The East Carolinian, March 25, 1999







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Would you vote for
Elizabeth Dole for President
in 2000?
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ECNAO plans tow Wow fcr March 27
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www.tec.ecu.edu
THURSDAY. MARCH 25.1999 VOLUME 74. ISSUE 34
Itudent reports assault
at Rineeold
Suspect lives in same
as victim
Amy Wagner
assistant news editor
According to a police report, while
many ECU students were leaving
for spring break a woman was
allegedly held hostage and sexual-
ly assaulted by a neighbor in her
Ringgold Towers home.
Between 1-4 p.m. on March 12,
Micheal Shea Dorsey, 22, held a
Woman against her will with a knife
for over two hours, sexually assault-
ed her and attempted to rape her,
according to police reports.
Ringgold Towers is an apartment
building located on Cotanche
Street in front of the Student
Recreation Center. Dorsey lives in
apartment 122, and the victim lives
next door.
Ringgold Towers was the site of an
assault
PHOTO BV SARAH CHRISTIE
Representatives from Ringgold
Towers would not comment on
the assault, but did say that they
feel the apartment building is a
safe place to live, and this is the
first violent crime to happen in the
building since the apartments'
opening 14 years ago.
A relative of the woman arrived
and scared off Dorsey before call-
ing police, according to a police
SEE RINGGOLD PAGE 2
B-GLAD celebrates
annual Pride Week
Special performances,
days, picnic planned
R a (; ll A K i. H Hi n o n
STAFF WRITER
Bisexuals, (Jays, Lesbians, and
Allies for Diversity will celebrate
their fifth annual Pride Week in an
attempt to increase awareness and
open minds on campus.
The week will kick off on March
28, at 7 p.m. with a performance by
alternative Asian-American artist
Magdalen Hsu-Li at the Paddock
Club. Hsu-Li is a native of Seattle,
Washington whose sound is
described as "Chic Pop She is an
ally who performed this year at the
Downeast Pride Festival. Other
events in which students can partic-
ipate include Blue Jeans Day, which
4jill be Wednesday, March 31, and
the annual Pride Picnic which will
be held on the brickyard Thursday,
April 1. Other events, centered
around awareness, will include
"Out at the Movies" a film festival
focused on gays and lesbians and a
"Socially Queer" gay, lesbian, and
bisexual trivia session.
This is the club's fifth year at
ECU, and its members say Pride
Week is their chance to celebrate
their diversity and to be "out"
among the campus community.
"Personally I feel it is important
to have Pride Week because there
are a lot of people in the world who
are different and it is good to take
time and celebrate diversity said
Nicole Underwood, coordinator of
Pride Week and two-year B-GLAD
member.
' B-GLAD's mission is to give its
members a chance to become com-
fortable with their sexuality and to
have an open forum for discussion.
There are over twenty active mem-
bers and over one-hundred stu-
dents included on B-GLAD's email
list.
"Pride Week is good because it
exposes the campus to an alterna-
a
tive lifestyle said Junior B-
GLAD treasurer Craig Garner.
But, some members say they
have come to realize that discrimi-
nation and ignorance is common.
"There is always a strong
chance that we will receive back-
lash, but it only shows narrow-
mindedness Garner said.
Incidents of harassment and
tearing down of the Pride flag have
occurred at ECU.
"We don't accept, we expect
backlash Underwood said.
However B-GLAD President
John Holden feels that the campus
climate has remained stable over
the past five years and tends to be
one of support and understanding.
"The administration and other
student organizations have been a
great support Holden said. "It is
just a matter of time before every-
one understands that we are all the
same, we take tests and cram for
exams just like everyone else
Holden feels that homosexuals
on campus need to be "out"
because it is harder to hate or judge
someone with whom you have no
contact with. Day to day interac-
tion, according to Holden, is the
way to understanding.
"The only way the campus will
get better is through support of
minority groups Garner said.
Other upcoming events include
the National Day of Silence on
April 7, a day in which students par-
ticipating will not speak to signify
the lack of voices gays and lesbians
have both socially and politically.
Also, on April 27, critically
acclaimed film Dear Jessi will be
shown in Hcndrix. The author of
the film, which centers around a gay
man living in North Carolina and
the letter he writes to Senator Jesse
Helrns, will be present to give an
introduction.
"We want the campus to know
that B-GLAD is not going any-
where Holden said. "It is time to
stop tearing people down and start
building each other up

Muehlt Wmah
Month focuses on important
contributions of women
Terra S t ein b eis e r
STAFF WRITER
Women nation-wide are cele-
brating the rich history and
legacy of women's history
month through explorations of
the numerous women whose contribu-
tions have changed, enriched and bet-
tered lives.
The month of March was chosen to cele-
brate women's achievements because it
was in this month in the early 1900s that
a group of young female strikers were
attacked by police. The anniversary of
the assault was made into an internation-
al holiday recognized by feminists world-
wide. The initial organized celebrations
of women's history in the 1970s were
only a week long, but after extensive
petitioning by women's advocate groups,
the celebration was expanded to the
entire month of March in 1987. Each
year since programs in schools, commu-
nities and universities have grown to
accommodate the new interest in
women's history.
"It's important that women's history is
learncdJbauLuse jt is left out so much
said Women's Studies minor Megan
Dullaghan. "It's really something that
can't be neglected anymore
Women's History Month was created
some time after Black History Month
even though the two have common ori-
gins in activist movements. Many of the
early suffragists and women's rights lead-
ers were drawn into the movement by
way of the abolitionist cause; in the fight
to end slavery many became more aware
of their own lack of rights.
After women secured the right to vote,
many former suffragists became active in " '
other reform movements such as birth
control, workplace safety, fair labor standards, and pure-food-and-drug
legislation. In the 1960s and 1970s a new emphasis on women's rights
Quotes From Influential Women
"I think in terms of a woman as president. There are women in the pipeline who are prepared and ready
-Elizabeth Dole, possible Republican presidential candidate
"In politics, if you want anything said, ask a man; if you want anything done, ask a woman
-Margaret Thatcher, former prime minister of Great Britain
"Most women have two jobs, and we're the only democratic society without a national child-care system.
So the problem now Is killing off this ideal of the superwoman
-Gloria Steim
Clockwise from top left: India Ghandi, Antonia Novello, Jane Austin, Zora Neale Hurston, Sandra Day O'Connor,
Flossie Wong-Staal, Coretta Scott King, and Sally Ride
DIGITAL ENHANCEMENT .
and history was again brought to the forefront.
"No one was studying or talking about women's history until there
was a revived social movement for women's rights said Dr.
Lilian Robinson
More and more universities are accommodating the push to
provide courses that focus on women's issues. ECU has a
Women's Studies Program offers a B.A major in addition to
graduate and undergraduate minors. There are a variety of
classes offered in different departments that focus on
women's issues as well.
In addition to classes, the program offers other opportuni-
ut its woman.
a first women p
rland
mm
SEE WOMEN PAGE 2
Campus professors, students speak
about Dole's possible presidential bid
Many support native
North Carolinian
f$
Erik Tschekunow
NTiWS WRITKR
The arrival of a j�ew rjriiljennium
could signify a pibffeering hew role
for women in politics.
On Wednesday, March 10,
Elizabeth Hanford Dole took cen-
ter stage at a rally in Iowa where she
officially announced the creation of
her presidential exploratory com-
mittee. �
"I am not a seat warmer Dole
said of the number of high-level
positions she has held both in and
out of Washington.
Most recently Dole was the
president of the American Red
Cross. She resigned on Jan. 15 in
order to consider the nation's presi-
dency. She has also been a staff
member for five different presi-
dents, including cabinet positions
with both Reagan and Bush.
Moreover, Dole was an active
and influential campaigner for her
husband Bob Dole as he challenged
President Clinton's second term in
the 19 election. Elizabeth Dole
insists, however, that she is "not a
politician and while the presiden-
cy intrigues her, she will always
place "service over politics
Despite her record of serving on
T
a humanitarian level, and her vast
experience in the political arena,
the 62-year-old Salisbury, N.C.
native has never seriously pursued
an elected office.
Elizabeth Dole
FIUMMT0
"I don't think her not having
served political office is a disadvan-
tage in terms of gaining votes from
the electorate or in terms of gaining
votes within the Republican Party
said Dr. Richard Kearney, chair of
the political science department at
ECU. "(Nomination) is definitely a
possibility
Many of Dole's leading support-
ers say that gender is not an issue
because of what they have seen of
her overall strength as an individual
and as a leader.
"I am supporting Elizabeth Dole
not because she is the most quali-
fied woman to become president
said Charlotte Mayor Pat McCrory,
one of North Carolina's most promi-
nent Dole supporters. "I am sup-
porting Elizabeth Dole because she
is the most qualified�period�to
- .
SEE00UPAGE2
I





2 ftwttoy. March 26. 1888
news
Thi Etlt Carolinian
Failed steam line forces residents to take a cold shower
University scrambles to
fixproblem quickly
Kristy Daniel
senior write�
Residence halls and campus build-
ings have been faced with the prob-
lem of limited hot water and heat
due to a steam line failing recently.
The line is a steam condensate
return line, that is a part of the
steam distribution system used to
heat buildings and water around
campus.
According to officials, last week
a leak was found in the line, and a
repair was made. At the time they
were unaware there was another
leak underground.
"The line failed because it is
very old and worn out said Dr.
George W. Harrcll, assistant vice
chancellor.
According to Harrcll, in efforts to
get as much steam to the residence
halls, they have rerouted some
steam and shut down the steam
that is used to heat the pool at the
recreation center.
As a result of shutting down the
steam to the pool, they have had to
Career Services web
site helps in job hunt
Internet job searches
grow in popularity
James Poe
STAFF WRITER
Put down your classifieds. Looking
for a job in the newspaper no longer
dominates the search for employ-
ment
Job sites have blown up on the
Internet giving loads of information
from the type of job to the benefits
a certain job will reap.
It's easy to get lost in the copi-
ous amounts of information the
internet can provide. But for ECU
students this is no longer a prob-
lem. Career Services has formatted
a website of their own that gives
students access to numerous job
sites. This is helpful because it
gives the person searching for a job
many major job sites all wrapped
up into one package.
"The online process to search
for jobs is continuing to grow and
we want ECU students to best
know how to use these sites said
James Westmoreland, Director of
Career Services.
The website address for Career
Services' home page is
www.ecu.educarecr. Here, you
will find job sites like Monster.com
or America's Job Bank. You can
type in a certain job, press enter,
and you will get insight on the lat-
est data pertaining to that kind of
position.
Another way to locate job site
listings is through the Employment
Security Commission website.
Here, you can access types of jobs
available in a specific state of the
K
women
continued from page 1
ties for students to keep abreast
of women's issues
"Last semester we ran a very suc-
cessful student-faculty forum on
the Starr ReportMonica
Lewinsky affair from feminist
perspectives Robinson said.
"I look forward to extending the
analytical and intellectual activi-
ties of Women's Studies beyond
the classroom through other pub-
lic events of this nature
Though the month's popularity is
spreading, and with the potential
nomination of a woman for presi-
dent tolerance also seems to be
increasing, there are those that
are concerned that the holiday
and it's message are not hitting
the people that need it the most
�school age children.
"One of my biggest concerns
about kids in grades K-12 are the
books in the school libraries said
Women's Studies senior and
mother Brenda Crouch. "Books in
libraries are outdated and stereo-
typed � those negative stereo-
types hurt both males and
females
"I think the main purpose of
U.S but the sites don't always give
you the name of the employer or
job benefits. First, you submit your
job qualifications online. Then, the
Employment Security Commission
sorts through to find the most eligi-
ble applicants for a desired job. If
you are eligible, they will call you
into the office to learn more about
the position.
Some job sites like
JobMonkey.com will give you spe-
cific information on a specific job
such as the name of the employer
and the wages and the benefits of
that opening.
"We are adding new information
to the website daily said Kevin
Lustgarten ofJobMonkey.com.
You might also want to check out
the Oudook Handbook, a site you
"We an adding new information
to the website daily
Kevin Lustgarten
JobMonkey.com
can reach through a link on the
Career Services homepage. This
resource can offer information on
the job responsibilities of certain
kinds of positions and recommend
contacts for further information.
Furthermore, most job sites offer
contacts such as phone numbers
and e-mail addresses as well.
Internships are included in job
sites too. For example, if you go to
the "Career Mosaic" website,
which can be found on Career
Services' home page, you will find
internships for employers like Walt
Disney World. Disney offers 7,500
internships from 150-plus campus-
es every year alone. According to
Disney representatives, at least 90
percent of the interns found out
about the opportunity online.
Women's History Month is to
remind people that women have
made a lot of progress over the
years, but we still have a long way
to go said junior Emily Schappe.
"In many places women are still
making less money than men for
shut down the pool.
"We have been working around
the dock and expected to have all
steam services restored by noon
Thursday Harrcll said.
According to students living in
residence halls, they feel they have
been the most affected.
This is not good. We have to
plan when to take our showers, so
we can get as much hot water as
possible said Holly Hall, sopho-
more nursing major. "We have only
been able to take warm showers
since we returned from Spring
break Sunday
According to Harrcll, the prob-
lem was unexpected and the uni-
Ringgold
continued from pigs 1
report.
Using a police dog, police found
Dorsey in the stairwell of the
building. He had a large knife in
his coat, which fell out when he
stood up.Dorsey is charged with
first-degree sexual offense,
attempted first-degree rape and
second-degree kidnapping. He
was taken to jail under a bond of
$250,000.
A police report said that Dorsey
used drugs and alcohol on the day
of the assault.
"In many places women an still
making less money than men for
doing the same job
Emily Schappe
Junior
doing the same job
At ECU, females make up to 37
percent of the faculty and earn an
average salary of $44,055. The
average salary of a male faculty
member is $51472, according to
Statistical Research
Assistam,Renee Jarvis. Also,
about 33 percent of male faculty
members an permanently
tenured while only 12 percent of
female faculty ate.
"I think that the bureaucracy, the
upper echelon is male and this is
reflecting that fact Crouch said.
i

