St.
Next to Food Lion
757-1212
Late Night
Sun-Thurs. Midnight
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Landmark &
Greenville Blvd.
Next to Ramada Inn
321-8100
Bells Fork
Next to Food Lion
756-6776
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7TuMdiy. April B. 1899
features
Tin EM Carolinian
i
Greenville's
Students speak out
on downtown scene
Brooke Potts
staff writer
Hey, baby. Wanna get naked?"
Ladies, how many times have you
leard this line from some drunken,
lesperate, dork? And guys, do you
eally think someone is going to be
tupid enough to say yes?
Such is the story of Greenville
lighdife. We all go out, otherwise
why would we be in school at ECU?
But the question remains, why do
we go out?
"I go out to relieve stress and
;njoy the company of my friends
.aid senior Danielle Pschcrer.
For the most part, going out and
laving fun is a great way to relax
ifter a long week of classes. And
with the variety bars located in
Greenville, the nightlife here does-
l't often get old.
If you are headed out, there is
ots to choose from. Some places,
iuch as BW-3 and Chico's, offer a
nore relaxed atmosphere where
socializing and with old friends and
neeting new ones is possible. For
:hose who take their night life a lit-
Je more seriously, dance clubs such
is The Cellar and Parana Bob's give
:he Greenville players a chance to
trut their stuff. There are also sev-
:ral places to hear live music if the
Dar or club scenes aren't for you.
Another great thing about the
downtown scene is its proximity to
ampus. Students who live on cam-
jus don't usually have to worry
ibout driving downtown, and since
nost off campus students live near-
ay, many people who enjoy going
downtown can stumble home after-
wards and stay off the highways.
Since the downtown area is cen-
trally located, most of the students
frequent the same places, which
makes it a great way to socialize
with people you know. Chances
arc, you're going to know a few peo-
ple already when you go into a
place, which makes students feel
more at home at the night spots
they frequent. A consistent crowd
draws many people, students and
non-students alike.
Speaking of the crowd, it's pret-
ty much the same on any given
night. An informal (and anony-
mous) poll revealed the typical atti-
tudes that most people have about
the downtown crowd. For the most
part, the girls are described as
undepressed whores and the guys
as drunk, desperate, and looking for
the aforementioned women. (Of
course, not all people downtown are
like this, but if you are planning to
go downtown on a regular basis, it
will help you to fit in).
"Greenville caters to the
hoochie-mama slut-puppy, red
neck lovin' crowd said one anony-
mous senior. Ouch.
"I no longer do the
downtown scene
because all it is is a
bunch of alcoholics
looking for an excuse to
grope and grab one
another said junior
Jeannette Jackson.
When asked about what
students specifically
like to do downtown,
most will non-specifi-
cally answer, "To drink
and socialize
Translation: get drunk
and harass the opposite
sex. Of course, with the
variety of cheap drink
specials offered down-
town, it is an easy thing
to do. Most places outside of the
downtown area don't offer drinks as
cheaply as the bars and clubs down-
town, which encourages most peo-
ple who go out on a regular basis to
frequent the downtown area.
Although the Greenville
Many ECU prefer to use their weekends relaxing in the downtown bars while they drink away their stressful weeks in the company of friends.
PHOTO BY JACOB GARMON
nightlife offers a lot of things to do,
there are some drawbacks. One of
the worst things about downtown
involves the problems of the city of
Greenville. There just isn't enough
close parking, so expect to walk at
least a block or more to get where
you're going. And also expect to be
watched closely by the Greenville
police if you are walking anywhere
down Fifth street. This is a problem
that people who go to bars outside
of downtown don't have to deal
with, and many students feel that it
NIGHTLIFE INFORMATION
TOP FIVE PLACES TO GO
DOWNTOWN
BW-3
2, Pantana Bob's'
3. Underwater . ��
t: 4. Cellar
5. Sports Pad
m
.some Reasons people
:give for going out
Watch sporting events
JJC-
� talk to the ladiesguys
drink get dru
PEOPLE YOU WILL-
ENCOUNTER pOWNTOWrT
pt "X" ���
- drunks
- girls wearing very little
N; clothing '�
-drunk guys looking for women
in the military
WHErtE PEOPLE ftO OUT
TOlGReENVILLE
is unfair that this area is targeted
more heavily by our local law
enforcement.
On the whole, most students
seem to either love or hate the
downtown area. Those who love it
frequendy bar hop, looking for the
coolest crowd, while those who
hate do everything they can to
either avoid it find at least one
decent place they like.
Rob Westrick, grad student,
said "You can only go to the same
places so many times; that's why I
like to get out of town on week-
ends if I can
No matter what you think about
the downtown scene, it seems that
here at ECU, you cannot avoid it
If you want to have some sort of
nightlife, it is the place to be.
Many students kept up all
�: hours of night due to Insomnia
Lack of knowledge
keeps disorder mystery
��
IErica Sikes
STAFF WRITER
You look at the clock. It's 2 a.m. If
you could just go to sleep now, you
could get at least five good hours
before it's time for your eight
o'clock class, you wouldn't be tired
during the day and you'd also be
able to concentrate and stay awake
in math class.
Many students face this com-
mon disorder known as insomnia.
The National Heart, Lung and
Blood Institute, NHLBI, defines
insomnia as the perception or com-
plaint of inadequate or poor quality
sleep. According to the NHLBI,
insomnia is characterized by having
difficulty falling asleep, waking up
frequently during the night, wak-
ing up too early in the morning and
unrefreshing sleep.
Insomnia is classified into three
categories, according to severity.
The first, transient, which is short
term, lasts from a single night to a
few weeks. The second category,
which is intermittent, occurs when
there are frequent episodes of tran-
sient insomnia. The third, which is
chronic, and more serious, and
occurs on most night s and lasts for
a month or more.
Insomnia occurs most often in
people over 60, of the female gen-
der or with a history of depression.
Other conditions such as stress,
anxiety, a medical problem, or the
use of certain medications, are con-
tributing factors to the severity of
the disorder.
