The East Carolinian, February 23, 1999






Thursday:
High: 41
Low: 21
Friday:
High: 40
Low: 31
Online Survey
www.tec.ecu.edu
"Do you think our school has
attained racial harmony?"
"Are you a year 2000 compliant?"
64 Yes 35 No
Carolinian
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23. 1999 VOLUME 74. ISSUE 40
Brandon Hawkins flies high but falls deep in
ECU's loss against the Seahawks on Saturday.
See Sports page 8
African-American experience improving on campus
Editor's Note: This article is the
final in a two part series on race rela-
tions at EClI.
Some minorities unhappy
with college experience
T O l M v Yakbor O U Ci II
S I A FI WRITER
Even though race relations have
improved at ECU, with African-American
students delving into almost every area of
Michael Brown, junior merchandising major, and Scott
Bradley, Criminal Justice major walk their dogs on the mall
PHOTO BV MICHAEL SMITH
the college experience, some "students
still overwhelmingly report that they're not
happy said Dennis Chestnut, profes-
sor of psychology at ECU.
Exactly what accounts for the
unhappiness is not completely under-
stood, but Chestnut says he labels it as
a "quality of life, quality of experience
issue at ECU
Chestnut said that often "the scope
of the academic setting within the
classroom doesn't address the African-
American experience but this is def-
initely changing.
For example, since 19 there has
been growing support in his depart-
ment for teaching classes against the
backdrop of the ethnic, cultural experi-
ence, Chestnut said.
ECU now has an African-American
studies program, and English professor
Reginald Watson teaches African-
American literature as a way to foster dis-
cussion among his students about race
issues. He noted that text written by black
abolitionist Frederick Douglas in the mid-
19th century still has ideas relevant to
today's young African-American students.
"In that process, (students) start to do
things, they start to get that dialogue going.
That really opens up the class to a lot of
productive discussion Watson said.
ECU has the third-highest percentage
of blacks among traditionally white schools
in the UNC system. There are at least 15
university-recognized organizations
geared toward black students.
So why do some black students feel
alienated on campus? Unfortunately,
Watson said, these groups suffer poor com-
munication among themselves and operate
"in isolation from one another Thus,
their power to help weave black students
into the university fabric becomes frac-
tured.
"In fact, most of your minority organiza-
tions will complain about lack of participa-
tion he said. Watson knows about this
firsthand. In 1993, he formed a theater
company called Thespians for Diversity,
an ensemble group that uses drama to
SEE HARMONY PAGE 2
Hunt submits state
budget to assembly
Pure Gold Dance Team rocks the court
YinSiTfi:
Tuition hike, decrease
in funding proposed
Moi.i.v Harris
S T FI WRITER
Governor Jim Hunt submitted his
biennial 1999-2001 state budget
proposal to the North Carolina
General Assembly on Feb. IS.
I lowever, according to universi-
ty sources, the North Carolina
University system is less than
pleased with his recommendations.
Hunt's budget, which will be
revised and finalized by the
General Assembly, not only
includes a 2.5 percent tuition
increase for every university in the
UNC system, but fails to increase
funding for projects such as infor-
mation and technology additions,
distance education (remote site
classes) and libraries.
The budget is broken down into
two parts; the continuation budget
or the amount of money that was
allotted in 1998-1999, and the
expansion budget which is com-
posed of new dollar requests for
programs such as salary increases
for state employees and capital pro-
jects such as new buildings. The
UNC system requested $99.4 mil-
lion in new expansion budget fund-
ing. Hunt recommended $34.5 mil-
lion.
ECU's doctoral status was not
addressed in terms of expanded
funding, and also the $55 million
needed to complete the Science
and Technology building was not
recommended. Additionally,
Hunt's budget included a .5 per-
cent decrease in the UNC system's
budget which equates to a $750,000
cut for ECU.
"It's very difficult to accept bud-
get cuts in a period when the econ-
omy is thriving and the state's fiscal
situation is excellent said Richard
Brown, vice chancellor of
SEE BUDGET PAGE 3
Pure Gold Dance Team entertains the largest crowd this year at Minges Coliseum during half time of the rivalry between the Seahawks and the Pirates.
FILE PHOTO
Joyner Library dedication
to be held on Founder's Day
Ceremony to take place
March 8 at 2 p.m.
K R I S I Y D A N I F. I.
STAFF WRITER
This year's Founder's Day celebra-
tion, which is exactly 92 years after
the North Carolina Legislature
approved the charter for the East
Carolina Teachers Training School,
will include the dedication of Joyner
Library.
Founder's Day was celebrated
annually until the 1930's. For some
unknown reason, the celebration
stopped until three years ago.
"I think it's great said Manny
Amaro, director of University
Housing. "We need tradition on
campus and this is a great way cele-
brate
V
The major highlight of this year's
celebration, which will take place on
March 8, is the dedication of the
newly renovated and expanded
Joyner Library. The dedication will
take place at 2 p.m. at the main
entrance of the library and will be
followed by a reception ,in the
Joyner sculpture garden.
At 3 p.m. the opening of the
Queen Anne's Revenge exhibition
will take place in the North Carolina
Collection of the library. This dis-
play will feature artifacts from the
ship which belonged to Blackbcard.
According to Michael Dorsey,
dean of the School of Arts and chair
of Founder's Day, the main
Founder's Day program will begin
at 11 a.m. in Henderix Theater.
The ECU faculty will march in
wearing their full academic regalia.
Professors Henry Ferrell, Gene
Lanier and former Academic
Library Services Director Kenneth
Marks will make speeches during
the days event.
V
Chancellor Eakin will present
the Founder's Day Service Awards
to the university employees who
have been selected to receive this
award.
The ECU Symphony, conduct-
ed by Douglas Morrison, will pre-
sent a medley of music from the
television documentary "Victory at
Sea by Richard Rodgers and the
ECU alma mater.
"We are honored to be asked to
come back again this year
Morrison said. "Last year was our
first year performing for the celebra-
tion
Also, according to Manny Amaro,
at 8 p.m. the rededication of Cotten
will take place
"The Founder's Day celebration
takes on a special meaning in the
hearts and minds of faculty and stu-
dents who look forward to the day
with anticipation and excitement
and take a moment to pause and
celebrate the birthday of the univer-
sity Dorsey said.
Performance artist exhibits skills
Student Union brings
Cosmic guide with dog
Peter Dawvot
ASSISTAN I N'EWS EDITOR
In recent weeks, students and fac-
ulty members have discovered
new forms of spiritual guidance
through the help of a cosmic guide
known as Ann Shengold and her
dog Rudie.
The two have been working in a
joint effort with the North Carolina
Arts Foundation and the ECU
Student Union in an effort to give
students a new insight about the
events which surround them on a
daily basis.
Shengold incoqiorates a combi-
nation of spiritual guidance through
conversation, as well as Reiki,
which is an ancient Tibetan hands-
on art. It uses mental massages in
attempt to allow students a new
way to vent frustrations as well as
bridge gaps between missing auras.
This project, known as "Dreaming
of a Cosmic Catering Device has
(iened new perspectives for both
students and faculty.
Members within a Student
Union subcommittee were in
charge of helping initiate the drive
to bring Shengold to ECU. With
the help of the Student Union and
a grant from the N.C. Arts
Foundation, the two were able to
get Shengold and her pet on cam-
pus.
According to Shengold, she
received a grant from the North
Carolina Arts Council for around
$8,000 as well as other grants from
ECU.
Jeffrey Marshall, assistant direc-
tor of Student Activities, said that
there have been mixed reactions
concerning the presence of the cos-
mic lady on campus from students
and faculty.
"Student reaction has been pret-
ty positive Marshall said. "There
has been some skepticism from fac-
ulty members
Marshall said that this is
Shcngold's last week on campus
and that as many students as possi-
ble should take advantage of the
exhibit.
Freshman Aaron Clevenger was
among many interested in the
exhibit. '
"I think it is great that the uni-
Michael Papera receiving Reiki treatment.
PHOTO BV MICHAEL SMITH
versify is allowing students the
opportunity to gain insights from
numerous different horizons
Clevenger said. "While it is a little
pricey, still the university is making
an attempt to provide other per-
spectives to its students
Shengold's art exhibit allows the
viewer to be a part of a 3-D world
by allowing them to participate.
Students arc invited to attend the
final ceremonies of the art exhibit
on Sunday at 5:30 p.m. Student are
encouraged to meet Shengold on
the second floor of Mendenhall, or
email her at k9heart@aol.com.





3 Tmtdiy,
Z TwHiy, frtrmry 23. 1999
news
Thi Eitt Carolinian
news
briefs
Black student rejected for
service as orientation assistant
NC MARINE JETS
LEAVE CHERRY
POINT FOR KOSOVO
REGION
HAVELOCK, N.C. (AP) Six
Marine jets have left here as part
of a group of dozens of military
aircraft ordered to the Kosovo
region to support possible
NATO airstrikes there.
Five EA-6B Prowlers and one
backup jet flew out of Cherry
Point Marine Corps Air Station
around 8:30 a.m. Saturday, said
Capt. Matthew McLaughlin, a
base spokesman.
An additional 140 support ser-
vicemen for the jets also were to
fly over to Europe as early as
Saturday night, McLaughlin
said.
A deadline came and passed
early Saturday at the Paris peace
talks between Serbs and the eth-
nic Albanians trying to end the
fighting in the Kosovo province
of Serbia.
CRUISE MISSILES
WOULD MAKE INITIAL
STRIKES ON SERB
TARGETS
WASHINGTON (AP) The U.S.
military would take the lead in any
initial NATO airstrikes on Serb tar-
gets in and around Kosovo, batter-
ing air defense sites, radar facilities
and command posts with up to 80
sea-launched Tomahawk cruise
missiles, Pentagon officials say.
Denied after used as
source in news story
Tommy Yarboroich
STAFF WHITER
A black ECU student said he has
been rejected for service as an ori-
entation assistant, and the $1,200
paycheck, because he spoke out
about what he believes is a poor
environment for African Americans
at this university.