versiry is trying to correct the prob-
lem as quickly as possible.We
"We an sorry for any inconvenience
this may have caused the campus
community
Or. George W. Harrell
Assistant Vice Chancellor
are very sorry for any incon-
vience this may have caused the
campus community Harrell
said.
Dole
continued from pagel
become president
Experts say while the fact that
Dole being female may remain a
factor in some people's minds, soci-
ety should be ready for such an
important step.
"She has the chance now
because the country is changing
and attitudes are changing said
Dr. Veronica Wong, ECU professor
of English and women's studies.
However, not everyone is so
optimistic.
"It would be great to have a
woman in office at a high position
like the presidency said Andrew
Riddle, president of the ECU
College Republicans. "It would be
good for the party and society.
Unfortunately, America today will
WORKERS TRY TO FIX THE FAILED STEAM LINE SO STUDENTS CAN TAKE HOT MOWERS
. PHOTO IT SARAH CHRISTIE
not allow a woman for president.
However, George. W. Bush is the
better candidate
In 1998, Dole was named by the
Gallup Poll among the world's top
three most admired women. Come
2000, she will more than likely
attempt to use this distinction along
with her valuable service experi-
ence and educational background
(Duke, Harvard Law) in order to
contend for the GOP nomination
and possibly the presidency�an
ultimate goal that would redirect
American political history.
Whether Dole makes history or
not, her presence is still redefining
political barriers. "The fact that her
candidacy is being so seriously con-
sidered is an important recognition
of the strengthening of women in
the electorate said Dr. Kearney.
The Presidential Primary begins
March of 2000 in New Hampshire.
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NATO secretary general
orders airstrikes against
Kosovo
Associated Press
BRUSSELS, Belgium (AP)
NATO Secretary-General Javier
Solana ordered airstrikes against
Yugoslavia on Tuesday, saying all
efforts to achieve a negotiated set-
tlement had failed. It was not
known when the operations would
begin. "All efforts to achieve a
negotiated, political solution to the
Kosovo crisis having failed, no alter-
native is open but to take military
action Solana told reporters in
Brussels, Belgium.
The decision came after a last-
ditch effort by special American
envoy Richard Holbrooke, who
conducted several hours of talks
with Yugoslav President Slobodan
Milosevic to no avail Monday night
and Tuesday.
Holbrooke flew from Belgrade to
Brussels to brief NATO allies on his
failure to persuade Milosevic to halt
military activity against ethnic
Albanians in Kosovo and agree to a
political agreement already signed
by the Albanians.
"We deeply regret that these
efforts did not succeed, due entire-
ly to the intransigence of the
(Yugoslav) government Solana
said. "This military action is intend-
ed to support the political aims of
the international community
Solana's orders directed Gen.
Wesley Clark, Surpeme Allied
Commander in Europe, to initiate
Two women charged
with having sex with
boys
Associated Press
ST. JOHN, Ind. (AP) A school
superintendent said he was
shocked to learn one of his top vol-
unteers was having sex with a 16-
year-old boy.
Karen K. Savickas, 37, of St. John
was charged with sexual miscon-
duct with a minor Friday for her
involvement with the boy she met
on a volunteer assignment for
Hanover Central High School.
Meanwhile, in LaPorte County,
a woman allegedly pregnant with
the child of a 13-ycar-old boy has
been charged with felony child
molesting.
Savickas was president of the
parent-teacher organization at
Hanover Central High School when
she began sleeping with the 16-
year-old, the Lake Count prosecu-
tor's office said.
Savickas often chaperoned at fun
nights at the high school, and some-
times served as a substitute in the
office or as a teacher's aide, Hanover
Superintendent
George Letz said.
"This is a really sad surprise, if
those are true charges Letz said.
"I'm very disappointed. I hope
somehow this can all be worked
out
Court documents say Savickas
and the boy started having sexual
intercourse at her house, which is in
the victim's neighborhood, in July
NC bill seeks to put more
women on governing
boards
Associated Press
RALEIGH (AP) Women are ask-
ing that more of them be appointed
to governing boards in North
Carolina.
"Fifty-two percent of the folks
in North Carolina are women and
certainly, if you look at numbers,
they are very underrepresented on
any policy or advisory board said
Sen. Beverly Perdue, D-Craven,
who introduced a bill recommend-
ing that governing boards appoint
more women.
The Women's Forum of North
Carolina found that while females
make up 52 percent of the state's
action with the more than 400 allied
aircraft and a half dozen missile-car-
rying ships at sea.
Clark had said eadier that his
forces were ready.
"The crews are read the equip-
ment is ready; we know what Serb
capabilities are, we know what Serb
vulnerabilities are, and if required
we will strike in a swift and severe
fashion Clark said Monday.
Solana said the attacks would be
directed at weakening the Yugoslav
army and special police forces and
reducing their ability to cause
humanitarian catastrophe.
"NATO is not waging war
against Yugoslav, " Solana said,
adding that the door remains open
to the Yugoslav government "to
show at any time that it is
ready to meet the demands of
the international community
He appealed to the Kosovo
Albanians to remain committed to
the peace agreement they signed in
Paris last week and urged the rebel
Kosovo Liberation
Army to refrain from provocative
military action.
"Our objective is to prevent
more human suffering and more
repression and violence against the
civilian population of Kosovo he
said.
More than 2,000 people have
died and hundreds of thousands
have been driven from their homes
in nearly 13 months of conflict in
Kosovo, a southern
province of Serbia, the main
republic in Yugoslavia.
More than 90 percent of
Kosovo's 2 million inhabitants are
ethnic Albanians and most want
independence, a solution that
Milosevic has rejected.
or August. Their sexual encounters
continued through January.
The boy told police he would
often sneak out of his house to visit
Savickas at night.
"It's just very sad to hear this
happened Letz said.
Savickas faces up to 20 years in
prison if she is convicted.
In LaPorte County, Constance
Miller faces 20 to 50 years in prison
in convicted on the charge of felony
child molesting.
During her initial appearance
Friday in LaPorte Circuit Court,
the 23-year-old LaPorte woman was
ordered held on a $50,000 bond.
Her trial was sent for Aug. 30.
Miller is due to give birth in July,
court records show.
She began having sex with boy,
then 12, last October at her LaPorte
home. It continued when she
moved into the apartment building
where the boy resided, said LaPorte
Detective Sgt. Lynn Cains.
Miller and the boy knew each
other for several years because of a
friendly relationship between their
families.
Child Protective Services first
approached police after "hearing on
the street" that Miller was pregnant
with the boy's child, authorities
said. The boy admitted having sex
with Miller several times when
questioned by child welfare author-
ities and police in January.
On March 3, the boy confided to
a social worker that he was the
unborn child's father and had con-
tinued having sex with Miller even
after he was fust approached by
authorities about their relationship.
The boy has been removed from
his mother's care and is being cared
for by Child Protective Services.
population and 47 percent of the
workforce, men dominate the most
powerful and influential state-
appointed boards.
Of the 11 state boards studied,
the Social Services Commission had
the highest percentage of women
directors at 42 percent The State
Banking Commission had the low-
est, 6 percent.
The bill sets out a sate policy
that those who appoint state regula-
tory boards, commissions and com-
mittees should select qualified can-
didates while at the
same time, try to reflect the pro-
portion of men and women in the
state.
It also requires the appointing
authority to submit an annual report
showing the number and percent-
age of women appointed and
ensure that information
SEE �III PAGE 3





