The East Carolinian, March 11, 1999







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High: 51
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Have you �v�r come do:
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bile on or near campus?
www.tec.ecu.edu
THURSDAY. MARCH 11.1998 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 33
Toys, they are not just far kids anymore
See Features fege 7
Parking and Traffic to update transit system
Department says lack
of spaces not problem
Rachaei. Hiodon
staff writer
Campus parking and traffic will be
undergoing many changes as the
system becomes more transit ori-
ented in the coming years.
"Parking next to buildings will
become less available, so the entire
community needs to buy into the
park and ride system said Johnny
Eastwood, external operations
Bill seeks
building
funds
$58 million needed
for total project costs
Peter Dawyot
senior writer
Proposals for the financing of the
new Science and Technology
Building have been requested to
the North Carolina General
Assembly for parts of the $58 mil-
lion needed in order to create one
of the largest and most expensive
buildings on main campus.
ECU hopes to relieve the allot-
ted money in a bill that proposes
circulation of the money through a
two year fiscal deal each amount-
ing nearly $27.5 million. The
Science and Technology building
in which ECU hopes to relieve to
money for will be the second
largest building on the campus at
259,000 square feet, dwarfed only
in size to the School of Medicine's
Brody Building which encompass-
es 476,329 square feet.
ECU sparked a major interest in
the development of the building
after a panel of N.C. University
inspectors rated the Flanagan
Building as the second worst-
developed building in the universi-
ty system. Flanagan currently
houses the chemistry department,
and the School of Industry and
Technology along with depart-
mental offices and labs, all which
will be transferred over to the
Science and Technology Building
possibly as soon as the fall semester
of 2002.
The bill was sent to appropria-
tion committees Monday, March 1
for considerations. House
Representatives Gene Rogers,
Marian McLawhorn, Joe Tolson,
Zeno Edwards, and Edith Warren
are among the co-sponsors of the
bill. While Senators Bob Martian
and Ed Warren are looking into the
proposed bill for the Senate.
Bruce Flye, director of Facilities
Planning, does not think the bill
wilt delay the progress for the
building's development since plans
have already been made for the
design of the building.
After the money has been grant-
SEE SCIENCE AND TECH. PAGE 2
manager for ECU Parking and
Traffic Services. "A cultural change
needs to take on the campus com-
munity
Sources say that the problem
with parking is not availability, it is
convenience.
"People need to utilize fringe
parking said Pat Gertz, adminis-
trative officer for Parking and
Transit services. "There are plenty
of spaces, they are just not on the
core of campus
The use of the bus system will
become essential in the coming
years to utilize all of the parking
available to students and staff.
Appalachian and N.C. State
University are also in the process of
implementing a more transit based
system.
"If everyone would obey the
rules and park where they are sup-
posed to, then traffic would be
much less of a problem said
Debra Grubb, office worker in traf-
fic services at Appalachian State
University. At ECU, there are also
problems with illegal parking.
"It is a convenience issue, but it
is an issue that needs to be
addressed Eastwood said.
Parking at all three schools is
offered on a limited basis according
to class rank. Freshmen being the
lowest on the scales, finding park-
ing to accommodate them is often
an issue.
"ECU does a great job with
freshman parking, it is not offered
at State for students who live on
campus and only a limited amount
is available for freshman who com-
mute said Cathy Reeve, director
of transportation at N.C. State
University. N.C. State also uses a'
system similar to ECU's Pirate
Ride, the Wolfline, which is a free
Park-and-Ride system that picks
up students at predetermined loca-
tions.
"State does the best they can
with limited space said Tracey
Phillips, N.C. State student and
communications major. "Almost
everyone uses the Park-and-Ride,
there are convenient locations for
everyone, it is free, and the best
thing is that it is almost always on
time
ECU is looking toward follow-
ing State's example of a successful
transit system
"Our plan is to make this a
pedestrian campus said Gertz.
"Within the next six months a
parking consultant will be brought
on campus to review the facilities
and help us make a plan for the
future
The revenue gained from park-
ing decals and the parking and traf-
fic services goes to maintenance
and grounds upkeep as well as to
new project at all three of the
schools. Lots are being paved over
Numbers show ECU not E-Z U
Terra Steinbeiser
staff writer
Some students are concerned that
ECU's longstanding reputation as a
party school may affect the way
people perceive its academics.
However, statistics show that ECU
students are up to par with stu-
dents at comparable institutions
such as Appalachian State
University and UNC-Greensboro.
"I think we are a party school,
but not to the extent some people
make us out to be said freshman
Hillary Andrews.
The average GPA and SAT
scores of last year's incoming fresh-
man class at ECU was 3.2 and 1020
respectively.
"The average SAT and GPA
scores of the latest freshman class
were both higher than they were
last year said Gerald Clayton,
associate director of admissions.
Incoming UNC-G freshmen
SEE MEASURING UP PAGE 2
ECU's party school reputation may be a view of the past. Studies show that ECU
students compare equally to students at many respectable universities.
PHOTOS BY MARC CBIPPFN
Safety precautions followed in Clement fire
Each semester
residents conduct drills
James Poe
staff writer
All students living in the residence
halls must perform an evacuation
drill each semester to ensure safety.
But, last week at Clement, it was
not a drill.
A fire broke out in Clement Hall
last Monday forcing residents to
evacuate the premises. An electric
short in the air conditioning of an
unoccupied room was most likely
the cause of the flames, officials
said.
"Definitely an accident said
Phil Louis of the ECU
Environmental Health
Department.
According to Louis, all fire safe-
ty precautions were operating
smoothly.
"The alarm systems functioned
"Definitely an accident
Phil Louis
ECU Environmental Health Department
properly and there were no prob-
lems getting kids to safety
Louis said.
Each residence hall has evac-
uation plans posted prominently
on every floor and conducts fire
drills to practice fire evacuation
safety. The Department of
Environmental Health inspects
each building on campus annual-
ly to make sure fire alarms are
operational, and the escape
routes
are the quickest and safest
means to safety in case of a fire.
The State Department of
SEE FIRE SAFETY PAGE 3
Spring Break on Reade Street,
adding to the availability of student
parking.
"It is not that we have a shortage
of vacant spots, it is that the spaces
are not convenient to where stu-
dents want to go said David Santa
Ana, director of transportation.
The issue is being able to make
parking convenient for students
and staff alike.
"We want to implement the
park once policy, where a student
leaves their car in one place to
attend all of their classes, therefore
reducing traffic on campus and pro-
moting pedestrians and bicyclists
Reeve said.
University
to occupy
VOA site
Land slated for use as
"millennium" campus
A fin on the second floor of Clement Hall
evacuated students last Monday.
PHOTO BY MICHAEL SMITH
K r i s t v Daniel
SENIOR WRITER
ECU officials are considering a for-
mer International Broadcasting
Bureau (IBB) building shut down
in 1995 as a possible area for uni-
versity expansion.
The IBB, renamed from Voices
of America by Clinton, decided to
shut down the site to save money.
According to Bruce Hunter,
"We were going to use the main
building for a museum and the
rest of the land for recreational
services Kimble said.
Ron Kimble,
City Manager
station manager for IBB, the site,
a receiving station for the bureau,
was built in the late 1950's along
with two other sites in Pitt
County used for transmitting.
After the site was shut down, it
was taken over by the General
Service Administrators. According
to ECU professor Byron
Burlingham, the university wants
the 640 acres of land to expand
the campus.
The university, in conjunction
with N.C. State and A&T
University, will be receiving a grant
from the U.S. Department of
Education to cover the costs of the
expansion.
Featured on the site is a 27,000
sq. ft. building that will become
the future site of the North
Carolina Institute for Health and
Safety in Agriculture, Forestry and
Fisheries, shortened to the Agro-
Med Institute.
"The three schools united
SEE1
I PAGE 4





Till tilt I
tgnrnt
Mitch 11. 1999
news
Thl Ellt Carolinian
y
conttnuid from pigi 1
jveraged the same GPA, but with
" Slightly higher mean standard-
jizcd test score of 1030, while
Appalachian sets the highest initial
.standards with an average GPA of
35 and SAT score of 1100.
,rm ECU has the third largest stu-
Udent population in North Carolina,
Siinth a total campus enrollment of
Qt&,271 students. While this may
ihean the student-faculty ratio is a
,httle higher than some smaller
3J schools, there is no evidence that
�jJStudents are suffering. The average
1'jOPA of ECU freshmen after com-
'pteting their first year is a 3.0.
,� Freshmen at Appalachian have the
isame average GPA but UNC-G is
,Ubchind with a 2.0.
itfjf One area that universities are
always looking to improve is their
u individual retention rate. At ECU,
�ty5 percent of students returned
Rafter their first year to continue
"�'iheir education. UNC-G was not
far behind with a rate of 73.8 per-
cent of students returning.
Appalachian only retained 62.1
percent of their first-year students.
The university is always trying
to come up with new programs and
support systems for students so
that they will be able to stay moti-
Jr,vated to graduate said Annette
?'fPacilio, associate director of
"Institutional Research and
"�Planning at Appalachian. "It's
,i something we're improving on
r,lAll schools have their specific
areas of strength in academic pro-
grams. The top three majors at
ECU are business, nursing and ele-
mentary education. Graduates of
ECU are most frequendy hired at
banks, schools and accounting
firms, and at textile, transportation
and insurance companies.
Appalachian is best known for
their management, communica-
tions and elementary education
programs. Nations Bank, Gallo,
First Union Bank and Burlington
Industries are the the companies
that many graduates work for after
leaving Appalachian.
At UNC-G, the three most pop-
ular majors include business
administration, nursing and psy-
chology. Companies like American
Express, Arthur Andersen, IBM
and Wachovia Bank are the most
common employers of graduates in
these fields.
"We've found that graduates of
the business administration pro-
gram at UNC-G are very well pre-
pared to meet the demands of our
business said Carl Langely of
Wachovia Bank.
"We're pretty much even with
the other colleges around here
said sophomore Elizabeth Jones.
"I'm not surprised, even though so
many people seem to think ECU is
slack
Science and Tech.
continued from page 1
DeMarco denied Adviser surveys now online
rehearing by ESC
Former professor does
not plan to repetition
KmsTY Daniel
SENIOR WHITER
Former ECU professor Sal
Demarco, terminated from the uni-
versity, was denied a rehearing of
his case by the Employment
Security Commission.
The former speech pathology
professor was terminated from his
tenured position by Chancellor
Eakin amid allegations of using
obscene language during faculty
meetings, shoving fellow professor
Dr. Richard Shine and disobeying
requests from his department chair.
According to DeMarco, the alle-
gations of disobeying his depart-
ment chair came after he was told
not participate in further sessions
with students. Demarco said that he
did not cancel a scheduled session
with one student because he misun-
derstood the requests of the chair.
Demarco claims that the shoving
incident was the result of his multi-
ple sclerosis. He said it happened
when he was shocked when Dr.
Shine placed his hand on him.
Demarco said he reacted by throw-
ing his hands up, and as a result of
this, accusations of pushing Shine
were made.
In a recent letter from the
Employment Security Commission,
Demarco was denied the rehearing
because his application was four
days late.
Demarco's lawyer, Al McSurery,
thought he had 15 days to apply for a
rehearing, but the deadline is 10
days.
"He missed the deadline
DeMarco said "I understand peo-
ple make mistakes. I'm unhappy,
but I have to move on
DeMarco said that he has no
plans to repetition the ESC.
On April 19, a judicial appeal will
be heard by the Wake County
Superior Court to determine if it
was a fair trial.
DeMarco also said that McSurery
will file suit against ECU and
Chancellor Eakin under the 1990
American's with Disabilities Act.
DeMarco said he was discriminated
against because of his multiple scle-
Evaluations planned
jbrMardi22-April8
Amy Sheridan
senior writer
nation of an ad in TEC, this story,
and the e-mails sent to all the stu-
dents through the the school e-mail
system, that will encourage more
student participation said
Associate Dean Jo Ann Jones.
Each student participating in the
survey becomes eligible to win
For the first time, the
adviseradvisee evaluation survey
will be conducted electronically
through the Internet.
Students can participate in the
evaluation March 22-April 8.
Furthermore, students can find the
survey at either of the following two
web sites: www.student.ecu.edu or
a c
http:intranet.ecu.edustudentadv
isersurvey.cfm.
In the past, advisers usually
passed out the evaluation survey
form when students came in to
make their spring schedule.
However, last year, for the first time
students were given a choice to
either get the survey from their
adviser and mail it in, or use the
Internet. The Office of
Undergraduate Studies hope that
this year there will be a much more
positive turn out because they have
sent e-mail to every students school
e-mail address.
"Hopefully by running a combi-
"As a senior, I never have been
gven the opportunity to evalu-
ate my adviser's performance
Jacques Grace
Senior Accounting Major
$300 in textbookschool supplies
for the summer terms andor fall
semester courtesy of the ECU
Student Stores. By participating in
this survey, students will be able
not only to evaluate their advisers,
but also to help improve academic
advising at ECU.
"The $300 is,a way of saying
thank you for the" student participa-
tion said Dorothy Muller, dean of
Under Graduate Studies.
Advisers who choose to partici-
pate in the evaluation program will
be eligible for recognition as out-
standing advisers for the 1998-1999
academic year. Faculty will be
selected as outstanding General
College and declared major advis-
ers by committees established by
the Office of Undergraduate
Studies in conjunction with appro-
priate Faculty Senate cornmittees
and the Council on Undergraduate
Academic Advising.
Four former winners of the
General College or Declared Major
Outstanding Adviser Award at
ECU have been selected recipients
of the Outstanding Adviser Award
given by the National Academic
Advising Association.
Seniors can participate and a
number of professors and senior
students are encouraged to as well.
"As a senior, I never have been
given the opportunity to evaluate
my adviser's performance; however,
I feel that many more students will
participate because it will alleviate
the pain staking process of mailing
the forms back to the university
said Jacques Grace, a senior and
accounting major.
"Having the survey on the
Internet will allow more opportuni-
ty for students to participate
Mailer said. "While they were on
the school e-mail system we would
hope that students might look fur-
ther than the survey into the rest of
the schools web location
ed, the university must then find a
contractor for the development of
the proposed area near 10th Street
and the General Classroom
Building, partially set on Faculty
Way. This process could take some
time since the N.C. system
requires that a committee must
decide which contractor offers the
best value for the money.
Flye said that the building will
combine much better technology
than that of the old Flanagan
Building.
"This one is probably a litde
more complex than the Brody
Building, with more sophisticated
laboratories Flye said.
Sen. Ed Warren thinks that once
the wheels sun turning there
should be no problem in getting
the project started in the develop-
ment stages. Warren said that usu-
ally capital projects are looked at in
the last two to three weeks of ses-
sion, sometime near June, with
results coming possibly in May.
Warren, however, is not sure if the
bill will be passed.
"The bill was just submitted.
That's one of the last things we will
look at at the present time we
don't know if the bill will be
passed Warren said.
Yc
Yc
Yc
r
Free
Call
209-B:
COMINi
NEXT
TUES


4
fyou're one of the 99.9 of aH cotege students who could use a little extra spending money during
Spring Break, stop by TJ. Maxx before you go. We have everything you need from swimsuils to sandals,
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- �







