The East Carolinian, March 9, 1999






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Check out TEC's website at
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Carolinian
TUESDAY. MARCH 9. 1999 VOLUME 74. ISSUE 44
Kenny Kirby can not prevent
ECU's strati loss against N.C. State.
Sports rageS
Exhibit features artifacts from pirate ships
Team work brings bit
of history to Joyner
Peter Dawvot
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
As part of the 92nd Founder's Day
Anniversary events, alumni, faculty
and students witnessed the unveil-
ing of a new Maritime Studies
exhibit known as Queen Anne's
Revenge: The Search for
Blackbeard's Ship.
Faculty members including
Michael Dorscy, dean of the School
of Arts, were among the many
speakers who emphasized the
importance and impact this project
has on ECU.
"It took teamwork to create this
exhibit and it took teamwork to get
this project together Dorscy said.
Blackbeard's ship was first dis-
covered by treasure hunters off the
coast of North Carolina in the late
1980's and since that time Maritime
Studies students have worked to
preserve many of the artifacts dis-
covered along with the shipwreck.
Dr. Tim Runyan director of
K R1S T V DANIELS
NEWS REPORTER
Former ECU Playhouse Manager
Gary Faircloth's court date of
Feb. 22 has been postponed until
March 22.
F'aircloth was charged last June
with four felony counts of embez-
zlement and one count of forgery
related to the embezzlement.
Faircloth had been an employ-
ee with the university since 1987
and pleaded not guilty on all
charges.
The court date had been set
during his arraignment in the Pitt
County Superior Court.
Faircloth had been accused of
embezzling over $23,000 from the
fund, and was fired from the uni-
versity on July 31.
According to Ben Irons, attor-
ney for ECU, all evidence regard-
ing the case has been handed
over to the SBI.
The SBI agents filed the
charges after an ECU probe dis-
covered differences in the foun-
dation's books.
According to reports, ECU
closed the theater foundation
account and transferred the
remaining balance of approxi-
mately $70,000 to its main fund
raising arm, the ECU
Foundation, when suspicions
arose.
In addition to pleading not
guilty, Faircloth waived a proba-
ble cause hearing and denied
accusations and charges against
him.
TEC will report further infor-
mation on the case when in the
March 25 issue, our first after
spring break.
Maritime Studies said that the ship-
wreck's discovery has sparked inter-
est from people around the globe.
"1 was even featured on a morn-
ing talk show in Sydney, Australia to
talk about Blackbeard's ship
Runyan said.
Runyan also said the shipwreck is
one of the earliest to be found in
North Carolina waters.
"We're very pleased to have this
opportunity, and we are very close to
the project Queen Anne's Revenge
Runyan said " The state has
worked very closely with us on
underwater projects dealing with
this
"This one is very special
because of the dedication of the
library and our chance to view
the Queen Anne's Revenge
Eakin
Chancellor
Among the many pieces shown
were artifacts from the sunken ship
(which still lies 30 feet below the
Atlantic ocean off the coast) such as
a bell, telescopes and various other
materials. The star attraction and
what many found to be the most
interesting piece was a cannon. It
was discovered on another ship-
wrecked sailing vessel 20 miles off
the coast of North Carolina near
Roanoke, Va. Runyan said that the
cannon directly relates to the time
period of the Lost Colony.
Dr. Caroll Varncr, director of
Joyner Library, believes ECU's roots
parallel that of Blackbeard's
"Blackbeard was the most awe-
some pirate on the Pamlico in the
19th century just as ECU has
become the most awesome pirate on
the Pamlico today Varner said.
Chancellor Eakin attended the
ceremony and feels that the dedica-
tion ceremony honoring Joyner
Library's new entrance, as well as
the Queen Ann's Revenge exhibit,
were fitting events to take place on
Founder's Day.
"While celebrating the 92nd
anniversary of the founding, wc
decided that it would be appropriate
to dedicate the library and enjoy this
wonderful exhibitEakin said.
"This one is very special because of
the dedication of the library and our
chance to view the Queen Anne's
Revenge Eakin said.
Faircloth
hearing
postponed
Former Playhouse
Manager awaits court
date of late March
Founders Day celebrates achievment
Far lift: Chancelloe Richard Eakin delivers a speech; Middle left Library dedication takes place; Bottom
right Students partake in ice sculpting; Top: Chancellor Eakin follows the procession.
PHOTOS BY JACOB CARMON AND MICHAEL SMITH
Day of festivities includes
awards, dedications
Peter Dawyot.
assistant news editor
Each year students, faculty and alum-
ni celebrate the history and achieve-
ments of ECU.
Monday, events including ice carv-
ings, a dedication ceremony and a
birthday celebration dinner marked
the university's 92nd year.
While Founders Day celebrations
occurred as early as the 1930's, there
was a span of many years which
passed unmarked. Chancellor Eakin
revived the custom in observance of
ECU's 90th anniversary.
Sculptors kicked off the day at 10
a.m. by creating ice carvings near the
Mendenhall Student Center.
An hour later, Chancellor Eakin,
members of the Board of Trustees,
students, faculty and the ECU sym-
phony joined for the official
Founders Day program.
At this time, Eakin announced the
recipients of the Founder's Day
Service Awards. Linda Ingalls and
George Knight were honored for their
dedication to the university.
Dr. Henry Ferrell, Dr. Gene Lanicr
and Dr. Kenneth Marks as well as
"The university was much smaller
in those days, there is no compari-
son to the size now
Fara Congleton
Visiting Aiimm
Harold MacDougle, an alumni of the
class of 1944, spoke about the univer-
sity and how it has progressed over
time.
After a reception in Mendenhall
and a cake cutting celebration at the
Wright Place, Joyner Library's new
entrance was officially dedicated.
The $30 million project was funded
by a statewide university construc-
tion bond issue approved by North
Carolina voters in November 1993.
Dwain Teauge, director for
Development of Joyner Library said
he had been anxiously awaiting the
SEE FOUNDERS DAY PAGE 2
Halon gas warning signs merely precautionary
T E R R A S T E I N B E IS E R
STAFF WRITER
The signs outside of the computer
labs on the third floor of the
General Classroom Building that
read: "Warning: Do not enter room
when alarm sounds. Halon 1301 is
being released have concerned
many ECU students.
Halon 1301, or bromotrifluo-
romcthane, is a gas that is used in
many fire suppression systems.
I lalon is unique in that it allows the
fire to be extinguished without
damaging the surrounding area.
This is why halon systems arc espe-
cially popular in libraries or areas
that contain a lot of sensitive elec-
tronic equipment.
"Halon works by quickly deplet-
ing the area of oxygen so that the
fire has nothing to feed on, " said
Computing and Information
Systems Director of Operations,
Woody Bolton. "It does this so fast
that the fire is put out within a mat-
ter of minutes
The warning signs outside of the
computer labs are just a precaution
to let people know that there is a
high pressure, gas release fire-
extinguishing system inside.
"The alarm functions just like
any other fire-warning system,
except that this one gives people
time to either get out or deactivate
the system before the halon is
released said Bill Koch, director
" does this so fast that the
fire is put out within a matter
of minutes
Woody Bolton
Systems Director ol Operations.
of the Office of Environmental
Health and Safetv. However,
despite all of the benefits of the
swift fire fighting power of Halon
1301, a link was established
between it, chlorofluorocarbons
(CFC's) and ozone depletion in
the mid 80's. It seems that the
quick discharge of halon releases
CFC's, which have been proven to
damage the ozone layer.
"To help solve this problem,
the Environmental Protection
Agency issued a mandate that no
SEE HAL0H PAGE 2






2 T�id�y, Mirth 9. 1989
Tin Em Carolinian
ngws
JUDGE RELEASES
WOMAN CHARGED IN
FIRE THAT KILLED GIRL
DURHAM (AP) � A judge
released a woman from jail who is
charged with setting a house fire
that killed a 5-year-old girl, citing
weaknesses in prosecutors' case.
LaBarre then permitted Brenda
Copeland to gojiome on $50,000
unsecured bond.
RETIRED U.S.
SUPREME COURT
JUSTICE DIES AT 90
WASHINGTON (AP) � Retired
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Harry
A. Blackmun, who wrote the 1973
decision that legalized abortion
nationwide and ignited a still-rag-
ing moral and political debate, died
at 90.
He had retired in 1994, after
serving 24 years on America's high-
est court.
Blackmun died Thursday at a
hospital in suburban Arlington,
Virginia, from complications fol-
lowing hip-replacement surgery
performed nine days earlier. He
had fallen and broken his hip at
home a day before the operation.
OFFICIALS DENY
RUMORS OF POSSIBLE
RUSSIAN
GOVERNMENT
SHAKEUP
MOSCOW (AP) � Boris Yeltsin
fired controversial tycoon Boris
Berezovsky as head of an alliance
of former Soviet republics
Thursday, and reports that Yeltsin
was planning to reshuffle his
Cabinet again sent Russian law-
makers into a political frenzy.
MANHUNT
INTENSIFIES FOR
REBELS WHO
SLAUGHTERED
TOURISTS
KAMPALA, UGANDA (AP) �
After surviving a rebel attack that
killed eight foreign tourists,
American Elizabeth Garland left
Uganda's remote jungle with a
sinking heart rather than a sense of
relief.
Founders Day
continued from page 1
dedication ceremony.