4 Thurtlty. Much 2SJ989
The East Carolinian
bill
coniinuid Iron paga 2
describing each applicant's gen-
der and qualifications is made avail-
able for public inspection.
� "It does nothing in terms of quo-
tas and mandates said Perdue,
who said it does send a strong mes-
sage.
Rep. Jean Preston, R-Carteret,
who said she would sponsor the bill
in the House, said if women were
still consistently left off boards after
the bill took effect, more action
would be taken.
The bill has gained support from
both men and women in the
Senate. Among the co-sponsors are
Sens. Charlie Albertson, D-Duplin,
David Hoyle, D-Gaston, and John
Kerr, D-Wayne.
It has bipartisan support from
the Senate women and may get the
same in the House.
Rep. Carolyn Russell, R-Wayne,
said that as long as there are no quo-
tas involved, she believes it was
important to raise awareness of the
issue.
Rep. Debbie Clary, R-Cleveland
said the bill sends the right mes-
sage, but she did not think it was
practical.
"It's a statement and we've
made these statements for years
Clary said. "It's a political statement
from (Perdue) she said. "It's got
gravy but no meat
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S Thundiy, Mi red 25. 1999
news
The Etlt Carolinian
You drank.
You danced.
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Associated Press
NEW YORK (AP) Marijuana use
remains widespread and many
heroin users prefer to snort the drug
rather than inject it, according to a
report that White House drug poli-
cy director Gen. Barry McCaffrey
planned to release today.
The findings are contained in
"Pulse Check: Trends in Drug
Abuse which McCaffrey's office
releases twice a year. The latest
report covers the first half of 1998.
McCaffrey was to announce the
findings at a news conference at
Roosevelt Hospital, on Manhattan's
West Side, this afternoon.
The report covers marijuana,
cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine
and so-called club drugs, such as
Ecstasy and Ketamine. According
to the report:
Snorting heroin continues to be
popular in areas where high purity
levels make it an alternative to
injecting. In the New York area,
more users snort heroin .than inject
it.
other cities studied describe mari-
juana use as widespread and stable
or increasing. Users are a heteroge-
neous group, though use is moat
prevalent among the young. In the
Northeast, 39 percent of those in
treatment for marijuana use are
under age 20; 36 percent are in their
20s.
Also, 20 percent of people
receiving treatment for drug addic-
tion cite marijuana as their drug of
choice.
"That's counterintuitive to those
who believe that marijuana is not a
dangerous drug said .McCaffrey
aide Ben Weiner.
The use of so-called designer
drugs including Ecstasy, the vet-
erinary anesthetic Ketamine and
the sedative GHB (gamma-hydrox-
ybutyrate) at nightclubs and other
party scenes has become increas-
ingly popular. Typically, users are
young and middle class.
McCaffrey also was to announce
an upcoming federal report on
methadone use, a sensitive topic in
New York City. Last year Mayor
Rudolph Giuliani
announced that he wanted to
abolish methadone treatment,
which is used to weaken herot.
addictions. He backed down earlier
Mark A.Ward
ATTORNEY AT LAW
this year, saying the idea was
Sources in New York and 14 "maybe somewhat unrealistic
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BEFORE early
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Don't lose your place in line or
your seat in a class when you
register for summer session or
fall semester!
Students with uncleared parking citations may
have a tag placed on their record and are not
permitted to register until the tag is cleared.
I tch r HI
feta Yau iUphaUpha Xi DeitaAlplia Delta 11
� -a I II sl
51 IJIlfl Ma?
WMVIU9
ooi v u n
m
East Carolina University � 1999 Rush Registration
Your registration must be accompanied with a check for $40, non-refund-
able, made payable to ECU Panhellenic Association. Rush dates are August
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of Rush. Registration deadline is August 6,1999. Questions? Call (252)328-
4235.
Return to: East Carolina University
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Tta till Catsllaw
opinion
ThundlY. Mirch 11, 1889
1
eastcarolinian
AMY L.ROVSTER Editor
Amanda G. Aims Mmging Hat
Holly Harris RmEtfni
AMY WAONER AMisim Mbh EIiioi
Nina Dry i
Cory Phoenix I
Mario Scherhaufer Spore
Tracy Hairr Asjuimi Sponi Ediiw
Chris Knotts Stiff
Robert Moore Ijtm Drognti
Stephanie Whitlock m Deign
Janet Respess i
Ri.ss Blackburn LiyouOsngntr
Bobby Tuggle
BndlBeMfOlltatRlort in! iiwnifl in turn litWttwl Bart i"�i� W Ew CiiMkii Mkana mwi to flu tdnor. hnad 10 250
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Butuat
OUN1GW
This is an exciting time to live in the United States. We just witnessed an impeachment of a
president and now, with the turn of the century closing in, we may see the election of the first
female president ever.
Whether you agree with her political stance or not, Elizabeth Dole may become the first
woman ever to be elected to the top office in our government in 2000. She is already cam-
paigning and may get the bid from the G.O.R
This country was established over 200 years ago, and there have been 42 presidents since, all
white males. Since this country's population is not entirely white males, this seems silly. We
are behind other countries such as the United Kingdom and Switzerland in this aspect.
There are remarkable women who have influenced America's history. For example, Susan B.
Anthony defied the law and voted when it was illegal for a woman to do so. Rosa Parks, an
African-American woman, broke the law and tradition in the South by refusing to give her
bus seat to a white person. And who can forget Madeleine Albright, the U.S. Secretary of
State. These brave women changed world history forever.
the United States has also seen the strengths of women through it's first ladies. Hillary
Clinton, Jackie Kennedy Onassis and Eleanor Roosevelt are three of the most famous first
ladies. It is even rumored that Eleanor Roosevelt, the wife of F.D.R acted as president mak-
ing important decisions during her husband's bought with Polio.
We here at TEC are not saying whether or not Dole is the lady for the job. That is up to you
and the other voters to decide.We simply say that America is ready for a female president.
OPINION
Ryan
Kennemur
Dental visits cause columnist pain?
LETTER
to the Editor
Parking and Traffic out of touch
Disgustingly enough, my two
front teeth were pushed up
into my gums, so when I
smiled I resembled Chernobyl.
"Hi. What's up? Yeah, same here.
How was your break? You went to
Cancun, Mexico? Sounds like fun.
Oh, what did I do? Not too much
really. I helped my dad and not
much else. Did I go to the dentist?
You bet! Did I hate it? Let me tell
ya
First, let me give you nice folks
some background on my teeth and
their horrific past. It all began one
beautiful summer day in my old
hometown of Roanoke Rapids,
North Cacky-Lacky. I was seven
years old and my friend Paul and I
were playing on my family's ham-
mock (or as I call it, the"good ole
teeth destroyer") on the deck of my
house. He was pushing me back
and forth, and for some strange rea-
son, he pushed me and then jerked
back on the hammock. This sent
me flying forward, face first onto
the wooden floor of the deck.
Disgustingly enough, my two front,
teeth were pushed up into my
gums, so when I smiled I resem-
bled Chernobyl. It was sad. I felt
horrible and I looked even worse,
so I got braces twice. I dont
know if you've ever had braces,
(chances are, I don't know you at
-ill�. but it is truly a confidence-
shredder. No one, unless they shell
out the big bucks for the porcelain
kind, can look good in braces. But
the fact remains that if you want
nice, straight teeth, in contrast with
looking like a psychotic jack-o-
lantem, you have to wear them.
Then, after you get used to wearing
these mini train tracks, the dentist
introduces you to headgear. This
comical looking device looks like
the braces-wearer recently collided
headfirst into a low-orbiting satel-
lite. And it doesn't really do any-
thing to help your dental problems.
I think it was more of a way for
orthodontists, or "rich people who
hurt children to get another addi-
tion to their yacht collection. I
never had to wear headgear, thank-
fully. Apparently, the dentist had
enough of my family's money
invested in the stock market to take
some pity on my already shattered
ego.
This brings us up to date, and I am
starting to have to see the dentist
again on a regular basis. I went to
get a tooth filled last week, and
here's what happened:
The family dentist came in and
said his usual pleasantries, and then
proceeded to pry my mouth open
with the "fun size" jaws of life. He
numbed up my lip with novicanc
nocivan um some drug that
numbs stuff, and then proceeded to
ask me questions. He looked into
my mouth and said, "Have you had
your wisdom teeth taken out?"
The thing that got my britches was
the fact that he was looking right at
my teeth and could see that the
wisdom ones were right in front of
him! It was like he was expecting
me to lie about it, once again foiling
my sinister plan of being an amuse-
ment park for cavities.
I respectfully replied,
"Aaaaarrrrrgggglillleeeenah yegh-
pri-ee sooo, dough
He nodded and said, "Good. I
hope it all works out for you I
looked at him with a look that is
only given by dogs after the 20th
time of falling for the old "I'll pre-
tend to throw the stick but I'll real-
ly hide it behind my back" prank.
The look ceased when he got out
the drill. I
I'm running out of space, but let
me tell you that there are two
things that bother me, and the drill
causes two of them. First, you get
that super high-pitched squeal
echoing out of your mouth, as if a
syphilitic baboon was attacking
Mariah Carey. Then, you smell the
smoke. It really bothers me when
smoke comes out of my mouth,
especially since I don't smoke.
In conclusion, if you ask me if I like
dentists, my answer will be "nope
OPINION
Columnist
While the folks at Parking and
Traffic may find that there is no
problem with parking, it just may
be that they do not have one. As
for the rest of us, it is a horror. If
you leave campus at lunch time (12
p.m. - 2 p.m.), you take the chance
of not finding a space for at least a
half-hour. I have witnessed many
unlucky folks driving around and
around looking for a spot If you do
not leave campus, you are locked
In for the entire day. You must take
a day off to get errands taken care
of which once could be done by
utilizing an occasional lunch hour.
What Parking and Traffic appears
to not be considering, is the
diverse faculty, staff, and students
on this campus. Many faculty and
staff are a little older and may find
walking long durances difficult,
while still having the desire or
need to work. We have some dis-
abled faculty and students. Where
are they to park on a pedestrian
campus? There are a number of
non-traditional students, some of
whom find it difficult to walk great
distances. All of this is magnified
when there is inclement weather.
Cavalier statements such as "walk-
ing is good for you do not take
away the pain from the disabled
nor the need to work from an older
staff or faculty. I am not attributing
this statement to anyone, but
anticipate that it will be one of the
statements issued in response.
Just this past week, I witnessed
one of our students in a motorized
chair fall to the street while trying
to access a street incline on 10th
Street. How are these folks sup-
posed to manage, particularly in
bad weather?
We get many deliveries each day
from various carriers. Since we
have not had use of the Rawl park-
ing for the last year, (we have been
told it is being removed), our deliv-
ery people have had to pull their
handtrucks long distances with
parcels for us, and many are
extremely heavy. We get deliveries
from Central Supply several times
a month. If this becomes a pedes-
trian campus, will trucks be per-
mitted on the walkways? Must we
then dodge delivery, Facilities
Services, and semitrucks making
various deliveries and calls on cam-
pus? We have to do that now with
Facilities Services trucks. Will
there be special roads for the
trucks? Where will they park to
make deliveries? Before the so-
called "Master Plan" is totally
implemented, I think there are
many issues that still need to be
addressed. The face of this campus
has changed greatly since this plan
was originally conceived.
Many of the offices, such as
Payroll, Accounts Payable, and
Human Resources have been
moved to facilities off the main
campus. There are times when
office personnel must go to these
locations. These locations are a lit-
tle too far away to walk to and get
back in a timely manner. Not many
people would like to take that
walk, or can, and so they must take
their car. Again, when they return,
where is there to park?
Taking a bus from the stadium is
not accommodating for most. In
effect, I would have to start my day
extra early (I presently leave my
home before 7 a.m. in order to get
a parking place) to account for traf-
fic, ten miles a day to Greenville
(some of us do not have the privi-
lege of living nearby the campus),
payfor a parking permit, park
my car at the stadium, and wait for
a bus, get off the bus on main cam-
pus, and still have a distance to
walk to my building. If it is raining,
or extremely hot, this is a most
unpleasant experience.
My final thought is to say to those
considering this plan, before you
take this drastic action, walk a mile
in my shoes as well as the shoes of
the rest of the staff, faculty and stu-
dents who will be made to suffer.
Stephen
Kleinschmit
Troopers ruin columnist break
He was probably checking the
computer to see if I had any
outstanding warrants, park-
ing tickets, library fines, ect.
Well, it was bound to happen. I
finally got my first speeding ticket.
During spring break, as I was head-
ing up 1-81 in Western (not West)
Virginia, to visit some of my frater-
nity brothers at Virginia Tech, I was
stopped by a Virginia state trooper.
After he made several comments,
he took my registration and sat in
his car for what I judged for at least
ten minutes. He was probably
checking the computer to see if I
had any outstanding warrants, park-
ing tickets, library fines, ect.
As he handed me this citation, he
told me that between Pulaski and
Blacksburg there were six other
troopers. I grudgingly told him to
have a nice day, and then I took off
in my Ford Ranger P.O.S. It sur-
prised me to learn that I had a short
distance to go. When I got to
Blacksburg, I learned that during
one weekend, the Virginia highway
patrol had given seventeen hun-
dred speeding tickets along this
route.
Anyone who knows my truck
would say, "Steve, man, 76 miles
per hour? That thing couldn't hit 70
if you threw it from a plane
Exactly. Not only did this officer
give me a speeding ticket, but he
had to give it to me for that one
extra mile per hour just so it would
go on my insurance.
I am appalled at how a state could
screw so many of its own residents.
I'm sure they must have a quota
system for tickets. My friend Brian
got a ticket for 67 in a 65 on the
same route. So we have to do a
ridiculously slow 55 from now on,
because we can't afford another
ticket.
Another great law (sarcasm)
enforced by Virginia is that if you
get an off-campus alcohol violation,
it gets reported to the school, and
you get in trouble with the school
as well! Underage drinking is just
barely illegal at ECU. Heck, drink-
ing tickets are cheaper than parking
tickets here. People, we need to get
out and vote. Obviously, Virginians
are letting their crazed, power-hun-
gry law enforcement reign
supreme. I hope to God that we
won't let ours do the same.
Writes & Letter
to tk& Editor
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Have you had
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see that the
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vas expecting
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replied,
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a look that is
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ched squeal
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ill be "nope
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tave a quota
friend Brian
a 65 on the
lave to do a
rom now on,
ford another
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tiol violation,
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March 31, 1999
4:30 to 5:45
Mendenhall 221
It is important that all
organizations interested in
receiving funding attend.
Changes have been made to the
funding packet and will be
discussed at this workshop.
1
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Questions? Contact the SGA office at 328-4726 or the SGA
treasurer at 328-4720.
Drop-In Passes
only $5 for 5 classes.
Pass is valid for any
RPM Studio Cycling or
AerobicFitness class.
Friends can punch in
on one card as well.
All punches count
toward completing a
card for prizes.
TO WIN PRIZES:
� Complete Drop-In Card
� Turn into Fitness Class Attendant
� Drawings for:
t-shirts
waterbonies
free passes and more
(offer for all SRC immbws. To purchoM pan
bring ECU On� Card fo SRC Main Offic.
For more Information call 328-6387)
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features
9 Yhurtdty,
The Eitt Carolinian
ow did you learn about
Native Americans?
Were they discussed in
your American history
lecture or did you find
an arrowhead in your
backyard one day? Perhaps you
remember seeing them in an old
western movie.
Some of these images may appear
to be tactual, but they do not accu-
rately portray the experiences of
Native Americans today. Here at
ECU, several groups of students
exist to make the campus more
of stereotypes and to edu-
ECU students. Two Greek
organizations, the sorority Sigma
Omicron Epsilon and the fraterni-
ty Epsilon Chi Nu, are social orga-
nizations for all students. Both of
these organizations work closely
with the East Carolina Native
American Organization or
ECNAO. This organization, which
it a part of the minority affairs
office, offers support to Native
American students and seeks to
educate the campus.
"We work to break down stereo-
types and to encourage respect
said Eddie Harris, a member of
ECNAO.
One of the best ways to do this is to
sponsor events which allows the
Members of ECNAO will sponsor a pow wow on March 27 at the College Hill Field. Admission is free for students and the community.
COURTESY OF ECNAO
community to see what Native
American culture today is really
about. ECNAO is sponsoring
their sixth annual pow wow and
encourages the whole community
to attend so that they can interact
with one another. Some of the
area schools have also been invit-
ed to attend to make future gen-
erations more educated.
"The more you know about other
cultures, the more you under-
stand and respect one another
Harris said.
It has taken nearly a year to put
the event together, and a lot of
hard work has gone into planning
and fund raising. SGA provided
some of the money to hire
dancers and drummers and to
advertise, but the rest had to be
raised by the members of
ECNAO.
The activities incorporate tradi-
tional ceremonies with contempo-
rary Native American culture.
There will be intertribal dancing,
with participants wearing the tra-
ditional regalia. Singing, as well as
drumming and traditional give-
Recognized Indian Tribes and Their Location in North Carolina
Meherrin: Ahoskie, NC
Cherokee: Cherokee Indian Reservation
Western, NC
WW Waccamaw-Siouan: Buckhead, NC
Lumbee: Lumberton, NC
aways, will also take place. Indian
arts and crafts traders will also be
present, and traditional foods such
as tacos and fry bread will be
served.
The history of the pow wow goes
back to a traditional spring event to
celebrate the seasonal
renewal of life. Often times
the events had a religious signif-
icance, such as naming and hon-
oring ceremonies.
The circle is the most impor-
tant feature of a pow wow
and a traditional symbol for
Native Americans. The
dancers and the drums are
both in the circle, and the
audience forms another cir-
cle around them, with the
vendors and concessions
behind them. Through
the circle, family and
friends are brought closer
together to share in the
culture.
Though pow wows
have been going
on for centuries, the
modem intertribal
form developed
in the 1920's
and the
con-
test-
i n g
began.
Contests are
for the best
dancers can
last all weekend
and prizes, some-
times ranging into
the thousands of dollars,
are handed out.
After World War II there
was a revival of tradition-
al pow wows, and ever
since then the form has
been changing and evolving
into the modem form, which
M wawi an typfcafly held yearly at ECU, and are a great way tar Native American students and the community to get involved.
PHOTO COURTESY OF EtMO
X
MM
involves brighter colors and more
complicated dancing.
Just as important as dancing is the
drum. The drum consists of the
instrument and its singers, and is
placed at the center of the arena.
They have songs for all occasions,
and set the tone for the dances.
Goo
drums
are
always in
demand,
and are
essential
for a good
pow wow.
Ir is also
important
to know
some of
the eti-
q u e t t e
appropriate
for attend-
ing a pow
wow. If you
have a
question or
don't know
what to do
in a certain
situation, be
respectful and ask before you
embarass yourself or someone else.
Pow wows are typically held year-
ly at ECU, and are a great way for
Native American students and the
community to get involved. They
also are a way for people to be in
contact with one another that they
may not see very often.
"It's like a big family reunion
said Dicrdra Blanks, junior and
member of ECNAO. "You meet
new friends and remember the
old
Blanks is also a dancer at the pow
wow and does what is known as
fancy dancing, which has brighter
regalia and faster, more flashy
dance steps.
"This is the best way to be togeth-
er and to learn about people from
other cultures Blanks said.
One of the most important things
that the pow wow tries to teach is
respect. At the pow wow, younger
children will have a chance to talk
to elders and learn about tradition-
al ways, which is an important part
He feels that it is important for
Native American students to
become involved on campus.
"At a school so big, it's easy ro
get lost in the crowd Gilland
said. "These events are a great
way to let people know who you
are, and to promote awareness on
the rest of the campus
The pow wow is also a great
learning experience. Not only
does the younger generation get
to learn traditional ways from the
elders, but it also educates the
community about Native
American culture and helps to
put an end to old stereotypes"
Those who have never attended
a pow wow before should leave
with a better perspective about
other cultures, and about them-
selves.
'The pow wow is such an impor-
tant event Gilland said. "I'd like
to come back in twenty years and
see it still going on at ECU
The pow wow will be held at
College Hill Field on campus on
March 27, and admission is free for
students and the community.
of Native
American cul-
tures. The
activities will
also encourage
respect for the creator
and for each other.
Randy
Gilland
works as a
1 i a son
between
the office
of minori-
ty affairs
and
ECNAO.
C(
50
Lingf
Men's 1
Novel
i
I 2(tt
i � km
� nail
J located
i
i
I �
I
i
i
Nl
s
hiri
Dancing and drums are an important part of all pow wows.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECNAO






