The East Carolinian, February 18, 1999






-�VXHIMM
?
Thursday:
High: 60
Low: 54
Friday:
High: 57
Low: 45
Elo
Online Survey
www.tec.ecu.edu
"Did you have a Valentine for
Valentine's Day?
"Was your power bill too expensive over
December break?"
75 Yes 25 No
Carolinian
THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 18. 1999 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 39
sooreless in 26 innings.
See Sports 10
School of Medicine awarded $1.9 million grant for study
Effects of coronary
bypass on brain studied
Terra Steinbeiser
STAFF WHITER
Recently, the National Institute of
Neurological Disorders and Strokes
awarded a $1.9 million grant to both
ECU and Wake Forest University
to study the adverse effects of coro-
Graduation
speaker
announced
William Friday to
deliver spring address
Peter Dawvot
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
In gearing up for the 90th Spring
Commencement, ECU has
announced that the program will
be hosted by William Friday, exec-
utive director of the William R.
Kenan Charitable Trust and for-
mer president of the University of
North Carolina system.
Friday will deliver the May 15
speech at Dowdy-Ficklen to more
than 2,000 graduates and numer-
ous members of the public.
Friday recently announced that
he would retire from the Kenan
foundation on June 30. The foun-
dation, while under his control, has
incorporated over $420 million in
assets to various areas and organiza-
tions. Friday also served as the
head of the UNC system for 30
years.
Under his leadership, the foun-
dation has launched and supported
major educational initiatives such
as the creation of the Kenan
Institutes at four universities in the
North Carolina system.
nary bypass surgery on the brain.
Coronary bypass surgery is per-
formed when a blockage occurs in
the arteries surrounding the heart.
The surgery is intended to improve
the blood flow in the coronary arter-
ies, insuring the heart muscle is get-
ting the oxygen-rich blood it needs.
Problems can arise when the
heart is moved during surgery. The
movement often causes plaque to
dislodge from the sides of the arter-
ies where it then travels upward
and clogs the blood vessels in the
brain.
Previous studies have shown
that many people experience
strokes, memory loss and even per-
sonality changes after undergoing
bypass surgery because of such
blood clots.
"My husband was a very differ-
ent man after his triple bypass
said Cloretta Thomas, 65, of
Greenville. "I hope this research
will help make it so that nobody
ever has to.get to know a loved one
all over again like I did
Currently, there are two stan-
dard surgery procedures used to
perform heart bypass surgery. ECU
was chosen to participate in the
"We're just trying to determine
the safest way to operate on
patients
Dr. Walter Chitwood
Chairman of ECU'S Department ol Suigeiy.
study because of the unusually
large number of heart disease
patients in Eastern North Carolina,
and because ECU uses one stan-
dard bypass surgery procedure
while Wake Forest uses the other.
"Even though we're in the same
state, we have two different popula-
tions of patients said Dr. Walter
Chitwood, chairman of ECU's
Department of Surgery.
Three hundred patients at both
universities will be studied to try to
determine which of the procedures
causes the least amount of damage
to the brain and nervous system.
"We're just trying to determine
the safest way to operate on
patients Chitwood said.
Even though the study will take
place over the course of three years,
doctors at Wake Forest have,
already made some important dis-
coveries.
By making minor changes in the
standard surgery technique, such as
using less invasive instruments and
moving the heart around less, a sig-
nificant number of patients are
experiencing fewer neurological
problems during and after surgery.
Playing during the dog days of winter
Faculty
supports
firing
Demarvo dismisses
former colleague's letter
Peter Dawyot
ASSISTANT NEWS
tj $
The grassy area in front ot Jenkins is a popular place for students from the Tar River residential area to recreate with their pets.
PHOTO BY MIKE JACOBSEN
a
Former colleagues
of Sal Demarco from
the department of Sal Demarco
Clinical Science, sent a
letter to the "Daily Reflector"
expressing their support of
Chancellor Eakin's decision to fire
Demarco.
Demarco a former professor of
ECU was fired in 1997 after
numerous questionable events cir-
culated about his .abilities to per-
form his job properly. Demarco
claims that numerous faculty
members and Chancellor Eakin
have shown a biased attitude
toward his fight against Multiple
Sclerosis (a disease which affects
the nervous system).
In a letter sent to The Daily
Reflector, fourteen former faculty
SEE DEMARCO PAGE 2
Voice mail undergoes maintenance
Analysis prepares
system for year 2000
K ris t y Daniel
STAFF WRITER
The campus voice mail system
received routine maintenance from
telecommunications in various res-
idence halls and office buildings
last Thursday.
� Edmond Bowers, telecommuni-
cations technician, sent out verbal
announcements over the voice
mail to inform the students and
faculty that from 5:15 p.m. to 7 p.m.
there was a chance their voice mail
would be unable to access.
Furthermore, Cotton and Jones
posted signs at entrances to inform
their residents about the work.
All students and faculty weren't
affected by the services.
"We were just working on
the system Bowers said.
"Nothing was wrong with it,
we were just making improvc-
use an answering
machine instead. It is less
complicated than the voice
mail system
Elizabeth Hamer
Sophomore
ments. We are upgrading the
software to make it compatible for
the year 2000. The students will
not even notice a difference
Sophomore marketing major,
Elizabeth Hayek, experienced
Freshman Lee Hinson checks his voice mail.
PHOTO BY MICHAEL SMITH
some difficulties during the main-
tenance because she was expecting
a phone call.
SEE TELECOMMUNICATIONS PAGE 2
Spring Break alternative offered
15 students travel to
Atlanta to help needy
Devon White
staff writer
A small number of students will
get the chance to go to Atlanta to
help make a difference in the
lives of needy families through a
special program known as
Alternative Spring Break (ASB).
Only 15 out of the 75 ECU
students that applied will be par-
ticipating in ASB this semester. It
places teams of college or high-
school students in communities to
engage in community service and
experience learning during the
summer, fall, winter or Spring
Break.
The objectives of ASB are to
involve students in community
based service projects and to give
students the opportunity to learn
about problems faced by mem-
" think there is no better way
to spend your spring break
Erin 0'Boyle
Sophomore
bets of community. Students per-
form short-term projects for com-
munity agencies and learn about
issues such as literacy, poverty,
racism.hunger, homelessness and
the environment.
"I think there is no better way
to spend your spring break said
sophomore Erin O'Boyle, who
will be participating in the Atlanta
trip.
The crip to Atlanta consists of
five days of community service.
Students will visit the Atlanta
Community Furniture Bank.
The Furniture Bank is a non-
profit agency that works with
over 60 social service agencies to
help furnish houses of needy
families. By obtaining much
needed furnishings, homeless
people can keep their families
together in a comfortable, safe
environment
Next, students will visit the
Atlanta Community Food Bank,
one of the five largest in the
nation. The food bank is a non-
SEE SPUING BREAK PAGE 4
k