"It is a very exciting time for the
library Teauge said. The Joyner
library construction was completed
in January, but the formal dedica-
tion today will give people the
opportunity to see the develop-
ment we have made
A lecture was also given by
North Carolina teacher of the year,
Rebecca Hoyle, an alumna of
ECU, who spoke about her experi-
ences teaching. Hoyle has also
been selected as the School of
Music's Distinguished Music
Alumni for the academic year
1998-99. Hoyle has taught in the
North Carolina school system for
approximately 30 years.
Students found the Founder's
Day events to be an exciting way
to commemorate the longevity of
the university. Junior Julie
Gorman, 20, said that the events
characterized just how far the
school has come since its first few
years of existence.
"It's amazing to see the accom-
plishments which have been made
throughout the years since the
school has been around Gorman
said.
While students enjoy taking
part in the festivities, a large part of
the ceremonies were geared
toward faculty members and for-
mer alumni.
Fara Congleton was one of the
many alumni visiting the universi-
ty's founder's day celebrations.
Congleton , a home economics
major from the class of 1945, said
that she has seen many changes in
the university's appearance since
her days here during World War II.
"The university was much
smaller in those days, there is no
comparison to the size now
Congleton said. " We didn't have
as many men here because they
were all off fiehtine the war
Halon Gas
continued from page !
more Halon 1301 could be pro-
duced after 1993 said Joe
Ziemba, former executive director
of the National Association of Fire
Equipment Distributors. "Since
then, only recycled halon is avail-
able to recharge systems that are
already in place until alternative
systems can be installed
There are no plans to replace
any of the halon systems at ECU
any time soon.
"There's no point in replacing
the system until the halon has been
used and needs to be refilled
Koch said. "It would be very
expensive, especially since we're
not even required to have such a
system in any of those rooms
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Date: March 8,1999
Absent Members: Erin Alderman, Diane Hill, Cwen Overby,
Mary Schubert, Jamie, Newsom
list of Business: The SCA executive committee discussed their
recent attendance at a Texas A&M conference. The confer-
ence included motivational speakers, and the SCA will begin
implementing the ideas they learned. The budget for this year
was also discussed. David Bucci, the new sophomore class
president, and Scott Gassell, the new senior class secretary,
were pledged in.
Quote: "We only have $281 remaining for the year Alan
Stancil, student body treasurer
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Tuesday
Students who wish to join the
the group Students For A Free
Tibet will meet in Brewster room
D-304 at 5:00 p.m. Paintings,
sculpture.ceramics and jewelry by
ECU art students are on display in
the Gray Art Gallery at the Jenkins
Fine Arts Center. The
Undergraduate Exhibition runs
through March 30. The Leo
Jenkins Cancer Center will be pre-
senting "I Can Cope a five-part
educational and support program
for people affected by cancer begin-
ning Tuesday and continuing each
Tuesday through April 6. The class-
es will meet from 5:30-8 pm. in the
second floor lobby of the cancer
center. Call Ellen Walston at 816-
7943 for more information.
Wednesday
Russian National ballet will pre-
sent "Swan Lake" at 8 p.m. in
Corrections:
In the March 4 issue of the
Fountainhead, the title of Lee Howard's
sculpture should have read "Sida We
apologize for the error.
Wright Auditorium for ticket infor-
mation call ECU Central Ticket
office at 328-4788.
The Wednesday Film Series will
show "Touch of Evil" at 8 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Center. Thb
film series features acclaimed
movies not seen in local theaters
Thursday
ECU Trombone Ensemble will
perform at 8 p.m. in the Fletcher
Recital hall. The recital is free and
open to the public.
Friday
Restored Portrait of Gen. Bryan
Grimes will be on display in a cere-
mony at the Nonh Carolina
Collection in Joyner Library at 4
p.m. The portrait is one of only a
few portraits of the Last Major to be
appointed by Gen. Robert E. Lee
to exist. ECU professor Dr. Harrell
In the Feb. 25 issue of TEC, ECU
Police Officer Joe Horst was pictured on
the front page. Horst, along with fellow
officers in the police department do not
Allen will speak on the unveiling
Allen authored the book " Lee's
Last Major General: Bryan Grimes
of North Carolina
ECU Board of Trustees will
meet at 9 a.m. in the Great Room
of Mendenhall Student Center.
The board's agenda includes
reports on student recruitment, the
new doctoral program in coastal
resources management, athletics
and construction projects.
Saturday
The Family Fare series will pre-
sent " House at Pooh Comer" at 2
p.m. in Wright Auditorium. The
stage production is an attraction for
youngsters. For tickets, call the
ECU Central Ticket Office at 328-
4788orl800-ECU-ARTS
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sibility of Parking and Traffic Services
officials.
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4 TWtrtiy, March 9. 1989
opinion
Tht Ent Cirolinlin
eastcarolinian
AMY IROYSTER Ediw
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Ahhh, Spring Break. It is finally that time of year again when college students are graced with
a week of vacation time.
In our week off, many plan to go to Florida where fun in the sun is pretty much guaranteed.
Others tend to dig farther down into the couch that eats everyone's change and muster up
enough cash to go on a cruise or head somewhere exotic like Mexico or Jamaica. Ski buffs are
preparing to hit the slopes in Colorado or Vermont, you know, those snowy places. In Feb. we
reported on students who are spending their break volunteering their time and talents to help
others. While most undergraduate students would know nothing about this, man graduate
students are using their breaks to conduct research. The honor!
Whatever your destination this Spring Break, there are pitfalls that can put a serious damper
on your fun. At the risk of sounding like your mother we want to remind you to be safe.
for beach lovers � use sun block to avoid painful burns and deadly exposure. Sunblock is
important for snow lovers too, as is avoiding trees at high speeds. For all the party people out
there � carry protection, walk in crowds, and stay in control. Finally, for those stuck with
school work � try to find some time for yourself.
TEC wants everyone to have fun and play it safe. Just because we have a week away from
classes does not mean we have to overload ourselves with adventures that could jeopardize our
health. We want you to return to college with good memories, not horror stories.
LETTER
to the Editor
Reader offers hope for other sufferers
I would like to commend the "East
Carolinian" for its January article on
depression as well as subsequent
public service ads for www.save.org.
Depression is a topic that needs
addressing, and yet, goes
undiscussed far too often. I recently
began treatment for depression
after being hospitalized for a failed
suicide attempt. I've kept this as
much as a secret as I could from
those around me in hopes of
dodging any unwanted sympathetic
or judgmental responses. And while
few people know this, I feel the
need to come clean now only to
show that I'm not ashamed of it,
and in hopes that others in this
situation will have the courage to
admit the same and to do
something about it before it's too
late. Living with this disease is an
experience that millions of
Americans go through, and one that
can only be fully understood by
those having lived with it. It can
ruin lives, wreck friendships and
make even the most desperate
situation worse. There isn't a day
that goes by that I'm not thankful
to the friends that saved my life,
and while I know there's nothing I
could ever do to repay them, I wnte
this letter in hopes that anyone in
this situation might find solace in it
and use it as the first step toward
healing. An anonymous quote I
recently stumbled upon comes to
mind when discussing the matter.
"May God grant you the serenity to
accept the things you cannot
change, courage to change the
things you can, and wisdom to
know the difference
To those living what seems like a
desperately paralyzing sleep, just
know that waking up doesn't have
to be an unrewarding chore, and
that you're not alone. And to those
loved ones forced to sit back and
watch while doing only what they
can to help, thank you
Brian Williams
Junior
Communication Arts
LETTER
to the Editoi
VAC seeks to expand ideas about art
I'm writing in response to "Our
View" regarding Ann Shengold's
performance art piece "Dreaming
of a Cosmic Device I think the
reason the editor was lost as to how
the performance piece was art is
directly related to their concept of
performance. Shengold's work
doesn't fit the paradigm of
performance like Whistler's
"Mother" fits the paradigm of
painting. It is not conventionally
recognizable as a performance. On
the other hand, "Our Town" does.
"Our Town" fits the paradigm of
a performance that is a theatrical
production. Therefore, its success
precedes it because it caters to our
understanding of what performance
is. When the newspaper editor of
Grover's Corner was asked if there
was any appreciation for art in "Our
Town" he replied, "Not in the
sense that you mean This raises a
good question: What did the
Student Union Visual Arts
Committee (VAC) mean by inviting
Shengold and her unconventional
an form?
The VAC intended to advance
the populist views of the visual arts
to consider the artistic value of art
forms other that sculpture and
painting. "The Concise Oxford
Dictionary of An & Artists, if we
assume its authority on the subject,
lists and entry for "performance
art The definition begins, "An art
form combining elements of
theater, music and the visual arts
This kind of multidisciplinary
activity is widely practiced in our
Write a Letter
�easferolinian
located on the 2nd floor of The Student
Publications Building.
tytt'S a friCNDLV
cMWWS!
Here's 3 ye$m
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carcpus p�l.c? Jo have CMS ?
ECU' pflfity j to jjk 6h ejwgs, Other colleges' pfllicf M fote fire�W. Ww 3r�
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society in our educational and
professional pursuits. So, why is it
so confusing when practiced in an
arts activity.
Perhaps the VAC would have
received a positive response to our
programming if we would have
asked a famous actor or wrestler to
endorse and participate in one of
our functions. Incidentally,
Shengold's performance was
addressed three times in TEC last
week, and I wanted the editor to
know how much we appreciate
their help in promoting the event.
Thank you.
Lee Howard
Chairperson of VAC
i
OPINION
Columnist
1
I
1
Ryan
Kennemur
Columnist catches cold, blues
have done everything in my
power to make myself feel
better, not to mention eating
an entire cheesecake while
watching the Monica
Lewinsky interview and
yelling "You go, girl
Why does it happen now? Right
when I have this huge paper due
this Thursday! That Mother
Nature is a cold-hearted (censored).