Na'im K. Akbar, a 51-year-old
student, commented about the
unsatisfactory atmosphere of blacks
at ECU and the lack of black facul-
ty. He used ECU's counseling cen-
ter as an example, saying ECU
employs counselors, none of which
are black.
Akbar feels that these people are
no doubt qualified.
"But, when you're talking about
18 or 19-year olds going away for
the first time, who might have been
sheltered, they might be more com-
fortable talking with someone they
can relate to culturally and racially
Akbar said.
He also pointed to what he calls
lack of sufficient African-American
representation on the student
union board, which schedules stu-
dent activities.
"I could not recommend ECU
to a young African-American stu-
dent Akbar was quoted as saying.
Akbar said he met with Beth
Anne Pretty, the associate dean of
student development who heads
up orientation, to discuss his appli-
cation to become an orientation
assistant this summer. Pretty told
him the application had been
denied, he said.
The Daily Reflector quoted
Akbar's opinion in the Feb. 11 issue
and he feels that the quotation in
" could not recommend ECU
to a young African-American
student"
Na'im K. Akbar,
51 -year-old siudent
the paper was the reason for his
application getting denied.
"I feel that it's because of my
quote in the paper Akbar said.
During his meeting with Pretty,
Akbar was asked if he had made the
remark attributed to him in the
newspaper.
Akbar said that he had, then
went on to explain why he made
the statement.
"I feel very bad that a person can
be rejected based on a personal
feeling they have.which they can
point to many examples of why that
feeling is valid Akbar said.
Neither Pretty nor her boss,
Chris Smith, dean of student devel-
opment, would comment on
Akbar's application, citing that state
law prohibits them from discussing
personnel matters.
Pretty said 30 students applied
for 20 slots as orientation assistants.
PIRATE
UNDERGROUND
Design and Paint
a mural for the
Pirate Underground
$500 PRIZE
Submissions (i.e. ideas and tight sketches)
must be received by March 8th, 1999
All materials for the final project will be supplied.
The project starts after spring break.
For more information contact
the Student Unon offices at 328.4715.
For a good time call the Student Union Hotline at 252.328.6004,
or visit our website at www.ecu.edustudentunion.
She said a selection committee ulti-
mately chooses the successful can-
didates after they have gone
through a series of four "event sce-
narios" and a 20-minute interview.
The event scenarios use role
playing to measure the applicants'
abilities in areas such as public
speaking and conflict management,
Pretty said.
Orientation assistants answer
questions and serve as campus
guides for prospective students
who visit ECU for two or three days
to find out about the university.
Orientation assistants receive
$1,200 pay, plus free lodging and
meals.
Pretty declined to say whether a
remark like the one Akbar would
affect an applicant's chance on
becoming an orientation assistant.
During orientation, if a black
student asked about the African-
American experience at ECU,
Akbar said he would encourage that
person's participation as a tonic to
any ills on campus.
"I would let them know that,
being on a majority (white) campus,
there are issues that black students
have, and in order to be abreast of
the issues. You have to become a
part of the East Carolina life to
effectively bring about change
Akbar said he practices what he
preaches, serving in several univer-
sity-recognized organizations such
as the Student Government
Association, Chancellor's
Leadership Program, and Allied
Blacks for Effective Leadership.
Harmony
continued from page I
explore concerns facing minority
students. But he said fewer
students joined than expected.
"I hate to say it, but it's going
to take more effort from blacks to
integrate themselves into the col-
lege experience says senior
Richard Clark. "Just between the
activities at Mendenhall and the
new recreation center, a person of
any race can find similar interests.
Having minority organizations
are fine, but how many white peo-
ple are
actually going join a black orga-
nization?"
"Because, I know from experi-
ence that black people aren't nec-
essarily going to make a white
person feel comfortable when
they (blacks) are in the majority
he added.
Sometimes it takes someone to
step forward and make an exam-
ple of what can be done.
When Troy Yarborough, a
merchandising major, decided to
join Sigma Pi, he became one of
the first blacks to join a white
social fraternity.
"I really did it for the experi-
ence he said. "These guys came
to me and asked me to join, which
I thought was cool, because to
them, my race wasn't an issue
"I knew that other students
were going to have something to
say, and it came from blacks and
whites Yarborough added. "But
I think some people were just
jealous because they knew they
wouldn't do what I did
Keith Copeland, a junior
majoring in communications, also
says color had nothing to do with
joining Sigma Pi.
"Being in a white fraternity, I
actually have seen it (prejudice)
from both sides (black and white),
but the reason I joined in the first
place had to do with the guys who
I hung out with, not because they
were black, white or whatever,
but because they were my
friends Copeland said.
Chestnut, who as a student was
the first black elected to the
Student Government Association
Judiciary Board, commended
Chancellor Eakin and his admin-
istration for a "strong push toward
ethnic and cultural diversity
"I am loyal to ECU Chestnut
said. "I'm a pirate bom and bred,
and I'll be a pirate when I'm
dead
Yarborough thinks that it's
going to take effort by both blacks
and whites if we are ever going to
see full integration.
"ECU has done its part to give
all minorities a chance to fit in
Yarborough said. "We have more
opportunities than ever before to
interact with each other. For years
the black man has been crying for
the white man to give him a
chance. Now, we have that
chance. But it's going to take an
effort
from everyone
"The path for true equality,
albeit narrow and rocky, has been
forged,so I think we can either sit
on the sides of the path and talk
about what should be done,
watching and criticizing others, or
we can join the few actually doing
something to make the path easi-
er to walk on Yarborough said.
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rhi Ent Carolinian
irhtte fraternity, I
en it (prejudice)
black and white),
joined in the first
rith the guys who
not because they
itc or whatever,
:hey were my
id said.
i as a student was
elected to the
nent Association
;1, commended
i and his admin-
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al diversity
ECU Chestnut
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lirate when I'm
:hinks that it's
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we can either sit
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Budget
continual) from pagi 1
Administration and Finance. "We
are particularly disappointed that
funding for doctoral status has not
been recommended. Everyone at
ECU has worked very hard to lift
our university to this new level
The budget calls for some of
the money from the universities'
budgets to be reallocated in an
across-the-board 3 percent faculty
salary increase, a 2 percent salary
pool increase to reward instructors
chosen by their university for
teaching excellence and a 3 per-
cent increase for non-faculty staff
members including a .5 percent
one-time bonus.
Though Sen. Ed Warren is sub-
mitting a bill on behalf of ECU
asking the General Assembly to
provision the $55 million to com-
plete the Science and Technology
Building. ECU students are still
dissatisfied with Hunt's budget
proposal.
"I think money should be allo-
cated to education if there's a sur-
plus said J. Powell.
"If you increase education stan-
dards you're investing in the
future
The General Assembly is slated
to finalize the budget by June
1999.
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4 T�id.� Fitiyirv 23. 1998
opinion
Th. Flit Cirnliniin
eastcarolinian
AMY L.Roystbk Editor
Amanda G. Austin Memging Edhw
Amy Sheridan NmnEdiiot
Peter Dawvot AuiiuniNmEdiioc
Nina Dry Fmiuih Ediin
Mario Schkrhaufer SponiEditw
Tracy Hairr AnimntSporuEdim
Chris Knotts Stifll
Robert J. Moore Liyout Oesignar
Stephanie Whitlock MOwgnMiragn
Janet Respess AdwiisingMinigei
Russ Blackburn Layout Dwtgrtet
Serena the ECU community since 192, tht EM C�cmw publishes 11.000 copies evety tuesdiY end Thunder Trw teed edticeiel in eetlt edioon n the opio
ion ohhe meexiiy of the Educnal Boetd and cs winter, m mm by Editorial Bond nseirtbets lite Eesl Cwohmon welcomes letters to the editor limned to 760
words ermcti may be edited tot decency or brevity The test Cetohmon (eseiyes the tohi to edit ot leyen ttlrets In pubticetnn All tenets must be seined
lenets shook! be eddtessed to: Opinion ereiot .Ihe Eesl CarDtimari. Student PucJicstmns Building, ECU. GieemnHe. 2fflo643o3 For inlmmetm ce
2b2.321.e3te
ouNiew
Rudolf Nureycv's life is what most college students dream life should be: lying on a moun-
tain of pillows, getting petted and taking naps all day.
Rudolf ('Rudie' for short) is a very "inactive" dog, who is currently taking his naps on the
second floor of the Mendenhall Student Center surrounded by pillows and incense.
'Rudie' is Ann Shengold's spiritual guide. He leads her to explore the beauty which some-
times stays undiscovered by human beings. Most importantly, 'Rudie' is part of Shengold's
current performance art piece, called "Dreaming of A Cosmic Catering Device which is The
Student Union's most recent contribution to broadening our horizons, releasing our chis and
mentally messaging our minds.
We recognize that performance art is often intangible and should be left to the audience and
the performer to determine its worth. Nevertheless, we are going to go out on a limb, risk
sounding like uncultured hicks and flat out say that Shengold comes across to most students
more as a flake who may be wanted in several states than an artist To be fair, our Features
Editor found her encounter with Shengold worth while as no doubt have some other students.
It's questionable enough that the Student Union chose to bring Shengold to campus, but
the job they did promoting her is even worse. Shengold complained to us that few people are
showing up to interact with her. You could follow the smell of incense up to the second floor
of Mendenhall, but how would you know that smell doesn't stem from the Spot's kitchen
where somebody just burnt a cheese steak? The Visual Arts Committee, who partly sponsored
Shengold's stay in Greenville, published a brochure and sent out email inviting "students and
members of the community to join Ann and 'Rudie' for "dreaming, questions, conversation,
silent sitting, laughing, tea, mediation, gentle dog petting, Reiki, manifestation exercises and
other forms of process-oriented work as they develop over the course of this public residen-
cy Are we still speaking English?
Nothing is wrong with spiritual arts in general, and Reiki in particular. We think that stu-
dents should be more aware of various types of New-Age thinking. Unfortunately, Shengold
just learned Reiki techniques last year and recently incorporated them into her repertoire.
Besides, how can you release the barriers in your chi with all the noise in the Student Union?