There are many things that
cause insomnia. Stress, environ-
mental noise, extreme tempefa-
tures, change in environment and
medicinal side effects are among
the components responsible for
this disorder. Chronic insomnia is
affected by a combination of these
Restless nights lead to exhaustion and lack of performance in the classroom.
PHOTO BY JACOB GARMON
factors. One of the most common
factors is depression, which is sta-
tistically high among teenagers.
Students usually come up with
their own anecdotes to aid them in
falling asleep. They are either
unaware that there is a problem, or
simply blame the difficulty on
stress and caffeine or alcohol.
"When I can't sleep at night, I
normally toss and turn for about
two hours said freshman, Mary
Beth Fleming. "Then I get fed up
and take Nyquil, and that puts me
to sleep
As opposed to drugs, some stu-
dents use more natural methods to
get themselves to sleep.
"When I have difficulty falling
asleep.I find it more relaxing to
have music playing said sopho-
more, Nick McLamb. "Another
alternative, which is popular among
my suite mates, is just to go four-
wheelin
"Usually, when I can't sleep I
break out my Algebra said
junior.Tricia Bell. "That usually
does the trick
Diagnosis of insomnia is very
difficult because of the lack of
knowledge about the disorder.
Lack of sleep can be caused mere-
ly by stress or by more serious dis-
orders such as sleep apnea, heart
failure, asthma, narcolepsy,
Parkinson's disease or hypothy-
roidism.
Treatment of insomnia is less
mandatory in transient and inter-
mittent insomnia because the
symptoms only last for a few days.
Treatment for chronic insomnia
consists of different therapy meth-
ods such as relaxation therapy,
sleep restriction and recondition-
ing.
Five greek organizations are planning a step show to bring awareness to violence, portions of the proceeds will
go to New Directions, a Pitt County based organization geared toward family violence in the local area.
PHOTO COURTESY OF NATIONAL PANOHELLENIC COUNCIL
Fraternities, sororities join
together to step out violence
Portion of proceeds
benefit New Directions
Phillip Gilfis
SENIOR WRITER
If the only thoughts you have of
Greek organizations involve loud
music and parties, you had better
think again.
A group of fraternities and soror-
ities are joining together under the
organization of the National Pan-
Hellenic Council, to perform an
annual Greek stepshow. A portion
of the proceeds from this event will
go to New Directions, Pitt County
Family Violence Program, Inc.
"The stepshow is a traditional
program done on most campuses
said Chris Rey, president of the
National Pan-Hellenic Council.
"The dances and different moves
are styles that go back to Africa
The five Greek organizations
taking part in the performance are
three sororities, Alpha Kappa
Alpha, Zeta Phi Beta, Sigma
Gamma Rho, and two fraternities,
Kappa Alpha Psi and Phi Beta
Sigma.
Each organization is participat-
ing in the event in different ways.
"(Alpha Kappa Alpha will be
helping with the ushering and will
count votes. We may do some
floorstepping, but not for competi-
tion said Dushun Evans, presi-
dent.
"Ten of Phi Beta Sigma's
members will be participating.
We've taken part in the stepshow
since our fraternity started in
"The stepshow is a traditional
program done on
most campuses
Chris Rey
president of ihe National Pan-Hellenic Council
1983 Rey said, who is also presi-
dent of Phi Beta Sigma.
"Sigma Gamma Rho will help
count the votes for the competition
and do some stepping said
Christy Lock, president.
The sororities will be competing
among themselves, as will the fra-
ternities. The winners of the com-
SEE VIOLENCE PAGE 7





8 TdMISV, A�HI6. 1989
features
Thi Eitt Carolinian
Violence
continued from pagt 6
petition will receive a grand prize.
Judges for the competition will be
members from three impartial
Greeks organizations.
After the performance, an after
party will take place at as yet deter-
mined place.
"Last year we had it at
Christenbury, but we're still
unsure where it will be this year
Rey said. "But everyone will defi-
nitely be jammin wherever it is
Each year the National Pan-
Hellenic Council votes to have a
portion of the proceeds go to the
community. The rest is kept for
the Pan-Hellenic Council, which
organizes the Minority Ball on-
campus and provides many differ-
ent programs including social
events, comedy shows and panics.
This year, Toya Sanders, member
of Sigma Gamma Rho, convinced
the council to give ten percent of
the proceeds to New Directions.
"New Directions provides a
safehouse for battered women and
children Sanders said, who is also
the Community Education
Coordinator for the organization.
"One main purpose of this perfor-
mance is to show suppon for the
Greeks and New Directions
Sanders, along with volunteers,
will pass out purple ribbons at the
step show which symbolize the
need to stop domestic violence and
share information about the pro-
grams that they provide. The
money New directions receive will
help them provide 24-hour crisis
counseling, temporary housing,
clothing and food for in-house
women and children.
The stepshow will take place at
Wright Auditorium on Friday,
April 9 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $8
in advance for non-Greeks and $6
for Greeks. The Central Ticket
Office at Mendenhall Student
Center will be have advance tick-
ets available. The public is invited.
MMH9UM
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students drink alcohol
twice a month or less.
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where alcohol is NOT served.
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sports
Tmidiy. April 6. 1899 9
Pirates sweep William and Mary
ECU improves, 28-6
overall; 6-0 conference
Paul Kaplan
senior writer
The Pirates baseball team swept
William and Mary last weekend in a
three game Easter home confer-
ence special series.
It was the first time since 1989
that ECU had back to back sweeps
over conference teams as they
increased their record to 28-6 over-
all and 6-0 in the conference and
first place atop the CAA.
ECU took down William and
Mary 23-3 on Friday night in the
first of a three game series, and later
put away W&M 4-2 in game three
on Sunday. But the number 13
ended up being the lucky number
on Saturday night for the number
23 Pirate baseball team in game two
of the series.
It was in the bottom of the 13th
inning when Steve Salargo hit out
the game winning home run in dra-
matic style to end a not so dramatic
8-6 triumph overWilliam and Mary.
Nick Schnabel led off the inning
with a sensational infield hit, just
beating the throw from the W&M
short stop. Then with Schnabel on
First, Salargo decided that 13
innings on a Saturday night was a
little too long and sent his second
home run of the day just over the
deep center-field wall sending
everybody home and taking the
win.