2 TmrtOy. rrttmry 18, 1989
news-
The Ent Cirolinlin
news
briefs
Telecommunications
continued from page t
Demarco
continued (torn page 1
NC CHURCHES
OPPOSE STATE
LOTTERY THAT MANY
MEMBERS SUPPORT
GREENSBORDW�Establishing a
state lottery may be the will of
most North Carolinians, but it goes
against the will of God, according
to some church leaders.
In a 25-page report issued
recently by Faith in Action, an ecu-
menical group, the Rev. Mark Sills
says lotteries force people to put
their faith not in God, but in luck.
And luck, he says, is a false deity.
DUKE DOCTORS
MARVEL AT HEPATITIS
CURE FOR SICKLE
CELL PATIENT
DURHAM (AP) � A patient
released from Duke University
Medical Center represents hope
for the unknown number of people
who may have caught a dangerous
� liver virus from blood transfusions
� intended to treat sickle cell ane-
i
' rrua.
Huda Al-Saadi, 35, was retum-
1 ing to her home in United Arab
� Emirates Sunday. Doctors say she
' was successfully treated for hepati-
: tis C despite her sickle cell anemia.
"I was waiting for a phone call
from my sister who was coming to
see me from Pennsylvania and I
had to be here when she called
she said. "That meant I either had
to stay around and wait or make
sure my roommate was going to be
around, just in case
Sophomore Elizabeth Hamer
said she would much rather use an
answering machine instead of the
voice mail service.
Hamer feels students often find
using the voice rhail system too
complicated and in turn, decided
to use an answering machine.
"I wasn't affected by the main-
tenance to the system because I
use an answering machine
instead Hamer said. "It is less
complicated than the voice mail
system
Bowers said this was just routine
maintenance and he could not say
for sure when, if anytime, it would
happen again. However, telecom-
munications has plans set up if
other problems should occur.
"We are required to notify
seven days in advance if we are
planning to do such work on the
systems he said.
OFFICIALS TRY TO
BURN OFF THE
REMAINING FUEL OIL
ON THE FREIGHTER
COOS BAY, Ore. (AP) �
Demolition experts attempted to
torch the remaining fuel from a
heavily listing wreck on Sunday,
estimating that 90 percent of the
oil has been burned off the
grounded freighter.
A helicopter dropped a fire
accelerant on the ship Sunday
afternoon to reignite one of the
cargo holds of the New Carissa,
which may have as much as 50,000
gallons of fuel oil remaining.
The practice was repeated sev-
eral times throughout the after-
noon, since the fire kept going out.
The fire burned for about an hour,
said Coast Guard Petty Officer
Greg Folkins.
TWO DEAD, 37
INJURED IN THAILAND
BUS ACCIDENT
BANGKOK, Thailand (AP) � A
Dutch tourist was among two peo-
ple killed when a tour bus over-
turned turned Monday as the dri-
ver tried to pass a truck at high
speed, police said. At least 37 peo-
ple were hurt.
The dead foreigner was identi-
fied as Marcel de Hoog, 25, of the
Netherlands, police Lt. Reungyoj
Kham-in told The Associated Press
by telephone. The other fatality
was a Thai male crew member of
the bus, he said.
30 PEOPLE KILLED, 14
INJURED IN CHINESE
BUS EXPLOSION
BEIJING (AP) � At least 30 peo-
ple were killed and 14 injured
when a gas-powered public bus
plunged over a 3-meter (10 foot)
drop and exploded in the south-
western Chinese city of
Chongqing, an official newspaper
said.
The explosion Friday also
injured "many" people in a
minibus that was behind the bus,
the Yangcheng Evening News said
Saturday in a report seen Sunday in
Beiiine.
members of Demarco asserted
their support for Chancellor
Richard Eakin's decision to termi-
nate Demarco's employment The
letter also states that the faculty of
the CSDI department want to work
in an environment in which, "acad-
emic freedom is fostered in a con-
structive and collegial manner
A portion of the letter reads,
"The undersigned CSDI faculty
strongly believe that this was a case
of the administration responding to
concerns of the majority of faculty
within our department
Demarco was stunned by the
recent turn of events. He believes
that the members of the faculty
who signed the letter were pres-
sured to do so by tenured members
of the faculty.
"For your information, seven of
the 14 faculty who signed the letter
did not witness any of the of the
alleged acts of misconduct
Demarco said. "Five of the 14 were
present only during one of the inci-
dents of misconduct. Only two of
the 14 faculty were present during
two of the alleged acts of miscon-
duct
According to Demarco, the one
person who witnessed all acts
which led to the dismissal of
Demarco was Dr. Monica Hough.
She was the only person in the
department not to sign the letter of
intent to back the Chancellor.
"Dr. Monica Hough was the
only faculty member present dur-
ing all three incidents Demarco
said. "She supported my accounts
of what happened. The administra-
tion intimidated her not to testify
on my behalf
Hough, declined to comment on
the the circumstances surrounding
the case.
Demarco has repeatedly said
that he believes that the actions of
the school have caused far more'
problems than he himself could'
have caused.
Richard Shifte, Allied Health'
professor, thinks the claims con-
cerning pressure from the tenured,
faculty are a bit far fetched .
"If thai were true, the 14 indi-
viduals would not have signed the
letter Shine said. "This has unfoM
tunately became a case of faculty
versus faculty with the administra-
tion responding to the point
After a university-wide faculty'
committee found no grounds to
dismiss Demarco in 1997, Eakin4
overruled the decision.
"I am saddened that my faculty
never treated me fairly as an
American with a disability
Demarco said. "It is discouraging
to me that the administration and
the faculty choose not to work with
me constructively, but rather
choose to treat me with hostility
Currendy, Demarco has asked
the Employment Securities.
Commission (ESC) to reconsider,
his case concerning whether or not
Demarco should receive unem-
ployment benefits. Demarco's
attorney Al Mcsurely, said that the
commission had made errors in the
law in reaching its decision con-
cerning the case.
"The petition is that they( the
Commission) made a ruling that is
180 degrees opposite to their own
legal precedents said McSurcly.
Demarco however, with no real
gain to be received from the
request has found himself fighting
for the rights of others who are per-
haps in similar situations as himself.
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Thursday, fibmiry 18, 1899
East Carolinian
news
Ths Eld Ctrslfsiti
� llil h
52-7303
Iff II
ATHinOI
Evans
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1
Are You Concerned
� About Making the Right Career Choices?
� Whether Your Education is Relevant
to the Real World"?
Do You Wonder
� Exactly What an Employer Expects?
� What Habits and Traits can Set ou Apart
(or Set Sou Back)?
Would you like some advice and insights on these issues
from experienced business leaders who have "been there, done that.
"7
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Selecting Your First Job
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Register by February 19th. Phone 1-800-397-8575
� What We'll Cover �
Selecting Your First )ob Career Management
What Are Your Goals7
Does Industry Matter7
Competitive Posture
Staff vs. Line
Corporate vs. Field
Private or Public
Think Ahead
Culture
Compensation - Short and Long Term
Interview for the lob
Personal Performance
Integrity
Focus On The Mission
Ownership
Style or Substance7
Tailoring To The Organization's Culture
Work Ethic And Attitude
Commitment And Follow-up
"Six Honest Serving Men"
Today's Work Today
What Characteristic Is Most Contagious?
"Dare To Be Different"
Three Key Leadership Traits
Why Continue To Grow?
Seminar Leaders
Our seminar leaders are successful
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While holding graduate and under-
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lob Security
Critical Relationships
The Mentor
Career Killers
Breadth vs Specialization
How To Avoid Stereotyping
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Perception of Top Management
When To Stay And When To Go
Organizational Dynamics
� What The Organization Really Expects
� What The Boss Really Expects
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� Activity vs. Results - Some Surprises
� Are Your Peers Support Or Competition?
� How You Will Be Measured - And By
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7 Good Reasons
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crime
Sunday, Feb. 14
2:55 pm, Communicating
Threats - A non-student threatened
a student in a room in Slay Hall.
The student did not want to press
charges.
3:41 pm. Disorderly Conduct - A
resident of White Hall was issued a
campus appearance ticket after
cursing at an officer and refusing to
provide her identification to him.
Monday, Feb. 15
10:00 am , Damage to Property -
A staff member reported damage to
the left front bumper and headlight
on a state vehicle parked east of
Austin.
10:20 am. False Fire Alarm -
Christopher Parker, student, of
406-D Scott Hall was served a crim-
inal summons for false fire alarm.
The incident occurred on 21299 at
Belk Residence Hall. The sum-
mons was served at the Police
Department.
10:30 am Failure to Appear -
Israel Acosta, student, of 142
Aycock Hall was arrested for failure
to appear in court. The arrest took
place at his residence.
2:36 pm, Larceny - A resident of
Fleming Hall reported the larceny
of her bicycle from the bike racks
between Cotten and Fleming
Halls.
2:52 pm. Simple Assault - A res-
ident of Umstead Hall reported
that he was pushed and threatened
in the parking lot east of Umstead
Hall.
3:20 pm - Simple Possession of
Marijuana - A resident of Aycock
Hall was issued a campus appear-
ance ticket for possession of mari-
juana and alcohol. The charges
came after a consent search of the
room. Three bottles of beer and a
baggie with marijuana seeds were
seized. 99-0113
3:38 pm, Damage to Property -A
student reported that his vehicle
had been scratched while parked in
the commuter parking lot on
College Hill Drive.
4:14 pm. Larceny - A resident of
Garrett Hall reported that a male
took money from him. The male
stated he needed the money for a
bus ticket.
4:50 pm, Larceny - A student
reported the larceny of her license
plate from her vehicle parked in the
commuter parking lot north of
Traffic Services.
10:15 pm, First Degree Trespass
Desedrick Monta Freeman, non-
student, DOB 101176, of 201-B
Rivcrbluff Road, Greenville, NC
was arrested for first degree trespass
after roaming unescorted in
Clement Hall.
He also refused to leave after
being asked to leave by one of the
residence hall staff. Mr. Freeman
was banned from campus.
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4 TlMfrtiy. Fa.rairy 18. 1999
news
Spring Break
continued from page I
profit organization that supplies
food and other products to nearly
700 non-profit feeding programs in
north Georgia as well as metro
Atlanta.
The students will also visit
Ansley Pavilion Nursing Home.
Additionally, the students will visit
Wonderland Gardens, a non-profit
group that provides a variety of ser-
vices for the metro Adanta commu-
nity targeting seniors, inner-city
youth, at-risk youth and people
with disabilities.
Finally, the students will visit
Atlanta's Children's Shelter. The
shelter maintains a day day care for
homeless children, and supports
their families by providing social
service resources for job training,
transitional housing and coping
with the unique issues of homeless-
Tm hoping to gain a positive
experience from this trip and to
bring back some knowledge that I
did not already have said junior
Carrie Hewitt, who is also partici-
pating in the trip.
"It is a great feeling knowing
that students want to volunteer for
their spring break said Jeff
Novak, residence hall coordinator,
who is heading this trip.
"My Alternative Spring Break
trip was an experience where I
received much more than I gave
Novak said.
"I'm hoping that this will inter-
est many other students and get
them to become involved with the
program, Novak said.
For more information please
contact Jeff Novak at 328-6144 or
novakj@maiI.ecu.edu.
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Thi Eilt Carolinian
The Mysterious Journey
Did ancient space
travelers build Peru's
elaborate underground
aquaducts some 10.000
years ago? Did visitors
from another galaxy
dnw the mysterious
Nasca lines?
AU-you-can-eat dinner menu: Orange salad with onions and olives, broiled sea bass with lemon-
oregano vinaigrette, breast of chicken supnma, heart of palm in tomato sauce, BnzitUan rice,
menjar bianco (Peruvian craam pudding), cornbread, water, coffee, and tea.
Tuesday, February 23, 1999 Hendrix Theatre, 4pm & 7:30pm
Runs an free to students with a current, valid ECU One
Card. Dinner tickets an $12 each. To reserve your dinner
ticket, come to the C10 In Mendenhall Student Center by
Thursday, February It, 1999 and pay with cash, a meet
card, or your declining balance. Dinner will be served at
6:00pm in the Great Room.
CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE HOURS Monday - Friday 8:30am
to 5:00pm 252.328.4788 or 1.800.ECU.ARTS;
Dearspeech Impaired access 252.328.4736
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5 Thundair Fein
.
' As most s
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These stu
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Spring Break
ways to volui
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4