The next time the Student Union decides to bring something unusual to campus we hope
they do a better job promoting, explaining or in this case helping us prepare for "cosmic
dreaming because they really lost us this time.
opinion!
"Failing a roadside test
would result in an automatic
one-year license revocation
tive level. More recently, judges scoffing at the law. After a first
got a little statutory authority; but offense for DWI, for instance, the
it wasn't aimed at serial offenders, presumptive level would drop
which may explain why judges from .08 to .04. Subsequent
have been less than enthusiastic in offenses would lower the tolerable
ordering it. level to zero. The licenses of
It is precisely those offenders offenders would be encoded so
on whom the task force is homing that an officer administering a test
in, and the penalty would be both would know what level to test for.
statewide and mandatory. Failing a roadside test would
The technology is surprisingly result in an automatic one-year
From the Observer-Times, sophisticated. That doesn't mean license revocation.
Fayetteville, N.C.�Ignition it's foolproof, but it does mean that When the task force meets
interlocks are not new to North bypassing it would be both diffi- again next month, it will also take
Carolina as a means of dealing cult and, if the bypass were up more controversial issues such
with drunk drivers. But they have detected, costly for the offender. A as restrictions on open containers
never been used effectively, and single start-up wouldn't be of alcohol in vehicles, and rcvok-
that's what the Governor's Task enough. ing the licenses of people who
Force on Driving While Impaired After an extended period provide alcohol to minors. Let's
is out to change. behind the wheel the driver hope they do more than take these
Good for them. would have to prove his or her issues up. North Carolina is not
The idea of having drunk dri- sobriety again. Both drive time unlike most states in regard to
vers pass a breathalyzer test in and test results would be recorded such things: It gets an A-plus for
order to unlock their ignitions got for a later printout at DMV. good intentions. This strikes us as
its first real test a decade ago when There are in fact several pro- a grand opportunity to get some A-
thc Division of MotorVehicles posals for increasing the inconve- plus results.
.gave it a whirl at the administra- niencc to people accustomed to
OPINION
Columnist
Ryan
Kennemur
Kids turn into computer freaks
" hope my kid likes regular
little kid things, likefrisbees
and kites. 1 mean, think about
it. Who really wants their son
or daughter to turn into "Sir
Hacks-a-lot, the virus
breeder
You know, I was sitting in a
friend's room the other day play-
ing video games. I was struggling,
as I usually do, and in walks my
friend's little six-year-old brother.
The game was Goldeneye for the
Nintendo 64, and he asked if he
could play. When I said no, he
came back with "I just wanted to
show you what you were doing
wrong
This is coming from a boy who
routinely has to sit down to put
pants on, and even then he forgets
that the zipper goes in the front.
Sometimes, I admit, that one gets
me as well. My point is that kids
these days are continually getting
smarter and smarter in the ways of
technology, but their parents
aren't pushing them to learn com-
mon sense.
It's like that commercial with
the little eight-year-old that gets
the computer for Christmas. I had
to wait until I was 18 before I
could get one of those doohickies,
but my "kids are too spoiled these
days" column is forthcoming. It
just kills me to think that the kids
that don't have computers or
Nintendos or Ataris (you young-
sters probably don't remember
that one) have to play outside with
actual footballs. Imagine, if you
will, this scenario, complements of
yours truly.
Tmy Tim goes to his computer-
owning elementary school chum's
front door and knocks. When the
mom answers, our hero asks
politely if Lil' Huckelberry can
come out and play. Is this mother
going to reply withOh sure he
can! Let me get him. Huck!
Some kid with crutches wants to
play football with you, honey Or
will she say, "Oh no. My little
baby's stomach really megahertz,
and if he doesn't feel better soon,
he may not finish that Y2K prob-
lem in time, and then the world
will be forced to use nothing but
our fingers to count with
I believe we all know the
answer to that one. Another thing
that kills me is the fact that kids
are taking high school classes in
middle school. The school system
in Wake County (motto: Home of
Lizard Lick and, urn, oh yeah, the
state capital) started letting kids
take algebra in eighth grade at the
same time I was starting high
school. Now, I felt pretty stupid
having to take pre-algebra twice,
but when I was a sophomore tak-
ing geometry and there were
incoming freshmen taking algebra
II, I wanted to beat them with
their own rulers.
I guess my main thing here is
the fact that, even though I'm get-
ting a quality education here at
"Parking and Traffic Hell I am
still afraid that after I graduate,
some astute little 18-year-old
something-something is gonna
swoop right past me and get that
manager position, and I'll still be
burning my geri-curl in the
french-fry grease. Oh well,
there's always construction work.
Thank God I played with Lincoln
Logs and Tinker Toys as a child,
or else I'd be up poop creek, the
Tar River, I believe it's called.
OPINION
"It's our duty to give
those New Year babies a
little elbow room
Citizen-Times, Asheville,
N.C.� An interesting conflu-
ence of news events happened
earlier this month.
The first involved a story
about couples who, through
monitoring menstrual cycles,
tracking basal body temperatures
and the like, will begin trying in
earnest to conceive in late March
or early April.
The goal: To have the first
baby bom on Jan. 1, 2000, the
famous first baby of the new mil-
lennium.
The second news story was
out of The Hague, Netherlands,
where some 140 non-govern-
mental organizations were meet-
ing to gauge the progress of pro-
grams designed to slow popula-
tion growth.
Almost lost in the flow of
earnest pronouncements was the
projection that, despite a dramat-
ic slowing of the fertility rate, the
world's population will hit 6 bil-
lion this year, probably in July.
That number has huge ramifica-
tions for those babies bom Jan. 1,
2000.
And for the rest of us.
Six billion is a difficult figure
for the mind to grasp here in the
age of trillion-dollar budges and
the like. Around the time of
Jesus' birth, the world population
was around 300 million about
28 million shy of the current pop-
ulation of the UnitedStates.
At the end of the first millen-
nium, 1,000 AD the world pop-
ulation was 345 million. By 1800,
it was 1 billion. 1900 saw 1.7 bil-
lion. 1950, 2.5 billion. And com-
ing soon, 6 billion.
To break the number down
further, planet Earth is adding 80
million new editions of homo
sapiens a year. Even 80 million is
still a hard number to wrap the
mind around. So try this: consid-
ering Asheville's population is
around 68,000, that 80 million
figure means the equivalent of
1,142 Ashevilles are being
dropped on the planet on an
annual basis.
Three a day.
By 2050, those children being
welcomed into the world New
Year's Day, 2000, will be living on
a planet with a population of 9.3
billion.
Of course, these numbers
seem at best a fuzzy mirage on a
distant horizon to those of us in
Western North Carolina, where
there is still elbow room to be
I
had.
So does the population boom
mean anything here? Of course it
does. It is manifesting itself in
various ways. You wouldn't have
land use or zoning questions if
people weren't beginning to
crowd each other.
You wouldn't have clogged
highways. You wouldn't be fret-
ting about water sources and
shortages.
And considering the fact that
the U.S. population is expected
to near 400 million by 2050,
fueled mostly by immigration,
you can expect to see more of the
same.
The question: What to do?
One simple tack would be to
support international family plan-
ning, an area in which the U.S.
has shirked its responsibility. At
the 1994 U.N. Population
Conference in Cairo, the U.S.
made a commitment to family
planning efforts. It has not ful-
filled it. U.S. funding for popula-
tion assistance has dropped from
$583 million in 1995 to $385 mil-
lion in 1999. Had we lived up to
the promises we made in Cairo,
the 1999 figure would be $1.9 bil-
lion.
It's our duty to give those
New Year babies a little elbow
room.
We should take that duty seri-
ously.
5 Tuffdiy. Fibrui
Four Seat!
Life on Tues
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sources and
5 Timiiv. Fihruirv 23. 1999
comics
Tht Eiit CwoHbIm
Four Seats Left
Jason Latour
Everyday Life
Mike Litwin
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Chris Knotts

rJt� (,�� hlflll.
Answers in this weeks Fountainhead
ACROSS 42 Makeshift 5 Eisenhower to
1 In tavor of 44 Business abbr. cronies
4 Parasitic 45 Computer input 6 Secret meeting
arachnid 47 Arrives on stage 7 Decrease
8 Afford 48 Vex 8 Escape vehicle
opportunity SO Avoided defeat 9 Make a law
14Atmo6phare 51 Use elbow 10 Comment
15 Gumbo grease 11 Run poorly
ingredient 52 1990-92 Frencr 12 Marriage vow
16 Iroquois League Open winner 13 Khaki shade
tribe 54 Strange 18 Biases
17 Distinctive fabric 56 Lathers 22 Blue ducks
patterns 60 Floral neckwear 27of Lebanon
61excellence 28 Holds on to
62 Anwar of Egypt 30 S. Dey TV
19 Eurasian plum
20 Coral isle
21 At the ready
23 Eccentric piece
63 Heaver or
dog, at times
24 Hawaiian island 66 Condition at
25 Lilte piggy
26 Follow closely
29 Org of Giants
31 Much removed
33 Leg joint
34 Nova
37 Loose fat
39 Lemon drink
40 Dangling
ornaments
oceanside
68 Blackout
69 Car on call
series
32 Estimator
34 Mixes up
35 Waiercraft
36 Swing to and fro
38 Free turn
70 Yours and mine 41 Brownstone
71 Toed the line
72 Adam's garden
73Clemente
DOWN
1 Of the Vatican
2 Lariat
3 Belted hunter ol
the sky
4 Soothed
entrance
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vessel
46 Allegretto-
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59 Severe
63 Sticky
substance
64 Essence
65 Crimson or
scarlet, e.g.
67 Chopping tool
appening
at ECU?"
� Two-thirds of ECU students
consume four or fewer
drinks when they drink.
� More than half of ECU
students drink alcohol
twice a month or less.
� One-third of ECU students
prefer to attend parties
where alcohol is NOT served.
What's happening with
BtJ
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
'fcWft �f If �H IW7 Jtarttl 4 OUnt On U� ��m� t� COI wlwritoMI ��tw� jdmwmml b) lt� OtiMxi �� 5U� Uf.