Thl tut Carolinian
TtifriiY, Mtreli 11. IgM
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jlty will be
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major advis-
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idviser Award
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participate
they were on
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light look tiir-
into the rest of
ion
V
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sandals,
v
You drank.
You danced.
You had se
ryiiss�3
Free Pregnancy Tests
Call Carolina Pregnancy Center 757-0003
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ATTORNEY A T L A W
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� ECU Class of '84, Campbell Law Class of '87
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752-7529
ROTC branch now
recognized by Army
Kristy Daniel
senior wiitii
THE PONDERING
THEX-PERIMENT
OPENED FOR HOBEX
I
COMING
NEXT
TUES ,
'B&a.t Roots
Adviser Survey
ADVISERADVISEE EVALUATION SURVEY
�ejPa�SSj BloSoW �vljilTOafrvooVtiilMBliY aaSaooVM Wm1BAMmMj
Mardi 22 - April 8.
PARTICIPATE in the survey at
either of the following websites:
' & ' ' ��
� http:www. student.ecu.edu
� http:intraott.ecu.eilu8tudentadvisersurvey.cfiii
The activation ceremony of the
ECU ROTC branch was held
Wednesday to formally present the
battalion with its official colors
(flags).
According to Maj. Stuart Jolly,
the ECU ROTC branch was for-
merly pan of the N.C. State
University ROTC branch. During
the activation ceremony, the ECU
ROTC branch became an indepen-
dent organization recognized by
the U.S. Army as a host institute.
The ceremony began at 3 p.m.
with a parade and was followed by
a reception at the Pirate Club in
honor of the new battalion.
In attendance was the 82nd Air
Borne Division Band and ECU's
ROTC higher headquarters from
Ft. Bragg. Members of the B.O.T
and a wide variety of staff and (ac-
uity members also came to the
watch the 82nd Air Borne flags.
Maj. Jolly, who has been with
the ECU branch for more than a
year, said this was a big step for the
ROTC branch at ECU.
"This is a big day for the Army
ROTC here at ECU Jolly said.
"Wc arc becoming our own battal-
ion, which gives us more visibility
within the army and school
"I think it is positive that we
have a battalion at ECU that is ded-
icated to the army and the school
said Al Matthews, vice chancellor
for Student Life.
Former ROTC member, Chris
Turner, a senior majoring in crimi-
nal justice, feels the battalion's new
independence is a benefit for the
university.
This is a chance for the ECU
ROTC to grow and excel Turner
said. " It is a definite plus for die
university
Fire Safety
continued from page 1
PARTICIPATE and have a voice in
improving academic advising at ECU.
PARTICIPATE & become eligible
to win $300 in textbooksschool
supplies for the summer andor fall
Insurance inspects all ECU build-
ings annually as well.
The Greenville Fire
Department works with ECU to
control and investigate any fire that
occurs and often collaborates with
ECU's Department of
Environmental Health. The
Greenville Fire Department also
assists in producing pre-emergency
planning by doing a walk through
of all new buildings on campus.
Greenville Fire Department
Fire Inspector Allen Everette said
there haven't been any serious fires
at ECU in the past six years.
"We believe in using teamwork
to help save lives and property
Everette said.
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4 JTmrrtay. Mifrit 11.1989
ff lmillf i
Tht Eiit Ctroliitiirf; "
Tin tut Cifol
BOND RAISED FDR
MAN CHARGED WITH
IMPERSONATING A
STATE TROOPER
DURHAM (AP) j Bond was
tripled to $3 million for a man
accused of impersonating a state
trooper and a Carolina Panthers
football player as he allegedly
robbed people in Durham and
Charlotte.
He is accused of posing as a
state trooper in October to rob a
Duke University student and as a
Panther to force a man to withdraw
money from automated teller
machines'throughout Charlotte.
ftr
CHARGED WITH
MURDER
KINSTON, N.C. (AP) A captain
with the. Kinston Fire Department
faces a charge of killing a man who
had been dating his estranged wife.
Anthony Dove, 30, is charged in
the January 26 death of Victor
Williams, who was shot twice in the
head.
Lenoir County sheriff's investi-
gators said they believed Williams
was shot after he was stopped on
N.C 55 by someone using a blue
lighf
POLICE RAID UNDER-
GROUND POT BUNKER
ANCHORAGE (AP) Drug
enforcement raided an under-
ground bunker in Wasilla Monday
and seized marijuana plants,
according to Alaska State Troopers.
The bunker was beneath the
home of Robert W. Snider, 46, and
Billie Jean Marmon, 44, troopers
said. Snider and Marmon were
arrested on charges of violating
probation, troopers reported, and
charges of misconduct involving a
controlled substance were being
referred to prosecutors. Snider was
being held without bail under the
terms of his probation; Marmon
was to be arraigned Tuesday.
TEEN SENTENCED IN
ATTACKS OF 5 WOMEN
MACON, Ga. (AP) A 17-ycar-
old has been sentenced to life in
prison plus 20 years for violendy
attacking five Macon women,
including one who was raped at
knifepoint while her three children
slept in the house.
Cecil Howard III was sentenced
Monday by Bibb County Superior
Court Judge Bryant Culpepper. He
will be eligible for parole in 36
years.
BRAZIL TO LIMIT IN-
FLIGHT ALCOHOL
ROD JANEIRO, Brazil (AP)
Brazil's aviation authority may
limit or ban in-flight alcohol to
combat "air rage officials said
Tuesday. � i �
VIAGRA APPROVED IN
CANADA
TORONTO (AP) Nearly a
year after Viagra was authorized for
use in the United States, Canadian
health officials have approved the
anti-impotence drug, its manufac-
turer said Tuesday.
Since Pfizer Inc. launched
Viagra in the United States in
March 1996, more than 50 coun-
tries have approved use of the Iitde
blue pill.
VGA
continiid from pigt 1
rally
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP)
Elizabeth Dole's announcement of
an exploratory committee for the
Republican presidential nomina-
tion brings new attention to the
GOP field and should give her
cariy steam in the race, analysts say.
Mrs. Dole will announce at a
rally here Wednesday the forma-
tion of the committee and also
begin airing television commercials
in Iowa and New Hampshire flesh-
ing out her campaign's themes,
aides said.
In the TV spots, she warns of a
"thickening layer of skepticism
and doubt
"If I run, this will be why I
believe our people are looking for
leaders who will call America to her
better nature Mrs. Dole said.
"Yes, we've been let down, and by
people we should have been able
to look up to
A transcript of the commercial
was obtained from a site on the
World Wide Web, and two Dole
aides confirmed it was the script for
the new spot
"I'm not a politician and,
frankly, today that may be a plus
Mrs. Dole says.
With the formation of an
exploratory committee, Mrs. Dole
joins Texas Gov. George W. Bush
at the top of the name recognition
heap among GOP presidential
hopefuls. The two dominate early
polling for what is shaping up as a
large Republican field.
"They have a magnifying glass
above them that other candidates
don't have,? said Ed Gillespie, a
strategist allied with Ohio Rep.
John Kasich. "They have very pos-
itive names in the Republican
Pany
cooperatively to put on the pro-
gram Burlingham said.
To apply for the land, the deed
must go to the Governor and the
Council of State to be considered
for acceptance. According to
Burlingham, the process takes
about 45 days after the application
is received.
"The application will be leaving
the university in the next couple of
days Burlingham said.
The land on the site will be
used by the university to start
building the "millennium" cam-
pus.
"We are using the word millen-
nium in the sense of new, not the
year 2000 Burlingham said.
According to Burlingham, the
new campus is to feature some
high-tech programs that will help
in resident and graduate education.
There is also the idea to have some
residential opportunities for stu-
dents and offer summer camps on
the land.
This is a long-term investment
for the university Burlingham
said. "It is estimated to be a 30-
year project"
However, the building on the
site will be occupied in the next
few months.
The city and the county origi-
nally wanted to secure the land,
but according to Ron Kimble, city
manager, when ECU officials men-
tioned using the land, they decided
not to apply.
"We were going to use the main
building for a museum and the rest
of the land for recreational ser-
vices Kimble said.
According to Kimble, the
takeover would be costly for the
city and officials felt ECU needed
the land for the expansion of edu-
cational purposes.
Dole to
announce
Several students found great enjoyment in participating in an ice
sculpting contest during the Founders Day celebration Monday
PHOTO BV MICHAEL SMITH
March 4
Breaking and Entering �
Jones Hall residents reported the
breaking and entering of their
room. Items were taken.
Littering � A member of the
student patrol reported a subject
throwing bottles from a window in
Scott Hall. A resident was issued a
campus appearance ticket for
throwing bottles onto parked cars.
March 5
Driving While
ImpairedDamage to Property �
A resident of Aycock Hall was
arrested for driving while impaired
and damage to property. The inci-
dent occurred on college hill
March 7
Resist, Obstruct and Delay �
A non-student was arrested for
resist, obstruct and delay after fail-
ing to stop twice after being
ordered to do so. The man was
part of a group of bicyclists that
officers attempted to stop to
inform them of university policies.
The group was banned from cam-
pus for failure to stop and for trick
riding on bicycles.
Damage to Personal
PropertySecond Degree
TrespassResist, Obstruct and
Delay � A non-student was
arrested after officers witnessed
him throw rocks through the win-
dow of a vehicle parked in the
Third and Reade Street parking
lot. The man attempted to flee
from officers before he was caught.
Use of marijuana � Two resi-
dents of Clement Hall were issued
campus appearance tickets after
admitting to smoking marijuana. A
consent search of one of their
rooms was done, but no contra-
band was found.
Damage to property � A resi-
dent of Scott Hall reported that he
witnessed a male break the win-
dow on the first floor of Aycock
Hall. The subject could not be
located.
March 8
Driving While License
RevokedFictitious Registration A
non-student was arrested for dri-
ving in the parking area at
Harrington Field and Charles
Boulevard with an expired regis-
tration and a revoked license '
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Sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ
For a FREE article on this add, please call
(252) 830-1646 j
When you t
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OPINIC
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you, GenX (a
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the ballot booth.
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candidates. In the
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came so close to
Gore. Now whei
people vying for i
in the land (the s
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OPINIOI
iColumnist
Phillip
Gilfuns
2000 election hoopla commences
It's that time again!
Time to make fun of Pepsi?
Time to wonder why Spring Break
happens in winter, instead of
spring? No, it's time to start think-
ing about the 2000 presidential
elections.
I know, I know, most of you are
thinking, "But Grand Master Funk
P, I'm just an average college stu-
dent who cares nothing about the
wild world of politics. I mean, I'm
lucky enough if I can make it out of
bed in the morning to go to class
Yes, well true as that may be, when
election day rolls around next year,
you, GenX (a.k.a. GenNext,
GenN-Sync and GenTinkyWinky)
will be able to play a pivotal roll at
the ballot booth.
Let's start with the potential
candidates. In the left comer, wear-
ing green trunks made from envi-
ronmentally-safe fibers, is Al "I
came so close to kicking Bill out"
Gore. Now when examining the
people vying for the highest office
in the land (the second highest is
being a model photographer.
Hello, nurse!), it is important to
look at the special qualities that are
needed for the presidency.
Like hair, for instance. The vice
prez is starting to acquire a bald
spot in die back, but he still has his
original hair color. This will proba-
bly help him pick up some votes on
the West Coast. Also he's relatively
young, and one of his daughters
looksgood, if I remember right.
Oh, and he's not a member of that
evil party known as the
Republicans. They call themselves
the "Party of Lincoln Hello! He's
been dead for more than 100 years!
Can we update already!
Theoretically, congressional
leaders Dick Gephardt and Tom
Daschle might be testing the
waters for the White House, but
Gore could take them both on with
one hand tied behind his back,
blindfolded, jumping through a
flaming hoop, with a man-eat-
ingsorry, got carried away there.
The current Republican front
runners appear to be Texas Gov.
George W. (the W stands for "Won
thanks to my name") Bush and
Elizabeth Dole. Now Georgie-boy
knows how to campaign well, and
he received a large percentage of
the Hispanic vote in his last elec-
tion, a vote which usually goes to
the democrats. Both he and Gore
are sons of successful politicians
(not that anyone needs reminding
here but, and I'm looking in the
freshmen's general direction,
George Bush was president before
Clinton. You know, when Vanilla
Ice was cool). Gov. Bush also looks
good (I guess), so that won't hurt
him at the polls. But ladies, don't
be fooled. He has the heart of a
snake and has left the toilet seat up
on numerous occasions (okay, I
can't prove that, but then I don't
have to).
Mrs. Dole is an intelligent, kind
lady from a small town in North
Carolina (translate small town as "I
forgot where she was from"). She
was the president of the American
Red Cross and knows how
Washington, D.C. works. But, she
has never touched an elected polit-
ical office before (well, I suppose
when she touches her husband, she
is touching a former senator, but I
don't need that picture in my mind.
Sorry, Bob). She's just another Ross
Perot, except for being sane, and
Colin Powell, except for being, a
woman. Of course there is the
attraction of voting for the first
woman president, but sex should
play no part in voting (everyone
stop laughing). Of course, Libby
hasn't even officially announced
that she's running, yet. But I'll tell
you something, if the Republicans
nominate her as their presidential
candidate, you will be able to
knock me over with an ECU One
Card, I will also take back half the
bad things I have ever said about
the GOP. Well, maybe a quarter.
So I hope I have been able to
shed a little light on the next presi-
dential election. For those of you
wondering why you should care
about the 2000 race, remember
this: A person who doesn't vote is
automatically placed on the list for
jury duty. Everyone thinks that it's
the other way around, but's that's
exactly what "they" want you to
think. Muhahaha!
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When you tell people you go to ECU do they smirk and say something along the lines of
"EZU?" There is a huge misconception that all ECU students do is party. Admit it, how
many of you came to ECU because of the unbeatable party-school reputation?
When compared to N.C. State and UNC-G, we don't look too shabby in the academic
department We even have more freshmen coming back for a second year than both of those
schools. Why don't we hear about how much the students who failed out of those schools
party? Furthermore, while ECU's bar scene is definitely pumping, N.C. State has more bars
around their campus than ECU does.
For some reason, even though we are getting our work done and walking out with diplomas
in hand to join the ranks of industries like banking, accounting, medicine and education, peo-
ple everywhere have something snide to say.
So, next time you proudly hail your institution of choice and someone starts to give you that
knowing look, blast them back with stats like these:
The average GPA of ECU freshman after their first year is 3.0. ECU was named one of the
most wired universities in the country. We have achieved doctoral II status and boast over 50
advanced-degree programs including a medical school, not to mention a host of instructors
well-known and accomplished in their fields.
The point is not that we here at ECU are academic gods that can juggle everything more
efficiently than students at other universities, but more that we and our institution are beyond
OPINION
Marvelle
Sullivan
Communication key to relations
Men are more likely to start
the conversation, talk the
most, try to be rigit, and then
have the last word.
In our society, communication is an
individual's venue to both express-
ing and receiving thoughts.
Although this relatively simplistic
attitude toward communication
theory seems commonplace,
human communication is one of
the most complex facets of our
lives.
In the novel, "A Passage to
India E.M. Forstcr writes, "A
pause in the wrong place, an inno-
tation misunderstood, and a whole
conversation went awry Forster
was describing how people of dif-
ferent cultures through no fault of
their own, can completely misun-
derstand each other as a result of
extremely simple communication
differences. This concept is not
exclusive to people of different cul-
tures though.
Every day we all experience the
effects of ill communication. What
is worse, a lot of the time we proba-
bly do not even realize it!
Everyone has their own style of
communicating an idea or feeling.
Individual style along with unique
phraseology and obscure usages of
euphemisms, makes it a wonder
that anyone gets the intended point
across.
Miscommunication hinders rela-
tionships with parents, professors,
employers, friends, co-workers, sib-
lings, virtually anyone with which
you come into contact. Most dis-
agreements are essentially the
result of a misunderstanding due to
misinterpretation of intent or the
lack of forthrightness in the first
place. Either way, the result is the
same.
How many times do relation-
ships break down or marriages fall
apart and in retrospect someone
says, "She just doesn't understand
me" or "He never told me how he
felt"? Communication, or the lack
thereof, is at the heart of all such
conflict. Most psychologists and
sociologists who study communica-
tion patterns have come to the con-
clusion that males and females
express themselves so differently
that it can almost be equated to the
OPINION
Columnist
TA
difference between two different
species. How do you compete with "b1
that? QaH
According to those who suppoit
this theory, women above all strive; 'n
for connection while men strive for1
status through communication.
Men are more likely to mil the
conversation, talk the most, try to
be right, and then have the hat'v'
word. Women, on the other hand, "
act as receptors to the male Kyle of1
communication by listening, moat
likely agreeing, and permitting thc�l
imposition of dominance. MafcsjS
tend to handle conflict or RU-j
ments differently because, to diem
life is a quest for dominance so con-1.
flict is natural and comfortable, i
Women, seeking connection will be
deeply bothered by conflict and go
to lengths to avoid it or resolve k if;
it does occur. This explains why9
women like to "talk about it" andu13
men like to "forget about it
Of course, there are exceptions
to these generalizations, but the
described patterns ring one for'
most. Since there is no way to
change people's communication
style, the best way to avoid conflict' K
and understand others is to be
aware of the differences that exist J
and then go from there.
3131
tisd
T3J
Stephen
Kleinschmit
Don't throw caution to the wind
I'm sure Mexican jails aren't
any more decorative than
their American counterparts.
Ah, Spring Break approaches! It's
that time again when we pull out
that old dusty Travel Mate luggage
set and pack up half our belongings
and head south. Personally, I have
to go (gasp) home for two days
before I go up to Virginia and party
like a rock star, but many of you are
headed to the beaches of Cancun.
Here's a couple reasons why I
will not go to Mexico.
To begin with, you are in a for-
eign country. They have different
customs, laws and traditions. I am
sure that I would probably end up
breaking at least one of these. And
I'm sure Mexican jails aren't any
more decorative than their
American counterparts.
Next, I try to avoid countries
where political uprisings and assas-
sinations occur. Occasionally,
armed rebels have been known to
take over parts of the country, and I
would not like being a hostage. I
know a couple ladies from several
schools who were attacked by cab
drivers who try to take advantage of
attractive, young, intoxicated col-
lege girls . Also, a few years ago,
Mexican bandits kidnapped and
murdered American Spring
Breakers on South Padre Island.
Not exactly the safe party atmos-
phere that I would like.
Finally, there's the food and
water. The water and sanitation
TA
systems are notoriously bad Many
areas surrounding huge dries have
thousands of people living in .
squalid living conditions. If you
drink the water, you will most like-
ly get Montezuma's Revenge
Some area restaurants even serve
!oni
field rats as dinner entrees.
For all the rest of ya'H with'
other destinations, please don't '
drink and drive. If you must, wear a .
condom. And for Pete's sake, use
common sense. For example, don't
be the Panama City Spring Breaker
who dies from a fall from jumping
to and from hotel balconies. I
would really hate to see the
headline of this newspaper start
"ECU students
injuredkilled while
t�i-�
onies. I
the next
start off:
severely!
LETTER
to the Editor
Health Educator praises coverage
I mil
.103
Jiff
I'm writing in response to the col-
laboration I received from your
staff regarding the Sexual
Responsibility Week held Feb. 8-
12, sponsored by the Student
Health Services. First, the collabo-
ration with the paper has been
excellent! Working with Nina Dry
has been a pleasure. She always
follows through with tasks,
whether it involves an article or
not. She made arrangements for
there to be comprehensive cover-
age for this awareness week which
included an article prior to the
event, as well as incorporating stu-
dent feedback into an article the
week of the event. I must also
applaud Phillips Gilfus for his arti-
cle in the Feb. 4 edition of TEC
"Health Education sponsors sec-
ond Sexual Responsibility Week
The article was well written.
Thanks again for being so
to work with. Please let me know
if I Can assist the paper in any way
in the future.
Heather Zophy
Director of Health Education
Student Health Service
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Tickets can be picked up for free any Tuesday, Friday or Saturday before the show
I Vau$
I teach
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��One ECU s
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features
The East Cereaaiea'