That is so (censored) stupid to
make my sorry (censored) sick. If I
could see that (censored-censored)
little (censored) right now, I'd
(censored) her up six ways from
(censored) Sunday!
I have done everything in my
power to make myself feel better,
not to mention eating an entire
cheesecake while watching the
Monica Lewinsky interview and
yelling "You go, girl Nothing
seems to work. I get sick about
twice or three times a year, but its
never just "sick
No, I'm talking about that kind of
sick that if you had a few centuries
ago, the doctor would say without a
moments notice, "We'll have to cut
it off Then again, if my History
Channel memory serves me
correct, they'd say that over just
about anything. This true-to-life
reenactment shows just how it was
back in the 1700s.
A man walks into Ye Olde Doctors
Place and meets the doctor.
Doctor Hello old fellow! Can I
interest you in some leeches?
Man: No, actually. I'm looking for
a place where a man might find
some paper-rolled tobacco
products. Can you direct me to
such a place, my lord?
Doctor HmmYes. I see. We'll
have to cut it off.
Man: But no, I just wanted some
aarrgghh!
Doctor Nurse! Seal up those
wounds by applying an open flame
to them and attach some leeches to
his various appendages. I shall take
my leave now. I tee off in ten
minutes.
Funny people, those old geezers.
But really, I am sitting here typing
between sneezes and coughs. Still,
this isn't as bad as it was when I was
a child. I was what one would
consider to be the poster child for
strep throat. I was out of school for
weeks at a time, which would have
been cool what with the daytime
television that I would have never
been able to watch, but I was even
too sick to lift my head up off the
pillow. It got so bad once that the
doctors thought I had
leukemiawhich is bad. But it
turned out to be just a terrible flu.
Still, I'd rather know if that were
the real case. Its like the Student
Health Center, (suggested motto: If
you don't have mono yet, you'll get
it when you sit in the waiting room.
Ha. Ha. Ha.) Indeed, it seems like
they just want your blood and ten
dollars so that they can tell you that
you have some kissing disease.
They'd pretty much tell you
anything just to get that ten dollar
blood-sucking (blood-
takingsorry) fee, shown in this
exchange:
Susan "the picture of health"
Privette walks into the doctors
office.
Sue: What's up, doc?
Doc: Not much, Susan. Oh, it
appears that you have mono.
Sue: But doctor, I have already had
mono once. I thought you said that
you can only get it once.
Doc Oh yes. So I did. I'm sorry. I
meant to say that you have Dutch
Elms Disease.
Sue: I thought only trees could get
that.
Doc: Ycsof course. Uhohycs! I
forgot to tell you. You are a tree.
I'm running out of room, so I'll kill
this one. If you're a religious
person, pray for me to feel better.
But don't go out and sacrifice
anything, if you're into that. And
don't forget about the pick up line
contest! Free cd to the best pick
up line! Mail your entries to
murdoch623@hotmail.com. This is
me saying goodbye and thanks for
reading. Peace.
OPINION
Columnist
Stephen
Kleinshmit
Core courses crucial to education
I find it a damn shame that
someone could score high
enough on state mandated
intelligence tests and college
entrance exams, be admitted
to an institute of higher
education such as ECU, and
not have at least the scientific
knowledge that was bestowed
to us in fourth grade.
Yesterday as I was walking to class,
I realized the importance of the
core requirement of our university
studies. I was strolling past the
Geology Building when I
overheard two students talking.
They were looking at the big stone
in front of the building when one
asked the other "what's Geology"?
"I think it's like the study of trees
and stuff" remarked her
companion. "Yeah, that's it" the
girls agreed.
Now fm not a Geology major, but
I learned in fourth grade science
class that Geology is the study of
rocks and sediments, volcanoes,
earthquakes and landslides, just to
name a small percentage of all the
things that geology encompasses. I
find it a damn shame that
someone could score high enough
on state mandated intelligence
tests and college entrance exams,
he admitted to an institute of
higher education such as ECU,
and not have at least the scientific
knowledge that was bestowed to
us in fourth grade.
Granted I always have felt most
foreign language requirements are
useless, however most everything
else I have taken here has been
useful and instrumental in forming
a better view of the way things
work theoretically and practically.
Philosophy asks us why we
believe in what we do. Political
Science and History challenge our
views of the past and present.
Geography gives us the
knowledge of other cultures and
challenges us to think globally
instead of locally.
Without such courses in the
general curriculum, what type of
college graduate would we have?
An Accounting major who can
really crunch numbers, but can't
read a map to get to their first job
interview? A young new doctor
who buys an expensive new beach
house at Nags Head only to see it
washed away the next year
because they never learned about
beach erosion? Or a parent whose
child asks them for help with their
homework, but is unable to help
little Timmy because they
skipped that Science class so they
could go to the Elbo for penny
draft night.
I wouldn't be so harsh the next
rime you register when you feel
like you are not taking anything
useful. All of these classes are for
your benefit, and will (hopefully)
make you a better person with a
little more knowledge when you
leave then when you came.
Tm.diy, Mircl
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comics
Tin tut CftW�
Four Seats Left
Jason Latour Everyday Life
Mike Litwin
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A special program just for ECU students
over 24 and their families
It's a Vmdtf Afiair f93
Saturday, March 27
10 AM - NOON
At the Student Recreation Center
& Mendenhall Student Center
ALL ACTIVITIES ARE FREE!
j� � bowling ,
Tjk � billiards
�pJ � free snowcones
JBLjjW racquetball
M lJi volleyball
Jm W � swimming
f � 3-legged race
�L k water balloon race
� Basketball
� dizzy lizzy relay
All participants must register in 211 Whichard or complete
and return a registration form by Monday, March 22
Buffet style all-you-can-eat lunch in Mendenhall after the program. Pay at the door.
Name
Address
Phone Number
Guests you will be bringing:
NameAge
NameAge
Name.Age
NameAge
NameAge
Check Events you are interested in:
10:30 a.m. 3-legged race
11:00 a.m. Dizzy Lizzy Relay
11:30 a.m. Water Balloon Toss
Will you be attending lunch?yesno (pay at the door.)
Age S5.40(10yrsadult) $3.40 (3-IOyrs.) Free (under 3)
Return Registration by 5p.m. Monday, March 22 to:
Shelly Myers, 211 Whichard, Greenville, NC 27834
Call 328-6881 for more information
Reality Check
"One more trip off campus to find a place to live
This is taking way too much time, and I still have
to find someone to share the rent. I wonder if it's
too late to get a room on campus
w 1rfi 5
o
-
o
o -
o
CO
m
o
O
z
o
o
o
It's never too late to enjoy the astronomical advan-
tages of campus living.
Reserve a room in the residence halls and a meal
plan for next year and become eligible to win
in the 1999-2000 reach for the stars Campus
Living Sweepstakes.
k 1 Second Chance Campus Living Sign-Up, March
,6 22-26, Ground Floor, Jones Residence Hall.
c Campus living�it's stellar!

K
UP
O
UNIVERSITY HOUSING AND CAMPUS DINING SERVICES � TELEPHONE: ECU-HOME; ECU-FOOD
UP tfHO
i�lfriniiininlMfli





6 Tutidiy, Mtrch 9, 1999
features
Thi Ent Can
Th� East Carolinian
you
know what
time it is?
ECU students
who enter any
classroom
building may
think that with
every step they
take, they are
entering a dif-
ferent time
zone. We all
know there is
Pacific Time
and Eastern
Standard time.
Maybe Pirate
Time should
be added to
that list.
Any student
who has a class
in the General
Classroom
Building
knows the
clocks may not
always be
accurate.
Whether they
are one, two or
five minutes
off, it can be
confusing.
"I've lost my
watch and the clocks have
messed me up said junior
Michael Williams.
As an experiment, this reporter
took a tour of the clocks in GCB.
Basing the time on a Acqua digital
be buying their own quartz clocks and setting them up in their class- "Before the stand alone.system we had no way of correcting
rooms. These clocks may resemble the ones used by the university. all the clocks Cox said.
PHOTOS BY MICHAEL SMITH
"Some battery
powered clocks
at the Rec
Center may be
a minute or two
off. We replace
their batteries
during the day-
light savings
times
The Tower
Clock on the
glackenspiel at
Joyner Library
has not yet
been declared
official by the
state. It does
keeps the time
from off of a
computer, but
it is stiil under
construction.
So the next
time a student
enters their
classroom and
sees that the
clock is appar-
ently telling
the time for
Seoul, Korea,
remember, at
least you have
an excuse for
being late.
Students who
notice any dis-
crepancies between the clocks are
encouraged to call the Facilities
Services Service Center at 328-
6776.
Shoplifter appears in
advertisement for store
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) - Three
years after being accused of buying
property stolen from Dayton's by a
personal shoplifter, a Twin Cities
man showed up in a full-page
newspaper advertisement for the
department store.
James Dick, one of four mem-
bers of a Roseville family snared in
a highly publicized shoplifting sting
in 1996, appeared in Dayton's
menswear ads in Friday's Star
Tribune and Saint Paul Pioneer
Press. Dayton's officials were not
aware that the man in the advertise-
ment was Dick, said Melissa Stark,
spokeswoman. "This has been an
unusual case from the beginning
and this is just the latest chapter
Stark said. She said the ad was
scheduled to run once.
During the sting at the Dick
family home, police seized about
$40,000 worth of goods, mostly
women's clothing and some expen-
sive crystal. Prosecutors said the
family paid a man to steal for them.
