The East Carolinian, April 1, 1999







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www.tec.ecu.edu
Carolinian
ECU cheerktders gpai- up for
national oompHtilion.
Sports Pg. 10
THURSDAY. APRIL 1.1999 VOLUME 74. ISSUE 38
New basketball coach announced
Herrion takes the helm
inwakeofDooley
Stephen Schramm
sports editor
Bill Herrion, former head coach at
Drexel University, was introduced
as ECU's new head basketball
coach Tuesday.
Herrion will become the 20th
basketball coach in ECU history.
He replaces Joe Dooley who
stepped down earlier this year after
four seasons.
"Four weeks ago, wc decided to
go in a different direction. Four
weeks later, we got just what we
wanted. We wanted a head coach
who has had big time success. We
wanted a coach who's style people
would want to see. We wanted
someone who could rally the troops
and get this program to the top of
the CM and the top of the
NCAA said Mike Hamrick, ECU
Athletic Director.
Herrion was the head coach at
Philadelphia's Drexel University
for the past eight seasons. At
Drexel, Herrion went 121-32.
Herrion's .791 winning percentage
ranks him 15th among active coach-
es.
"I'm not a win at all costs coach.
I want to have good people in this
program and take a lot of pride in
developing these guys as people
Herrion said.
Bill Herrion, Head Basketball Coach
file PHirro
Herrion takes over a program
that went 13-14 during the 1998-99
season.
"I can't guarantee wins and loss-
es right now. But what I can guaran-
tee is a basketball team that will
play hard and compete hard
Herrion said.
Herrion agreed to a five year
deal with a base salary of $130,000.
During his eight years at Drexel,
Herrion led the Dragons to seven
winning seasons, five conference
championships and three trips to
the NCAA Tournament. Herrion
was also named Coach of the Year
four rimes.
The highlight of his tenure at
Drexel came in 19, when his
Dragons upset Memphis in the first
round of the NCAA Tournament.
ECU students are excited about
the new coach.
"From what I've heard, he's a
good coach. I think he can build a
good program here said Brian
Porter, junior decision sciences
major.
s Domestic Violence
19 to 29 year olds
most common victims
J essica Reed
NEWS WRITER
E
very nine seconds a woman
becomes a victim of domestic
violence.
A study of violence against
women conducted by the Justice
Department's Bureau of
According to the Federal Bureau
�of Investigation, domestic vio-
lence is the establishment of con-
trol and fear in a relationship not
only through violence, but also
through intimidation, threats,
psychological abuse and isolation.
Statistics found that women from
19 to 29-years-old were more like-
ly than women of other ages to be
victimized by someone they
know.
Two -thirds of these attacks are
committed by boyfriends, hus-
bands, other family members or
acquaintances.
Domestic violence is the leading
cause of injury to women between
ages 15 and 44 in the United
States, more than car accidents,
muggings, and rapes combined.
"Domestic violence is one of the
number one health risks for
women today and also for the chil-
dren growing up in these homes
said Diana Lucas, Executive
Director of Pitt Co. Family
Violence Inc.
Statistics from Pitt County
Domestic Violence Facts
- It is estimated that one third of all high school and
college students have been in an abusive relationship.
- Relationship violence is toe number one cause of injur
to women ages 15-44. fPif
� 63 percent of all boys ages 11-20 arrested for murder,
murdered the man who was assaulting their mother.
'� � �� : v :
- As many as IS million women have been abused at
some time in their lives.
- The average battered women is attacked three times a
year.
Family
Violence cen-
ters show 75
percent of
women who
come through
the clinics
have children
and 60 per-
cent of these
children
become abu-
sive adults.
"Domestic
violence is a
generational
cycle Lucas
said.
"Statistics
show if one
grows up in
violent
homes,
females have
a greater risk
of becoming
victims and
males a
greater risk of
becoming bat-
t e r e r s ,
although men
can be victims
also
Even though men can be vic-
tims of domestic crimes, 95 per-
cent of domestic victims are
women.
Lucas believes that many of
domestic violence problems begin
when girls start to date.
One out of three young adult rcla-
Dornestic violence is the leading cause of injury to woman
between the ages of 15 and 44.
tionships include battering or
rape. Only four out of 10 of these
relationships end when violence
and abuse begin.
ECU Freshman Amanda Pollard
believes that domestic violence
is also .a problem with college
SEE VIOLENCE PAGE 2
Match Day places doctors with schools
Sixty-nine medical
students learn whew
they will do residencies
Terra Steinbeiser
STAf P WRITER
Sixty-nine students recently partic-
ipated in Match Day, an annual
event in which ECU medical stu-
dents gather together to find out
where they will spend the next
three to five years in residency
training.
"It's a really big event where
everyone and their families get
together in an auditorium to find
out the news said Roytesa
Rodgers, a medical student.
After students spend four years
in medical school they are eligible
to apply for residency training.
"After interviews at residency
programs throughout the country,
students rank their top ten choices
for programs said Jeannine
Hutson, Information Specialist.
"The programs also rank their
choices for students. Then, a
National Residency Match Program
computer sorts through all the
applicants' and graduate medical
programs' rankings and produces an
impartial matching
This is what is distributed to stu-
dents on Match Day.
There are about 23,000 residen-
cy positions available nationwide.
Besides the US medical students
who compete for these slots, anoth-
er 19,000 "independent" applicants
including former graduates of US
medical schools, US osteopathic
students, and graduates of foreign
medical schools apply for these lim-
ited spaces.
This year, 71 percent of graduat-
ing medical students got into their
top choice for a residency training
program, ECU's highest percentage
ever.
Twenty-four percent of students
placed will remain at ECU and 42
percent will stay in North Carolina
for their residency training
"The residency is just field
training for your particular area
said Karen Gavigan, pediatric med-
ical student, who will be spending
her three year residency at ECU.
"There are people above you look-
ing out and making sure everything
goes right
Consulting firms
to assess parking
Selection process
in early stages
Amy Wagner
assistant news editor
Parking and Traffic Services, along
with Materials Management have
begun the process of selecting a
consulting firm to discuss the future
of parking at ECU.
Dave Santa Ana, director of
Parking and Traffic Services;
Layton Getsinger, associate vice
chancellor for administration and
finance; Bruce Flye, director of
Facilities Planning and other mem-
bers of the Parking and Traffic
Policy Committee held a confer-
ence on Monday with consultants
representing four firms. The com-
mittee explained the major prob-
lems with current campus parking
and addressed specific desires for
the future so that the consulting
firms can include solutions in their
proposals.
The consultants' request for
proposals must address many
issues wih ECU parking including
medical school parking, fee struc-
ture, charging the Athletic
Department for use of the lots dur-
ing athletic events, private parking,
dealing with the projected increase
in enrollment and locating areas for
new lots. The committee is espe-
cially interested in utilizing current
resources.
"How do wc live with what we
currently have?" Getsinger said.
There are currently two lots that
are not utilized because they are
inconvenient, he said.
The committee wants to find
ways to encourage people's use of
other means of transportation to
campus because parking is current-
ly too congested.
"We have to find out where it is
to decrease the amount of cars cur-
rently on campus Getsinger said.
He believes this can be done by
improving the transit system. He
also mentioned perimeter-based
fees whereas the farther away from
campus you park, the less your
parking sticker costs.
The Parking Policy Committee
said they want to help the entire
campus by receiving input from
everyone. The committee, which
will work as a contact for the select-
ed consultant, is composed of staff,
faculty and students. In addition,
the committee wants to survey the
campus community about current
parking problems.
"When we come up with a final
project, everyone will be exposed to
it Getsinger said.
The Parking and Traffic Policy
Committee wants to examine the
prospective consultants' previous
experience with university parking.
Ruth Davis, a committee member
representing the medical school,
asked the consultants to include
specific examples of their previous
work with medical school parking.
Although the committee is anx-
ious to get the parking renovations
underway, they said they are being
realistic.
"We're not going to be able to
make everyone happy and wc know
it Getsinger said. "But, that's not
the goal here
Students' pets often
meet untimely end
3,200 animals
destroyed in 1998
Lisa Stokes
NEWS WRITER
On sunny days you can observe
students walking their dogs on
campus or playing fetch on the
mall with their canine friends. But
have you ever considered what
happens to these pets when
school is over or the owner gradu-
ates?
According to some experts many
of our four-legged friends are given
up to the humane society and ani-
mal control, or they are abandoned
all together.
In 1998, Greenville Animal
Control only adopted out 137 cats
and dogs, while the remaining 3,200
abused, abandoned and unwanted
animals were destroyed.
Animal control and the humane
society cite irresponsible owners.
Some owners abandon their pet
when they have to move, assuming
SEE PETS PAGE 2
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Many students ire responsible pet owners. However, the Humine Society it over-
whelmed with the animals people neglect or abandon.
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Thundiy, April 1, 1998
news
Tin ftn CarellntsN
SGA elections slated for April 7
Pete
Executive Committee
seats up for vote
Holly Harris
news editor
The SGA will hold its annual exec-
utive committee elections to fill the
offices of president, vice president,
secretary and treasurer on April 7.
Candidates campaigning for
positions include Cliff Webster and
Raymond McGill for president,
Na-im Akbar and John Meriac for
vice president, Overton Harper and
Jason Evans for treasurer and
Jessica Dowdy and Shondell Jones
for secretary.
Students can vote vote from 9
a.m6:30 p.m. at Mendenhall
Student Center, the Student
Recreation Center, Todd Dining
Hall, the Wright Place and Minges
Coliseum. The polls at Wright
Place will remain open until 7 p.m.
Ballot locations will be run by
members of the elections commit-
tee. To vote, students are required
to swipe their One Card to ensure
that each person can only vote
once. Then, voters mark their
selections on a ballot sheet and turn
it in to the attendant.
According to James
Kaltenschnee, the elections com-
mittee chair, this system will
ensure that there will be no oppor-
tunity for unfair ballot collection.
"Because we arc using the One
Card system, I'm not really con-
cerned Kaltenschnee said. "The
people working the polls are not
allowed to endorse anybody, every-
body on the elections committee is
totally unbiased.
Last year, only 1,150 out of the
16,636 enrolled students voted in
last year's election. Despite the fact
that the current student body sur-
passes last year's total,
Kaltenschnee said he expects a
similar turnout next Wednesday.
SGA Chief of Staff Cliff Webster
said he believes the problem is that
students don't know have enough
information to go to the polls.
"I think students care and
would go out and vote if they knew
where Webster said.
Issues that will face the next
executive committee include cam-
pus safety, parking and transit, and
the simplification of funding for
student organizations.
Local Fraternity Raises Money
for Special Olympics on seesaws
ThetaChisets
?oalat$4000
A MSA GHRAIRI
STAFF WRITER
Theta Chi fraternity helped raise
money over the weekend for the
Pitt County Special Olympics by
holding a seesaw fundraiser.
With a goal of $4,000 to reach
this year, the brothers went out
around Greenville collecting
money from local businesses
including the Burger King on the
corner of Red Banks road and
Greenville boulevard where their
fundraiser was held.
"We've been doing this for
about nine years said Eddie
Jappell, chaplain and head of phil-
anthropy for Theta Chi.
In the past they have raised at
least $2,000 a year.
"Over the past five years, Theta
Chi is the largest sponsor we have
raising over $10,000 Dean Foy,
coordinator for the Pitt County
Special Olympics said.
The money that Theta Chi rais-
es helps the Special Olympics in
several ways.
"The money goes to help the
actual set up of games and support
of Special Olympics in North
Carolina, but mainly in Pitt
County Jappell said.
In addition to receiving dona-
tions from local businesses, repre-
sentatives of rhe fraternity also
received pledges of $24 dollars, one
dollar for every hour on the seesaw.
"The community turn-out has
been great; people stopped at the
red lights have been giving us
money and a lot of support Vinnie
Brown, a member of Theta Chi.
Aside from holding a fundraiser,
15 of Theta Chi's brothers will be
volunteering all day at the Special
Olympics helping in various activi-
ties.
The Pitt County Special
Olympics will be held on April 15
at J.H.Rose High School.
April marks STD Awareness Month
Student Health to give
presentations, classes
RACHAF. I. HlCDON
STAFF WRITER
April is national Sexually
Transmitted Disease (STD)
Awareness Month.
County and campus health orga-
nizations are gearing up to spread
knowledge and raise awareness
throughout ECU and the
Greenville community.
"We have a population that is
very much at risk said Heather
Zophy, director of health education
with the Student Health Center.
"Raising awareness is a definite
need
The Student Health Center will
be giving presentations in resi-
dence halls and Health 1000 classes
through an ongoing project to pro-
mote STD prevention. The
Health Center offers free HIV test-
ing, as well as tests for other STDS
at a comparatively minimal cost.
Also available to students in the
Student Health Center are educa-
tional videos and brochures.
PICASO (Pitt County AIDS
Service Organization), which serves
more than 25 counties statewide,
also will be working in outreach to
reduce the spread of HIV through
education.
Along with speaking to classes,
PICASO representatives will be
working on campus and throughout
Pin County with organizations such
as the Boys and Girls Club, to dis-
cuss making responsible choices
about everything from cigarettes to
sex.
Also scheduled in April is the
Human Race slated for April 17,
which is a 5K walk or run to bene-
fit non-profit organizations in Pitt
County.
"Having a designated month
hopefully will raise awareness,
however we need to be promoting
awareness twelve months out of
the year said Barry Elmore, out-
reach coordinator for PICASO.
"Every month is STD awareness
month for us
Elmore also said that although
STD numbers are declining in
other parts of the state, there has
been a recent increase in STD
numbers in Eastern North
Carolina. Students are invited to
contact PICASO with any ques-
tions.
continued (torn pegs I
someone will care for it.
Occasionally students bring a pet
from home, only to find their apart-
ment doesn't allow pets or they
can't afford the deposit.
Other reasons owners may aban-
don pets include expensive' vet
bills, inadequate living spaces,
destructive behavior and unexpect-
ed and unwanted litters of puppies
and kittens.
Because of the thousands of
unwanted pets in Greenville, Pitt
County Law prohibits the sale of
dogs and cats in pet stores. This law
is fully supported by the Pin
County Humane Society (PCHS).
"A lot of students leave for the
summer and end up leaving their
pets behind. Cats go wild and dogs
get hit by cars. In fact we have five
dogs that have been hit by cars
now �ajd Bobbie Parsons, PCHS
director.
Laura Eber, 20, a junior, found
her cat behind Flanagan. Eber
Violence
continued from page t
aged students.
"Once someone is in a relation-
ship that involves domestic vio-
lence, they feel they have no
where else to go Pollard said.
A bill recently passed by the
N.C. Senate called The Safe
Families Act, would step up (aw
enforcement efforts, make it easi-
er to track batterers and give court
and law enforcement officials
more tools to protect victims of
abuse.
This act would give police the
named the 3-year-old orange tabby
Jack.
"He was too cute to leave there,
I had to take him homeEber said.
Although Eber adores her cat.
"He was too cute to leave
there, I had to take
him home
Laura Eber, 20
she has come to realize his friend-
ship is expensive.
"I had to pay $40 for his check-
up (which included shots), $40 to
get his teeth cleaned, $30 for his
flea medication, and then I had to
buy food, kitty litter, toys and two
cat pans Eber said. "It really adds
up fast
Danielle Lawerence, a graduate
student, knows all about pet
expenses as well. Her two black
labs, Rawlings and Poseidon, each
cost over $500. That doesn't
ability to make domestic violence
arrests without warrants.
The Safe Families Act would
also abolish a sate law barring
police from responding to more
than one domestic violence com-
plaint at rhe same address within
48 hours.
Dave Vanderhcyden, ECU fresh-
man, supports The Safe Families
Act, but thinks some aspects
should be changed.
"I don't think it would be cool to
arrest someone without a war-
rant Vanderhcyden said.
In addition, two other proposals
will be considered by the Senate
this legislative session.
include the annual vet eve or the
$50 she spends a month on special
dog food.
"I spend more on the dogs than
I do on myself Lawerence said.
Tipping the scales at 100
pounds each, the dogs actually live
inside. However, both have exten-
sive obedience training and access
to a doggie-door that leads to a
fenced in acre of land.
Lawerence commute from
Moorehead City to ECU and the
dogs are on their own for the day.
Having a doggie-door, self feeders
and a spot in the garage for the two
labs saves Lawerence and the dogs
stress and money.
Parson warns that because col
lege-age adults move around fre- '
quendy, they should be doubly
cautious about taking on the added
burden of a pet
"A lot of times a student will;
take a dog and their apartment will
be too small or the landlord will
make them get rid of it They stu-
dents really ought to think
because it's a big responsibility
Parsons said.
The first would provide assistance
to domestic violence victims in
the 26 counties in North Carolina
where assistance is not currently
available. The second would
make a domestic violence com-
mission a permanent part of state
government
Sen. Ed Warren said he feels :
that everyone should be aware of
domestic violence, especially
individva in North Carolina.
"It's important that we give all
the support we can to help fami-
lies in North Carolina with .
domestic violence problems ,
Sen. Warren said.
Clinton rejects Milosevic's plan
WASHINGTON (AP) -
Slobodan Milosevic could lose
international recognition for his ter-
ritorial claim on Kosovo if the Serbs
don't stop killing the region's ethnic
Albanians, President Clinton said
Tuesday. He rejected a formula for
peace offered by the Yugoslav pres-
ident.
"If there was ever any doubt
about what is at stake in Kosovo,
Mr. Milosevic is certainly erasing it
by his actions Clinton said. "They
are the culmination of more than a
decade of using ethnic and religious
hatred as a justification for uproot-
ing and murdering completely
innocent, peaceful civilians to pave
Mr.
Milosevic's path to absolute
power
The president urged the allies to
remain steadfast in their opposition
to Milosevic on Day 7 of NATO's
air campaign against the Serbs
while the administration promised
neighboring nations financial aid
for the refugees streaming across
their borders and support against
Serb threats.
"There have to be some limits
beyond which we collectively do
not wish to see our country go and
our worid go Clinton said in a
keynote address
Tuesday night to the Electronic
Industries Alliance. While technol-
ogy opens the door for new oppor-
tunity, it also can aid those who
would destroy peace, he said.
"When married together with
the most primitive hatreds, like
those we see manifest in Kosovo
today, the advent of technology and
decentralized decision making and
access to information can be a very
potent but destructive force
Clinton said.
Some success was reported in
diminishing Serb air defenses and
strikes against troops stationed just
outside Kosovo. But a Pentagon
spokesman cautioned
against expecting a quick
"knockout punch and the military
refused to detail the damage
NATO has inflicted on the Serbs.
U.S. policy has opposed inde-
pendence moves in Kosovo and
supported Serbia's claim to the
province. During peace talks this
month in Rambouillet, France, the
Clinton administration supported
autonomy but not independence
for the majority ethnic Albanians
in Kosovo. Milosevic rejected that
plan.
Administration officials insisted
that there had been no policy
change, but during a State
Department ceremony honoring
former Secretary of State Warren
Christopher, Clinton signaled that
the Serbs' actions in Kosovo carried
a price: the loss of international sup-
port for Milosevic's claim on the
region.
"Today he faces the mounting
cost of his continued aggression
Clinton said. "For a sustained peri-
od, we will see that his military will
be seriously diminished, key mili-
tary infrastructure destroyed, the
prospect for international support
for Serbia's claim to Kosovo increas-
ingly jeopardized
To the 18 other NATO coun-
tries, with whose leaders he has
been in frequent contact, he said:
"We must remain steady and deter-
mined with the will to see this
through
Milosevic's proposal to return to
the negotiating table once NATO
halted the bombing by German
Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder,
Police not parking cops
Only Parking and
Traffic Services ticket
Jessica Reed
NEWS WRITER
Some university officials say they
are concerned that many students
on ECU's campus may not be aware
of the difference between the
responsibilities of Parking and
Traffic Services and the ECU
Police Department. The fact is, it's
all in who writes the parking tickets
and who enforces the laws.
ECU Parking and Traffic
Services handles all parking on
campus, and the four parking con-
trol officers employed by Traffic
Services give out all parking cita-
tions.
"No new parking officers have
been hired in two years said
David Santa Ana, ECU transporta-
tion director.
Campus is divided into four sec-
tions and parking control officers
patrol on foot and in vehicles from
6:30 a.m12 p.m.
Officers say resident parking is
the most problematic area. Parking
control officer Shirley Bazemore
said that a majority of the 25 to 50
tickets that she gives out a day are
at meters around the dorms.
The ECU Police Department
enforces university regulations and
state laws on campus. Sgt Joseph
C. Horst said that their main focus
is the safety of students, faculty and
staff on campus.
The department educates stu-
dents and staff on safety and securi-
ty practices through a variety of pro-
grams and services.
Forty-five sworn certified police
officers are employed with the
department. These officers have
jurisdiction on all owned and oper-
ated property controlled by ECU.
"All of the officers have all of the
powers of a sworn North Carolina
officer said Horse "Our jurisdic-
tion is just more limited
The department is open 24
hours a day and 365 days a year.
WKKKKKKKKKmm
�-