"In all honesty, you never really
try to hit a ball out of the park. You
take a good swing, you hit it solid
and it just goes Salargo said.
"Honestly, I was trying to drive
the ball in the gap with a runner
onfirst and give him a chance to
score, he threw a fast ball up and
awayand he just gave it to me
In Saturday's game, ECU did
not score a run until the bottom of
the third inning when they found
themselves down 3-0. Then with
one out Salargo and John
Williamson knocked out back-to-
back home runs to shrink the
deficit down to 3-2. Then with two
men on base and only one out, Lee
Delfino hit into his first of two dou-
ble plays to end the rally just as it
Clayton sets records
4x200 places third
in Texas Relay
Mandy Reutter
STAFF WRITER
Men's 4x200-meter finished third
and took fourth in the 4x400 in
Texas, as Michelle Clayton stole
first-place and set a new school
record in the weight throw at
Duke.
The Texas Relays, held on the
campus of the University of Texas,
housed some of the best track
teams in the country, including our
ECU men's track team.
"The Texas Relays is the most
prestigeous in the country
Bill Carson
men's head coach
"The Texas Relays is the most
prestigeous in the country said
Bill Carson, men's head coach. "To
finish third was good
This was not the only time that
ECU has placed third in the 4x200
at the Texas Relays. In fact this is
the third year in a row that they
have placed in third position.
It was the combination of James
Alexander, Darren Tuitt, Lawrence
Ward and Darrick Ingram that led
to this third place victorv with a fin-
ishing time of 1:23.90. Individual
times included 21.0, 20.7, 21.10,
and 20.4 respectively. The only two
teams that stood in their way of a
first place win was Arizona State
(1:22.20) and Southern (1:23.45).
"Bad batton handoffs is what
kept us out placing first said
Carson.
Bad handoffs or not, the men's
4x400 went on to place fourth and
recorded a time of 3:05.33. This
time is currently the fourth best
time in the country. Alexander,
Ingram, Damon Davis and Mike
Miller were the four who tallied
individual times of 46.6, 45.6, 46.4,
and 46.0 respectfully.
ECU women's track was also
representative in Texas as their
4x100 and 4x400-meter relay teams
finished fifth and ninth in their
heats, but failed to advance to the
championship round.
Success didn't just strike in
Texas but also here in North
Carolina. Michelle Clayton, senior
weight thrower, set three school
records at the General Motors-
Duke Invitational.
Out of 63 teams in the
Invitational, Clayton placed first
and set one school record with her
winning throw of 186-7. This throw
qualified her for the ECAC
Outdoor Championships on May
21-23 in Fairfax, Va.
Clayton then went on to set
record in the discus with a throw of
146 feet, 8 inches to place fifth and
break Darlene Vicks' previous
record and shot 47 feet, 34 inches
to break her last and final record of
th- Invitational.
"I knew she would do it eventu-
ally, I just didn't know that she
would do it this fast said Charles
Justice, women's head coach. "I
wasn't expecting her to do it all at
once
In the 800 meters, Fran Lattie
placed fourth, while teammate
Leana Anding placed eigth in the
triple jump.
Michelle Clayton
FILE PHOTO
ECU's improving distance run-
ners had a banner day in Durham.
The Pirates set a new school record
in the distance medley.
"They did well said Leonard
Klepack, men's cross-country head
coach. "They ran competitively in
a field that was very good
Stuart Will, Von Johnson, Brian
Beil and David Balon turned in
strong performances en route to
earning ECU a tenth place finish
and a time of 10:06.52.
"It's nice to set a school record
with a team that you know still has
a long way to go Klepack said.
was beginning.
The Pirates scored two more in
the fourth off an RBI single by
Schnabel and one more off a
dropped pop fly hit by Wlliamson.
ECU scored two more in the fifth
inning off of a two RBI single by
James Molinari. But not without
giving up two in the fifth and one in
the sixth inning to W&M.
"It was a long day. It shows a lot
of character of this team, to keep
battling and battling. We had so
many things go wrong for us and we
just kept battling and that's the sign
of a good team Schnabel said.
When it was all said and done
the Pirates took Saturday's game 8-
6 and Adam Reikowski got the win
on the mound for ECU and Justin
Wellen took the loss for William
and Mary.
"I think it was a true test of char-
acter. I thought we battled andhung
in there as a team when we could
have given up on several
occasions and I thought it was
tremendous win said Keith
LeClair, head coach. "I thought the
bullpen did an outstanding job and
kept us in the game long enough to
give us a chance to win the game in
the end
ECU went on to win Sunday's
game in a regular old nine-inning
game as they beat W&M 4-2.
Brooks Jemigan took the win after
eight innings of pitching, giving up
six hits, four walks and with seven
strike outs.
ECU came into the W&M series
after being upset 4-3 by Coastal
see Bittiall page 10
ECU baseball takes another win.
PILE PHOTO
Basebau
East Carolina 4, William & Mary 2
(Apr 04,1999 at Greenville, N.C.)
William & Mary 000 000 011 - 2 6 1 (19-14)
East Carolina 002 020 00X - 4 9 2 (28-6)
WP-JERNIGAN(7-2) Savc-REIKOWSKI(l) LP-LEEK(3-3) T-2:15 A-509
East Carolina 8, William & Mary 6
(Apr 03, 1999 at Greenville, N.C.)
William & Mary012 021 000 000 0 - 6 16 2 (19-13)
East Carolina 002 220 000 000 2 - 8 13 2 (27-6)
WP-REIKOWSKI(l-O) LP-WELLEN(l-l) T-4KK A-767
HR ECU - SALARGO 2 (12), WILLIAMSON (10)
East Carolina 23, William & Mary 3
(Apr 02, 1999 at Greenville, N.C.)