Feb. 25 To March 3
Swing Thing
227 Dance Lessons 8PM
Dance Starts 10PM
Mendenhall Great Room
KJ. James
(Blues)
22710PM
In the Pirate Underground
BINGO
228 6PM
At Mendenhall Room 244
BELOVEDR
225,26,27 8PM 2128 3PM
The Color Purple
33 8PM
At Hendrix Theatre
For a good time call:
ECU Student Union Hotline
@ 252.328.6004 of
visit us here:
www.ecu.edustudent union
PG-13
MM





6Tmd�y. February 23. 1998
features
The East Carolinian
Performance piece of Campus kicks off Sexual
art comes to campus Assault Awareness Week
Shengold presents
work at Mendenhall
Nina M. Dry
FEATURES EDITOR
Art can be as simple as a painting or
can become a three dimensional
masterpiece. Ann Shengold, an
instillation artist, is visiting our
campus with her performance
piece, "Dreaming of a Cosmic
Device
Shengold wanted to invent and
realize in physical form a mobile art
piece and have it travel to different
places.
Dreaming of a Cosmic
Catering Device' is a work in
progress about process and transfor-
mation Shengold said. "I want to
develop a mobile unit that would
refresh your senses, enliven your
spirits and reinvigorate your sense
of wonder
Shengold said with this piece
she would like to blur definitions
and rub up against boundaries of
anitheater, the artist and the view-
er.
"In this piece, the viewer liter-
ally may enter the work, sitting on
the comfortable pillows, at the
desk, petting Rudie her dog or
receiving Reiki treatment from
me Shengold said.
Reiki is an ancient Tibetan
hands-on healing art that was lost
and rediscovered by Japanese
monk Mikao Usui. Shengold has
been practicing Reiki for about six
months.
"Reiki is somewhat similar to
healing touch Shengold said. "It
comes through you. The practition-
er serves as a vehicle to move the
universal energy through and mix it
with the person's life energy
Organizations plan
programs for students
Erica S i k e s
STAFF WRITER
Ann Shengold, along with her dog, give cosmic guidance to students on campus.
PHOTO BY MICHAEL SMITH
According to Shengold, Reiki is
considered an intelligent energy. It
goes to wherever there is an energy
"In this piece, the viewer lit-
erally may enter the work, sit-
ting on the comfortable pil-
lows, at the desk, petting Rudie
her dog or receiving Reiki
treatment from me
Ann Shengold
instillation artist
deficiency.
"The treatment was very relax-
ingsaid junior Doralissa Griffin.
Shengold was invited here by
Chairperson of the Student Union
Visual Arts committee, Lee
Howard; Assistant Director of stu-
dent activities, Lynn Caverly; and
Director of Mendenhall Student
Center, William Clutter. Funds
were provided by a North Carolina
Arts Council Fellowship grant and
was partially supported by the ECU
Visual Arts committee.
"1 think been she's greatsaid J.
Marshall, assistant director of
University Unions. "We've never
had a show like this before
Shengold and Rudie are located
at Mendenhall Student Center sec-
ond floor for the rest of this week.
On Sunday, there will be a ceremo-
nial close at 5:30 p.m. to conclude
this piece. Shengold is keeping
quiet as to what she has planned.
"People will have to show up
and take a chance to sec what will
happen Shengold said.
For more information you can
contact her at 328-0852 or e-mail
her at k9heart@aol.com
Each day people must acknowl-
edge the reality and severity of
rape.
Yesterday began what is known
as Sexual Assault Awareness Week.
Our campus is actively participating
by organizing many programs for
students.
"We want to create a campus
awareness in the issue of sexual
assault said Heather Zophy,
health educator at Student Health
Services.
According to a recent study, one
in four women who were surveyed
had been victims of rape or
attempted rape. 84 percent of those
women knew the attacker while 57
percent of those were date rapes.
A special presentation in
Hendrix Theater by Dr. Alan
Berkowitz began Sexual Assault
Awareness Week qn Monday at
7:(K) p.m. Dr. Berkowitz is a nation-
ally renowned speaker and scholar
who has served for The Centers for
Disease Control, The U.S.
Department of Education among
other organizations. His speech
focused on promoting consent and
preventing coercion in intimate
relationships.
The ECU Police Department is
also an avid supporter of Sexual
Assault Awareness Week.
"We are very supportive of all
the activities and will be helping
out in any way we can, such as traf-
fic control during the march said
Lt. LaFrancc Davis of the ECU
Police Department. "We will also
attend as many events as our sched-
ules will allow
Davis has been involved with
the Sexual Assault Awareness
Week programs for the past two
years. Last year, there were over
200 participants in the Take Back
the Night March.
"The Sexual Assault Awareness
Week committee would like to
exceed the amount of last year's
participants Lt. Davis said.
Many problems and concerns
involving the sexual assault issue
will be introduced during this
week. Ways to avoid certain situa-
tions will be covered in the various
activities and programs.
To reduce your risk of being
sexually assaulted, always give ver-
bal consent before engaging in sex.
Stay in public places where there
are a lot of people. If something is
too good to be true, then it probably
is.
"If you do become a victim of
sexual assault, you are encouraged
to contact the ECU Police
Department Lt. Davis said.
Laura Sweet, ECU's sexual
assault victim's advocate, is avail-
able to guide victims through legal,
medical and counseling processes
can be reached through the ECU
Police.
"I am available anytime to aid
any victim who has been sexually
assaulted Sweet said.
This week also has programs
specifically formed for men. On
Tuesday, there will be a discussion
exclusively for men led by licensed
psychologist Dr. Thomas Maple.
Everyone is encouraged to
attend as many events as possible
during this week.
Sexual Assault Awareness
Week at a glance
Tuesday
1:00 p.m.
Self defense training, Studeri
Recreation Center in room i
LaFrance Davis, ECU Police
8:00p.m.
Men's Perspective: A
Discussion for Men Only,
Mendenhall Social Room
Dr. Thomas Maple, Licensed
Psychologist
Wednesday
7&0p.m.
Candlelight Vigil for survivors
of sexual assault and those who
are supportive of survivors,
Resource Room located behind
Student Health Center.
Entrance between Student
Health and Joyner Library
8:00p.m.
One Night of Partying: The
Role of Alcohol and Drug Use;
in Sexual Assaults
Mendenhall Great Room 1
Mr. Bob Morphet, Substance
Abuse Counselor
Thursday
6.00pM.
Take Back the Night March,
meeting at the Cupola
sourre: Student Life
Students become familiar with campus computer services

-
Students on campus have recently found themselves becoming familiar with RezNet
the process through which campus residents connect their computers to the internet.
PHOTO BT MICHAEL SMITH
"winSfTfi
One in four
connected to RezNet
ILIP Gii.iis
SI AH WRITER
Hardly a day goes by that most
ECU students do not go online.
Whether they are checking their c-
mail or doing research, students
take full advantage of the many
computer services that the univer-
sity provides.
Since ECU was declared 25th
out of the KM) Most Wired College
Campuses by Yahoo Magazine,
computer services have been
placed in the spotlight. The most
important computer service has
become RezNet, which is a cooper-
ative function by University
Housing Services and Computing
and Information Systems (CIS).
RezNet is the process through
which students who live in resi-
dence halls connect their comput-
ers to the Internet.
"RezNet is entering its fourth
year and continuing to grow said
Aaron Lucier, assistant director of
Housing for Technology. "About
one fourth of all on-campus stu-
dents are currently connected
In Spring 1995, RezNet started
out with 50 users. The numbers
have gone up to 1,375. The
Ethernet card that is used to con-
nect a student's computer to the
world wide web is more efficient
than a regular modem. There are
no passwords or numbers to dial. In
many ways the Ethernet is actually
faster than a conventional modem.
Students who need an applica-
tion can fill one out online. It is
located on the University Housing
home page and leads the student
through a step-by-step process.
"We try to keep the information
up-to-date on the applications.
That's why it's kept online
Lucier said.
After students fill out an applica
tion, they must connect an
Ethernet card to their computer.
The ECU Student Store sells this
hardware along with other comput-
er stores in Greenville. Prices can
range from $23 to $123 depending
on the brand name of the card and
whether it will be installed or not.
Students who need help with the
installation process are encouraged
to call the Ethernet helpline at 328-
4133.
University Housing is currently-
connecting students to RezNet
once a week. This is the first year
SEE COMPUTER PAGE 7
New York FBI agent
attested for drunk driving
Man subdued
with pepper spray
LINDEN, N.J. (AP) - The head
of the FBI's New York criminal
division was arrested for drunken
driving and subdued with pepper
spray when he refused to get out of
his car, state police said.
� Victor Gonzalez, 48, of Old
Bridge, was driving north on the
New Jersey Turnpike to pick up
his daughter at Newark
International Airport at about 4
p.m. Monday when he was stopped
by police, State Police Lt. Dan
Cosgrove said.
A motorist had called on a cellu-
lar phone to say that a driver
appeared to be drunk and had
almost hit a wall on the side of the
highway, Cosgrove said. Troopers
soon saw the man driving erratically
in the turnpike's outer roadway,
activated their sirens and pulled
him over three miles later,
Cosgrove said.
Gonzalez refused to get out of
his car or identify himself, then
locked his hands around the steer-
ing wheel and wrapped his legs
under the car seat to make it harder
for officers to remove him, police
said. The troopers squirted
Gonzalez with pepper spray, then
three officers removed him from
the car.
Gonzalez appeared to be drunk
but refused to take a breath test,
police said. He was charged with
driving while intoxicated, obstruc-
tion of justice and failure to take an
alcohol test.
Gonzalez has worked for about a
year as special agent in charge of
the FBI's criminal division for New
York, FBI spokesman Joseph
Valiquette said Wednesday.
Valiquette refused to say how
long Gonzalez has worked for the
FBI or whether the bureau would
discipline him.
Woman's deceased father
saves her from near death
��
Out-of-control car
crashes througji door
KISSIMMEE, Fla. (AP) - A
woman's dead father is credited
with warning her to move from a
couch seconds before an out-of-
control car crashed through the
front door of her home, knocked
over the seat and demolished an
interior wall.