Eilt Carolinian
fney
ace
Peru's
jrground
ie 10.000
I visitors
jalaxy
en'ous
Mis with utmon-
Brazillian rice.
n & 7:30pm
Hit valid ECU 3rw
reserve your dinnei
II Studeiit Center by
with cash, a meal
tr will 1m served at
day - Friday 8:30am
UMTS:
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its
:n mic
over the land
ody
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Drink
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rou The
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5

5 ThurtdiV. F.brmrv 18 1HD9
opinion
Til lux Cirtliniin
eastcarolinian
Amy L.Royster Ediiw
Amanda G. Austin Managing Ediiw
Amy Sheridan NawsEditof
Peter Dawyot Asiistam News Editor
NINA DRY Futures Editor
Mario Scherhaufer SponaEditor
Tracy Hairr Assistant Sports Editor
Chris Knotts Stall Illustrator
Robert J. Moore Layout Designer
Stephanie Whitlock Ad Design Manager
Janet Respess AdvertisingMensgar
Russ Blackburn layout Designer
Serving ihe ECU commgnu, since 1975. the Etsl Carotinran publishes II 000 copies every leader and Ihutsdey. The lead Mtfroriel in tech edilion is the oppn
ion ot ire maiornv ol (tie Ednotial Bond ind is wnrien in (urn by fdnoinl Board members The Eesi Csiohmon welcomes enters 10 rha edno; Irmnttd to 750
words, which may he edited loi decency oi brevity the East Cnoliman iturves the nght lo edit or reject letters for publication Ad loners must be stjned
Lenei! should be addressed 10 Opinion editor the East Canrtnian. Sludent PuhholMMie Budding. ECU. Gtoemmte 778S843&3. For infoimalion. cell
757.37B.B3I6
oumew
' As most students gear up for a fun exhilarating week of action known as Spring Break a
j
Handful of ECU students will set off for a week in Atlanta, Georgia on a mission to make the
lives of many needy people better.
! They are opting for a non-traditional spring break experience. TEC feels that this is an
excellent way for students to help others while also helping themselves. While they may not
I
oome back to campus with killer tans, they will bring back something more valuable, a real
sense of accomplishment. Remember what your mother told you - "A friend in need is a friend
indeed These students will earn friendships and bring back memories that last far longer
than blurry memories of Spring Break.
These students are joining thousands of other students across the country who work to ful-
fill dreams through projects such as Habitat for Humanity and the National Food Bank dur-
ing spring break. While this event is full, there are many other ways students can use their
Spring Break to help others. Students can contact Judy Baker at 328-6432 to find out other
ways to volunteer their time during their time off from school.
Aside from the the sense of accomplishment that comes after volunteering for a good cause,
volunteering also looks great on resume, especially during Spring Break.
Now, we know that not all of you are going to cancel your trips to Florida and sign up with
the Red Cross, quit frankly, neither are most of us, but we are inspired to make time in our
lives for a good cause. We hope you are too.
OPINION
Columnist
Christopher
Coppedge
Wacky weather confuses senses
, "Of course Mother Nature could
i
� be a big help to sick students every-
where and mate up her mind
V
I
about which season she wants.
I

i
i
I

This flu season has taken its toll
; on many students, including this
columnist. Although most of the
I symptoms have since disappeared
I still can feel the effects of the flu.
J Especially on my brain. I do not
J know exactly why it has affected
j my thought and memory so much,
( but school has become harder
because of it. Also I'm not sure if it
I was the flu but I have become
more lazy than usual. However I
have figured out who and what is
to blame for this terrible flu that
many have experienced�Mother
Nature and the weather.
Obviously Mother Nature has
I
i , K
had some problems recently on
deciding what season it is. Being
Feb. 1,1 believe it is still supposed
to be winter. However, judging by
the recent weather it is mid-
spring. Of course the weather
seems to change at will on an
hourly basis. Today is cold, tomor-
row is hot. I cannot stand the fact
that one day I can wear shorts and
a T-shirt, but the next day I have
to wear jeans, a sweater and a coat.
Either that or in the morning I
have to wear a coat and during the
afternoon I'm sweating in a T-
shirt. The weather is truly messed
up.
I don't mind hot weather much,
nor do I mind cold weather, but
the constant change of day-to-day
weather is making me crazy, as
well as sick. I figure any day now
the temperature will be around
100 degrees and the next day it
will snow. This event would not
surprise me one bit. You try for a
tan one day and then go skiing the
next. Of course this would proba-
bly lead to another strain of the flu
bug. The worst result of the con-
stantly changing weather could
mean having a tough time recover-
ing from your sickness. I think I
have had the flu for almost over
two weeks. I have downgraded it
from the flu to a cold now but I
still have that stupid hacking dry
cough. I'm not sure which is more
annoying�being in class with
someone constantly coughing, or
being the one in class constantly
coughing. I am ready to be fully
over this cold or flu or whatever I
have so I can actually wake up in
the mornings and get to class on
time. I think the flu just makes
you tired and lazy, and if it's not
the flu then I'm probably in big
trouble. Of course Mother Nature
could be a big help to sick stu-
dents everywhere and make up
her mind about which season she
wants. It's time to pick a season
and stick with it. Quit teasing us
with spring and stick with winter
for just a little while longer. Spring
will come soon enough, when the
time is right. In the meantime one
season would help to keep us all a
little bit healthier.
,
. . .
flE5W5l$lEP EVER WlEEteH
OPINION
Columnist
Ryan
Kennemur
Pizza delivery technology scary
"Since I don V want the estab-
lishment mad at me, let's call
it Mama Joan's Pizza
Howdy y'all! Did ya miss me?
Sure ya did.
This week's column is going to
be about the telephone. I was with
my girlfriend last Saturday and we
were planning on ordering a pizza.
Since I don't want the establish-
ment mad at me, let's call it Mama
Joan's Pizza. I picked up the
phone and dialed the number, and
the girl working took my order just
as one would expect.
What happened next frightens
me more than any old hormone-
crazed squirrel. I started to give
her my phone number, but she
stopped me with, "We already
have it
"Oh I said. "Well do you want
my name?"
She replied sternly with, "Sir,
we already have all the informa-
tion that we need. Your name,
address, phone number it's all
here
"Urn why do you have all
that stuff already?" I asked sheep-
ishly.
She immediately changed the
subject with, "Did you want
mushrooms on that?"
"Yes, but what I want to know
is�"
"Okay sir, we'll call you when
it's ready she said as she hung up
on me.
Now this really gets my goat,
and it didn't take long for my girl-
friend to realize that my goat had
been gotten. I told her what had
happened and she looked at me
with the same expression that one
would give a high school student
that couldn't spell "cat "Don't
worry she said. "There's nothing
wrong with it. It's just so they can
find out where you live and stuff
I gazed at her, and though I
love her dearly, I could not figure
out why she was treating me like a
child regarding this matter. It
became blatantly obvious that she
was one of "them It would be
difficult, but I would have to turn
her in to the proper authorities
and get her deported. It would be
the only way to save her.
But the pizza came, and it was
great, and there was no noticeable
poisonous toppings. I was still not
convinced that there was some-
thing afoot. We turned on the tele-
vision, and there were about a
gazillion commercials about dial-
ing 10-10-some-random-number.
And what was worse, they all had
old sitcom stars reprising their
famous roles and pretending to
really love the service. Yes, even
Tony Danza!
Something's going on here, and
I don't know what it is yet. I will
do all I can to figure it out, so until
I do, don't leave the house. Don't
watch television. And for Tony
Danza's sake, don't answer the
phone. We need to show the world
that we're not interested in their
10-10 crap!
Sorry about this column I
need to cut back on the caffeine.
Go ahead and use the phone and
stuff. I was just kidding. It's not
like there is someone out there
that is going to kill you if you don't
use their stupid phone serv
AHHH click (dial tone).
OPINION
Columnist
Marvelle
Sullivan
Proud Southerner defends her land
"Really I do not see what is
so adherent about politeness
and hospitality"
The South and its characteris-
tics are seemingly always the tar-
get for scrutiny and ridicule. As a
Southerner, although dismayed by
most of the remarks that I hear
and read, I usually just dismiss the
demeaning comments as inso-
lence and ignorance of what the
South is and who Southerners real-
ly are. There comes a certain point
though where the negative conno-
tations must be reckoned with�
not for revenge but rather for clar-
ification.
One of the most annoy-
ing generalizations made is that
Southern dialect is a sign of stu-
pidity andor slowness. This has to
be the most absurd notion that has
been formed in regards to the
South. To generalize someone's
mental capability and aptitude
based on an accent is absolutely
asinine. It is interesting to note
that Europeans find the Southern
accent much more pleasant and
dignified than other various
American dialects. So, what's
everyone else's problem?
Also, why are the
Southern customs and ways of life
so outrageous to newcomers? I
really do not see what is so abhor-
rent about politeness and hospital-
ity. We say grace and we say
"ma'am is that really so offen-
sive? It is understandable to be
taken aback by Southern attitudes
at first, but they stem from a
unique and harmless socialization
that occurs in many forms and on
many levels. Tactfulness is a
Southern virtue which some attain
and some do not
Of course, like any part of
the country and its inhabitants,
extremes exist, but also like any
part of the country those extremes
are the exception rather than the
rule. There are admittedly facets
i
of the South that can prove to be
irritating, but for some reason
Southerners are bashed
unashamedly. It's snobbery in the
purest of forms, and it would be
100 politically incorrect to speak
or think of any other group of peo-
ple the same way.
Not all non-Southerners
demean the South, and in fact,
many people from different parts
of the country that settle here for
retirement and other reasons adore
it. The benefits just outweigh any
negatives that may exist To scruti-
nize and patronize the South�
especially if it is where you live�
is just as backward in thinking as
Southerners are assumed to be.
There has to be some-
thing better to pick on and com-
plain about than the South. The
whole mentality is about as old
and worn-out as the Clinton scan-
dal. Like most, I'm not hostile nor
am I mad�I'm just Southern and
I love every minute of it!





