The East Carolinian, March 30, 1999







Tuesday
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H7f Online Survey
Would you vote for Elizabeth
t; Dole for president?
88 Yes 11 No
TUESDAY. MARCH 30.1999 VOLUME 74. ISSUE 35
www.tec.ecu.edu
New minor
offered
Program covers
works by great authors
Peter Lenk
news writer
ECU is announcing a new minor
called Great Books which will be
offered through the department of
Multi-Disciplinary Studies. Great
Books will be composed of eight
classes (24 hours) with at least nine
hours above 2999 levels.
Students participating in the
minor will put together a course
list of eight classes from three to
five different departments of their
choice. Great books courses will
deal mainly with the great writers
of each field. The course selection
will not be exclusively English ori-
ented and it will deal with any
great writer that has changed his or
her field. Included in the courses
are great writers in English, politi-
cal science, foreign languages to
physics and chemistry. The avail-
ability of course topics will depend
on the demand and participation of
students. Classes that are currently
offered include Chaucer, Plato,
Russian Prose of the Nineteenth
Century, and Western Political
Thought: Moses to Montesquieu.
SEE MINOR PAGE 3
Study abroad programs in exotic places like
Belize make hitting the books worth it
page6
College Hill
slated to
get face-lift
Projects include
new student center
Edically for stu-
PF aluminum, plas-
W glass products
HgJb Koch, students
sujrfonsible amount of
� in the recycling
Hver, in a recent TEC stu-
Hfl, most students that lived
Hdence halls said that they
t recycle as often as they
�uld. But all of them said that
ey would participate more in
?ecyclirig if the facilities were
more available.
SEE RECYCLING PAGE 3
Terra Steinbeiser
staff writer
The sights and sounds of construc-
tion on campus are already so
familiar that many students hardly
notice it anymore. However, start-
ing next year with the total renova-
tion of Jones Residence Hall and
The Galley, changes on College
Hill will be difficult to ignore.
Last Thursday the ECU Board
of Trustees met and voted on a
plan to make College Hill into
what Facilities Planning Director
Bruce Flye calls "a much more
habitable place Other projects
besides the Jones Hall renovation
include a new look for Tyler
Residence Hall, replacing Belk
Residence Hall with a new student
center, possibly a new residence
hall at the bottom of College Hill,
and a walkway over the intersec-
tion at College Hill Drive and 10th
Street.
"In my opinion, being able to
SEE COLLEGE HILL PAGE 2
Phony parking
decal use on rise
Officials: duplicate
passes common
Jessica Reed
NEWS WRITER
Officials say possession of illegal
parking stickers might be on the
rise at ECU, and steps are being
taken to prevent use of duplicate
passes.
Parking stickers are available to
ECU students, vendors and staff
according to class and need, at
prices ranging from $42 to $288.
However, some students say
the prices are so exorbitant, that
they would use counterfeit stickers
themselves if they knew they
wouldn't get caught.
"It's ridiculous how you pay all
this money for a parking sticker and
aren't guaranteed a space said
GwynGarber, ECU freshman. "If I
could get away with it, I would
duplicate the stickers
According to ECU Parking and
Traffic Services, these students try
to duplicate university stickers
because they do not want to pay the
fee.
"Students wonder if they can get
away with it said Johnnie
Eastwood, external operations man-
ager at Parking and Traffic Services.
"There is money to be made
A student living in Aycock Hall
was caught in December using a
counterfeit resident sticker. ECU
police said the student had dupli-
cated the permit using the comput-
er program Microsoft Publisher.
Eastwood said the dimensions
on the duplicate sticker looked
almost exactly like that of the resi-
dent sticker issued by Traffic-
Services.
The giveaway, he said, was the
rough edges of the "R" and the
plastic that was laminated over it.
This resident violator was
"It's ridiculous how you pay
all this money for a parking
sticker and aren 't guaranteed
a spaceIf I could get
away with it, I would dupli-
cate the stickers
Gwyn Garber
ECU lieshman
charged with one felony count of
obtaining property under false pre-
tenses and a misdemeanor count of
computer fraud.
Eastwood said this was the first
case of a student duplicating per-
mits. There have been cases of ille-
gal stickers in the past, but they had
been stolen and resold to other stu-
dents.
Permits are now designed to
peel off in pieces to avoid being
SEE STICKERS PAGE 2
Pedestrian traffic

creates dirt paths
About 30 foot trails
to remain un
Myron A l b rig ht
NEWS WRITER
ECU has 12 miles of sidewalks.
But as any student rushing to class
can tell you, the campus also has
many miles of dirt paths.
ECU has about 30 dirt paths,
created by foot traffic looking for
the quickest route between two
ing the same direction over time.
The largest dirt path is in front of
Mendenhall Student Center. This
path is more than 50 feet long and
6 feet wide as it stretches towards
west campus. Students from four
residence halls use this path to get
to and from the student center.
Another 6 foot wide path begins
just east of the Student
Publications Building and extends
past the library into the mall.
Across from the commuter lot on
College Hill is a path used by stu-
dents from five dormitories on
College Hill, plus commuting stu-
dents walking to and from their
automobiles.
Students Ryan Harrington and Ray Collins make use of one of ECU'S 30 dirt paths.
points.
Doug Caldwell, Grounds
Manager at ECU for 31 years, says
that dirt paths have been here as
long as he can remember.
According to Caldwell, the
paths result from many feet walk-
To solve the problem of some
dirt paths in the past, the Facilities
Services department has made
mulch paths in wooded areas.
Mulch paths are more aesthetically
SEE PATHS PAGE 3
Students prepare to
enter global classroom
Interactive TV connects
campuses with Japan
Mario Sc ii erhauf e r
senior writer
Six graduate students from ECU
and UNC Wilmington experienced
the rising sun of Japanese educa-
tion and the power of technology
by attending an international edu-
cation class with the help of inter-
active TV.
The class focused on the
Japanese education system and
was taught by Yumiko Ono, a
guest professor from Naruto
University of Education in Japan.
A grant from the Global
Foundation for Scholarship and
Research financed Ono's visit to
ECU.
According to Donald Spence,
Associate Director of
International Affairs, this grant
opportunity had to be taken
advantage of quickly, and it was
seen as a first effort in connecting
this university with Japanese coun-
terparts.
"We are working on connecting
the University's Teacher Education
Program with our Public Schools'
Partnership Program at the elemen-
tary, middle school, and high school
levels said Spence, who is also a
professor at ECU's school of educa-
tion for kids at the elementary and
middle school level. "Our final goal
is very pioneer, it's to connect uni-
versities here with universities in
Japan. We want to be able to have
students, teachers, and faculty
exchange with our Japanese partner
schools and go into research on
both, the vertical and the horizontal
levels
Horizontal level research wbuld
allow students and faculty to con-
duct research in Japan as well as in
the United States. By adding the
vertical level, this would enable
universities in both countries to
Yumiko Ono, guest professor from Japan.
PHOTO BY MARIO SCHERKAUFER
explore all levels of education, from
elementary to the high school level.
Ono's visit to ECU was a first
tiny step toward the final goal,
according to Spence. According to
Ono, who primarily teaches interna-
tional graduate students who attend
teaching training programs in Japan,
the way she teaches international
students and Japanese students dif-
fers.
SEE JAPANESE PAGE 2





2 Tuwdiy. Mireh 30. 1999
College Hill
continued from page 1
cross 10th Street safely is the most
important thing said CEO of
Trade Oil Company and Board of
Trustees member Walter Williams.
Officials said much of the work
to be done on College Hill is cos-
metic but is still seen as vitally
important.
"A campus needs to have a cer-
tain amount of continuity said
Williams. "Belk and some of the
other dorms up there are sort of
stick out like red-headed stepchil-
drea If we can renovate them and
get them to blend in a little more it
would make us very proud
Though the first of these pro-
jects is scheduled to begin next
year, the work will be completed
incrementally.
"We haven't really applied all of
these projects to a time line yet
because the need for them depends
on the growth of the university
said Flye.
Besides the drastic changes to
College Hill, the Board also
approved plans for renovations on
other parts of campus. These plans
include expansion and renovation
of the Student Health Center, a
new dining hall on West Campus
and the completion of the renova-
tion of Jarvis Residence Hall. ECU
also plans to buy The Daily
Reflector building on Cotanche
Street to house CIS.
"We want to get CIS its own
building so we can use Austin for
faculty and class space said Flye.
As of now, CIS is split up between
Austin and the old Jones cafeteria.
"Overall, the Board wants to
make ECU an attractive and func-
tional campus said Williams.
Stickers
continued Irom page 1
stolen.
The most recent duplicate dis-
covered was a scanned limited per-
mit done by computer. Eastwood
said this sticker was easily notice-
able.
"It was a poor excuse for a dupli-
cate Eastwood said. "It was
pathetic
This student had to appear in
court with charges of forging a uni-
versity document. They were fined
by the university and by the city of
Greenville.
Any student caught with or using
illegal parking permits are towed
and campus parking privileges are
suspended for one calendar year.