Ellt Carolinian
J
s important for
n students to
on campus,
jig, it's easy to
rowd Gilland
nts are a great
know who you
te awareness on
npus
is also a great
nee. Not only
generation get
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a educates the
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Id stereotypes
never attended
e should leave
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such an impor-
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at ECU
ill be held at
on campus on
ssion is free for
mmunity.
1
I i SPHfl
-Jv- . J
I all pow wows.
9 Yhundty, Mirch 28, 1999
features
Th Em Carolinian
COOL WEATHER - COOL CLOTHES
MY SISTER'S
CLOSET
A resale shop to benefit New Directions,
Pitt County Family Violence Program, Inc.
308 EVANS STREET, 754-2495 - ACCEPTING WOMEN'S
AND CHILDREN'S CLOTHING AND ACCESSORIES
American Red Cross sponsors
mock relief demonstration
Simulation teaches
protective measures
&4X�s
INTIMATE AppAREl & qirTS
FINAL CLEARANCE � GOING OUT OF BUSINESS MARCH 31s
50 Off
Lingerie
Men's Items
Novelties
Everything
Must Go!
Fixtures &
Racks
Mirrors
Mannequins
Arlington Village � MonSat. 11-6 p.m. � 758-6846
75 Off
Hosiery
&
Shoes
any service with coupon
actajf! uajdng
er
133 0akrni,
across from Pulsl
(252)756-3713
Robin and Rhonda only
ns and night appointments available
Phillip Gilfls
senior writer
Most ECU students can remember
the various threats of hurricanes
that Greenville has faced. But when
a major disaster strikes, does every-
one know where to go and what to
do?
The Pitt County chapter of the
American Red Cross is at the fore-
front of community disaster prepa-
ration. Since March is Red Cross
Month, the Pitt County chapter
hopes to promote awareness about
its services and to provide vital
emergency information to the pub-
lic.
"It's important that the commu-
nity become more aware and pre-
pared about emergency services
said Leonardo Custis, senior
instructor in the ECU military sci-
ence department.
Custis, who is also a Red Cross
shelter manager, is heading up the
Pin Red Cross mock relief shelter
demonstration.
"There will be a mock shelter
setup, a simulation of a shelter that
people would go to in the event of a
community disaster said Charlene
Lee, director of the Pitt County
chapter of the Red Cross.
"We will be highlighting all that
the Red Cross does for the area
said Nathan Szejniuk, disaster chair
for Pitt County and ECU
Environmental Health senior.
In the event of a hurricane, tor-
nado or flooding, residents of
"It's important that the com-
munity become more aware
and prepared about emergency
services
Leonardo Custis
senior instructor, military science department
Greenville would be told to evacu-
ate to local shelters, which are nor-
mally area high schools. Other non-
response emergencies (situations in
which no warnings are given) that
would call for evacuation are resi-
dential or apartment building fires
and toxic waste or chemical spills.
In 1998, shelters were opened on
three different occasions.
The purpose of the mock relief
shelter is to demonstrate what steps
must be taken when residents enter
a shelter. There will be three mock
shelters available on Saturday.
"We will show people how to
move into a shelter and the proce-
dures and rules that are followed
Custis said. "We will also talk about
the conditions that are necessary for
moving into the shelters and what
conditions must be like for resi-
dents to return to their homes
Those who visit the setup will
be taken through a walk-through of
the shelter. They will register, just
as if they had been evacuated to a
shelter, and be shown which things
they are allowed and not allowed to
bring to an emergency shelter.
Residents will also be told which
places are primary shelters and sec-
ondary shelters, and what the dif-
ferences between them are.
About 75 volunteers will be on
hand to help with the disaster pro-
gram and to teach CPR classes.
During Red Cross month, adult
CPR classes will be taking place
throughout Pitt County,
Reccrtification for those with cur-
rent CPR certification will be given
The universal logo tor the Had Cross I
PHOTO COURTESY OF RED CROSS WEI SITE
if
the Lowe's location.
An emergency response vehicle'
(ERV) from Raleigh will also be;
showcased to the public.
"The ERV helps in mass feed-
ing efforts in the case of a large
scale emergency Lee said.
There will also be raffles at the
Lowe's site for generators and
emergency kits. The raffle for the'
generator will take place at 1:45
p.m. Door prize drawings will be
held every half hour.
This disaster awareness program
will take place in the parking lot of!
Lowe's, on Memorial Blvd from 1
10 a.m. to 2 p.m.on Saturday, March
27. Refreshments will be served
throughout the day.
I expires 4-10-99
I'
Greenville's
Best Kept Secret
1,2 & 3
Bedroom
Apartment
Homes
' State of th� ort FHnMi Canter.
i Pool, t�nni� 4 voUvybal
1 CIom to campus.
i Waih.r. ft dry.ri avaUabte
0�rt tCKoHonl
NEED A JOB THIS
s umrne
HOUSING
SERVICES
University Housing Services will be
hiring student painters($7.50 per hour)
for the paint crew this summer.
Full and part-time positions available.
For details and applications, please
come to Office Suite 100, Jones Hall.
If you are interested, please apply by
April 30, 1999.
Session I
My 20 ' dme 25
Inter session
dme 14 ' July 15
Session II
dme 28' My 50
The University of
North Carolina at Wilmington
(910) 2�:24:or 1 (800) 220�5:71 � email: summer(� uiuuii.edu
Or visit us al www.uncwil.edusunimschi
V�





IQThursday. March 26. 1999
ieaturei.
Thi Elit Ci�ll�lifi .
11 Thqndiy. M
NYGASP performs British
satire, HM.S. Pinafore
Event sponsored bj
performing arts series
Nina M. Dry
FEATU�ES EDITO�
Start this weekend off right with a
night of satirical humor and feet-
tapping tunes. The S. Rudolph
Alexander Performing Arts Series
presents the New York Gilbert and
Sullivan Players (NYGASP) as they
perform H.M.S. Pinafore.
From its first performance in
London in 1878, H.M.S. remains
ever popular all over the world.
According to NYGASP artistic
director, Albert Bergeret, who has
earned the illustrious tide of "the
leading custodian of the G&S clas-
sics" by New York magazine,
Gilbert and Sullivan's music is
"mer.iorablc by its tunefulness
"The pieces still have a rele-
vance to people's lives and make us
laugh Bergeret said.
This operetta takes jabs at the
British Navy and the rigid Victorian
class structure as a lowly sailor,
Ralph Rackstraw, falls in love with
the captain's daughter, Josephine.
Unfortunately for Ralph, there
seems to be no possibility for this
romance to ever take shape since
Josephine's hand was already
promised to the first Lord of the
Admiralty, Sir Joseph Porter. And
besides, since the two fall under
completely different social classes,
it would be unheard of for the two
to unite.
Backed by a full orchestra, this
production offers energetic action,
lively choreography and a broad
array of comedy.
SEE PINAFORE PAGE 11
(3x tsSi t r. Pm'x'((! SQ

i
March is
National Nutrition Month
1
i
5 1 for the health of it! �
On Monday, March 29, Campus Dining Services will
host the "ICU MEAT OUT at Todd and Mcndcnhall
Dining Halls in honor off the "Great American Meat
Out Come taste vegetarian samples even the
meat eater will love.
Our goal is to promote the consumption of a
predominately plant-based diet, rich in a variety off
vegetables and fruits, legumes and minimally
processed starchy staple foods.
According to the American Dietetic Association, if
people eat 5 or more servings of vegetables and fruits
per day, overall cancer rates could decline as much
as SO percent. Currently, most Americans average one
serving of fruit and only t vegetables per day!
Come join the fun!
Try new foods and learn
the benefits off a
plant-based diet.
OLE ! OLE !
It's Today! Ifs Today!
Steak Picado
IS
But Hurry Amigos -
on special 11-3 p.m.
Strips of steak sauteed with bell
peppers, onions, tomatoes, and
spiced with Mexican
flavor. Served with rice and beans
Maxfccmltortqmqnl
fi NO MUCHOS PESOS, AMIGOS!
Downtown Greenville 757-1666 � ALL ABC PERMITS

MANUFACTURERS'
TRIPLE COUPONS!
UNIT 6! GOOD THRU TUESDAY, MARCH 30,1999
� Coupons up to 50U are Tripled. � Over 50 J are face value.
� One coupon per item purchased. � Limit 6 Tripled Coupons.
Limit one manufacturers' coupon for any particular item Items must be
purchased in sizes specified on coupon This offer SftAWrS'8
Cents Off coupons for items sold at Winn-Dixie and not to FREE or tobacco
product coupons. Coupon value cannot exceed the price ol the item.
fit
Marketplace �-
Tropicana
Orange Juice
64 oz. size Season's Best
�mm "if� JtP �
HHomeStyk
Coke, Diet Coke
Or Sprite
6 pk20 oz. btls. 3 liter bottles
6 pk20 oz. btls. 3 liter bottles I
2$5 2$31
Prices good Wednesday, March 24, thru
Tuesday March 30,1999. Effective In
Our Greenville, NG Location Only! (jfavnte,
�Copyright 1999. Winn-Dixie Raleigh. Inc. Quantity Rights Reserved, www.wlnndixie.com
gtt&
w gp m
HesS






East Cirbllitin
11 Thirdly, Match 25, 1999
features
Til last Carolinian
8Dwmmmm
fcS5lHiK

Harris Teeter
Your Neighbor! iood Food Market
wwwJiarristeeter.com
v.winndixie.com
t
Prices Effective Through March 30,1999
mm. in Thta Ad Effceth WWiMaday. Mar 24 Thiough MMSO.lWjhOurftwwJtoatomonljr.
Pinafore
coniinuid from pig 10
"The live orchestra adds texture
and dimension to the perfor-
mance said Carol Woodruff, mar-
keting director of University
Unions.
"Besides an element of societal
parody the overall picture is a
satire on human nature that tran-
scends any date in time Bergeret
said. "The music is catchy and illu-
minates what the theatrical move-
ments are
Reigning from the Big Apple,
NYGASP has been America's pre-
eminent professional Gilbert and
Sullivan repertory ensemble since
its founding 25 years ago.
"NYGASP is probably the only
company who dedicates their
repertoire to performing Gilbert
and Sullivan on tours exclusively
Woodruff said.
The NYGASP productions are
charged with energy while retain-
ing the traditional respect for the
shows. i
"This is not a 'stand there and
sing' kind of company Bergeret
said. "We do the works as they are
written, but give them a flair and a
contemporary energy
The company creates this ener-
gy with the use of elaborate, yet rel-
evant choreography and wherever
possible, topical references from
the 1800s are updated to a more
modem time without disturbing
the scope of the piece as written.
According to Bergeret, the vision'
of the company's mission is to build
and maintain an ensemble of pro-
fessional repertory singers, actors,
dancers and musicians dedicated to
bringing quality performances of
the Gilbert and Sullivan master-
pieces to as wide an audience as
possible.
"The material itself has a rele-
vance and an energy that will con-
tinue to be relevant and enjoyable
for years to come Bergeret said.
The show premieres tomorrow
night at 8 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium. Tickets are set at $12
for ECU students, $20 for ECU
staff and faculty and $25 for the
public. All tickets purchased at the
door will be $25.
HAMSTRING
HUSTLE
5k RUN
RACE TIME 2:00 pen on March 28, 1999
(Late registration at 12:45 pm)
AGEGROUPS:ttmrjowr 20-29 3039 4049 5059 BOandover
AWARDS
BURY FEE.
LATE ENTRY FEE.
Overall male and female winners
Top three males and top three females in each age group
12 and under- $3.fJ0 (noT-fhirtlor $12.00 (wjlhrawt) t �- :
All other age groups - $12.00 (includes T-shirt)
12 and under-$5.00 (no T-shirt)
T-shirts
$10.00
A� other age groups - $15.00 (includes T-shirt)
Fill out & return this portion with appropriate entry fee to:
(Make checks payable to ECU Medical Student council)
John Brooks, 3446 Westgate Drive, Greenville, NC 27834 Phone (252) 329-0042
NameGenderAge on day of race
Date of Birth.
Address
Home Phone
-City.
Work Phone
State
Zip
T-shirt Size(check one):MediumLargeXlarge
Registration (check one):
5k (indudes T-shirt) $1212andur�Jer(noT�hirt) S312artJunuBr(wT-sh�t) $12
Late fee (postmarked after March 21) $15Late fee (12 and under) $5
I RELEASE TH� CITY OF 8REENV1U.E. EAJTtAROUNA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. THE HAMSTRIN6 HUSTLE 5K HUN AND All OF ITS SPONSORS AND RACE
PERSONNEL FROM AIL CLAIMS FOR DAMABES AND LIABILITY WHICH MAY RESULT FROM MY PARTICIPATING IN THE HAMSTRINB HUSTLE 5K RUN. I ALSO AGREE
THAT MY ENTRY FEE IS A DONATION TO THE ECU SOM MEDICAL STUDENT COUNCIL AND THAT NO REFUNDS WILL BE GIVEN.
Data
.Signature)signature of parent or guardian if under 18).
UOTORTUNATEffi TfflS IS WHERE PEOPLE ARE
PUTTING TOOMANY ItEITREMENT IX)LLA�S.
Every year, a lot of people make a
huge mistake on their taxes.
They wind up sending Uncle Sam
money they could be saving for
retirement.
Fortunately, that's a mistake you
can avoid with SRAs�tax-deferred
annuities from TIAA-CREF. SRAs not
only ease your current tax bite, they
offer an easy way to build retirement
income�especially for the "extras"
that your pension and Social Security
benefits may not cover. Because your
contributions are made in pretax
dollars, you pay less in taxes now. And
since earnings on your SRAs are tax
deferred, your money works even
harder for you.
Today, we offer other before- and
after-tax financial solutions, including
IRAs and mutual funds. They're
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Why write off the chance for a
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your benefits office or call us at
1800 8422776 and find out how
TIAA-CREF SRAs can help you enjoy
happier returns.
www.tiaa-cref.org
Ensuring the future
for those who shape it"