t
Sex toy
business
moves
mcHnStlTGIL
never pictured her as
someone bold enough to
walk into a store and pur-
chase one of these things.
You alone have trouble
looking at the cashier
when you purchase those
products that you "just
don't mention at the din-
in his closet. The top story i
one of them is "How to
Enhance Her Orgasm What
you thought was just natural tal-
ent has now been revealed as
the works of a few magazine
articles.
These may not have been the
type of people that you as a
Mult romance enhancers may
add fun to healthy sex life
Erica Sike
staff whiter
s you rummage
through your girlfriend's closet,
you discover a weird shaped
electronic device that resembles
your own umm You look
down and begin to feel
depressed and
inadequate. You
have dated this
woman for about
four years and
you would have
Demographics of se
(Made up of 23 percent of Americans)
Aga Groups
26 percent
.18 percent
19 percent
.37 percent
Educational Background
High School Graduate or lass35 percent
24-29
30-34
35-39
40-49
du!t toy st
Correct terminolo
1. Blow-up doll
2. Climax control
3. Massage oiti
4. Edible lubricant!
9. romantic candle
Jffjuucal terminology
Soma College
Collage Graduate
Post Graduate Study
Marital Status
SingleJO percent
Married45 percent
Divorced 23 percent
isprays
name
Stripper Doll, Lai Mi Doll,
of Love, Rubber Maiden
African-American
Asian
J1 percent
28 percent
8 percent
10 percent
0 percent
Caucasian
Hispanic
Other
.JO percent
5 percent
.3 percent
Mandeiiv, A&E Control Gel, AM
Delay Spay
Honey Rub
Tasty Lovin Banana Tasty Lovin
Chocolate Finger Paint
Candle Glow, Beaux Gest
Pbaromone Candle
Source: Adem end Eve Feb. sex stat on sextoyusefle
jn�rlu- Th. AiUm .nrf F�. ftrUn. r�t�lnn
ner table
When you decide that it's
time to clean up your
boyfriend's apartment,
you find a few magazines
(not newsstand material)
servadve, controlled individual
would see yourself dating or
even marrying. When you dis-
cover this other side of your
SEE TOYS PAGE 9
$
Graduate student
achieves dream in jazz world
Vaugfm Ambrose to
teach in Maryland
Erica Sixes
staff writer
I
I With the new age of swing dancing,
jazz music has risen to new heights.
;One ECU student has been given
jithe opportunity to educate others
about the history of this newly
reborn music style.
I Jazz studies graduate student,
Waughn Ambrose, has achieved his
dreams through hard work and
�determination. This Jacksonville,
JNC native has been asked to fulfill
Ian opportunity that most musically
�talented individuals would envy.
It all began when Ambrose's
jjadviser and the director of jazz
studies, Carroll Dashiell, was con-
f
Ambrose makes sweet music with jazz ensemble
PHOTO COURTESY OF CARROLL DASHIELL
tacted by Melvin Parker, the origi-
nal drummer of the James Brown
Band. Parker, who is now the assis-
tant principal at Thurgood Marshall
High School in Maryland, contact-
ed Dashiell in need of a music edu-
cation teacher. Ambrose immedi-
ately came to Dashiell's mind.
According to Dashiell, Ambrose
was his first choice because of his
determination which helped him
accomplish so much thus far and his
drive to educate others about music
history.
George Broussard, one of
Ambrose's other influential
instructors said Ambrose possesses
the leadership qualities and self-
control that are needed to pursue a
career as an educator.
"In situations where Vaughn
needed to be level-headed and pro-
fessional, he displayed these char-
acteristics quite well Broussard
said.
For example, many famous jazz
musicians and performers attend
the Jazz Educator's Conference
Students voice concerns i
about AIDS epidemic )
Student health, RAs
educate campus
Brooke Potts
STAFF WRITER
Ambrose (left) and Dashiell
PHOTO COURTESY OF CARROU OASHIEU
where the students were asked to
perform. While in a student leader-
ship position, Ambrose remained
cool under pressure and his efforts
SEE JAZZ PAGES
When you look at the typical ECU
student, what do you sec? Probably
someone who is young, intelligent,
enjoys going out and having fun
and looks a lot like you. What you
don't see is someone who is infect-
ed with a deadly disease.
Think you don't have anything
to worry about? It is estimated that
one in every 500 college students is
infected with HIV. The number of
women who contract HIV through
heterosexual contact is steadily
increasing, and close to 70 percent
of all new AIDS cases in North
Carolina are seen in people ages 20-
39. Chances are you fall into at least
one of those categories.
Here are some other statistics
you might not be aware of.
Compared to surrounding states,
North Carolina continues to have
the highest number of new HIV
infections, but the lowest rate of
AIDS cases per 100,000 people.
There is also an important link
between sexually transmitted dis-
eases, HIV and AIDS. A person
who already has an STD and is
exposed to HIV through sexual
contact is five times more likely to
contract the virus.
As the number of cases contin-
ues to grow, so does the amount of
money that the taxpayers and the
government have to spend on treat-
ment and care. Last year, the state
spent over $70 million dollars treat-
ing people with HIV and AIDS.
Cliff Seagroves, an ECU alumni
who works with the N.C.
Department of Epidemiology
AIDS Care Branch, realizes that
students should be especially con-
cerned.
"I think it's important for all
young adults, and especially ECU
students, to understand the issues
surrounding this virus that could
directly affect their lives
Seagroves said. "One doesn't have
to be a homosexual or a drug user to
be infected by this virus. For exam-
ple, the South has the highest pop-
ulation of people living with
AIDS
Pitt County also has been dra-
matically impacted by HIV. It cur-
rently has the highest number of
AIDS cases per capita in the state,
most of whom seek treatment at
Pitt County Hospital. Out of every
1000 people in the county, 220 are
infected with HIV and 200 have
developed AIDS.
"Contrary to popular beliefs, this
virus is not an urban disease
Seagroves said. "12 eastern North
Carolina counties accounted for 20
percent of the new AIDS cases, but
these counties only account for
about 12 percent of the total popu-
lation
As a response to the increase in
our area, organizations such as
PICASO have formed to provide
support and outreach to those who
are infected with the virus. They
provide a valuable resource to those
who are infected and in need of
support services.
Zach Siler, an RA in Fleming,
brought PICASO representative
Berry Elmore to Cotten Hall
recently to inform students about
the severity of STDs and AIDS.
"Elmore spoke to students
about STDs, how they are contract-
ed and contraceptives Siler said.
"He also brought one of his
patients who is infected with HIV
According to Siler, having a per-
son attend who is living with the
virus brought the AIDS issue to a
more personal level and opened the
students' eyes.
"It's definitely a problem that
should be addressed Siler said. "I
would like to make PICASO an
annual program in the residence
halls
ECU has also been forced to
acknowledge the threat of HIV on
campus. Last semester, they began
offering tree HIV wnng ar the
Student Health Services.
"Student Health instituted its
testing as a response to the
demands of students said
Heather Zophy, a health educator
at SHS. "They felt that it was
important that this service be
offered on campus
According to Zophy, the
response has been very positive.
There has been a steady flow
of testing since the fall, and stu-
dents have expressed their appreci-
ation for the services that the SHS
provides Zophy said.
You are at risk for HIV and
should be tested if you have
engaged in any type of unprotected
sex, shared drug needles or
syringes, have ever been infected
with a sexually transmitted disease,
or have ever been sexually assauJo
ed. Any student who wants to be
tested can call SHS to make an
appointment. Counselors will dis-
cuss the results of your test with
you, and help you to interpret djj�
results.
"We encourage abstinence as
the best way to prevent HIV infec-
tion, and we are trying to make stu-
dents realize that the danger is
real�even at ECU Zophy said.





9 Thundiy,
4f-
ft
ITIwidlv. Much 11. 1999
features
Thi Elit Carolinian
Jazz
continuid from p�g�7
Jujpere clearly observable.
As an artist, Ambrose contem-
� the offer to teach music at
lurgood Marshall High School
I ypd gladly accepted.
"I'm really excited about the
opportunity to teach music to
I' young adults Ambrose said.
Ambrose feels that he is well
L prepared for the position as a
teacher because of his experience
a a graduate assistant to Jeff Bair, a
(lecturer for the School of Music.
According to Bair, there are two
, types of students that he encoun-
U ters�those with a lot of talent and
little discipline and those with a lot
of discipline and very little talent.
. "His combination of talent and
discipline makes him more than
' ready to take on this position Bair
said. "He is also very informed
about the tradition of jazz music
and the major influences to the
style, which makes him a perfect
candidate as an educator
"Middle school is the perfect
place to start music education and I
feel that I can open up different
avenues and genres for them
Ambrose said. "I feel that the jazz
faculty has given me a firm founda-
tion to go out and make an impact
in the world of music
Ambrose credits much of his
accomplishments to the music staff
here at ECU and his story is an
excellent example of the way that
students and teachers influence
each other. Ambrose hopes to influ-
ence the middle school students
just as he was encouraged and
influenced by his professors.
Ambrose and Dashiell met at
band camp while Ambrose was
attending White Oak High School
in Jacksonville, NC. Dashiell recog-
nized Ambrose's hidden musical
talents which didn't surface until
he made the transition from French
horn to saxophone. Ambrose then
decided to attend ECU and receive
his undergraduate degree in music
education. Through Dashiell's
encouragement and Ambrose's
own determination, he became one
of the first freshmen to make the
Jazz Ensemble A.
"I wouldn't be where I am today
without Dashiell's musical guid-
ance Ambrose said.
Ambrose worked hard and
earned a spot as the lead alto player
for the Jazz Ensemble. He later fur-
thered his accomplishments and
achievements as president of the
International Association of Jazz
Educators Student Chapter.
Upon graduation, he decided to
continue his education at ECU and
receive an additional degree in jazz
studies. He has taught saxophone
and various jazz history courses as
well as conducted the Jazz
Ensemble B.
Dashiell is very confident that
Ambrose's education and talents
will pave the way toward a bright
future for him.
"With his playing ability and
teaching skills, he's going to do
well Dashiell said.
Cockapoo comes to boy's aid
dogmewes"purpIe
Ueart"for his bravery
IeVITTOWN, Pa. (AP) - A 30-
fcund cockapoo charged two pit
11s attacking an 11-year-old boy,
distracting them so the lacerated
toy could scramble to safety in a
Itearby house.
!l "I thought he was dead said
tyito Addesa, owner of Bo, the
mighty mite lavished by the neigh-
borhood with doggy treats and a
Hand-drawn "purple heart" award
�ring "bravery and strength under
extreme circumstances
9 Falls Township Police Chief
Arnie Conoline said the dog
deserved the honors.
Addesa said Bo, a cocker
spaniel-poodle mix, didn't hesitate
when he saw the pit bulls, twice his
size, attacking 11-year-old John
Itewart.

As it was, Stewart spent two
days at St. Mary Medical Center,
where he was treated for arm lacer-
ations.
Conoline said the boy was walk-
ing home from school Feb. 12
when he was attacked by the two
dogs, which were owned by John
Martell.
The attack occurred nearly in
front of Addesa's home. The 64-
year-old retired chemist said he
heard the boy screaming and ran
toward the street, with Bo right
behind him.
"I saw John with a dog holding
on to each arm, ripping his arms. Bo
came out behind me, ran toward
the boy and was attacked by both
dogs Addesa said.
Another neighbor, Robert Ipry,
36, ran out with a .357 magnum he
is licensed to carry. When Addesa
was unable to pry one of the pit
bulls from Bo's throat, Ipry shot the
pit bull in the shoulder.
"I think the litde dog deserves a
medal Ipry said. "When I got
there, one pit bull was just leaving
him, the other was running around,
and blood was running down his
arms. If not for Bo, the pit bull
would still be mauling the kid
As the dogs chewed deep gashes
in Bo's hide, the boy ran for a
neighbor's home.
"He's okay now, but I thought
he was dead that night" Addesa
said. "He's got six or seven holes in
him the size of my thumb
Anton Spiritosanto, Falls
Township animal control officer,
said the wounded pit bull was euth-
anized and the other is still with
Manell, who was charged with har-
boring a dangerous dog.
Spiritosanto said he will ask at a
hearing that the remaining pit bull
be destroyed.
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9 Thundiy. Mirch 11, 1999
features
Taa East Ctrelinil
olinim
7-8 oz.
Nabisco
Air Crisps or
Sweet
Crispers
WithVICCard
9-10 oz. 3 pack
Microwave
Orville Redenbacher's
Popcorn
BUY1 GET1
FREE
2liter
Diet Coke or
Coca-Cola
U'
With
VICCmrA
Prices Sf fectiv Through March 16,1999
Toys
coryinuad horn pigi 7
pinner's life, although you
should be able to separate the
facts from the myths. Contrary to
what you may believe or what
values mom and dad instilled in
you, many level-headed and pro-
fessional individuals utilize these
various resources to enhance their
sexual relationships. Yes, even
mom and dad.
According to Phil Harvey, owner
and president of Adam and Eve,
all types of people are known to
have a few hidden secrets such as
a vibrator, explicit magazines or
sexy lingerie.
"We just recently commissioned
a survey of a cross-section of
adults ages 19-45 Harvey said.
"Our results showed that a large
majority of adults have used
romance enhancers such as mas-
sage oils, explicit magazines and
sexy lingerie to better their sexu-
al relationships
Adam and Eve, which is located
in Hillsboro, NC is the nation's
largest adult oriented mail order
distributor. It started out in 1970
as a mail order contraceptive
business. The idea came as a
result of Harvey's ventures in
India where poverty has
increased because of a lack of
family planning educational pro-
grams. Harvey felt that if America
was going to aid other countries,
then they should improve their
own family planning practices.
He returned to the States and
received a scholarship to attend
the University of North Carolina
and majored in family planning
administration.
Tiffany Maxwell-Smith, who is
the spokesperson for Adam and
Eve can agree that although
many people classify those who
buy their products as low-class,
the typical customers are within
the population of married, mid-
dle-class individuals with kids
and a house in the suburbs.
"About 80 percent of our cus-
tomers are men and an astound-
ing 20 percent of our customers
are women said Smith.
Their products lie geared tovard
enhancing the romance in sexual
relationships rather than selling
sexually explicit material that
degrades sex.
"Because of the controversial
nature of what we sell, Adam'and
Eve has gone to great lengths to
have everything screened by fero-
fessional sex therapists who omit
any degrading, violent or negative
content Harvey said.
One local business here in
Greenville that sells romance'
enhancers is Lori's Intimate
Apparel which is located in '
Arlington Square Shopping
Center on Red Banks Road. The
atmosphere that is created in the
store is very welcoming and isn't
designed to make even the most
modest individual feel inade-
quate or out of place.
"When I first walked into the0
store, I didn't feel uncomfortable
at all said senior Man
Christopher. "My roommate also
used to go in there all the rime
with his girlfriend
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-fc
f
TlwUty, Mirth 11, 18
features
Thi Etit Ciroliniin
iami Universityprofessorbam most at pool
)KORD, Ohio (AP) -Miami
Jrlversi
University officials think there's
just too much of G. Roger Davis
showing.
The musk professor says the
school violated his constitutional
rights by forbidding him to wear a
thong at the campus swimming
pool.
' G. Roger Davis sued the univer-
sity's board of trustees Monday,
atjting U.S. District Judge Herman
VJJfcer to order the school to let
hlftf wear the swimsuit of his
dtffce.
ttte is seeking unspecified com-
pensatory damages, plus attorney
fcr
ABavis was joined in the lawsuit
byifhe Naturist Action Committee
&
1
Inc an Oshkosh, Wis group that
promotes "clothes-optional
lifestyles
Davis said he began wearing his
thong in the fall of 19 during his
regular workouts at Miami's
RecwatmttlSports Center pool.
The following October, school
administration banned the skimpy
suit
He said the administration
revoked his paid membership at
the center in December. Davis
claims the dress code wasn't pub-
licly posted.
University administrators hadn't
seen the lawsuit Tuesday and
could not discuss it, said school
spokeswoman Holly Wissing.
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only 128 slots available
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For more information,
pick up a registration packet
from the MSC desk, or
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-
O
A
d
,1
Till Eitt Ciroll
Di
CO
rei
Rosea
plans
I
he
Bl.AI
8INI
' John Rose
' lay on the
diving
: board and
: with a smile
5 began his
'best
i impression
' of the ele-
r
; men tary
backstroke
while stu-
I dents looked a
Rose will
! more of his di
the Exercise
Department,
departure as
coach. After 31
� were at ECU,
coaching chap
His retirement
; as he plans to i
j responsibilities
to pursue som
� as well.
I just wan
;teach my das
Jtime to go hut
J will be trying t
�turkeys, duclu
�want to shoot�
"I'm very g
;my coaching
�It's a lot of tii
Sof intense prac
Sand traveling o
Head swim
has worked sid
for the last
During this t
posted an ov
wins and only
also helped 35
the finals
Championshii
qualify for tt
tournament.
there are marv
about Rose, bi
remember Ros
"He has a
and is a great
said. "It's b�
together and
friends
In 1979, ai
gymnastics co
Missouri State
moved to Gr
arrival he tool
duties for worn
men's tennis,
women's gymr
and Rose was s
ing the divii
According to
gymnastics are
diving is men
the water.
.Although hi
humor make
most everyon
Rose, many
remember hi
toughness. At
more diver Job
to teach all of
confidence ii
strive to reach
"I never dc
Rose taught
know Bishop
everyone can
heseessomeoi
n't take too kit
Rose label
coach. He beli
tough to get tl
athletes. He
demanding an
coach receive:
success is som
"Push, pusl
SEE HOSE