The permit is confiscated and
Japanese
continued Irom page 1
Golden Key National Honor Society
"Depending on the student pop-
ulation I adapt my teaching style.
Students who are pursuing their
graduate degree need a lot of writ-
ing skills and reading comprehen-
sion in the Japanese language, for
example Ono said. "But those
students are not Japanese language
majors. They just need the lan-
guage as a communication tool
when they go to Japan
Satoshi Kansaki, James I larper,
and Bobby Phillips are three ECU
graduate students who took the
opportunity of Ono's visit to explore
the Japanese model of teaching.
� "After exploring different
aspects of the Japanese education
system and including their own per-
sonal interest, they will present a
research proposal tonight Ono
said. According to Spence, they are
expecting to use those proposals to
apply for grants to Fullbright
Scholarships to go to Japan. In addi-
tion to Ono's lecturing, they are
gaining practical experience with
the help of ECU's Partnership
School Project at various local
schools by assisting Japanese-teach-
ing professors. "We do have five
the violator is fined. Depending on
the violation, additional punish-
ment and fines may be enforced.
Eastwood suspects there are
more duplicate stickers on campus.
The problems the university has
had with illegal stickers has been in
the last six years, Eastwood said.
"Anytime it happens it's a prob-
lem because it's breaking the law
Eastwood said. "It leads to other
things
These cases have made officers
more aware of these stickers. They
have started looking for things like
color difference and the quality of
the sticker.
Starting in the fall, the price of
parking stickers will increase.
Eastwood feels the use of illegal
stickers will too.
high schools that teach Japanese
here and our students have the pos-
sibilities to get teaching experi-
ence
Joining the ECU students were I
three students at UNC Wilmington,
by attending Ono's lectures via the
help of Interactive TV.
"I was very skeptical, but it
works really Spence said.
According to Spence, the lecture
given last week was taped and
handed out to the ECU students
when they came back from spring
break. The week before, the
Wilmington students were provid-
ed with a tape after they returned
from their break. "Looking down
the road, we are actually hoping that
eventually we are able to tie our
classes across our campuses with
schools in Japan. We want to be able
to have our students here being
able to observe Japanese teachers in
Japan while we are half a day apart
Japanese public schools are not
as wired as the U.S. counterparts,
and translation software will also be
needed in order to extend the
Interactive TV model beyond N.C.
boundaries, but the technological
progresses were exiting and promis-
ing, said Spence.
Officer Elections will be held
March 30, 1999
at 5:30 in GCB 1012.
All positions availible.
Gall Gelena at 328-8683 for more details.
Refuse to
pay retail.
See the best selection of your favorite
name brands for men & women at
Greenville's Uptown Outlet.
Tin Em Cirolin
Cubbies Downtown
STUDENT SPECIALS
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$4.00 CUBBIES CHEESEBURGER,
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752-6497
The ECU Student Media Board invites
applications for the position of
Expressions
The East Carolinian
EDITOR,
Rebel
for the 1999-2000 academic year.
Applications are available in the Media Board office.
The deadline for submitting an application is
WEDNESDAY, APRI114 AT 4 P.M.
For information, call the Media Board office at 328-6009.
If you
have any
brains at all,
7011II be aware
of the danger
of depression.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
WISHES TO ANNOUNCE THE FOLLOWING
Holy Week & Easter Services
urvTfiefATFD
DEPRESSION
presents
McDonalds
Quarter Pounders
with Cheese
Large
Medium
$a.23
http:www.save.orc
723O Mil
Good FrfdayServkes (Aprfl2):tpm-OutdowStattonsaftheG
7:30 pmCkxri Friday liturgy and Cornrnunion Service at St Peter's
Saturday Easter vlgfl Service (April 3: 8:00 pun. at St Peter's
Easter Sunday Masses (April 4): 11:30 ajn. and 8:30 p.m. at the Newman Center
Forfiirther irtfbrmatlon, please call Fr. teul Vaeth, Chaplain at 757-1991
(St. Peter's Is located at 2700 E. 4th Street)
Newman Center 953 E. 10th Street (at the foot of College Hill)
ECU '
j
Bi
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UT1
o"
2
k
-Q-
Free
Free I
Neai





Tin Ent Carolinian
Tmrtn. Mwtt m wt 3
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citw SANGRIAS $1.75
BLOODY MARYS $2.25
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TUITDQ HEINEKENS $1.75
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Near ECU Bus Line .JUcm
Recycling
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"If they were more available,
yeah I'd do more recycling. We
have recycling facilities in our sor-
rity and I do it there laid Miacy
Bennett, student of ECU.
Paths
continued from pan t
Btjst Kept Secret Srot Of tlM Brt rwfWW CVHPW J j � Clow to campui. V k� fjj. � Wointfi �� oryrs crvoiloW 1 MO Tfl 11 id 11 t? � Oroot Lxattonl V � ttrrric CALL TODAYI1I 1510 Bridle Circle 355-2198
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41
pleasing in these areas, Caldwell
said.
In other locations on campus,
sand and brick pavers have been
used because they absorb some of
the impact caused by foot traffic,
whereas concrete sidewalks com-
pact the earth.
"It's less of an environmental
issue to put brick down Caldwell
said. "Actually, the brick sidewalk
that presently exists in front of the
Minor
continued Iron page 1
The Great Books courses will
be taught in a Socratic fashion in
which the students read books
and come to class to discuss their
thoughts with fellow students.
However, traditional tests and
quizzes will be up to the discretion
of the teacher.
Dr. Edmund Wall, one of the
professors who will be teaching
courses in the new minor said that
the purpose of the minor is to f
study a discipline by reading the
great writers of each field.
To be eligible for this minor stu-
dents will need to have a declared
major with at least 30 credit hours.
There is an introductory class
strongly recommended called Clas
2000 and will give students a gen-
eral feel for the courses and writers
for the Great Books minor.
I
ea
Pay for your
parking tickets
BEFORE early
registration!
Don't lose your place in line or
your seat in a class when you
register for summer session or
fall semester!
Students with uncleared parking citations may
have a tag placed on their record and are not
permitted to register until the tag is cleared.
I
find
have
outstanding student �
,l.og"n
T -w stodent.ec� the
at !�'t have a f�l you.
�00fhaveone0t0cccVc
stcpS t0,hc dictions t�
Fotto s a0d pa"
violations- De,yo�can
,� you nave trouhroUgh
hnrl ECU Parking and Transportation Services
U U 305 E. Tenth Street
y 328-6294
t





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Is that a tin can you just threw away? Or worse, a glass bottle? Do you ever think about what hap-
pens to things you throw into the trash can? If you don't maybe it's time to start.
On campus alone, students throw away tons of trash, all day, every day. And once it's trash, it can't
be reused. Trash is carted off to huge landfills where it slowly decomposes, releasing toxic fumes
into the air and harmful chemical mixtures into surrounding soil and water.
Many of the items that fester in landfills could have been recycled with minimal time and effort,
if we had simply put those things into appropriate recycling bins.
For a campus our size, student have fewer opportunities to recycle than we should. If we want to
hunt for a paper or glass receptacle, we can find them in GCB or Brewstcr, and can bins are locat-
ed in each dorm. Still, it's always easier to throw away our trash, rather than carry it around until
we find the proper receptacle.
But if we really care about changing the environment, we'll find a way to recycle, even if it incon-
veniences us a bit. We really have no choice.
We need to do all we can to cut back on garbage dumping, because garbage doesn't just go away.
Years, sometimes centuries, are re(iiired for the decomposition of garbage items, and until
garbage decomposes, more landfills need to be constructed to hold all the new garbage.
So collect your recyclablcs in a plastic bag or a cardboard box (both recyclable) until you're ready
j to take them to a recycling bin or truck. Resist the urge to toss everything into a convenient trash
; can and take time to familiarize yourself with nearby recycling bins. If every ECU student rccy-
; cled just one pound of garbage a week, we'd be conserving H tons of garbage a week.
OPINION
Columnist
OPINION
Columnist
Phillip
Gilfus
Thinking of registration tactics
Marvelie
Sullivan
Clinton obsessed with NATO poweij
Clinton, et al have a wild
fascination with the power of
NATO and the UN and have
turned them into European
policemen instead of wo rid-
U.Sled NATO forces are
now attempting to settle the fight
in Kosovo between the Christian
Serbs and Moslem Albanians. A
man named Slobodan Milosevic
leads the Serbs. Milosevic is a psy-
chopath in the truest sense of the
word. I lis psychopathic nature is
probably the result of his abusive
childhood and both of his parents
having committed suicide.
Essentially, the use of logic and rea-
son is not really an option when
dealing with him. The Serbs arc-
intent on reclaiming their land and
meanwhile are slaughtering masses
of Kosovar Albanians in order to
accomplish their goal.
This ordeal is needed a
tragedy, but it isn't so much what it
is, moreover what the ordeal repre-
sents. The escalation in Kosovo is
representative of what the U.S.�
under the Clinton administration�
is greatly lacking: a coherent and
cohesive foreign policy along with
the respect that such a policy would
command. The United States has
its hand on everything and its grip
on nothing. If Milosevic respected
the U.S he would not remain so
staunchly and ludicrously defiant.