Tkt Eiit Carolinian
UPWS
Thundty, April 1, 1999 3
news
briefs
UNC researchers
discover way to
shrink tumor
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) -
Researchers at the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill say
they have found a way to shrink
human tumors by slowing down a
natural mechanism that prevents
tumor cells from dying.
Scientists have only tested their
discovery on laboratory mice but
want to perform their first tests on
Mental exam ordered
for woman accused of
killing her children
WHEATON, III. (AP) - A judge
has ordered a mental examination
for a nurse accused of drugging
and suffocating her three young
children.
DuPage County Judge George
Bakalis expressed doubts about
Marilyn Lemak's ability to under-
stand the three murder charges
against her.
Prosecutors allege Mrs. Lemak,
of Naperville, III gave her chil-
dren prescription drugs before
putting them to bed March 4, then
suffocated 7-year-old Nicholas, 6-
year-old Emily and 3-year-old
Thomas Lemak with her hands as
Melaysia to kill more
than 1 million pigs to
fight mystery virus
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia
(AP) - Five more people have died
of a pig-borne virus that has left
Malaysia's prosperous hog farming
industry in shambles, a news
report said Wednesday.
On Tuesday, Malaysia said it
would destroy 1.3 million pigs to
help curb the epidemic. Soldiers
and policemen, covered head-to-
toe in plastic suits, have entered
pig-farming villages as part of a
massive campaign to shoot the
pigs. Health authorities have also
launched a drive to spray chemi-
cals to kill mosquitoes that carry
the disease from pigs to humans.
First Union puts $5
million into fund
investing in black
businesses
CHARLOTTE (AP) - First
Union is putting $5 million into a
fund that will invest in minority-
owned businesses, part of a new
partnership between the bank and
the founder of Black Enterprise
magazine.
Earl Graves, whose magazine
today has a circulation of 300,000,
started a private equity fund with
Citigroup that typically invests
about $5 million in minority-
owned businesses with revenues
of at least $10 million.
Penn bans alcohol at
university parties
PHILADELPHIA (AP) -The
University of Pennsylvania has
banned alcohol at undergraduate
campus parties after a parrygoer
died at a fraternity house.
The ban, expected to last at
least until a student-faculty task
force at the Ivy League school
takes up the issue in about six
weeks, applies to registered cam-
pus parties, typically those hosted
by fraternities and attended by
Kosovo rebels say
they're barley
holding on
VIENNA, Austria (AP) - Faced
with a massive Serb onslaught,
ethnic Albanian rebels are no
longer attacking Serb forces and
are barely holding on, a regional
rebel commander said today.
Ramush Hajredinaj, a comman-
der of the Kosovo Liberation
Army, told The Associated Press
by satellite phone that the rebels
are trying to protect what's left of
the Albanian community in
Kosovo.
Brand New Luxury Apartments
Now Leasing
"Utilities included Fully furnished
Private Bathroom
4 Bedroom 4 Bathroom
Individual Leasing
Roommate Matching
Designer Interiors
State of the Art Amenities
Free Cable
Free Computer lab
Free Monitored Alarm
Near ECU Bus Line
. Pirates Cove
330 110 Sowt � Cmmtk, NC 27858
,y-aatLStMiJcm
crime
UlEntCitalir
March 23
Larceny - A student reported
the larceny of his wallet from
Christenbury Gym.
Intoxicated and
DisruptiveCommunicating
Threats - A student was charged
with being intoxicated and disrup-
tive, after receiving complaints that
he was disrupting a class at the
Rawl Building and threatening two
employees and an officer at the
Wright Place. He was transported
to PCM Hospital due to a minor
self inflicted injury.
Harrassing Phone Calls - A stu-
dent from Slay Hall reported
receiving harassing phone calls.
March 29
Larceny - Two staff members
reported the larceny of cash from
their lockers at the Recreation
Center.
Harassment - A resident of
Aycock Hall reported being
harassed by another resident of
Aycock Hall.
Damage to Property - A resident
of Umstead Hall reported damage-
to her vehicle while parked at the
bottom of College Hill Drive.
Trespassing - Four non-students
were banned from campus after
they were seen walking into sever-
al residents rooms in Aycock Hall.
The four subjects were unescorted
in the residence hall.
March 30
Arrest Warrant - A Garrett Hall
resident was arrested at his resi-
dence after . Goldsboro police
advised they had warrants charging
him with embezzlement.
Domestic Dispute - A resident
of Scott Hail reported a domestic
dispute in a room in Scott Hall.
Officers made contact with two stu-
dents who stated they were having
a discussion and were not fighting.
Neither showed any signs of a
physical fight.
Larceny - A staff member
reported the larceny of a mink coat-
from Wright Auditorium sometime
on March 10.
Larceny - A resident of Scott
Hall reported the larceny of two fog
lights from his vehicle parked in
the parking lot off Curry Court.
Helms, Edwards clash over nomination
U.S. Sen. John Edwards' advocacy
of a close personal friend for a fed-
eral judgeship has run head-on into
Sen. Jesse Helms, the first major
clash between North Carolina's two
senators since Edwards' election in
November.
Rather than see the slot filled,
Helms wants it moved from the
Eastern District of North Carolina
to the Western District.
Edwards, a Democrat, asked the
White House to nominate IS.
Bankruptcy Judge Rich Leonard to
be a U.S. District Court judge in
Raleigh, and President Clinton
nominated Leonard on Wednesday.
Helms introduced a bill this
month that would transfer the fed-
eral judgeship from the Eastern
District to the Western District.
Helms says the Western District,
with three jtidgeships, has more
pending cases then the Eastern
District, which has four.
"We don't need him said the
Republican senior senator. "We
need one in the Western District
Leonard, 49, has been a federal
bankruptcy judge since 1992 in the
Eastern District of North Carolina,
which stretches from Raleigh to the
coast. Leonard operates from
Wilson.
"He's just infinitely qualified
Edwards said. "He's a fair-minded,
straight-down-the-middle judge.
He's the kind of person you look for
in a judge
I
The Eastern District shouldn't
give up a judge to the Western
District, Edwards' aides Said. They
cite a report last week by the
Judicial Conference of the United
States stating the number of
Eastern District' judges should
remain at four to handle the dis-
trict's caseload. � � i
The same report said the
Western District, Which stretches
from Charlotte westward, needs
two more judges. � I
"This robbing Peter to pay Paul
approach would still leave the peo-
ple of North Carolina without that
kind of access to the courts that
they deserve Mike Briggs,
Edwards' pres's secretary, said.
Wednesday.
v � i , ri(irr rl"UP
NEED A JOB THIS
It.
NiversiT
Housing
services
University Housing Services will be
hiring student painters($7.50 per hour)
for the paint crew this summer.
Full and part-time positions available.
For details and applications, please
come to Office Suite 100, Jones Hall.
If you are interested, please apply by
April 30, 1999.
The comp
many college
Of course,
in their lives
lifestyles are
As a result
irresponsibili
The life of
ter to semest
You may g
allow pets. Yt
pet detrimen
Even if liv
ing the schoc
Taking car
live in cramp
enough mom
Ifastuden
strain put on
to care for a p
Planning n
when you go
else who you
If you dor
If astuder
the pet could
before the an
The pena
want pets th
ership shoulc
but is often t
LETTI
After a half oi
I must say I
gusted by th
lessnessof ca
organizations
cate, if noi
promiscuity.
Every othe
thumb throug
ments for St
aware of at
rally" where
iway condoi