Police said Dick paid undercov-
er informants $800 for Armani suits
and designer sweaters worth more
than $6,000.
Charges against Dick were dis-
missed during an ensuing trial
when a judge ruled that Roseville
police had withheld evidence. Mis
mother, Judy, was convicted of
attempting to receive stolen proper-
ty, but his father, Gerald, and sister,
Stacy Zehren, were acquitted of
theft-related charges. Stark said she
did not know whether James Dick
was aware his picture was going to
be used in the advertisement.
The Minneapolis agency that
represents Dick, Meredith Model
& Talent Agency, would not com-
ment on the ads. Dick, who is
apparently using his first and mid-
dle name - Jim Brian - in his model-
ing career, did not return phone
calls.
"This proves that not only are
the cases against my clients dis-
missed said Earl Gray, James
Dick's lawyer, "they sometimes
even get to work for the company
that charges them
Eating disorders affect
all students on campus
organizations offer
assistance for disease
Brooke Potts
staff writer
Think back over the last few days
and honestly consider the foods
that you ate. Weae they nutritious?
Did you eat from all of the food
groups? More importantly, did you
eat enough to keep your body run-
ning at a healthy level?
If you answered no to the first
two questions, small changes in
your eating patterns can fix your
problem. If the answer to the last
question was no, then you have a
much bigger case to solve.
Students who consistently deny
themselves food or binge and purge
have what is known as an eating
disorder. It is estimated that 20-25
percent of all college women have
an eating disorder, and the problem
is growing among men.
There are two types of eating
disorders: anorexia and bulimia.
Anorexia typically receives the
most attention. People suffering
from this disease have an intense
fear of being fat, even when they
are obviously emaciated.
"Anorexics look in the mirror
Anorexia distorts the image of a person
ILLUSTRATION BY CHRIS KNOTTS
and what they see is not what they
are said Laura Hartung, nutrition
SEE DISORDERS PAGE 7
South Eastern Wrestling Alliance invades Minges Coliseum
sponsored by student
union, pain
Erica Slices
STAFF WRITER
wrestler, Lodi, will be on hand at event.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WORLD WIDE WEB
Although Friday is not considered
one of the typical wrestling nights,
there is always an exception to
every rule.
ECU's Student Union, the
Painting Guild and South Eastern
Wrestling Alliance (SEWA), will
present the first annual Buccaneer
Brawl in Williams Arena, Minges
Coliseum.
The purpose of this event is to
raise funds for ECU's painting
guild in order to bring visiting
artists to the university. The idea
can be accredited to senior Dustin
Massey. Besides being an art major,
he is also "Lazuruz one of the fea-
tured wrestlers in the event. Aside
from art, Massey hopes to pursue a
career in professional wresding.
"I plan to visit Japan Massey
said. "There, wresding is more pop-
ular
His ultimate goal is to return to
the states in about three years and
join the World Wrestling
Federation.
Dan Wright, the promoter for
SEWA, is in charge of the event and
has been involved with the
wrestling scene for about five years
now. According to Wright, 90 per-
cent of his wrestlers were among
the top 500 in the PWI500, which
is very competitive and a presti-
gious accomplishment to obtain.
tsaid.
Some well known wrestlers will
be featured in the event such as
Lodi, Toad, C.W. Anderson and
Venom as well as four-time tag
team champions New Rock 'N'
Roll Express. Lodi, Toad,
Anderson and Venom will all com-
pete in the Main Event which will
be a hardcore street fight.
"If this event sells well, we are
looking at having shows here
at ECU four times a year
Dan Wright
ptomoier for SEWA
Lodi, one of the -featured
wrestlers also graduated from ECU.
Toad is currently an ECU student.
There will also be two tag team
matches and one triangle match.
The four tag teams that will be fea-
tured are the New Rock 'N' Roll
Express, Serial Thrillaz,
Firebreaker Chip and Poison Ivey.
Joey Matthews, Christian York and
Lazuruz will compete in the
Triangle Match. Then Chilly Willy,
Kid Dynamo, the Dude and Viper
will compete against Otto Schwartz,
Cham Pain, the Hawaiian G.Q. and
Dog, respectively.
This event will take place on
Friday night March 26�right after
Spring Break, folks.
Tickets are available at the
Central Ticket office at
Mendenhall Student Center. Prices
range from $25 to as low as $8
according to seat location.
"That's not really a lot of money
to pay for a night of wresding enter-
tainment said Cindy Horrell,
freshman. "It couldn't compare to
Nitro, but I'm sure we will have a
good time
Truth,Equ;
102B East
Bedford Par
Lc
Yd
SI
t






Tht Em Carolinian
features
TuiiCiy. Mirck 8. 1899 7
l EM Carolinian
"Some battery
powered clocks
at the Rec
Center may be
a minute or two
off. We replace
their batteries
during the day-
light savings
times
The Tower
Clock on the
glackenspiel at
Joyner Library
has not yet
been declared
official by the
state. It does
keeps the time
from off of a
computer, but
it is still under
construction.
So the next
time a student
enters their
classroom and
sees that the
clock is appar-
ently telling
the time for
Seoul, Korea,
remember, at
least you have
an excuse for
being late.
Students who
notice any dis-
een the clocks are
all the Facilities
Center at 328-
t
s
image of a person
CHRIS KNOTTS
is not what they
artiing, nutrition
IIS PAGE 7
:um
Brown & Brown I
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
Truth,Equality,JusUce
102B East. Victoria Ct.
Bedford Park, Greenville
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired-
�Under Age Possession ,
�Possession of DrugsParaphenalia
�Drinking in Public
�Felonies and Misdemeanors
�Free Consultation
Phone 752-0952 752-0753
e-mail - ghb.greenvillenc.com
91
jk I:
presents
1 McDonalds
Quarter Pounders
with Cheese
Large
Disorders
continued from page 6
director for campus dining.
In other words, they have a dis-
torted image of their body and
work to correct it, even when their
health is at risk.
Anorexics refuse to eat, and
when they do, it is in minutely
small quantities and calories and fat
grams are precisely calculated.
They will often eat in private and
avoid social gatherings or events
where food is present. The disease
will slowly begin to affect the per-
son's daily life and will eventually
control it completely. Generally, a
great deal of secrecy is involved in
the eating habits of an anorexic,
and those close to the person may
never suspect until their health is
at risk.
"Anorexics lose the ability to be
carefree, which is really sad said
Dr. Jane Ross, staff psychologist at
the Student Health Center.
Dr. Ross assists in leading a
group for those struggling with an
eating disorder, and knows first-
hand just how drastically this dis-
ease affects a person's life.
Those who suffer from anorexia
will continue to struggle with it
throughout their lives, because the
fear of food, despite the body's
need for it, is a daily problem.
There is no one cause of anorex-
ia, but generally those who suffer
from it are very perfectionistic, dri-
ven and goal oriented individuals.
They may be under intense pres-
sure from family, or they may feel
that their lives are out of their con-
trol. Since no one can literally force
them to eat, controlling their diet
and their body is how they react.
"It's really not just about food
Hartung said. "Anorexics use food
as a means of controlling their
lives ,
Bulimia is the other most com-
mon eating disorder. Bulimics eat
large quantities of food, more than
should be consumed in one sitting,
and then purge to prevent weight
gain. Purging consists of inducing
vomiting, taking laxatives, fasting,
or vigorous exercise to offset the
binge. This cycle is usually per-
formed at least two times a week
for several months.
Bulimia is more common among
college age women than anorexia,
and it is estimated that 20 percent
of college females will have at least
one bulimic episode. Most bulim-
ics do not purge in order to lose
weight, but as a means of control-
ling their weight. Because they do
not significantly change weight,
often the disease goes unnoticed.
Medium
$4.23

Tax
ECU Valu Mea
Available at Greenville 10th Street McDonald's Only
Ar�X?F5 644 Arlington Blvd.
ff�s5 Greenville
BARRIW 756-6670
"In the long run, their need tor
treatment becomes more serious
Ross said. "Because they are eat-
ing, it becomes difficult to identify
the disease and get help
If you are concerned about a
friend or yourself, look for the
warning signs. Anorexics will be
abnormally thin, and may have hair
loss, dry skin covered with downy
fuzz, loss of menstrual periods, or
digestive difficulties. More serious-
ly, it can result in frequent stress
fractures, osteoporosis, infertility
and death in extreme cases.
Bulimics may show fluctuations
in weight, swollen glands beneath
the jaw, yellowed and blotchy
teeth, scratches on the backs of the
hands, and a puffy and splotched
face. Over a long period of time,
the heart is weakened which could
lead to irregularities or a heart
attack. Ulcers, colitis and fainting
spells may also occur.
If you are concerned about a
friend, the best thing to do is to let
your friend know you are worried
and to give them information that
they can use. Anyone at Student
Health, the Counseling Center,
Mental Health, or the Student
Recreation Center can help. Most
importantly, don't try to force them
to change. Support is the best that
you can do.
Layout
Needed .it
the East Carolinian
$20 pur mi lion ' I set lions .i week
Must Have knowledge of
Photoshop, Quark Xpress
Chimpanzees attack
zoo employees
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) - Two
Hoglc Zoo employees were j
injured Saturday when they were
attacked by three chimpanzees.
The chimpanzees escaped their
enclosure and gained access to the
employee service area, where two i
of them became dangerously"
aggressive, according to spokesper- 9
son Cyndy Andrews.