Thi Em Ciroliniin
it Carolinian

fcauiane
afaaUittaW
ridle Circle
r
e
6954020
jps-Desserts
Die
A - 10PM
mines
ajfinB
.
�1
I
1; � J
. io
J,
I'
. .H
'1d
� V.1
ible
�n,
acket
or
0
�r
1
Taarst'w. atlita
fl,w if
retires
Rose already has
plans for future
Blainb Denius
senior writer
' John Rose
' lay on the
j d i v i n g
I board and
J with a smile
began his
'best
i impression
of the ele-
mentary
backstroke
while stu-
dents looked on.
Rose will be spending much
more of his rime as a professor in
the Exercise and Sports Science
Department, since his recent
departure as the Pirates' diving
coach. After 30 years, 20 of which
were at ECU, Rose is closing the
coaching chapter of his life story.
His retirement is from diving only,
Pas he plans to increase his teaching
�responsibilities while making rime
gco pursue some personal interests
j as well.
"I just want to settle back and
;teach my classes and have more
;time to go hunting Rose said. "I
; will be trying to shoot Bambi, wild
�turkeys, ducks or anything else I
�want to shoot at
"I'm very glad to be done with
;my coaching career Rose said.
"It's a lot of time, with six months
iof intense practice every afternoon
�and traveling to all the meets
Head swim coach Rick Kobe
has worked side by side with Rose
for the last 17 years at ECU.
During this time, the two have
posted an overall record of 273
wins and only 114 losses. Rose has
also helped 35 Pirate divers reach
the finals of the CAA
Championship and five others
qualify for the NCAA regional
tournament. According to Kobe,
there are many things he will miss
about Rose, but he will especially
remember Rose's positive attitude.
"He has a great sense of humor
and is a great story-teller Kobe
said. "It's been great working
together and we are really good
friends
In 1979, after working as the
gymnastics coach at South East
Missouri State for three years, Rose
moved to Greenville. Upon his
arrival he took over the coaching
duties for women's gymnastics and
men's tennis. Two years later,
women's gymnastics was canceled
and Rose was approached concern-
ing the diving coach position.
According to Rose, diving and
gymnastics are closely related and
diving is merely gymnastics into
the water.
Although his smile and sense of
humor make an impression on
most everyone who works with
Rose, many of his athletes will
remember his persistence and
toughness. According to sopho-
more diver John Bishop, Rose tries
to teach all of his athletes to have
confidence in themselves and
strive to reach their full potential.
"I never dove before, so coach
Rose taught me everything I
know Bishop said. "He believes
everyone can be successful and if
he sees someone slacking, he does-
n't take too kindly to that
Rose labels himself a tough
coach. He believes you have to be
tough to get the most out of your
athletes. He says you must be
demanding and the satisfaction a
coach receives from his athletes'
success is something he will miss.
"Push, push, push I've always
SEE B.OII MOFILE PAGE 12
Membership
falls short
STEPHEN SCHRAMM
SENIOR WRITER
c
or many
� ECU stu-
dents and alumni,
ECU football and bas-
ketball are a source of
school pride.
The Pirate Club is an
organization, through
which
alumni can
show their
pride and
support for
Pirate ath-
letics. The
Student
Pirate
Club is a
branch of
the Pirate
Club
whose
members
are ECU
students.
The
Student
Pirate
Club is a
new orga-
nization
whose pur-
pose and
effective-
ness have
raised
questions.
For $25 an ECU student can join
the Student Pirate Club. Student
Pirate Club members get a Pirate
Club decal, 20 issues of the
Pirate Club newsletter and access
"The last couple of
years it's been a battle
of attrition with the
Student Pirate Club.
We're just trying to
find some more bells
and whistles to get
more kids in the club
and help out Pirate
Athletics Wharton
said.
y The lack of "bells and
The Student Pirate Club offers members convenience in getting tickets.
FILE PHOTO
Club who works alongside the
Pirate Club in many community
events.
"We try to help the Pirate Club
run things better. In the past we
have with the Ronald McDonald
House and the University Book
Exchange Wharton said.
So far, the ECU student body has
not been as receptive to the idea
of a Student Pirate Club as the
Pirate Club would like.
Membership in the club has
been lagging.
to certain Pirate
Club social events.
Student Pirate
Club members also
receive all of their
free student and
guest tickets before
the season begins.
"They arc regular
student tickets and they are first
come, first served said Mark
Wharton, Assistant Pirate Club
Director.
The club is an arm of the Pirate
whistles" may be a
main reason why stu-
dents have shied away
from joining the club.
It has also caused
some Student Pirate
Club members to sour on the
club.
"I only got one newsletter and
only got invited to one function
junior Bobby Tuggle said. "I'm
not saying it has to be a coat and
tie type thing, but its got to be
more for my money
In addition to problems with
some of the promised perks of
the members, the club has had a
tough time with getting student
SEE nOTMU PAGE 12
Creatini
userise&
t?f�
Controversialdrug
used heavily in
Frank Hrndricks
If you had the chance to add 39,4
or even 50 pounds to your I
press, would you? That is c
what some athletes say
Crearine does for them.
Creatine is a natural prothaot
that is derived from coiimMRR '�
amino acids. It has been show to �
enhance physical performance aW"
tasks that involve explosive baa
of power with limited recovery
time. This type of exercise Jk
known as anaerobic, meaning I
muscles can proceed without I
use of oxygen. Creatine can i
by providing power bursts for i
25)
"I would say that between
percent and 50 percent of oar
football player? are using At
product
Jeff Connors
Sataal �d Conatiaaai Caajl
Creatine is legal in NCAA i
letics right now and use of
product is growing rapidly,
doubled last year to $1W i
The product is used frequently f
among college athletics, according I
to ECU strength and conditioning
coach Jeff Connors. , I
"I would say that between 4w X
percent and 50 percent of our font- ;
ball players are using the p��aV. J
uct Connors said. . �
While the human body oay
intakes around 1 gram of Creaoaas
daily, these athletes are increasing
that dramatically.
"We only advocate about six to
eight grams a day Connors said.
Long term effects of Creatine
have not been determined though
SEE CRMTME PAGE 12
Search begins for head coach
Indoor track season ends
Committee looks to
replace Dooley
Mandy Reutter
staff writer
Monday afternoon, Chancellor
Eakin, the Board of Trustees and
Athletic Director Mike Hamrick,
met to discuss the hiring process of
a new head basketball coach.
The job was opened when Joe
Dooley, head coach since 1995,
stepped down last week.
Chancellor Eakin began the
meeting with a brief statement on
the issues that were and were not to
be addressed. The first and main
concern was the establishment of a
committee that would conclusively
narrow down a broad group of indi-
viduals to one final coach.
"We would hope that this com-
mittee would be formed quickly so
that they could go about the busi-
ness of conducting a national search
so that ECU might be able to hire
the best talent available for their
basketball coach said Eakin.
Hamrick then took the floor
answering the most important ques-
tion being asked: just who is going to
be on the committee and who are
we looking for as our coach?
Using the same method during
the hiring of the current baseball,
women's basketball, and men's soc-
"We would hope that this com-
mittee would be formed quickly
so that they could go about the
business
Chancellor Eakin
Board of Trustees
oer coaches, Hamrick proposed to
the board a list of potential members
of the committee who he felt would
well represent all aspects of the cam-
pus.
Included on the list were three
trustees, one current player selected
by team members, George Kooncc,
a former ECU athlete and alumni;
one faculty member; Diane
Murphrey, the Pirate Club execu-
tive president; and one other alum-
ni.
"In any kind of search, you have
to be open in your public body. You
have to basically advertise that your
position is open and you have to
afford the opportunity to everyone
whatever experience level it may
be said Phil Dixon, trustee. "The
search committee screens those peo-
ple and brings it down to a more
workable number where you might
focus your energy and work onto one
group
There was no mention of specific
names that had shown interest in the
position or talk of the amount of
salary they would be presented with.
However, it was said that the athlet-
ic department was basically willing
to provide whatever it would take.
"I think that our salary has to be
at the top range of the conference
that we play in said Hamrick. "We
do feel that we can be competitive,
SEE BASKETBALL PAGE 13
Pirate quarter-milers
dominate meet
Stephen Schramm
sports editor
The ECU men's and women's
track teams finished their indoor
season last weekend, sending com-
petitors to both the NCAA
Championships and the IC4A
Indoor Championships.
The women sent tHrower
Michelle Clayton and triple jumper
Toni Kilgore to the NCAA Indoor
Championships in Indianapolis.
Clayton threw her way into the
championship round where she fin-
ished 13th out of 18 competitors
with a throw of 59 feet. In
Saturday's
triple jump
Kilgore posted
a jump of 38' 10
12" on her first
jump. She fell
on her second
jump and twist-
ed her leg on
the third, thus
failing to make
the finals.
Kilgore wound
up 18th.
The men
"Damon went out too fast. He
had to get a good start but he
went out too fast and that
affected him"
Bin Canon
Hud nan's nick cotch.
traveled to Boston to compete in
the IC4A Indoor Championship.
The team had to endure travel
delays and snow en route to the
event. In the 400 meters ECU
dominated. Darrick Ingram won
the event with a time of 47.39.
"Darrick ran the finest open
SEE THAT PAGE 13
t 2 Zm Saarff �





12 Tlwrtn. MirO tt. 1998
Football
continutd (torn pigi 11
leadership. At this time there are
no Student Pirate Club
Representatives and no student
leaders.
"At this time I am trying to find
members who would like to
devote their time to the Pirate
Club and help organize bus trips
and functions Wharton said,
despite troubles with low mem-
bership and complaints from
members, the Pirate Club stands
behind the Student Pirate Club
and feels that it will eventually
be successful.
"I think it's great. I think as soon
as we get the students, alumni
and friends of the university
involved with it, it will be great
said Mark Meltzer, President of
Rose Profile
continued from page 11
pushed pretty hard Rose said.
"That role of a pushy coach is not
always Mr. Nice Guy. You don't
always win the popularity contest,
but that's not what I get paid for
According to Henry VanSant,
associate athletic director, Rose has
been a loyal employee and has
done great work with ECU divers.
VanSant added, the athletic depart-
ment hates to lose a good coach
like Rose and officials are in the
preliminary steps of finding a
replacement, but a full-blown
search has not begun.
"Remuneration is a feather in
his cap VanSant said. "He has
given lots to the students without
receiving much in return
Rose, a native of Philadelphia,
plans to remain in the city of
Greenville which has been his
home for the last 20 years. His two
children, one a graduate of N.C.
State and the other a Wolfpack
senior, enjoy the Greenville area
along with his wife who now runs
Rose's Gymnastics Training
Center in Bells Fork.
"ECU and Greenville have
been awesome and we are very
happy here Rose said. "I raised
my kids here and I love it. Pirates
all the way
Creatine
continued from page II
sports
Thi East Cirollilm
Childhood friend
recalls DiMaggio
MEDFORD, Ore. (AP)�A child-
hood friend of Joe DiMaggio says
he was tempted to contact Joltin'
Joe back in 1990 when the friend
began playing senior softball in his
70s, a game the pair played as kids.
"I was going to tell him, 'Hey
Joe, you're retired but I'm still play-
ing ball said Tony Scafani. "I
think he would have gotten a kick
out of that" '
Scafani, 85, learned softball
alongside DiMaggio back in the
North Beach neighborhood of San
Francisco in the 1920s.
"Joe lived right around the cor-
ner from me said Scafani, a retired
Medford School District superin-
tendent. "We played ball together a
lot back then. Of course, he was a
much better ballplayer than I was.
"We weren't buddies, but we
were friends he added. "We
talked, that sort of thing. He wasn't
a celebrity back then
Scafani has a June 2, 1938, copy
of a magazine with a black-and-
white photograph of DiMaggio
playing accordion while several
childhood chums, including
Scafani, clowning around in the
background.
"This is me Scafani said,
pointing to the young man at
DiMaggio's right shoulder. "That's
the old gang from the neighbor-
hood.
"Back then, he was holding out
for $40,000 he added. "He was
back in the neighborhood because
it is thought to cause dehydration
and weight gain as a short term
effect. It is also thought to possibly
cause some severe cramping due to
dehydration. All of this information
has some athletes weary of
Creatine use.
"I have used it before said
Travis Thompson, a senior pitcher
for the Pirates, "but not knowing
the long term effects, I think I
would rather be natural
Thompson also thinks the drug
is effective.
"I'd say my bench press went
up 30 pounds in three weeks
Thompson said.
Sports trainer Mike Henley said
that "Creatine is there for the ath-
lete, but these kids have to watch
how much they take and their fluid
intake
None of the athletes are pushed
either way when dealing with the
use of Creatine. The football pro-
gram has more need for it, so natu-
rally uses more.
"We don't tell an athlete to use
or not use, we just make it avail-
able. I do, however strongly
believe that it works and that it is
very effective Connors said.
he wasn't playing ball then. He was
with the Yankees but he was hold-
ing out for more money
Scafani was reared just around
the comer from the DiMaggio fam-
ily. They both attended Galileo
High School.
"I hate to say it�Joe wasn't the
greatest guy about going to school
Scafani said. "But he was a great
player. He had a good arm, he could
hit and he was a good fielder. There
wasn't anything he couldn't do
Scafani, who played second base
in college and then semi-pro ball,
became a teacher, then a school
administrator. He retired as the
Phoenix-Talent School District
superintendent in 1978. Although
DiMaggio wasn't as serious as he
could have been about school, he
was serious about baseball even as a
youngster, Scafani said.
Scafani still has newspaper clip-
pings from 1929 when North Beach
smashed the Michelangelo club,
19-9. Third baseman DiMaggio hit
three out of four times at bat; first
baseman Scafani was three out of
six.
"That was just sandlot ball he
said. "It was a recreation league
that all the ballplayers in the neigh-
borhood played on. We were in
junior high back then
But even then, DiMaggio stood
out from the rest. Scafani recalled a
field they played on where an out-
field wall separated the field from a
playground for youngsters.
2K. A Cut Above
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for a free visit
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BARRE,
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644 Arlington Blvd.
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A special program just for ECU students .
over 24 and their families
It's a FaniJf Affiar b9
Saturday, March 27
10 AM - NOON
At the Student Recreation Center & Mendenhall
Student Center
ALL ACTIVITIES ARE FREE!
� bowling
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� free snowcones
� racquetball
� volleyball
� swimming
� 3-legged race
� water balloon race
� Basketball
� dizzy tizzy relay
All participants must register in 211 Whichard or complete
and return a registration form by Monday, March 22
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1
Ride the fast track
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London $271
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Barcelona $402
fmi im tram RaltlftiDurtiun.ucti wo bind on
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Haitrlctloni top Call tor �or tow domaitic (ami
and (ami to oihir world arlda
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we want to be a
can get the rcsoi
itive, as far as the
One point thi
the fact,that the
their confidential
they would turn;
ing the program
Currently H
around the count
he feels are the
ketball" and com
rial coaches to pre
tee. ,
finaldeci
on the committei
Chairman of the
Ward has taken
Hamrick's propos
give his verdict
week.
HAMSTRING
HUSTLE
5k RUN
RACE TIME 200 pm on March 28,1999
(Late registration at 12:45 pm)
T-shirts
$10.00
AGE GROUPS:
AWARDS
ENTRY FEE.
LATE ENTRY FEE.
Grim 20-29 3039 4049 50-59 60andover
Jbmmmm and female winners
Top three males and top tlweefcrnatesin eadi age group
Band under- $3.00 (noT-sl�it)()r$llM(vfihfi)
All other age groups - $12.00 (includes T-shirt)
12 and under � $6.00 (no T-shirt)
Al other age groups - $15.00 (includes T-shirt)
Fill out & return this portion with appropriate entry fee to:
(Make checks payable to ECU Medical Student council) ���i -
John b3C 3446 Westgate Drive. Greenville. NC 27834 Phone (252) 329-0042
Name Gender Aoe on day of race.
Date of Birth.
Address.
Home Phone.
-City.
Work Phone
State
MediumLargeJClarge
-Zip-
T-shirt Size(check one):
"ImlrL�VrtutoWm $3t2andunde�1wrfi1t) $12
Late fee (postmarked after March 21) $15 tate fee (12 and under) $5
i .nIi� Tut CITY OS BflFENVILLE EAST CAMWl UNIVERSITY 8CHD01 OF MEDICINE. THE HAMSTIIN6 HUSTLE SK HUN AND All Of ITS SPONSORS AND RACE
THAT MY fbjTRY FEE IS A B0HATI0N TO THE ECU SOU MEDICAL STUDENT COUNCIL AND THAT NO REFUN0S Will BE GIVEN.
Date.
Signature(tignature of parent or guardian if undar 18).
&m
Regulai
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F
WED
10





�lit Carolinian
� Wtfcal
y: 12-10 pjTT.
Wenue
ivllle.
c � � � �,
Tftt East Carolinian
sports
ThurUiy, March 11, MM 13
1
Basketball
continued from page 11
Track
cominuid from pige II
278
i
we want to be competitive, and we
can get the resources to be compet-
itive, as for as the salary standpoint
One point that was stressed was
the fact,that the candidates needed
their confidentiality and if violated,
they would turn away from consider-
ing die program.
Currendy Hamrick is calling
around the country speaking to who
he feels are the "gurus of college bas-
ketball" and compiling a list of poten-
tial coaches to present to the commit-
The final decision of who will be
on the committee is decided by the
Chairman of the Board, Bob Ward.
Ward has taken into consideration
Hamrick's proposal and is willing to
give his verdict by the end of this
week.
Hoffman re-signs with Padres
quarter I have ever seen him run
said BUI Canon, head men's track
coach.
Finishing second to Ingram was
teammate Damon Davis.
"Damon went out too fast. He
had to get a good start but he went
out too fast and that affected him
Carson said.
Freshman Lawrence Ward fin-
ished eighth.
ECU's stable of talented quarter
miters showed their worth again in
the 4x400 relay. Ingram, Davis,
Michael Miller and James
Alexander put together a strong
race and took first place.
In the 500 meters, Lynn Stewart
finished in a time of 1:03.95.
"I didn't do as well as I wanted,
but it's nothing to look down on
Stewart said.
The ECU distance runners also
had a fine meet. The 4x800 relay
squad of Stewart Will, Steve
Arnold, Brian Beil and Justin
Poretti set a school record with a
rime of 7:47.36. They placed 12th
in the event
"What I appreciate is that they
all ran very hard said men's cross-
country coach Leonard Klepack. "I
am very happy with the way they
ran especially in those circum-
stances
PEORIA, Ariz. (AP)�Just a few
weeks ago, Trevor Hoffman was
worried that he might be traded.
Now he's baseball's highest-paid
reliever.
The San Diego Padres closer
agreed to a $32 million, four-year
contract extension through 2003,
the Associated Press learned.
The deal, which is the largest in
club history, reversed an exodus of
Padres stars since the World Series.
Hoffman's extension includes a $10
million club option for 2004 which,
if exercised, would make the deal
worth $40 million over five years.
The Padres can buy out the option
year for $2 million. For the first
time ever, the team has granted a
no-trade clause.
Either way, Hoffman, the pre-
mier closer in baseball last year with
53 saves in 54 chances, gets what he
wanted�an $8 million average
annual salary. His last two deals
have been at the so-called San
Diego discount, and Hoffman, who
wanted to remain with the Padres,
made it clear that a new deal would
be on his terms. He set a deadline
of opening day for completing an
extension.
The Padres now have the two
relievers with the highest average
annual salaries in baseball. Randy
Myers is owed $6 million this year
in the middle year of an $18 mil-
lion, three-year deal he signed in
November 1997 with Toronto.
Acquired Aug. 6, Myers was
ineffective and has been on the
trading-block, but the Padres would
have to eat some of his salary in any
potential deal.
Hoffman, 31, will be paid $4.1
million in 1999, the final year of an
$8.4 million, three-year extension
he signed in August 19.
The largest previous deal in
Padres history was the $15.5 mil-
lion, three-year contract given to
left-hander Sterling Hitchcock, the
SEE HOFFMAN PACE 14
.it
IK I