If the Albanians had faith in the
U.S they would be welcoming our
protection instead of reluctantly
accepting it.
The present administra-
tion and in particular Hill Clinton is
to blame for the weak image that
the U.S. conveys abroad. Even
when Clinton's own, like Secretary
of State Madeline Albright, make
attempts of being more assertive
and coherent, someone within the
White I louse flip-flops and ruins it.
Clinton, et al have a wild
fascination with the power of
NATO and the UN and have
turned them into virtual European
policemen instead of worldwide
peacekeeping organizations. The
post-cold war era in the foreign pol-
icy sense is admittedly trickier
though. The black and white has
now faded into a gray, and irrita-
tions, like Kosovo, are too small to
commit to a full-scale war but are
definitely too serious to completely
ignore. So, Clinton's decisions are
tougher but that is no excuse for his
inconsistencies throughout his
presidency.
Now, the U.S. is experi-
encing foreign policy trauma
because of the Clinton "shot inihe
dark" approach. China, a couiitry
that Clinton embraced in 1992, has
stolen our most precious military
information and intelligence
according to the CIA. All of the
IMF funds Clinton begged to hi)ve
sent to Russia never ended up stim-
ulating the Russian cconorliy.
Instead, the money has beien
deposited in the bank accountsjof
the Russian "elite" and consequen-
tially, the Russian economy is te(ri-
ble and laden with rapidly growrjig
crime rates. Basically, the Russians
took the money and ran like it Was
their job. Iraq is always a threat, and
the Middle East could break out
any time. The instability of Eastern
Europe does not seem to be waning
as a new bout of ethnic cleansing
takes place all the time.
All of this is not to say thflt
we should be the world's savior. In
fact, we shouldn't be at all, but if
the United States is going to com-
mit to a nation or a cause, then the
job should be done correctly and
completely. Partisan politics art!
internal White House conflict hin-
der the realization of the UM.
receiving any further respect ar)tl
thus producing any real results fijr
our country or for any other. It's juSt
one more thing to think about for
the next presidential election.
Life on T
.&
I NOTlc
ALWAYS i
ABOUT Pi
Of THE I
CLASS
pi
I know it has been a week since
winter break (go ahead, look at the
calendar, that was a winter break),
but let me say welcome back all
;anyway. Let the countdown for
Easter Break begin, or is it spring
vacation? I don't remember what
the politically correct term is. But
as we all know, this is a special
week that contains a very impor-
tant day for millions of people on
this earth: there's a full moon on
Wednesday (mmmsacri!icious).
With that comment that will get
me excommunicated, I'd like to
take one moment to say something
to the wonderful, attractive people
who make and edit this fine publi-
cation: MY NAME IS PHILLIP
GILFUS!
Imagine my look of chagrin
( when I opened the March 11 issue
of TEC to find my name on the
editorial page twice (yea me!), but
it was misspelled both times! And
in two different ways! 1 tell ya, if
that dumptruck full of money did-
n't come to my dorm at the end of
every month, I'd quit right now.
And while I'm on the subject, a
certain opinion columnist spelled
the epitome of Southern vocabu-
lary as "ya'll I'll just assume it
was a typo and not start to question
his southernity (for the record, it's
y'all).
In case some of you arc inebriat-
ed from trying to recapture spring
break, I'd just like to remind every-
one that registration for classes is
this week. That's right, time to go
through that pile of papers next to
your bed, ignore the odors, and try
to remember who is your advisor
and what their phone number is.
Yes, it's time to tally up your hours
and see if you should take Biology
4220 or Basket Weaving 1020 (I
think it's an honors course for the
second summer session).
ECU offers many registering
services for students. We can sign
up for our classes over the phone or
through the internet. But is this
such a good idea? Don't tell me you
haven't ever left a message like this
on an answering machine:
um, oh, hey. Yeah, urn, this is
(fill in name) and I was just won-
dering if you would you like to,
GET OFF ME, CAT (Sounds of
meowing, hissing and kicking) So,
anywayoh man, I just ripped my
pants. Er, I mean, um,
uhclick"
And they expect college stu-
dents to plan a whole semester on
their cell phone? One mispressed
number and you've suddenly
changed your major.
As for on-line registration, we
have to be very careful. After filling
out your social security number
and PIN number approximately 42
times, you must then trust the
information superhighway (invent-
LETF HER
ed single-handedly by Vice
President Gore) to sign you up for
fifteen hours of exercise, theater,
and English courses and not make
you a schedule consisting of seven-
teen hours of geology classes (not
that there's anything wrong with
that).
I know many students are wor-
ried about how many hours they
have and if they will graduate on
time. Now I think it is very impor-
tant to keep a good G.P.A. and to
graduate in four-ish years, but
c'mon, what is everyone complain-
ing about? You love ECU and ya
know it. So you might have to
spend an extra couple thousand
dollars to stay another semester.
Big deal. You would probably end
up wasting the money on frivolous
stuff anyway, like a down payment
for a house or an engagement ring.
Of course now I'm going to get
lynched by the faculty for encour-
aging students not to graduate and
congratulated by the administra-
tion for making the kids spend
more money. Heh, heh, I'm kid-
ding, of course (nervous laughter).
Don't forget Ryan Dogg's pick
up line contest! A free CD for that
lucky winner! E-mail your entries
to murdnch623@hotmail.com.
Now if you'll excuse me, I have
to go slip the copy editors $20 so
they'll "remember" my name.
Student frustrated with alternate lifestyles
After reading the article entitled
"B-GLAD Celebrates Annual
Pride Week which appeared in
the March 25 edition of The East
Carolinian, I must admit that I am
getting sick and tired of having the
acceptance of "alternative
lifestyles" pushed on me. In the
article Garner suggests that those
of us who do not condone such sin-
ful lifestyles are narrow-minded.
As a Christian I have seen sin in
my own life, turned from sin, and
have been forgiven of the sins I
have committed. With the accep-
tance of Jesus Christ as my Lord
and Savior my eyes have been
opened to what sin really is. It is
anything that goes against the will
of God, and thus separates us from
God. So why must I accept that
which I know is wrong? Instead of
being closed-minded, I, and the
other Christians on campus, have
actually seen the big picture and
know that such lifestyles are
wrong. We are not trying to be
judgmental, we are just following
the word of God. So please do not
attempt to categorize us as closed-
minded.
Above all, Jesus Christ taught that
we should love the Lord our God
with all our heart and that we
should also love other people
(Matt 22:37-39). But this certainly
should not be used as a justifica-
tion for homosexuality as it so
often is. Jesus used the Greek
word "agape" for love in the above
verse. Only Christians can express
agape, which is a "fruit of the spir-
it" (Gal 5:22) received when a per-
son is born again. Agape comes
from God and can only result in
Godly things. Agape and sin can-
not exist together at the same time.
And since homosexuality is
detestable to the Lord (Lev 18:22),
love expressed in a homosexual
relationship is not the love that
Christ spoke of.
Those of us who are Christians
need to stand firm in our beliefs.
We should treat everyone with the
love Christ showed us, but have
the integrity not to allow others to
persuade us to compromise our
beliefs. And remember, wear your
shorts or khakis on "Blue Jeans
Day" to show that you do not con-
done such sinful or "alternative"
lifestyles.
Steven Wood
Finance major
w
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rch 30. 1999 4

J
powetf
inton "shot inihe
China, a country
raced in 1992, lias
precious military
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oney has bejen
bank accounts'of
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economy is (chi-
ll rapidly growftig
illy, the Russians
nd ran like it was
tvays a threat, and
could break out
ability of Eastern
;em to be waning
ethnic cleansing
time.
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world's savior. In
be at all, but if
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ne correctly artl
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the love that
ire Christians
n our beliefs,
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How others to
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5 Tuesdiv. Match 30. 1999
comics
Four Seats Left
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� Two-thirds of ECU students
consume Four or Fewer
drinks when they drink

� More than halF oF ECU
students drink alcohol
twice a month or less.
One-third oF ECU students
prefer to attend parties
where alcohol is NOT served.
What's happening with
'BruM af thr tprttf, W Alcohol �od Oihr. Drug Uw vm) of ECU KiOryjtot. MaoWi �dm�ii�nfd by tkt ObhMn of Stuota Ufr.
The fan Ctrotlniin
Life on Tuesday
Chris Knotts
Chris Knotts Life's Meanings
W A R N I N
I iu- t inniH'ticr stress.
Kevin Jordan
But, you were thinking:
"if i can't be with the
one i love, i'll. love
the one i'm with"
Mill U llll tills IllU'lll
lave ever said:
be thes
ant to be the summer breeze lhat puts
the smile on your face.
I want to be the song on the radio.
to he okav.
scares auav
the booevman in the night.
c there
IftVUIWHWIVIPIPIIIrai
1
Why is it parents can explain the harmful effects
of one and not the other?