TIAA-CREF l,�lrvaveJer�nrM�ocJSer�keliKi
eWfW �� mfmmK Ml 1 MO WM7� �. M09. far CRET mi TtAA Reel Erne. Aecceoii
t Account Per mer complete mforneuieet. wirteieelg
eieeiciliieee rteeillheee rerefeBjWnre jnra imneT nrttrlmnttrj
'j





�fNUMMUMQtilMI
12 Tksrtliy. Mirth 28. 1899
features
The EM Carolinian
Registration for Summer and Fall Semesters
Monday, March 29 - Thursday, April 1
Beginning March 29,1999, currently enrolled students may use the
following options to register for Summer and Fall Courses:
Tit tut enroll
Pin
Basebrn
votessh
1) Web Registration
2) Telephonic Registration
Carolina University StudentDesktoi
www.student.ecu.edu
3) Terminal Registration
Automated Voice Response System
AVRS (328-2149)
Allocation of Registration Days
March 29
March 30
March 31
April 1
Graduate students, second degree
students, students with physical
disabilities registered with the
Department of Disability Support
Services and students with 70
or more semester hours credit.
Students with 40-69 semester
hours credit and those eligible
prior to this period.
Students with 13-39 semester
hours credit and those eligible
prior to this period.
All students eligible.
Terminal Locations
Terminal Location
School of Allied Health
IAnnex 1CSC1 Office
2Room310EHLTBIOS
3Room 306OCCT Office
4Annex 3PTHE Office
5Room 308CLSCHIMA
6Room 312REHB Office
7302PA Office
School of Art
1-2Burroughs Wellcome
Senior Gallery
Jenkins Fine Arts Ctr.
33rd Floor of Jenkins
Bldgeast end media ctr
School of Business
1GCB 3209
2GCB 3411
3GCB 3413
4GCB 3422
5GCB 3105
6GCB 3203
School of Education
1102A Speight
2109 Speight
3134 Speight
4137 Speight
5-6203 Speight
7230 Speight
82318 GCB
9357 Flanagan
10215 Joyner
School of Health A Human Performance
1 MCA-15
2 MC171
3 MC 177
4 MC 174
5 Christenbury Gym 203
School of Human and Environmental Sciences
1 HESC 142
2 HESC 148
3 HESC 150
4 HESC 152
School of Industry and Technology
1 Flanagan 103
2 Flanagan 105
3 Rawl 343
4 Rawl327
5 Rawl 139
6 Wright Annex 307
School of Music
1-4
5
School of Social Work
1
2-3
School of Nursing
1-3
4
5
Fletcher 102
Fletcher 119
Ragsdaie 102
Ragsdale 104A&B
Nursing 108
Nursing 119
Nursing 157
College of Arts & Sciences
Anthropology Department
1
Biology Department
1-2
3
4
Chemistry Department
1
BrewsterA-214
BN-108
BN-108E
BN-108 A
Flanagan 204
Communication Department
1 Erwinll3
Economics Department
1 Brewster A-427
2 Brewster A-429
English Department
1-2 GCB 2201
Foreign Languages and Literature Department
1
2
3
Geography Department
1
2
Geology Department
1
History Department
1
2
3
Mathematic Department
1-4
Philosophy Department
FL&L Rec. Area
GCB 3324
GCB 2003
Brewster A-227
Brewster A-229
Graham 101
Brewster A-310
Brewster A-311
Brewster A-316
Austin 129
1
Physics
1
Brewster A-327
Howell Complex 209
Political Science Department
1 Brewster A-124
2 Brewster A-126
Psychology Department
1 Rawl 135
Sociology Department
1 Brewster A-411
2 Brewster A-414
Theatre Arts Department
1 Messick 106
Undergraduate Studies
1-5 BB101
6-7 BA 102-ATP only
8-11 BB103
12-16 BA113
Registrar's Office
1-4 Whichard 100
5-6 Whichard 101
7-8 Whichard 102
9-10 Whichard 104
11-12 Whichard 105
Honors Program
I GCB 2026
I

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Ellt Carolinian
-A
10
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ystem
iys
iree
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irt
!
The Ent Carolinian
TUrUw. Maria �� HW 13
Pirates take down UNC-G with near sell-out crowd
Baseball team four
votes shy of top 25
Paul Kaplan
sinio waiTia
Amidst almost sold-out attendance
of 1,421 fans Foye Minton and the
Pirate defense put up a seemingly
impenetrable shield against
UNC-Grccnsboro's offense in
last Tuesday night's 6-1 victory.
In their first night game of the
season, the new Harrington Field
lights seemed to fire up the Pirate
defense as they held UNC-G to just
one run and three hits. Minton
threw 10 strikeout's while giving up
only one walk in his nine-inning
tenure on the mound.
"We all had fun, that was all I
came out to do, we got the win but
as long as we were having fun that
is all that matters Minton said.
"On defense, Steve Salargo made
some great plays out in center field,
Bmscbmll
UNC Greensboro at East Carofcva
Mar 23,1999 at Greenvii, N.C. (Hamngton Field)
East Caroina (206)
Name(Pos) AB R HRB BBSOPO A
DELFINO.Leess 2100 2214
SCHNABEL, Nick 2b� 312 2 00 0 2
SALARGO, Steve cf 3 0 2 2 104 0
W�ilAMSON,Johnif4 0 1 0 1130
BAWCH,E� 5 0 00 0110
TRACY,Chad 1b 3 2 10 0080
GODWIN, Off 4 010 0100
HOWARD,Jasonc 4132 0 0 91
WARD, Bryant 3b If 1 0 1102
MINTON, Foye p 00 0 0 0001
ToUs 31 6116 5 62710
EastCaroina IP H R ER BB SO ABBF
MINTON, Foye9.0 3 1 1 1 10 3132
Win-MINTON 5-1. Loss-GORDON 1-1. Saw-Nona
we also had some
really great fan sup-
port tonight and it
helped us out a lot
The game stayed
scoreless until the
bottom of the fourth
inning when the
Pirates scored three
runs on four hits
against three differ-
ent
Spartan pitchers
as they almost batted
around. ECU scored
off of a
Jason Howard
RBI single that
knocked in Chad
Tray, then off of the
arm of Nick
Schnabel when he
was hit by a pitch to
force in the second
run of the inning.
The third run of the
inning came off a
sacrifice RBI by
Steve Salargo,
which scored Bryant
Ward.
The Pirates held
the Spartans score-
less until the top of
the sixth inning
when they scored
their only run on a
sacrifice fielder's
choice RBI by Jeff Smith.
ECU went on to score one more
run in the bottom of the fifth when
Jason Howard hit in Chad Tracy for
his second RBI of the day. Then in
the bottom of the eighth the Pirates'
put two more on the board scoring
two more care of RBI singles by
Nick Schnabel and Steve Salargo.
ECU defeated UNC-G it Harrington field Tuesoiy night.
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPfEN
"We pitched well, we played
really good defensively, we just did
not swing the bats like we are capa-
ble of, but we did enough to score
some runs and get the win said
Keith LeClair, head coach.
Wednesday, March 24 the 20-5
Pirates look to continue their six
game winning streak as they play at
Campbell at 7p.m. Then this week-
end the Pirates will be traveling to
conference foes James Madison for
a three game series. The series
against JMU will be their first con-
ference games of the season.
"Our three conference pitch-
ing starters really match up well
against anyone. As long as we keep
playing the same kind of baseball
we'll keep on winning, we just can't
afford a let down Howard said.
As of last Monday's ESPNUSA
Today Top 25 Coaches Poll, ECU
received 50 votes just four votes shy
of 25 Arkansas who entered the
poll this week with a 15-9 record.
Committee adds student Campbell sets new record
EricRivenbarkjoins
search for new coach
Mandy Reutter
staff write
An already overpopulated selec-
tion committee for the new head
basketball coach added just one
final member, Eric Rivenbark, stu-
dent body president.
Rivenbark has sat on other hir-
ing committees previous to this
time. It has been characteristic to
have a member of the student
body, other than a player, sitting in
on the hiring process for the coach
of a so-called "money" sport. So
why should this time be any differ-
ent? Why wasn't Rivenbark auto-
matically appointed to this commit-
tee?
One would think that the stu-
dent's voice should be heard, when
in fact, they provide 40 percent of
the ECU staff's income. But when
athletic director Mike Hamrick
first sat down with Chancellor
Kakin and the Board of Trustees
and presented to them a list of
potential committee members, he
failed to mention anyone represen-
tative of the largest population at
ECU, the student body. The board
at first agreed with Hamrick's pro-
posal and soon after announced the
names on the committee, exclud-
ing a student. This sparked con-
cern in Rivenbark and even in a
former student body president,
Allen Thomas.
"When I first heard of who was
on the committee, I was extremely
disappointed Rivenbark said.
"It's my personal responsibility to
make sure that any decision made
is in the best interest of the stu-
Final Com
mbers
Gene Rayfield Jr. (Chairman of tfijWniyertti
Board of Trusts a)
Bob Ward (Cha n nan of!
"Committee on I cjar, '
Walter Williams J
Committee on Board
David Taylor (Player RepreseY
George Koonce (Former ECU
Dr. Ernest Schwartz
Diane Murphrey (Pirate Club Representative)
Jim Buckman
Eric Rievenbark (Student Body President)
dents
Rivenbark, after voicing his
opinions, immediately found his
way onto the committee, with
support from fellow trustees as
well as the Chancellor. But the
incident didn't go quietly unno-
ticed. Thomas, who resides on
the other half of the state,
became furious that Rivenbark
had to subject himself to the
humiliation of asking to be on
the committee.
"The students should never
be an afterthought Thomas
said. "Sometimes they lose
touch of what the university is all
about-the students, not just ath-
letics
While there are no rules or
guidelines that say who can or
cannot be on a committee, it is
almost always represented by
the same group of people. There
are members of the Board of
Trustees, current faculty along
with a player, the athletic direc-
tor, alumni, Pirate Club repre-
sentative and a student. This is
to allow for a balanced commit-
tee that expresses the concerns
for every aspect of the campus
life, including students.
Some may think that this is a
large committee, and Hamrick
would have to agree. His inten-
tions were to keep the group as
small as possible. Hamrick felt
that the smaller the committee
the better, because as soon as the
the girth widens too much, it
allows for leaks and rumors.
"The utmost confidentiality
needs to be kept with alot of
candidates, good candidates
Hamrick said. "If they feel that it
can't remain confidential to a cer-
tain extent, they will not get
involved
We are supposed to be part of a
system that lives by an honor code,
so ideally there should be no con-
cern that an insider would willingly
speak out and break this sacred
confidentiality. Right?
Golfersfinish
second in Greenville
Blune Denius
SENIOR WRITER
Pirate senior Scott Campbell's golf
game is definitely up to par, after he
crushed the ECU low-score record
and captured a first place finish
over the weekend.
The ECU golf team used their
home course advantage and the
outstanding play of Campbell to
finish second at the Pepsi
Intercollegiate Tournament March
19-20. This 54-hole event was held
in Greenville at the Bradford Creek
Country Club, which is the Pirates'
home course. The Pirates posted a
total score of 864 and placed second
to Coastal Carolina who finished
first with a five under par 859 three
round total score.
"The team played will, but Scott
Campbell played exceptionally
well said Shane Robinson, a
junior on the Pirate team. "Scott
carried this team and everyone will
tell you that
Robinson was one of two Pirates
allowed to compete in this tourna-
ment individually, but their scores
were not added to the five member
ECU starting team. Robinson
proved himself individually carding
a 75, 71, 75 for a total score of 221
and a tie for 24th.
"The course was not playing
that difficult and I played solid
Robinson said. "I would not call it
good, but decent and I'm not going
to complain about it
Campbell, freshman Frank
Adams, and juniors Marc Miller,
Stephen Satterly and Brian
Crawford were the starting five for
ECU. Campbell posted a 13 under
par total of 203 to set a new ECU
record low score and capture the
individual tournament tide. Adams
and Miller each carded a six over
total of 222 and finished in a tie for
22nd. Crawford, in his first outing
of the spring, posted a 221 total and
an impressive tie for 24th. Satterly
shot a nine over 225 to round out
the Pirate team.
"I am very pleased with how we
played today Saturday said
Kevin Williams, head golf coach.
"This tournament proved why we
came to Bradford Creek. We came
here four years ago looking for a
home course advantage and it obvi-
ously paid off
The staff of Bradford Creek
Country Club is as equally pleased
with their involvement with the
Pirate golf team. According to
Bradford Creek's assistant golf pro-
fessional Will Roebuck, the ECU
players have been easy to work
with throughout the season and he
is proud of how well the Pirates per-
formed over the weekend.
"Everyone was happy with the
course and played really well
Roebuck said. "They ECU play-
ers are nice kids to be around and I
think they really enjoyed this tour-
nament
The Pirate golf team is coming
off a 13th place finish at the
Birkdale Collegiate Classic, which
was held in Charlotte March 13-14.
ECU posted a three round total
score of 923,61 strokes behind the
Tarheels of UNC Adams led the
Pirates during this event, finishing
in a tie for 36th in the individual
competition. Campbell posted a
231 and tied for 52nd. Josh Madden
of the University of Nebraska won
the individual title carding a total
score of 211.
After completing competition at
the Cleveland Golf Championship
in Aiken, S.C. March 22-23, the
ECU golf team will travel to
Greensboro to compete in the
UNC-Grecnsboro Spring
Invitational April 5-6.
Track team takes it outside
Piraterunners begn
outdoor season
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
ECU's track teams began their
outdoor seasos last weekend with
the Weems Baskins Invitational.
The women's team traveled to
Columbia, S.C. to compete in the
Weems Baskins Invitational along
with some members of the men's
team.
The Pirate women were led by
senior Saundra Teel. Teel set a
new school record in the 100 meter
hurdles with a time of 14.20. She
finished third in the event.
Teammate Marshari Williams fin-
ished tenth in the event at 14.80.
ECU also had strong perfor-
mances in the sprint medley. The
team of Latonya Little, Nicky
Coins, Rashcca Barrow and Kiona
Kirkpatrick finished first in their
preliminary heat and set a school
record with a time of 1:45.10.
ECU's 4x100 and 4x200 meter
relay squads both suffered bad
breaks in their races. The 4x100
SEETMCKIWEM