William &Mary.�010 002 000 - 3 6 4 (19-12)
East Carolina 463 401 41X - 23 22 2 (26-6)
WP-MINTON(6-l) LP-KELLEY(4-5) T-2:34 A-796
HR W&M - ROGERS (6) HR ECU - SCHNABEL(2), BAKICH(4), DELFINO(7)
MJ, just buy NBA Hornets
Jordan looks at
buying die Hornets
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
Recently, Michael Jordan has been
looking to add another title to his
basketball resume: One that
already includes six-time NBA
Champion, countless MVP awards,
NCAA Champion and of course
the title of Greatest to ever play the
game. Now, in retirement Jordan
wants to add NBA Owner to that
list. He has contacted the beloved
and underachieving Charlotte
Hornets about buying 50 percent of
the team.
I think the only drawback to his
plan is the fact that he only wants to
buy 50 percent and share owner-
ship of the team with the cheap
George Shinn. C'mon Mike just
one more percent wouldn't hurt.
Shinn's unwillingness to dish
out the eight figure salaries and
thus remain competitive in a
league where $100 million dollar
salaries are not uncommon shows
the average Hornets fan that the
ownership of their team is not com-
mitted to winning.
In the early nineties, the
Hornets looked to be the team of
the future. With a nucleus of
Alonzo Mourning and Larry
Johnson, the team appeared to be
on the road to becoming one of the
NBAs elite.
The Hornets re-signed the
injury-ridden Johnson to a deal that
effectively made keeping
Mourning financially impossible.
Mourning was dealt to Miami for
perennial All-Star Glenn Rice.
Johnson went to New York for
the much cheaper Anthony Mason.
Over the course of the decade, the
Hornets' roster became cheaper
and filled with more obscure play-
ers. Can you name the Hornets
starting point guard?
The Hornets are now a shell of
the team that was once considered
the heir apparent to Jordan's Bulls.
The Hornet's downfall came as
a result of Shinn's lack of financial
support. A top center like
Mourning automatically makes you
a contender. The departure of
Mourning took the Hornets from a
championship contender to an
afterthought.
Jordan's purchase of the Hornets
would breathe life into an organiza-
tion whose current status is that of
a has been in the Eastern
Conference. Jordan's acquisition
could make the Hornets an attrac-
tive option for free agents and
Jordan's money could make the
salaries offered to players on par
with the rest of the league.
In addition to the Jordan's
stature and money, Michael Jordan
is one of best basketball minds in
the game. However, it is unknown
whether his on-coun acumen will
extend to the front office.
The team is currently bound to
mediocrity brought on by poor per-
sonnel decisions. Jordan's input
would give the Charlotte front
office instant credibility and a
knowledge for the game that only
the greatest to ever play the game
could posses
� �: �����'�irf
-
aM





10 TMriiy, �HI 8. 1889
sports
THE EA8T CAROLINIAN
Lindros recoves after lung injury
Injury accund after
beingcmss-checked
PHILADELPHIA (AP)Eric
Lindros's lung was expanding again
and most of the fluid has drained
from his chest cavity after doctors
began treating the Philadelphia
Flyers star for a collapsed right lung.
Doctors reported Saturday on
the condition of Lindros, 26, who
was apparently injured Thursday
after being cross-checked during
the Flyers' 2-1 victory at Nashville.
Television replays showed Lindros
falling on his stick in the first peri-
od.
Lindros, of Canada, spoke with
reporters in the dressing room for
several minutes after the victory
and did not appear to be in pain. He
awoke Friday morning with chest
pain and went to the hospital.
Nearly three quarts of bloody
fluid filled into the space where the
lung collapsed, and doctors at the
hospital drained the fluid with a
chest tube. Team physician Dr.
Gary Dorshimer said doctors insert-
ed a vacuum pump in the lung to
help re-expand 3it.
"Eric is a big piece of this team.
Somebody else has to pick it up and
step up center Marc Bureau said
after a 3-0 loss in Boston on
Saturday.
Lindros, who is being treated by
Predators team physician Dr.
Richard Garman, will stay in Baptist
Hospital in Nashville at least until
Tuesday to make sure the lung is
working properly. He will probably
be moved from intensive care to a
regular room on Sunday, Dorshimer
said.
Lindros was coming off a two-
game suspension when the injury
occurred.
He will probably miss the rest of
the regular season and his status for
the playoffs remains unclear.
The injury could not have come
at a worse time for the injury-
wracked Flyers, who have seen
their chances of going deep in the
playoffs diminished.
"Put it this way: We have a lot
bigger chance with him. Wc need
him back Flyers winger Mikael
Renberg said. "But whatever hap-
pens, if he can't come back, we got
to do it without him. It's going to be
tough, but we've got a good team
still
In addition to Lindros, the
Flyers played Saturday without sec-
ond leading-scorer John LcClair,
who has an injured back; right wing
Mark Recchi, who complained of
headaches and nausea; and top
defenseman Eric Dcsjardins, out
with a torn left anterior cruciate lig-
ament.
"It's tough for any team if you
take away the team's top scorers
said Flyers coach Roger Neilson.
On the bright side, Dorshimer
said Recchi was feeling much bet-
ter.
The team was initially con-
cerned that Recchi's condition
might be related to a March 22 con-
cussion that kept him out of the
lineup for three games.
But Dorshimer said the nausea
and headaches were probably
caused by a combination of insom-
nia, the stress of traveling, and lack
of conditioning from his time off.
Recchi, who told Dorshimer he
felt "back to normal will be evalu-
ated again Sunday.
Boozer announces
he will attend Duke
First choice to UCLA
and St. John's
AUBURN HILLS, Mich.
(AP)When you think of Alaskan
pipelines, you generally think of oil
being transported, not basketball
players.
But Duke University has found
a pretty nice lode of hoop talent in
the Great North.
Five days after Trajan Langdon
played his last game for the Blue
Devils, fellow Alaskan Carlos
Boozer, Jr. announced that he, too,
would attend Duke.
The 6-foot-9 forward from
Juneau had narrowed his choices to
Duke, UCLA and St. John's before
making his announcement at the
Magic Johnson RoundbaH Classic
Saturday at the Palace of Auburn
Hills.
"It's just a great situation for
me Boozer said. "To go in and
have a good time, play for a great
coach, to play for a team that has a
chance to win a national champi-
onship
Boozer averaged 30 points, 12
rebounds, two steals, three blocks
and three assists for Juneau-
Douglas High School.