Mr
.12 j
raj
ica
Crown Jewels of the
&. ZggfSSte
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,
1 !
Here's a trip for all you
mountain climbers and
outdoor adventurers -
whether you actually
climb and hike - or just
daydream about it.
All-you-cin-e�t dinner mtmi: Spinach salad with bacon dressing, roast trout with herbs, roast kaaf
ta Jus, whole tomat com, rod boiled potatoes, western slop peach cobbler, com broad, biscuits,
water, coffee, end tea.
Wednesday, March 24,1999 Hendrix Theatre, 4pm & 7:30pm
TRflUFL AnUENTURE FILM
STiEME DINNER SERIES
IT DOESN'T MATTER
HOW YOU GET THERE
Films are free to students with a current, valid ECU One
Card. Dinner tickets an S12 each. To reserve your dinner
ticket, coma to the no in MtndsflhaU Student Center by
Thursday, March 19,1PM and pay with cash, a meet
card, or your declining balance. Dinner will be served at
6:00pm in the.Groat Room.
CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE HOURS Monday - Friday S:S0am
to �:00pm 252.328.47SS or 1.800.ECU.ARTS;
Oaafspaach impaired access 252.328.736
wre
T�e. tfouee af Pnnfc Conner
Saturday, March 13, 1999
2:00 p.�i Wright Aeiltorlam,
(lit Coronaa University
Join Pooh and all your faithful friends.
Advance tkktli Sf table, SI ECU lac.ltyslatf,
S5 ECU sledealyaalli. Doer tickets available
It pj. rjsju �( iktw. Al Hdwl. $� it BM eW
ECU Cetlral Ticket Office, mondoy-Frlday,
8:30 IB600 p-m, 252-328-4788;
1-800-ECU-ARTS; r dealspeech-impaired
access 252-328-4736
b-t
ASTERN
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� With Buffet From Menu Group of 10 or More.
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(Over $20)
Good Thru 2 2 99
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m
(252)321-7277
Business Hours: Take Out (252) 321-7793
MorL-Thurs. 11:00 AM-1M0PM 3400 S. Memorial Dr. 17
Fd-SaL 11:00 AM-10:30 PM (Carolina East Center)
Sunday 1100Noon- lfhOOPM Greenville, NC27834
i'�J H
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reserve the right to limit quantltlw. None �oW to
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1B81G Q
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Student Government
Association
The following are available
for the 1999-2000 School Year
Student Body President
Student Body Vice President
Student Body Treasurer
Student Body Secretary
You must have a 2.0 and be in good standing with 48
semester hours completed and have 2 consecutive
semesters at East Carolina University
Filing Dates
March 5,1999
Through
March 12,1999
Apply in 255
Mendenhall
Student
Center
A






14 THiftOy, Mircn, 1999
sports
Thi East Carolinian
Hoffman
continued from page 13
i
MVP of the NL championship
series, on Jan. 27.
General manager Kevin Towers,
who attended the Padres' game
against San Francisco at Scottsdale
on Monday, wouldn't confirm or
deny the deal. A source familiar
with the deal, speaking on the con-
dition he not be identified, said San
Diego planned to announce it
today.
Hoffman was not at Monday
afternoon's game, but said earlier in
the day that talks were "moving in
the right direction
Just a few days ago, Hoffman
wondered whether a deal would get
done. But talks proceeded at a
remarkable clip after Hoffman met
this weekend with owner John
Moores and club president Larry
Lucchino, who were in town for the
club's board of directors meeting on
Saturday. Hoffman summoned his
agent from Florida, and negotia-
tions went late into Sunday night.
"Really, it's been a lot of K.T.
Towers') input in regard to getting
stuff started Hoffman said. "I
don't know if they want to wait
until the end of spring
Hoffman's .981 save percentage
last year was the best in major
league history and his S3 saves tied
the NL record. He made the All-
Scar team for the first time and was
runner-up to Atlanta's Tom Glavine
in the NL Cy Young balloting.
The Padres were 62-4 in games
in which Hoffman pitched. His
only blown save came on July 26,
when he allowed Moises Alou's
first-pitch homer in the ninth. That
came one day after he matched Rod
Beck's big league record with 41
straight saves, a mark later sur-
passed by Boston's Tom Gordon.
Retaining the popular reliever is
certain to be a hit with the fans,
who saw Kevin Brown, Steve
Finley and Ken Caminiti leave as
free agents, and Greg Vaughn and
Joey Hamilton depart via trades.
The Padres traded Vaughn in
part because of his potential free
agent status, and Hoffman feared
he might be traded for the same
reason. Now he becomes the first
player locked up through 2002,
when the club is scheduled to move
into a new downtown ballpark that
was overwhelmingly approved by
voters two weeks after the World
Series.
Even with all the off-season
moves, the Padres project a player
payroll of about $48 million, a $3
million increase from the figure
they opened 1998 at.
Uv,
HIGH WINDS DELAY
START OF WORLD CUP
JSIERRA NEVADA, Spain (AP)�
C JThe men's and women's downhills
" at the World Cup finals in southern
.Spain were called off today because
pf dangerous high winds on the
a course.
" The downhills will be held later
. In the week, though a time had not
r,been determined. Weather fore-
-i .casts predicting heavy snowfalls
"later in the week had already
'l pushed organizers to reshuffle the
" week's schedule and advance both
downhills from Wednesday. Two
super-G's were also expected to be
moved up a day to Wednesday.
Despite the schedule changes, a
women's night slalom was still set
for Friday with men's slalom and
women's giant slalom on Saturday,
and men's giant slalom Sunday�
the closing day.
It is not the first time that unpre-
dictable weather has affected ski
races in this Spanish resort.
Because of poor weather condi-
tions during a World Cup final in
1993, organizers replaced a men's
downhill with a slalom�easier and
less dangerous to stage�causing
miffed technical skiers to go on
strike.
Gloomy forecasts in a World Cup
in 1994 pushed officials to advance
all the women's races without
notice. The world championships
in 1995 were wiped out altogether
because of a lack of snow and held
a year later.
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FOR RENT
3 BEDROOMS, 1 12 baths condo
near ECU. WD hook-up, 3 floors,
lots of space. 752-1899 day. 661-
2203 pager night.
WESLEY COMMONS North. One
bedroom $310 & two bedroom
$400. near campus. ECU bus stop,
free water and sewer, washer and
'dryer hookup and on site laundry,
pets considered. Call Wainright
Property Management LLC 766-
6209.
B1NGQOLD TOWERS - 2 bedroom.
1 bath apartment, on campus. Avail-
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utilities. Call 329-7034. please leave
a message.
106 STANCILL DRIVE. 2 bedroom.
1 bathroom, brick duplex near ECU.
new central heatair. $425 month.
CaJI 363-2717 or 756-2766 or e-mail
kendraCesn.net
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$285month. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apts 125 Avery St. in Green-
ville - 6 blocks from campus. 758-
6696.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom. 1 bath apt.
4 Blocks from ECU. $330 per month.
Available Now! Call Pitt Property
Management 768-1921.
PINEBROOK APARTMENTS. 1-2
BRs available, water, sewer, cable in-
cluded. On-site maintenance, man-
agement. ECU bus line. 9-12 month
lease, pets allowed. 758-4015.
ROOMMATE WANTED
ROOMMATE NEEDED for May. Du-
plex near campus with fenced yard.
Nonsmoker, mutt like animals. $200
month. $200 deposit and half bills.
Call Bryan. H768-7626. W763-6466.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED to share 3
bedroom apartment near campus.
$210 per month plus utilities and
phone. Call 830-4867.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share a furnished two bedroom
apartment beginning in May or June.
Must be responsible, non-smoker
preferred, and easy to live with.
Please call 830-9065. if not there,
please leave a message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP. 2
bedroom, 2 bath furnished apt. in
Fairlane Farms. $250mo. with
washer dryer and fireplace plus bal-
cony included. Call Travis at 356-
1139; during Spring break call
(910)426-3680.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom apart-
ment 2 blocks from school. Rent
$256. Washerdryer included. 12
cable, 12 utilities, 12 phone. Avail-
able at end of this semester. Make
plans now. Call Emily. 329-0886.
TWO MF roommates needed to
share 3 BR apt. at Tar River Estates.
Very spacious, everything provided.
All you need is bedroom furniture.
Asking $275 each and 13 electric.
757-2037.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
ASAP to share 3 bedroom house.
Walking distance to campus and
across the street from rec. center.
$176 a month plus 13 utilities. Call
Katy or Steph at 931-9015.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 2 bedroom apt. in Wilson Acr-
es. Call 754-0755.
WE NEED a roommate. 14 utilities.
14 rent. 14 phone. 5 bedrooms, 2
bath house on Harding Street. Must
like animals. Call at 757-2482.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU mNMilMdhom
$ C A S H ���g�1��
FQR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER TIMBERLAND
NAUTICA ABERCROMBIE
FOR SALE
1881 HONDA Accord EX-black with
tan leather interior. High mileage
from commuting to school. Kept up
and taken care of well. Asking
$5.000. Call 329-7034.
FOR SALE! Acer laptop computer
with Lotussuite with Canon BJC-70
Color Bubblejet portable printer. Car-
rying case included. Sold together.
$800 OBO. (910)577-4692 ask for
Melissa.
CLARINET FOR sale, best offer, it's
yours. Call Jessica O 328-7987.
PRE-PAID Calling cards. 106 min.
$10. 216 min. $20. For more infor-
mation or to purchase, call Kristy at
328-8426. Limited numbers avail-
able.
STUDY CRUNCH? Student desk,
used, missing one drawer handle.
$76 with small office chair thrown
in. Perfect for studying, possible
price negotiation. 762-5899. leave
message.
LAST MINUTE Panama City Spring
Break Blowout Specials) 7 nights at
the Boardwalk Beach Resort $1791
Next to Best Bars! Hurry Space Lim-
ited) springbreaktravel.com 1-800-
678-6386.
HELP WANTED
CHILD CARE needed. Nanny for
two children. Must be kind, responsi-
ble, positive, honest, reliable, pa-
tient, and warm. Must have reliable
transportation and good driving
record. Must be willing to work long
hours: 7:15-6:45 Monday through
Friday. Starting March 15. Must have
excellent references. Call 931-0760
days or 321-8658 evenings.
HIRING: ADULT entertainers and
dancers. Must be at least 18, have
own phone, transportation and be
drug free. Make up to $1600 week-
ly. For interview, call 758-2737.
SPRING YOUTH Indoor Soccer
Coaches. The Greenville Recreation
& Parks Department is recruiting for
12 to 16 part-time youth soccer
coaches for the spring youth indoor
soccer program. Applicants must
possess some knowledge of the soc-
cer skills and have the ability and pa-
tience to work with youth. Applic-
ants must be able to coach young
people ages 5-18, in soccer funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3 until 7
p.m. with some night and weekend
coaching. Flexible with hours accor-
ding to class schedules and Spring
Break week. This program will run
from March 8 to early May. Salary
rates start at $5.15 per hour. For
more information, please call Ben
James. Michael Daly or Judd Crum-
pler at 329-4560 after 2 p.m.
HAM'S BREWHOUSE now hiring
servers and kitchen staff. Servers
must have day availability. Do you
like to make money? Do you like to
have a good time while making that
money? Apply in person Monday
thru Saturday 10-6p.m. O 701 South
Evans Street. Come to the trailer be-
side the building. EOE
POLO
EDDIE BAUER
AND OTHER NAME BRAND MEN'S CLOTHING
SHIRTS, PANTS, JEANS, SWEATS, JACKETS, SHOES, ETC.
WE ALSO BUY AND SELL:
GOLD & SILVER Jewelry: Coins- Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TVs, VCRs, CD Players � Home, Portable
QUICK, EASY, HELPFUL
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
414 S EVANS (UP THE STREET FROM CUBBIES)
752-3866
TUESDAY - SATURDAY, 9:00 - 5:00
(DRIVE TO THE BACK DOOR BEHIND PARK THEATRE)
ONE OF THE FAVORITE STUDENT STORES FOR YEARS
(ff YOU ARE SELLING, ID IS REQUIRED
classifieds
HELP WANTED
MODUS WANTED: for videos,
great pay.l no experience needed.
For detail call 1-877-338-4169 or
write to M.V.P PO Box 1607, Eliza-
beth City. NC 27906
HELP WANTED
Cypress Glen Retirement
Community. 11:00a.m1:30 p.m.
Flexible work schedule. Contact Jim
Sakell at 830-0713 for more informa-
tion.
EARN GOOD money and learn at
the same time with an internship in
the financial services industry. Fax
your resume to Jeff Mahoney at 356-
7980 or call 366-7700.
MAINTENANCE TECH. Main-
tenance of swimming pools. Part or
full-time. Training provided begin-
ning mid-March. Call 321-1214.
COURTYARD TAVERN is now ac-
cepting applications for cook, dish-
wash, and waitstaff positions. Apply
in person only between 2p.m4p.m.
daily. Located in the K-Mart Shop-
ping Center.
MATURE STUDENT for lovely fur-
nished quarters. Denoffice, BR
wfplc, bath, kitchen, 0S parking.
Laundry, cable, utiis. inc. Sep. entry.
Refs. $360mo. 830-1478
CHILDCARE NEEDED for 3- year-
old girl, 7:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. (3-4
days week); during school year
needs to drop off (8:46) pick up
(11:45) from pro-school, willing to
come to my home (your home if
nearby). During school vaca-
tionbreak also care for 7- year -old
sister. Experience and references re-
quired. Ph: 321-6710 (leave mes-
sage) e-mail: greenv10209aol.com
LIFEGUARDS WANTED for sum-
mer employment at local neighbor-
hood pool. Applicants must already
possess Lifeguard Certification. Seri-
ous inquiries only to 321-0725; ask
for Chris.
OCEANBEACH RESCUE manag-
ers and lifeguards. Summer. Atlantic
Beach. ORLGT training offered. Call
locally 321-1214.
FREE PICTURES. Would you like to
have special pictures to give to your
family or boyfriend? I enjoy shooting
pictures of young women for my
portfolio. If you model for me, I will
give you free pictures. Reputable am-
ateur photographer. References
available. Please send a note, phone
number, and a picture (if available - it
will be returned) to Paul Hronjak,
4413 Pinehurst Dr Wilson, NC
27896-9001 or call (262)237-8218 or
e-mail hroniakCsimflex.com
NEED SUMMER help at Hatteras
Beach. Free housing. Need two
males or females for retail seafood
market. Bonus offered. Call 252-986-
2215 or e-mail riskybainterpath.com
NEED A JOB?
LOOK IN
THE CLASSIFIEDS.
SUMMER POSITIONS available on
the Outer Banks of North Carolina.
Papa's Garden is hiring for summer
and fall retail positions in Duck, Kill
Devil Hills and Hatteras. Interviews
will begin during spring break. Limit-
ed summer housing available. Send
resume to POBox 743, Hatteras, NC
27943 or call 252-986-4040.
POOL MANAGERS and Lifeguards
with great people skills needed for
the summer of 1999 in the Triangle
area. Additional offices in the Balti-
more, Richmond. Philadelphia. DC.
Atlanta. NJ. and Nashville areas.
Please contact Lisa at 919-878-3661.
POOL MANAGERS and lifeguards.
Summer. Greenville. Goldsboro. Wil-
son, Rocky Mount, Atlantic Beach.
Raleigh. Cary. Chapel Hill. LGT train-
ing offered. Call locally 321-1214.
$7.00 PER hour plus $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina. (Nags Head). Call
Dona for application and housing
info 80062-2122.
EASTERN CAROLINA'S finest
adult entertainment is now hiring.
Call for interview. Playmates. 252-
747-7686.
PERSONALS
THE CARD Post Report 317 Tip
Top Inn. The extent of the suicide cri-
sis is most complex to measure. Ac-
tive suicides (guns, trains, pills,
etc.) are challenge enough to accu-
rately count. Passive suicides (as
when one stops trying, they start dy-
ing) are the greatest challenge to
count. Recognizing the 'active' may
be the tip of the iceberg The Card
Post will continue to promote the
'forum' as the foundation of educa-
tion to progress in addressing this ur-
gent matter. Prosper 'n Live Long.
Tom K. Drew
GREEK PERSONALS
DELTA ZETA would like to wish
everyone a fun and safe Spring
Break!
CONGRATULATIONS TO Daniel
and Jim for lavilering our sweet-
hearts. Marie and Ellen, welcome to
the family, girls. Love, the brothers of
Delta Chi
CHI OMEGA, thanks for a dynamite
voyage "Around the World Friday
night. We had a blast and looking
forward to doing it again. Love. Del-
ta Chi
DELTA ZETA would like to thank all
of the sororities that attended our
dinner last Thursday.
KAPPA SIGMA, we had a great
time singing the night away. Hope to
do it again soon. Love, the sisters of
Chi Omega
�1 IB
Live Music � Sushi
Happy Hour - 10t Shrimp
Sunday Brunch
Have a great summer
Chilli Peppers has Summer positions available
for hard working, fun loving people so while
you're at the beach, bring your resume
252.441.8081 � Kill Devil Hills NC
Want to have fun and make money?
Raleieh Parks and Recreation has over 2,000 summer job opportunities for
camp counselors, camp directors, lifeguards, aquatic management, parks
maintenance, amusement ride operators, corporate leisure services and more.
tBtaSS call (9191890-3285 or visit our website at
www.raleigh-nc.orgparks&recindex.ntm
Work Outdoors !
Want Honest, Reliable Students
Wdependable truckcar
TO MONITOR COTTON
(No experience neceeaary)
$7.00hr. -i- mileage
mailfax resume
MCSI-Box 370
Cove City, NC 28523
Fax: 262-637-2126
(Nr. Greenville, New Bern, Klnston)
Tht East CareMaa
GREEK PERSONALS ANNOUNCEMENTS
ID THE brothers of Pi Kappa Alpha.
Anything for Money la the game you
wanted to play, which eventually led
to a long nights stay, who had the
moat money-nobody knows, in a
game where just about anything
goes! Thanks for a great time, as al-
ways. Love, the sisters and new
members of Delta Zeta
LAMBDA CHI Alpha, we had a
"groovy" time at the 70s social on
Saturday. Can't wait to do it again
next yearl Love, Alpha Delta Pi
HEY, PHI Kappa Taul Thanks for the
awesome social Saturday. Everyone
had a wonderful time! Let's get to-
gether again soon. Love, the sisters
and new members of Delta Zeta
SIGMA ALPHA Epsilon, we had a
great tie at the social on Friday.
Thanks. Love. Alpha Phi
LAMBDA CHI Alpha, we had a
great time Thursday night. Hope to
do it again soon. Love, the sisters of
Chi Omega
DELTA CHI, six years around the
world and we're back again. What a
crazy night. We can't wait to make it
seven. Love, the sisters of Chi Ome-
ga
OTHER
SUBLEASE 2 bdrm 2 bath King-
ston Cond. available now. March
rent paid. 919-751-9481.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
THERE WILL be a trip to Linville
Gorge. NC March 26-28. Learn cut-
ting edge climbing techniques in a
premiere climbing area. Cost is $59
students$69 non-members. This
cost includes everything Be sure to
register by March 12.
DR. ROY Hicks, a General in God's
Army who has given his life to pas-
toring and pioneering churches
throughout the US, will be minister-
ing at Community Christian Church
on Sunday. March 21 at 6 p.m. He is
the former General Supervisor of the
Foursquare Churches in America
and has served the Lord in various
foreign fields, having made mission-
ary journeys toSouth America, the
Orient. Australia and New Zealand.
For more information please contact:
Pastor James D. Corbett. 1104 North
Memorial Drive, Greenville, 752-
5683.
ADVISING SESSION for Pre-OT
Students will be Wednesday, March
24. 1999 in room 203 of the Belk
Building. Advising and signing of
registration forms will begin at 5:30;
please try to be prompt. If you can-
not come to the Wednesday night
session, please come to the OT of-
fice, room 306. between 8-5 the
week of March 22-26.
BECOMING A Successful Student-
11a.m12 noon. The Center for
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering the following work-
shop on Monday, March 22, and
Thursday, March 25. If you are inter-
ested in this workshop, contact the
Center at 328-6661.
THE BRYAN Adrian Basketball
Camp Registration is now open for
The 21st Annual Bryan Adrian Sum-
mer Basketball Camp. Boys and girls
ages 5-19 are eligible. Locations in-
clude: Hickory. NC; Rocky Mount.
NC; Charlotte, NC; Greensboro, NC;
Elkin, NC and Raleigh. NC. Included
on the camp staff are: Jerry Stack-
house(Pro), Antawn Jamison(Pro).
Vince Carter(Pro), and Steve Wo-
jeiechowski(Pro). For a free brochure
call 704-372-3236 anytime.
CAMPPIXEWOOD
Summer Camp
COUNSELORS & INSTRUCTORS
for private Co-ed youth camp
located in the beautiful mountains of
Western North Carolina Over 25
activities, including All sports, water
skiing, heated pod, femes, art,
taseback,Goarts.
615 to 816earn S1350-S1750
plus room, meals, laundry &
great fun! Non-smokers call for
applicationbrochure:
800-832-5539 anytime!
H0�w4�� "OwiSOf F&1 DNKS
Jamaica Cancun Florida
South Padre Bahamas Barbados
Lowest Prices Best Meals
CALLTODAYI1-800-426-7710
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION: 11tuin
12.00 noon. The Canter for Counaef
ing and Student Development la of
faring this workshop on Wednesday.
March 24 and Thursday. March 26. ft
you are interested In this workshop
please contact the Center at 328-
6661.�
BECOMING A Successful Student-
3:30-4:30. The Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development is of1'
faring the following workshop on
Tuesday. March 23. If you am inter-
ested In this workshop, contact th
Center at 328-6661.I
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: 3:30-6PM. The Canter for
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering this workshop on
Thursday, March 11 and March 25th.
If you are interested in this program.
contact the center at 328-6661.
TEST ANXIETY: 3:30-4:30. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering this work-
shop on Monday. March 22. If you
are interested in this workshop
please contact the Center at 328'
6661.
REGISTRATION FOR General Col-
lege Students. General College stud
ents should contact their advisers
the week of March 22-26 to make
arrangements for academic advising
for FallSummer Semesters 1999.
Early registration week is set for
March 29-April 1.
SPRING BREAK "Bah Humbug
Free Aerobics at the SRC all week
long March 13-20
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: 11a.m12noon. The Cen-
ter for Counseling and Student De-
velopment is offering this workshop
on Tuesday, March 23. If you are in-
terested in this program, contact the
center at 328-6661.
YOGA CLASSES begin again soonl
Intro & Advanced Beginner slots
available. Register before March 22
at the SRC main office.
ADVANCED CUMBING Sessions:
Increase your knowledge of climbing
skills at the SRC Wall. Tuesdays,
March 23-May 4 from 7-8 p.m. The
cost if $16 students$25 non-mem-
bers Be sure to register one week
prior to each session and as space
permits.
INTENDED CSDI Majors. AH Gener-
al College students who intend to
major in the Department of Commu-
nication Sciences and Disorders and
have Mr. Robert Muzzarelli or Mrs.
Meta Downes as their advisor are to
meet on Wednesday, March 24 at 6
p.m. in Brewster C-103. Advising for
early registration will take place at
that time. Please prepare a tentative"
class schedule before the meeting.
Bring Taking Charge, Your Academic
Planner, and use the worksheet to
develop your schedule. j
-CELEBRATING OUR Differences'
RaceHuman Relations Symposium.
The Greenville Human Relations
Council invites you to attend a
racehuman relations symposium on
Thursday. March 18. in the City
Council Chambers of City Hall at 7
p.m. Moderator: Dr. Yolanda BurweH.
East Carolina University. Sponsored
by the City of Greenville and the'
Greenville Human Relations Council.
TIME MANAGEMENT: 11a.m
12noon. The Center for Counseling
and Student Development is offering
this workshop on Tuesday. March
23. If you are interested in this work-
shop, contact the center at 328-
6661.
ADVERTISE IN
THE CLASSIFIEDS.
IT WORKS!
east'carolinian
A
Sportswriters