TEENS WHO HAVE LEARNED A LOT ABOUT THE RISK
OF MARIJUANA FROM THEIR PARENTS ARE HALF AS
LIKELY TO USE POT AS THOSE TEENS WHO SAY THEY
LEARNED NOTHING ABOUT DRUGS FROM THEIR
PARENTS TALK TO YOUR TEENAGER ABOUT
MARIJUANA KNOWLEDGE IS PRETTY CONTAGIOUS
STUFF IF YOU NEED HELP. CALL 1-888-732-3362 FOR
A FREE COPY OF 'MARIJUANA: FACTS PARENTS NEED TO
KNOW " DON'T LET THE WORDS GET CAUGHT IN YOUR MOUTH
i
i
Partnership for a Drug-Free
North Carolina i�$
Pvmenhlp tor a Dug-Free AmcrkjiTW
Toll Free 1-888-732-3362
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6 TuMdiy. M�rch 30. 1999
features
7 Tussdiy, M
The East Carolinian
Program backed by English
Dept, International Affairs
I'll 11.1. II' (� II. VI S
SKMOU U' RI I K �
Imagine waking up for class, opening
.windows and
letting in a tropi-
cal breeze. Palm
trees swaying as
the tide rushes in,
hitting the sandy
beaches that is
almost outside
your window.
Sound too good
to be true?
Well.that is exact-
ly what students
studying in
Belize get to look
forward to each
and every day.
"This program was started three sum-
mers ago. It focuses on cultural studies
Belize locals make
PHOTO COURTESY
and has courses taught by professors
at the University College of Belize
and ECU professors said Linda
McGowan, ECU Overseas
Opportunities Coordinator.
The 1999 summer Belize program
will be offering courses in English,
Ethnic Studies and Art taught by
ECU professors. The classes will
include ENGL 4510; Directed
Readings: African and Caribbean
Literature, ENGL 6365;
Multicultural Seminar, Ethnic
Studies 3500;
Selected
Topics in
Ethnic Studies:
Humanities, Art
3000 & 5500;
Independent Study
and Art 3500 &
5000; Intermedia
stud i o
From June 13 to
July 5, students and
alumni will live in
Belize and have the
opportunity to learn
about the country's
culture through
Caribbean literature, reggae and puma
music and the archeology of Belize's
Facts About Belize
I former British colony
- English speaking
-ethnic make-up consists of African
descendants, Creole, Hispanics and
Native Indians
-government is constitutional monar-
chy
� ancient Mayans used to inhabit
country; majestic ruins still standing
-most places within walking distance
music for the tourists.
OF BELIZE BROCHURE
ancient past.
This program is open
to students from all
universities. Alumni
are also eligible to par-
t i c i p si t e .
"Students should get
applications and turn
them in soon
McGowan said.
Participants will also
be able to take cours-
es in archeology,
Caribbean studies and
environmental studies
SH BELIZE PAGE
Belize's beautilul water front entices many visitors to indulge in relaxation.
PHOTO COURTESV OF BELIZE BROCHURE
Internships gives students edge in workforce
Co-op assists in
finding job placements
K I C A S I k K S
SI U I- v HIT Kit
You may have a need to attend
summer school. You may also have
to work to make money to reim-
burse your parents or Uncle Sam.
Why not do both? There are so
many opportunities to expand your
education this summer while mak-
ing money through summer intern-
ships.
"There are hundreds of summer
internships available said Mary
Cauley, director of Cooperative
Education. "They are not difficult
to find, students just need to come-
to the co-op office
Some internships are paid while
you can receive class credit for oth-
ers. Payment depends on the
employer.
Upon graduation, employers
usually look for someone with
experience, in turn raising the
question of "How do I get a job
without experience and how do I
get experience without a job?"
Students should become involved
with some work experience that is
directly related to their major. With
so many opportunities to get expe-
rience, students should have no
problem finding internships and
work experience.
"I think summer internships are
great said Chrissy Miller, junior.
"It gives you experience in one's
field of study instead of just absorb-
ing the knowledge received in
class. It gives you a chance to apply
what you've learned in the real
world
"My brother is doing an intern-
ship this summer. This is automati-
cally looked upon as if he has job
experience and he'll have a step
ahead of those he'll be up against in
the workforce said Jennifer
Elkins, senior.
Some internships are strictly-
taken on as fun, but underhanded-
ly turn into work-related experi-
SEEINTERNSHIP PAGE
Students plagued by
on-campus car vandalism
Police put forth efforts
to remedy problem
K rica Siki:s
S I M I tt H I I t. H
Street signs create lawsuits
Locals speak out on
negative street names
HEDGESVILLE, W.Va. (AP)�
Berkeley County's decision to
change "Boy Scout Road" to "Big
F Park Road" has landed county
officials in court, and now another
band of residents is debating
whether to file a lawsuit of its own.
A group of about 100 residents
calling themselves "Berkeley
County Citizens For Common
Sense 911" said they will meet later
this week to decide whether to
challenge the renaming of 61
streets in Marrinsburg and 425
county roads.
The new names, due to take
effect April 1, are part of a county
wide reorganization of the 911
emergency response system. The
"address conversion plan" adopted
by the county is an attempt to elim-
inate duplicate road names that
could cause confusion for 911
responders.
Paul D. Oliver and Carolyn S.
Oliver, the first to file a lawsuit,
contend that the county's choice of
"Big F Park Road" has a "negative
sexual connotation" that will drive
down the value of their $205,000
home.
"Your address defines who you
are said Paul Oliver. "Most peo-
ple take 'Big !�" to mean something
else
Oliver said he does not object to
enhanced 911, but thinks the coun-
ty needs
to come up with a better way to
upgrade the system.
The Olivers' lawsuit will be
heard March 24. In their suit, they
argue that the Berkeley County
Commission lacks the authority to
change county road names, and
they want a judge to reverse the
name changes or order the commis-
sion to pay damages.
With an April 1 implementation
deadline looming, the county com-
mission cannot afford further delays
and arguments about name
changes, said Berkeley County
Commission President D. Wayne
Dunham.
"It's so late in the game
Dunham said. "If we have to go
back and change streets it will take
forever
"Someone had to take the initia-
tive to provide better emergency
services. The bottom line is we are
doing this to save lies Dunham
said. The Olivers' lawsuit could
interrupt the entire project and
efforts to upgrade other systems
statewide, he said.
You don't remember leaving your
car window down, but it appears
that you did. As you walk closer,
you see shattered glass all aside
your car. It's dark and you are
afraid. What do you do? Students
face this problem on campus.
This year, ECU Police have put
extra effort into preventing car theft
and vandalism.
"Due to the abundance of last
year's thefts and vandalism, we
have instituted a surveillance pro-
gramsaid Captain W.F. Knight of
the ECU Police Department.
Parking and Traffic Services has
made efforts to lessen the number
of vandalism and theft by joining
the ECU police in the surveillance
program. In this new program
Parking and Traffic Services are
instructed to report any suspicious
activities to the police. Since the
enforcement of the surveillance
program, the amount of car thefts
have decreased to about one car a
month. "We can't eliminate the
incidents, but we can reduce
them Knight said.
ECU freshman Marisa Kelly
experienced bad luck as her car was
broken into three times this semes-
ter.
"The first time I was completely
shocked, but after the third time I
just said, 'again? Kelly said. "The
first two times I reported it to the
Greenville police, but I didn't
report it the third time since noth-
ing came out of the first two
reports
According to Knight, most of the
incidents that occur involve alcohol
and take place in the Reede Street
parking lots. This is subsequential
to the crowd, both students and
non-students, that departs from the
downtown area late at night.
A few of the thefts that occurred
during the daylight hours this past
semester were hang tag thefts.
Only about 10 percent of the
break-ins are targeted thefts or van-
dalism. The other 90 percent usual-
'We ran 7 eliminate the inci-
dents, but we ran redure
them
Captain W.F. Knight
ECU Police Deparimem
ly involve alcohol or are random
offenses. "My car was parked out-
side of White Hall and when I went
to get it, the passenger side view
mirror was gone said Kiersten
Hansen, junior. "I would have
thought that something like this
could happen off campus, not
somewhere well lit
Although the campus police and
Parking and Traffic are trying to do
what they can with this dilemma,
students are still wary about the sit-
uation.
"I don't have my car on campus
because I do not want to risk get-
ting it broken into said Tricia
Bell, junior. "Besides everything is
within walking distance on cam-
pus
If you find yourself to be a vic-
tim of a break-in or vandalism, the
ECU Police encourage you to uti-
lize the emergency phone located
all over campus. An officer will then
arrive to gather information about
you and your car. They will then
investigate the crime scene, look:
ing for.any evidence that may be
helpful. Police reports are then
compared in thefts and vandalism
and analyzed in order to locate a
possible pattern in the crimes. A
police report will be readily avail-
able to you within two or three days
to file with your insurance compa-
ny.
Gina Lanvermeier, a freshman
at ECU, was awoke one morning by
a phone call from the Police
Department informing her that
they had caught someone attempt-
ing to steal her license plate.
"They (the police did a very
good job Lanvermeier said, "but
did they have to call at 5 a.m.?"