Maria Tejada was watching tele-
vision Wednesday when she
reportedly heard her father, who
died five years ago, tell her to
move.
"He told me to get up off the
couch said Ms. Tejada, 40. "I did-
n't listen the first two times he said
it, but the third time I got up and
went over to the love seat
Just then, a car with two teen-
agers on their way to school crashed
through the front door.
"If I didn't listen to my father,
I'd be dead Ms. Tejada said.
It apparently isn't the first time
that ghosts have shown up at the
house.
Inexplicable door slams, noises
in the attic, footsteps, shaking door-
knobs and a rumbling sound have
been reported.
Ms. Tejada said the house is
haunted by a man who hanged
himself from a big oak tree next to
the house about 20 years ago.
Others say they have heard the
man walking on the roof.
"I was in the house with Maria
before this, and we heard foot-
steps said
Carmen Pagan, her best friend.
"I think he was walking through
the house.Then the radio shut off
Even the accident had an ele-
ment of mystery. Driver Willie
Wells told authorities that his
brakes failed.
"I tried them right after the acci-
dent and they were fine said
Bethany Santiago, a Kissimmee
community services officer.
Wells, 17, was ticketed for
careless driving. He and his passen-
ger were not seriously injured.
7 Tundiy, Febi
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I





The East Carolinian
ual
Awareness;
glance
jiing, Student"
ter in room 246
, ECU Police I
ve: A
ten Only,
:ial Room
pie, Licensed
il for survivors
: and those who
f survivors,
located behind
Center,
en Student
ler Library
Mtying:The
and Drug Use;
Its
:at Room t ;
et, Substance j
" ;
Might March
Cupola
Life
:es
kept online
I out an applicav,
connect an
heir computer.
Store sells this
i other comput-
'ille. Prices can
il23 depending
of the card and
nstalled or not.
I help with the
are encouraged
helpline at 328-
ing is currently-
its to RezNet
is the first year
ER PAGE 7
er
th
have heard the
5 roof.
ause with Maria
we heard foot-
her best friend,
valking through
8 radio shut off
ent had an ele-
Driver Willie
iritics that his
ht after the acci-
ere fine said
, a Kissimmee
s officer,
s ticketed fol
: and his passen
isly injured.
a
7 Tuitdiy, Ftbrmry 23. 1999
features
Thi East Carellnlan
Subjects Needed
For Research Project
A Study of Food Supplements and Exercise
Performance
Requirements: Trained Cyclists 100 milesweekj
Age 18-40 Years (Male)
Compensation: Determination of Aerobic Fitness
Body Composition Analysis
Monetary Compensation
Call Robert Hickner, PhD
or Prisciila Byrd
Human Performace Lab
East Carolina University
(252)328-4684
Brown & Brown
ATTORNFYS AT LAW
Truth,Equality,Justice
102B East. Victoria Ct.
Bedford Park, Greenville
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Under Age Possession
�Possession of DrugsParaphenalia
�Drinking in Public
�Felonies and Misdemeanors
�Free Consultation
Phone 752-0952 752-0753
e-mail - ghb.greenvillenc.com
Llda Idnuj&iMLf.
?nMm ts: Gosjw mi:ording Artist Patrick Love
Con eft SnrJaWebruary 27,1999 vVrint Auditorium
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��"
TO SAY?
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WHO WOULD LIKE TO SHARE
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DISABILITY RELATED TOPICS
AND SUPPORT SERVICESI
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I
the pilvVte experience
(there is a little RA in all of us)
University Housing Services is now
accepting applications for
1999 - 2000
Resident Advisor positions
As compensation, RAs receive a free single room, a 9 meal
advantage account, and a $105 stipend per semester. The
position is considered a scholarship worth a cumulative
total of approximately $4800. Please keep in mind
that in order to be considered for the position you must
meet the following qualifications:
Be at least a second semester freshman at the time of application
Have a clear judicial record with 1 THSDean of Students office
Have a least a 2.5 overall grade point average
Applications can be picked up at a
Coordinator's office or at 100 Jones Hall
The deadline for applying is March 5th
For more information please call
Jeff Novak at 325-6144
Computer
continued from piji 6
that student staff were hired to
help in the connecting process.
Housing hopes that the connec-
tion process will increase over time.
"A lot of people use the online
services said Jenny Hobgood,
university housing computer lab
assistant. "They're very user-
friendly
CIS launched a new ECU
Student Desktop system last
December that gives students such
options as registering for classes,
checking their grades, looking up
their exam schedule and much
more.
"The Student Desktop will
allow students to interact with the
university electronically said
Freda Pollard, manager of Student
Information Systems at CIS.
"They'll be able to interface with
many administrative services
The page, located at www.sr.u-
dents.ecu.edu, has received over
10,000 hits. When students log
onto the page, they are met with a
"Tip of the Day This can include
a helpful hint about computers. On
almost every page, students must
enter their social security number
for verification. For more personal-
ized information, students must
enter in their personal identifica-
tion number (PIN), which can be
found on the Student Desktop or
at the ECU home page. The
Student Desktop has such individ-
ual features as singing "Happy
Birthday" to a student on their
birthday or telling them if they
have any parking tickets.
CIS is currently planning to
place the ECU phonebook online,
which would lift a burden off of the
Mendenhall Student Locator.
"It would be a whole lot easier if
that happened said Kcri Pridgen,
an employee at the Student
Locator.
In keeping with the many
online services becoming available
from the university, a computer
policy was recently released.
Students and staff who wish review
may find it in the public folders on
Microsoft Exchange E-mail
System or can contact the Dean of
Student's office at 328-6824.
covering the
Pornographic material accidentally
shown on cartoon 'The Simpsons"
LONGVIEW, Texas (AP)
X-rated scenes in TV's popular
cartoon A rerun of "The
Simpsons" on Wednesday night
also had a portion of pornographic
movie spliced in. Four seconds of
the clip reached the homes of
(thousands of viewers who were
watching two local stations.
Fast reactions from station
employees ended the peep show,
said Mark McKay, general manag-
er for both stations.
"The operator that was on
board, after he got over the shock,
reacted as quickly as I could ask
anyone to do McKay said.
After switching to a station pro-
motional clip, the tape operator
fast-forwarded past the 20-sccond
scene, and resumed broadcasting
"The Simpsons McKay said.
Minutes later, the station
scrolled a written message across
the bottom of the screen, apologiz-
ing and promising an investigation.
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For an application or information, Please contact Laura Egeln
(910) 962-3903 � ($10) 962-3815 (Fax) � egeln@uncwil.edu
MM





8 Tmidiy, Febmery 23, 1999
The East Carolinian
Seahawfcs guards take over wn finale
HUP
Simmons & Donon
steal Dunk the show
Eric Couch
SENIOR WRITER
In Alico Dunk's last basketball game
at a sold out Minges Coliseum, the
UNCW guards stole the show by
completely dominating the entire
game.
CAA preseason player of the year
Stan Simmons led UNCW to a sti-
fling win over ECU by a score of 59-
45. Simmons led all scorers with 19
points and teammate Billy Donlon
chipped in his own 14 points.
Simmons and Donlon controlled this
game from start to finish and they
were not just doing it on offense.
With 7,311 attendees, the biggest
crowd of the season, the Pirates were
shut down on the offensive end as
the Seahawks defense held ECU to
26 percent shooting in the first half.
ECU did not even have 10 points on
the board until the 6:28 mark of the
first half.
"That's probably the best 40 min-
utes of defense we've played this
year said Jerry Wainwright, UNCW
head coach.
The shooting woes continued
throughout the night as ECU was off
and on for the rest of the game. The
one Pirate who was consistent was
Neil Punt, who had
his best game of the
season. Punt shot 7-
8 from the floor and
finished with 15
points. Even with
Punt shooting well,
the Pirates still
played cold.
"They came out
and beat us up
Punt said. "I
SEE BASKETBALL PAGE 9
Evaldas Joeys (25) is watching freshman guard Brandon Hawkins (23) flying high for a dunk above the head of UNC Wilmington defender in Saturday's loss to the Seahawks.
PHOTO BY JACOB GARMON
Pirates win two of three in home opener
Baseball struggles Sunday
after winning two Saturday
BLAINE DENIL'S
SENIOR WRITER
The diamond sparkled when ECU baseball
team picked up two wins from Radford over
the weekend.
The Pirates started the series strong on
Saturday, blasting the Highlanders 9-3 and 3-1
in a double-header before losing 11-7 on
Sunday.
Game one put ECU's strikeout leader
Brooks Jernigan on the mound against
Radford's Jamie Booth. Jernigan, who was
coming off a loss to the University of North
Carolina on Feb. 12, went 6.2 innings and
struck out three while bringing his record to 1-
1.
The Pirates jumped on the Highlanders
early in the bottom of the third to post a 2-0
lead. Everything was calm until the Pirates
caught fire in the seventh, scoring three runs on
a John Williamson double. ECU continued its
streak adding four more runs in the eighth and
never looked back. Junior infielder Nick
Schnabel provided the majority of ECU's
offense in game one. Schnabel went 3-3 with
two doubles and three runs scored.
Senior pitcher Travis Thompson continued
his winning ways in game two. Thompson
Pirate catcher Jason Howard feels that the Pirates underes-
timated Radford after their strong showing last week.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
struck out three in 5.0 innings of play and has
not allowed a run so far this year. The Pirates
scored three runs in the second and held on as
Radford added one run in the ninth. Senior
right-hander Kevyn Fulcher pitched one inning
and picked up his first save of the year for the
Pirates.
"We came off a good weekend against the
ACC and we just wanted to build on that
Schnabel said. "We did some good things and
we did some bad things
Last week's "Collegiate Baseball" Player of
the Week Foye Minton was the starting pitcher
for the Pirates on Sunday. Minton, a sophomore
left-hander, struck out six and completed 5.0
innings in the Pirates 11-7 loss to the
Highlanders. The temperature dropped to
near freezing Sunday afternoon and the wind
chill had Pirate fans bundled up as they hoped
for a three game sweep of Radford. The
Highlanders' Mike Lombardi smacked a
homer off Minton in the third to stretch the
Radford lead to 5-0.