il 1, 1989 3
d at his resi-
sboro police
Tants charging
lent.
; - A resident
;d a domestic
in Scon Hall,
t with two stu-
y were having
c not fighting.
y signs of a
raff member
fa mink coat-
urn sometime
dent of Scott
eny of two fog
de parked in
irry Court.
ation
�. �' i
trict shouldn't
i the Western
des said. They
week by the
of the United
number of
jdges should
andle the dis-
i' � i
art said the
hich stretches
tvard, needs
I
:er to pay Paul
leave the peo-
a without that
le courts that
like Briggs,
;oretary, said.
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The companionship and warmth a pet can bring into a person's life can be immeasurable. For
many college students, who are a long way from home, the idea of owning a pet is alluring.
Of course, there are many responsible pet owners. Unfortunately, many others are not at a place
in their lives where they are best prepared to care for a pet. The truth is that most student
lifestyles are not conducive to pet ownership.
As a result, area animal shelters are filled with pets who have been left homeless because of the
irresponsibility or circumstances often of college students.
The life of a college student can be hectic. Living arrangements change year to year and semes-
ter to semester. This uncertain environment is not stable and not always appropriate for pets.
You may get a new roommate who doesn't like pets. You may move somewhere that doesn't
allow pets. You may transfer or get expelled ftom school. Too many variables can make owning a
pet detrimental to the life of the animal.
Even if living arrangements are stable, what happens when pet owners leave for breaks dur-
ing the school year?
Taking care of a pet is a responsibility that is often underestimated by students. Students often
live in cramped apartments with far too little room for animals to run. Many of us barely have
enough money to feed ourselves, much less a pet.
If a student chooses to own a pet, serious thought must be put into the decision. With all of the
strain put on your time by studies and social activities, are you really going to want to take time
to care for a pet?
Planning must be done for the safety of the pet. Is there someone who can take care of the pet
when you go home? If for some reason you cannot keep your pet anymore, is there somebody
else who you know can and will take care of it?
If you do not have easy answers to these questions, a pet might noi be a wise choice.
If a student chooses to own a pet, and is later unable to care for it, the student loses a pet and
the pet could possibly lose its life. Animal shelters can only hold pets for a limited period of time
before the animals are destroyed.
The penalties for irresponsible pet ownership are vastly greater for the animals. If students
want pets there is very little anyone can do to stop them from obtaining one. However, pet own-
ership should be a choice that is well deliberated. Mistreating animals is rarely anyone's intention,
but is often the result of poor planning.
LETTER
Student frustrated with alternate lifestyles
After a half of a semester at ECU, Place. In fact, on the back cover of morality (No way! That might
I must say I am thoroughly dis- the March 25 edition of The East offend and betray our great pals-
gusted by the repugnant shame- Carolinian, there is a full-page ad lust, fornication and impetuous-
lessness of campus periodicals and for some naked bar in town. Plus, ness and make them think they are
organizations who seemingly advo- the televisions in The Croatan are immoral). However, I do expect a
cate, if not celebrate, sexual constantly showing music videos more neutral stance. I'm tired of
promiscuity. that are almost exclusively based being bombarded with the abhor-
Evcry other campus periodical I on a sexual theme with half naked rent depravity of our generation
thumb through contains advertise- people singing their newest hits every time I walk around campus,
ments for strip clubs and I am desperately hoping to sell a few which is otherwise a beautiful
aware of at least one "condom more records with their bodies. place,
rally" where an organization gave I don't expect campus organiza-
iway condoms at The Wright tions and periodicals to encourage Kathy Gunter
OPINION
Columnist � Point
L&th.
Caleb
Rose
Communist conspiracies abound
Even little ol' Greenville has
communist undertones that
please me to no end. My
Greenville Utilities bill dou-
bledthis mouth and there isn't
a thing I can do about it
because there is no other com-
pany that will supply me
with power.
April Fools, fools. Nolxxly knows
me because I am not the usual
opinion columnist to the stars as our
beloved Ryan Dogg is. Well, please
allow me to be the first to tell you
that I, yes, am the one who writes
all of the Ryan Dogg's material.
"Yo, Yo, what is upthe Ryan Dogg
is up in dis is what he writes, how-
ever if you substitute the name C-
Lo (me) in for Ryan Dogg, then you
will have the original dopesta.
I do have an opinion and it is
this: I really don't know. I could sit
and rant about the multitude of
problems that I encounter on cam-
pus each day such as the fact that
twenty-five cents counts for 30
minutes in the half-hour parking
meter and the same quarter would
only count as twenty minutes in the
hour parking meters. What the
dilly, yo? I don't know about you
but I love it!
Communism is great, isn't it? I
sit on my knees and admire my life-
sized cardboard cutouts of Karl
Marx, Fredrich Engels and Vladmir
Lcnnin on a daily basis after that I
have to go to class and stuff. But
seriously, dude, these guys were
dope! I mean, think about all that is
wrong with capitalism. Business are
running each other bankrupt and
all, and just think of all the choices
we get to make on our own�non-
sense.
If America was run by
Communists (though some may
argue that is already is), life would
be like living on a college campus,
and how great would that be?
Everone could cat at the same great
campus restaurants, and we would
all make the same wages as college
studentswhich is a little less than
nil so we are well on our way.
Here is a common Capitalist
doctrine: a man goes into a pawn
shop and purchases a still-sealed
playstation game for twenty dollars
(there would be no playstations in
my perfect communist world, mind
yonplaystations bad!) and then
proceeds to drive to the local Wal-
Mart and return it for thirty crisp
dollars he can use to buy computer
games or hookersnow who would
want to do that? This would never
have happened had Mr. Marx's
ideals been carried out.
If Communism were King, there
would be no thought of getting 12
free CDs from BMG that you don't
want and selling them to CD Alley
for better music.oh no. Don't get
any ideas either because once Y2K
rolls around andwe all live in straw
huts again, there will not be any fun
capitalist activities to engage in�
ever again.
Besides, there are only two
things that matter in life anyway-
communism and Hank Williams Sr.
You cannot imagine how
Communism would extinguish all
of the petty, aggravating things we
have to deal withlO-l(Minseit 3
numbers), MCI is better that
AT&T, McDonald's value meals
are cheaper than Hardecs plus they
have Monopoly, IBM
goodMacintosh bad, and lastly, for
the Southerners, there would be no
more Chevy vs. Fordonly Chevy.
Even little ol' Greenville has
communist unertories that please
me to no end. My Greenville
Utilities bill doubled this month
and there isn't a thing I can do
about it because there is no other
company that will supply me with
power. The Capitalist energy mar-
ket seems to have passed by
Greenvilleperhaps this is an
encouraging sign from the men
behind the Iron Curtian.
Well, that is it. Communism is
da dopest trip. All ye scurvy Pirates
may not believe me, but tune ye in
yer ears, ye barnicle laden bastards,
the end of Capitalism is nigh and
when the zero hour is upon us and
the anti-life equation has been sub-
mitted to the world by Bill Gates,
me and my trusty Italian
Greyhound, Spicy, will be laughing
at all of you from afar on our remote
area of leased Canadian tundraha
ha ha ha
OPINION
Columnist � Counterpoint
Ryan
Kennemur
Communism?whatever!
Okay, here's the situation. My par-
ents went away on a weeks vacation
and they left the keys to my mom's
new Porsche. Would they
mindhmmwcllof course not.
For those of you who never lis-
tened to rap music as a kid, you
probably don't recognize the above
snippet from DJ Jazzy Jeff and the
Fresh Prince's song "Parents just
don't understand Man, that song
was dope. With this in mind, allow
me to get to the topic at
handCapitalism.
"Capitalism is defined by that
fool Noah Webster as "the dialect
spoken in or around Canton,
China No, wait. That's the defi-
nition of "Cantonese I Imm. I
wonder if they're related somehow.
Capitalism is the foundation
upon which this great nation of ours
(the people of Canton, China) was
built on. To many people, it has
turned into a way of making money
without actually doing any work.
An example of this is going into a
pawn shop and finding something
that purchasing something that
looks new, then taking it to Wal-
Mart and getting the full retail price
for it in cash. How do I feel about
this? In a wordword. This is a
great way to make money, second
only to prostitution. And seeing as
how I was a victim of the Freshman
Forty, that one's out.
Big corporations like Wal-Mart,
K-Mart and Roses are thieves in a
thieves market.These guys (not
the people of Canton, China) are
taking us for every penny that we
earn, and I sec nothing wrong with
the occasional Savings and Loan
scam.
But I have to respect these cor-
porations, even if it's only because
they have nifty logos. But also
because of what they do for the lit-
tle mom and pop places that spring
up in the area. You know, the ones
that open and close in the same
week because they can't compete
with the surrounding chains. Man,
that's awesome. Darwin's Natural
Selection theory really applies here.
Survival of the fittest, PTA Pizza!
And another smooth wacked-out;
idea is ordering a bunch of cd's from;
BMG and then turning around and;
selling them at a used CD store
Isn't that genius? And also, getting
compromised credit card numbers;
off the internet and using them for
900 numbers (and 10-10 numbers).
We're not stealing so much as "tak-
ing back" what they (the people of
Canton, China) stole from us. Let's
sec you try to get anything like that
done through the ideal of
Communism. Marx was a Nazi and
Frederich Engels wasn't even
American! How can we possibly
listen to what those weird French
people have to say?
Yo. Don't let that fool Caleb
sway you over to Communism.
That guy is as smart as two rats
screwing in a sweat sock. And that
italian greyhound of his has a rain-
bow of diseases. Communism is
bad. Believe me. Out.

fu





,5 Twm M.h 30, If 98
comics
Tin Em Ctrollniin
Life on Tuesday
Chris Knotts Everyday Life
Mike Litwin
CM tflU WJ WS STIFF IUTV FOOD7.
Great Books
Last year, a new minor was created in "Multidisciplinary Studies"
allowing declared majors who have completed 30 s.h. to design
their own minors under the direction of their major advisor.
Students interested in the "Great Books" that have shaped our
present cultures and civilizations can design a minor on this
theme.
Beginning in spring 2000, selected courses with an emphasis on
the great works of literature, philosophy, history, science, social
science � every discipline � will carry a special GB designation
in the course catalog. For fall 1999, interested students should
sign up for the first seminar, "An Introduction to the Great Books
CLAS2000 p etnU ?�Ht�i
T-Th 11:00-12:15 Distinguished Visiting Professor of Classic and Great Books
Brochures are available listing the specific requirements, contacts,
and courses that will regularly carry the GB designation when they
are offered. The program in Great Books plans to have a web page
up and running soon. In the meantime, send your e-mail or other
address to Professor Rand Evans at rbevans@aol.com to keep
informed of developments and courses to watch for.
V
vole
ons
we April 7,1999
positions
Student Body President
tudent Body Vice President
udent Body Treasurer
Body Secretary
tions
Must have
ecu one
in order to
polls are
9 a.m.
wri-ht placeclosest jicmp.m.
7 Thundiy, April
Students s
that thing
A
Er ic
STAFF
h, the fi
love. Is 1
place to
mate or is it in
some
To some, datin
in college is a w;
ity youth. Oth
themselves ca
completely hap
ship. Why do i
one subject
t r e m e n
According to f
while you atte
general idea is
which sometime
to include juggli
tionship, classe
With exposure
people in schoc
sionally an urg
Sti
exp
Couples s�
on mam
Brooke I
STAFF WR
How many times hi
think this could
Daily? Twice? Ne
toss around phrases
out them ever cor
among the studeni
ECU are many stuc
said this and meant
these couples comn
their schoolwork, b
dealing with the pre
married.
Devotion to a sp
to make time for
everyone busy, bi
pleasures of being
weigh the negative
The following th
have unique situai
similar challenges. 1
a graduate student
his degree, feels th:
right decision to ge
still in school.
"I wouldn't trs
world Bumpass sa
According to
appreciates the sec
his wife Dora at hon
in, and the financii
his wife's job provi
sure off of him as
degree.
He also realizes
some drawbacks tc
time.
"Sometimes I
whelmed with sch
and then she fee
Bumpass said. "I b:
Sfcw