14 Tawrtay. MartMS. 1999
Track
continual) horn paga 13
squad botched a hand off and fin-
ished hut. In the 4x200 relay ECU
did not finish due to an injury to
Goins, who was running the sec-
ond leg. They did not finish.
"They all ran hard, but they just
were not able to put it together
said Charles "Choo" Justice, head
women's track coach.
ECU showed off its strong
throwers at the meet. Michelle
Clayton placed third in the shot
put with a toss of 45' 2.50 Crystal
Frye and Margaret Clayton fin-
ished sixth and 11th respectively.
The men's team carried a split
squad to the Weems Baskins
Invitational and the Cape Fear
Classic in Wilmington.
In Columbia, the highlight of
the men's meet came when Lyn
Stewart won the 400 meter inter-
mediate hurdles. ECU's Terry
Speller finished sixth.
"For those two it was the first
rime they had run the intermedi-
ate hurdles, and Lyn won his race.
So that's great said Bill Carson,
head men's track coach.
The 4x100 relay saw a coura-
geous performance from sopho-
more Britt Cox. Cox was anchoring
the 4x100 meter relay when he
injured his foot.
"He went about 35 meters and
his foot gave out, but he limped on
in Carson said.
In the 4x300 meter relay ECU
sports
Thi Eait Cirellalin
placed just ahead of South
Carolina and took first. The 4x200
meter relay saw ECU's "A" team
place fourth and ECU's "B" team
take fifth with rimes of 1:24.71 and
1:27.10 respectively.
While ECU sprinters were
compering in South Carolina, the
distance runners went to
Wilmington to run in the Cape
Fear Classic.
"I think we ran well for the first
outdoor meet of the season.
Outdoors you have to acclimate to
the temperature, whereas when
you're indoors the temperature
never changes. Plus it was pretty
windy in Wilmington said
Leonard Klepack, assistant track
coach.
Justin England won the 5,000
meters with a time of 15:06.00.
Stuart Will finished second among
college competitors in the 1500
meters with a time of 3:59.12.
ECU's David Balon finished sixth
in the 1500.
1RTCK
2. Saundra TmI, S" 0.5"
�hot Put
J. Mlch.ll. Clayton, 45' 02.80"
S. Crystal Fry 42TJ3.29
11. Margar.i Clayton, 37-01.7S"
17. Magan3S-O9.50"
10. M.roar.t Clayton, 144-08.00"
18. Jannlfar Pr.vatt, 136'01.00"
Discus Throw
13. Crystal Fry 11911.00
18. Margarst Clayton, 11102.00
100 Motor High Hurdles
4. Saundra Tool, 14.20
10. Marshar! William 14.80
1. �CM,2)1IM�
4x200 motor relay
4. BCtl "A" Team, 1:24,71
5. ECU ��" T.am, 1:27.10
Luwaj Jump
18. Mlchoat Merer, 1910.78
110 laslsrMsjh hurdles
16. Rashean Deans, 16,08
4O0 MOtol Iwtoiaisillali hurdles
1. Lyn Stewart, 53.84
6. Tarty Speller, 87.60
1. Justin England 15:06.00
1800 motors
2. Stuart Will, 3.89.12
6. David Salon, 4.02.59
WAIA
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PONTE VEDRA BEACH,
Fla. (AP�Tiger Wood is the
explosive type.
Watch an important putt slide
by the hole, and it won't be long
before he slams his putter into the
side of the bag. Read his lips after
an approach strays offline. See the
scowl when he walks from green to
tee.
In the Match Play
Championship, Woods swung
from the heels on the 17th tee,
needing a long, straight drive to
keep alive of any hope of winning
his quarterfinals match against Jeff
Maggert. When the ball hooked
into the rough, he tomahawked his
driver into the turf. This is the
kind of behavior that Arnold
Palmer wants to stop.
"I think that frown all the time,
and that slamming the club down
doesn't do anything for his game
and the game Palmer said on the
eve of his Bay Hill Invitational.
"He's got the world in his
hands. All he has to do is enjoy it
and laugh, and enjoy the ability
that he has to fullest extent. He's
not convincing anybody of any-
thing when he slams a club down.
They know he's good. He's proven
that
What Palmer proved with his
sharp criticism is that Woods oper-
ates under different standards than
anyone else on the PGA Tour.
Mark Calcavecchia threw his
putter into the pond in the Honda
Classic and hardly anyone noticed.
Scott Hoch broke his 3-wood in
the Tour Championship and no
one cared. Craig Stadler flings his
club at any tournament and every-
one laughs.
Last week in the Bay Hill
Invitational, just two days after
Palmer's remarks about Woods'
1 OKI HENRY'S ARMYNAVY
� (Ta 111 pin,i nil spot I int;
ntwcai - losrout nmba
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I Surh I vuiSirt. (�(.�. mmII. . V.
behavior, Davis Love III caught a
plugged lie in the 17th bunker.
After blasting out 45 feet past the
hole. Love climbed out of the
bunker and smacked a sprinkler
head with his sand wedge, shatter-
ing the valve and causing water to
gush out of control.
The next day. Love found a
note in his locker from Palmer, the
tournament host and course
owner. It was a mock bill�$3.50
for parts, $175,000 for labor.
"It would have been a little dif-
ferent story if I would have done
it Woods said.
No one draws the size of gal-
leries as Woods. No one gets as
much television time. No one gets
the amount of attention when they
win or the same scrutiny when
they don't. Woods was reminded
of that when he sacked Fluff
Cowan last month.
Two-time U.S. Open champion
Emie Els fired longtime caddie
Ricci Roberts and it barely got a
paragraph. Woods fired Cowan and
went through two weeks of
Caddygate.
"What I do is news he said.
Of course, it works both ways.
So Woods might have caught more
grief had he broken the sprinkler
head. How many more headlines
would he have captured had he,
and not David Duval, shot a 59 on
Sunday to win a tournament?
"That's part of transcending the
game, of being an icon Duval
said. "He's always going to be
under a lot more scrutiny, just like
Michael Jordan was. At the same
time, he's compensated for it
Palmer says he talked to Woods
about his responsibility when
Woods turned pro at age 20.
"He didn't have his hearing aid
on Palmer said.
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.
�� "� ���
16 TlmrKiy. Wirt 26. WM
sports
Tin E.it Cirolinifn Vf
Sister's attorney says others
were pressured to help player
MINNEAPOLIS (AP�An
attorney for two sisters who claim
they did course work for University
of Minnesota men's basketball
players says others were pressured
to help the athletes.
"My clients aren't the only ones
that have information about acade-
mic misconduct with the men's bas-
ketball department Others have
contacted us to confirm that they,
too, were pressured to help players
keep their eligibility through spe-
cial academic assistance said
James Lord, who represents
Danbury, Wis resident Jan
Gangelhoffand Jeanne Payer. Lord
declined to name any of the others
who contacted him claiming to
have knowledge of academic
wrongdoing.
Gangelhoff, a former office man-
ager in the university's academic
counseling unit, and Payer planned
a news conference today to display
the papers they say they wrote for
players. Gangelhoffs claims that
she wrote papers and did course
work for at least 20 current and for-
mer Golden Gopher players have
triggered an investigation into acad-
emic fraud at the university. The
official investigation began
Monday. She said coach Clem
Haskins paid her to keep tutoring a
player after the university's acade-
mic counseling unit told her to stop.
Subsequently, former player
Russ Archambault has said Haskins
gave him several hundred dollars in
cash while he was a member of the
team from 19 through February
1998, when he was dismissed by
Haskins for leaving his hotel after
curfew the night before a Big Ten
game at Illinois.
Cash payments could bring
severe NCAA penalties for Haskins
as well as the basketball program.
Haskins issued a statement
Monday through the university
with the approval of his attorney,
Ron Zamansky.
"I deny the allegations of former
player Russ Archambault. I again
deny the allegations of Jan
Gangelhoff. They are not true
Haskins said.
"The people of the state of
Minnesota are smart and recognize
that people in leadership positions
can have false allegations raised for
whatever reason or agenda
Haskins said. "Fortunately,
America has a system of justice that
preserves the rights of all people,
including those of athletes and
coaches
Zamansky declined to discuss
any other specific allegations.
"We are disappointed that the
University of Minnesota is now
fighting so hard to deny the exis-
tence of a conspiracy i
versiry basketball play
play said Lord, thq
Gangelhoffand Pave
University Pre�l
Yudof took exception tj
of the word conspiracy,
"irresponsible
On Monday, Yudof spoke with
Haskins by telephone from Florida,
where the coach is for the Final
Four. He said he wanted reassur-
ance of Haskins' denials.
"I got that Yudof said.
Yudof said he believed Haskins
but added, "What I personally
believe is not the issue. We will
have investigators who will inter-
view the witnesses and look at the
document and see what can be cor-
roborated and what can't, and we'll
go with the evidence
BE
�3
Nothing to tie at your aportmentsi
Players Club Cm Help!
�)fwto.w
Now Leasing � (2S2) 321-7613
1526 S.CharUi Blvd. � Crtmeilk, HC 3785S
EMlHMtbtlfftnMNf
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KINGSTON PLACE
Don't delay! Call 252.758.5393 Rainbow Realty Ask for Ted or Jeff
Fully Furnished and Accessprjscdl
Beautiful Pool
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Rummer & Fall
17 tThundiy. Mi

Not an athlete?
j�.
You can still
get a scholarship
by the seat
of your pants.
No purchase necessary. Entry forme end full
rules available at participating Duck Head
retailers. Entries must be received by 41799
when sweepstakes ends. Void where prohibited.
Enter Duck Head's Khakis for
College Sweepstakes and you could
win a Grand Prize of a $10,000
college scholarship, or that
amount in cash. First prize is
$500 worth of Duck Head khakis.
Second prize is $250 worth of Duck
Heads. Khakis for College from
Duck Head. Proof that you don't
have to be athletic to win a
scholarship. Just lucky.
i
CAJOLlfU
i
Pr
H
w
EARN $$$
You can earn money vmilecontributlngtothe future of medicine. We need
healthy Individuals to participate In medically-supervised research studies to help
evaluate new medications. YOU may be eligible. You have to meet certain criteria
to qualify for a study, including our free medical exam and screening tests.
See below for our current study opportunities.
To � i if yuu qualify or for more inform.ifion .iIh.hi thi si ind other
PPD PHARMACO
I-800-PPD-CRU2 (1-800-773-2782)
Visit our wobsitt foi niiin tin'
Current Study Opportunities
j, COMPf NSAIK'N
132 Up to $1200
Call for dates and times
Males & Females
w rnfld to moderate
Wgh blood pressure
Ages 18-65
146
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49
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412
419
Up to $1000
Healthy, Males & Females
Ages 18-40
i5i Up to $600
Check in Check oufi
418 AM 418 PM
Outpatient visits: 422,426 a
Healthy, Non-smoking
Males & Females
Ages 18-60
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PPD PHARMACO Conducting clinical studies sine. 1981
E-mail us at RTP - Clinics a rtp.ppdi.com