6 TlmrUty, ftbruiry 18, 1999
comics
Thi Eitt Ciroliniin ml Thursday, Fel
Four Seats Left
Jason Latour Victoria Kidd
Ants Marching
A N'T
KeLcW
4Hr�j is
0
4VaaJCo ru. ko ��-��U job.
pQ.ii -for bu oor
Life on Tuesday
Chris Knotts
Life's Meanings .
Kevin Jordan
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feb. 18th ,19th,20f h
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For a good time call:
ECU Student Union Hotline
@ 252.328.6004 or
visit us here:
www.ecu.edustudentunion
fM.iillinramil
Miilim.ib.
Th
Drug4
well-kno
imi 11
There are dnif
gaining popula
edge about the
well known. I
ecstasy and liqt
to induce a del
and both hav
cause great har
"Liquid ecs
GHB, was firsi
'60s and wasn'
1990 said He
tor of Health I
Services.
GHB (gamn
though called 1
different from
appears as a cle
mixed with oth
its unpleasar
Possession of
illegal until ini
ing banning it
alleged links t
rape.
"With GHB
for addiction
counselor at
Counseling
Development,
relaxation, simi





Thi Eitt Ciroliniin n�7 Thursday. February 18, 1
(evin Jordan
hanks
"C"
IX
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PM
?M
had
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iHirfnwtotatKl
999
features
Th� East Carolinian
Ecstasy growing
in popularity on campus
The dangerous drug. Ecstasy, comes in the form of both liquid and pills and induces a state of relaxation.
PHOTO COURTESY OF WORLD WIDE WEB
Drug effects aw not
well-known by public
v ii i i.i. ip g i i.i is
s I V I W R I I K H
There are drugs at ECU which arc-
gaining popularity, though knowl-
edge about their effects may not be
well known. The drugs known as
ecstasy and liquid ecstasy both help
to induce a deep state of relaxation
and both have the potential to
cause great harm.
"Liquid ecstasy, also known as
GHB, was first synthesized in the
'60s and wasn't made illegal until
1990 said Heather Zophy, direc-
tor of Health Education at Health
Services.
GHB (gamma hydroxybutyrate),
though called liquid ecstasy, is very
different from ecstasy. This drug
appears as a clear liquid and is often
mixed with other liquids to conceal
its unpleasant metallic taste.
Possession of "liquid E" was not
illegal until individual states start-
ing banning it in 1997, due to its
alleged links to incidents of date
rape.
"With GHB there is a potential
for addiction said Bob Morphet,
counselor at the Center for
Counseling and Student
Development. "It induces a state of
relaxation, similar to alcohol
Liquid ecstasy triggers chemical
renctions in the brain that increase
the supply of both the neurotrans-
mitter GABA and dopamine levels.
It can be snorted, smoked, and
injected into the body. Its effects
can begin within five to 20 minutes
of ingestion and can last one to
three hours.
At low doses, relaxation occurs.
When a medium amount is taken, a
trance-like state is induced, that
can sometimes be followed by
amnesia. Those who choose to take
GHB regularly or in unusually high
doses may be in danger of a cardiac
"The only approved uses for
GHB are for narcolepsy, child
birth, muscle enhancement and
self-treatment withdrawal
Heather Zophy
Director of Health Education
arrest or respiratory problems.
Some high-dose users have been
put into a sleep state so deep it has
been mistaken for coma.
"The only approved uses for
GHB are for narcolepsy, child birth,
muscle enhancement and self-
treatment withdrawal Zophy said.
Known as the Generation X
"thrill pill ecstasy has grown in
popularity since the '80s. Ecstasy is
the hallucinogenic amphetamine
MDMA. It was not a controlled
substance until 1985, and is cur-
rently listed as a Schedule I con-
trolled substance, along with liquid
ecstasy. This classification means
that they have no recognized legiti-
mate uses and are illegal under all
circumstances, like heroin, LSD
and marijuana.
Ecstasy can be sold in powder,
tablet and capsule form and can be
inhaled, injected or swallowed.
The most common form is tablets,
which sells on the street for $10 to
$30 per dose.
"This drug isn't as prevalent as
alcohol or marijuana, but anyone
could purchase it if they were look-
ing for it in Greenville or at any
other campus Morphet said.
The effects of ecstasy induce
feelings of increased confidence
and relaxed arousal. Effects can
begin within 30 minutes and can
last four to six hours. People who
use ecstasy can be characterized by
a tense appearance, which includes
clenched teeth, increased heart rate
and increased blood pressure.
MDMA can also cause confusion,
severe depression and memory
impairment.
The greatest danger of ecstasy
and liquid ecstasy is that users who
buy it do not really know what they
are getting. Often impurities are
contained in the drug which can
lead to great health dangers. Users
must also keep in rmifd that both
drugs are usually imported, so it can
be anyone's best guess what is real-
ly in the drug.
College budgets put
squeeze on students wallets
Money's whereabouts
baffle mind
Erica Sikes
staff writer
FREE! During your college years,
it becomes your favorite four-letter
word. Many of us know from expe-
rience what it's like to hit rock bot-
tom. We all wonder where all the
money goes, and we want to know
the best ways to make more. And
there's got to be a better way to
save money than to break up with
someone right before the gift-giv-
ing holidays and wearing dirty
underwear inside out.
It has been said that the best
way to make money is to get an
" spend most of my money on
stupid things such as food,
going out and so many other
things
Mary Beth Fleming
ECU student
honest job. Nude dancing, by the
way, is not the most dignified way
to support your habit for extrava-
gant clothing.
Programs sponsored by the
University such as the Co-op pro-
gram and various job placement
programs are offered to the finan-
cially challenged. Although the job
placement programs are not need-
based, they help students find jobs
within their area of study.
"It is, however, a good way to
defray the costs of your education
said Mary Cauley, director of the
Co-op program.
Finding a job that is related to
your major has numerous benefits
that include the hands-on experi-
ences you get while in the process
of paying for and supporting your-
self through your education.
When students were asked to
analyze their expenses, needs and
stupid things such as food, going
out and so many other things said
Mary Beth Fleming, freshman. "I
think that people just blow their
money on small things that add
up
"I'm usually pretty good about
spending my money, but it always
seems to disappear any time I take
an unnecessary trip to Target or
Wal-Mart said Melissa Tilley,
sophomore. "I always get home $30
short and nothing to show for it
Students remain baffled as to
where their money is going.
Frequent trips to the grocery store,
Students stop at ATM machines to retrieve money before shopping at local stores.
PHOTO BY MICHAEL SMITH
wants, they gave the most interest-
ing responses. Puzzled, they tried
to rationalize their expenses and
splurging habits.
"I spend most of my money on
the department store and down-
town suck away all of our money
without us ever realizing it. The'
cost of living has also just increased,
SEE MONEY PAGE 9
I
Intense controversy arises over
death penalty in Texas
EDINBURG, Texas (AP) -
Prosecutors portrayed Pablo Lucio
Vasquez, convicted of killing and
mutilating a 12-year-old boy, as the
embodiment of evil and deserving
of the death penalty.
"Evil exists in our community
said Joseph Orendain, prosecutor.
"Evil exists in our society. The first
thing you need to do is to identify
that evil to understand it. You have
to confront that evil and then you
have to deal with that evil
Orendain told jurors to keep the
victim, David Cardenas, in mind
when they decide whether the 21-
year-old Vasquez deserves to die by
injection or be in prison for life.
"You will never hear Cardenas'
side of what happened that night
Orendain said. "Pain, suffering,
Pablo Lucio Vasquez What about
the pain of the family? What about
the pain of David Cardenas?"
Cardenas' mother left the court-
room in tears during Orendain's
statements, as she did during his
closing arguments Tuesday.
In his remarks, defense attorney
Daniel Reyes said Vasquez should
not be punished for his mental
problems, some of which Reyes
said are genetic.
"If the answer to your special
issues lead to Pablo Vasquez being
put to death, then our society is
going to be a society where eye for
an eye is the rule of law, where
tooth for a tooth is the rule of law, a
society where vigilante justice is
the law be said.
Jurors began deliberating late
Thursday afternoon. They stopped
for the day around 10 p.m. and
were sequestered overnight.
Deliberations were to resume
Friday.
A psychiatrist testified earlier
Thursday that Vasquez was anti-
social and had contemplated sui-
cide because he feared the death
penalty.
"I know they're going to kill me,
so I'd rather take my life Vasquez
told Diego Rodriguez Escobar dur-
ing a September evaluation, the
doctor testified.
Rodriguez, who determined that
Vasquez was mentally ill but com-
petent to stand trial, was the
defense's first witness during the
punishment phase of the Vasquez
capital murder trial.
"If the answer to your special
issues lead to Pablo Vasquez
being put to death, then our
society is going to be a society
where eye for an eye is the rule
of law, where tooth for a tooth
is the rule of law, a society
where vigilante justice is the
People diagnosed as anti-social
tend to be predatory in nature and
are bound to repeat past mistakes,
Rodriguez said during cross-exami-
nation by Orendain. It is a trait
common to serial killers and mass
murderers, he said. But the doctor
added that he could not determine
whether Vasquez is a continuing
threat to society.
"We cannot predict violence in
psychiatry he said.
An academician also called by
defense attorneys testified
Thursday afternoon that statistics
show those convicted of capital
murder like Vasquez have a low
likelihood of committing future
violent acts.
"The fact of the matter is mur-
derers are usually your best
behaved inmates and, when and if
released, they are also your best
behaved on parole said Jonathan
Sorensen, a criminal justice profes-
sor at the University of Texas-Pan
American.
Earlier Thursday, Mancias
denied a defense motion to declare
a mistrial because of news reports
by a television station.
Vasquez was convicted of killing
Cardenas, whose body was found
scalped and dismembered in a
vacant field in Donna. The sev?
enth-grader was killed the night of
April 17-18 while partying with
Vasquez and Andy Chapa, 15.
In his statement to authorities,
Vasquez admitted hitting Cardenas
with a metal pipe, cutting him with
a knife and drinking the boy's
blood. He said the devil and other
voices told him to commit the mur-
der.
Prosecutors have pointed to rob-
bery as the motive for the vicious
attack because the boy's jewelry
was taken. However, the way in
which Cardenas was killed and the
timing of his death�April 17 and
18 are days that call for a human
sacrifice on a "satanic calendar"�
have stirred talk of occult activity in
Donna.
Chapa will also be tried on capi-
tal murder charges as an adult. The
maximum penalty he faces is a life
sentence because he was a juvenile
at the time of the killing. Six others
are accused of helping to cover up
the crime.
� � ��� � ' -���
ti� i�mtmi. 1 n, , ,� ����- - - � �





8TKiir��iy. Feirntry 18. 1888
features
Tha Ent Carolinian
Company forecasts weather
WAYNE, Pa. (AP) - Predicting
the weather a year from today in
any city across the country?
Nonsense, meteorologists say.
But Frederick Fox, a business-
man turned self-proclaimed weath-
er prophet, offers a money-back
guarantee that it can be done and
will provide Internet users the best
time to get married, plan a ski trip
or even sell raingear.
"Others think along the chaos
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For only $19.95, dates and desti-
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ter than 70 percent and that only a
dozen of the 3,000 customers over
the past year have asked for
refunds.
Eastern Mountain Sports of
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WeatherPlanner to manage their
inventory of clothes and outdoor
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"It gives us a better idea of what
kind of demand we'll be facing
from season to season according to
the weather fluctuations said Alan
Margulius, company spokesman.
"It's definitely helped us increase
profitability
Fox said the secret behind
future forecasting is his company's
use of about 100 years of historical
data from the National Weather
Service and a theory that every-
thing, even weather, happens in
cycles.
Mainstream meteorologist call
his ideas way over the top.
According to the American
Meteorological Society, there is no
verifiable skill that exists in fore-
casting day-to-day weather changes
a season or even a month in
advance.
The National Weather Service
also maintains that accurate fore-
casts are possible only two weeks in
advance when it comes to today's
physics and technology, said Allan
Eusris, industrial meteorologist for
the National
Weather Service in Silver
Spring, Md. "I don't think the guy
is necessarily a heretic because
there are cycles and different ways
to look at things Eusris said. "But
would I buy it?
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3 Thundiy, Fibruiry 18, 1998
features
Thi tut Carolinian
look wkoEt Imck
Please cut out and share with a friend
the only spring c;
CAREER SERVICES
Ottering A Variety ot Services tor Freshmen through Alumni
701 Hast Fifth Street, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
Graduating in May or Summer of 1999?
Have you registered by attending a Connections session?
Offered every Monday at 4PM in the Room 103-Career Services Building,
other sessions on other days of the week to accommodate schedules
EDUCATION CAREER DAY Feb 26 100 School Systems
Geared for students to meet representatives about jobs
SCIENCE CAREER FORUM-Planned for March 11 at Flanagan Meet Recruiters
at 12-12:30 in classroom, later at tables in lobby
Services for Freshman through Alumni
Sign up for "SIGI" which helps you understand career options. Using "1,2,3 and enter
on a keyboard" is all you need to know how to do. You may also search for careers by major.
Check out the Career Services Home Page:
http: www.ecu.edu career
Under Career and Occupational Information Button,
check out MACES if you want to find out more about jobs for different majors.
Other Programs: Resume Preparation Workshops
Help for Better Interviews Workshops
Using the Internet for Job Searching Workshops
General Job Search Strategies Workshops
Class and Club PresentationsTours of three Resource Rooms
Others may be added in March and a schedule for April will be sent to those
graduating students who are connected with Career Services!
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So when you're looking to cut
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10
sports
Minton highlights game with no-hitter
Timidly, Feimiry 18. 1998
Pirates pound ACC
with defensive skills
Blaine Denius
SENIOR WRITER
. ACC storekeepers had lots of free
time over the weekend as the
Pirates began the '99 season by
, keeping their opponents scoreless
for 26 innings.
The Winn-Dixie Shoot-Out
' tournament held in Charleston,
S.C. over the weekend started the
Pirate baseball season and matched
ECU against three strong competi-
tors from the ACC. The Pirates
opened the tournament Friday
with an 8-3 loss to the University of
North Carolina, followed by a 12-0
stomping of the University of
S Virginia on Saturday. ECU
J wrapped up the tournament
Sunday with sophomore pitcher
' Foye Minton throwing a no-hit
shutout to beat the Wolfpack of
NC State 8-0.
"You couldn't ask for a better
game to round out the weekend
said Steve Salargo, senior left-field-
er. "It's one of the best pitching
performances I have ever seen in
my career. When Foye Minton is
on, he's on
Minton threw 106 pitches while
completing all nine innings of the
game and was recently named one
of "Collegiate Baseball's" players
of the week. According to the ECU
Sports Information Department,
head coach Keith LeClair said he
doesn't want a pitcher to throw that
many pitches his first outing of the
year, but Minton was "in the zone"
and the defense was playing great.
Minton's no-hitter is only one of
the many highlights from the
Pirates' performance over the
weekend. The Pirates played a
total of 27 innings and only allowed
runs during one inning throughout
the entire tournament. ECU held a
2-0 lead early against UNC on
Friday, but allowed eight runs in
the bottom of the fourth as the
Tarheels charged back into the
game. Even though the Pirates
dropped this first game, they held
their opponents scoreless for the
remainder of the weekend. The
defensive showing was outstanding
for the Pirates, but the offensive
side was equally strong producing a
total of 23 runs.
"It was defense mainly said
Travis Thompson, senior pitcher.
"We did it on defense and so we
"Coach LeClair told us to
enjoy the win, but when you
come to practice be ready to
rock'n'roll
Steve Salargo
Senior Left-Fielder
were pumped up on offense
Pirate team members recovered
quickly from the loss to UNC and
prepared themselves for the tough
games ahead by focusing on what
goals they did accomplish.
"We looked at the positive
instead of the negative said John
Williamson, sophomore outfielder.
"We outplayed Carolina.
We played hard all day
and just had one bad
inning
After the fourth
inning against UNC,
ECU was virtually flaw-
less. The Pirates shut
down the offense of the
ACC and showed that
defense will be the key
to a successful season
this year.
"Anytime you come
out with two wins in a
series against the ACC,
you're doing well
Williamson said.
"Anytime you can beat
the Wolfpack it's great. If
a no-hitter had to be against any-
one, I'm glad it was them
The Winn-Dixie tournament
opened the '99 season and was the
first opportunity for the Pirates to
watch the 17 new members added
to the team this year in action.
'The new guys did an awesome
job Thompson said. "There were
great double-plays and great
defense all around the field.
i Pirates' defense came out strong to defeat the Wolfpack after losing to the Tarheels
PHOTO COURTESY OF SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
Everyone bonded together work-
ing for one goal
These first few games have
answered many questions about
the '99 Pirate baseball team and
players are still enjoying the sweet
taste of victory from this tourna-
ment. However, team members
know that many games lie ahead
on the road to the NCAA
Championship in Omaha and they
must continue to work hard.
"Coach LeClair told us to
enjoy the win, but when you come
to practice be ready to rock 'n'
roll Salargo said. "We have to
come out of the gates with the
same intensity every ball game
The Pirates' record now stands
at 2-1 and they will play their home
opener at Harrington Field Feb. 20
against Radford University.
Intramural Rankings for our Intramural 5-on-B Basketball Leagues
Fraternity 1. SigEpA 2. DeftaChiA 3.SAEA 4. Kappa Sigma A 5. PikaAGold 20 30 20 30 2-1Fraternity 1. Lambda Chi B 2. Alpha Sig 3. ThetaChiB 4SigEpB 6. Phi Tau BPurpla 4-0 30 30 20 2-1
ft 1 2 3 4 5lan'a Gold Big Bakers Too . Sleeper . Fabulous Coltege t . Dirty Bird . Duett Downyi StarsMew'i 30 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-1i Purpla I : Jj1. WestskJe Knuckleheadz 2. Big Bakers 3. Warriors 4. Pawn Starz 5. Denatured DNA30 30 30 30 30
V 1 2 3 4 6toman's Gold . Bomb Squad . ICHIBIAN LO.G. Stir it Up) ThaTrfxWoman' Purpla 30 2-1 1-1 0-2 0-21. Retrovision Wonder 2. Fleming Flames 3. Tar Heals 4. Cheese Nips 6. Shootsrs30 SO 2-1 1-1 0-2
Men's soccer program
welcomes new head coach
O'Neill stands ready to
Co-Rac
1. Fearless
2. Knuckleheadz
3. ChexMix
4. East Side
5. The Dream
Sorority
30
20
2-1
1-1
0-2
1. CM Omega
2. Alpha Omicron Pi
3. Zeta Tau Alpha
4. Alpha Phi
5. Alpha Delta Pi
3-0
2-1
2-2
1-2
0-3
Compiled by Patrick Daniel. Coordinator of Intramural Sports
Mandv Reutter
staff writer
Pirate's soccer began spring season
practice on Tuesday afternoon under
the leadership of new head coach,
Devin O'Neill.
O'Neill takes over for Will Wiberg
who resigned his position after the
1998 fall season. Out of approximate-
ly 70 applicants, O'Neill was chosen
for his competitive attitude and suc-
cessful history with three previous
collegiate programs.
"In the short-run our first priority
is to be a great defensive team said
O'Neill. "Long-term goals are a con-
ference championship and an estab-
lished name in the region
Biography:
Name:Devin O'Neill Head men's soccer coath
Position:
Age:29
Years Coaching:5 12 :�� 7 �
Hometown:West Springfield, Mass.
Formal Education:Masters from Springfield (Mass.) College
Bachelor's from Middlebury (Vt.) College
Source: ECU Sports Information Department
ECU is
O'Neill's first
head coaching
position. Prior
to arrival at
Greenville,
O'Neill served
as assistant
coach at Ohio
State, Fresno
State and
Lafayette
College (Pa.). Success first began in
O'Neill's introductory coaching posi-
tion. He helped lead the Lafayette
Leopards to back-to-back Patriot
League championships, with a Sweet
16 appearance at the NCAA
Tournament in 1995. While at Fresno
State, the Bulldogs were 19 WAC
champions and even went as far as to
reach the quarterfinals of the NCAA
Tournament. His influence at Ohio
State helped to guide the Buckeyes
to a 1997 berth in the Big 10
Conference in addition to the league
semifinals last season.
Positive results are something that
the Pirates are looking forward to
achieving. Men's soccer over the past
four years has played for an overall
record of 19-56-2 (.253). CAA statis-
tics report that in these same four
years, ECU has won only four games
and has lost 28, and three of their past
four seasons have been spent in ninth
respect they feel they deserve from
their opponents, and are willing to
work hard for it.
Pirates feel resentful
after Monday night
Men's basketball blitzed
in final road game
Eric Couch
senior writer
The last time ECU went to Virginia
to face the division leader, they
returned having upset their oppo-
nent. Not this time.
CAA leader George Mason top-
pled the Pirates' plans Monday
night as ECU lost 87-68. This loss
dropped ECU to a record of 12-12
and 6-8 in the conference.
GMU had two different players
scoring 20 points and four players in
double digits. Avery Carey of GMU
set his season high with 20 points
and forward George Evans also
tacked on his own 20. GMU set a
school record with 11 CAA wins and
clinched a share of the CAA regular
season tide.
The Patriots were on fire all
night and answered everything that
the Pirates offered. The Pirates'
leading scorer had a very tough
night as GMU was able to hold
Evaidas Joeys to five points 2-12
from the floor.
"Joeys had a rough night, which
we thought he probably would at
some point in the season head
coach Joe Dooley said. "He has
been playing so well all year that at
some point you have to figure he's
probably going to have a tough
game
According to Dooley, the story of
the game was missed opportunities
and turnovers. While the Patriots
were out-rebounding the Pirates
41-29 they also forced 20 turnovers.
"We had opportunities to get
back into it Dooley said. "We
climbed back within 10 late in the
game, but we didn't score
One bright spot for the Pirates
Monday night was the shooting
behind the three-point arc. As a
team, ECU nailed 10 three-point
baskets. Brandon Hawkins scored
15 points while going 5-7 from
behind the three-point line.
Garrett Black welder scored 17
points to lead ECU in scoring, and
Quincy Hall added 12 points.
"Our focus right now is to finish
out our last two home games with
two wins Biackwelder said to the
media on Monday.
On Saturday, arch rival UNC-
Wilmington will come to Minges
Coliseum. The Pirates will be look-
ing for revenge for the January loss
in Wilmington. The tip-off is set for
7 p.m.
I.
Tennis teams off to strong beginning
Freshmen back up core
of women's programs
Morgan Hefner
staff writer
The Pirates' new head coach Tom
Morris, who is bringing his tennis
background to both squads, is addi-
tionally bringing nothing but victo-
ries during the young tennis sea-
son.
After a successful career at
Atlantic Christian, Tom Morris
coached at Barton College for eight
years before joining the Pirates.
Returning only two players from
last year's squad, the Lady Pirates
are packed with young talent this
year, having six freshman on the
team. This season will depend on
how well the older players can
bring the team together and incor-
porate the younger team members.
The Lady Pirates are looking to
improve their finish last year of
sixth in the CAA Championship.
"This year will be a rebuilding
season in many ways, although I
expect it to be a solid year Morris
said. "I believe we will lay a solid
foundation for the future with the
hard work and commitment I have
seen in this team so far.
"We had a productive fall sea-