j,�U

7 Thundiy, April 1, 1999
features
TfclEaMCMMM
Students speak out on
hit thing called love
Paul Reiser uses meek skills to
A
Erica Sikes
staff writer
h, the fabulous world of
love. Is the dating pool a
place to find a perfect
mate or is it in serious need of
some chlorine?
To some, dating seriously while
in college is a waste of good qual-
ity youth. Others have found
themselves capable of being
completely happy in a relation-
ship. Why do opinions on this
one subject vary so
tremendously?
According to popular opinion,
while you attend college, the
general idea is to "have fun"
which sometimes does not seem
to include juggling a serious rela-
tionship, classes and friends.
With exposure to a variety of
people in school there is occa-
sionally an urge to experiment
PHOTO COURTESY
with different types of people and
relationships.
Some students have created a pes-
simistic opinion towards the idea
of dating and serious relation-
ships. Their on the subject has
originated from their bad luck in
relationships while they have
been attending college.
When a room full of acquain-
rjet the ladies in "Bye Bye Love"
OF WORLD WIDE WES
tances were asked their opinions
on the subject, the topic of con-
versation immediately cleared the
room.
"Having a relationship is very
stressful said Sonya Long, a
freshman.
"Especially when the other per-
son does not know what they
While some students remain opti-
mistic about finding that special
someone, others seem to have
given up completely.
"If it's long-distance, quit it
before it hurts said Brad
Makepeace, sophomore.
Makepeace also gives his advice
to every man through this easy to
remember phrase�"Bros before
H o s . "
This comment may be offensive
to women, but women are just as
quick to put down the male gen-
der because of the stereotype that
men "only want one thing
"I believe that only about five
percent of guys are looking for a
one-night stand Makepeace said
in defense of this stereotype.
"When the woman lets the guy
believe that she is not looking for
Choice Pick-Up Lines
1. "I may not be Fred Flinstone, but I bet I can make your bed rock
2. "If I could rewrite the alphabet, I would put U and I together
3. "Let me check the tag on that shirt. I need to see if it says, 'Made in Heaven
4. "Is your father a thief? I was wondering who stole the stars from the sky and
put them in your eyes
5. "Hey baby, it's my birthday. I'm the cake and you're the candles.
Wanna party?"
6. "I seem to have misplaced my phone number. Can I have yours?
7. "Someone call Heaven quick! Tell the Big Guy an angel is miss-
ing
8. "You might not be the best looking girl here, but beauty is only a
light switch away
and dump
The mysterious!
lack of understand-
ing between men
and women also
seems to be
accredited toward
the failure of rela
tionships. This
phenomenon is
unexplainable and
difficult to analyze,
However, those
who find them
selves content in
an ongoing, com'
mitted relation-J
ship all seem to
agree on one
thing�it takes
work. Positive
communication
skills play a large!
part in the success
of a relationship. Ii
you can't be open
about what you
want and what you
expect from each
other, then any
effort towards the
relationship is
doomed to be in
?. Dairy Queen
8. SportsworW
9. Putt-Putt
10. Wal-Mart
"Communication is the key to a
healthy relationship said Adam
Mason,
freshman. "It is very hard to jug-
gle my girlfriend, friends and
classes.
"It is very difficult to maintain a
relationship while in college
said Leah Flowers,
unior. "But the
motional rewards
are worth the
effort
You just have to
be able to manage
your time wisely
and communicate
with your part-
ner said senior
Donnie Smith,
who has been dat-
ing his partner for
six vears. "If you
know what you
expect from each
other, then every-
thing else will fall
into place.
As long as I could
jmanage my time
wisely between
school and friends,
I think it would be
easy to be in a sen- j
ous relationship,
said Steve Dover,
sophomore
Whether you con-
Isider love a dirty
four-letter word or
a state of complete and total bliss,
it's something we all have the
opportunity to fall into at some
point in life.
SEE DATING PAGE 8
Students balance college
experience with family life
Couples speak out
on married life
Brooke Potts
staff writer
How many times have you said, "1
think this could be the one
Daily? Twice? Never? Often, we
toss around phrases like this with-
out them ever coming true. But
among the student population at
ECU are many students who have
said this and meant it. Not only do
these couples commit their time to
their schoolwork, but also have to
dealing with the pressures of being
married.
Devotion to a spouse and trying
to make time for school keeps
everyone busy, but overall the
pleasures of being married out-
weigh the negative aspects.
The following three couples all
have unique situations, but face
similar challenges. Kelly Bumpass,
a graduate student who is finishing
his degree, feels that he made the
right decision to get married while
still in school.
"I wouldn't trade it for the
world Bumpass said.
According to Bumpass, he
appreciates the security of having
his wife Dora at home when he gets
in, and the financial security that
his wife's job provides takes pres-
sure off of him as he finishes his
degree.
He also realizes that there are
some drawbacks to balancing his
time.
"Sometimes I can get over-
whelmed with school and work,
and then she feels neglected
Bumpass said. "I basically have to
slow down and try not to do too
much
He advises students who are
thinking about getting married and
going to school at the same time to
carefully consider the additional
responsibilities that married life
will bring. Not only do you have to
consider the impact of your deci-
sions on your own lite, but on your
spouse's as well.
Unlike single ECU students, he
has to think about the future not
just in terms of school, but of long-
JEFF ELLIS SPENDS TIME WITH FAMILY AFTER CLASS
PHOTO BY NINA M. DRY
range consequences.
"You're living a life outside of
school, at the same time that you
are in school Bumpass said. "You
have to get your priorities straight
to make it work
Other married students face
similar situations. Junior Jeff Ellis
and his wife Roberta have been
married since August and have a
baby girl. They also feel the pres-
sures of balancing home and
school.
Roberta is glad they decided not
to wait until they finished school.
"When you love someone and
are committed to them, you can
work through anything she said.
This way, they don't have to
worry about finding time to see one
another or have to experience the
apprehension of being single and
dating.
One of the keys to their relation-
ship is understanding and support.
Jeff realizes the difficulties Roberta
has in caring for the baby, and
Roberta enrouraees him as he tries
to finish school and support the
family.
Looking back, the decision to
marry and start a family definitely
caused a major change in Jeffs life.
"I really had to grow up
overnight he said.
Jeff decided to put his family
first, even if it meant putting
school lower on his list of priorities.
Even though sometimes it is diffi-
cult, he doesn't give up.
"It's definitely worth it Jeff
said.
Another couple, Don and
Martina Froning, have to deal with
a particularly unique situation.
Don is a graduate student, while
his wife still lives in Hawaii, where
they met. They have been married
for nearly two years, and Don has
been going to school here in
Greenville since the fall. Due to
the separation, he is trying to finish
school as quickly as possible and
resume his life in Hawaii.
"We had always planned for me
to go away to school, but it still
doesn't make the separation any
easier Froning said.
His wife, who works in Hawaii,
only gets to see him about every
two months.
"It's been more of an adjust-
ment for her he said. "I have to
adjust to a new environment, but
she has to get used to me not being
around our home
The couple is also trying to buy
Students use campus
as personal catwalk
STUDENTS HANG AROUND THE WRIGHT PLACE SPOHTING THE LATEST STYLES OF FASHION
PHOTO BY MIKE JACOBSEN
Fashion plays essential
role in everyday life
SEE COUPLE PAGE 8
Phillip Gilfls
senior writer
Ring! The alarm goes off just in
time for you to get a shower and do
some last minute cramjning for that
big test. But what in the heck are
you going to wear today?
From T-shirts that have been
laying on the floor for a week to
tube tops combined with capri
pants, on-campus fashion is diverse
at ECU.
"Some people don't even try
said David Gutierrez, junior.
"Mostly everyone just wears jeans.
though I'm not one to say any-
thing
Sitting in front of the Student
Store at 9:30 a.m one can make the
sidewalk transform into a catwalk.
Even though the temperature
was 70 degrees, not many students
were wearing shorts. Most people
were sporting either jeans or
khakis, but that is where the simi-
larity ended.
"I see some people wearing real
baggy clothes and others with
clothes that are too tight said
Lindsey Cranston, sophomore.
"And some people look like they
just rolled out of bed
Since students were out for
morning classes, there tended to be
a more conservative style present.
One man followed the standard
style by wearing a Polo shirt, jeans
and boots, following the standard
style.
"A lot of people go for the prep-
py, good-looking look Gutierrez
said.
It appeared that most men just
vary themselves on the basic
theme. One male walking to class
was wearing baggy jeans, a baseball
cap, gold chain, black T-shirt and a
football jersey, while another had
on khaki pants, a T-shirt, fleece
pullover and sunglasses. Sunglasses
appear to be the most common
accessory for hot weather.
"I don't think people try on reg-
istration days. Most people just
dress up on certain days. Of course,
people just go for comfort said
Megan Tathie, junior.
There also appears to be a dress-
down trend on Fridays, possibly
SEE FASHION PAGE 9
i
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Snmtoy, April 1.1898
features
Hauris Teeter
wwwJiarristeeter.com
The Best Is Whaf'Were All About!
bur Neighborhood Food Market
Fresh
Large
Ripe
Judge njects claim of cash from God
GLENWOOD SPRINGS, Colo.
(AP)�A District Court judge
rejected claims from a New Castle
man that God provided him with a
plastic jug of cash and advised the
man he was being charged with
burglary and theft
Ubaldo Madrid Rodriguez, 31,
was arrested after he tried to cash
$400 in U.S. Savings Bonds at an
Alpine Bank branch on Tuesday.
The bonds were issued to
Richard Luetke, also of New
Casde.
Luetke said he put the money
in a jug and kept it on the head-
board of a bed in his apartment
Rodriguez told police he was
desperate for money for rent and
was "praying to God for help
police said.
He said he heard someone run-
ning and saw someone fleeing,
then saw the plastic jug sitting in
front of Luetke's door.
Tit East Ciroliniin
Couples
continuid from pigs 7
them creates additional I
tion that most couples don't I
to deal with.
"It's difficult not being wit!
her during the hard rimes
said. "But she is supportive of r
and that makes everything a
easier
Overall, all three of these
pies share the same feeling. Beii
married and going to school is dif-
ficult and creates a lot of extra
responsibilities, but if you are com-1
mined to one another and willing I
to work hard at both, it is all worth-
while.
�m.
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The remains of van stolen in 1974 found'in vacant lot
12 gal.
Hunter
Ice Cream
TUCSON, Ariz. (AP)�Marge and
Gene Fehr were surprised and
pleased when police told them
their stolen van had been found�
finally.
The red Volkswagen microbus
had been a special love for Fehr.
"That year, 1966, was the last year
they made that kind he said.
He recalled that he and his wife
used to paint homes for a living,
and they had all of their equipment
in the van when it was taken while
they lived in Phoenix. They moved
to Tucson in 1989.
It had been stolen in 1974, and
the Fehrs had given up hope they
ever would see it again.
Police told the Fehrs last week it
was found recently in a vacant lot in
Phoenix, what was left of ic The
interior had been stripped and the
carpet was worn down to the metal.
The sound system, an AM radio,
was gone.
Mrs. Fehr had given her hus-
band a model of the van for
Christmas. "He just about fell
through the floor when he saw it
she said.
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Cirollnll"
9 Thursday. April 1. 1998
jples
I from pigi 7
(additional I
couples don't I
It, not being �id
: hard tunes
s supportive of i
s everything a
hree of these
ame feeling. 1
ing to school is dif-l
tes a lot of extnl
but if you arc com
mother and willing
both, it is all worth-
features
TNt Eitt Carolinian
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Fashion
continued from page 7
from students waking up after a'
night of partying.
During this morning "fashion
show" in front of Rawt Building,
several girls passed by resembling
Sporty Spice. This particular com-
bination is made up of athletic
pants, tennis shoes and a short-
sleeve T-shirt.
An ever-present accessory for
all students is the book bag. Most
appear to stick with simple, sub-
dued colors, like black, dark blue,
green and the occasional daring
dark red or cream. However, some
girls seem to be choosing to carry
their books in a long-strapped
satchel.
Be it guy or girl, though, not
many students have the money to
spend large amounts on their
wardrobe. But those individuals
who consider themselves fashion-
conscious usually spend most of
their money at stores in their own
hometown, not necessarily here in
Greenville.
The only fashion-deviant spot- j
ted on this particular day was a
man dressed up in Johnny Cash-
style, complete with boots, black
jeans, black belt, black denim shirt
and a cigarette.
Of course this is college, not a
fashion show. Most students go for
a utilitarian look, and do not waste
their time worrying about chic-
ness. Just remember to put away
the white shoes after Labor Day.
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rMMrfcrriWTTirMMn
The East Carolinian
sports
Thurtdiy, April 1. 1999 10
ast Carolina Cheerleaders Gear Up
Pirate Cheerleaders
Head to Daytona
MoKC.W IlKKSKM
ST.U UHITKR
etition
As college basketball crowns
their national champion, college
chcerleading holds a similar com-
petition to find the best squad in
the nation.
ECU's cheerlcading squad is
currently putting the finishing
touches on its routine as they get
ready for to travel to Daytona,
Florida to compete in the National
Cheerlcading Competition.
This tournament is a five day
affair that is comprised of both seri-
ous competition and an equal
amount of fun.
On the first day of the five day
event the Pirates will arrive in
Daytona.
Day two of the competition
is the preliminary round, and
the last day of competeting
for most of the teams. The
Pirates will be in Division
1-A, the most difficult
division to compete in.
The preliminaries are
held inside at the
Ocean Center.
Up until they take the
stage, the Pirate cheerlead-
ers will be honing their rou-
tine to make it the best they
can for the judges.
The top ten teams sur-
vive to the third day, which
is the finals. The end of
the competition is held
outside where the these
ten teams try their best
to claim the champi-
onship trophy. The
teams that usually
have a good show,
ing are frijtfn
Louisville, Florida
State, Georgia Tech
Texas and Purdue.
The fourth day of Daytona is a
day of fun. The teams that have
traveled to Daytona and worked
hard to prepa'hf; for he champi-
onship are rewarded with a day of
fun on the beach. Here the com-
petitors have a chance to mingle
with the other schools and playing
the sand demonstrating some of
the moves and stunts they showed
ort Stage, but this time in a more
relaxed atmosphere.
Day five will be another day of
travel for the Pirate cheering squad
when they embark homeward,
hopefully, with a trophy in hand.
Sophomore, Courtney White
said, "I hope they do �jally well
Last year the ECU cheerkading
team made its first trip to Daytona
in a longtime and placed sixteenth
out of eighteen teams in the
d i v ;i s i o ri
Captain Jonathan Cyrus said,
"There is a huge difference
between last year's team and this
year's team referring to the
amount of experience, "Last year's
team was more talented, but hav-
ingbeen one year, just knowing
how things are run, gives a better
a d v a n t � g. e .
Using their experience to their
advantage, this year's team looks to
improve front last year's finish.
Cyrus said, "We'd like to make
top ten and finals, but our goat is
just to improve from last year
Kuss Saputo was a little more
optimistic than his captain and said.
"We're pushing each other for top
mfist decide
on details such as
The ECU Cheerlcading Squad I music, stunts and tumbling while
is made up of twem
an equal number
of men and
women . .
These ath-
letes take their
sport just as seri-
ous as arty other
athlete and want
to do thefc.DesEr
"Its all about
technique and
not strength. V&u
M$mm
thting.OUl each'beat to make
sure it fits.
Location: Daytona, ftoridai
I When: April 1-5,l9&
Channel;ESPN
J
� KR
have to be in
good physical condition to do this
Saputo said.
"There is a high percentage of
injury if everjlw
one is not careful
and know what
they arejdoittg
Cyrus, said.
' v, Saputo reiter-
ated by saying,
"just the other
day someone
broke their
) S e .
Right now the
team is putting
all of their energy
into preparation
for the competi-
tion. Much goes
on to prepare
team for
Daytona. First,
the team must
Come up with a
routine. They
Individual ele-
ments are a
large part of
the routine as
well as team
oriented ones.
"Teams are
not judged on
the difficulty
but on cleanli-
ness of the routine Cyrus said.
The individual elements
include stunts such as basket tosses
and tumbling. Not only must the
team come up with a cheer, but
also the physical capabilities of
each member must be taken into
account.
The Pirate cheerleaders are
coached by Paula Corbet who won
a national championship at the
University of Richmond. The
team members consider her a
great leader.
The competition in Daytona
will have a taped delayed airing on
ESPN, so support the ECU cheer-
leaders and check your local list-
ings to watch your Pirates in
action.
ECU Cheerleaders perform during the season.
Flit PHOTO
No. 24 Pirates take
down No. 23 Wake
Steve Salargo, Erik
Bakich each hit one out
I'm i. Kaplan
HKMim WRI I I H
1,367 fans packed the bleachers and even more
lined the outfield fence and filled the outfield
bleachers of I larrington Field last Tuesday night
to see the No. 24 in the nation ECU baseball
team (2S-5) defeat No. 23 Wake Forest (19-7).
For those who missed out it was yet another
Pirate baseball nail-biting victory as
ECU took the 11-8 win.
In the bottom of the eighth inning
with the score tied and 1,300 fans won-
dering just what the Pirates were going
to do this time, Steve Salargo, last
week's CAA Player of the Week, got up
to bat. With Cliff Oodwin on First base
and two outs Salargo sent the game
clinching home run deep over the centerfield
wall.
"A home run is always good but I honestly
wasn't trying to hit it out, we had a runner on sec-
ond so 1 was trying to hit the ball hard to get a
base hit to score him Salargo said. "He threw
a fast ball up in the zone and luckily I was able
to get enough on it to get it out of the yard
The Pirates took the lead in the first inning
on Nick Schnabel's RBI single hitting in James
Track, Field
travel to NC State
Men's 4x1500
sets school record
The Pirates protect their national ranking against Wake Forest
PHOTO BY MARK CBIPPtN
Molinari who had reached third on a lead off
triple. The Pirates then added three more
runs in the second inning when Jason Howard
knocked in two on a triple. Molinari later
scored Howard on a sacrifice RBI. WFU
stayed scoreless until the third inning when
they scored three quick nins until a pitching
SEE BASEBALL PAGE 11
MOKCAN IlKKNKR
SI All WRIT Kit
The ECU's men's and women's track
teams competed in the Raleigh
Relays on Friday and Saturday.
The meet consisted of about 117
university and club teams. These
teams brought with them about
4,000 athletes to compete.
The Pirate women ended up with
a good showing. Michelle Clayton, in
particular, had a commendable per-
formance. She placed third in the
hammer throw with a throw of 185
feet.
"That is one of the top throws in
the country this year said Charles
Justice, women's coach.
Clayton did not stop there. She
went on to place eighth in the shot
put, posting a throw of 46 feet as well
as an eleventh place finish in the dis-
cus toss.
The Lady Pirates' Toni Kiltor
placed in the triple jump. Rasheca
Barrow posted a score well enough to
give her a seventh place finish in the
SEE TRACK PAGE II
NCAA freshman eligability requirements overturned in court
Colleges must now
set their own guidlines
Mavdv Kkittkk
STM-F U HI'I'KR
The court case of'two African-
American high school student-ath-
letes ultimately led to the current
controversy over Proposition 16.
Leatrice Shaw and Tae Kwan
were seniors at Simon Grantz High
School in Philadelphia in 1996.
Shaw and Kwan had grade-point
averages of 3.5 and 2.8 respectively
and finished in the top ten percent
of their class, but each failed to
achieve the minimum SAT score.
According to Proposition 16, these
two should have been labeled as
"partial qualifiers" and sent on to
college to play at the school of
choice. Yet somehow they were
never officially cleared through the
NCAA Clearinghouse.
Proposition 16 says that in order
to play as a freshman and receive
scholarship, a prospective athlete
must at least score an 820 on the
SAT along with a 2.5 grade-point
average, or a 1010 SAT score and a
2.0 grade-point average. If only one
part is met, like in the case of Shaw
and Kwan, then they are deemed
"partial qualifiers" and can practice
with their collegiate team and
receive scholarship, but lose one
year of eligibility. If a student-ath-
lete completes both parts of the
requirements then they are allowed
to start playing and have no restric-
tions or penalties held against them.
For years many black coaches
and professors in addition to rural
whites, have held their beliefs that
standardized test scores are "radi-
cally and culturally discriminatory"
which has led to the attack against
Proposition 16. They contend that
standardized test scores have noth-
ing to do with a student-athlete's
ability to complete a college course,
and therefore should not inhibit the
student-athlete from going to col-
lege.
District Judge Ronald
Buckwalter agreed and on March 8
he ruled that the NCAA can not use
the minimal standardized test score
to eliminate student-athletes from
Division I eligibility because their
practice is unfair to black students.
Buckwalter denied the NCAA's
request for a stay, making
Proposition 16 officially overturned.
This decision has left open holes
for 302 Division I coaches and their
now non-existing guidelines for
recruiting. Our own ECU coaches
now struggle to decide as an institu-
tion, what standards they want to
set for prospective student-athletes.
"NCAA standards define who
you can recruit. This decision has
now affected all sports across the
board said Neil Roberts, head
coach of women's soccer. "Three
months ago during the signing
process many students weren't eli-
gible for Division I sports and now
they are
There are many concerns to this
more open style of recruiting. The
pool of potential student-athletes is
now greatly enhanced. It has given
schools more of an opportunity to
increase their level of competitive-
ness but may in the future result in
a decrease in the percentage of stu-
dent-athletes who graduate.
"If you are trying to build a good
program and bring in more money
to the school, then yes it would be
better said Marvin Miteell, assis-
tant athletic director for student
development. "But if it is strictly for
athletics and the student conies just
for sports, then no it's not a good
idea because they aren't going to
focus on graduation which is our
main focus
As the fall approaches student-
athletes anxiously await to hear that
they have been officially cleared.
They may have more worrying to
SEE NCAA PAGE 12
� � , . .