More renovations are being
made to the Reede Street parking
lots to ensure the safety of parked
vehicles. Over the spring breaK,
more lights and cameras will be
added to the parking lots and will
also be paved. This particular reno-
vation will decrease the availability
ofrocks that are used as weapons to
shatter windshields.
To prevent a break-in, you
should always lock your doors. The
old saying is that if they want some-
thing in your car, they are going to
get it whether the doors are locked
or not.
Also, never leave valuable items
visibly in sight. This will only
increase temptation level of for the
perpetrator. Take all valuables out
of your vehicle; if possible remove
the face off of your or cassette play-
ers. ;
Location of where you park also
plays a key role in auto theft. Be
sure to place your car in a well lit.
populated area.
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7 Tussdiy, March 30. 1999
features
Tk� Eait Carolinian
la East Carolinian
Ul&1.
An officer will then
� information about
:ar. They will then
crime scene, look:
dence that may be
: reports are then
lefts and vandalism
n order to locate a
n in the crimes. A
ill be readily avail-
lin two or three days
ir insurance compa-
rmeier, a freshman
oke one morning by
from the Police
nforming her that
t someone attempt-
license plate.
police did a very
ivermeicr said, "but
o call at 5 a.m.?"
vations are being
eede Street parking
:he safety of parked
the spring break,
id cameras will be
arking lots and will
rhis particular reno-
�ease the availability
: used as weapons to
elds.
t a break-in, you
ock your doors. The
it if they want some-
ar, they are going to
the doors are locked
leave valuable items
it. This will only
ition level of for the
ike all valuables out
; if possible remove
four or cassette play-
where you park also
le in auto theft Be
our car in a well lit.
hS
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Internship
continued Irani paga 6
Klkins, senior.
Some internships are strictly
taken on as fun, but underhanded-
ly turn into work-related experi-
ence. Employment can range from
YWCA day camp or other summer
day camp counselors, assisting stu-
dents become some of the best
entertainers and teachers, respec-
tively.
"Summer camps usually have
our biggest demand for students
Cauley said.
Students interested in getting an
internship over the summer should
attend an informational Co-op
seminar to learn more about it,
complete an application, prepare a
resume and make an appointment
with the Co-op coordinator
assigned to their major.
Most deadlines for internships
are around mid-March, so those
seeking employment should try to
apply as soon as possible.
Applications for government posi-
tions are due even earlier in mid-
January.
As for what types of students
should apply for internship posi-
tions, the Co-op Department works
with any students with a minimum
2.0G.P.A
Co-op also has a good relation-
ship with regional businesses. A
student who is seeking an intern-
ship will be able to find out the
exact requirements for their job
and what their potential employer
is looking for by talking with Co-op
Department.
"We work a semester ahead
with students. Those looking for a
spring position should come to us
in the beginning of the fall semes-
ter, for example Cauley said.
To locate a list of summer
internships related to their major,
students should also visit the Co-op
department's web site at
www.ecu.educoophome.htm.
There you can perform a search
specific to the particular region, city
and major that you wish to work in.
Belize
coniinued liom page 6
through professors at the
University College of Belize,
which is located in Belize City.
"The university has very high
expectations for students. It is
based on the British school-sys-
tem and focuses on the whole per-
son, not just academics said
Vilma Joseph, lecturer in the
Department of English.
The fee for the program $1500,
plus instructional costs. Students
can expect to pay $2000 total,
which does not include spending
money.
After completing the courses
abroad, students will receive
transfer credit hours.
"Those who go should expect to
study in class, learn from the envi-
ronment, and take advantage of
opportunities McGowan said.
Participants in the Belize trip will
be housed with English-speaking
Belizean families. Included in the
program is a day-trip to a Mayan
village near Belize City. On the
weekends, a student could
snorkel, take a trip to the Cayes
(bay islands), investigate the rain
forests or take a trip to Guatemala.
An optional seven-day tour will be
available at an additional cost. It
will include a stay in a Mayan vil-
lage and visits to villages populat-
ed by people of African descent
"Students should feel free to
explore the area and visit the
Mayan ruins and take a look at the
history of the region. It is all easi-
ly accessible Joseph said.
Belize itself contains a tropical cli-
mate, and the wet season occurs
from July to September. It is a
Central American country that
borders Guatemala and Mexico.
However, the country compares
more to the Caribbean islands
than Central America in its culture
and society.
"Everyone who has been in the
program was very positive about
it. Students applying for the pro-
gram should come with an open
mind and be flexible McGowan
said.
GROUP THERAPY"�
4 PEOPLE
4 SHOTS
1 PITCHER
1 LOW PRICE
SPORTS PAD
EVERY TUESDAY NIGHT
$
8 & 8-BALL POOL
TOURNAMENT
STARTS AT 10:30pm
CASH POT
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March 31, 1999
4:30 to 5:45
Mendenhall 221
It is important that all
organizations interested in
receiving funding attend.
Changes have been made to the
funding packet and will be
discussed at this workshop.
Questions? Contact the SGA office at 328-4726 or the SGA
treasurer at 328-4720.
BARRE,
Arlington Village �Greenville
756-6670
More Than a Dan
Brighten up your workout
with New Spring Arrivals!
Features
editor needed
for summer
�Must be creative,
responsible self-motivated,
and able to meet deadlines.
Also have good grammar &
editing skills.
� Apply at the second floor
of Student Publications
Last year, a new minor was created in "Murtidisciplinary Studies"
allowing declared majors who have completed 30 s.h. to design
their own minors under the direction of their major advisor.
Students interested in the "Great Books" that have shaped our
present cultures and civilizations can design a minor on this
theme.
Beginning in spring 2000, selected courses with an emphasis on
the great works of literature, philosophy, history, science, social
science � every discipline � will carry a special GB designation
in the course catalog. For fall 1999, interested students should
sign up for the first seminar, "An Introduction to the Great Books
CLAS2000 2W. gtatte tuUtmi
T-Th 11:00 -12:15 Distinguished Visiting Professor of Classic and Great Books
Brochures are available listing the specific requirements, contacts,
and courses that will regularly carry the GB designation when they
are offered. The program in Great Books plans to have a web page
up and running soon. In the meantime, send your e-mail or other
address to Professor Rand Evans at rbevans@aol.com to keep
informed of developments and courses to watch for.






A.J2St -mm
tiHX
Tkt Eist Carolinian
SDorts
Tuasdav. March 30. 1999 8
Pirates take theTield for spring practice
Football players
train for new season
Bl.AINK I) K vies
KKMOH �HIIK�
Even though flowers are blooming
and temperatures are rising, it's
never too early to dust off the hel-
mets and start tossing the old
pigskin at ECU.
The Pirate football team had
their first official practice of the
spring on March 25. The energy
level was high around the Pirate
camp and players eagerly took the
field for their first practice. The
team practice began at 3 p.m. and
continued throughout the after-
noon until about 6:30 p.m. ECU
football is allotted 15 practices dur-
ing the spring and head coach
Steve Logan is spreading out these
sessions over the period of one
month. The practices will run
throughout the remainder of March
and wrap up on April 24. The sea-
son of spring is often associated
with new beginnings and according
to Logan that is the theme of this
year's Pirate squad.
"The atmosphere is very upbeat
and the players have adopted a
theme of new beginnings Logan
said. "They are a very refreshing
and upbeat group of guys to work
with
The Pirates welcome new
defensive coordinator Tim Rose to
their camp this year. Much of this
first practice was devoted to Rose
and the new defensive alignment
for ECU. Rose comes to ECU by
way of Boston College most recent-
ly. The Pirates hope this new
defense and their strong passing
game will help to improve on their
6-5 (i-i) record from last season.
"We focused on the installation
of our new defensive scheme
Logan said. "We are also going to
spend lots of time on our passing
game. Today was mostly installa-
tion and being the first day the exe-
cution was lacking, but you have to
start somewhere
The Pirate football camp has
been busy during the off-season
with players hitting the weight-
room and the excitement of the
new signees for fall. However, for
some ECU players the off-season
has been a little too lengthy.
According to David Garrard, start-
ing quarterback for the Pirates, he
was very happy to be back on the
field.
See Football page 9
Pirates take on Wake Forest
Salargo, Fulcher break
records in JMU sweep
I'M I
SKMII
K i'i. w
The No. 26 ECU Pirates baseball
team will be taking on the No. 24
Wake Forest Demon Deacons 7
p.m.uonight at I larrington Field in
what is expected to be the first sell-
out game of the season.
The 24-5 Pirates arc looking to
extend their
10 game win-
ning streak
against a for-
midable 19-6
Wake Forest
team who
look to add to
a five game
winning
streak.
W a k c
Forest will be
coming off of
their first
three game
sweep over
C I e m s o n
since 1952.
John Palmieri
should be a
man the
Pirates need
to look out for
as he is listed
with one of
the highest
batting aver-
ages in the
nation at .444
and also listed
among the
best in the country with 29 doubles.
Wake Forest's overall team ERA is
also listed as one of the foremost in
the nation at 3.97. The last time the
Pirates went against the Demon
Deacons they took the victory 3-2
at Wake Forest.