East Cirolinifn Vf
J7 rThundiy. March 25. 1889
sports
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Divisional Champions
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Champions
I RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
t A i T
CAJIOL1MA
Co-Rec
Knuckleheadz
Jeremy Howard (Capt.
Hope Murray
Takesha Wall
Stacy Murray
Tomeikea Blackmon
Chad Jewett
Marc Goldberg
Jason Kelley
Patrese Jarrell
Sorority
Chi Omega
Randi Scharvei (Capt.
Sarah Pearson
Nicole Pappa
Robin Wilson
Karen Johnson
Rebekah Johnson
Lauren Causey
Caroline Pisani
Ashton Anderson
Women's Purple
Tarheels
) Sheila Best (Capt.)
Sara Fiorini
Karen Mealey
Erin Linker
Amy Nickles
Laura Sharp
Ann Colameo
Veronica Cole
Amy Horton
Fraternity Purple
Sig Ep B
) David Singer (Capt.)
Murray Poole
Andy Cesario
Andy Seism
Jason Foster
Jason Taylor
David Crafer
Dennis Harang
Murray Pool
Women's Gold
Bomb Squad III
Hope Murray (Capt.)
Tomekia Blackmon
Takesha Wall
Staci Murray
Jennifer Westfort
Tracendia Sauls
Stephanie Washington
Irish Hamilton
Astria Coppage
Fraternity Gold
Sig Ep A
Bryan Moore (Capt.)
Brandon Wingate
Matt Gullo
Pete Harris
Travis Shepard
Grant McMasters
James Garner
MVP HONORS:
Adam Strother � Justin Haggerty � Sheila Best � Jay Corby � Nick Schmeising
Jennifer Westfort � Lucinda Mason � Patrick Daniel � Marcellus Harris
Sarah Pearson � Theresa Donovan � Andy Cesario � Thomas Forbes
Hope Murray � Lea Jones � Travis Shepard � Wes Mister
All Campus Officials:
Todd Boyd � Jayme Stokes Doug Smith � Steve Staton � Travis Fisher � Todd Riddick
Men's Res. Hall
7th Floor Fletcher
Robert Jeffreys (Capt.)
Tim Davis
Dereck Totten
Jordan Arthur
Dave Jennings
Chris Kaufman
Jeff Baucom
James Sellers
Adam Strother
Men's Purple
Westside Knuckleheadz
Marc Goldberg (Capt.)
Jeremy Howard
Jeremy Andrews
Josh Freeman
Jay Corby
Chad Jewett
Brian Harrell
Eric Nance
Men's Gold
Fabulous College All-Stars
Chris McGinn (Capt.)
Derrick Hammon
Patrick Daniel
Joe Williams
Terrance Barnhill
John Masotti
Earl Martin
Morris Grooms
Travis Macintyre
Robby Lee
es
Females
)
Dking
)
Phone: 328-6387
Hotline:328-6443
www.recserv.ecu.edu
Fitness
Free Aerobics
Apr. 5-13 See Schedule SRC 239 & 240 Free
Free Aqua Fitness
Apr. 5-13 M-Th 5:30-6:30 PM SRC Pool Free
"Get Your CAN to Class"
Apr. 5-16 See Schedule SRC 239 & 240 Free
Adult Intermediate Tennis Lessons
Apr. 5-21MW 7:30-8:30 PM Minges Tennis Cns.
$15 mem.$25 non-mem. Mar. 22- Apr. 1
CPR-PR Re-Certification
Apr. 7 or 13 6:00-10:00 PM SRC Classroom
$35 mem.$45 non-mem. Mar. 22- Apr. 12
Lifeguard Training II - Weekend
Apr. 9-25 SRC Pool
$110 mem.$130 non-mem. Mar. 29-Apr. 8
Lifeguard Training Re-Certification
Apr. 12 & 14 SRC Pool $55 mem.$65 non-mem.
Mar. 29-Apr. 11MW 6:00 10:00 pm
Lifeguard Training Re-Certification
Apr. 20 & 22 SRC Pool
$55 mem.$65 non-mem. Mar. 2 -Apr. 11
TTH 6:00-10:00 pm
Recreational Service:
SPRIN
A New Year1 A New You!
Intram
4-on-4 Flag Football
April 6 Reg. Mtg. 5:00 pm MSC244
Tennis Doubles entry deadline
April 7 5:00 pm SRC 128
Golf Singles entry deadline
April 13 5:00 pm SRC 128
Softball Ho'me Run Derby
April 14 8:00 pm Blount Fields
Fiesta Night special event
April 22 7:00 pm SRC
Arise
Aquaexercise and Swim lesson 2
April 5 6:30-7:30 PM SRC Pool
Climbing Wall
April 8 7-9 PM SRC
Wheelchair Basketball Practice
April 10 HAM-noon SRC Forum
WheelPower Dance Troupe Practice
April 11 3-5 PM SRC
Aquaexercise and Swim lesson 3
April 12 6:30-7:30 PM SRC Pool
Annual Camping Trip with Kayaking
Workshop at Goose Creek State Park
April 17-18 Weekend Trip SRC
Aquaexercise and Swim lesson 4
April 19 6:30-7:30 pm pC Pool
Adventure
Tar River Sea Kayaking Trip 1
2x April 7 Reg. April 1
Goose Creek Sea Kayaking
2x April 15 Reg. April 9
George Washington National Forest Backpacking
3x April 16-18 Reg. April 9
Cape Fear CanoeKayak
3x April. 18 Reg. April 9
Lower New River WV Rafting
4x April 23-25 Reg. April 9
Haw River Kayak
4x April 24 Reg. April 16
Linville Gorge Climbing Trip 2
5x April 23-25 Reg. April 16
Tar River Sea Kayaking Trip 2
2x April 28 Reg. April 22
Balcony Falls of the James, VA CanoeKayak
4x April30-May2 Reg. April 23
Cape Lookout Sea Kayaking
4x May 1-2 Reg. April 23
mtm





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Realty Check
"It's after spring break and I STILL don't have
a place to live. Plus, my car got flooded when
I parked at the bottom of the Hill. When is
second chance campus living sign-up?"
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Second Chance Campus Living Sign-Up, March 22-26,
Ground Floor, Jones Residence Hall
Don't miss this opportunity to guarantee yourself a
room before University Housing begins assigning
new istudents. Participants in second chance
O campus living sign-up also become eligible for

the 1999-2000 reach for the stars Campus
Living Sweepstakes.
Campus living�it's stellar!
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UNIVERSITY HOUSING AND CAMPUS DINING SERVICES
TELEPHONE: ECU-HOME; ECU-FOOD