r�





The S6A Executive council is excited about the various things currently going on with our organization.
We have received fifteen nominations for our new leadership scholarship program. Within the next few months, members of the GA, L fore ad the SGA
Executive council will be traveling to these schools to discuss the unique opportunity with the nominee. The purpose of our visits is two-fold F st we v.11
STKaS program more in-depth with the individual. Second, we are using this opportunity to market East Carolina to MM are
Sfrtfti! which University to attend Needless to say, we are extremely excited about sharing our experiences at this university with prospective future
PlrateS The conference that the SGA Executive council attended in College Station, Texas, was a huge success. We were able to learn many new and innovative
JSS�S� that we are currently facing on our campus. There was a large cross-section of schools represented and it was interesting o
Sub"tfiMMta Student Governments worked. We are fortunate to have such a well-maintained organization here at East Carolina. I personally attribute
this excellence to our advisors and the individuals that currently serve on the SGA Legislature and Judiaal branches.
I�time of year again, SGA Executive elections are on the horizon. Currently, we are accepting appHcations for the positrons of �Jlte�Jt
SGA Vice-President, SGA Treasurer and SGA Secretary. I encourage you to get involved and attempt to make a difference If you have any questions about the
process, please feel free to call the SGA office at 328-4726. In addition, I welcome all comments to SGAPREZ@Hotmail.com.
Eric Rivenbark
SGA President
1.
I
February 15, 1999
Appropriations-1 Old
Screenings-4 New
Rules and Judiciary-3 Old, 2 New
Student Welfare-No Report
QUESTIONS AND PRIVILEOGE
Ms. Pulley discussed the awards banquet and announced that it will be held
at the Beef Barn on April 29th at 7:00. Start thinking of nominees for
awards. Mr. Webster spoke on the ASG conference in Chapel Hill and asked
for more people to work it the Wright Place table on Tuts.
NEW BUSINESS . �
Mr Schofflier introduced LB. 15-1: "East Carolina Chinese Association .and
LB. 15-2: "Media Association of ECU Six now candidates for Legislative
members were introduced and screened onto the Legislature:
Brent Queen-Day Rep Ginny Stanley-Dey Rep Lauren Carrier-Day
RepWilliam LeLiever-Slay Hall Rep Leigh Hancock-Day Rep end
ChristinaLynch-Greeno Hall Rep.
OLD BUSINESS
The following Bills win nvisitid: LB. 14-1: "ECU Chapter of Alpha Kappa
Delta LB. 14-2: "International Students Association L.B. 14-
3 "Constitution of Ditto Chaster if NC Alpha Kappa Delta International
Sociology Honor Soetoty and LB. 144: "Phi Sigma Pi All four Bills are
passed.
NOTICES AND ANNOUNCEMENTS
Appropriations-no milting
Student Welfare-Greet Rm. 1 it 4:30
Rules ind Judiciary-Rat. 238 it 4:30
Scraenings-Rm. 247 it 4:30
Mr. Rivenbark reminded the Legislature of the SGA table in front of the
Wright Place on Tuei.
The meeting was adjourned it 5:22
Respectfully submitted
John P. Meriac, SGA Secretary
Steve W. Marasco, SGA Speaker of the House
MEET YOUR SGA
Name:
Steve
Marasco
Year: Second
Year Graduate
Student
Major:
Has received
8.S. in Business Administration Working
toward M.B.A.
SGA Position: Speaker of the House
Duties: Presides over meetings, Assigns
legislature to committees
Other Organizations: Graduate Business
Association
Prior SGA Experience: SGA President,
Guilford College, 1996-1997 Athletic
Representative, Guilford College, 1995-1996
How and Why Did You Get into SGA?
"I never thought I would be interested in
SGA but at Guilford I found students really
did have a voice and I have not been able
to give it up
Why should other students get into SGA?
"It's a great experience working with other
students and effecting change on campus
February 22,1999
Appropriations-I New
Screenings- i Now
Student Welfare-1 Now
Rules and Judiciary-3 Naw, 2 Old
QUESTIONS AM PRIVILEGES
Ml. PuHey reminded awaryone about the banquet on April 29th at
the Beef Bam at 7:00. Mr. Rivanbark, Ms. Pulley, Mr. Stancill and
Mr. Meriac will be attending COSGA in Texas this weekend. Mr.
Marasco, Mr, Webstar, arid Mr. Brotherton will be running the meet-
ing next week. Mr. Webster and Mr. Meriac will start having the
minutes on E-mail soon.
New Business � , . � u ,
Mr. Papers introduced LR. 16-1; Resolution Concerning Hate
Crimei at ECU Mr. Schoffner introduced L.B. 16-1: Bi-Laws of Ecu
model of the UN and LB. 16-2 the Society for Technological
Communication LB. 16-2: "Constitution of the Officially Chartered
Chapter of Campus Crusade for Christ international. Jamie
Newsome was Screened on and allowed to join the Legislature, mr.
harper introduced LB. 164: "New
Generation Campus Ministry Election rules need to be changed to
delete Croatan and bottom of Collage Hill and to have the Wright
Place booth close at 7:00. The motion was returned to the Elections
Committee to bring back nax
OLD BUSINESS
Mr. Schoffner revisited LB. 15-1. East Carolina Chinese Association
and LB. 15-2: Constitution of the Media Society of Ecu. Both Bills
were passed.
NOTICES AND ANNOUNCEMENTS
Mr. Btombark said that the changing of the Election Rules needs to
be addressed by the Legislature. Mr. Papera thanked everyone who
helped with thi SGA newsletter
Appropriations-Rm 212 at 4:30
Student Wtrfin4:15
Rules and Judiciary-Rm. 248 at 4:30
Screenings. 247 at 4:15
The meeting was adjourned at 5:55
Respectfully submitted
John P. Meriac, SGA Secretary
Steve W. Marasco, SGA Speaker of the House
v'

L
RESOLUTIONS THAT HAVE PASSED THIS YEAR AND WHAT THEY MEAN:
SGA Supports the Improved Communication Between Itself and the Student Body: SGA is trying to help students to better understand what goes on with
the Student Government (ex. SGA Vision) SGA Supports the removing of the motorcycle parking out of the bottom of co liege hill commuter lot: SGA rec-
ommends to the Parking and Trafficking committee that the unused motorcycle parking places at the college hill commuter lot be turned into regular parking
spaces and given to students that desperately need them. SGA supports the Hurricane Mitch Relief Effort: The student government supports, and encourages
all students to support Omicron Delta Kappa's effort to bring much needed supplies to the victims of Hurricane Mitch in Honduras. A Resolution Concerning
Hate Crimes at ECU. SGA strongly recommends that the university adds sexual orientation to their original hate cnmes clause. E-mail the chair with questions
or opinions about campus issues at studentwelfare@hotmail.com . m m
NOTICE: The deadline for Bi-Annuais for Fall Semester 1999 will be 5:00 P.M. Frida April 10th. All groups need to submit their requests to the SGA
Sn�S Ust roMhe Appropriations Committee of the Student Government Association has met with one group. On Monday, March 1st, the committee met
with New Generation Campus Ministries and appropriated $400.00. Shondell Jones, President of the organization explained that the money would be used for
travel to a conference in Atlanta, Georgia where approximately fifty students would represent East Carolina University The next
appropriations meeting will be on Monday, March 22th at 4:30 P.M. in MSC 212. Email the chair with questions about how to get your organization
funded at: appropriations@hotmail.com m
�gat H WtgK Mm mm '&W
Thtre are still some positions on SGA that are open. To find out more come to room 251 in Mendenhall, call 328-4726, or email
screemngschaiT@hotman.com. The positions are that are up for election are SGA President, Vice president, Secretary, & Treasurer
8B5&'SK - as be �at th�
location. The Wright place polling precinct will close at 7:00p.m instead of 8:00 p.m. because that is the time that the student stores close In the event of a
run-off election, the Croatan and Bottom of College Hill Drive polling precincts will be eliminated. This is because neither the Croatan or the Bottom of
College Hill Drive can support the one card system.
SE
3
1





ffSpawiSPsi '
Arts & Entertainment Magazine of The East Carolinian
MMM�����M������
D. Miccah Smith
Fountainhead Editor
Its Spring Break time again, time to jet off to some sunny beach
far away, look for a summer job, hang out with the parental units,
or work on piled-up assignments. A lot of students take this gold-
en opportunity to flail around in a week-long drunken stupor.
But if you've got nothing planned in particular, a little money and
a sense of adventure, North Carolina can be a great place to
explore. Most students have lived here all our lives, rarely taking
advantage of the cultural and natural resources just a couple of
hours'drive away.
To the west lie ancient mountains that students take for granted
when driving up to visit friends at Appalachian State or Western
Carolina.
These mountains are home to folk arts, pristine waterfalls, fishing
spots, rapids and, of course, Cherokee. If roughing it is your idea
of a good time, the Blue Ridge Parkway is a great place to start
searching for highland adventure. Dr. James Kirkland of ECU's
North Carolina Studies program says that the Moses Coit State
Park, which is accessible from the parkway, is "a beautiful place to
camp Horseback riding and canoeing are just a couple of the
activities offered by the park.
See Spring Break, continued on page7
Thursday, March 11,1999
Spring Break 99
Stuck at home? Get unstuck
Paul Westerberg
makes a
comeback
CD Review
"8MM" explores
life on the other
side of "decent
Movie Review
If you missed
the Better Than
Ezra show, it's
too bad
S.U.R.G.E. mem-
bers kick cyber-
bootie on a
regular basis
idw&Mskk
fountainhead � 2nd Floor Student Publications
ications Building Greenville. NC 27858 � Phone 328-6366 � Fax 328-6558 � Advertising328-2000.www.fountainhead.ecu.edu
liSttwSs
6iSifis: H' HHHHHHi ' Hi I Wtt � H 11 : I � 91I I I HHHfl I HHI





Video Renew
"Shagf'this
chick flick
is for everyone
Patrick "I'm sorry about last night"
McMahon
Video review
"Shaf
Alright guys, just go ahead and cru-
cify me now. As hard as I tried to
hate this "girl movie I just couldn't
bring myself to dislike it. I know, I
know, I'm a wuss, a puss and just an
all-around fairy for liking this movie,
but 111 tell you what I got a damn big
feeling you'd like it too. It's just too,
wdTsweet-not to like. Sure, I like a
good ol'blood'n guts John Woo
movie just like the rest of you, but
something a little sentimental is
good every now and again.
"Shag" is the story of four young,
beautiful southern belles who get
together and go to Myrtle Beach for
one last fling before they all go to col-
lege or get married. They're a mixed
bag of personalities, ranging from
the uptight, mom-like Luanne to the
fast and easy Melaina. But on this
trip, they're just four sheltered
women who want to cut loose, have
fun and maybe get up with some
guys in the process.
The trip starts off with a bang; they
each tell their parents that they're
going to Fort Sumter to take tours
and learn about colonial households.
Being the typical all-believing par-
ents they are, they applaud their chil-
dren's desire to learn about their her-
itage. So the girls head off the the
"Grand Strand" to have the time of
their lives.
Upon their arrival, they meet the
movie's main male characters: Buzz,
who falls in love with one of the girls,
and Dale, who digs an absolutely
adorable girl named Pudge. The girls
don't like them at first but soon find
out that they have more in common
than they really thought.
I just can't get over the pure cuteness
of this movie. Eve ry thing about it
had me kicking myself in the rear for
actually liking it, but it really is a fun
movie. From the gorgeous Melaina
dancing and singing "Dixiewhile
wearing nothing but a string bikini
and a confederate flag to Pudge win-
ning the shag contest, it's truly a
story for everyone.
And what would a movie entitled
"Shag" be without dancing? The
actors dance like there ain't no
tomorrow and have a blast the whole
time. With the band singing old stan-
dards like "Sixty Minute Man they
danced their little southern hearts
out
If you really want to see a good
movie,check this one out. It's defi-
nitely worth the time and money.
Girls, rent it and make your
boyfriend watch it; I know they'll like
it. And meanwhile, maybe I'll go and
take some shag lessons so I can keep
up with all my friends. Oh, and one
last message for the guys: trust me, if
you can shag, you can guarantee
yourself a phone number when you
go downtown.
Amy LRoyster Editor in Chief
Amanda G. Austin Managing Editor
MiccahSmi EJaar
Caleb Rose
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CDReview
Westerbeig cool again
Ryan Kennemur
Senior Writer
CDReview
SuicaneGmtifaction
Okay, to fully get the message of this
review, you have to be able to answer
"yes" to the quest ion: "remember the
Replacements?" If not,I suggest you
go out and purchase All for Nothing
Nothing for Ml, the greatest hits of
the best punk rock band of the 80s.
Those guys were everything that I
think Rock'n Roll should be: loud,
obnoxious and against everything
society stands for.
But in 1991, the lead singerguitarist
Paul Westerbeig mentioned to his
band mates that he would like to try
a solo album. So, instead of working
things out, the rest of the band
decided to "help him quit"
The back-up players moved onto
smaller bands or started families,
but Paul still wanted to do the solo
thing. In 1993, he gave us his very
own album titled 14 Songs.
He followed up two years later with
his second effort, Eventually, which
was moving more and more toward
aduh contemporary pop. Some peo-
ple might say that he was a horse
with a broken leg.
Well, those people need to go out
and buy Suicane Gratifaction, the
revolutionary new solo album. Don't
ask me what the title meanscause I
don't got no due. The only thing I'm
sure of is that sometimes, growing
up is a good thing. This album finds
Westerbeig in a surprisingly intro-
spectivc and confessional mood.
While the Replacements were
known to wear their heart on their
sleeve, Westerberg is willing to hand-
deliver it to you.
The record begins with "It's a
Wonderful Lie a downbeat acoustic
See Cd Review, continued on page 7
you an
organ
& tissue
donor?
Ask your family today, and let them know your decision, too.
That way you'll know, they'll know, and there will be no question later.
For a free brochure, call 1 -800-355-SHARE.
Share your life. Share your decision?"
o
COALITION ,