Zoo employee Jamie Bradley
was seriously injured when he was
attacked by the animals.
Employee Kimberiy Tropea came .
to Bradley's aid and was less seri- i
ously injured, Andrews said.
One chimpanzee was safely
contained, but the other two were
shot by zoo personnel. Both were
then euthanized because of the
severity of their injuries.
The extent of Bradley's injuries
wasn't immediately known, but he
underwent surgery at a local hospi-
tal Saturday night, Andrews said.
"Our hearts go out to our
injured employees and their fami-
lies zoo executive director Craig
Dinsmore said.
I
Apply at TEC office on the second floor of the
Student Publications Building
r
Student Government
Association
al Thrillaz�'
uid Poison Ivey.�-
iristian York andijfi
mpete in the�i1
icn Chilly Willy,A
Dude and Viper'Zf
t Otto Schwanz,r-
waiian G.Q. and�).i
take place onno
26�right after131
ailable at thesd
office at'E
it Center. Prices3!
3 as low as $88$
cation.
y a lot of money'Ot
wrestling enter13
Cindy Horrelllit
dn't compare to!
: we will have aH t
The following are available
for the 1999-2000 School Year
Student Body President
Student Body Vice President
Student Body Treasurer
Student Body Secretary
You must have a 2.0 and lie in good standing with 48
semester hours completed and have 2 consecutive
semesters at East Carolina University
Filing nates
March 5,1999
Through
March 12,1999
Apply in 255
Mendenhall
Student
Center
Brand New Luxury Apartments
.
Pirates Cove
Now Leasing
Utilities included Fully furnished
Private Bathroom
4 Bedroom 4 Bathroom
Individual Leasing
Roommate Matching
Designer Interiors
State of the Art Amenities
Free Cable
Free Computer lab
Free Monitored Alarm
Near ECU Bus Line
Pirates Cove
l�3 �. IdN Street � Own NC VtSSt

i
JfM





.HT
8 faeeasy, March S, 1989
sports
Tin Ewl Cirollniin
Pirates lose Tournament, but take out Nos. 31

Baseball team clobbers
Miami and Georgia
Paul Kaplan
senior writer
The ECU baseball team traveled
to Florida on Friday for the Bell
South Hurricane Diamond Classic,
which turned into a defining
moment for the Pirate season.
ECU finished the weekend 2-2
settling for runner-up in the tourna-
ment, losing to the Ohio State
Buckeyes twice, their second loss
in the championship game.
"I was a little disappointed that
we did not come out as
Champions junior Erik Bakich
said. "On Friday we just beat our-
selves, and just did not play
defense, and in the championship
game we came out flat offensively
and we didn't get it going
On Friday, ECU took down No.
28 Georgia in their first game, only
to lose to Ohio State 10-7 in their
second Friday showdown.
But, it was Saturday when the
Pirates really put their mark on the
college baseball world by defeating
the Miami Hurricanes, the No. 3
ranked team in the nation 6-5.
"I think the biggest thing about
this weekend is that we came down
here and played with some ranked
teams, teams that are nationally
recognized, and showed people we
can compete at that level head
coach Keith LeClair said on
Sunday. "We would have liked to
win three games, but (Friday) we
didn't play well at all against Ohio
State and let that one get away
from us. We came out Sunday and
Ohio State put the ball in play and
beat us on their own. But overall, I
think we showed a lot of people
what we are about and that we are
capable of winning anytime we
play
In last Monday's USA Today
Baseball WeeklyESPN Coaches
Top 25 poll, ECU received three
points from a pool of 33 Division I
head coaches.
"It doesn't necessarily matter
what the polls say because I really
believe we are a top 25 team and
SwK�:WlDC0rtCTam
Women's basketball team
finished strong season
showed that this weekend. We
played the No. 3-ranked team in
the country and beat them, and
beat the No. 28-ranked team as
well. And with our schedule -
which I don't think many teams
around can say they have a tougher
schedule than ours - I think we
have proven that we have the kind
of team that belongs in the top 25
LeClair said.
" think the biggest thing about
this weekend is that we came
down here and played with
some ranked teams
Keith LeClair
head coach
In Friday's win against Georgia,
John Williamson led the way going
3-5 with two doubles three RBI's
and a home run. Eric Bakich went
3-5 with three runs scored. Brooks
Jernigan took the win as he threw
for seven innings allowing only
three runs, Kevyn Fulcher got his
second save of the year in two
innings giving up four hits and two
runs.
In the Pirates second game on
Friday, the Pirates seemed to have
opened Pandora's box of errors as
the Pirates lost a 5-1 lead in the bot-
tom of the second when Ohio State
scored five runs off of three Pirate
errors to take the lead by one. ECU
finished the game with eight total
errors.
Foye Minton (3-1) picked up
the "W on Saturday in the Pirates
6-5 victory over the Hurricanes.
Minton went 7.2 innings giving up
only ten hits and five runs while
striking out three. Fulcher took his
third save of the year after 1.1
innings of play, giving up a mere
two hits and no runs. Bakich went
3-4 with three runs and an RBI,
Molinari and Chad Tracy each were
2-4 in the game.
In Sunday's championship
game, ECU lost 9-3 producing a
rare poor offensive performance.
ECU could not get on the board
until the eighth inning when they
scored off of two unearned runs
from three walks and a later
Buckeye throwing error which
scored Molinari and Cliff Godwin.
ECU only connected for six hits in
the game, as Bill Outlaw (1-1) took
the loss.
Both Bakich and Molinari won
places on the all-tournament team
for Designated Hitter and
Outfielder respectively.
This week, the Pirates (11-4)
will take on College of Charleston
at 4 p.m. this Tuesday and
Wednesday at Harrington Field.
"This is a big week with College
of Charleston and then UNC-
Asheville this weekend; were look-
ing to get a winning streak going
Bakich said.
The Etit Ctrolini
Bt
Bedroom
Apai
Hoi til
as
Senior Steve Salarao adds his throws to win against No. 3 Miami over the weekend.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
Swinging into action for a promising season start
Mario Scherhaufer
FILE PHOTO
Mario Scherhaufer
sports editor
While! the ACC
tournament did
not peoducc any
surprises this
weekend,
something at
the bottom of
the TV screen
caught my
attention.
A sixth seed
ECU' women
basketball team (16-13) was down by
only one point in Saturday's CAA tour-
nament final against the nationally
ranked Monarchs. Preferring to watch
the ESPN cutlines at the bottom
rather than Duke beating everybody,
it happened to me again when I fol-
lowed ECU's cruise through the first
round, beating the favored Patriots by
59-51 on Thursday before going into
triple-overtime to defeat the
Richmond Spiders 116-111 in the
semifinal.
Picked to finish last by everybody
in the conference, the Pirates sur-
prised everybody with their perfor-
mance but themselves.
After another slow start (the same
thing happened against GMU and the
Spiders) ECU caught up and was
down by five to go into halftime with
a score of 31-26 in favor of the
Monarchs. I totally lost my attention
to the main game on the TV screen
when the Pirates cut the lead to one
point with freshman Allison Trapp on
fire, scoring a game-high 22 points.
Desperately I flipped through the
channels to find the next update on
the Pirate game.
Despite the loss, the game was
ODU's closest call in the tournament
finals since the 1991-92 season when
they beat ECU 85-80 in the finals.
Trapp and Danielle Melvin, who
chipped in 13 points and a team-high
13 rebounds for her third consecutive
double-double of the tournament,
were named to the All-Tournament
Team - along with ECU guard
Waynetta Veney, who scored 33 in the
semifinal win over Richmond. More
importantly, Gibson and the team got
the respect they deserved. With only
one senior this year, the Pirates want
to step in ODU's sneakers next season
by winning the CAA conference final
to break ODU's dominance of eight
consecutive CAA post-season titles.
Golfers finish top five at
Fripp Island, S.C.
Blaise Denils
senior writer
The Pirate golf team survived the windy
weather, only to blow past the competition
and finish in the top five as they opened the
season at Fripp Island, S.C. over the week-
end.
After three solid days of action, the ECU
golf team blasted their way into the top five
at the Fripp Island Intercollegiate
Tournament. The Pirates posted a three-
round total score of 891 and finished fifth
overall behind the leadership of senior Scott
Campbell. Campbell's two-over par 74 on
Sunday gave him a three-round total of 217
and a tie for sixth place in the individual
standings. Campbell's total score was a mere
four strokes over par and only seven behind
the individual champion Chad Collins of
Methodist College.
"We hadn't played in a while so it was
good to get back into the swing of things
Campbell said. "We could have done better,
but it could have been a lot worse. I think
we hung in there pretty good
After the first round on Friday, ECU was
tied for sixth with a 298 total score.
Campbell was tied for second after one
round when he posted an impressive two-
under par 70. After Saturday's round, the
Pirates were still in sixth place with a score
of 294 for the day and grand total of 592 for
the weekend. Campbell dropped to founh
Saturday carding a 73, while juniors Stephen
Satterly and Marc Miller also added 73 and
freshman Frank Adams posted a three-over
75.
"I was pleased to begin the spring season
with a top five finish head coach Kevin
Williams said. "I think we built some confi-
dence that will give us momentum for next
week
Both freshmen entries for the Pirates,
Adams and M. Chad Webb, played well
throughout the weekend- The freshmen
recruiting class is coming off a successful fall
season and will play a major role in this
year's Spring season. Adams shot a final
round score of 73 to post an 11 over par 224
total and tie for 22nd in the individual com-
petition. Webb carded a tournament total
232, 19 strokes over par.