1. 1999 10
I
ith a cheer, but
I capabilities of
st be taken into
u n t .
heerlcaders are
Corbet who won
pionship at the
ichmond The
consider her a
leader,
on in Daytona
lelayed airing on
the ECU cheer-
l your local list-
'our Pirates in
4
i
tate
hclle Clayton, in
nmendable per-
l third in the
a throw of 185
le top throws in
r said Charles
ch.
stop there. She
�hth in the shot
jf46 feet as well
finish in the dis-
ss' Toni Kiltor
jump. Rusheca
: well enough to
ace finish in the
'AGE II
ourt
future result in
rcentage of stu-
raduate.
to build a good
in more money
yes it would be
i Mitcell, assis-
or for student
fit is strictly for
dent comes just
it's not a good
aren't going to
l which is our
aches student-
rait to hear that
Icially cleared,
tre worrying to
K12
11 Thursday, April t, 1999
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purchased in sizes specified on coupon. This offer applies only to Manufacturers'
Cents Off coupons for items sold at Winn-Dixie and not to FREE or tobacco
product coupons. Coupon value cannot exceed the price of the item.
Winn-Dixu
fit
Marketplace $$&�
Minute Maid
Orange Juice
64 oz. size
Minute
Maid
Prices good Wednesday, March 31, thru
Tuesday April 6,1999. Effective In
Our Greenville, NC Location Only! tfwUo,
Club
�Copyright 1999. Winn-Dixie Raleigh, Inc. Quantity Rights Reserved, www.winndixie.com
Baseball
continued Irom page 10
change, when Josh Bucy came in
and shut down WFU with two of
his days six strike-outs and then
forced a fly out to end the inning.
WFU made another rally later in
the sixth inning scoring three runs
as they batted around on Bucy's
pitching until ECU's Adam
Reikowski came in to pitch the
third out of the inning. The Pirates
took the lead back (8-6) in the bot-
tom of the seventh inning off of an
Erik Bakich two RBI home run
scoring John Williamson who had
reached second on an error.
"With a runner on third and two
outs, I was just trying to get that run
in, it was a tie game at the time and
I was just trying to put us ahead
Bakich said.
WFU then bounced right back
in the top of the eighth inning to
retie the score, now at 8-8, off of
Track
continued Irom page 111
100- meter dash.
"We ran well but did not place
well. We're still getting our hand-
offs down Justice said.
Another big story at the Raleigh
relays was the men's 4x1500 relay
replacement pitcher Kcvyn
Fulcher with a two RBI single by
Ben Danosky. Fulcher then ended
the inning by striking out Danny
Borrell who seemed to think the
pitch was outside.
"It was a good win for the team,
a big win. Them Wakc Forest
being ranked shows that we can
hang with ranked people Fulcher
said.
"I felt good and Steve picked
me up with that home run and we
managed to push another run one
across and that was big
As of last Monday ECU was
ranked No. 23 by the Baseball
America poll and ranked No. 24 on
Collegiate Baseball's top 30 list.
The Pirates also received 51 points
in the USA TodayESPN top 25
poll, up from 50 last week. It is the
first time in nearly a decade that
ECU was ranked in the top 25 in
the nation.
"The win got us a lot of respect,
we need to earn the respect,
team that consists of Brian Biel,
Stuart Will, Steve Arnold and fresh-
man Poretti who ran anchor.
"Even though it was cold, we are
still pleased with the results said
Coach Leonard Klepack.
The Pirate Sprinters did not
make the trip to N.C. State.
"We thought it was too cold
said Bill Carson, coach. "It was not
because around here we don't get
much of it, especially in baseball
Salargo said. "Beating a great team
like Wake who has a great program
day in and day out, year in and year
out, gets us a lot of respect
Bakich finished the game 4-5
with two runs and three RBI Lee
Dclfino finished 2-3 with one run
and Jason Howard went 2-3 with
one run and three RBI's. Fulcher
was the winning pitcher, and since
there was no save the loss went to
Wake Forest's Scott Siemon.
The Pirates are currently on an
II-game winning streak and next
will play Coastal Carolina at 6 p.m.
March 31, then this weekend the
Pirates have a three-game series at
home against conference foes
William & Mary. Friday and
Saturday games start at 7 p.m and
Easter Sunday at 2 p.m.
worth it to run in those conditions
Coach Carson was saving his
team for future relays and did not
want to risk an injury.
"I didn't want to risk someone
getting banged up Carson said.
The teams will travel to Texas to
compete in the Texas relays for
their next meet
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HHHJIvQPMVVVQN&Jpv9BfftV
12 Thursday. April 1. 1999
sports
.er
NCAA
continued hum page 10
do than first expected The NCAA
I niti;i I-K liability Clearinghouse
has temporarily suspended gener-
ating preliminary and final certifica-
tions All reporting mechanisms
have been discontinued. They are
still accepting and processing stu-
dent registrations but arc not post-
ing any information.
There have been periodic com-
pliance meetings where the discus-
sions revolve around trying to fig-
ure out some guidelines to use for
recruiting but nothing has been
solved as of yet.
"After going to the compliance
meeting, everything is still up in
the air said Rosie Thompson,
Director of ComplianceSWA.
If this ruling by Buckwalter
stays in effect, the earliest that new
guidelines could be established by
the N(;AA is October.
ELTORO
Men's Hair Styling Shoppe
Barber a) Style
2800 E. 10th St
Eastgate Shopping Center
Across From Highway Patrol
Behind Stain Glass
Mon Fri. �-�
walk-Ins Anytime
752-3318
say Pirates
& Get Hair
Cut for $7
Every time.
Pirate Special
Haircut
Brown & Brown
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
Truth.EqualityJustice
123 WSt.
Greenville
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Drug Charges
�All Criminal Matters
�Free Consultation
752-0952
The EnterSoft Network
1 -888-2 76-4ESN
INTERNET
ECU Student Special
$18.95lWonth
Available at:
The little Computer Co.
� Located at 106 Trade St. off Memorial Dr.
(behind Outback Steakhouse)
Unlimited Access � 100 Digital, 100 S6K � No'Busies
252-355-9105
Mark A.Ward
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� DWI, Traffic, and Felony Defense
� Assistant Public Defender 1988-1993
� Private practice since June 1993
� Has Represented Thousands of Individuals
in District and Superior Criminal Courts
� Member - Pitt County Criminal Defense Bar
� ECU Class of '84, Campbell Law Class of '87
� 24 hour message service
� Visa and Mastercard welcome
www.GreenvilleNCLawyer.com
752-7529 s
EISuiT Dolls
Doors Open: 7:30 p.m.
Stage Time: 9:00 p.m.
TUESDAY
Lingerie Night
WEDNESDAY
Amateur Night and
Silver Bullet Dancers
THURSDAY
Rock-N-RoU Night
FRI & SAT
"AVouch Of Class"
756-6278
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Refuse to
pay retail.
See the best selection of your favorite
name brands for men & women at
Greenville's Uptown Outlet.
The ECU Student Media Board invites
applications for the position of
GENERAL MANAGER

Expressions
onnection
Division Of S&S
210 E. 5th St. 758-8612 MS 10-6 Sun. 1-5
The East Caroliniai
ft
Rebel
for the 1999-2000 academic year.
Applications are available in the Media Board office.
The deadline for submitting an application is
WEDNESDAY. APRIL 14 AT 4 P.M.
For information, call the Media Board office at 328-6009.
ft Silver Bullet Exotic Dancers