Some of his accomplishments
include being named Alaska Player
of the Year, Gatorade Player of the
Year and Parade All-American.
Boozer led his team to back-to-
back state titles and was team MVP
three years in a row.
Baseball
continued from page 9
Carolina last Wednesday night.
The Pirates were out hit 11-8 in
the game and gave up two errors in
the loss.
"That Coastal game was kind of
a freak, one of those weird things.
We had a lot of anger built up
inside of us and we pulled every-
body together after that game to
play our best game against William
and Mary Friday night, Salargo
said. "They're a good ball club
and they're going to compete with
us. We just hung in there and bat-
tled tonight. Baseball's a crazy
sport and sometimes stuff like this
happens, but we stayed in here
and battled
Their next conference action
will be this weekend at Virginia
Commonwealth.
The Ent Car
Btst Kept Secret � SMto a� tha art FHnai, Cantar. JTOv . �aal,ta�htYaSayfcai .AfftX � data to la�p Ml. aW V�lrfl�ll�aa�� � Wuhan dryar. avollobl �FajIlaiiC � � Oraat Location! J IW Raymc � : CALL TODAYIII 1510 Bridle Circle 355-2198 X
1,2 & 3 Apcir Irnent Hon 5
tU
1 n til
H The ECU Student Union �r
Special Events Committee
PRESENTS:
Uiaygy Sue
y Sot
'WUTO
- TrutlxEqua
123 W
J Greer
I
A Hilarious, Interactive
Murder-Mystery Dinner Theatre
Thursday, April 22,1999 7:00 p.m. Mendenhall
ECU Student tickets priced at only $5.00
Includes gourmet dinner and ticket to the play.
ECU students can pay $5.00 cash, use a
dinner equivalent off their meal plan, or a
$5.00 debit against their declining balance.
a
ECU FacultyStaff - $13.00 General Public - $15.00
Tickets on sale at the Central Ticket OlTice-Mendenhall
Monday, April 5 - Tuesday, April 20
Call 252-328-4788, 1-800-ECU-ARTS,
8:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. for more information.
AT,
BA
Arlington
1
More
Brighte
wrthNe
Coo


r
The East Carolina University ms,
Student Union presents
An evening with
Use vkah
Monday, April 26th, 1999
8 PM in Wright Auditorium
Doors open at 7 PM
Tickets on sale Monday, April 5th at Central Ticket
Office, CD Alley, and East Coast Music & Video.
Special East Carolina University
student discount for one week only
from Monday, April 5th through
Friday, April 9th at Central Ticket
Office in Mendenhall Student Center.
Limit two per ID.
For more information contact
www.ticketslive.com or call the Central Ticket
Office at 252.328.4788 or I.800.ECU.ARTS.
For a good time call The ECU Student Union
Hotline at 252.328.6004, or visit our website at
vww.ecu.edustudentunion.
Individuals who require aooommodatiofw under ADA should contact the Department tor
Disability Support Services at 252.328.4802, forty-eight hours prior to the start of the program.
G
K A
CARI
UNIV
�W
If!

� '
9
,





A8T CAROLINIAN
Tht Enl Carolinian
sports
TuMdty, April 8.1988 11
it
Bridle Circle
H
3
Mf?m s
2905 E. 5th Sheet, Greenville, NC � (252) 6954020
Pasta � Pizza � Salads � Sandwiches � Homemade � Soups � Desserts
Dine In or Take Out � Bond Lunches Available
Dining Room Open
Mo�-Thurs 1030AM-9PM Fri & Sat 1030AM - 10PM
Closed Sundays � Full ABC Permits
Greenville's largest variety of imports and fine urines
QmSiJHm,mBm
Panthers cut Carrier, all-time receptions leader
i-i i-ii-1 i-n-i 11-i r-u-i i-ii-j i-i cJ
n
ee
Brown & Brown
ATTORNEYS VI A
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP)The
emergence of several younger play-
ers has prompted the Carolina
Panthers to cut Mark Carrier, the
club's all-time receptions leader.
Carrier, 33, who caught 176 pass-
es for 2547 yards with Carolina but
had just 19 receptions for 301 yards
last year, was released Thursday by
new coach George Seifert.
"Mark's a player who has obvi-
ously meant a lot to the Carolina
Panthers during the team's first four
seasons Seifert said. "Mark will
always be held in high esteem by
everyone in the Panthers' organiza-
tion, but we feel that we have a
good group of young receivers who
need to develop
That group is headed by Muhsin
Muhammad, a second-round draft
pick in 19, and Rae Canuth, the
Panthers' top selection in the 1997
draft. Both have shown promise
when not sidelined by injuries.
The Panthers, who lost free-
agent wide receiver Raghib Ismail
to the Dallas Cowboys last week,
also are pleased with the progress of
two wideouts they drafted last year.
"Mark will always be held in
high esteem by everyone in die
Panthers' organization, but
we feel that we have a good
group of young receivers who
need to develop
George Seifert
Head Coach
Donald Hayes, a fourth-round
selection, and Jim Turner, a sev-
enth-round pick, both were side-
lined by injuries for extended peri-
ods in 1998 but looked solid when
healthy.
Also Thursday, the Panthers re-
signed unrestricted free-agent cor-
nerback Steve Lofton, who had
been claimed off waivers from New
England midway through the 1998
season and started seven games for
Carolina.
The Panthers also waived line-
backer Ray Farmer, who failed his
physical.
; Truth,Equality, Justice

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Greenville
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
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atre
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SMELLY, LETHARGIC,
INCOHERENT.
IT'S HARD TO DETECT
INHALANT ABUSE
IN THE
AVERAGE TEENAGER.
"It's Time ForACaaage
SGAElbctions
Raymond McGill III . President
Na'imK. Akbar . . . . Vice President
Jason EvansTreasurer
Shondell JonesSecretary
� '
More Funds For Student
Organizations
Diverse Leadership
Diverse Opportunities
Improve Communication
More information
Uphold
your 1st
amendment
right:
Freedom
of the
press!