o
Band Review
Better Than Ezra rods live
Patrick McMahon
StaffWriter
As tar as concerts go, it can be hit or
miss when it comes to the show's
quality. The guys could be tired and
don't really fed like being out there or
they can come out and put on one of
the best shows imaginable. Lucky for
the fans out at the Attic, Better Than
Ezra came out swinging and blew the
crowd away. The people in atten-
dance had a due that it was gonna be
a fun night when a big-headed alien
walked out on stage, lit candles and
eventually summoned out the band,
who jumped right into the set.
But before 1 start reviewing Ezra
though, I have to mention the open-
ing act, Train, which hails from San
Francisco. These guys left me in
absolute awe. Each band member
was a natural up on stage and they
looked like they loved what they were
doing. They had already played a
song when 1 got into the club and at
first I noticed that there weren't a
whole lot of people in the back. 1
looked around and all I saw were a
few people getting the big white bar-
becue cups full of Busch Light in the
back. But when I turned the comer,
it hit me. The reason why there was-
n't anybody in the back (except for
thai weird 99X sticker guy) is
because they were all up front and
jamming to Train. Half-Blind Melon
(they had great songs too, you know)
half-Led Zeppelin and half pure
adrenaline, these guys are going to be
nothing short of huge. Look for an
upcoming CD review right here in
the Fountainhead of their new self-
tilled album coming up in a few
weeks.
And on the eighth day, God created
um, wait a minute, there is no eighth
day. Wdl on Man 2, Better Than
Ezra created something truly speciaL
They came on stage laughing and
smiling and just had fun the entire
time. Some of the fans around me
though that they could have been a
little more professional about it, but I
thought they were just up there
entertaining the fens and having a
Em brought G-g� u iti htt
Itime.
Ill have to admit, I am not really an
Ezra fen and didn't know how to
approach the show from a reviewing
standpoint But all musical feelings
aside, the show was absolutely kick-
ass.
Each song was a solid effort and
played with excellent precision. I
almost pooped in my britches when
they covered LL Cool 'Because I
I.ove You" from, like, 1986. A down-
side of the show was that they cov-
ered way too many songs; some-
where between six or seven. Some
worked (like the cover of Prince's
"Purple Rain) and some didn't (that
Chumbawomba song).
Long song interludes provided the
band with rest but also let them have
fun with the crowd. Using a sampler,
they incorporated people's voices
from the crowd and blended them id)
together to make one hdl of a jam.
That was definitely the highlight of
the show.
As much as I'm not realty into their
kind of rode I have to give credit
where the credit is due. Theycap-
tured the crowd's attention like few
bands can. As long as I live I will
never forget seeing a 45-year-old,
overweight and balding man singing
Maybe we do need radio rock after
all. It gives us something to sing
along with in the car and then we
can go back to our Chris Duarte
albums at home.
Let me go ahead and apologize to my
editor for putting this in, but I have
to thank the new friends I made at
the Attic who treated me great: the
band manager of Train, Carol Ann
Eastwood for a shoulder to lean on,
the guy who bought me a beer, I
mean dub soda, because he sneezed
on my notepad, and Chris for letting
me hold his spot
And one final message for all you
fans, or at least fens of a good show,
make sure you catch Better Than
Ezra whenever you can. It is weO
worth the money.
SURGE battles for glory
Becky Charny
StaffWriter
I)o you get your kicks playing video
and computer games? If so, then you
should be part of the S.U.R.G.E.
computer multi-player game dub on
campus. The club is fairly new; this
is its second semester in existence.
Members congregate at 7 p.m. on
Friday nights in the White Hall com-
puter lab on west campus.
Everyone is welcome to come and
compete in various games like
"QuakeQuake 2PostalNF53
"StarcraftrXvTTAoE" and "Half-
Life just to name a few. Competition
occurs between other colleges and
dub members. In the past
S.U.R.G.E. has partidpated in inter-
collegiate games with Auburn.
University. Michigan University
should be hopping on the bandwag-
on with their own club in the near
future.
Members enjoy the setting of friend-
ly competition and sharing of game
strategies. S.U.R.G.E. is a social club
where people share a hobby as a
group.
As member Richard Miller put itrt
serves as a chance to combine team-
work, competition and adrenaline all
in one. What more could you ask for
on a Friday night than to go in with
a dose-knit team, hunt down fellow
players and take home the trophy, all
in a night's play?"
Others see it as a way to take a break
from academics, hang out, and have
fun meeting new people.
"It's great! What better way can
you think of to relieve stress but
blasting your friends into a mil-
lion electrons?" asked a member
who prefers to be called "Driver?
Increasing importance of comput-
ers in the 21st century leads to a
society that should be educated in
their use. One of S.U.R.G.E.S main
objectives, according to the char-
ter, is using the "exposure and
motivational factors of various
games to lead to increased interac-
tion with computers; and thus build-
ing further understanding of com-
puters and computer mediated com-
munication
S.U.R.G.E does this while breaking
the isolation of playing just one
game, and the isolation of people
that is often associated with comput-
ers. As gamer Andy Vincent said, "It
promotes community among college
students though a hobby?'
There is a discussion list and web
site for interested gamers on
S.U.R.G.ES web site, located at wysi-
wyg-i104httpwww.clubhouse.ecu
.edusurgcinformation.htm.
If you are interested in the discus-
sion list send an email to LIS-
TFJWeECUMAIL7.ECU.EDU
Whatever your reason, be it learning
some new strategies for games,
meeting new people, or just online
computer gaming, S. U. R.G. E. is the
place to be!
answers to Tuesday's East (olinian Crossword
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Events Cale
Your complete guide to upcoming events in Greenville a
Thursday
March 11
AJ Fletcher Recital Hall-
Trombone Ensemble 8:00
PM
Cafs Cradle-Jets to Brazil
The Cellar-Karaoke 9:00-
close
Chefs 505-Arvid Ray
Munson
Peasanfs Cafe-Baaba Seth
Sports PadSplash-
Karaoke 10:00-dose
�������������������
��������������
Friday
March 12
Cafs Cradle-Sparklehorse
Cellar-Karaoke 9:00-close
Chefs 505-Arvid Ray
Munson
Hard limes-Hurricane
Willie
Peasanfs Cafe-The
Pondering
Son II Studio-Line Dancing
Sports PadSplash-Karaoke
lO00-dose
Saturday
March 13
Cafs Cradle-The ABBA
party
Cellar-Karaoke 9:00-close
Chefs 505-Arvid Ray
Munson
Hard Times-Hurricane
Willie
Peasanfs Cafe-White
Rhinocerous
Wright Auditorium-Family
Fare: "House at Pooh
Corner"2:00PM
ATTIC

March 14
Cafs Cradle-Cibo Matto
wJack Drag
Courtyard Tavern-The
Magic Pipers
Peasanfs Cafe-Open Mic
Night
�������������
��������������
v '���
March 15
Cafs Cradle-Ten Foot Pole
w Digger
March 16
A Matter of Taste-Live
Blues
Bolfs-TheTreeHuggers
Cafs Cradle-The
Freestylers
Peasanfs Cafe-(Mug nite):
Beat Roots
������-����
4 Thursday; March 11. B99
����������������a
Jpas
March 17
The Attic-Corned'
Cat's Cradle-Slea
KinneyFlim Flor
Courtyard Tavem
Patricks Day spei
Mueller
Hard Times-The (
Peasant's Cafe-Fr
Sports PadSpla:
1000-close





Calendar
rents in Greenville and surrounding areas
For More Information
lay
smOs
;oot Pole
iy
March 17
The Attic-Comedy Zone
Cat's Cradle Sleater
KinneyFlim FlomButchies
Courtyard Tavem-St.
Patricks Day special: Scott
Mueller
Hard Times-The Catalinas
Peasant's Cafe-Fresh
Sports PadSplash-Karaoke
10:00-close
ve
ers
nite):
��������
The Attic
Greenville, NC 752-7303
Backdoor
Greenville, NC 752-7049
The Beef Barn
Greenville, NC 756-1161
Big Jake's Bar
Williamston, NC 799-0022
BW-3
Greenville, NC 758-9191
Cat's Cradle
Carrboro, NC
(252)967-9053
The Cellar
Greenville, NC 752-4668
Chef's 505
Greenville, NC 355-7505
The Corner
Greenville, NC 329-8050
The Courtyard Tavern
Greenville, NC 321-0202
Deadwood
Greenvme,NC 792-8938
TheElbo
Greenville, NC 758-4591
Hard Times
Greenville, NC 758-9922
On-Campus Activities
328-6004
Pantana Bob's
Greenville, NC 757-3778
Peasant's Cafe
Greenville, NC 752-5855
Sports PadSplash
Greenville, NC 757-3658
Son II Studio
Greenville, NC 830-5279
Southern Nites Nightclub
946-5785
Texas 2 Step
Greenville, NC 752-3600
Underwater Cafe
Greenville, NC 754-2207
Wrong Way Corrigan's
Greenville, NC 758-3114

Eand
Preview
Peasant's Cafe
Thursday
March 11
Baaba Seth returns to Peasant's Cafe
tonight to hit Greenville with anoth-
er blast of their musical fury. The
Chariottesville, Virginia group fires
an arsenal of African, Reggae and
Lath musk styles into a funk and
jazz fusion, backed by a full horn
section and lavish percussion.
What to expect An all-around
great evening of eccentric music
Take your happy face and dancing
shoes if you plan to dabble with the
Baaba.
Peasant's Cafe
Friday
March 12
The Pondering are busy wondering
what Friday's show at Peasant's Cafe
is going to be like. The "funkrock-
groovepop" group based in
Charleston, South Carolina does not
have to ponder on how good they
are due to the enormous fan base
they have gathered as a result of
constant touring in the southeast
What to expect A harmonious
blend of horns, drums, bass, key-
boards, guitars and vocals. Their lat-
est CD, Standing in the Light
Laughing" reflects the "funkrock-
groovepop" nature, and the band is
currently planning a new album
whenever they can get a break from
touring.
X?
T
weekly top hits
Top 30 Artists
11. Jon Cougar
Concentrationcamp
lO.Boo Radleys
9.BenLee
8.KORN
.Puniovin' Criminals
6. Built to Spill
5.Trinket
4. Pear of Pop
3.Ani Difranco
2. Pat Boy Slim
Carmikel2
168SEastFim1awerM
GrmvSkNC
Telephone: 353-4988
200 Cigarettes R
8MM R
Analyze This g
Blast From the Past PG-13
Cruel Intentions R
Message in a Bottle PG-13
My Favorite MArtian PG-13
OctoberSky PG
Payback R
Shakespeare in Lowe R
She's All lliat PG-13
The Other Sister PG-13
Carolina East 4
Carolina East Convenience Center
memoriai drive
GreenvuTe,NC
Telephone (252)756-140
A Simple Plan
Life is Beautiful
Saving Private Ryan
The Prince of pt
R
R
PG-13
R
PG
The Buccaneer
Greenville Square Shopping Center
275 Arlington Bbd
&eemille,NC
Telephone: (252) 756-3307
InDreams R
Pieasantville PG-13
Star Trek fasunecuoa PG
J,
Thursday, March 11. 899 5






g
!
MomcReww
"8mm" not a date movie
RyanKennemur
Movie Reviewer
"8 MM"
There is another world, ami it exists
just below the surface of our own.
Down there, people wear dark colored
clothing and trench coats, and pay for
sexua! gratification. The big difference
between here arid there, however, is the
fact that sometimes the sex part
involves violence, and even death.
This is the case in the newest suspense
thriller out of HoUywood8rnmThe
story goes that Tom Welles (Nicolas
Cage) is hired by a rich widow to find
out if the reel of film she found in her
late husband's safe depicting a young
gufs murder is a genuine article. This
type of film is affectionately called a
"snuff" film, and as far as anyone
knows, there's never been a case to
prove its existence. This sends him
away from his family for a few months
and into the underbelly of the world
spoken of in the preceding paragraph:
the pom industry.
His voyage begins with finding the
girks picture at the "missing person
resource building Once he finds apt
ture match, our frowning hero
embarks on a journey through the
grimiest places in the country.
Net CototU inovtr his btai
Interestingly enough, all of these
places look alike. Along the way, he
meets up with adult bookstore clerk
Max, played by Joaquin Phoenix who
looks like Dawson's Creek's Pacey with
multi-colored hair and death metal
clothes. Together, they embark on a
journey of perversion unlike any they
have ever seen.
"8mnf is a enjoyable roller coaster
ride, but it's not for the weak-stom-
ached. It shows the murderer hacking
up the little girl, as well as many scenes
that include bondage and rough sex. I
guess this movie was made to show
that perversions exist in everyone. You
just have to be introduced to realize
that they are there. Like Max says,
"When you dance with the devil, the
devil doesn't change. He changes you
This is what happens to Tom WeDes,
and by the end we see what he has
teamed through his dispensing with
the bad guys.
The acting in the movie is pretty well-
done, but Nick Cage could have done
more with the emotions of the charac-
ter. We're expecting to see what his
character is going through, but all we
have to show us this are a few frowns
and a final scene in which he cries in
his wife's lap. Catherine Keener, who
plays his wife, is limited to two-minute
scenes, which occur almost always on
the telephone. This gets repetitive
quickly. Only when James Gandolfini
(from HBOsThe Sopranos") is
onscreen does the scenery begin to get
chewed up. He is an incredible actor
with "better late than never" potential
and he gives the movie a much needed
over- the-top villain.
The story is by the same writer as
"SeverC and it shows in every nook
and cranny. The film deals with the
exploration of one's own morality, just
as "Seven" did. It seems like someone
couki make a heck of a living writing
movies like this, so I won" t be sur-
prised when then next movie like this
comes out
All and all, "8mm" is an entertaining
dive too a territory that few people are
willing to admit to liking. Make no
mistake. This is not a kid movie, as if
you had to guess. Also, this is NOT a
date movie. Who knows. HaUway
through it, you may build your confi-
dence up and admit to her fina thing
that you areumfit to be tied
Spring BnHartiniii from PKH 1
Asheville is another popular vacation
spot, and the Bikmore House is a defi-
nite must-see, but Dr. Luanne Jones,
also of the North Carolina Studies
program, urges students not to stop
there.
"If they've only been as for as
Asheville and think they've seen the
mountains, they really haven't she
says.
lb the East, North Carolina's haunted,
legend-soaked coast and Outer Banks
region draw tourists from all over the
country, but Spring Break prices for
lodging should be cheaper than those
in the summer.
Check book listings for bed-and-
breakfast hotels, cozy little joints
where the service is personal and a
home-cooked breakfast comes with
every room. Poke around on a beach
for shells and hang out in oyster bars.
If a sailor's life interests you, visit one
of North Carolina's maritime muse-
ums, like Beaufort's Hampton
Mariners'Museum.
You can kayak in Ocracoke with the
� . �. � . �
TEC has teamed up
with Barnes and Nchk:
to bring book reviews to
Wednesday s Fbuntainhead
in our new program.
ECO-Tbur company, immerse yourself
in creepy Bluebeard lore, or go ghost-
hunting at one of dozens of haunted
sites in the eastern part of the state.
If you're short on money and equip-
ment, ECUs Outdoor Recreation
Center can rent you almost anything
you need for an adventure, including
tents, kayaks and backpacks.
"We do specials for Spring Break says
John Brown, a full-time employee of
the CenterTypically we rent out
most, if not all, of our gear over Spring
Break
Rentals are good through the entire
week of Spring Break, and the Center
will be open today and Friday until 6
p.m.
Don't let Spring Break pass you by
unchallenged. Exploring North
Carolina can be one of the best and
least expensive vacations you'll ever
take. Have fun; you've got a whole
week to climb, swim, canoe, ride
horses, eat, relax and enjoy the view.
ec
Carolinian
Id are looking far fellow book lows to
read and review best sellers far a good
cause. Each Semester wc will donate these
best sellers to Ihc Ranald McDonald House
where UVy will l� available kr tl�' family
members of terminally ill children lo read
If you would like to write a review
pause call Mkxah at 328-6366
6 Thursday, Mardi 11, B99
:�������,��





f
d
ARIES:
(March 21-April 20)
You will be challenged to put forth
your very best, so keep any rebellious
thoughts to yourself Being rilled
with high energy, make sure you are
sensitive to other peoples feelings.
It's time to come out of your shell
and live a little.
TAURUS:
(April21-May21)
Guard against any undue stress-
someone or something has hit just
the right button and drained your
energy. Your mate may be having
problems coping, and moodiness
will no doubt result - remember that
actions will always speak louder than
words.
GEMINI:
(May 22-June 21)
' Make time to stay home and rest,
tension from all sides may be stress-
ing you out Your fresh, new ideas in
the workplace will be received very
favorably. Conditions are excellent for
rapid progress at work. Get in con-
tact with an old friend you've lost
track of
CANCER:
(June 22-July 23)
There may be heavy demands on
you, so try to stick to routine and all
will go well. If you have been clinging
to either a child or lover, you need to
let go a little, they need more space
now. Angry words may flare between
yen and another, be cautious.
LEO:
(July 24- August 23)
four mind is usually quick and per-
ceptive. You will no doubt captivate
others with your wit and wisdom.
Authorities at work are interested in
hearing your opinions, and the abili-
ty to see the big picture will be great-
ly appreciated. Listen to the ideas of
others.
VIRGO:
(August 24-September 23)
If you can grasp an opportunity to
better yourself financially don't pass
it up, the effort is worth it Again, the
extra effort may be needed at work -
go early and stay late. Your under-
standing of the needs of both men
and women helps you mediate gen-
der-based disputes.
LIBRA:
(September 24 - October 23)
Heavy demands are made on your
time and energy. Disputes with fami-
ly members can be resolved through
thoughtful discussions. Any business
meetings will also be productive.
Your mate will end the week with a
romantic interlude, and, if unat-
tached, a new love is waiting.
SCORPIO:
(October 24 - November 22)
Your keen memory and problem-
solving abilities will help you to
impress your bosses. It's reality check
time for you, with memories and
intuition playing major roles in your
actions for the next few months.
There are powerful spiritual insights
dominating your inner self.
SAGITTARIUS:
(November 23 - December 21)
It may be time to step back from
current projects to think things out,
to give you a better perspective on
long-term career strategies. It's a
good time to share bright ideas with
receptive colleagues. There seems to
be an old adversary back on the
scene, be cautious and patient.
CAPRICORN:
(December 22 - January 20)
It will be a challenging week, and you
are assertive in getting your ideas
across. A friend will no doubt wel-
come your help, and may be either
combative or irrational, so be patient
with them. But there will also be a
limit to patience, so know when to
say enough is enough.
AQUARIUS:
(January 21-February 19)
Your health is in question during the
week. Be reassured that there is
nothing wrong with you that more
rest and less stress won't cure, lake
extra time for your mate, and have a
long and loving talk with a loved
one. Your communication skills will
get you through the week's chal-
lenges.
PISCES:
(February 20-March 20)
You may need to talk your ideas out.
Nobody will mind though, because
what you have to say is fascinating.
The work week will start out with
opportunity for monetary gains.
There are differences of opinion
which may threaten a friendship;
resolve them now.
IF THIS WEEK IS
YOUR BIRTHDAY:
You are highly attuned to your own
emotions and those of others. When
in love, you emerge with your lover
with all your heart, mind and soul
Your friends know you will be the
first to join their celebrations, and
the last to leave when trouble strikes.
akvietv, continued tram papa 2
ballad that foreshadows the tone of
the album by employing lyrics like,
"How am I looking, I don't want the
truthWhat am I doing, I airft in my
youthI'm past my prime, or was that
justapose?"
Then comes the piano-driven ballad
"Self- Defense a ditty that is easy to
pass off as just background music to
play while you drive around in the
rain. But lines like, "It's wrong to com-
mit suicide, unless it's in self-defense"
really make the gears turn. This is the
voice of a man who has been to Hell
and back, and it's "story time" in Mr.
Westerbergs class.
The next few songs all deal with
theme of desperation. "Best Thing
That Never Happened "Lookin' Out
Forever" and "Final Hurrah" are all
"Replacements-lite" rockers that show
just how concerned he is with the
future and where he stands with it
Stuck in between these instant clas-
sics is"Born for Me the sweet honey-
suckle tune that he wrote for his wife.
Just about every song here is a keeper.
I even like the acoustic enigma "Actor
In The Street just because it incorpo-
rates a string section.
The best song on the disk, however, is
"Whatever Makes You Happy?
It best showcases the ideal that Paul
Westerberg is trying to embrace: that
of thinking and caring about other
people and dropping the self-centered
indifference that made him such a
worthy spokesman for the 80s punk-
rock movement
I
i
Apply at the Student
publications Building
7ThaAn.lhidin.fi99
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at wAA.iee.eu.ediplffcK on the calendar link.
esTlTstinajsitflo the event submission form.
www.tec.ecu.eduevents into your browser,
your event onto our campus calendar.
It's just that easy. And it's one more free service of The East Carolinian.
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The East Carolinian 1999
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1999 HOUSING GUIDE
The East Carolinian
Greenville's
Best Kept Secret
1.2 8. 3
Bedroom
Apartment
Homes