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WISHES TO ANNOUNCE THE FOLLOWING
Holy Week & Easter Services
Holy Thursday Services (Aprih): 8:00 am-
7:30 pjTt-Holy
Good Friday Services (Aprfl2):ian5 pm-Outdoor Stations oftneCross at St PeterY
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Greenville's
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1,2 & 3
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209-B South Evans Street (downtown near Courthouse)
Tennis
falls to
W.
Virginia
Losing Streak
Extended to Three
I'RANK IlKNDRICKS
ITArT WSITKS,
ECU lost a non-conference dual
match on Monday to visiting West
Virginia.
After losing the in doubles, the
Pirates dropped five out of six sin-
gles matches to give the
Mountaineers the 6-1 victory.
"I felt we played well today but
West Virginia played better on the
critical points said Tom Morris,
ECU head coach.
Freshman Michael Huez, who
is 10-4 on the season, was the only
Pirate who was victorious in the
singles matches. He beat out West
Virginia's Irakli Tatishvili by a score
of 6-3, 6-2.
Three of the singles losses came
in grueling three set matches.
Oliver Thalen, who played at No. 2
for the Pirates, lost to James Kent
3-6, 6-4, 6-4. Dustin Hall also lost
in three, losing 6-7, 64,
6-0 to Guillame Raux.
"I was pretty tired after two. I
was worn out and (Raux) really
stepped up in the third Hall said.
Another three set battle came at
the No. 6 spot where Pirate fresh-
man Leshaun Jenkins was beaten
6-0, 2-6,6-2 by James Simpson.
Senior Kenny Kirby's ankle
injury may explain some of the
hardships that the Pirates faced.
"I think things would have been
different if we had Kenny in the
lineup Morris said.
Kirby is a high seed for the
Pirates and his injury forces all
other players to bump up a seed
and play a higher seed than usual.
"Injuries have hurt us all year.
It's very competitive out there and
when you have to move up a seed,
you can tell. It's pretty hard
Huez said.
Kirby is not expected to return
until April 8th when the Pirates
face conference foe George Mason.
The Pirates, 6-8 overall, 0-1 CAA
are traveling to Elon college today.
The match begins at 2:30 p.m.
E-
is
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Now Leasing � (252) 321-7613
1526S.ChartesBlvd. Gremvilh.NC 27858
t2
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�RWfcNaB-BM
14 Thurify, AaVlM, 1898
classifieds
Thi East Carolinian
. MF to
shara 4 badroom houaa off of 12th
Straat. Rant $170 14 utilities. Par-
fact location. Great price. Call Jason
782-9663.
ECU AREA big three badroom. one
bath houaa. Washerdryer with cen-
tral heat and air. Paved drive with ga-
rage. Caw 8308602.
TOWNHOUSE NEAR ECU. 3 or 4
bedrooms. 2 12 and 3 12 baths.
WD hook-up. Iota of storage, spa-
cious. 762-1899 day. pager 661-
2203 night.
North. One
badroom $310 O two badroom
$400. near campus. ECU bus stop,
free water and sewer, washer and
dryer hookup and on site laundry,
pats considered. Call Wainright
Property Management LLC 756-
6209.
DUPLEX 2 BR. 1 bath, heat pump,
washerdryer hook-up, private drive,
close to campus, no pets. $430.
Please call 756-8444 or 366-7799.
Available immediately!
FOR RENT: 1 room efficiency apt.
with kitchen and bathroom, on 10th
Street in Forest Manor Apartments.
$296 per month, utilities included.
Available Now. Call 768-1921.
PINEBROOK APARTMENTS, 1-2
BRs available, water, sawar. cable in-
cluded. On-site maintenance, man-
agement, ECU bus line. 9-12 month
lease, pets allowed. 758-4016.
FOR RENT: 1 badroom, 1 bath
apartment on 10th Street in Forest
Manor Apartments. $326 per month,
watersewer included. Available
Now. Call 768-1921.
FOR RENT: 6 blocks from ECU. 1
bedroom, 1 bath, living area 8- kitch-
en, cable & local phone included- un-
furnished, $376 a month 13 utili-
ties. No pets, no smokers. Call 919-
497-0809 after 6 p.m. or leave mes-
sage.
2 BR. APARTMENTS above Cata-
log Connection 8 Percolator avail-
able in early April. $600-$560 per
month all 661-9040, ask for Rick
Smiley.
RIIM GOLD TOWERS
Nov.Taking Leases for
1 beO'iom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 7S2-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share a furnished two badroom
apartment beginning in May or June.
Must be responsible, non-smoker
preferred, and easy to live with.
Please call 830-9066, if not there,
please leave a message.
MF ROOMMATE needed to share
3 bedroom house one block from
campus. Rent $190 plus 13 utilities
and cable. Call Katie at 931-0348.
SUMMER ROOMMATE wanted
to share three badroom apart-
ment near campus. Include
washer and dryer and outdoor
pool access, 13 rant and utili-
ties. We're clean and friendly.
Call 782-8810.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
ASAP to share 3 bedroom house.
Walking distance to campus and
across tha street from rac. canter.
$176 a month plus 13 utilities. Call
Katy or Steph at 931-9016.
NEED A JOB?
TRY THE CLASSIFIEDS.
ROOMMATE WANTED
�LACK female seeks mature female
to share home. No smoking or
drugs. Rent will be $200 par month,
this includes all utilities. Vary nice
neighborhood. Call 321-7723. leave
message.
MF ROOMMATE needed to shara
2 BR, 2 bath duplex near campus.
Washerdryer included. Rant
$287.60.12 utilities. Must not mind
smoking or pets. Call Megan, 767-
1280. Availabia � end of this semes-
ter.
MALE ROOMMATE- Beginning Fall
1999; free roomboard. Good loca-
tion � ECU bus available. 321-1848
for details. Help with petal
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed in
May to share two bedroom in Cedar
Creek near hospital. Rent $400
month includes water, sewer. Nice
neighborhood. Call Brandy. 661-
7860.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for May. Du-
plex near campus with fenced yard.
Nonsmoker. must like animals. $200
month. $200 deposit and half bills.
Call Bryan. H768-7626, W763-6465.
ROOMMATE WANTED April
1ASAP through July 31. Tar River. 2
bedroom. 2 full bath, free cable TV.
master badroom. $282.60month.
split utilities. MF. Vinny, 329-7083.
FOR SALE
FLOOR LENGTH black satin sleeve-
less gown with scoop neck lined
with rhinestones. Sizes 1616 and
1718. $100 each or best offer. 252-
244-8986.
1982 I8UZU Pickup, 61.000 miles.
one owner. $3700 0B0. 363-1667.
LOVESEAT, THIS End Up brand in
good condition. Asking $125. Please
phone Babs at 764-2944 and leave
message.
FOR SALE: IBM PSValuepoint com-
puter. Pentium. 24MB RAM. CO.
tape backup. Windows '95,
MSWord. Photoshop 4.0. Illustrator
7.0. Corel 6.0. package. Canon BJC-
4400 color printer, $760 OBO. 328-
3690.
LAPTOP COMPUTER- Toshiba 435
CDS. $800. Call 768-9640 and leave
a message.
FEMALE LAB Mix, house-broken,
spayed, all shots. Needs stable, lov-
ing home. 252-638-6617
FOR SALE: 1990 Ford Mustang 6.0
GT, loaded. Alarm and 10-CD player.
Asking $5,500 negotiable. Call 661-
7987 for more info.
HELP WANTED
CHILDCARE NEEDED for 3- year-
old girl. 7:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. (3-4
days week): during school year
needs to drop off (8:46) pick up
(11:46) from pre-school. willing to
come to my home (your home if
nearby). During school vaca-
tionbreak also care for 7- year -old
sister. Experience and references re-
quired. Ph: 321-5710 (leave mes-
sage) e-mail: greenv1020Oaol.com
LIFEGUARDS AND beach vendors
needed in North Myrtle Beach for
1999 season. Will train. Housing pro-
vided if needed. For information call
843-272-3269.
NEED A PART TIME JOB?
RPSINC
a taoake fa Mxa aenaj id kej m sod
untoid toon fa ta mi tat tan Mam to ten.
$7SHtiam tuttoi nuance mink ate 30 days.
B�iw iism llMllllnoaanTO�ndlMn�
lent poattjk Appfcakra en be Said outat 2410
UiiaotmtmttiaMotmmSmiim
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER TIMBERLAND
NAUTICA ABERCROMBIE
POLO EDDIE BAUER
AND OTHER NAME BRAND MEN'S CLOTHING
SHIRTS, PANTS, JEANS, SWEATS, JACKETS, SHOES, ETC.
WE ALSO BUY AND SELL:
GOLD It SILVER- Jewelry k Coins- Also flmksffl Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TVs, VCRs, CD Players � Home, Portable
QUICK, EASY, HELPFUL
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
414 S. EVANS (UP THE STREET FROM CUBBIES)
752-3866
TUESDAY-SATURDAY, W�-5:00
(DRIVE TO THE BACK DOOR BEHIND PARK THEATRE)
ONE OF THE FAVORITE STUDENT STORES FOR YEARS
(IF YOU ARE SELLING, ID B REQUIRED)
HELP WANTED
HIRING: ADULT entertainers and
dancers. Muat be at least 18, hava
own phona. transportation and be
drug free. Make up to $1600 week-
ly. For Interview, call 768-2737.
EASTERN CAROLINA'S finest
adult entertainment ia now hiring.
Call for interview. Playmates. 262-
747-7686.
FRATERNITIES. SORORITIES 6
Student Groups: Earn $1000-82000
with easy 3 hour CIS Fund Raiser
event. No salea required. Fund
Raiser days are filling up, so call
today. Contact Chris 80029-4777.
EXOTIC DANCERS $100041600
weekly, no experience needed. 919-
660-7084. Sid's Showgirls, Gold-
sboro.
WANTED: PAYING $6.60 an hour
plus bonuses for qualified tetemar-
keters. No Friday or Saturday work.
Hours: 6:30-9 p.m. Monday-Thurs-
day. 4:30-8 p.m. Sunday. Apply in
person between 5-6 p.m. at Energy
Savers Windows 8 Siding, Inc
1806 Dickinson Ave Greenville, at
the side door.
UTTLE CAESAR'S Pizza is looking
for Assistant Managers. Call 767-
1212, ask for William, to set up an
appointment.
NEEDED. CYPRESS Glen Retire-
ment Community. 11:00a.m1:30
p.m. Flexible work schedule. Contact
Jim Sakell at 8300713 for more in-
formation.
NEEDED: SOFTBALL officials for
Greenville Recreation 8 Parks De-
partment Adult Spring Softball
League. Clinics will be held to train
new and experienced officials. How-
ever, a basic knowledge and under-
standing of tha game is necessary. A
training meeting will be held Wed-
nesday, March 31 at 7:30 p.m. Soft-
ball season will run from May thru
August. For more information,
please call 328-4550 after 2 p.m.
NEED SUMMER help at Hatteras
Beach. Free housing. Need two
males or females for retail seafood
market. Bonus offered. Call 252-986-
2215 or e-mail riskybOinterpath.com
PERSONALS
HAPPY BIRTHDAY Chrisl I love
you, Sophie
THE CARD Pott Report 320 With
Inn. With exploring the status of the
forum' at ECU, UNC. 8 NCSU 8
finding a crisis within a crisis with-
in a crisis 8 to gain insight to the
crisis of 'higher education have be-
gun to explore the status of debate
teamsclubs in N.C. Public Educa-
tion's 'high schools Findings of
their existence thus far have been a
rare exception rather than the rule.
That indoctrination is replacing edu-
cation in N.C creates the reality of
high tech low ethics (pacemakers
in place of peace makers), history
books getting thinner rather than
thicker 8 fighting wars we know
not what for. Kosorol Prosper n Live
Long, Tom Drew, PO Box 687. Gold-
sboro, NC 27533. P.S. Chancellor of
Administration has scheduled a
closed hearing to address 'appeal' of
'warning of trespass on 47 at
11a.m. Will explore opportunity to
tape record so that transcripts will
be available for public.
GREEK PERSONALS ANNOUNCEMENTS
-
Summer Camp
COUNSELORS & WSTrtUCTORS
for private Co-ed youfi camp
IndurJrtg AH sports, water
xL tarns, art, horse-
. 15 to 816earn
. 1350-$1750 plus room, meals,
laundry 4 great funl Non-smokers
800-8-5539 or ernaJ'8'
CPPInewoodOaol.com anytimel
PHI KAPPA fau. we had a great
time Saturday night and meeting the
Phi Tau's from State. Love, the sis-
ters of Chi Omega
DELTA ZETA would like to thank
everyone who attended our annual
Sexy Boxer Contest. Thanka for mak-
ing it a successl
THANKS TO everyone that came
out to the grabe-date on Saturday. It
was truly a "Blast from the Past
Love, the sisters and new members
of Pi Delta
THANK YOU, Delta Chi pledges for
helping us in our yard on Sunday.
We love you guysl Love, Alpha Delta
Pi
SIGMA PHI Epsilon, once again,
you guys showed us an unbelievable
time. Thanks for the blast from the
past. Can't wait till next year. Love,
Chi Omega
CONGRATULATIONS TO Jodi Mc-
Kenna on your engagement to
Shawn. We are so happy for you!
Love, your Delta Zeta sitters
THANKS TO everyone who came to
Alpha Delta Pi's Lemonade Social on
Wednesday.
PI KAPPA Phi. thank you for the so-
cial Thursday night. We had a great
time as always. Let's do it again
soon. Love, the sitters of Chi Omega
CONGRATULATIONS CHRISTINA
Alexander on being accepted into
the Misher program. Love, your Al-
pha Delta Pi sisters
LAMBDA CHI Alpha, we had a
great time at the dinner social the
other week. Love, Alpha Delta Pi
CAREY C. and Jen H We wish you
luck in grad school. We're so proud
of you. Love, your Chi Omega sisters
CONGRATULATIONS VANESSA
M. and Lisa P. for being accepted
into OT school. Your hard work paid
off) Love, your Chi Omega sisters
TAU KAPPA Epsilon, thanks for the
great toga social on Friday! We had
a blast as usual. We love you guysl
Love, the sisters and new members
of Pi Delta
TO THE fabulous women of Alpha
Delta Pi, thanks for another terrific
social. We always have the best
times with you girls. Love, the broth-
ers of Delta Chi
ALPHA DELTA Pi would like to con-
gratulate Michelle Gottschalk of Al-
pha Omicron Pi for being elected
North Carolina's area coordinator for
the Southeastern Panhellenic Con-
ference.
GREAT JOB in your cheerleading
competition. Ginger. You were awe-
some. Love, your Chi Omega sisters
SUBLEASE 2 bdrm 2 bath King-
ston Cond. available now. March
rent paid. 919-751-9481.
OTHER
KITTENS FREE to a good home.
Call 353-2932 ASAP.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: 3:30-6PM. The Center for
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment ia offering this workshop on
Thursday, April 1 and April 8. If you
are interested in this program, con-
tact the center at 328-6661.
FREE TAX services to students and
members of the ECU community.
Standard tax forms only (1040A,
1040EZ). Dates of services: Mar. 25,
April 1, April 7, 3:30-6:30 p.m. Gen-
eral Classroom Building room 3012
OMEGA PSI Phi Interest Survey.
Persons interested in attending an
interest meeting for Omega Psi Phi
Fraternity, Inc. should go by the
Dean of Students office and com-
plete a questionnaire. (Sign-upRe-
lease Form) Questionnaires will be
accepted to April 16. 1999. If
enough interest is shown, the Intake
Process will be started. James L
Ebron, Jr Area Intake Team Chair
Work Outdoors !
Want Honest, Reliable Students
Wdependable truckoar
TO MONITOR COTTON
(No axperlanoe necessary)
$7.00hr. mileage
mallfax resume
MCSI-Box 370
Cove City, NC 28523
Fax: 252-637-2125
(Nr. Greenville, New Bern, Klnston)
PROFESSIONAL RESCUER CPR re-
certification availabia at the SRC. 3
scheduled sessions to choose from.
Register before April 12. Cost $36
for studentsmembers.
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION: 11a.m
12:00 noon. The Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development is of-
fering this workshop on Thursday.
April 1. If you are interested in this
workshop, please contact the Canter
at 328-6661.
LIFEGUARD TRAINING- 2 weeks
of classes, full Red Cross Certifica-
tion. Mutt attend all sessions. Cost
$110 for studentsmembers. Reg-
ister before April 8 at SRC.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC Student
Canter wishes to announce the fol-
lowing Holy Week and Easter Servic-
es. Holy Thursday Services (April 1 y
8 a.m Holy Thursday Mass at the
Newman Center 7:30 p.m Holy
Thursday Mass at St. Peter's Church.
Good Friday Services (April 2:
12:1&Outdoor Stations of the Cross
at St. Peter's, 7:30 p.mGood Friday
Liturgy and Communion Service at
St. Peter's. Saturday Easter Vigil
Service (April 3): 8 p.m. at St. Pet-
er's. Easter Sunday Masses (April 4):
11:30 a.m. and 8:30 p.m. at the
Newman Center, 963 E. 10th Street
(at the foot of College Hill Drive). (St.
Peter's is located at 2700 E. 4th
Street). For further information,
please call Fr. Paul Vaeth at 757-
1991.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
RECERTIFICATION FOR LIFE-
GUARDS availabia at the SRC. Con
tact the main desk at 328-6387 for
details�
TEST PREPARATION: 11 a.m
12noon.The Center for Counseling
and Studant Development is offering
this workshop on Tuesday, April 6. If
you are interested in this workshop,
please contact tha Center at 328-
6661.
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING:
11a.m-12noon.The Center for Coun-
seling and Student Development is
offering this workshop on Tuesday.
APRIL 6. If you are interested in this
workshop, please contact the Center
at 328-6661.
SADD MET Wed March 31 at
6:30 p.m. in GC 1001. If you missed
the meeting, please contact Doug at
8931. Thanks
NOTE TAKING: 3:30 p.m The Cen-
ter for Counseling and Student De-
velopment is offering this workshop
on Monday. April 6. If you are inter-
ested in this program, please contact
the Center at 328-6661.
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION: 11a.m
12:00 noon. The Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development is of-
fering this workshop on Thursday,
APRIL 8. If you are interested in this
workshop, please contact the Center
at 328-6661.
Advertise in
The East
Carolinian
classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE$4.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 50 each
STUDENT LINE AD RATE
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 50 each
.$2.00
Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to refuse fhis rate for any ad deemed to be
non-student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE .$1.00
add to above line rate for either BOLD or
ALL CAPS type.
.All classified ads placed by individuals or campus
groups must be prepaid. Classified ads placed by a
business must be prepaid unless credit has been
established. Cancelled ads can be removed from the
paper if notification is made before the deadline, but
no cash refunds are given. No proofs or tearsheets .
are available. The Personals section of the classi-
fieds is intended for non-commercial communication
placed by individuals or campus groups. Business
ads will not be placed in this section.
All Personals are subject to editing for indecent or
inflammatory language as determined by the edi-
tors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE
4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue
we want
�SSSF
Did you see news happen?
Did you mike news happen?
Do you belong between our covers?
OUl past&rolinian � 328-6366.
a
I





iMiiiiiimii 'Warn
Arts & Entertainment Magazine of The East Carolinian
Thursday. April 1,699
D.Miccah Smith
Reporter-at-Largt
An astounded crowd of students and faculty crammed into
Hendrix Theater Saturday to witness a technology so advanced
that it can only be described as "breathtaking
After weeks of deliberation, ECU made a bold leap into the 20th
Century by showing a moving picture-show to a select crowd of
ticketed students, teachers and journalists.
"Ice Cream the first picture-show ever to be shown on campus,
is a short film about a small girl licking an ice-cream cone. Since
the film is silent, organist Ethel B. Simmonds, who usually plays
for the weekly Hendrix Theater variety show, added a comical
musical score to the ten-minute film, much to the audience's
delight.
"Oh, its just super gushed Sue-Ann Brown, junior elementary
ed. major. "Our school is the best! Who'd have guessed that in
1999, we'd get to see real moving pictures, close-up, just like they
do in New York? I bet State won't catch up "till 2005
Audience members laughed when the film's heroine, "Baby Betty
dribbled ice cream behind her, attracting the attention of neigh-
borhood dogs.
"It was so real, I could almost hear them barking said Robert
Seymour, a biology major. "Gee whiz, just imagine what this tech-
nology could mean to science
Even faculty members couldn't get enough of Baby Betty's fat lit-
tle cheeks. Mathematics professor Harold R. Worsterchire stood
up after the first showing and demanded an encore. Subsequent
See Hendrix, continued on page 3
Hendrix
New moving-picture craze takes campus by storm
Rush to your
local discount
bin for this fine
CO by
Wulfgang
CD Review
"EDtv" shows
that America s
privacy is under
siege by the
government
P
Movie Review
Weird Al - not
just for 15-year-
old boys
anymore
Video Review
Aussie celebrity
checks campus
for dangerous
creatures
wlvdtinrick
fountainhead � 2nd Floor Student Publications Building Greenville, NC 27858 � Phone 328-6366 � Fax 328-6558 � Advertising 328-2000 � www.fountainhead.ecu.edu