"We had a solid finish and Scott
Campbell played really well Satterly
said. "Frank Adams had a really good
showing and played consistent. Our fresh-
men did well
The tournament team champion West
Florida was in command throughout the
tournament. West Florida was alone in the
top spot after each day's rounds were com-
plete. Their second day total of 580 was
especially strong and continued to increase
their lead over the rest of the pack. Coastal
Carolina finished second overall followed by
South Carolina-Aiken. Methodist College
posted a final score of 883, just eight strokes
ahead of ECU to round out the top five.
All five Pirates played well and as a team
they are pleased with their performance in
this opening tournament. All Pirate team
members noted the windy conditions at the
Ocean Creek course and believe created
another opponent on the course. According
to Miller, the team played well, but he is not
pleased with his individual performance.
"Putting was a big thing, I didn't make
my putts Miller said. "I had a couple of
bad drives that hurt me and usually driving
is my strong point
The ECU golf team will travel to
Charlotte for their next event and team
members are exited about the competition
at this match. The tournament will place
ECU against at least three top 25 nationally
ranked schools, including the University �f
North Carolina Tar heels.
"It will be the best field we face all year
Campbell said. "There will be a lot of big
name golf schools and it will be interesting
to see how we hold up out there
The Pirates will be on the course again in
Charlotte March 13-14 for the Birkdale
Collegiate Golf Classic.
ECU Golf Stats
Top20Te�m� Total Score
DWestRorkJa 863
2) Coastal Carotin 877
3) South CacoSoo-ASSBn 881
4 Methodist College 883
5) East Carotimt 891
6) Charleston Southern 882
7) Tenneeeoe-Chattenoooa 834
8) Iowa State Univ. 898
9) W.nthioi Univ. 897
K� UNC-Greensbero 904
11) Afkansas-Uttle Rock 911
V.) Eastern Kentucky Univ. 920
13) Austm Peay State 933
Vt High Point 940
15 Citadel 941
16) Cincinnati Urev. 947
Source: Athletic Department
KING OF
R.A.
Please I
Men's tennis team gets ravaged by Wolfpack
Pirates continue five match
skid after gpod season start
Morgan Hefner
staff writer
The ECU men's tennis players ran into a
tough NC State squad and found them-
selves shut out 7-0 by the end of the day.
This defeat comes on the coattails of a
Pirate loss to High Point where they lost 4-
2. The team's losing streak rose to five
games after the Pirates won their first four
matches of the 1999 season.
Head coach Morris and the team knew
that they were up against a tough opponent
at NC State on Saturday.
They NC State already have a win in
the top 10" Morris said. "The guys were a
bit intimidated
Derek Slate agreed that playing against
the Wolfpack was different from their
. matches at the beginning of the season.
"We were a bit intimidated by their fans
Kenny Kirby gets closest to a win against
NC State on Saturday in Raleigh, N.C.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU SPORTS INFORMATION OEPT.
and them Slate said. 'They were our first
big caliber team
In Raleigh the Pirates found themselves
struggling in nearly every match. The clos-
est singles bout was between Kenny Kirby
at No. 3 facing Keith Salmon of NC State.
After dropping the first set' 7-5, Kirby
rebounded in the second to even things up
at one set apiece by winning 6-4. "I just
stayed consistent Kirby said. "I played
every point and did not look too far ahead
The third set was just as close as the first
two, but Kirby ended up losing the match at
6-4 in the third.
Coach Morris had some kind words
regarding Kirby's play. "Kirby had a good
match. He had some chances to win
Morris said.
The Pirates gave the Wolfpack another
scare at the
No. 1 doubles
position
where Kalajo
and Thalen
gave the NC
State team a
for their
Morris said.
That service break proved fatal to Kalajo
and Thalen as they fell 8-6.
Slate and Kirby found themselves out of
the winners circle as well, losing 8-2. "We
got off slow Slate said. "One of their play-
ers was in the top 10 and we did not play up
to what we could have
The Pirates will match up against South
Carolina State in their next match, which is
scheduled for Saturday, March 13.
ECU (4-6) O, NC State (8
run
money.
"Number
one double
was a good
match. It
came down to
a service
break
StrtgN
Robert araocm
Eric Jackson
Keith Salmon
Shaun ftxatias
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.
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��T
� Carolinian

Till tilt Carolinian
sports
I�.IM.t
's
Best Kept Secret
i of the art ritrwti Center.
�- � - �
CALL TODAYIII 1510 Bridle Circle
355-2198
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Men's soccer coach
starts with wins
.) i-n) mrs
sE it-1 aw.g y
2905 E 5th Street, Greenville, NC � (252) 6954020
Pasta � Pizza � Salads � Sandwiches � Homemade � Soups � Desserts
Dine In or Take Out � Boxed Lunches Available
Dining Room Opai
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Closed Sundays � Full ABC Permits
Greenville's largest variety of imports and fine wines
QdSiJHm3m!
j r-i i-1r-1 i-1r-1 �� ir��
i-ll-ii-ll-i -1I-V i-l u
Who said you couldn't find
a meal for a SI anymore?
Beginning Wednesday, January 20th,
at the First Pentecostal Holiness Church in Greenville, you can
join us for a time of food, fun and fellowship. Every Wednesday at
5:45PM we will be serving a meal - and it's only a BUCK! All
college students are welcome. After the meal we will have Cutting
Edge Youth Church to feed your soul. So come and bring a friendll
We're located off Evans Street on 100 Plaza Drive - behind
Overton's Sports Center or call 756-3315.
Don't have a buck, COME ANYWAY! We'll see you there!
r the weekend.
start
tent will place
p 25 nationally
: University of
e face all year
be a lot of big
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iere
course again in
the Birkdale
tats
Total Seo�
863
m '�
881
893
891
897
904:
911
920
923
940
841
34?
m
k
tal to Kalajo
elves out of
ig 8-2. "We
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iinst South
:h, which is
3.
DO YOU NEED CASH FORSPRINC BREAK?
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BUSCH Natural
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Please bring your empty A-B kegs to the warehouse, Monday- Friday, 8:30 -11:30 a.m. and 1:30 - 4:30 p.m.
For more information
www.tec.ecu.edu
Barton, Mt. Olive
PirutesyfintvkAms
Mario Scherhaufer
sporti (oitor
Physical fitness is highlighted by
Devin O'Neill when he sends the
team to the track for sprint training
after chey have just played 90 min-
utes of soccer.
The Pirates' new soccer head
coach just witnessed another victo-
ry on Saturday against Barton
College after the men's soccer team
defeated Mt. Olive with a score of
2-1 last weekend. The 4-0 victory
over Barton was die first time since
Oct. 18,19 that ECU won a game
by four or more goals. Back then,
Maryland Eastern Shore was
defeated 4-0 in ECU's last regular
season victory of such dimension.
Senior defender Sean Hawley
started the scoring early for the
Pirates when he tapped the ball
across the line. Connecting on a
long pass from junior Chris Powell,
midfielder Greg Hoffman put his
name on the scoring board for the
Pirates. Following another quick
counter attack, Demar Martin, a
sophomore from Greensboro,
scored the most appealing goal of
the day when he sprinted across the
field and left two Barton defenders
bchirui to rruuee the Pinste lead a 3-
0. Rounding out the productive day
for ECU was Kevin Maloney, win
finished after a Doppelpass for die
final score of 4-0.
After the game TEC talked to
O'Neill about his goals i
Pirate head coach.
TEG Were you sauafie
the performance of your Mam dur-
ing your first two games as Pirate
head coach?
O'Neill: Definitely. We did not
focus too much on the results. The
results are nice. It's always nice to
win, but more important, we have
shown improvement defensively.
We are playing a little different
then what the guys ate used to end
it takes a little bit of adjustment.
But to the guys' credit, they have
adapted pretty quickly and we are
doing it well We still have some
adjustments to make, we still have
to get better, but die signs they
have been showing are encourag-
ing. It's been enjoyable to score �
few goals, and the guys are excited
about that, we needed more pro-
duction. To have that happen so
quickly is an added bonus.
TEC- What's the goal for the
spring season?
O'Neill: At this point in the
spring what I really am moat con-
cerned about is at how we are
defending. And I'm'happy with the
progress so for. We want� become
a great defensive team, and we
want to get reasonably organized.
We want to hit the ground running
once we come back in August.
Editor's note: (far the complm
interview on our net page.
8-1. W)
6-2. 6-2
7-8.4-8, 6-4
8-1,60
84.04
e-&o
Tournament Begins
March 22nd 1999
Mendenhall Student Center
.
Sponsored by; ECU Student Union
Special Events Committee
Sign Up!
March 1-10th
only 128 slots available
$2.00 entry fee
For more information,
pick up a registration packet
from the MSC desk, or
the Billards Lounge
mammmmmammmmmmmmmm
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IQTWOy. Msrcn 9. 1988
sports
Tht Eilt Carolinian

Intramural
5-on-5 Ranking
The molting are bated on
taeiro Mill eJrve in lounvwrient play
- "WbiaiaW �Baefi an�� iieV
FISUilWY JUtO
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4.AWwStg
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' 4. Steeper
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2.nMMi9ttrz
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4 Below the Net
S. Econ Society
Wbmen'eGoW
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Watnw't Purple
1 F�strov�or Wfonder
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Co-flee
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Get Pierced
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Large selection of imported
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From downtown, go straight down Dickinson Avenue
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appening
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; 1
� J"
� Two-thirds of ECU students
consume Four or fewer
drinks when they drink.
� More than half of ECU
students drink alcohol
twice a month or less.