CALL TODAY III
355-2198
1510
Circle
YOUR HOUSING
OPTIONS
may be as close as
The East Carolinian classifieds!
Check 'em out.
Brasswoods
� Quiet Neighborhood
� 1 Bedroom $300
� 2 Bedroom $360
� WasherDryer Hookups
� Ceiling Fan
� Free WaterSewer
� Small Pet with fee
� Near Malls & restaurants
� furnished unit for
corporate leasing available
� Office on site
3216 Brasswood Court 1
Phone 252-355-4499
Fax 252-355-1554
brasswood@greenvillenc.com
Green mill run
apartments
Smart Choice
larger 1 and 2 bedroom apartments
low utility rates
water & sewer
basic cable furnished
onsite manager
24 hr emergency
maintenance
1.5 blocks from ECU
large pool
on site laundry
convenient to
downtown &
shopping mall
252.758.2628
Don't make a move wi-l"Hou"t
EA5TBROOK A VILLAGE
Pack up A come on over To the best!
STar next semester out right in one of
6REEN
MENTS
Eastbrook Dr.
752-5100
Fax: 752-1630
LEASING FOR FALL 1999





rifiiniitjitO VaK srfif
The East Carolinian
KmTj wauoH p.p.er
1999 HOUSING GUIDE
Get neighbors to turn down the loud noise
CORA JORDAN
It's 2 in the morning.
You're lying in bed trying to
sleep because you have a big
meeting tomorrow morning.
You feel a pounding sensa-
tion in your head.
At first, you think it's a
headache. But then you re-
alize that it's music blasting
from your neighbor's stereo,
rattling your windows.
Before you pound on the
neighbor's door and yell
something you'll regret, try
some more constructive al-
ternatives.
1. TALK TO YOUR
NEIGHBOR
Your first step is to talk to
your neighbor and try to re-
solve your differences in per-
son. It's hard to believe, but
sometimes neighbors are not
aware that they are causing a
disturbance. Even if you're
ready to punch somebody's
lights out, try a little sugar in-
stead.
2.GETACOPYOFYOUR
LOCAL ORDINANCE
Your next step is to get a
copy of your local noise laws.
Most cities and counties have
ordinances that control the
times, types and loudness of
noise.
You can look up your lo-
cal ordinance at city hall or
the public library. Make at
least two copies of it, one for
your neighbor and one for
yourself.
3. WARN YOUR NEIGHBOR
IN WRITING
If things don't improve,
ask your neighbor again �
this time in writing�to quiet
down. Don't make threats,
but state that if the situation
doesn't improve you'll be
forced to notify the authori-
ties. Enclose a copy of the
noise ordinance. Keep a copy
of your letter; you'll need it if,
as a last resort, you later sue
your neighbor.
4. SUGGEST MEDIATION
Most cities offer free or
low-cost mediation services,
which means they provide an
impartial mediator who will
sit down with you and your
neighbor and try to help you
resolve your differences.
Just call the mediation ser-
vice; someone there will con-
tact the neighbor and suggest
mediation. (These people are
very good at convincing oth-
ers to give mediation a
chance.)
5. CALL THE POLICE
If you have done all of the
above and your neighbor has
responded by turning up the
volume, now is the time to call
the police (or the Animal Con-
trol officer if the problem is a
barking dog). Try to get the
police to come while the noise
is occurring.
Of course, you can call the
police on a noisy neighbor the
first time the music gets too
loud for your taste. But the
police will be more sympa-
thetic to your situation if they
see that you have tried to
solve the problem on your
own.
6. SUE FOR NUISANCE
If all else fails, you can get
your neighbor's attention�
and maybe some money�by
suing in small claims court.
You can sue your neighbor for
nuisance if your neighbor's
noise unreasonably interferes
with your enjoyment of your
property. In the lawsuit, you
ask for money to compensate
you for the interference with
your right to peacefully enjoy
your home.
Small claims court is easy
and inexpensive, and you
continued on page 6
Ahoy, Tirates!
Don't get stuck on a sinking ship.
Sail away to easy iiving
Tarjfcfrer Estates
214 Elm St 5
Greenville.WC27858
v 6,(252) 752-4225
Trmrm iiiiiiiiniiin m i,i�i u m,� u.u.mum .vtttttttv,1.111
��





1999 HOUSING GUIDE
The East Carolinian
Brand New Luxury Apartments
NOW LEASING
. 752-9995
Utilities included Fully furnished
4 Bedroom 4 Bathroom
Individual Leasing
Roommate Matching
Designer Interiors
State of the Art Amenities
Free Cable
Free Computer lab
Free Monitored Alarm
Near ECU Bus Lne
Pirates Cove
3305 E. !0(h Street � Greenville, IMC 27B58
i-i.A, A.AijiiiLJiil 1 ;itui





Carolinian
Woodcliff
Apartments
2 Bedroom 1 Bath Apartments
Range & Refrigerator
Washe$Dyer Hookups
Water� Sewer
Also Available
I BedroonV "I Bath Apartments
Range & Refrigerator
WasherDryer Hookups
Water & Sewer
Oa-Site Maniger
ECU bus pickup
758-S005
Dogwood Hollow
Apartments
2 Bedroom 2 Bath Apartments
Range, Refrigerator, Dishwasher
& Garbage Disposal
WasherDryer Rentals Available
Water & Sewer
Also Available
2 Bedroom 1 Bath Apartments
Range & Refrigerator
On-Site Laundry facilities
On�Site Manager
2 Blocks from ECU Campus
752-890�
Eastgate
Apartments
2 Bedroom1 Bath Apartments
Ranee & Refrigerator
WasnerDryer Hookups
Water & Sewer
Also Available
1 Bedroom1 Bath Apartments
Range St Refrigerator
WasherDryer Hookups
Water St Sewer
On-Site Manager
ECU bus pickup
752-8900
All with 24 hour emergency maintenance and no pets allowed
Professionally managed by: Joyner Be Associates Management
1110 East Tenth St Apt. 1 G
wwwgreenvilleapartments.com
BEDROOM
BEDROOM
vVOO
LIVING ROOM
ir xi5'
ql agTHs
'� Joining A f j
BEDROOM
2 bedroom units
contain 1050
square feet
WILSON
APARTMENTS
'� 2. Joining fcft� nr l
BEDROOM
3 bedroom units
contain 1350
square feet
.
752-0277
1806 E. 1st Street
Greenville, IMC 27858-0772
Each unit contains a self cleaning oven, a large frost-free refrigerator,
dishwasher, washerdryer connections, utility room, large patio with private
fence, extra outdoor lighting and deadbolt locks on all doors for added security,
wallpapered bathrooms and ceiling fans.
All units have large walk in closets and storage areas
as indicated by the diagonal lines .
Washersdryers available upon request for 3 bedroom apartments.
We Charge No
Application Fee.
Now Offering $300 Security Deposit for
2 Bedrooms, & $400 Security Deposit for
3 Bedrooms.
2 and 3 Bedroom
Townhouses 1 Baths
Water, Sewer, and Cable Included
Small Pets Ok With Fee
5 BLOCKS FROM
ECU WITH BUS
SERVICE
AVAILABLE





I
6
1999 HOUSING GUIDE
The East Carolinian
NOISE
continued from page 3
don't need a lawyer. You will
need to show the following:
�There is excessive and
disturbing noise.
�Your enjoyment of your
property is diminished.
�You have asked the per-
son to stop the noise (your let-
ter should be enough to prove
this).
To prove your case, you
can use police reports, wit-
nesses, recordings, your own
testimony and the testimony
of neighbors or other wit-
nesses.
If you're in an apartment,
noisy neighbors are always
bad news. But when you share
walls with the insensitive
neighbor, the problem is es-
pecially vexing. The good
news for renters is that, in ad-
dition to all your other op-
tions, you have built-in allies
in the battle to keep your
apartment livable: your lease
or rental agreement and your
landlord.
Remember the lease or
rental agreement you signed?
Chances are your neighbor
signed one too. Standard
leases and rental agreements
contain clauses that entitle
you to "quiet enjoyment" of
your home.
A neighbor who is blasting
the stereo in an unreasonable
manner is probably violating
the lease or rental agreement
and can be evicted.
If you warn your neighbor
about the noise in writing, in
your letter, tell the neighbor
that the next complaint will
be to the landlord or neigh-
borhood association if the
noise continues.
If warning your neighbor
doesn't work, go to your land-
lord. Most tenants don't like
to complain to the landlord
or manager about unreason-
able noise. But other neigh-
bors are probably bothered
by the noise too.
Get together with them
and complain to the landlord
as a group. It's easier and you
might get faster results. Most
landlords don't want argu-
ments between tenants. Your
landlord will probably tell the
noisy tenant to pipe down or
face eviction.
onogement
Apartments & Rente House
PO Box 873 � 08 Browntea Lwe� Suite A
Geefwife, Nwth Caroline 27835-OB73
(252) 758-1921 � FAX (252) 757-7722
Now Preleasing
for Fall Semester
Langston Park Apartments
Wesley Commons South
hfej
3
ASK
ABOUT
SECURITY
DEPOSIT
K
All Apartments
Just 5 Blocks
from ECU Campus
1 Block from ECU
Bus route
Two Bedroom Units
Ibath
Free Water and Sewer
Central Heat & Air
Dishwasher
RefrigeratorStove
WasherDryer Hook Ups ,
Mini-Blinds
Deadbolt Locks
Each Unit Has a Patio or Balcony
Pets Allowed with Pet Fee
OneTwo Bedroom Units
Ibath
Free Water and Sewer
Central Heat & Air in 2 Bdrms
Wall AC Unit in 1 Bdrms
RefrigeratorStove
WasherDryer Hook Ups
Mini-Blinds
Deadbolt Lodes and Hall Closets
1st Floor Patio with Fence
2nd Floor Front or Back patio
Pets Allowed with Pet Fee
1
All Apartments Just 5 Blocks
from ECU Campus
On Site Laundry Facilities
On ECU Bus route
STRATFORD ARMS
"We Focus on You"
-1,2 bedroom gardens
3 bedroom gardens
2 bedroom townhouses
- swimming pool
- basketball court
- tennis court
- on site laundry facilities
-2 playground areas
ECU transit stops here
- we will furnish upon request
security Deposit: $200
1 bedroom $375
2 bedroom gardens $425
2 bedroom townhouses $465
- 3 bedroom $565
office hours: M-F 8-5,S 9-1
1900 S. Charles Blvd.
756-4800
i7W'
"����������
'







The East Carolinian
1999 HOUSING GUIDE
Pinnacle
Property
Management
Company
offering apartment & duplex communities convenient
to ECU, Pitt Community College, & the Medical District
all units are carpeted & serviced by a great maintenance
program. Call once and it's fixed!
Wvndham Court
5 blocks from ECU
2 bedroom apts.
energy efficient
central heatair
kitchen appliances
washerdryer hookups
on ECU bus route
pets ok with deposit
Dockside Duplexes
3 bedroom units
2.5 baths
5 blocks from ECU
on bus route
central heatair
dishwasher
garbage disposal
washer & dryer in each unit
back deck
carport parking
storage room
Eastqate Village
2 bedroom units
1 bath
washer & dryer in each unit
dishwasher
refrigerator w icemaker
ceiling fans
range spacious closets
Cheyenne Court
behind Plaza Mall
1 bedroom
energy efficient
watersewer provided
kitchen appliances
washer & dryer in each unit
patios
laundry facility on site
small pets ok in some units
Eastgate Duplexes
2 bedrooms
2 bath
kitchen appliances
washer & dryer hookups
ceiling fan
range
spacious closets
Summerfield Gardens
convenient to Pitt
Community college and
Medical District
1 & 2 bedroom units
energy efficient
watersewer provided
kitchen appliances
washerdryer hookups
no pets
Hampton Court
spacious 1 & 2 bedrooms
3 miles to ECU
1 mile to hospital
ceiling fans
energy efficient
central heatair
dishwasher
washerdryer hookups
watersewer provided
back deckpatio
no pets
Caldwell Court
convenient to Pitt
Community college and
Medical District
1 & 2 bedroom units
energy efficient
watersewer provided
kitchen appliances
washerdryer hookups
small pets ok with deposit
University Terrace
Condominiums
3 bedrooms
3 bath
kitchen appliances
dishwasher
spacious closets
central heatair
on ECU bus route
no pets
Office located at:
104 WYNDHAM Cr.
APARTMENT D
56l4terrt
Watch for these things
when renting
ERICA FARRIS
STUDENT LEGAL LEARNING CENTER
UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI
Looking for an apartment? You
might want to start now and there are
things you should know. Many stu-
dents start hunting for apartments for
the fall as early as spring break.
In addition to luxuries like swim-
ming pools, dishwashers and micro-
waves there are other matters you
should consider before signing a lease.
Check the apartment's construc-
tion, appliances, electrical outlets,
lighting, window and door locks, and
the general cleanliness and parking.
Are there laundry facilities avail-
able or close by is there grocery shop-
ping or a bus stop?
All these things should be consid-
ered in addition to the general repu-
tation of the landlord for making re-
pairs in a timely manner and for re-
turning security deposits at the end of
the lease.
Once you decide on an apartment,
you should carefully review the lease.
Read it word for word.
If you do not understand a provi-
sion or do not agree with it, have
someone explain it or advise you how
to rewrite it in terms agreeable to you
and the landlord.
If the landlord makes promises re-
garding repairs that will be made be-
fore you move in or shortly thereaf-
ter, get those promises in writing,
along with a date they will be com-
pleted.
If you have roommates, every-
body should sign the lease.
Remember that the lease is a
binding contract. If the term of the
lease is for one year, you are bound
to its terms for one year.
Choose your roommates carefully.
You could be paying their rent if they
decide to move out.
Every roommate signing the lease
is legally obligated for the full amount
of the rent if another roommate fails
to pay. Roommates should have a
written agreement with each other,
stating who pays what. If a utility is
billed in your name, you are respon-
sible for the entire bill and must ask
reimbursement from your room-
mates.
Can you afford it? It is highly ad-
visable to check your budget before
signing the lease, not when you re-
ceive an eviction notice or a call from
a debt collector.
If you have problems with your
apartment, there are specific laws
andor ordinances that may provide
help for you. Check out the local or
state laws which may apply in the
university or city library.
KINGSTON RENTALS
3002 Kingston Circle � Greenville, NC 27S50 � (252)750-7575
Kingston Garden Unit
two bedroom two bath
townhouse
Free Water & Sewer
Free Basic Cable
Central Air
Mini- Blinds
Bus Service
Ice Makers
Dishwashers
Equally Sized Rooms
Furnished Or
Unfurnished
Parkview (reverse)'
two bedroomtwo bath
Free Water & Sewer
Washer & Dryer
Connections
Private Balcony
Central Air
Mini- Blinds
Washer & Dryer
Connections
Bus Service
Garbage disposals
Ice Makers
Dishwashers
Equally SUed Rooms
Kingston Condo Style Unit
two bedroom two and 12
bath (reverse)
Free water and Sewer
Mini- Blinds
Bus Service
Ice Makers
Dishwashers
Equally Steed Rooms
I umished Or Unfurnished
Free Basic Cable
Bonus Half-Bath For
Guest
Central Air
Bedrooms Located
Upstairs





TktH0ttBSt(fobwTom!
k
NOW LEASING
FOR FALL '99
Fully Equipped Fitness Center a Lighted Basketball Courts
�� Clubhouse w Large Screen TV Washers & Dryers
Swimming Pool
Planned Social Activities
Sand Volleyball
Private Decks & Patios
Lighted Tennis Courts Roommate Matching Service
(252) 321-7613
1526 S. Charles Blvd.
Wmmmmm-MmmMMMiMMMMMM
Orit
$260 per
lroom
Equal Housing Opportunity
" . "


Title
The East Carolinian, March 11, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 11, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1315
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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