Minton settled down in the fourth and
saved a hit by fielding a line-drive heading
straight for his face to round out the inning.
Radford added four more runs in the ninth and
survived the final Pirate charge as ECU picked
up five runs in their last at-bat.
"I come out and try to play my best and that
usually takes care of itself Minton said. "I'm
not here for individual honors, but I'm here to
win for the team
The Pirates started off slow Sunday and just
didn't seem to warm up until the ninth inning.
Before Sunday's game the Pirates had not
scored in the ninth and fans looked worried as
ECU came up to bat for the final time. The
Pirates decided to change that statistic and put
on a hitting clinic in the ninth, bashing
Radford's relief pitcher Daryl DeSalvo and
scoring five.
"We waited too late and it's hard to beat a
team in the ninth inning Minton said. "I wish
I would have pitched a little better
After pounding the ACC in two of three
meetings at the Winn-Dixie Shootout
Tournament Feb. 12-14, some ECU players
believe that the team might have underestimat-
ed this Radford squad.
"We hoped to sweep them and we feel a lit-
tle let down after today said Jason Howard,
senior catcher for the Pirates. "After we played
the ACC, we kind of overlooked Radford. We
didn't look ready today
The Pirates will have the chance to battle
the ACC once again as they face the Demon
Deacons of Wake Forest on Feb. 24.
Tennis winning
streaks continue
Variety of intramural sports offered at SRC
Student officials
share passion for game
Jean Wharton
staff writer
Another semester of intramural sports has start-
ed, bringing competition and fun to ECU stu-
dents.
Intramurals offer students a chance to play in
a variety of sports at varying skill levels. Indoor
soccer, four-on-four flag football, foosball and
Softball are among the sports played this semes-
ter.
Students interested in playing on a team can
sign up in a number of ways. Students may cre-
ate a new team. Also, independent players can
be placed on teams that do not have a full ros-
ter. Each team must have a captain who will be
responsible for going to the registration meet-
ings and providing the team with information.
Registration meetings also discuss the rules and
regulations for each sport. As soon as the teams
complete all registration information they are
ready to start playing.
"Intramurals offer a release from daily grid of
classes said David Gaskins, assistant director
of Student Recreation Services. Gaskins coordi-
nates intramural sports at ECU.
"(Intramurals are great for relaxation
Gaskins said.
Senior Kelly Wehmann has played on the
same team in a number of sports throughout her
four years at ECU.
"Having played on the same team for so
long, it's all about fun for me Wehmann said.
"I don't let the outcome of the game affect my
attitude toward other players
Intramural games are officiated by student
officials. The Sports Officials Development
Program employs students who have finished a
training program to officiate intramural sports.
"I have always had an interest in sports and I
wanted to do something more said senior
fCNen Day, who officiates basketball and soft-
ball.
Officiating has given Day a new perspective
on playing sports, and a better attitude to the
officials during the game she plays in.
"When I am a player I know what it is like to
be an official and I try to encourage my team-
mates to have respect Day said.
Day said that being a female official in a
majority of male games is sometime difficult.
She has been forced to make tough calls, but
says that when she is confident in her call, play-
ers understand.
"Officiating has been a good way to earn the
respect of fellow students Day said.
Intramurals offer challenging and fun experi-
ences for students.
"A lot of students don't realize all of what
we've got Gaskins said.
Upcoming sports include a foosball tourna-
ment on March 3. The registration deadline is
March 2. Additionally, a 4-on-4 flag football reg-
istration meeting is on April 6.
Teams or individuals interested in intramur-
al sports are encouraged to stop by 128 SRC or
call at 328-6387.
Men and women
both roll to 4-0
Morgan Heener
staff writer
Both ECU tennis teams continued
their impressive winning streaks
this weekend.
The Pirates' male and female
tennis teams both won two matches
on Saturday to improve their
records to 4-0 overall.
"Both teams played really well
today said Tom Morris, ECU's
men's and women's head coach.
"We showed some improvement in
some areas and we are looking for-
ward to a good season
In the morning match, ECU's
men's squad shut out Mt. Olive los-
ing only 13 games in the entire
match. Freshman Michael Huez
"I think Roope Kalajo had
his best match in a long time
today
Stephan Siebenbrunner
Senioi Tennis Playei
did not drop a game in singles or
doubles, blanking Andy Clapp 6-0
6-0 and then won his doubles match
with Stephan Siebenbrunner 8-0.
According to Siebenbrunner,
who is one of the four seniors on the
Pirate roster, team spirit makes the
difference this year.
"Especially in college sports,
every single player is important to
form a team. And that's how we
played today, as a team
Siebenbrunner said.
Senior Derek Slate agrees by
saying that the team was very con-
sistent in its performance as a single
unit.
"We came out with a strong per-
formance and we were very
focused Slate said.
Kenny Kirby also won two morn-
ing matches, one of them teaming
with Slate.
"I was definitely hitting my fore-
hand well. I kept the ball deep con-
sistently and played within myself
Kirby said.
The Pirates had a slight advan-
tage playing the relatively easy
morning match, when it came to the
Senior Roope Kalajo defeats his opponent
in Saturday's toughest match in tiebreak.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU SPOUTS INFORMATION OEPT.
tougher Campbell team in the after-
noon.
"Playing in the morning helped
us with the weather aspect of the
match. It was a little windy and
cooler in the morning Kirby said.
Slate and Kirby lost the only
doubles match against Campbell,
falling 8-5 to the team of Mardbrink
and Bucko at No. 1 doubles.
"We missed a few big conver-
sions in the match that could have
changed things for us Slate said.
But Kirby was still optimistic
about the rest of the season.
"Campbell played well. We'vt
got to come out pumped up for
every match and focus on every
point he said.
Senior Roope Kalajo, a native of
Finland at ECU's No. 1 position,
had the toughest game of the day
when he was facing Andreas
Mardbrink, a 6' 5" tall Swedish
native, representing Campbell.
'Their No. 1 player Mardbrink
was undefeated so far this season.
He defeated Carolina's No. 1
Morris said.
The Scandinavian match looked
to be an easy one for ECU's Kalajo
when he outplayed Mardbrink 6-1
in the first set. After losing the sec-
ond set 7-5, however, Kalajo had to
go into tie break in the third where
he defeated his opponent by 7-6 in
a dogfight.
"I think Roope Kalajo had his
best match in a long time today
Siebenbrunner said. 'This guy was
tough, but Roope played terrific -
Facing a tight schedule, the
Pirates will be at Davidson for their
next match today at 2 p.m.
"We will have a tough match;
SEE TENNIS PAGE 9





The East Carolinian
le
aw
�i
:s to the Seahawks.
ng
ue

efeats his opponent
match in tiebreak.
IRIS INFORMATION OEPT.
cam in the after-
morning helped
er aspect of the
ittle windy and
ng Kirby said.
y lost the only
ainst Campbell,
imof Mardbrink
doubles.
Few big convef-
that could have
us Slate said.
still optimistic
e season,
ed well. We'vp
pumped up for
focus on every
ilajo, a native of
No. 1 position,
;ame of the day
acing Andreas
i" tall Swedish
; Campbell.
yer Mardbrink
far this season.
jlina's No. 1
in match looked
M ECU's Kalajo
Mardbrink 6-1
r losing the sec-
:r, Kalajo had to
the third where
lonent by 7-6 in
Kalajo had his
ng time today
. "This guy was
layed terrific �
schedule, the
ividson for their
2 p.m.
t tough match;
PAGE 9
9 Tuitdiy, February 23. 1999
sports
Tht Eatt Ctraliiiw
GROUP THERAPY"�1
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4 SHOTS
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SPORTS PAD
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Reality Check
" went off campus again yesterday to look
for a place to live, and I was late to class
because I missed the bus back to campus
"l 4W K "
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IS.
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Why add more stress to your life? Why not take advan-
tage of the astronomical value of campus living?
o
If you missed Return to Campus Living Sign-Up last
week, you still have a chance to reserve a space in the
residence halls and a meal plan for next year.
Just stop by the University Housing Office on the
ground floor of Jones Residence Hall, March
O 22-26, to sign up.
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Second chance sign-up participants also
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O REACH for THE stars Campus Living
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UNIVERSITY HOUSING AND CAMPUS DINING SERVICES � TELEPHONE: ECU-HOME; ECU-FOOD
Basketball
continued from page 6
thought wc were ready to play.
Guess not
The Pirates finished the game
shooting 35 percent from the floor
and 32 percent from behind the
three point arc. Garrett
Blackwelder, who had been aver-
aging over 14 points per game, was
held to 1 of 7 from the floor and
only three points.
In his last game at Minges,
senior guard Alico Dunk was held
to five points and one assist.
"It was a tough loss and we
came out flat Dunk said. "I don't
know why we came out flat, we
just didn't show up to play tonight.
We've got to give their defense
credit, they were in our face all
night
Even the Pirates leading scorer
Evaldas Joeys could not find a way
to bring the Pirates back from as
much as 16 points in the second
half. Joeys finished the night with
16 points and seven rebounds.
"Their defense was a factor and
we played tight all night said Joe
Dooley, Pirate head coach.
"Donlon and Simmons dominated
the game from beginning to end
The Pirates will have to
improve from this game for the
upcoming tournament. The CAA
tournament tips off for No. 7 seed
ECU on Friday in Richmond, Va
at 6 p.m. The Pirates will go into
the tournament with a 13-13 record
overall and 7-9 in CAA games.
Their opponent in the first round
game is No. 2 seed Old Dominion
University. The Pirates have a tied
record with ODU after losing at
home 54-51 on Jan. 13, but then
defeating the Monarchs in their
most recent meet by a score of 67-
62 at the Field House in Norfolk,
Va. on Feb. 1.
Tennis
continued from page I
Davidson will be our toughest com-
petition so far this season Morris
said.