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101
19 Thundiy, Mirch 25. 1989
FOR RENT
WESLEY COMMONS North. One
bedroom $310 & two bedroom
$400. near campus. ECU bus stop,
free water and sewer, washer and
dryer hookup and on site laundry,
pets considered. Call Wainright
Property Management LLC 756-
6209.
PINEBROOK APARTMENTS. 1-2
BRs available, water, sewer, cable in-
cluded. On-site maintenance, man-
agement. ECU bus line. 9-12 month
lease, pets allowed. 768-4016.
FOR RENT: 6 blocks from ECU, 1
bedroom, 1 bath, living area & kitch-
en, cable & local phone included- un-
furnished. $375 a month 13 utili-
ties. No pets, no smokers. Call 919-
497-0809 after 6 p.m. or leave mes-
sage.
TOWNHOUSES NEAR ECU. 3 or 4
bedrooms. 2 12 and 3 12 baths.
WD hook-up. lots of storage, spa-
cious. 752-1899 day: pager 661-
2203 night.
106 STANCILL DRIVE. 2 bedroom.
1 bathroom, brick duplex near ECU.
new central heatair. $425 month.
Call 353-2717 or 766-2766 or e-mail
kendraOesn.net
2 BR. APARTMENTS above Cata-
log Connection & Percolator avail-
able in early April. $500-$550 per
month. Call 651-9040. ask for Rick
Smiley.
3 BEDROOMS, 1 12 baths condo
near ECU. WD hook-up. 3 floors,
lots of space. 752-1899 day, 561-
2203 pager night.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom apartment located
at Kingston Place. Price includes
rent, cable, water. Laundromat, pool,
clubhouse on site. Needed for Sum-
mer or Fall. 758-6344.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$285month. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apts 125 Avery St. in Green-
ville - 5 blocks from campus. 758-
6596.
DUPLEX 2 BR. 1 bath, heat pump,
washerdryer hook-up. private drive,
close to campus, no pets. $430.
Please call 756-8444 or 355-7799.
Available immediately!
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 2 bedroom apt. in Wilson Acr-
es. Call 764-0755.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
ASAP to share 3 bedroom house.
Walking distance to campus and
across the street from rec. center.
$175 a month plus 13 utilities. Call
Katy or Steph at 931-9015.
TWO MF roommates needed to
share 3 BR apt. at Tar River Estates.
Very spacious, everything provided.
All you need is bedroom furniture.
Asking $275 each and 13 electric.
757-2037.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP to
share 2 bedroom. 1 12 bath, spa-
cious apartment. Furnished wwash-
er & dryer. Rent $230 per month
plus 12 utilities and phone. Call
Mike at 353-8950.
MALE ROOMMATE - Beginning Fall
1999; free momboard. Good loca-
tion - ECU bus available. 321-1848
for details. Help with pets!
FOR SALE
TRUK MATE truck box. black, made
by Delta, fits standard pick-up. Paid
$80, will sell for $60 OBO. Leave
message, 752-7914. Must sell!
1991 ACURA Integra, power wind-
ows, locks, mirrors. AC. 5-speed.
New tires and other new parts.
$6000 or best offer. Call 321-1534,
ask for Luke.
LAPTOP COMPUTER- Toshiba 435
CDS, $800. Call 758-9640 and leave
a message.
LOVESEAT, THIS End Up brand in
good condition. Asking $125. Please
phone Babs at 754-2944 and leave
message.
STUDY CRUNCH7 Student desk,
used, missing one drawer handle.
$75 with small office chair thrown
in. Perfect for studying, possible
price negotiation. 752-5899. leave
message.
FEMALE LAB Mix. house-broken.
spayed, all shots. Needs stable, lov-
ing home. 252-638-6617.
THREE BURTON snowboards for
sale: one new. two used, with bind-
ings; also Beanie Babies, old and
new, over one hundred to choose
from. Call Shaun at 353-1581.
FLOOR LENGTH black satin sleeve-
less gown with scoop neck lined
with rhinestones. Sizes 1516 and
1718. $100 each or best offer. 252-
244-8986.
HELP WANTED
NEED SUMMER help at Hatteras
Beach. Free housing. Need two
males or females for retail seafood
market. Bonus offered. Call 252-986-
2215 or e-mail riskybOinterpath.com
LIFEGUARDS AND beach vendors
needed in North Myrtle Beach for
1999 season. Will train. Housing pro-
vided if needed. For information call
843-272-3259.
classifieds
ROOMMATE WANTED
ROOMMATE NEEDED for May. Du-
plex near campus with fenced yard.
Nonsmoker, must like animals. $200
month. $200 deposit and half bills.
Call Bryan, H768-7625. W763-6465.
WE NEED a roommate. 14 utilities,
14 rent, 14 phone. 6 bedrooms, 2
bath house on Harding Street. Must
like animals. Call at 767-2482.
BLACK female seeks mature female
to share home. No smoking or
drugs. Rent will be $200 per month,
this includes all utilities. Very nice
neighborhood. Call 321-7723. leave
message.
MF ROOMMATE needed to share
2 BR. 2 bath duplex near campus.
Washerdryer included. Rent
$287.60. 12 utilities. Must not mind
smoking or pets. Call Megan. 767-
1280. Available 0 end of this semes-
ter
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom. 2 bathroom apart-
ment 2 blocks from school. Rent
$255. Washerdryer included. 12
cable. 12 utilities. 12 phone. Avail-
able at end of this semester. Make
plans now. Call Emily, 329-0886.
ROOMMATE WANTED April
1ASAP through July 31. Tar River. 2
bedroom. 2 full bath, free cable TV.
master bedroom. $282.50month.
split utilities. MF. Vinny. 329-7083.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed in
May to share two bedroom in Cedar
Creek near hospital. Rent $400
month includes water, sewer. Nice
neighborhood. Call Brandy. 561-
7860.
HELP WANTED
PART-TIME testing administrator
needed to answer phone, schedule
tests, etc. Must be a positive, ma-
ture, hard-working individual. Possi-
ble hours Monday-Thursday 2-8 p.m.
and Saturdays 8 a.m2 p.m. Pick up
application at Sylvan Learning Cen-
ter. 2428 S. Charles Blvd.
COURTYARD TAVERN is now ac-
cepting applications for cook, dish-
wash, and waitstaff positions. Apply
in person only between 2p.m4p.m.
daily. Located in the K-Mart Shop-
ping Center.
HIRING: ADULT entertainers and
dancers. Must be at least 18. have
own phone, transportation and be
drug free. Make up to1500 week-
ly. For interview, call 758-2737
EXOTIC DANCERS $1000-$ 1500
weekly, no experience needed. 919-
580-7084. Sid's Showgirls. Gold-
sboro.
FRATERNITIES, SORORITIES 6
Student Groups: Earn $1000-$2000
with easy 3 hour CIS Fund Raiser
event. No sales required. Fund
Raiser days are filling up, so call
today. Contact Chris 800-829-4777.
EASTERN CAROLINA'S finest
adult entertainment is now hiring.
Call for interview. Playmates. 252-
747-7686.
CHRISTINNE'S, GREENVILLE'S
Premier restaurant, is re-opening &
looking for the Best Waitstaff. Bar-
tenders. Hoststaff. & Cooks. Apply in
person Friday March 26 2-5 p.m. at
the Hilton. 207 SW Greenville Blvd.
We are looking for a Professional
Customer Service Oriented Team!
POOL MANAGERS and Lifeguards
with great people skills needed for
the summer of 1999 in the Triangle
area. Additional offices in the Balti-
more. Richmond. Philadelphia. DC.
Atlanta. NJ. and Nashville areas.
Please contact Lisa at 919-878-3661.
FREE PICTURES. Would you like to
have special pictures to give to your
family or boyfriend? I enjoy shooting
pictures of young women for my
portfolio. If you model for me. I will
give you free pictures. Reputable am-
ateur photographer. References
available. Please send a note, phone
number, and a picture (if available - it
will be returned) to Paul Hronjak.
4413 Pinehurst Dr Wilson. NC
27896-9001 or call (252)237-8218 or
e-mail hronjakOsimflex.com
BIG SPLATT Paintball Park needs
weekend cashiers. Contact Patrick
Carroll or Chris Bums at 561-8448
or leave message.
AUTISM SOCIETY of NC seeks in-
terested students to be Camp Coun-
selors for summer residential camp.
Internship credit possible. Needed
May 24-August 6. Contact David Yell
9 919-542-1033: dyellOautismsocie-
ty-nc.org.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER TIMBERLAND
NAUTICA ABERCROMBIE
POLO ! EDDIE BAUER
AND OTHER NAME BRAND MEN'S CLOTHING
SHIRTS, PANTS, JEANS, SWEATS, JACKETS, SHOES, ETC.
WE ALSO BUY AND SELL:
GOLD k SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TVs, VCRs, CD Players � Home, Portable
QUICK, EASY, HELPFUL
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
414 S. EVANS (UP THE STREET FROM CUBBIES)
752-3866
TUESDAY - SATURDAY, 00 - 5:00
(DRIVE TO THE BACK DOOR BEHIND PARK THEATRE)
ONE OF THE FAVORITB STUDENT STORES FOR YEARS
(IF YOU ARE SELLING, ID IS REQUIRED)
J
CAMPPIX'EWOOD
Summer Camp
COUNSELORS & INSTRUCTORS
(or private Co-ed youth camp
located in the beautiful mountains of
Western North Carolina. Over 25
activities, including All sports, water
skiing, heated pod, tennis, art,
Twseoack, Gokarts.
615 to 816earn $1350-$1750
plus room, meals, laundry &
great funl Non-smokers call for
applicationbrochure:
800-832-5539 anytime!
D.J. FOR HIRE
Mmm
Call
III
. rAMPil'S
HIT
J.Arthur @ 252-412-0971
LL FUNCTIONS
0I6AHTZATI0
SKYDIVE!
CMIWUSMVSFHTS
9191496-2224
NEED A JOB?
LOOK IN
THE CLASSIFIEDS.
H0�M4H0 "Owi OF nil OmnKS
Jamaica Cancun Florida
South Padre Bahamas Barbados
Lowest Prices Best Meals
CALL TODAY! 1-800-426-7710
Tbt East Carolinian
HELP WANTED
$7.00 PER hour plus $160.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina. (Nags Head). Call
Dona for application and housing
info 800-662-2122.
WANTED: PAYING $6.50 an hour
plus bonuses for qualified telemar-
keters. No Friday or Saturday work.
Hours: 6:30-9 p.m. Monday-Thurs-
day, 4:30-8 p.m. Sunday. Apply in
person between 5-6 p.m. at Energy
Savers Windows 6 Siding. Inc
1806 Dickinson Ave Greenville, at
the side door.
NEEDED. Cypress Glen Retirement
Community. 11:00a.m-1:30 p.m.
Flexible work schedule. Contact Jim
Sakell at 830-0713 for more informa-
tion.
CHILDCARE NEEDED for 3- year-
old girl. 7:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. (3-4
days week): during school year
needs to drop off (8:45) pick up
(11:45) from pre-school. willing to
come to my home (your home if
nearby). During school vaca-
tionbreak also care for 7- year -old
sister. Experience and references re-
quired. Ph: 321-5710 (leave mes-
sage) e-mail: greenv1020Oaol.com
SZECHUAN GARDEN Chinese Res-
taurant needs part-time cashiers. No
phone calls. Come after 2 p.m. in
person only. 909 South Evans Street.
EARN GOOD money and learn at
the same time with an internship in
the financial services industry. Fax
your resume to Jeff Mahoney at 355-
7980 or call 355-7700.
NEEDED: SOFTBALL officials for
Greenville Recreation & Parks De-
partment Adult Spring Softball
League. Clinics will be held to train
new and experienced officials. How-
ever, a basic knowledge and under-
standing of the game is necessary. A
training meeting will be held Wed-
nesday. March 31 at 7:30 p.m. Soft-
ball season will run from May thru
August. For more information,
please call 328-4550 after 2 p.m.
SUMMER '99 positions-Girl Scout
Camp. Looking for program and wa-
terfront directors and other staff po-
sitions. Specialty areas include
health, aquatics, canoeing, sailing,
tennis, and archery. Call Holly Harri-
son for applicationinformation at 1-
800-558-9297.
PERSONALS
THE CARD Post Report 319 Weigh
Inn. Recognizing a scheduled execu-
tion (325) & recognizing the 'forum'
as the foundation of democracy &
education. & as I recognized in Re-
port 294.2A 'that it would be a
sound decision of the governor to
stay all executions till the matter of a
fully functioning public address sys-
tem essential to a democratic gov-
ernmentwas fully explored sought
(12498) via 'ombudsman' to ex-
plore appropriate 'forums' at ECU.
Found no ombudsman though ad-
dressed matter via Vice Chancellor
of Academic Affairs. Matter was
transferred to his associate. Recog-
nizing his associate did not wish to
fully address matter.a final request
was for his signature to: 'Associate
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs
does not recognize the 'forum' as
the foundation to education He
signed. Progressed to address others
relevant to this matter at ECU. A
'warning of trespass' (12999) has
affected freedom to do so. Recogniz-
ing all my actions legal & properap-
pealed warning' to campus police
chief. With no reason included to
validate officer's writing of 'warning
of trespass' (officers reasonby or-
der of Dr. Eakin addressed who
though not why) appeal was 're-
jected Now via this report appeal
to the Associate Vice Chancellor for
Administration to review 'letter of
appeal' & issuing officer's & police
chief's decisions& provide substan-
tive reasoning for his decision for
publication as available. Prosper 'N
Live Long. Tom Drew. PS. At trying
times as these it's good to remem-
ber "Up heal all the way. (Above
published 32199 in Goldsboro
News Argus classified personal col-
umn)
ANNOUNCEMENTS
GREEK PERSONALS
AMY FLANAGAN, congratulations
on you acceptance to the Occupa-
tional Therapy School. We are so
proud of you. Love, the sisters and
members of Alpha Xi Delta
RUGBY GUYS, thanks for the terri-
fic social. We especially enjoyed see-
ing the rookies! Let's do it again
sometime! Love, the sisters of Gam-
ma Sigma Sigma
CONGRATULATIONS ON your
lavalier from George! We are so hap-
py for you! Love, your Sigma sisters
SISTERS AND new members- Get
ready for the 80s flashback on Sat-
urday! Good times are yet to come!
ORDER OF Omega will meet on
Monday. March 29 at 5:30 p.m. in
Mendenhall Underground. All mem-
rs must attend. See you all there!
ONGRATULATIONS, KELLY Wor-
sely, on your last opera. Love, your
Chi Omega sisters
NEW MEMBERS of Pi Delta- Con-
gratulations on getting your big sis!
Keep up the good work. Love, the
sisters
THANKS TO all the dates who
;ame to Chi Omega bring -a -date,
trve all had a great time at the Elbo.
Love. Chi Omega sisters
EUROPE
LEurounes passes nvciitable
separately from S5249
PI DELTA- Congratulations to all the
sisters with new littles! Love, the sis-
ters
TAU KAPPA Epsilon - We had a
good time at the social, thanks.
Love. Alpha Phi
ALPHA XI Delta hopes Sigma Sig-
ma Sigma had a great Spring Break.
We are excited about being your sis-
ter sorority. Love, the sisters and
new members of Alpha Xi Delta
WE HOPE everyone had a safe and
happy Spring Break. Love. Alpha Phi
JAMIE O'LOUGHLIN. congratula-
tions on treasurer or Order of Ome-
ga. Love, your Chi Omega sisters
MARCH CONTRA Dance! Sat
March 27. Willis Bldg. 1st and Read
Sts. Free beginner's lessons. 7p.m
dance 7:30-10:30. Come alone or
bring a friend. Music by Robin & The
Pickups; caller. Brian Hayes. Stud-
ents $3: public S&-S6. Sponsored by
ECU Folk and Country Dancers. 328-
0237
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: 3:30-5PM. The Center for
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering this workshop on
Thursday. March 25th. If you are in-
terested in this program, contact the
center at 328-6661.
THE NEWMAN Catholic Student
Center invrteiyou to artegti the un-
veiling of thelfpew Chapel- Crucifix.
carved in wood by EtJUygraduate
and artist Jodi Holinag'eme unveil-
ing will take place during the Palm
Sunday Services, Sunday. March 28.
11:30 a.m. and 8:30 p.m. (The New-
man Center is located at 953 E. 10th
Street. 2 houses from the Fletcher
Music Building.
REGISTRATION FOR General Col-
lege Students. General College stud-
ents should contact their advisers
the week of March 22-26 to make
arrangements for academic advising
for FallSummer Semesters 1999.
Early registration week is set for
March 29-April 1.
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: 1.30 p.m. The Center for
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering this workshop on
Tuesday. March 30th. If you are inter-
ested in this program, please contact
the Center at 328-6661.
TEN STAR All Star Basketball Camp
registration is now open for boys and
girls ages 10-18. Players are selected
by invitation only. Past participants
include: Michael Jordan. Tim Dun-
can. Jerry Stackhouse. Grant Hill.
Christian Laettner. Antawn Jamison.
Vince Carter, and Steve Woj-
ciechowski. Camp locations are Ra-
leigh. NC: Center Valley. PA Atlanta.
GA: Bristol. VA: Delaware. OH: Mari-
on. IN; and Mobile. AL. College Bas-
ketball Scholarships are possible for
the most advanced players. For an
evaluation form call (704) 372-8610
anytime.
THE MEDICAL Student Council at
the ECU School of Medicine is hold-
ing the Hamstring Hustle in down-
town Greenville on March 28th at 2
p.m. The 5K runwalk is open to all
ages. Registration forms are at area
gyms and hearth clubs or you may
call John Brooks at 329-0042.
TIME MANAGEMENT: 3:30-4:30
p.m The Center for Counseling and
Student Development is offering this
workshop on Monday. March 29th. If
you are interested in this workshop,
please contact the Center at 328-
6661.
NOTE TAKING: 11a.m12 noon. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering this work-
shop on Tuesday. March 30th. If you
are interested in this program,
please contact the Center at 328-
6661.
STRESS MANAGEMENT: 3:30
p.m. The Center for Counseling and
Student Development is offering this
workshop onWednesday. March 31.
If you are interested in this program,
contact the Center at 328-6661.
LIVING OFF campus next year? Yard
sale April 23 and 24. Location will be
announced later. Two seniors are
moving and they have all you need
for your own apartment at a low
price.
SADD WILL be meeting on Wed
March 31 at 6:30 p.m. in GC 1001. If
you have any questions, feel free to
contact Doug at 8931. We need eve-
ryone who can come to please at-
tend. Thanks
LUQU klUS U"4"f CONGRATULATIONS. MEREDITH
I mmmmmmmiwmmt I Dowtv. on y�ur engagement! Love.
IwWwE ffairrnracoml the sisters and new members of Pi
Delta
Want to have fun and make money?
Raleigh Parks and Recreation has over 2,000 summer job opportunities for
camp counselors, camp directors, lifeguards, aquatic management, parks
maintenance, amusement ride operators, corporate leisure services and more.
For information and an application call (919)890-3285 or visit our website at
www.raleigh-nc.orgparks&recindex.htm
Work Outdoors I
Want Honest, Reliable Students
Wdependoble truckcar
TO MONITOR COTTON
(No experience neceeeary)
$7.00hr. -I- mileage
mallfax resume
MCSI-Box 370
Cove City, NC 28623
Fax: 252-637-2125
(Nr. Greenville, New Bern, Kinston)
THANK YOU, Delta Zeta. for having
the cookout. We had a great time.
Love, sisters of Chi Omega.
OTHER
SUBLEASE 2 bdrm 2 bath King-
ston Cond. available now. March
rent paid. 919-761-9481.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
FREE TAX services to students and
members of the ECU community.
Standard tax forms only (1040A,
1040EZ). Dates of service: Mar. 26,
April 1. April 7. 3:30-6:30 p.m. Gen-
eral Classroom Building room 3012
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION: 11a.m
12:00 noon. The Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development is of-
fering this workshop on Thursday.
March 26. If you are interested in
this workshop, please contact the
Center at 328-6661.
BECOMING A Successful Student-
11 a.m12 noon. The Center for
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering the following work-
shop on Thursday, March 25.
Monday. March 29th. and
Wednesday. March 31st. If you are
interested in this workshop, please
contact the Center at 328-6661.
BECOMING A Successful Student-
3:30 p.m. The Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development is of-
fering this workshop on Tuesday.
March 30 and Wednesday. March
31. If you are interested in this work-
shop, please contact the Center at
328-6661.





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Title
The East Carolinian, March 25, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 25, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1318
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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