The Pirates are going into the
game with momentum from their
first three conference games of the
season last weekend, which led to a
three game sweep over James
Madison University putting them
atop the CAA bracket. Last week-
end's play was highlighted by a 16-
"We knew that to win the game
we were going to have to have
a solid offensive effort and
score a lot of runs
Keith LeClair
tail coach
15 nail-biter on Sunday where the
Pirates compiled a season-high 19
hits and rallied from both 6-1 and 8-
4 deficits.
Last Weekends winning pitchers
Friday: ECU 6, JMU 5
Brooks Jemigan (6-1) got the win in 8 innings
Kevyn Fulcher got the save, his&ighth and
a new ECU Single-Season record and career
record for saves.
Saturday: ECU 11, JMU 2
Travis Thompson (6-1) winner in 7 innings
Sunday: ECU 16, JMU 15
Cory Scott (1-0) was the winner after pitching
2 innings.
Kevyn Fulcher got the save his ninth
"We knew that to win the game
we were going to have to have a
solid offensive effort and score a lot
of runs said Keith LeClair, head
coach. "That was no secret. But we
swung the bats well Sunday and
got some big hits when we needed
them. The biggest thing was that
we countered every big inning they
had
With Steve Salargo's third hit in
Sunday's game he broke Randy
Rigsby's ECU all-time career hit
mark with 247 hits.
"The records are nice, but that's
not our main goal Salargo said.
"The senior class has not been to a
Regional and that, and Omaha, are
our main goals. Anything that hap-
pens along the way is nice, but the
team goal � reaching Omaha � is
the main focus for all of us
Kevyn Fulcher picked up the
save and Cory Scott took the win,
pitching 2.2 innings while giving
up only two hits and two unearned
runs with two Ks. Salargo lead the
way from the plate going 4-6 with
four runs and four RBI's. Lee
Delfino finished 3-5 with four RBIs
and John Williamson finished 3-5
with two RBIs.
On Friday
Brooks Jemigan
took the win as
he pitched 8.0
inning allowing
seven hits and
only one earned
run with one
walk and six Ks.
Kevyn
Fulcher set a
new ECU sin-
gle season
record and
career record for
saves with his
sixth save of the
season and his
eighth of his
career as he
went 1.0 inning
allowing one
run and striking
out one. Steve
Salargo went 2-3
with two RBIs
and Nick
Schnabel went
2-2 with two
doubles and a
run to lead the
Pirates.
"Fulcher did a good job. He
went out like he has all year and
settled in nicely and did a solid
job said LeClair in a post-game
interview.
"Fulcher did a good job too. I le
got two quick outs and got in a lit-
tle bind when they scratched out a
couple hits and a run. But he made
a couple big pitches when he need-
ed them and got us through
SEE BASEBALL PAGE 9
On March 25, ECU'S football team started its spring practice to get ready for the upcoming season
PHOTO By MIKE JACOBSEN
Campbell leads Golfers
Senior leadership
impacts team
III. M K 1)1 II S
S I I (I K W It I It. K
ECU senior Scott Campbell does
not consider himself a flashy player
or a super-star athlete, but this
Pirate golfer is lighting up the
course and giving his team a bright
future.
The spring of 1999 has been the
most successful season for
Campbell since joining the ECU
golf team as a freshman in 1996.
Campbell's most impressive feat of
the spring was at the Pepsi
Intercollegiate tournament (March
19-20) in Greenville when he
crushed the competition and the
ECU school record for the lowest
score in a tournament while captur-
ing his first individual title.
Campbell's statistics at ECU
speak for themselves and prove
why he has had such an impact on
this year's talented Pirate team. He
finished the '99 fall season with a
stroke average of 73.5 and was first
on the team with a putting average
of 29.86. After playing in only two
events his freshman and sopho-
more years, Campbell caught fire
his junior year. During this time he
participated in six of the eight
spring events and carded a team
best 219 at the CAA Championship
to tie for fourth place overall. Most
would assume an athlete would
dedicate hours of practice time to
accomplish these impressive
marks, but Campbell sees things a
little differently from most people.
"I'm not much on practicing like
a lot of guys are Campbell said.
"I'm not the type of guy to go out
on the range and beat balls for
hours.
"I get fired up for tournaments,
but not to practice. After a long day
at school, just playing with the
same old guys, it's hard to get fired
up for that
When the tournaments do
come, (lampbell has no trouble get-
ting enthusiastic. I le has participat-
ed in all the team events this spring
and led his team to three top 10 fin-
ishes. The ECU' golf team is on the
way to having its best season in
years and Campbell hopes to lead
his team toward this goal. As long as
Campbell does not let his practice
round scores replace his tourna-
and he has really come on strong in
the last year
Golf is a tradition in the
Campbell family. Campbell's father
is an avid golfer who shared the
game with his son at a very young
age. Campbell played both base-
ball and golf during his youth, but
dropped baseball at around the age
of 15 to pursue his golf career full-
time. His dedication as a youngster
led him to great success during his
years at Lee Davis High School in
his hometown of Mechanisville, Va.
Campbell won three Capital
District titles as the Confederates'
top player all four years of his high
Scott Campbell
Senior
I lometown: Mechanicsville Va.
High School: I.es Davis
Major: A.S.I.P.
ment scores, this year's team shows
great potential.
"It's a big joke on the team
because I don't think I have ever
broken 80 during a practice round
Campbell said. "It's hard for me to
go out there and play for no reason,
but once the I get in the tourna-
ment I bear down
These practice round scores
would seem to put his teammates
in a panic, but according to
Campbell his fellow golfers trust
that he will improve and show his
true colors when the competition
really heats up. Shane Robinson, a
junior on the Pirate golf team,
believes that Campbell has the
ability to play his best whenever he
has to and the pressure is high.
"He Campbell knows when to
turn it up Robinson said. "It's like
a switch he can turn on and his
game goes from average to great.
"There's a big heart in that body
Senior Scott Campbell putts the golf ball
during an afternoon practice.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU SPORTS INFORMATION DEPT
school career.
"It was kind of a family thing
because my dad played and he got
me involved Campbell said. T
just like playing, and it was some-
thing to do over the summers. My
dad has been watching me play
SEE GOLF PAGE 9
Lady Pirates buzz through Atlanta
Softball splits pair at
Georga Tech
JK.W V, WllAKTON
VI UE H IITEI
Pirate Softball battled out two wins
at the Georgia Tech Buzz Classic in
Atlanta over the weekend and
dropped two games against tough
competition.
The Pirates started off the
weekend with a loss to Florida
Atlantic 3-2.
An early 1-0 lead for the Pirates
was not enough to hold the win
against FAU. ECU fell behind in
the fourth inning due to errors.
The FAU lead advanced to 3-1.
Freshman Eva Herron lead the
Pirates in batting going 2-for-3.
"We know we can play against
some top ranked teams Herron
said. "We were in a tough pool of
competition
Later ECU bounced back to
pull out their first win of the tour-
nament beating Georgia State 4-3
in eight innings.
"We played against some top
teams said Angela Manzo, fresh-
man pitcher. "We had solid defense
and some of the best pitching so far
this season
The win was attributed to junior
shortstop Marnic Ousler's RBIs at
the bottom of the first that sent
Keisha Shepperson honie. Herron
drove Isonette Polonius home to
set the score at 3-2 Pirates.
"We played solidly Herron
said. "We hit really well
Lisa Paganini helped the Pirates
on the mound with six strikeouts of
GSU batters. Denise Reagan also
managed to notch two strikeouts to
keep GSU scoreless at the top of
the eighth.
Freshman Beth Bridger sent
Jessica Critcher home with a sacri-
fice fly for the ECU victory.
"We came in as the underdog
but hung in there Bridger said.
Reagan improved her record on
the mound to 17-5 on the season.
"Denise threw really well
I lerron said.
This weekend's games put the
Pirates 23-12 on the season. Up
next for the Pirates is a double-
header against Elon on March 31
Greenville.
9 Tuesday, March !
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1999 8
��-
9 Tuesday. March 30. 1999
s
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(bell's father
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i March 31
s
Don't forget our
BL
� � I
DRIVE
Baptist Student Union
511 E. 10th Street
Wednesday,
March 31, 1999
2:00 - 6:00 PM

American Red Cross
Sponsored by:
Campus Ministry
Association
WMB
Now, and all throughout the month of April win
ThisJrVeek - tickets for GOO GOO
Marilyn Ma
Plan is as ea5v as turning on your radio! Ji
our studio located in the basement of Mendenhall, or stop by I
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Listen to WZMB 91etwcen tjgpiurs of b AM & b PM when we will be calling
out one number per hotfcget jfpfelE and Win! Just bring your winning card into
the studio and clailpFprize. Remember, only listeners can win
HIGH MARKS FROft
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We take a lot of pride in gaining
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HibiM to nruin nlu includinf the pouibit low of principal I .� "
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nv�tn�nr if. ��turiiin such u i�utu�l fund .nd vtmblt .mu,t�. u
Baseball
cominued I ram" page 8
In Saturday's victory the Pirates
toppled JMU 11-2 as Travis
Thompson took the win while
pitching 7.0 innings, allowing just
one earned run. Erik Bakich and
Schnabel each, went 3-4 with a pair
of RBis on the day
and James Molinari finished 2-2
with two RBIs two walks and four
runs.