� One-third of ECU students
prefer to attend parties
where alcohol is NOT served.
What's happening with
6u
BAST
CAH.OLINA
UNrvmsmr
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All proceeds benefit St. Jude's Children Hospital)
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Tickets Available at Central Ticket Office
The Cfoffiuartet
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itt Carolinian
SCE
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� & Fall
NAT 9 PM
EJEKS
GREEKS
E DOOR l
available at
ATTIC
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& 9th)
ospiti
8
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anm
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ll
11 Tueiday. March 9, 1999
fnt till UtlMWI
FOR RENT
WALK TO ECU. 1.2.3, or 4 bed-
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renting. Call 321-4712.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom. 1 bath apt.
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Available Nowl Call Pitt Property
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Call 353-2717 or 756-2766 or e-mail
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WESLEY COMMONS North. One
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� Estates, in walking distance to cam-
� pus. 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms.
- kitchen, and living room. Rent
$265mo. 12 utilities. Ask for
�Chris at 752-1621 or leave message.
WE NEED a roommate. 14 utilities,
14 rent, 14 phone. 5 bedrooms, 2
bath house on Harding Street. Must
"like animals. Call at 757-2482.
TWO MF roommates needed to
share 3 BR apt. at Tar River Estates.
Very spacious, everything provided.
All you need is bedroom furniture.
Asking $275 each and 13 electric.
767-2037.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share 3
bedroom apartrnlnt near campus.
$210 per montrr plus utilities and
phone. Call 830-4857.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 2 bedroom apt. in Wilson Acr-
es. Call 7540755. "
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share a furnished two bedroom
apartment beginning in May or June.
Must be responsible, non-smoker
preferred, and easy to. live with.
Please call 830-9,065, if not there,
please leave a message.
I FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
' share 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom apart-
; ment 2 blocks from school. Rent
$255. Washerdryer included, 12
cable, 12 utilities, 12 phone. Avail-
able at end of this semester. Make
plans now. Call Emily, 329-0886.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP. 2
bedroom, 2 bath furnished apt. in
Fairlane Farms. $250mo. with
washer dryer and fireplace plus bal-
cony included. Call Travis at 355-
1139; during Spring break call
(910)425-3680.
FOR SALE
1991 HONDA Accord EX- black with
tan leather interior. High mileage
;from commuting to school. Kept up
'and taken care of well. Asking
$5,000. Call 329-7034.
LAST MINUTE Panama City Spring
Break Blowout Specials! 7 nights at
hhe Boardwalk Beach Resort $179!
Next to Best Bars! Hurry Space Lim-
ited! springbreaktravel.com 1-800-
�78-6386
4���
PRE-PAID Calling cards. 106 min.
10. 216 min. $20. For more infor-
mation or to purchase, call Kristy at
328-8426. Limited numbers avail-
able. .
BEDROOM FURNITURE for sale!
(Bed. mattress, two nightstands. two
dressers and large mirror). $750 or
best offer. Call 366-1521. All furniture
ftbm Ikea.
CLARINET FOR sale, best offer, it's
yours. Call Jessica O 328-7987.
FOR SALE
STUDY CRUNCH? Student desk,
used, missing one drawer handle.
$75 with small office'chair thrown
in. Perfect for studying, possible
price negotiation. 762-6899, leave
message.
FOR SALE! Acer laptop computer
with Lotussuite with Canon BJC-70
Color Bubblejet portable printer. Car-
rying case included. Sold together.
Carrying case included. (910)577-
4592 ask for Melissa.
IN NEED of the convenience of a
printer? Will sell my Stylewriter II for
only $80.0011 Also, software, games,
and modem for sale cheapl Call or
leave message. 329-0390.
HELP WANTED
Come to
our
Open
House.
We'd like you to get to
know us better.
We're very proud of our
unit, and look forward
to telling you all about
ourselves. If you like what
you see and hear, you
might want to join us. For
more information, just give
us a call:
252-756-9695
MALL YOU CAN M:
ARMY RESERVE
HELP WANTED
CHILD CARE needed. Nanny for
two children. Must be kind, responsi-
ble, positive, honest, reliable, pa-
tient, and warm. Must have reliable
transportation and good driving
record. Must be willing to work long
hours: 7:15-6:45 Monday through
Friday. Starting March 15. Must have
excellent references. Call 931-0760
days or 321-8658 evenings.
POOL MANAGERS and Lifeguards
with great people skills needed for
the summer of 1999 in the Triangle
area. Additional offices in the Balti-
more. Richmond, Philadelphia, DC,
Atlanta, NJ, and Nashville areas.
Please contact Lisa at 919-878-3661.
QREAT, SUMMER Job for bright,
personable student. Evening sched-
ule leaves time for beach, parties.
(252)441-6235 or write: Jobs, PO
Box 1036, Kill Devil Hills, NC27948.
EASTERN CAROLINA'S finest
adult entertainment is now hiring.
Call for interview. Playmates, 252-
747-7686.
EARN GOOD money and learn at
the same time with an internship in
the financial services industry. Fax
your resume to Jeff Mahoney at 355-
7980 or call 355-7700.
MAINTENANCE TECH. Main-
tenance of swimming pools. Part or
full-time. Training provided begin-
ning mid-March. Call 321-1214.
MODELS WANTED: for videos,
great pay.l no experience needed.
For detail call 1-877-338-4159 or
write to M.V.P PO Box 1507, Eliza-
beth City. NC 27906
SUMMER help at Hatteras
Beach. Free housing. Need two
males or females for retail seafood
market. Bonus offered. Call 252-986-
2216 or e-mail riskybCinterpath.com
SPRING YOUTH Indoor Soccer
Coaches. The Greenville Recreation
8- Parks Department is recruiting for
12 to 16 part-time youth soccer
coaches for the spring youth indoor
soccer program. Applicants must
possess some knowledge of the soc-
cer skills and have the ability and pa-
tience to work with youth. Applic-
ants must be able to coach young
people ages 5-18, in soccer funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3 until 7
p.m. with some night and weekend
coaching. Flexible with hours accor-
ding to class schedules and Spring
Break week. This program will run
from March 8 to early May. Salary
rates start at $5.15 per hour. For
more information, please call Ben
James, Michael Daly or Judd Crum-
pler at 329-4550 after 2 p.m.
OCEANBEACH RESCUE manag-
ers and lifeguards. Summer. Atlantic
Beach. ORLGT training offered. Call
locally 321-1214.
UFEGUARDS WANTED for sum-
mer employment at local neighbor-
hood pool. Applicants must already
possess Lifeguard Certification. Seri-
ous inquiries only to 321-0725, ask
for Chris.
$7.00 PER hour plus $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina. (Nags Head). Call
Dona for application and housing
info 800-662-2122.
FREE PICTURES. Would you like to
have special pictures to give to your
family or boyfriend? I enjoy shooting
pictures of young women for my
portfolio. If you model for me. I will
give you free pictures. Reputable am
ateur photographer. References
available. Please send a note, phone
number, and a picture (if available - it
will be returned) to Paul Hronjak,
4413 Pinehurst Dr Wilson, NC
27896-9001 or call (252)237-8218 or
e-mail hronjak�simflex.com
POOL MANAGERS and lifeguards.
Summer. Greenville, Goldsboro. Wil-
son, Rocky Mount, Atlantic Beach.
Raleigh, Cary. Chapel Hill. LGT train-
ing offered. Call locally 321-1214.
SUMMER POSITIONS available on
the Outer Banks of North Carolina.
Papa's Garden is hiring for summer
and fall retail positions in Duck. Kill
Devil Hills and Hatteras. Interviews
will begin during spring break. Limit-
ed summer housing available. Send
resume to POBox 743, Hatteras. NC
27943 or call 252-986-4040.
HAM'S BREWHOUSE now hiring
servers and kitchen staff. Servers
must have day availability. Do you
like to make money? Do you like to
have a good time while making that
money? Apply in person Monday
thru Saturday 10-6p.m. @ 701 South
Evans Street. Come to the trailer be-
side the building. EOE
SERVICES
DJ. FOR HIRE
NYC D.X READY TO
HYPE UP YOUR PARTY
For all functions & campus
organizations
Call J.Arthur @ 252-412-0971
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CMMHUMYSnin
(919)496-2224
ADVERTISE IN
THE CLASSIFIEDS.
IT WORKS!
Want to have fun and make money?
Raleigh Parks and Recreation has over 2,000 summer job opportunities for
camp counselors, camp directors, lifeguards, aquatic management, parks
maintenance, amusement ride operators, corporate leisure services and more.
For information and an application call (919)890-3285 or visit our website at
www.raleigh-nc.orgparks&recindex.htm
Work Outdoors I
Want Honest, Reliable Students
Wdependable truckcar
TO MONITOR COTTON
(No experience necessary)
$7.00hr. mileage
mallfax resume
MCSI-Box 370
Cove City, NC 28523
Fax: 252-637-2126
(Nr. Greenville, New Bern, Kin9ton)
GREEK PERSONALS
SISTERS OF Epsilon Sigma Alpha,
thanks for coming to the wine and
cheese. Hope to see you all at the
Attic tonight. Have a great week!
DELTA ZETA: as predicted. "Any
Thing For Money' was unpredict-
able. Thanks for the laughs and
smiles. Look forward till next time. Pi
Kappa Alpha brothers. Something
Big is Coming Soon!
EPSILON SIGMA Alpha- We hope
everyone had fun at the wine and
cheese party. See you tonight at The
Attic for a night with cold truth.