The Pirates' next home match
will be against CAA conference
opponent Richmond on Tuesday,
March 2, at 2:30 p.m. after playing
Coastal Carolina on the weekend.
Along with the men's team, the
Lady Pirates were victorious as
well this weekend. The women's
team did not drop a match to Mt.
Olive and won their afternoon
match against Campbell 7-2 by a
strong performance in the doubles
and the bottom four singles compe-
titions.
At number one singles, Hrusida
Kamthe showed that her freshman
nervousness is wearing off as she
was dropping only two games in
her morning match.
Carolina Torres, Asa Ellbring,
Meredith Spears, and Catherine
Morgan coasted wins over their
opponents, flexing their tennis
muscle.
The women continued to show
their strength in doubles this year
by taking all of the matches against
the outmatched Campbell doubles
teams. The team of Ellbring and
Kamthe struggled to a 9-8 win at
No. 1.
"They KamtheEllbring
played very well in their final dou-
bles match against a really good
Campbell team Morris said.
The Lady Pirates will next join
the men's team for their first game
on the road this season against
Coastal Carolina on Saturday, Feb.
27.
Intramural
5-on-5 Ranking
Fraternity Gold Wirvtot
1. 8AEA
2. SigEpA
Kappa SigmaA
PKe A
Delta Chi A
Fmternity Purpb
lambda ChiB
ThetaCNB
SioEpB
PhiTauB
Alpha Sig
Men Gold
6.
Big BaUar Too
Fabulous Co. AJ Stars
Duck Down
Dirty Birdt
Sleepers
40
3-1
3-t
3-1
3-1
44
SO
3-0
3-1
3-1
0
3-1
3-1
3-1
2-2
Men's Purple
1. Westside Knuckleheadz 4-0
Big Bailers 4-0
Warriors 40
Pawn Stare 4-0
PFU Fighters 4-0
Women Gold
1. Bomb Squad
2. LOO.
3. ICHIBIAN
3-1
2-2
2-2
Women's Purple
1. Ratrovision Wonder 4-0
Flaming Flames 4-0
3. Tar Heels 2-2
Co4hc 1. Knuckleheedz Fearless East Side3-1 3-1 3-1
Sorority 1. Chi Omega 2. Alpha Omtcron Pi 3. ZetaTau Alpha44 3-1 2-2
;��;
Source: Palm Daniel
Coordinator of bnannl Spam






10 Tuesday. Fadruary 23. 1996
FOR RENT
CANNON COURT Two bedroom. 1
12 bath townhouse. Includes stove,
refrigerator, dishwasher, washerdry-
er hook-up. on ECU bus route. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC. 766-6209.
DUPLEX. 2 BDR, 1 Bath, heat
pump, private drive, dose to cam-
pus, no pets please. Call 766-8444
or 356-7799.
WALK TO ECU. 1.2.3. or 4 bed-
room, available May to Aug. Now
renting. Call 321-4712.
106 STANCILL DRIVE. 2 bedroom.
1 bathroom, brick duplex, central
heatair. near ECU. $426 month,
pets extra with fee. Call 353-2717 or
756-2766.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom. 1 bath apt.
$275.00 per month, free watersew-
er, range, refrig. pets OK. Call 758-
1921 ask for Ken.
LANQSTON PARK Apartments:
$100 off deposit- 2 bedroom. 1 bath
apt. free watersewer, all applianc-
es, washerdryer hook-ups. over
900 sq.ft. Available now $425. Call
758-1921.
GLADIOLUS GARDENS One. two.
and three bedroom apartments. Free
cable. Located on 10th Street. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC 756-6209.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
5285month. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apts 125 Avery St. in Green-
ville - 5 blocks from campus. 758-
6596.
BEECH STREET Villas - Three bed-
room, two bath apartments, close to
campus, with laundry room, stove,
refrigerator, and dishwasher. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC 756-6209.
WESLEY COMMONS North. One
bedroom $310 6 two bedroom
$400. near campus. ECU bus stop,
free water and sewer, washer and
dryer hookup and on site laundry,
pets considered. Call Wainright
Property Management LLC 756-
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WESLEY COMMONS South: $100
off deposit: 2 bedroom, 1 bath apt.
free watersewer, washerdryer
hook-ups. 6 blocks from campus.
Available now $440. Call 758-1921.
ROOMMATE WANTED ASAP.
Dockside, 3 bedroom. $250 month,
14 utilities, washer, dryer, dish-
washer. Student preferred, great
area. Must be easy to live with. Call
757-8781
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE
Needed to share apt. close to cam-
pus, student preferred. Must be re-
sponsible & clean & like pets. Total
expenses per month will not exceed
$270. 752-0009.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share a 3 bedroom apartment. Pay
$125 month rent and 14 utilities.
Lease until August. Call 329-1493.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom apart-
ment 2 blocks from school. Rent
$256. Washerdryer included. 12
cable, 12 utilities, 12 phone. Avail-
able at end of this semester. Make
plans now. Call Emily, 329-0886.
ONE BLOCK from campus. Female
roommate needed. Must like dogs.
$130 month plus 14 utilities. 757-
1467.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for 2 bed-
room, 1-12 bath townhouse. Fully
furnished. Close to campus.
$236month plus half utilities.
Please call 321-7762 between hours
of 10a.m.and 6p.m.
'94 YAMAHA XT600 DualSport.
5.000 miles, excellent bike. $2,000
OBO. Call 353-8958.
FOR SALE - Bike. GT Timbertine.
1996. In great condition. $250 OBO.
Call Hallie. 752-2463.
FOR SALE
CUSTOM PRINTED T-shirts. Profes-
sion printers since 1981. Competitive
rate. Free shipping. Full art depart-
ment. Wa accept digital files in most
format. 800-272-2066 culture-
works.com
MONGOOSE MOUNTAIN Bike,
rock shocks, coda bar. racing stem,
ody racing pedals, bar ends, lotta ex-
tras for the money, excellent condi-
tion, garage kept. $350.00. Roland.
353-6810 or 329-1438
Spring Break Panama City
$129! Boardwalk room with kitchen
near clubs! 7 parties-free drinks!
Daytona $149! South Beach $129!
Cocoa Beach $149! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
1990 GEO Storm for sale by owner.
90,000 miles, in good condition.
Asking $2700 or best offer. Call Lau-
ren at 830-3803 if interested.
1989 JEEP Cherokee Laredo 4-door,
automatic, 4x4, p.lockswindows,
radioCD. excellent shape. $6,000
or best offer. 551-3828. Must sell.
APTIVA computer wprinter.
CD-ROM modem. MSWorks, Lotus.
etc. Must sell. $1000. 551-3828
LAPTOP COMPUTERTOSHIBA
Satellite Pro 435CDS. Equipped with
hard drive and CD-ROM. Best offer
and it's yours. Call 758-9640.
SERVICES
STUDENT DISCOUNT for auto de-
tailing. Don't like to clean your car?
Let us do it. Professional and experi-
enced. Pick up avail. Call Tim for
prices at 931-9166.
SlHSllE!
CMIUM SKY SPIRTS
(9191496-2224
D.J. FOR HIRE
NYC D.J. READY TO
HYPE UP YOUR PARTY
For all functions & campus
organizations
Call J.Arthur @ 252-412-0971
HELP WANTED
CHILDCARE PROVIDER needed
for two young children in my home.
8-12 hours per week, weekdays only.
Responsible applicants with child-
care experience and own transporta-
tion. Call 321-2086. References re-
quired.
CRUISE SHIP Employment - work-
ers earn up to $2000 month (w
tips 8 benefits). World Travel! Land-
Tour jobs up to $5,000 -$7,000
summer. Ask us how! 517-336-4235
Ext.C53623
NEED SUMMER help at Hatteras
Beach. Free housing. Need two
males or females for retail seafood
market. Bonus offered. Call 252-986-
2215 or e-mail riskyb9interpath.com
STUDENT PHOTOGRAPHER want-
ed for wedding. Experience required,
professional photographer is not
necessary. Please call 762-0595.
leave message.
We'd like you to get to
know us better.
We're very proud of our
unit, and look forward
to telling you all about
ourselves. If you like what
you see and hear, you
might want to join us. For
more information, just give
usacall:
252-756-9695
mau to� am:
ARMY RESERVE
si
The East Carolinian
FOR SALE
BEDROOM FURNITURE for sale!
(Bed, mattress, two nightstands, two
dressers and large mirror). $750 or
best offer. Call 355-1621. All furniture
from Ikea.
AAAI SPRING Break Bahamas Par-
ty Cruise! 5 nights $279! Includes
meals 8 parties! Awesome beaches,
nightlife! Departs from Florida! Can-
cun 8- Jamaica $399! springbreak-
travel.com 1-800-678-6386
FOR SALE: Queen size pillow top
mattress and boxspring, $100. 329-
8652, ask for Jamie.
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Secretary -Tues-
days 8 Thursdays, full-time in the
summer 8-5 M-F. Please send re-
sume to 3481-A South Evans Street.
Greenville, NC 27834
FRATERNITIES, SORORITIES 8
Student Groups: Earn $1000-$2000
with easy 3 hour CIS Fund Raiser
event. No sales required. Fund
Raiser days are filling up, so call
today. Contact Chris 800-829-4777.
DELIVERYSALES HELP needed.
Apply in person at Mattress Plus,
606 E. Arlington Blvd. No phone
calls please.
SYLVAN LEARNING Center is seek-
ing a Spanish and high level Math
tutor. We are looking for a reliable
person who is available MonThurs.
2-7:30. Please apply at 2428 S. Cha-
rles Blvd.
SPRING YOUTH Indoor Soccer
Coaches. The Greenville Recreation
8 Parks Department is recruiting for
12 to 16 part-time youth soccer
coaches for the spring youth indoor
soccer program. Applicants must
possess some knowledge of the soc-
cer skills arid have the ability and pa-
tience to work with youth. Applic-
ants must be able to coach young
people ages 5-18. in soccer funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3 until 7
p.m. with some night and weekend
coaching. Flexible with hours accor-
ding to class schedules and Spring
Break week. This program will run
from March 8 to early May. Salary
rates start at $5.15 per hour. For
more information, please call Ben
James, Michael Daly or Judd Crum-
pler at 329-4550 after 2 p.m.