"I thought we swung the bats
well (Saturday and did a good job
moving runners ahead We were
more aggressive at the plate, proba-
bly hitting the ball the best we have
in a couple weeks LeClair said.
Golf
Football
"We just wanted to come out
and have a good practice Garrard
said. "It seems like forever since we
have been out here and we needed
to work out the rust and get ready
for the spring
Defensive coordinator Rose was
not the only individual facing a new
job on the field during this first
practice. With the graduation of
many senior Pirate starters, some
team members are having to step
up and take new and bigger roles on
this year's team. According to
sophomore nose guard Mbayo
Ahmadu, the first practice allowed
coaches to observe how the players
will react to their new positions and
to the new defense.
"Being in a starting position is
new to me and I want to do my best
personally Ahmadu said. "I also
want to help out the younger guys
and give them the knowledge I
gained over the past three years
Pirate all-star linebacker Jeff
Kerr will be returning for his senior
year this fall. Kerr believes these
first spring practices are key to the
Pirate team, but that every practice
should be given the same emphasis.
"You have to practice every prac-
tice like it's your last Kerr said. "If
you slack on one, then you get
nothing out of it. I expect us to win,
not to lose. I expect a lot out of us
and look forward to big things
After the excitement of the
spring practices and the heat of
summer camp, the '99 Pirate foot-
ball team faces one of the toughest
schedules in the history of the pro-
gram. This fall's home schedule is
especially impressive, including the
opener against the Blue Devils of
Duke on September 11. The most
anticipated game of the fall is
against the Wolfpack of N.C. State
who will be making their first
appearance on the Pirates home
turf.
"This is the toughest schedule
since I have been here Logan
said. "We are really going to have to
step it up, but I believe we can
win
The Pirates vill hold their first
official scrimmage on March 31.
The spring practices will continue
throughout March and April with
ECU's popular Pirate Pigskin Pig-
out Scrimmage set for April 17.
c.ntimit: frwn Ml �
since I was 8 years old, and he was
more excited when I won the
Pepsi tournament than I was
Head golf coach Kevin Williams
has watched Campbell's game
grow and mature. Williams
describes Campbell as a fighter
and a scrapper who has improved
greatly because of the tough com-
petition here at ECU. As
Campbell completes his final sea-
son at ECU this spring, Williams
says he will always remember
Campbell as a smart player who
approached the game a lot like his
coach does.
"He understands what the
name of the game is Williams
said. "It doesn't matter how it
looks, just get it done. Scott does-
n't hesitate to do what he has to do
to get the job done
Campbell still has many goals
for this season and his career here
at ECU, but he often looks toward
the future. After graduation,
Campbell hopes to enter and play
successfully in the N.C. and U.S.
Amateur tournaments but shows
no interest in the professional
ranks of the PGA.
"Playing where you have to-
make money I think would bum
me out Campbell said. "I'd
rather get a decent job and just
play for fun
Nothing to do it fur apartments.
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Campus Living Prize Patrol
Invades ECU March 31.
You could be a sweepstakes star!
m
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So, be sure to be in class tomorrow. It could be
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11 Tuesday. Mirch 30, 1889
classifieds
Tht East CtrsbniM
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE WANTED
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
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DUPLEX 2 BR, 1 bath, heat pump,
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close to campus, no pets. $430.
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Available immediately!
TOWNHOUSE8 NEAR ECU, 3 or 4
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WD hook-up, lots of storage, spa-
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ROOMMATE WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED, MF to
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FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
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$75 with small office chair thrown
in. Perfect for studying, possible
price negotiation. 752-5899. leave
message.
THREE BURTON snowboards for
sale: one new. two used, with bind-
ings; also Beanie Babies, old and
new. over one hundred to choose
from. Call Shaun at 353-1581.
1992 ISUZU Pickup. 51.000 miles.
one owner. $3700 OBO. 363-1667.
LAPTOP COMPUTER- Toshiba 435
CDS. $800. Call 758-9640 and leave
a message.
HELP WANTED
PART-TIME testing administrator
needed to answer phone, schedule
tests, etc. Must be a positive, ma-
ture, hard-working individual. Possi-
ble hours Monday-Thursday 2-6 p.m.
and Saturdays 8 a.m2 p.m. Pick up
application at Sylvan Learning Cen-
ter. 2428 S. Charles Blvd.
POOL MANAGERS and Lifeguards
with great people skills needed for
the summer of 1999 in the Triangle
area. Additional offices in the Balti-
more, Richmond, Philadelphia, DC,
Atlanta, NJ, and Nashville areas.
Please contact Lisa at 919-878-3661.
AUTISM SOCIETY of NC seeks in-
terested students to be Camp Coun-
selors for summer residential camp.
Internship credit possible. Needed
May 24-August 6. Contact David Yell
@ 919-542-1033; dyellGautismsocie-
ty-nc.org.
EARN GOOD money and learn at
the same time with an internship in
the financial services industry. Fax
your resume to Jeff Mahoney at 355-
7980 or call 355-7700.
EASTERN CAROLINA'S finest
adult entertainment is now hiring.
Call for interview, Playmates, 252-
747-7686.
Work Outdoors I
Want Honest, Reliable Students
Wdopondable truckcar
TO MONITOR COTTON
(No experience necessary)
$7.00hr. mileage
mallfax resume
MCSI-Box 370
Cove City, NC 28523
Fax: 252-637-2125
(Nr. Greenville, New Bern, Kinstcyi)
WANTED: PAYING $6.60 an hour
plus bonuses for qualified telemar-
keters. No Friday or Saturday work.
Hours: 6:30-9 p.m. Monday-Thurs-
day. 4:30-8 p.m. Sunday. Apply in
person between 6-6 p.m. at Energy
Savers Windows �r Siding, Inc
1806 Dickinson Ave Greenville, at
the side door.
UFEGUARDS AND beach vendors
needed in North Myrtle Beach for
1999 season. Will train. Housing pro-
vided if needed. For information call
843-272-3269.
LITTLE CAESAR'S Pizza is looking
for Assistant Managers. Call 757-
1212, ask for William, to set up an
appointment.
Q
!
Wdmmtm o
m Em Cafrtnuw C
t
NEEDED. CYPRESS Glen Retire-
ment Community. 11:00a.m1:30
p.m. Flexible work schedule. Contact
Jim Sakell at 830-0713 for more in-
formation.
NEEDED: SOFTBALL officials for
Greenville Recreation & Parks De-
partment Adult Spring Softball
League. Clinics will be held to train
new and experienced officials. How-
ever, a basic knowledge and under-
standing of the game is necessary. A
training meeting will be held Wed-
nesday. March 31 at 7:30 p.m. Soft-
ball season will run from May thru
August. For more information.
please call 328-4660 after 2 p.m.
$7.00 PER hour plus $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina. (Nags Head). Call
Dona for application and housing
info 800-662-2122.
EXOTIC DANCERS $1000-$ 1500
weekly, no experience needed. 919-
580-7084. Sid's Showgirls, Gold-
sboro.
BIG SPLATT Paintball Park needs
weekend cashiers. Contact Patrick
Carroll or Chris Burns at 561-8448
or leave message.
EARN EXTRA cash Make your
own hours!) Responsible students to
marketmanage Citibank promo-
tions on campus. Free giveaways!
Earn $40Oweek. Call Ann at 1-
800-9503472.
NEED SUMMER help at Hatteras
Beach. Free housing. Need two
males or females for retail seafood
market. Bonus offered. Call 252-986-
2215 or e-mail riskybSinterpath.com
FRATERNITIES. SORORITIES &
Student Groups: Earn $1000-52000
with easy 3 hour CIS Fund Raiser
event. No sales required. Fund
Raiser days are filling up, so call
today. Contact Chris 800-829-4777.
HIRING: ADULT entertainers and
dancers. Must be at least 18. have
own phone, transportation and be
drug free. Make up to $1500 week-
ly. For interview, call 758-2737.
NEED A JOB?
LOOK IN
THE CLASSIFIEDS.
A
Summer Camp
COUNSELORS & INSTRUCTORS
for private Co-ed youth camp
located in tie bsauau moumahs of
Western NorthCardna. Ovar25
acWfes, Including All sports, water
skii ng .heated pod, tons, art, hcrss-
backGoterts. 615to816eam
$1350-$175O plus room, meals,
laundry & great fun! Non-smokers
call for applicationbrochure:
800-832-5539 or e-mail
CPPinewoodGaol.com anytime!
RPS
1X1
FREE RADIO $1260. Fundraiser
open to student groups ft organiza-
tions. Earn $3-$5 per VisaMC app.
We supply all materials at no cost.
Call for info or visit our website.
Qualified callers receive a Free Baby
Boom Box. 1-800-932-0628 x 65.
www.ocmconcepts.com
PERSONALS
NEED A ride. Going to Brunswick,
GA. leaving Fri. morning April 2.
coming back Sun. April 4. Call Sue �
UBE. 758-2616.