i ��a�
son, both in terms of winning per-
centages and in improvement and
we are looking to improve this
spring
In five straight set singles wins
the Lady Pirates blanked an over-
matched UNC- Asheville squad.
"The team played very well
today said Brian Jackson, assis-
tant coach, after the match. " This
is a good way to start the season
The Lady Pirates faced Barton
College next, and again, shut them
out 9-0. A freshman doubles com-
bination of Mary Elaine Knox and
Stacie Sasser won a hard fought
victory over the team of Griffin and
Almond, 9-7.
"We played very well today in
both individual and doubles
matches Morris said. "The hard
work that this team has put into
practices is beginning to show up
in matches. Our freshman are play-
ing solid tennis and we are looking
forward to our next matches
An important team leader is
Catherine Morgan, the only senior
on the team. She finished the fall
season with an unprecedented 9-1
record, which increased her mental
toughness for this season and made
her tougher than ever to beat
Another upperclassmen in the
top of the lineup is Asa Ellbring, a
junior transfer from Augusta State.
She is currently recovering from
injuries, but is expected to be a
force for the Lady Pirates.
The rest of the Lady's team is
comprised of six freshman:
Meredith Spears, Andrea Terrill,
"I'm looking forward to see
how the Pirates do against
teams in the CAA, but I'm
most excited about the matches
against NC State
Tim McMichaels
Sophomore and Tennis Enthusiast
Mary Elaine Knox, Hrushida
Kamthe, Stacie Sasser and Carolina
Torres. Spears dropped only one
match in the fall season and will
find herself doing damage in the
middle of the lineup. Additional
depth will be added by the others
as they get more experience.
The Pirates will take the courts
again on Feb. 20 to face Mt. Olive.
ECU's men's team is on the
same winning track. Hosting its
first dual match of the season the
men won over UNC-Asheviile, 4-0.
The doubles team of Derek Slate
and Dustin Hall shut down the
Bulldog team of Grimm and
Molina, 8-0. Strong play continued
into singles where the Pirates
dropped only one set.
"This was a good win for us.
The guys fought hard and played
well, considering it was their first
match of the season Morris said.
"This team shows tremendous
ability and talent. We are looking
forward to an exciting season
The '99 Pirates look to improve
their 10-10 record and a sixth place
finish in the CAA
At the top of the lineup the
Pirate's have a weapon that has
beaten nationally ranked players.
That weapon is Roope Kalajo.
Other seniors include Kenny
Kirby, Stephan Siebenbrunner and
Derek Slate. Kirby boasts the best
record on the team and Slate is
changing his baseline game to
servc-and-volley to improve his
doubles skills.
The Pirates play eight home
matches this season with two CAA
matches at home which will give
the Pirates a much needed advan-
tage.
"I'm looking forward to sec how
the Pirates do against teams in the
CAA, but I'm most excited about
the matches against NC State
said Tim McMichaels, sophomore
and tennis enthusiast.
The Pirates will face Barton
College in their next match. Coach
Morris is looking forward to playing
Barton and said that it should not
be as tough as last year.