Informational Workshop
on acting for film
Saturday Feb 27
If you would like to be an
extra in a feature film or
episodic in
Wilmington come
to this workshop!
Call Pitt County
Arts Council at
757-1785 or Steve
Myott 353-0514 for
more information.
FREE RADIO $1250. Fundraiser
open to student groups & organiza-
tions. Earn $3-$5 per VisaMC app.
We supply all materials at no cost.
Call for info or visit our website.
Qualified callers receive a Free Baby
Boom Box. 1-800-932-0528 x 65.
www.ocmconcepts .com
LOOKING FOR a part-time job?
Help wanted at Szechuan Express, in
the Food Court in the Plaza Mall.
Day hours from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m
night hours from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Apply in person. No phone calls,
please.
1999 INTERNSHIPS! Don't get a
summer job Run a summer busi-
ness. www.tuitionpainters.com. tui-
paint@bellsouth.net or 800-393-
4521.
HAM'S BREWHOUSE now hiring
all positions. Do you like to make
money? Do you like to have a good
time while making money? Apply in
person Monday thru Saturday 10-
6p.m. @ 701 South Evans Street.
Come to the trailer beside the build-
ing. EOE
POOL MANAGERS and Lifeguards
with great people skills needed for
the summer of 1999 in the Triangle
area. Additional offices in the Balti-
more, Richmond, Philadelphia, DC,
Atlanta, NJ, and Nashville areas.
Please contact Lisa at 919-878-3661.
$7.00 PER hour plus $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina. (Nags Head). Call
Dona for application and housing
info 800-662-2122.
HELP WANTED! Need part-time
employee for filing, typing, answer-
ing phone, keying in accounts paya-
bles, and other miscellaneous du-
ties. Applicant must'have computer
experience with knowledge of Mi-
crosoft Word and Excel. Hours nego-
tiable with applicants' schedule.
Very good salary! If interested,
please call 758-1212 and ask for
Leigh Ann or mail resume to PO Box
1565. Greenville, NC 27868.
EARN GOOD money and learn at
the same time with an internship in
the financial services industry. Fax
your resume to Jeff Mahoney at 366-
7980 or call 355-7700.
GREEK PERSONALS
PI KAPPA Alpha hopes that every-
one had a wonderful time at our an-
nual Valentine's Bring-A-Date.
Thanks to all who came out to the Pi
Kappa AlphaSigma Phi Epsilon
Band Party last Wed too.
TAU KAPPA Epsilon - Nice PJ'sl
Thanks for the great social! Love.
Zeta Tau Alpha
GREEK PERSONALS
ALPHA DELTA Pi would like to
thank Delta Chi for another great so-
cial. PS. Congratulations on a great
rushl We love you guys)
CONGRATULATIONS, KIM, on
your lavalier to Art. Love, your sisters
of Alpha Phi
THANK YOU to all our dates who
made our Valentine's Days so spe-
cial! We had a blast on Saturday
night! Love, the sisters of Zeta Tau
Alpha
ZETA TAU Alpha would like to con-
gratulate Casey Rushton and Mandi
Knox on their initiation into Order of
Omega. We're proud of you!
SIGMA PHI Epsilon - Haven't seen
you in a while. The lays really made
us smile. The dance floor let off a lot
of heat. Soon again we hope we'll
meet. Love, Alpha Phi
PI LAMBDA Phi- Mardi Gras was a
blast! Can't wait to do it again! Love,
Zeta Tau Alpha
PHI TAU - We had a great time at
the social last Thursday again as
usual. Thanks. Love, the sisters of Al-
pha Xi Delta
THANKS, PI Kappa Alpha, for the
great social last Tuesday. Let's blow
it out for Mardi Gras again next year.
Love, the sisters of Alpha Xi Delta
LAMBDA CHI Alpha, thank you for
the social last week. It was great
hanging out with you guys again.
Love, the sisters of Chi Omega.
OTHER
SUBLEASE: 1 bedroom. 2 blocks
from campus on Summit St.
$350month. Pets okay with fee. If
interested, call Stacey or Greg at
752-7967.
HELLO CANDIDATES) The first five
ladies who find our faculty advisor
by Thursday 5p.m and correctly rec-
ite the motto (Long Version) will re-
ceive a gift! Good Luck Ladies!
ANNOUNCEMENTS
CONGRATULATIONS TO Arron
and Dave for receiving Distinguished
Delegates Honors at the UNC-Char-
lotte Model United Nations. If you
would like to join the East Carolina
Model United Nations Club and ex-
perience international politics, come
to Brewster C105 on Monday at
5p.m. For more info, call Prof. Wil-
liams at 328-1051 or Dan at 758-
2385.
GOLDEN KEY WILL meet today at
5:30 in GCB 1012. Remember to
bring canned goods, non-perishable
items, andor warm clothes. See
you there!
ANNOUNCEMENTS
NICOTINE CESSATION (Part I):
Monday 3:30-4:30. The Center for
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering this workshop on
Monday. March 1. If you are interest-
ed in this workshop, please contact
the Center at 328-6661.
STRESS MANAGEMENT Work-
shop: Wednesday 3:30-4:30. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering this work-
shop on Wednesday, Feb. 24th. If
you are interested in this program,
contact the Center at 328-6661.
BE HERE be there BGLAD (Bisexuals
Gays Lesbians and Allies for Diversi-
ty). We meet every Wednesday at
7:30 in room GCB 3008. Come join
the fun. make new friends and make
a difference.
PERSPECTIVES - 'Modern Myths of
the Medieval Surgeon" - Michael R.
McVaugh. Ph.D. William Smith Wells
Professor. Department of History.
University of North Carolina at Chap-
el Hill - Monday. March 1. 12:30-1:30
p.m. Brody 2W-50. Co-sponsored by
Bioethics Center, University Health
Systems of Eastern Carolina Depart-
ment of Medical Humanities, ECU
School of Medicine. The public is in-
vited to attend. For further informa-
tion call 816-2797.
HAVE YOU chosen your major? Do
you know your career options? ECU
Career Education Forums will be
held March 8-12. Learn about possi-
ble majors and related careers. To
find out more visit the web site
http:www.ecu.educoopev-
ents.htm. Look for our upcoming ad
in the East Carolinian.
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION: Mon-
day 11a.m12:00 noon. The Center
for Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering this workshop on
Monday, March 1. If you are interest-
ed in this workshop, please contact
the Center at 328-6661.
"DONT LET the Flame Burn Out"
Wed. Feb. 24. 4 p.m. Mendenhall
Student Center Underground. Learn
how to stay motivated through a
long semester. Also learn how to
keep an apathetic group from keep-
ing you down. Keep the flame burn-
ing.
BECOMING A Successful Student-
Note-Taking: Tuesday 3:30-4:30 and
Monday 3:30-4:30. The Center for
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering the following work-
shop on Tuesday the 23rd and Mon-
day. March 1. If you are interested in
this workshop, contact the center at
328-6661.
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING:
Tuesday 11a.m12noon.The Center
for Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering this workshop on
Tuesday, Feb. 23rd. If you are inter-
ested in this workshop, please con-
tact the Center at 328-6661.
SPRINGBREAK
CANADA
MOLSON
5l 1M ,
PARTY �liN
'fSNOW! UjQV
n DAYNIGHTS
LIFTLODGING
PARTIESLIVE BANDS
�b S369
6�m
1-800-999SKI-9www.skitravel.coml
JvKnMnkmd
writers needed
� Reliable writers
needed to cover campus
entertainment news
� Apply at the second floor
of Student Publications
Building or call 328-6366
ear
Features
writers needed
� Writers must be creative
responsible and able to
meet deadlines
� Apply at the second floor
of Student Publications
Building or call 328-6366
'hit.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
LONDON SUMMER'99: ECU offers
students a study abroad opportunity
in London during the summer. 'Liter-
ary London" will be directed this
summer by Dr. Jeffrey Franklin of the
ECU English Department. Earn cred-
it toward your degree and have the
option of staying in London to work
(legally and for pay) during the re-
mainder of the summer! Learn more
at International House. 306 E. Ninth
St Wednesday afternoon. Feb. 24
at 4:30.
ALL GOLDEN Key members! We
will meet today at 5:30 in GC 1012.
Please come and join us!
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: Thursday 3:30-5PM. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering this work-
shop on Thursday, February 18th
and Thursday, the 25th. If you are in-
terested in this program, contact the
center at 328-6661.
ECU-SOM READERS Theater Com-
pany presents two readers theater
performances and discussion of the
short story: "Imelda" by Richard Selz-
er. St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 401
E. 4th St. 7:30p.m. Monday, Feb. 22
and Pitt Co. Memorial Hospital Cafe-
teria Maple Room 12:30p.m. Friday,
Feb. 26. A discussion will follow the
performance. Co-sponsored by
Dept. of Medical Humanities, ECU
School of Medicine 8 The Bioethics
Center, University Health Systems of
Eastern Carolina. The public is invit-
ed to attend. For further information,
call 816-2797. Dept. of Med. Human-
itiese
ADVERTISE IN
THE CLASSIFIEDS.
IT WORKS!
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cancun'oatnaioBaMawias
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Spring Break Travel was 1 of 6 small buvnesses in the US in 199! U be
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Bahamas Party
Cruise $279
Sdays � Most Meals � free Parties � Includes lues
Panama $119
City- Boardwalk, Holiday ton Surrspre A Mote
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� 7 Nights "Air ?Hotel" Saw $150 on Food & Drinks
Cancun $399
7 Nights Air Hotel � Fie Food & 30 Mrs o( Drinks
Spring Break Travel-Our 12th Year!
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MATCH POINT
When building a campfire,
clear a 5-foot area around
the pit down to the soil.
REMEMBER, ONLY YOU CAN
PREVENT FOREST FIRES.
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 23, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 23, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1328
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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