Video Review
UHFaperfectApril iaM
-IJ 4 � MetalReviewer
Fools treat -a
Wanttttan
Patrick-Today is My Birthday"
McMahon
Staff Writer
"UHF"
I realty can't figure it out. It seems as
though all the realty classic enter-
tainment emanates from 1989.
Look at the classic film "UHF from
the one and only comic genius
WeiidAlYantovkh. Who cares
about those other "Hollywood"
movies of the 80s anyway? Everyone
could use a good meaningless laugh
now and then. And that is exactly
what the movie provides: meaning-
This irreverent saga is about a
lowiy UHF station trying to survive
in the cutthroat world of basic tele-
vision. 1 know, 1 know, but trust me,
its a great film. The cast is headed
by the aforementioned Weird Al,
who plays the stations daydreaming
nincompoop of a manager, George
Newman.
A man with an overactive imagina-
tion, he shuffles from job to job, get-
ting himself fired for his idiotic
escapades. He finally finds his niche
when his gambling Unde Harvey
wins a small, decrepit UHF station
in a poker game.
At first, times are rough because the
only shows featured by the station
are reruns of Mr. Ed and Green
Acres. But with the help of his
trusty engineer Philco, George soon
gets hold of broadcasting basics.
On the brink of bankruptcy, George
finally has an idea that will save the
day: original prograrnming. From
the depths of his demented mind
come shows like "Wheel of Fish"
and "Name That Stain which help
fill airtimc.
He struggles along until the stations
ratings are finally boosted by
"Stanley Spadowski's Playhouse
hosted by a pre-Seinfeld Michael
Richards.
The cerebralty challenged host
draws attention and terrific ratings
to the station; during one episode, a
Sea UHF, continued on page 6
Lit�III li�l�frC�M.
Amy LRoyster Editor in Chief
Amanda G. Austin Managing Editor
Miccah "Crash and Burn" Smith Edrtor
Qleb"The Nose" Rose Assistant Editor
Stephanie Whillock
Russ Blackburn Unmil
land Rapes
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019193285366
CD Review
Wiiang worth a listen
Like a bat out of Hell's smoky
depths, radical metal ensemble
Wulfgang comes screaming out of
Concord, North tarolina with a
release pumped to the roof with
head-slarmnin fcather-wearin' rock
and roll
Love AM Easy is bursting with
melancholy ballads and heavy riffs,
and the talent these guys possess
can't be denied.
I'm scratching my head, wondering
why this musically superior group
hasn't garnered a major recording
deal. With such songs as"Rock My
Workflow Gone Badand"Back
in the Saddle Wulfgang boldly
Umtolhss
daims the right to be chased by
hordes of t-shirt clad women in tight
jeans, but they're still playing the
small-time label game.
These lyrics are incredible. Jimmy
Lee Price's husky, slightly nasal wail
cuts through my heart like a knife
with his primal "Hoooooo, whoa,
yeah-yeah
I nearly cried when I really listened
to the lyrics of "The Indian Song
whose plaintive refrain of "Hey-hi-
W-hey-hi-hi-hey-ru-W-yowww
tugged at my heart
Unfortwiatcfy Wulfgang will never
get the respect they deserve, since
this giourd-breaking album arrived
on the music scene about a decade
too late to matter.
Dont get me wrong; there's nothing
hackneyed about their sound. No
way do they sound like Whitcsnake
or Def Leppaid Ifs just that today's
market is already too flooded with
big-haired, mega-talented 35-year-
old men in hot pink bandannas.
But one thing's for sure: if you only
buy one album this year out of the
$1 bin at CD ADey, the one full of
CDs by non-famous people, make it
this one. You won't regret it very
much.
Its Your Place
ID Learn Some Manners
APRIL 7 AT 5 P.M. IN MENDENHALL STUDENT
CENTER, GREAT ROOM
A repeat performance of the most popular workshop
given by the Student Leadership Development
Programs. Take advantage of the opportunity to
leam table manners that will be expected of you in
the working world. You must pie-register for this
program by calling 328-4796. Space is limited
To Hear Some Music
APRIL 7 AT 8 P.M. AT FLETCHER OUTDOOR
AMPHITHEATER
There are five bands but only one opening gig for
this year's Barefoot on the Mall. So on Wednesday,
April 7 these bands are going head-to-head in The
Battle of the Bands for the right to take the stage.
Somebody has to lose, but it won't be youl You get
to see all five bands for free.
Tb Catch A Free FllcH
APRIL 8-10 AT 8 P.M. AND APRIL 11 AT 3 P.M.
IN HENDRIX THEATRE.
Ringmaster (R) Incest, adultery and love triangles
may be taboo to some, but its all in a day's work for
the producers of the Springer Show. Well, these
same guys decided to leave the tame world of TV
and make a full-length movie that holds no punches
- literally! You and a guest get in free when you pre-
sent your valid ECU One Card.
MSC Hours: MonThurs, 8 a.mll p.m Fri 8 i.mMidnight; Sat Noon-Midnight; Sun 1-11 p.m.
lb Shoot Some Pool
Whether you need to unwind from a stressful week
or your competitive juices are flowing, the billiards
room in the Pirate Underground will do the job. Just
bring your valid ECU One Card and a little money to
be set up with balls and a table.
To Get Some Worn Done
Did Spring Break go by a little faster than you
planned? Well, don't panic. Make up for lost time
in the Mendenhall Student Center Computer Lab,
located on the ground floor. We've got Pentium-
based computers. Power Macs, color and laser print-
ers, a scanner and various software programs to sat-
isfy your homework needs.
7b Knoch Em Down
Give your Monday a boost
from 1:00 - 6:00 p.m. with
50 cent bowling (shoe
rental included). Turn
Wednesdays and Fridays
into discount days by rolling
10 frames for just $1 (shoe
rental included) between 1:006:00 p.m. at the
Outer Limitz Bowling Alley in Mendenhall Student
Center's basement
2 Thursday,April 1999





Australians Steve Irwin makes
campus safety check
Ryan "Jungle Boy" Kennemur
Senior Writer
As you may or may not know, our
campus was recently visited by an
Australian celebrity. Yes, the mighty
Steve Irwin, also known as the
Crocodile Hunter, took time out of
his busy schedule of chasing the
fiercest creatures the world has to
offer to team up with the school's
ecology department and identify the
deadly creatures living on campus. I
had the chancc.no, the blessing of
interviewing him as he toured our
campus. Here is how it went, word
for word
Ryan Kennemur Howdy there.croc-
odileman! h is great to meet you.
Croc Hunter And a pleasure to meet
you, pally!
RK: I understand you are checking
out the campus to make students
and staff aware of the deadly ani-
mals that live-
CH: (pointing to Fountainhead
Assistant Editor Caleb Rose who is
standing behind me listening) Great
Flaming Wallabies! Do you realize
what that is?
RK: Ummyes. That is my friend
Caleb.
CH: (tackling him to the ground)
Did you know that your friend here
is a giant walking snake from Hell?
RK: Ofcourseldid. But don't
worryhe,s toothless, so he won't
hurt anybody.
CH: (standing up) Oh. Sorry UT
bugger.
RK: (seeing that Caleb is uncon-
scious with a massive head wound)
Oh, I'm sure he's fine. Lefs took
around (Walking towards
Mendenhall) See anything interest-
ing?
CH: Notmuch yet, mate. I'm really
not expecting to see much- Sweet
Blimey Roosterheads! Its a rare
shew loving squirrel! C'mon,
mate Jefs get a better look! Yesss!
See how he's copulating with me
shoe? Ahhh, he loves it!
RK: (as the squirrel attempts to
make love to MY shoeagain) Yes, I
have heard of this happening before.
I see that he prefers Adidas.
CH: Yeah, so does me wife Tern.
VMM mi Ma w ow iMMHtMiag tMfw. MM tot hntw?
But that's another story for another
day.
RK: Sure,right Arrythingelse?
CH: Not really, but there does seem
to be little something rightthere,
(he grabs something from the collar
on my shirt and quickly eats it.)
RK: What the hell was that?
CH: Nothing, mate, nothing I have
to be moving along now. My
Crocodile Sense is telling me that
someone is in danger of being eaten
somewhere down under, and I must
put a stop to it! Besides, I'm getting
hungry. Mmmm-Hmmm! Croc for
dinner, yum yum!
RK: You won't be able to make it to
Australia in time!
CH: (dropping to his knees and eat-
ing handfuls of dirt) Shows how
much you know, mate. lean eat my
way through the earth and get there
in ten minutes!
RK: Good enough! Good luck!
CH: You too, my little dingo friend!
Oh, watch out for that gargantuan
duck-billed platypus with rabies
behind youhe looks (CHOMP)
Oh well. Unlucky bastard.
Hendrix. continued from page 1
audience response was so high, the
Mendenhall staff had no choice but to
show"Ice Cream" a second time.
Mendenhall marketing director Arthur
Dent couldn't be happier about ECU'S
new craze, and can't wait to begin
showing weekly films.
"We've got big plans for Hendrix
Theaterf he said"WeTl move the vari-
ety show to the amphitheatei so that
we can transform Hendrix into a
space-age viewing facility for students
and faculty alike
Dent cited such upgrades as a new
450-horn pipe organ, large screen and
orchestra pit
Further plans to propel ECU into the
1900s include a sandwich shop, for
students who are too busy to consume
bowls of gruel, and spaces in which
students may park their motor-cars.
Movie Review
EDtv at the center of
telescreen conspiracy
Hw in yowtail, AiiMctlTtacmwi warning
Caleb Rose
Assistant Fountainhead Editor
"EDtv"
Aww right, aww right, aww right
Matthew McConaughey has been
aptly chosen to have his life video-
taped and have it aired over America
with his consent. Sounds somewhat
similar to that im Carey movie that
was out recently. You knowAce
Ventura: Pet Detective" (Carey plays
an idiot who travels to Aspen to
search for a woman in order to
return her suitcase). rfo,maybethat
was some other flick.
Well, Ed Pekumy is a thirty-some-
thing nowhere-man video clerk who
is chosen to be the subject in a radi-
cal television event: following some-
one and monitoring their life 24
hours a day. The television network,
"True TV, headed by Cynthia
Topping (Ellen Degeneres), is declin-
ing in ratings and she feels that this
will help bring them back up to par.
Since America is so great and fab,
they fall in love with Ed because he
falls in love with his brother Ray's
(Woody Harrkson) girlfriend (Jenna
Elfman). To add that twist, as all
� movies do, Ed's estranged father
(Dennis Hopper) returns to cause
conflict between everyone, resulting
in the end of Ed's fifteen minutes of
See 10 tv, continued on page 6
answers to Tuesday's East Carolinian Crossword
L.U3 DUG ULJUUUD
nun raairiM canmiFm
anuan uaa anaaa
?an una anna
EHHunn uuuu ana
naDuaaa DnHQtnau
DLJU WDDU riOflGCM
auann uau nanan
wnn udi.1 oanuu
naaCiQLi nanunnna
DiuwrsLiu aunn sec
Hunuas uaoa anm
Thursday; April I OB 3





eekly Events Cak
Your complete cuide to upcoming events in Greenville an
Aprill
Cats Cradle
Presents at the Ritz
-The Goo Goo
Dolls with the New
Radicals
The Cellar-Karaoke
9:00-close
Chef's 505-Arvid
Ray Munson
Peasant's Cafe-
Sports PadSplash-
Karaoke 10:00-
dose
Stacatto-Adrian
Duke
����������������������-��-����
April2
The Attic-Local 420
Records (Phoenix
Room)
Beef Barn-Cynthia
White
Cat's Cradle-
Andrew Bird's Bowl
of Fire
Cellar-Karaoke
9:00-dose
Chefs 505-Arvid
Ray Munson
Deadwood-The
Sensations
Hard Times-
Southbound
Son II Studio-Line
Dancing
Southern Nites
Nightdub-Sidekick
Sports PadSplash-
tiaraoke 10:(J0-close
Southern Nites
Nightdub-Sidekick
Saturday
April 3
TheAttic-Techno
Dance (Phoenix
Room)
Big Jake's Bar-
Karaoke and open
mic
Cat's Cradle-Reggae
Sunsplash
Cellar-Karaoke
9:00-close
Chefs 505-Arvid
Ray Munson
Deadwood-
Blackwater
Hard Times-
Southbound
Son II Studio-
Sound of Country
ATTIC
April 4
Easter
��������������������������������������������������������������
Aprils
Mendenhall Movie-
Home Fries
Tuesday
April 6
A Matter of Taste-
Live Blues
Boli's-B.D.C.
Mendenhall Movie-
Home Fries
Peasant's Cafe-
(Mugnite): Second
Hanajive
���������������������������"
Wfi
April 7
TheAttic-0
Zone
Brickyard-
"Battle of th
Bands feati
Mandorico
Courtyard 1
St. Patrick's
special: Scol
Mueller
Hard Times
Shaegin'mi
w Steve Ha
Original Be
Party featur
Holiday Bar
Mendenhall
Movie-Hom
Fries
Peasants Ca
Freak Out
(Parliament
Zappa)
Sports
PadSplash-
Karaoke 10:
dose
�������������-����
4ThundaApri1.B99