The Etit Carolinian
tf
lass.) College (Vt.) College

he Tarheels
k hard.
told us to
den you come
y to rock 'n'
"We have to
ites with the
ball game
d now stands
ay their home
Field Feb. 20
ersity.
ch
mething that
g forward to
over the past
or an overall
. CAA statis-
ie same four
ly four games
s of their past
pent in ninth
deserve from
re willing to
ng
win for us.
I and played
as their first
Morris said,
tremendous
are looking
season
t to improve
a sixth place
lineup the
on that has
ted players,
ape Kalajo.
ide Kenny
brunner and
ists the best
ind Slate is
e game to
mprove his
sight home
th two CAA
:h will give
:ded advan-
I to see how
earns in the
cited about
MC State
sophomore
ace Barton
itch. Coach
d to playing
should not
1 Thundiy, February 18, 1999
sports
Tkt Eiit C�roliniM
A Cut Above
Tanning Salon
� Be a gold Member
�Walk-ins Welcome
�Next door to A Cut
Above Hair Salon
�NewAC
� Student, Discounts
� Memberships
� MontWy Unlimited
Special
� Wolf Beds - new bulbs
Mon-Sat 8-9
Sun 1-6
hours may vary
3197 E. 10th Street, Suite A Greenville, NC 27858 (919) 830-0485
Bring in this ad
for a free visit
One per Customer
Sports information director
retires with 31 years service
presents
Purple Pride & Golden Arches
Cheeseburgers
Large
the
piRA
te experience
(there is a little RA in all of us)
Medium
$2.22
EC(J Vfre MeoJ
Available at Greenville 10th Street McDonalds Only
University Housing Services is now
accepting applications for
1999-2000
Resident Advisor positions
As compensation, RAs receive a free single room, a 9 meal
advantage account and a $10S stipend per semester. The
position is considered a scholarship worth a cumulative
total of approximately $4500. Please keep in mind
that in order to be considered for the position you must
meet the following qualifications:
Be at least a second semester freshman at the time of application
Have a clear judicial record with OHSDean of Students office
Have a least a 2.5 overall grade point average
Applications can be picked up at a
Coordinator's office or at 100 Jones HalL
The deadline for applying is March 5th
DAVIDSON, N.C. (AP) Emil
Parker, sports information director
at Davidson for the past 31 years,
has announced his retirement
effective June 30.
It's estimated that Parker has
covered more than 800 Davidson
basketball games, including five of
the school's six appearances in the
NCAA tournament and all three
outings in the National Invitation
Tournament He saw a stretch of
309 games in a row between 1979
and 1991, covering the Wildcats in
30 states, Puerto Rico and
Bermuda.
Parker saw 308 Wildcat football
games, including a streak of 204 in
a row between 1969 and 1989.
A 1962 graduate of Lcnoir-
Rhyne College, Parker worked at
that school's department of public
relations, and was sports publicity
director for four yean. Parker also
worked as a sportswriter at The
Charlotte Observer, the Statesville
Record & Landmark and the
Hickory Daily Record.
While not involved in day-to-
day operations, Parker will become
the school's sports archivist and
continue part-time on history and
statistical projects and help with
the transition process. He will also
be involved with a World War II
book project and research.
Rick Bender, Parker's assistant,
will become interim sports informa-
tion director through the end of the
current school year.
HAVE SOMETHING
TO SAY?
NOW IS THE TIME TO SAY
WHAT'S ON YOUR MIND.
THE DEPARTMENT FOR
DISABILITY SUPPORT
SERVICES WILL BE HOLDING
A FORUM FOR ALL PERSONS
WHO WOULD LIKE TO SHARE
THEIR THOUGHTS ON
DISABILITY RELATED TOPICS
AND SUPPORT SERVICESI
COME JOIN US AT
MENDENHALL STUDENT
CENTER IN ROOM 221ON
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25
FROM 3:30 UNTIL 5:00PM.






Sports
Writers
Needed afc
� Must have excellent grammar & editing skills
� Apply at the second floor of Student
Publications Building or call 328-6366
Laser Removal
of Tattoos
$99
per session
H Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, PA
HouMnt C. Dmukiny r. M.D F.A.C.S.
BoirJ Crrlifinl I'lialic Sujjiwi
mifw.tidniiikiilsxoni
752-1406
"Choose a board certified plastic surgeon
Mark A.Ward
ATTORNEY AT
� DWI, Traffic, and Felony Defense
� Assistant Public Defender 1988-1993
�Private practice since June 1993
? Has Represented Thousands of Individuals
in District and Superior Criminal Courts
� Member - Pitt County Criminal Defense Bar
� ECU Class of '84, Campbell Law Class of "87
� 24 hour message service
� Visa and Mastercard welcome
752-7529
OKCCC3
WCW World Heavy Weight Championship Match
V!
&v$
Sunday at 7:30
COME EARLY
1 14 East Fifth Street
Call for bw-3
Express Delivery
758-9191
A special Lunch
OFFER FOR YOU!
$1.00 OFF
Lunch
Here's a special hinch otter just for you! Bring in this certificate
and receive SI off any food and soft drink purchase of $5 or more
(does not include alooholO. Not valid with any other coupon offer.
Not vaBd on Tuesday's. One oer person, per visit Certificate
expire. April, 15 1999
expires April, lb IW)
bw-3
EARN $$$
You can earn money while contributing to the future of medicine. We need
healthy individuals to participate in medically-supervised research studies to help
evaluate new medications. YOU may be eligible. You have to meet certain criteria
to qualify for a study, including our free medical exam and screening tests.
See below for our current study opportunities.
if yrui qualify or for more information about these and other
PPD PHARMACO
I-800-PPD-CRU2 (1-800-773-2782)
Visit oui websitr for more study info.
Current Study Opportunities
132
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COMt'LNSAIION
Upto$l200
RFQUIREMINIS
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w mfld to moderate Ngh Wood pressure
18-65
137
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in mi
377 4H
Up to $2500 KXFTHn8
145
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312 314
31� 311
Up to $800
Healthy, Nonrnolong
Males & Females
Ages 18-40
134 G
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Upto$l800
Healthy, Non-snxOdng Females
Ages 18-48
354
Admit: Discharge:
39 41
Upto$5000 g�70
PPD PHARMACO Conducting clinical studies since 1983
il RTP - Clinics n- rtp.ppdi.com
MANUFACTURERS'
TRIPLE COUPONS!
LIMIT 61 FOUR DAYS ONLY!
Wednesday, Thursday, Friday And Saturday, February 17th-20th!
tap �, OS�i
� Coupons up to wKare Tripled. � Over 50 are face value.
� One coupon per item purchased. � Limit 6 Tripled Coupons.
Limit one manufacturers' coupon for any particular item. Items must be t
purchased in sizes specified on coupon. This offer applies only to Manufacutrers
Cents Off coupons for items sold at Winn-Dixie and not to FREE or tobacco
product coupons. Coupon value cannot exceed the price of the item.
r
Marketplace gS
French
Bread
Bakery Fresh
98
c
Pepsi, Dt. Pepsi,
Or Mt. Dew
2 liter bottles
88�
Superbrand
Ice Cream
12 gal. ctn.
2s3
Prices good Wednesday, Feb. 17, thru
Tuesday Feb. 23,1999. Effective In
m0 m Our Greenville Location Only!
�Copyright 1999. Winn-Dixie Raleigh. Iruj. Quantity Rights Reserved, www.winndixie.com
13 Thurfdiy, I
WALK TO E
$285month.
wood Apts 1
vide - 5 block
6596.
BEECH STRE
room, two bat
campus, with
refrigerator, ;
Wainright Pi
LLC 756-6209
GLADIOLUS
and three bed
cable. Locate)
Wainright Pi
LLC 756-6209
DUPLEX. 2
pump, private
pus. no pets
or 356-7799.
FOR RENT: 1
$275.00 per n
er. range, refr
1921 ask for K
PINEBROOK
BRs available,
eluded. Redui
ber, Deceml
tenance, mai
line. 9-12 mon
758-4015
CANNON CO
12 bath town
refrigerator, dii
er hook-up, or
Wainright Pn
LLC, 756-6209
106 STANCH
1 bathroom,
heatair, near
pets extra witr
756-2766.
NAGS HEAD,
gether early. R
excellent cone
washer & dryt
AC; available
gust 31; slec
month. 757-85
WESLEY COT
off deposit: 2
free waters
hook-ups, 6 I
Available now
LANGSTON
$100 off depo
apt. free wate
es. washerd
900 sq.ft. Ava
758-1921.
RINGGO
Now Tak
1 bedroon
Efficient;
CALL
FEMALE ROC
share a 3 bed
$125 month r
Lease until Au
ROOMMATE
room. 1-12 t
furnished. C
$235month
Please call 321
of 10a.m.and (
ROOMMATE
male. Available
Estates, in wal
pus. 2 bedrc
kitchen, and
$265mo.
Chris at 752-16
FEMALE ROC
share 2 bedroc
merit 2 block
$255. Washer,
cable. 12 utilil
able at end of
plans now. Cal
ONE BLOCK 1
roommate nee
$130 month p
1467.
FEMALE ROC
share 3 bedroi
ECU bus route
washer and dn
FOR