Apply for a
job at
oastcarolinian
today!
It it just a phase your child is going through? Or
is his life in danger?
The threat comes from inhalants, which are
ordinary household products that kids sniff to get
high.
Half of all 14-15 year olds have been offered
inhalants and almost one in five 8 graders has tried
them.
Few realize that just one sniff can cause death, or
that chronic users can suffer severe and permanent
brain damage.
The tell-tale signs of inhalant use include slurred
speech, glassy eyes and the smell of chemicals on
clothes.
Sniffers may also suffer nose bleeds, sores or rashes
around the nose and mouth, or a sudden lose of appetite.
Warn your kids before its too late, because we
don't recommend the other means of detection. It's
called an autopsy.
To learn more about inhalants, what they are and
where in your home they can be found, we urge you to
call 1-888-732-3362
Partnership for a Drug-Free
North Carolina rfi
r�tnenNp fcx a Oiug-free AroertuTW
Toll Free 1-888-732-3362
t
fawdcuwaU
writers needed
� Reliable writers
needed to cover campus
entertainment news
� Apply at the second floor
of Student Publications
Building or call 328-6366
east
Carolinian





12 Tuesday. April B. 1999
classifieds
Thi East Carolinian
FOR RENT
FOR SALE
HELP WANTED
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
a ML AMUmwniTS above Cata-
log Connection & Percolator avail-
able in early April. $5004660 per
month. Call 661-9040. ask for Rick
Smiley.
3 BEDROOM house for rent! Spa-
cious and well-kept. Beautiful hard-
wood floors throughout. Located 2
blocks from campus on Summit St.
Available in May. Please call 413-
0619.
ECU AREA big three bedroom, one
bath house. Washerdryer with cen-
tral heat and air. Paved drive with ga-
rage. Call 830-9502.
DUPLEX 2 BR, 1 bath, heat pump.
washerdryer hook-up, private drive,
close to campus, no pets. $430.
Please call 766-8444 or 366-7799.
Available immediately!
WESLEY COMMONS North. One
bedroom $310 & two bedroom
$400, near campus. ECU bus stop,
free water and sewer, washer and
dryer hookup and on site laundry,
pets considered. Call Wainright
Property Management LLC 756-
6209.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
SUMMER SUBLEASE an efficiency
apartment for one in Ringgold Tow-
ers. $288mo. May's rent only half.
Low utilities. Fully furnished. AC.
Available May 11 through July 31.
Call 329-2801.
SUBLEASE UP to four bedrooms in
Players Club Apartments. For
Summer months. May thru July. Call
for more info 321-8664.
TOWNHOUSES NEAR ECU. 3 or 4
bedrooms, 2 12 and 3 12 baths,
WD hook-up, lots of storage, spa-
cious. 752-1899 day; pager 561-
2203 night.
FOR RENT: 1 room efficiency apt.
with kitchen and bathroom, on 10th
Street in Forest Manor Apartments.
$295 per month, utilities included.
Available Now. Call 758-1921.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom. 1 bath
apartment on 10th Street in Forest
Manor Apartments. $325 per month,
watersewer included. Available
Now. Call 758-1921.
ROOMMATE WANTED
MF ROOMMATE needed to share
2 BR, 2 bath duplex near campus.
Washerdryer included. Rent
$287.50, 12 utilities. Must not mind
smoking or pets. Call Megan, 757-
1280. Available O end of this semes-
ter
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
ASAP to share 2 bedroom apt. Rent
$200 per month plus 12 utilities.
Call 754-2572. leave a message!
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed in
Fall. 3 bedroom townhouse,
$225month. 13 utilities. Great lo-
cation! Must see! Call Ashley. 353-
1286.
MALE ROOMMATE needed after
semester, non-smoker. 2 BR, 2 bath,
furnished, washerdryer, rent $275
month plus 12 utilities and phone
cable included. Call Brian, 353-6926.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share a furnished two bedroom
apartment beginning in May or June.
Must be responsible. - non-smoker
preferred, and easy to live with.
Please call 830-9066, if not there,
please leave a message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP to
share 2 bedroom, 1 12 bath, spa-
cious apartment. Furnished wwash-
er 8- dryer. Rent $230 per month
plus 12 utilities and phone. Call
Mike at 363-8960.
RESPONSIBLE AND fun roommate
wanted to share 4 bedroom house 2
blocks from campus with parking.
Graduate students and professionals
welcomed. Available April. Cass,
830-2122
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed in
May to share two bedroom in Cedar
Creek near hospital. Rent $400
month includes water, sewer. Nice
neighborhood. Call Brandy. 661-
7860.
SUMMER ROOMMATE wanted
to share thraa bedroom apart-
ment near campus. Includes
washer and dryer and outdoor
pool aceeee, 13 rent and utjll-
ttoa. We're clean and friendly.
CaE7B2-88K.
MALE ROOMMATE - Beginning Fall
1999; free roomboard. Good loca-
tion - ECU bus available. 321-1848
for details. Help with petal
FOR SALE: 1990 Ford Mustang 5.0
GT. loaded. Alarm and 10-CO player.
Asking $6,500 negotiable. Call 561-
7987 for more info.
MOTORCYCLE: 1991 Honda 760
Knighthawk. well maintained,
1600k. leather saddle bags, wind-
shield, double kickstand and cover.
New tires. Immaculate condition.
$2696. Call 830-2181.
1992 ISUZU Pickup. 51.000 miles.
one owner, $3700 OBO. 353-1667.
FLOOR LENGTH black satin sleeve-
less gown with scoop neck lined
with rhinestones Sizes 1516 and
1718. $100 each or best offer. 252-
244-8986.
LAPTOP COMPUTER- Toshiba 435
CDS. $800. Call 758-9640 and leave
a message.
PENTIUM 233MMX for sale! 15'
monitor. 40 megs, 3.2 gigs HD, 24x
CD. Ethernet and graphics card in-
stalled! $800 OBO. 3284079, ask
for Paul.