THANKS. CHI Omega. Sigma Pi
and Alpha Xi Delta, for a great social
last Thursday downtown. Can't wart
to do it again. Love. Sigma Nu
ALPHA DELTA Pi would like to
thank Phi Kappa Psi for a great social
on Thursday. Love, Alpha Delta Pi
CONGRATULATIONS, ELLEN, on
your lavalier to Jim. Love, your sis-
ters of Alpha Phi
THETA CHI - Thanks for a great
time at the gangster social, you guys
are da bomb. Love. Alpha Phi
THE BROTHERS of Delta Sigma
would like to thank the sisters of Chi
Omega for joining us in a great so-
cial. We had a good time. Thanks.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
OTHER
SUBLEASE 2 bdrm 2 bath King-
ston Cond. available now. March
rent paid. 919-751-9481.
YOGA CLASSES begin again soon!
Intro & Advanced Beginner slots
available. Register before March 22
at the SRC main office.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
GOLDEN KEY will meet today at
5:30 in GCB 1012. We will plan for
Sophomore Recognition.
PASTOR JAMES D. Corbott of
Community Christian Church will be
hosting the Amazing Grace Program
on Thursday. March 11 at 7 p.m.
This program is designed to minister
to those who are surrounded by.
involved in or overcoming the drug
culture and any other addiction in
life. The program will be held every
Thursday from March 11th through
May 27 at the Community Christian
Church, 1104 N. Memorial Drive,
Greenville. For more info, please call
551-9143
INTENDED CSDI Major. All Gener-
al Collage students who intend to
major in the Department of Commu-
nication Sciences and Disorders and
have Mr. Robert Muzzarelli or Mrs.
Meta Downes as their advisor are to
meet on Wednesday, March 24 at 6
p.m. in Brewster C-103. Advising for
early registration will take place at
that time. Please prepare a tentative
class schedule before the meeting.
Bring Taking Charge. Your Academic
Planner, and use the worksheet to
develop your schedule.
SPEAK UPI Does the thought of
public speaking panic you? You are
not alone and yet, public speaking is
one of tile most valuable leadership
skills you can possess. Tuesday.
March 9th. 4 p.m. Mendenhall
Student Center Underground
TEST ANXIETY: 3:30-4:30. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering this work-
shop on Tuesday. March 9 and
Monday. March 22. If you are inter-
ested in this workshop, please con-
tact the Center at 328-6661.
WE'RE BACK! B-GLAD (Bisexuals
Gays Lesbians and Allies for Diversi-
ty) is starting off the new year with a
bang! We meet every Wednesday
night � 7:30 p.m. in room GC 3008.
Come join the fun, meet new people
and make a difference.
SOFTBALL OFFICIALS meeting:
Anyone interested in being an intra-
mural Softball official needs to at-
tend the meeting on March 10 at 9
p.m. in the Student Recreation Cen-
ter classroom 202. Yes. this is a paid
jobl Some knowledge andor experi-
ence is requested. For more informa-
tion please contact 328-6387.
ARE YOU interested in helping out
the environment? Join ECO-ECU to-
morrow at 5 p.m. in Biology N-109.
We are planning for our annual bike
rally. Anyone interested just come on
by!
BECOMING A Successful Student-
11 a.m12 noon. The Center for
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering the following work-
shop on Wednesday. March 10. If
you are interested in this workshop.
contact the Center at 328-6661.
REGISTRATION FOR General Col-
lege Students. General College stud-
ents should contact their advisers
the week of March 22-26 to make
arrangements for academic advising
for FallSummer Semesters 1999.
Early registration week is set for
March 29-April 1.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
STRESS MANAGEMENT Work-
shop: Wednesday 3:304:30. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering this work-
shop on March 10. If you are inter-
ested in this program, contact the
Center at 328-6661.
DR. ROY Hicks, a General in God's
Army who has given his life to pas-
toring and pioneering churches
throughout the US, will be minister-
ing at Community Christian Church
on Sunday, March 21 at 6 p.m. He is
the former General Supervisor of the
Foursquare Churches in America
and has served the Lord in various
foreign fields, having made mission-
ary journeys toSouth America, the
Orient. Australia and New Zealand.
For more information please contact
Pastor James D. Corbett. 1104 North
Memorial Drive. Greenville. 752-
5683.
SPRING BREAK 'Bah Humbug
Free Aerobics at the SRC all week
long March 13-20.
ADVANCED CLIMBING Sessions:
Increase your knowledge of climbing
skills at the SRC Wall. Tuesdays.
March 23-May 4 from 7-8 p.m. The
cost if $15 students$25 non-mem-
bers. Be sure to register one week
prior to each session and as space
permits.
THERE WILL be a trip to Linville
Gorge. NC March 26-28. Learn cut-
ting edge climbing techniques in a
premiere climbing area. Cost is $59
students$69 non-members. This
cost includes everything Be sure to
register by March 12.
ADVISING SESSION for Pre-OT
Students will be Wednesday, March
24. 1999 in room 203 of the Belk
Building. Advising and signing of
registration forms will begin at 5:30:
please try to be prompt. If you can-
not come to the Wednesday night
session, please come to the OT of-
fice, room 306. between 8-5 the
week of March 22-26.
C, IMP PI.VE WOOD
Summer Camp
COUNSELORS & INSTRUCTORS
for private Co-ed youth camp
located in the beautiful mountains of
Western North Carolina Over 25
activities, including All sports, water
skiing, heated pod, tennis, art,
horseback, G&karts.
615 to 816earn $1350-51750
plus room, meals, laundry &
great fun! Non-smokers call for
applicationbrochure:
800-832-5539 anytime!
Panama City Blowout!
Summit Condo's $50 off!
All rooms face beach, wbalcony and full
kitchen, sleeps up to 6.
Boardwalk Suites $50 off!
All rooms face beach, wbalcony and
kitchenette, sleeps up to 6.
AH Cancun Packages $75 off!
If not too Itttl All credit emit tcctpttdl
l M3 HH
?t cm. Peppers A
Live Music � Sushi m
Happy Hour - lOt Shrimp J
Sunday Brunch
Have a great summer
Chilli Peppers has Summer positions available
for hard working, fun loving people so while
you're at the beach, bring your resume
252.441.8081 � Kill Devil Hills NC
CAMPUS REPS SIGN UP ONLINE '
18002347007
www.endlesssummertours.coin
SPRING
mm
Son no Break Trwti w� 1 of I pjtf buttwuM to Bit US m t 998 tow
rKogntied for outstanding Mho by Council of Better Bucntu Bureau'
Bahamas Party
Cruise $279
5 day � Mo Meats � Fret ParBei � ImMm Tun
Panama $119
City- Boardwafc. Wok-day Km Suntprw s More
Jamaica $439
Cancun $399
7 MghH � At- HoW � Fret Food & M H of Orwfcj
Spring Break Trevcl-Our 12th Year!
1-800-678-6386 �
Advertise in
the classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE$4.00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional words 59 each
STUDENT UNE AD RATE$2.00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional words 5t each
Must present a valid ECU 1.0. to qualify. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to refuse fhis rate for any ad deemed to be
non-student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE .$1.00
add to above line rate for either BOLD or ALL CAPS type.
.Ail classified ads placed by individuals or campus
groups must be prepaid. Classified ads placed by a
business must be prepaid unless credit has been
established. Cancelled ads can be removed from the
paper if notification is made before the deadline, but
no cash refunds are given.
DEADUNE4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue
MM





'
i
of regular & sale
priced merchandis
with ECU StuM
or Facul
Must be
at time of p
DOES NOT INCLUDE:
Cosmetics, Fragrances, Designer Watches, Estate Jewelry, Hair Salon. Polo, Chaps, Ralph Lauren, No Fear. Quiksilver. Mossimo, Nautica, Tommy Hilfiger, Hanes. Easy Spirit.
Liz Claiborne. Jones. New York, Ena Picone. Rene Rowan. JNCO. Etienne Aigner, Calvin Klein underwear. Cairn Studio Collectables. Department 56 collectables, Waterford.
All Clad Cookware. Value Edge Items, Fine Jewelry Best Buys. Belkie Bear. Doorbusters. Lay-Aways, Special Orders. Gift Certificates and previously purchased merchandise.
OFFER VALID ONLY AT BELK IN CAROLINA EAST MALL AND THE PLAZA MALL

Miiiftft"
41
EZf.
Departrrt
of spaces
R A C H A
STAI
Campus parkir
undergoing m:
system becom
entcd in the cc
"Parking nc
become less av
community ne
park and ride s
Eastwood, e:
Bill
buil
fu
$58 mil
fortotalA
P E T E I
SENIC
Proposals for tl
new Science
Building have
the North
Assembly for p
lion needed in
of the largest a
buildings on m;
ECU hopes
ted money in i
circulation of tl
two year fiscal
ing nearly $2
Science and T
in which ECU
money for wi
largest buildin
259,000 square
in size to the S
Brody Building
es 476,329 squa
ECU sparke
the developme
after a panel o
inspectors rat
Building as t
developed buili
ty system. F
houses the che
and the Schoc
Technology all
mental offices
will be transf
Science and T
possibly as soon
of 2002.
The bill wa:
tion committee
for considers
Representative
Marian Mel ,av
Zeno Edwards,
are among the
bill. While Ser
and Ed Warren
proposed bill fc
Bruce Flye, I
Planning, does
will delay the
building's devel
have already t
design of the bi
After the mo
SEE SCIENCE
��M


Title
The East Carolinian, March 9, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 09, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1336
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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