nts in Greenville and surrounding areas
April7
The Attic-Comedy
Zone
Brickyard-Annual
"Battle of the
Bands featuring
Mandorico
Courtyard Tavern-
St. Patrick's Day
special: Scott
Mueller
Hard Times-
Shaggin' mix at 6
w Steve Hardy's
Original Beach
Party featuring
Holiday Band
Mendenhall
Movie-Home
Fries
Peasants Cafe-
Freak Out
(Parliament and
Zappa)
Sports
PadSplash-
Karaoke 10:00-
close
��������������
�������
For More Information
The Attic
Greenville, NC 752-7303
Backdoor
Greenville, NC 752-7049
The Beef Barn
Greenville, NC 756-1161
Big Jake's Bar
Williamston.NC 799-0022
BW-3
Greenville, NC 758-9191
Cat's Cradle
Carrboro, NC
(252)967-9053
The Cellar
Greenville, NC 7524668
Chef's 505
Greenville, NC 355-7505
The Corner
Greenville, NC 329-8050
The Courtyard Tavern
Greenville, NC 321-0202
Deadwood
Greenville, NC 792-8938
TheElbo
Greenville, NC 758-4591
Hard Times
Greenville, NC 758-9922
On-Campus Activities
328-6004
Pantana Bob's
Greenville, NC 757-3778
Peasant's Cafe
Greenville, NC 752-5855
Sports PadSplash
Greenville, NC 757-3658
Son II Studio
Greenville, NC 830-5279
Southern Nites Nightclub
946-5785
Texas 2 Step
Greenville, NC 752-3600
Underwater Cafe
Greenville, NC 754-2207
Wrong Way Corrigan's
Greenville, NC 758-3114
��������������������������������
lIIMl
Preview
Thursday, April 1
Goo Goo Dolls
Cat's Cradle
You are probably accustomed to
hearing that dude on the radio deliv-
ering those sappy lines in those
sappy songs, you know the one in
particular: "I wanna get married and
slip awayT Mushy as it may be, the
songwriting craft of the Goo Goo
Dolls is superb and after many years
in the business they are finally get-
ting some recognition.
What to expect Three mugs clad in
some articles of leather with giant-
like hair and painted fingernails. A
rocking show. Hang around and
meet the band should you go;
Robbie, the bassist, is a trip.
fH
v H
Thursday, April 1
Caleb RoseRyan Dogg Band
A Public Restroom Near You
Oh yes yes y'all, 77k; Fountainhead
presents the finest musicians on this
side of Tar River delivering their
brigade of all 2-acoustic guitars in a
flourish of tunage right here in
Greenville.
What to expect Have you ever heard
the Ryan Dogg Rap over a Spanish-
style guitar riff with a bit of har-
monica here and there? Until you do,
you have not lived life to the fullest.
It is a damn shame neither one of
them can sing. April Fools!
weekly top hits
Top 15 Songs
15. Michael Jackson
"Bad"
14. Kenny Rodgers
"The Gambler"
13.nillalce
"Ice Ice, Baby"
12.NewKidsonthe
Block
1taighfHMr
11. Mr. Mister
"Broken Wings"
10.MilliVanilli
�WlfouKnowIfs
Tracf
9. Jem and the
Holograms
"Jem is Truly
Outrageous"
8. Kenny G.
"That one song we all
hate"
.Alvin and the
Chipmunks
"We're the Chipmunks"
6. Hootieandthe
Blowfish
"Some nondescript 3-
chord roots-rock song"
5jce�T
"DrinkMr
4. Dead or Alive
"You Spin Me Right
Round"
3.Poison
2-Survivor
"Eye of the Tiger
l�NeilDiamond
"We're Coming to
America"
Carmikel2
8MM
Analyze This
R
R
PG
R
G
PG-13
PG-13
PG-13
R
Cruel Intentions
Doug's First Movie
BoTV
Forces of Nature
Never Been Kissed
TheComtpter
ITie Deep find Of The Ocean PG-13
The King and I G
TheModSquad R
The Rage: Carrie 2 R
TrueCrime R
Wing Commander PG-13
Located at
1685 East Fire Tower Rd.
Greenvilfc.NC
Ifcpbone: 354968
Carolina East4
Life Is Beautiful
Message in a Bottle
Saving Private Ryan
Shakespeare In love
PG-13
PG-13
R
R
Located at
Carolina East Convenience Center
Memorial Drive
Greenville.NC
TekjhoriK (252) 756-1449
Buccaneer
A Bug's Life
The Prince Of Egypt
fouveGotMatl
G
PG
PG
Locatedat
GreenvilkSoiare Shopping Center
275 Arlington Blvd.
Greenville,NC
Telephone: (252) 756-3307
Traabv,Apni1.B995
�M






ODDITIES
Dog enjoys $70,000 a year
RALEIGH (AP) Once a homeless
mutt, Rowdy is living anything but a
dogs life these days in his air-condi-
tioned doghouse in north Raleigh. His
late millionaire owner's largesse pays
about $70,000 a year for his care.
Twenty miks away in Clayton, animal
shelter manager Melinda Barefoot
can't wait for the pampered 15-year-
old to finally gnaw his last chew bone.
Under Charles Caldwell's will, her
Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to
Animals shelter stands to get a share
of his estatebut not before Rowdy
rests in peace.
Meanwhile, the shelter is in dire
straits. It has $856 in the bank and
more than 150 abandoned animals
sharing cages. Dozens of animals are
put to sleep every month because
Barefoot cannot afford to keep them.
Barefoot works at the shelter seven
days a week, despite rheumatoid
arthritis and lupus.
Caldwell took Rowdy in during the
1980s. He died four years ago at age
92. Rowdy, however, still is going
strong, although he has a touch of
arthritis in his hind legs.
Rowdy lives behind the home of
Caldwell's long-time companion,
Lillian Smith, and wants for nothing,
including a daily dog-sitter visit.
"I know this is not what Mr. Caldwell
would have wanted said Barefoot,
who started the shelter from her own
back yard in 1982. She built it with
financial help from Caldwell, who also
sent the shelter $1,000 a month for
expenses.
"Mr. Caldwell loved all stray dogs she
said. "He promised us we would be
taken care of
Recently the estate's attorney, David
Cockman of Morehead City, began
sending the shelter $1,000 a month
from his own legal tees and promised
to continue the payments for the next
30 months.
The money helps, but it is not enough,
and when space runs short, Barefoot is
the one who must euthanize shelter
animals.
"Some nights 1 go home, and I try to
sleep, and all lean think about are
their faces she said.
Caldwell, who made a fortune in real
estate, left a $2.3 million estate when
Sheep make great pets
NEW YORK (AP) During his 13 years
driving a bus in the heart of New York
City, Jose Cruz said he had seen a
llama, a potbellied pig, a parrot and
plenty of dogs and cats. But Thursday
was the first time he spotted sheep.
As he drove across 42nd Street during
the morning rush hour, traffic forced
him to stop alongside the New York
Public Library, where he noticed a
well-dressed man and woman
strolling along the sidewalk with two
fuzzy white adult sheep on leashes.
"If you look to your right, you'll see a
couple walking their sheep, Cruz told
passengers through the public address
system on the bus.
Heads turned briefly, but passengers
quickly returned to their newspapers.
People on the crowded street saw the
sheep but also kept moving.
6 IhnfaK April 1,699
"It's New York shrugged Cruz, 37,
who lives in Queens. "You know what
makes it New York? Everybody looks
and says OK, yeah � no big deal
It turns out the sheep, Winnie and
Ajax, were part of a promotion for
lightweight wool sponsored by The
Woolmark Company, a textile organi-
zation which licenses its brands to
manufacturers in over 65 coun-
tricsThis is a fun way to get people's
attention in the country's fashion cen-
ter and dispel the misconception that
wool is only a cool weather fabric
said company spokeswoman
Stephanie GarbarinL
"Ajax and Winnie are domesticated
just like dogs � they love people and
attention, she said.
he died. In his will, he stipulated that
Rowdy and two other dogs, Butch and
Tramp, would have to die before other
beneficiaries, such as Barefoofs shel-
ter, could receive proceeds of the
estate.
Butch and Tramp are gone, but not
Rowdy. His veterinarian, Dr. Craig
Wilson of Bayleaf Veterinary Hospital
in Raleigh, said Rowdy "is in good
health, and well taken care of
"By the time Rowdy dies, there may be
nothing left said Cockman, the
estate's lawyer.
He said the estate was forced to pay $1
million in federal taxes after a recent
audit. Other funds have gone to pay
state taxes.
Smith has received dividends from
investments Caldwell made before he
died, phis $190,000 to buy herself and
Rowdy a house. And there are other
miscellaneous dog- and home-upkeep
expenses spelled out in the will.
Tm very protective of Rowdy" Smith
said. She said Caldwell would be
thrilled to know Rowdy is happy and
healthy.
UHF, continued from page 2
lucky child wins one of the zany
games (think "Double-Dare), and
gets to drink from the fire hose.
This kid gobbles up the hose, antici-
pating a mild stream of garden-hose
water. A large blast of water shoots
out and blasts the kid through a
three-inch- thick wall If you don't
laugh so hard you shoot beer out of
your nose, then you truly don't have
a funny bone in your body. I mean,
who doesn't like seeing acts of
strange violence against small,
defenseless children?
To make a long story short, the
movie is a drawn-out comedic mas-
terpiece with absolutely hilarious
sketches thrown in. Yankovich's style
of humor is priceless. If you have any
sense in that alcohol-numbed body
of yours, RENT THIS MOVIE, and if
you have the time, wish me a happy
birthday because today is my birth-
day and no one believes it because
it's April Fool's Day.
EDtv. continued from page 3
fame. But as Ed said, his fifteen min-
utes of fame was fourteen minutes
too long.
It sounds like a good movie, doesn't
itoh boy does ft have undertones.
Let me be the first to remind you of a
superb novel written in 1948 by a
man named Orwellyou got it, the
prophetic" 1984 The story was much
the same except that the main charac-
ter of"1984Winston Smith.didn't
decide to be watched all the time.
America is foreshadowing technolo-
gy's damnation, people! Like the
Marshall Tucker Band saidcan't you
see?" This"EDtv"bullschmidt is
nothing more than director Ron
Howard's way telling us that tele-
screens are coming!
Sooner or later they will be watching
our every move. Oh yes, Big Brother is
upon us and ferociously anticipates
making our American lives terrible.
What? You think you can run? You
can't run, it's Big Brother, flimsily dis-
guised as entertainment! Soon all of
us will have jobs working for Hig
Brother, sending scraps of paper with
important historical facts into an
incinerator so future generations will
riot ever know how great life was
before telescreens and doublespeak.
Don't you get it? This Ed is a messen-
ger, a messiah, a really special guy. He
is bringing a message to us humble
servants on Earth from a place of
much higher knowledgc.and that
place is Dover, Delaware. We should jj(
organize a sect and pay homage to
this man by smashing telescreen-like
devices and erecting video stores that
we will congregate in whenever
February 29 occurs on a Thursday�in
mark you calendar!
The end is nigh, friend, and "EDtv"
has spread the message of light to you
and 1, the humble beings that inhabit
this wonderful America, a country
soon to be catastrophically altered by
a new society where our every move
and thought will be monitored,
recorded and remembered. But as
long as we stick to believing the scrip-
ture from the Ron Howard film
"EDtv" and meet in Dover, Delaware
at the video storesynagogue, we shall
overcome. Until then, Big Brother is
watching you. ))
TEC has teamed up
with Barnes and Noble
to bring book reviews to
east �
Carolinian
Wednesday's Rxmtainhead
in our new program V
We an' looking for fellow book lovers to
nail and review In si soBere for a good
cause. Each Semester we will donate these
best sellers to the Ronald McDonald House
when; they will be available for the family
members of terminally ill chiltlnii to read.
If you would like to write a review
phase call Micoh at 328-6366






�M
ARIES:
(March 21-April 20)
Today is the day that you will eat
many tomatoes. The eating of the
tomatoes begins this day. You will
awaken, and the craving for toma-
toes is there, in your bowels. You will
open the refrigerator and reach for
all available tomatoes. You will travel
to your local supermarket also.
Then, when you think that you have
eaten all available tomatoes, you will
discover one more, slightly shriveled.
You will consume it. This is not my
fault
TAURUS:
(April 21 -May 21)
Ahhh! Awaken and feel the fresh
tingry sensation of a dean spring
breeze on your face! This day will
bring you much happiness and suc-
cess in money, love, fame or whatev-
er. When you root for a booger, you'll
find it. It's that kind of day. Just
remember, when you're walking on
the sidewalk, not to step on any
cracks. This is crucial! What? You
already did?
GEMINI:
(May 22-June 21)
Today you will find an old picture of
your ex-boyfriend or girlfriend.
Don't throw it away! Goodness, no!
Save it, in case someone else needs it
later on. And be sure and save your
food-scraps as well You never know
when hungry cats may come up to
your door. Honey, I never throw any-
thing away. You know, those toilet-
paper rolls can come in handy.
Martha Stewart says so!
CANCER:
(June 22-July 23)
The moon is aligned with Jupiter,
signifying that you will more than
likely meet the artist formerly
known as Prince this week. Also,
ctarttiyairything funny. We're
watching you. Like a hawkno. like
a dragonfly. Yeah. A dragonfly.
LEO:
(July 24- August 23)
This week is just going to be some-
where between sucking and blowing
for you and your sign. We
astrologers are going on vacation
and you people are just going to have
to take responsibility for your own
actions. Those guys are gonna come
get you pretty soon. It won't be in
the day light. But after dark. Cool
Breeze, your ass is theirs. Good luck,
putz!
VIRGO:
(August 24 - September 23)
With Cassiopeia shedding her virgin
light rays on Jupiter's third moon's
crater in the southeast hemisphere,
you can expect a bland week of col-
lege classes and working at that job
you hate so much. A trip to Delaware
is in your future. Oh boy!
LIBRA:
(September 24 - October 23)
Free love and a painless world lie in
the future this week Money? Have
no fear dear stargazing being, spend
all of the money you possess
because Mars is in Saturn's pathway
to Dagobah and you know what that
means, friend: lottery winner! Ding,
ding, ding, ding.
SCORPIO:
(October 24 - November 22)
b! Go smoke dat fool wit yo new,
dope gat dat you stoled from dat
muthagrabbin pimp hustler fool He
ain't no O.G. He be tryin' to whack
you but you jus cain't be fadeya
know what I'm sayin? Das right. It's
on dis week�suckas be thinkin
they can fake dissheeeeat!
SAGITTARIUS:
(November 23- December21)
Thisistheday! Right here in front
of you! That's right! Today is the
best day to abandon all hope.
A Message from Qint Eastwood
CAPRICORN:
(December 22 - January 20)
Chances are, ifs contagious. No soup
foryou.buddy! Two words: kidney
stones. That's all you, yaroody-poo .
candy ass! Ifyoucan.justgotoany
store and rob it One final hurrah,
you know what I'm saying?
Otherwise, just dig a hole and live
there until you die.
AQUARIUS:
(January 21- February 19)
Screw this week, just go ahead and
stay in bed. Trust me, that itching
downstairs you have been feeling is
not just chafing from that four mile
run in the rain, ifs genital herpes.
Don't worry, Zovarax comes in an
easy- to-use pill form to help control
your outbreaks. You are gonna ace
that test on Monday, but on the way
out you will lose a major appendage.
I won't tell you which one; 111 let it be
a surprise.
PISCES:
(February 20-March 20)
Using the ancient method of
"Nethario Buddhaistic Yumtuna I
have foreseen that you shall suffer
great misfortune at the hands of, oh
hell, what's the use anymore? No one
ever listens to me anyway. You all
hate me and couldn't give a damn
about my fortunes. Well fH show
you! No fortunes for you! I hate your
damn sign anyway, ya bunch of
fruity pebbles.
IF THIS WEEK IS
YOUR BIRTHDAY:
If you know what is good for you,
you will get out in the world and
build your own path. Just don't walk
down the path in front of the
Student Health building. I'm not
sure if the big grounds crew truck
saw you coming, but boy that look
on the driver's face as he runs you
over will be priceless! Ah.anyway,
make this week fun because you def-
initely aren't gonna have a next
Clint Eastwood
Staff Writer
Sit dewn, son. Sit up
straight and look me in
the eye. Look me hard in
the eye! I heard you been
drinkin' that sissy-boy
mkro-brewery yuppie
beer. Raspberry-Chocolate Red-Dog
Cider, or some such crap. I just caught
you forking over $8.99 for a six-pack.
Now I've got a case of Pabst Blue
Ribbon here, and me and you are
gonna drink it all. I won't take no for
an answersit down! 1 didn't raise my
boy to throw money around. Now you
look here: I paid three dollars for this
entire case. I know about the value of
a dollar.
Drink up. I'm spending quality time
with you. You're not leaving until it's
all gone.
Apply at the Student
publications Building
7 Thursday, April1,B99







put iiip The! JEast
Go to our weCalR)w the calendar link.
Just below Hi 0i i nl li 11111� in HlH In Hi event submission form.
Or if you want a Smortcujifpe into your browser.
Then just e'nter your event onto our campus calendar.
It's just that easy. And it's one more free service of The East Carolinian.


Title
The East Carolinian, April 1, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 01, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.2810
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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