HELP WANTED
EXOTIC DANCERS $100041600
weekly, no experience needed. 919-
580-7084. Sid's Showgirls, Gold-
sboro.
D.J. FOR HIRE
HYPE
for Aif fifflNjtf turns
ORGANIZATIONS
Call J.Arthur @ 252-412-0971
EARN EXTRA cash Make your
own hours Responsible students to
marketmanage Citibank promo-
tions on campus. Free giveaways!
Earn $400week. Call Ann at 1-
800-950-8472.
ACTIVE DISABLED man seeks
physical assistance. Lifting, bathing,
dressing, driving, domestic chores.
Good experience for future health
care professionals. Contact Marty,
353-9074.
FRATERNITIES. SORORITIES &
Student Groups: Earn $1000-$2000
with easy 3 hour CIS Fund Raiser
event. No sales required. Fund
Raiser days are filling up, so call
today. Contact Chris 800-829-4777.
EASTERN CAROLINA'S finest
adult entertainment is now hiring.
Call for interview. Playmates, 252-
747-7686.
CHILDCARE NEEDED for 3- year-
old girl, 7:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. (3-4
days week); during school year
needs to drop off (8:45) pick up
(11:45) from pre-school, willing to
come to my home (your home if
nearby). During school vaca-
tionbreak also care for 7- year -old
sister. Experience and references re-
quired. Ph: 321-5710 (leave mes-
sage) e-mail: greenv1020Oaol.com
WANTED: HELP landscaping, gar-
dening, etc full-time or part-time.
Flexible hours. Must be honest, hard
working and willing to get hands dir-
ty. $7 per hour. 752-0028.
THE GREENVILLE Recreation and
Parks Department is looking for life-
guards and swim instructors for
summer employment. Lifeguards
must have current lifeguarding, first
aid, and CPR certifications. May also
teach swimming classes. 30-40
hour work week. Salary is $6.00 to
$6.75 per hour. Swim Instructors
must have current WSI certification.
Will teach swim classes Monday
thru Saturday mornings, 20-25 hour
work week. Salary is $7.25 to $8.00
per hour. Apply by Friday, April 16,
1999 to the City of Greenville. Hu-
man Resources, 201 Martin Luther
King Jr. Drive (W. Fifth Street), PO
Box 7207, Greenville. NC 27836-7207.
For more information contact Danny
Bass at 329-4044.
FREE RADIO $1260. Fundraiser
open to student groups 8- organiza-
tions. Earn $3-$6 per VisaMC app.
We supply all materials at no cost.
Call for info or visit our website.
Qualified callers receive a Free Baby
Boom Box. 1-80O-932-O528 x 65.
www.ocmconcepts .com
HIRING: ADULT entertainers and
dancers. Must be at least 18, have
own phone, transportation and be
drug free. Make up to $1500 week-
ly. For interview, call 758-2737.
LOOKING FOR a summer job? Play
at day and work at night. The ECU
Telefund is hiring students for the
Summer and Fall of 1999 to contact
alumni and parents for the ECU An-
nual Fund Drive. $5.50 hour. Make
your own schedule. If interested, call
, M-TH between the hour of 3-6
p.m
cam!
frOOD
PPIXBW��
Summer Camp
COUNSELORS ft WSTRUCTORS
for private Co-ed youth camp
located m the beautiful mountains of
Western NornCaroana. Over25
actVNee, including All sports, water
skiing.heated jpccjtsrris. art, horse-
bBCkTGoaiB. o7l3 to 87l6eam
$1350-S1750 plus room, meals,
laundry & great fun! Non-smokers
call for applicationbrochure:
80O-832-S539 or e-mail
CPPinewoodOaol.com anytime!
NEED A PART TIME JOB?
RPSINC.
b looking txrtaua NMpuai to load vans and
unload MM far the am shift noun 3O0Bm to 8am.
S7.SQhoun tultton assistance available after 30 days.
hMK career opportunities In operations and manage
mart possible. Appkaoons can be ailed out at 2410
Untied Drive (near the aquatics cento) Greenville
WANTED: PAYING $6.50 an hour
plus bonuses for qualified telemar-
keters. No Friday or Saturday work.
Hours: 5:30-9 p.m. Monday-Thurs-
day. 4:30-8 p.m. Sunday. Apply in
person between 5-6 p.m. at Energy
Savers Windows 6 Siding. Inc
1806 Dickinson Ave Greenville, at
the side door.
LIFEGUARDS AND beach vendors
needed in North Myrtle Beach for
1999 season. Will train. Housing pro-
vided if needed. For information call
843-272-3259.
NEED SUMMER help at Hatteras
Beach. Free housing. Need two
males or females for retail seafood
market. Bonus offered. Call 252-986-
2215 or e-mail riskybOinterpath.com
LITTLE CAESAR'S Pizza is looking
for Assistant Managers. Call 757-
1212, ask for William, to set up an
appointment.
EXPERIENCED CHILDCARE pro-
vider. Need person to come to my
home to keep children and run er-
rands. Must have previous experi-
ence; references will be required.
Part-time during school, full-time dur-
ing summer. If interested, send your
resume to Human Resources, PO
Box 1527. Greenville. NC 27835; or
fax to 752-4217.
PERSONALS
MANDY, HAPPY 21 st Birthday to
my precious California Tickle Barbie!
I hope your birthday is special. I love
you always and forever. Love, Brent
GOT TAN- Want Pictures. Want pic-
tures to show off that tan from
Spring break? Or how about that big
smile because Summer break is al-
most here? Reputable amateur pho-
tographer wants young women for
portfolio shots. You get free pictures.
References available. Send note,
phone, and photo (if available - will
be returned). Paul Hronjak, 4413
Pinehurst Drive, Wilson, NC 27896-
9001. (252) 237-8218, hronjaktJsim-
flex.com
CONGRATULATIONS TO the new-
ly initiated sisters of Alpha Xi Delta.
We love you.
DO YOU smell what the Pi Kappa Al-
pha's are cooking? You better know
your roll and show up for the biggest
event each and ever year. Greek God-
dess is coming!