GREEK PERSONALS
CONGRATULATIONS TO Quita
Valentine on your engagement to
Matt. Wa are so happy for you! Love,
your Delta Zeta sisters
CONGRATULATIONS CHI Omega
basketball team, intramural champs.
Way to go!
TO THE big sis' of Delta Zeta. thank
you for all the wonderful things you
did for us last week and for our lava-
liers! We love you guys. Love, your
little sis'
SIGMA PI- The Hawaiian Social was
such a blast, but we're sad to say it
went too fast. The limbo contest was
tons of fun and we're looking for-
ward to another one. Love, Alpha Phi
CONGRATS, CAREY Craig on your
acceptance into Grad School at ECU.
Love, your Chi Omega sisters
MERI H Leslie P Amy D Dana G
Congratulations on your internships.
We know you will do a great job! We
wish you luck! Love, your Chi Omega
sisters
TO THE brothers of Phi Kappa Tau,
thank you for the social Thursday
night. Everyone had a great time as
usual! Love, the sisters and new
members of Delta Zeta
OTHER
WEIMARANER FREE to good
home. I have a dog that needs a
good home with a yard. He's house
broken and well trained. Christy,
757-1467.
SUBLEASE 2 bdrm 2 bath King-
ston Cond. available now. March
rent paid. 919-751-9481.
LOST: 3 silver rings attached to
wristband of a watch. The rings are
very important to me. Lost in or ar-
ound the library. There will be a re-
ward for the happiness you would
bring me for their return! If found.
call Carrie, 931-9004.
KITTENS FREE to a good home.
Call 353-2932 ASAP.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
$500 SCHOLARSHIP for women
attending ECU or PCC. Recipients
will be selected on the basis of com-
munity involvement, volunteer com-
mitment, participation in and leader-
ship roles in school, church, civic or
professional organizations. Must be
a Pitt County resident. Deadline for
application is April 15. Sponsored by
The Kiwanis Club of Greater Green-
ville. Contact the Financial Aid Office
for applications.
SADD WILL be meeting on Wed
March 31 at 6:30 p.m. in GC 1001. If
you have any questions, feel free to
contact Doug at 8931. We need eve-
ryone who can come to please at-
tend. Thanks
Want to have fun and make money?
Raleigh Parks and Recreation has over 2,000 summer job opportunities for
camp counselors, camp directors, lifeguards, aquatic management, parks
maintenance, amusement ride operators, corporate leisure services and more.
For information and an application call (9WJ890-3285 or visit our website at
www.rafeigh-nc.orgparksyrecindex.htm
NEWMAN CATHOLIC Student
Center wishes to announce the fol-
lowing Holy Week and Easter Servic-
es. Holy Thursday Services (April 1 )-
8 a.m Holy Thursday Mass at the
Newman Center 7:30 p.m Holy
Thursday Mass at St. Peter's Church.
Good Friday Services (April 2:
12:16-Outdoor Stations of the Cross
at St. Peters. 7:30 p.mGood Friday
Advertise in
The East
Carolinian
classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE$4.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 5$ each
STUDENT UNE AD RATE$2.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 5C each
Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to refuse fhis rate for any ad deemed to be
non-student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE .$1.00
add to above line rate for either BOLD or
ALL CAPS type.
.All classified ads placed by individuals or campus
groups must be prepaid. Classified ads placed by a
business must be prepaid unless credit has been
established. Cancelled ads can be removed from the
paper if notification is made before the deadline, but
no cash refunds are given. No proofs or tearsheets
are available. The Personals section of the classi-
fieds is intended for non-commercial communication
placed by individuals or campus groups. Business
ads will not be placed in this section.
All Personals are subject to editing for indecent or �
inflammatory language as determined by the edi-
tors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE
4 p.rrTFRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue
we want
recover
you
Did you see news happen?
Did you make news happen?
Do you belong between our covers?
Call eastcarolinian at 328-6366.
t





k giwrfKty �UNCf at what ha??nxn$ with TMf pivmion or ffUPfnt ttff
t,
�i;
i share this experience wrtau,
�rfHtfuateerin
vere all interested in the same goals.
Hftoarevfes fortunate than we are. �$
our first day on Monday voluttBDering at the Atlanta
was a shelter that provideft�Bjkss men arrgpportunity
hgiBfiU daily lives, mainltlBbalcohol and drug
: kitchft serving lunch to the
Jkclfeiffthestredt It "
a great way to Start off the i
Community Food Bank, the third largest food bank in the
supplies food to over 750 rtp�fo organizations with meal
ked food at bej�tribuf.ed to tleseTMganizations. When we were
: equivalent 6,00ffffis worth of food, enough to supply over 3,000
�Pger 101" where we learrled statistics and facts about
gl badBdjygkh poverty in Atlanta.
d at the Ansley Pavilion Mursing Home. The Home provides
indigent rail elderly. Approximately 13 of the residents living there have
; really learned at from the people at the home. Since it was St Patrick's
the residents a party and join in a game Bingo. It was sad to say good-bye
?ent at Wonderland Gardens, a non-profit group that provides a variety of
i Atlanta commjinity targeting seniors, inner-city youth, at-risk youth and
cs through therapeutic gardening. We helped with some of the
separation of the garden plots. It was a beautiful day and we all enjoyed
s preparing plots that would produce over 1,000 lbs of vegetables.
� volunteering was spent at the Atlanta Children's Shelter. The shelter maintains a
less children, and supports their families by providing social service resources
MirUM) housing and coping with the unique issues of homelessness. The
ided for free so that the families can focus on getting jobs and getting back on
linteering wc had time to take in several attractions in and around Atlanta,
i the opportunity to visit the Coke Museum, the CNN senter, the Atlanta
Centennial Park, and go see an NBA basketball game. Topping our week off
to Six Flags over Georgia on Saturday.
i to dedicating my Spring Break to helping others, I learned a lot about myself and
as interests. faknow this week has changed my life and those around me forever. I am
adj looking forwawl to going On Alternative Spring Break next year. I am also looking
Kko doing more volunteer work here in Greenville and back at home. If this sounds
isting til you, get involved with Alternative Spring Break at ECU. It is an experience
that will last a lifetime.
Top Ten Industries with the Fastei
ployment Growth, 1996-2006
a processing services
slic relations
�atfm ser '
i social se
?nl
As campus life runs along each day,
photographers will be out and about to
capture us, the students, at our best. If
you can identify yourself in any of our
pictures, present yourself to MSC 109 (Student Leadership)
and point "you" out to the staff there. Rewards will be on
hand for your efforts, so keep a close eye on these pictures!
Bine
tnln never
I was sitting in my residence hall room earlier today, and I had an amazing revHttU
You know, eventually my college fund is goingijjPpOut. That means I'm going to
have to get a JOB aghhhhhhh! Just then my roommate walked in. After calming tm
down rram my shock of reality, he gaff me some really sound advice. For those students
who are focusing on their next BIG step, Career Services may be helpful in a variety of 4
ways. Thcyare able to help everyone, from freshmen to Alumni.
There are two programs specially set aside for first-year students, sophomores, and
juniors: �
� Exploring Careers programs are offered every Wednesday at 4:00 P.fc .to help students
best select a major, or learn how to check out possible careers. r"
� You may also sign up for "SIGI" which helps you understand your dfeer options. This
is a computer program, which gives a list of several questions about yourself and your
future plans. It then proceeds to give you a list of careers that best suit you. You may
also search for careers by major.
Other programs are available for all students. They are as follows:
� ClubClass Presentations and Resource Room Tours
� Resume Preparation Workshops
� Help for Better Interviews Workshops
� Dining Etiquette (How to Put Your Best Fork Forward)
� Using the Internet for Job Searching Workshops
� General Job Search Strategies Workshops
Now I know all of this sounds like administrative mumbo-jumbo, but you should stop for
a moment and consider these programs. Qualified people put their time and effort into
these programs for your benefit, not theirs. The least you could do is try to help
yourself. I think you'll find that you will be very pleased with the outcomes. I sure was.
Are you graduating in May or summer of 1999? Be sure you have registered by attending
a Connections session. They are offered on Mondays at 4:00 P.M. in Room 103- Career
Services Building, the big white house on 5th Street. Sessions on the other days of the
week are offered to accommodate schedules! So now that I have that crisis under control,
I face the next. Where am I going to eat? You may also check out the Career Services
Home Page: http:www.ecu.educareer Under Career and Occupational Information
Button, check out MACES if you would like to find out more
about jobs or different majors.
The Top Ten Occupations with the Fastest
Employment Growth, 1996-2006
1. Database administrators, computer support specialists, and all other computer scientists
2. Computer engineers
3. Systems analysts
4. Personal and home care aides
5. Physical and corrective therapy assistants and aides
6. Home health aides
7. Medical assistants
8. Desktop publishing specialists
9. Physical therapists
10. Occupational therapy assistants and aides

These statistics ate from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Find more information on line at
http:stats.bls.gov

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Title
The East Carolinian, March 30, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 30, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1319
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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