CONGRATULATIONS TO Merideth
on being accepted in the Meisner
Program. Love, your Alpha Xi Delta
sisters
BRANDY CUNARD and Chandra
Martin: congratulations for getting
into Occupational Therapy School.
Love, your Gamma Sigma Sigma sis-
ters
THANKS CHI Omega, for the bas-
ket of candy you brought us last
week! Love, Sigma Sigma Sigma
SIGMA SIGMA Sigma hopes that
everyone had a nice Easter break!
SUBLEASE 1 bedroom at Park Vil-
lage, available end of May. Call 329-
0974.
SADD MET Wed March 31 at
6:30 p.m. in GC 1001. If you missed
the meeting, please contact Doug at
8931. Thanks
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
11a.m12noon.The Center for Coun-
seling and Student Development is
offering this workshop on Tuesday.
April3 6. If you are interested in this
workshop, please contact the Center
at 328-6661.
TEST PREPARATION: 11 a.m
12noon.The Center for Counseling
and Student Development is offering
this workshop on Tuesday, April 6. If
you are interested in this workshop,
please contact the Center at 328-
6661.
RECERTIFICATION FOR LIFE-
GUARDS available at the SRC. Con-
tact the main desk at 328-6387 for
details.
APPAREL MERCHANDISING Tex-
tile Organization members, we are
all looking forward to our departure
on April 8th to the Atlanta Apparel
Mart trip in Atlanta, Georgia. It'll be a
blast! See you on Thursday!
TEST PREPARATION: 3:30-4:30
p.m.The Center for Counseling and
Student Development is offering this
workshop on Monday. April 12. If
you are interested in this workshop,
please contact the Center at 328-
6661.
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION: 11a.m
12:00 noon. The Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development is of-
fering this workshop on Thursday.
April 8. If you are interested in this
workshop, please contact the Center
at 328-6661.
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: 3:30-5PM. The Center for
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering this workshop on
Thursday, April 8 and April 15. If you
are interested in this program, con-
tact the center at 328-6661.
LIFEGUARD TRAINING- 2 weeks
of classes, full Red Cross Certifica-
tion. Must attend all sessions. Cost
$110 for studentsmembers. Reg-
ister before April 8 at SRC.
IT HAS been previously published
that students would be able to use
Web registration 24 hours a day. it is
necessary that the system be
brought down from 9 p.m. until 1
a.m. nightly for routine backups of
the system. Students trying to use
the Student Desktop during these
times will get a message that the
system is down and the time it is
scheduled to be available again. Tel-
ephonic registration is also unavail-
able from 9 p.m. until 1 a.m. nightly
as published in the Schedule of
Classes. For your convenience the
scheduled hours of operation follow:
March 29, 1999 through August 24,
1999: Monday through Friday 1 a.m
6 p.m. 9 p.m12 a.m. Saturday 1
a.m12 a.m. Sunday 1 a.m. -4 p.m. 7
p.m12 a.m.
TEN STAR All Star Basketball Camp
registration is now open for boys and
girls ages 10-18. Players are selected
by invitation only. Past participants
include: Michael Jordan, Tim Dun-
can, Jerry Stackhouse. Grant Hill,
Christian Laettner. Antawn Jamison.
Vince Carter, and Steve Woj-
ciechowski. Camp locations are Ra-
leigh, NC: Center Valley, PA: Atlanta,
GA; Bristol, VA; Delaware. OH; Mari-
on. IN; and Mobile, AL College Bas-
ketball Scholarships are possible for
the most advanced players. For an
evaluation forrrcall (704) 372-8610
anytime.
LIVING OFF campus next year? Yard
sale April 23 and 24. Location will be
announced later. Two seniors are
moving and they have all you need
for your own apartment at a low
price.
SrKlVE!
cMiUMsnsrtire
(9191496-2224
'Tiyoacmtxxi
apply vithin
Gpy Mtors
Needed
� Must have excellent grammar
At editing skills
� English majors preferred
� Apply at the second floor of
Student Publications
Building or call 328-6366
easti
caroliraan
Advertise in
The East
Carolinian
classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE$4.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 5t each
STUDENT LINE AD RATE$2.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 5P each
Must present a valid ECU I.D. to quality. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to refuse fhis rate for any ad deemed to be
non-student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE .$1.00
add to above line rate for either BOLD or
ALL CAPS type.
.All classified ads placed by individuals or campus
groups must be prepaid. Classified ads placed by a
business must be prepaid unless credit has been
established. Cancelled ads can be removed from the
paper if notification is made before the deadline, but
no cash refunds are given. No proofs or tearsheets
are available. The Personals section of the classi-
fieds is intended for non-commercial communication
placed by individuals or campus groups. Business
ads will not be placed in this section.
All Personals are subject to editing for indecent or
inflammatory language as determined by the edi-
tors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE
4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue
we want
Did you see news happen?
Did you make news happen?
Do you belong between our covets?
Call caslcarolinian at 328-6366.
Work Outdoors I
Want Honest, Reliable Student;
Wdependable truckcar
TO MONITOR COTTON
(No experience necessary)
$7.00hr. mileage
mallfax resume
MCSI-Box 370
Cove City, NC 28523
Fax: 252-637-2125
(Nr. Greenville, New Bern, Kins
BIOLOGY,SCIENCE,EDUCAnON
AND LIBERAL ARTS GRADUATES
NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRED
FREE TRAINING IN A FIELD WITH SUPERB OPPORTIMTIES:
BIOMEDICAL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
STARTS AT 28K. MOST PEOPLE EARN 34K WITHIN A YEAR, PLUS FULL
BENEFITS. IMS, INC IS OFFERING A FREE 4 WEEK PROGRAMMING
COURSE. IN THE LAST 2 YEARS. IMS, INC HAS HIRED OVER 90 OF
THE STUDENTS WHO HAVE TAKEN THIS COURSE COURSES START
JUNE 7 OR JULY 12. POSITIONS LOCATED IN SILVER SPRING, MARY-
LAND 8 MILES OUTSIDE D.C CALL 888-680-5057 WWW.IMSWEB.COM
�aMaMaaaBl


Title
The East Carolinian, April 6, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 06, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1323
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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