IS!
If!
fth-20th!
mmml
I
n
value.
iupons.
list be
jfacutrers'
tobacco
'lflW�
few
�Wjyjt
Pepsi,
Dew
ittles
P
:Reg.
anks
1 Length Or
9
VISA
.id
'inndixie.com
i
13 Thursday. February 18, 1988
FOR RENT
WALK TO ECU 1 bedroom apt.
$285mortth. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apts 126 Avery St. in Green-
ville - 5 blocks from campus. 758-
6596.
BEECH STREET Villas - Three bed-
room, two bath apartments, close to
campus, with laundry room, stove,
refrigerator, and dishwasher. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC 756-6209.
GLADIOLUS GARDENS One. two.
and three bedroom apartments. Free
cable. Located on 10th Street. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC 756-6209.
DUPLEX, 2 BDR, 1 Bath, heat
pump, private drive, close to cam-
pus, no pets please. Call 756-8444
or 355-7799.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom, 1 bath apt.
$275.00 per month, free watersew-
er, range, refrig. pets OK. Call 758-
1921 ask for Ken.
PINEBROOK APARTMENTS. 1-2
BRs available, water, sewer, cable in-
cluded. Reduced Deposits Novem-
ber. December. On-site main-
tenance, management, ECU bus
line. 9-12 month lease, pets allowed.
758-4016
CANNON COURT Two bedroom, 1
12 bath townhouse. Includes stove,
refrigerator, dishwasher, washerdry-
er hook-up, on ECU bus route. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC, 756-6209.
106 STANCILL DRIVE, 2 bedroom,
1 bathroom, brick duplex, central
heatair, near ECU. $425 month,
pets extra with fee. Call 353-2717 or
756-2766.
NAGS HEAD, NC-Get your group to-
gether early. Relatively new house in
excellent condition; fully furnished;
washer & dryer; dishwasher; central
AC; available May 1 through Au-
gust 31; sleeps 8-$2200.00 per
month. 757-850-1532
WESLEY COMMONS South: $100
off deposit: 2 bedroom, 1 bath apt.
free watersewer, washerdryer
hook-ups, 6 blocks from campus.
Available now $440. Call 758-1921.
LANGSTON PARK Apartments:
$100 off deposit: 2 bedroom. 1 bath
apt. free watersewer, all applianc-
es, washerdryer hook-ups. over
900 sq.ft. Available now $425. Call
758-1921.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share a 3 bedroom apartment. Pay
$125 month rent and 14 utilities.
Lease until August. Call 329-1493.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for 2 bed-
room, 1-12 bath townhouse. Fully
furnished. Close to campus.
$235month plus half utilities.
Please call 321-7762 between hours
of 10a.m.and 6p.m.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. Malefe-
male. Available March 1st! Tar River
Estates, in walking distance to cam-
pus. 2 bedrooms. 2 bathrooms,
kitchen, and living room. Rent
$265mo. 12 utilities. Ask for
Chris at 752-1621 or leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom apart-
ment 2 blocks from school. Rent
$255. Washerdryer included. 12
cable. 12 utilities, 12 phone. Avail-
able at end of this semester. Make
plans now. Call Emily, 329-0886.
ONE BLOCK from campus. Female
roommate needed. Must like dogs.
$130 month plus 14 utilities. 757-
1467.
JL
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 3 bedroom, 2 bath house on
ECU bus route. Rent $220. includes
washer and dryer. 329-0471
ROOMMATE WANTED
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE
Needed to share apt. close to cam-
pus, student preferred. Must be re-
sponsible & clean & like pets. Total
expenses per month will not exceed
$270. 762-0009.
MF ROOMMATE needed to share
3 bedroom house one block from
campus. Must not mind smokers.
Rent $190 plus 13 util cable. Call
Katie 931-0348.
FOR SALE
AAAI SPRING Break Bahamas Par-
ty Cruise! 5 nights $2791 Includes
meals & parties! Awesome beaches,
nightlife! Departs from Floridal Can-
cun & Jamaica $399! springbreak-
travel.com 1-800-678-6386
1988 HONDA Prelude SI, 124.600
miles. 5-speed, sunroof, very de-
pendable. $3700 or best offer, 757-
1949.
'94 YAMAHA XT600 DualSport.
5,000 miles, excellent bike. $2,000
OBO. Call 353-8958.
1990 GEO Storm for sale by owner.
90.000 miles, in good condition.
Asking $2700 or best offer. Call Lau-
ren at 830-3803 if interested.
NEED A printer? 1995 Apple Style-
writer II, in excellent condition! Will
sell for only $100. Also. 1992 Macin-
tosh monitor (no harddrive). sell for
$60. Call, leave message 329-0390.
FOR SALE: Ferret with cage and
amenities. Call 353-5974. $200.
SNOW BOARD, 157cm, Matt Cum-
mins Burton Bindings, excellent con-
dition, only ridden eight times. Paid
over $300 new. $200 OBO. Call 757-
2859, leave message.
LAPTOP COMPUTERTOSHIBA
Satellite Pro 435CDS. Equipped with
hard drive and CD-ROM. Best offer
and it's yours. Call 758-9640.
AAAI Spring Break Panama City
$129! Boardwalk room with kitchen
near clubs! 7 parties-free drinks!
Daytona $149! South Beach $129!
Cocoa Beach $149! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
CUSTOM PRINTED T-shirts. Profes-
sion printers since 1981. Competitive
rates. Free shipping. Full art depart-
ment. We accept digital files in most
formats. 800-272-2066 culture-
works .com
SERVICES
STUDENT DISCOUNT for auto de-
tailing. Don't like to clean your car?
Let us do it. Professional and ex-
perienced. Pick up avail. Call Tim
for prices at 931-9165.
DJ. FOR HIRE
NYC D.J. READY TO
HYPE UP YOUR PARTY
For all functions & campus
organizations
Call J.Arthur @ 252-412-0971
SYLVAN LEARNING Center is seek-
ing a Spanish and high level Math
tutor. We are looking for a reliable
person who is available MonThurs.
2-7:30. Please apply at 2428 S. Cha-
rles Blvd.
HELP WANTED
STUDENT PHOTOGRAPHER want-
ed for wedding. Experience required,
professional photographer is not
necessary. Please call 752-0596,
leave message.
EARN GOOD money and learn at
the same time with an internship in
the financial services industry. Fax
your resume to Jeff Mahonay at 355-
7980 or call 365-7700.
FOR YOUR MAN'S VALENTINE GIFT!
GIVE QUALITY, CLASS. STYLE
i
CHECK OUTOUKBBSI
STOKE WIDE SALE

Tommy, Nautica, Polo -ALL THE BEST!
Shirts, Pants, Jeans, Shoes, Etc.
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
OtBmSt eqtmiami 7523X6
ruMfyttrayftSitinty O00-5O0

classifieds
Tht EM Carolinian
HELP WANTED
CRUISE SHIP Employment - work-
ers earn up to $2000-)- month (w
tips & benefits). World Travel! Land-
Tour jobs up to $5,000 -$7,000
summer. Ask us how! 517-336-4235
Ext.C53623
LOOKING FOR a part-time job?
Help wanted at Szechuan Express, in
the Food Court in the Plaza Mall.
Day hours from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m
night hours from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Apply in person. No phone calls,
please.
GIVE US TIME
TO REPAY
YOUR LOAN.
After just three years in
the Army, your college loan
could be a thing of the past.
Under the Army's Loan
Repayment program, each
year you serve on active
duty reduces your indebt-
edness by one-third or
$1,500, whichever amount
is greater, up to a $65,000
limit.
This offer applies to
Perkins Loans, Stafford
Loans and certain other
federally insured loans
which, are not in default
And this is just the first of
many benefits the Army
will give you. Get the
whole story from your
Army Recruiter.
.252-7569695
ARMY.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE:
www.goarmy.com
FRATERNITIES, SORORITIES &
Student Groups: Earn $1000-$2000
with easy 3 hour CIS Fund Raiser
event. No sales required. Fund
Raiser days are filling up. so call
today. Contact Chris 800-829-4777.
Part-TimeJobs
Earn Money And
Resume' Experience
Working For
ONLINE
COLLECTIONS
Earn Up T(
8
oo
Per
Hour
Mon-Frl S to 9 p.m.
Sat. 8 a.m. to Noon
ONLINE Collections is
looking for the 5 most
aggressive people on
ECU'S campus to work as
telephone collectors. The
perfect part-time job.
Excellent pay. Ourgrads
get hired based on their
experience working for
us. We also have a few
day slots open if you
have full mornings or
afternoons to work.
Contact Brian Franey at
757-2130.
NoteTakers Wanted
$200-$1500class!
Post your lecture notes on the Internet
SICN It' ON-LINE �
www.STUDY24-7.com
NEED SUMMER help at Hatteras
Beach. Free housing. Need two
males or females for retail seafood
market. Bonus offered. Call 252-986-
2216 or e-mail riskyb0interpath.com
TRUGREEN CHEMLAWN, nation's
leader in lawncare, is looking for in-
dividuals interested in part-time cler-
ical work from 5-9 MonFri. $6-$7
an hour. Call 756-2352 for interview.
1999 INTERNSHIPS! Don't get a
summer job Run a summer busi-
ness. www.tuitionpainters.com. tui-
paintGbellsouth.net or 800-393-
4521.
$7.00 PER hour plus $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina. (Nags Head). Call
Dona for application and housing
info 800-662-2122.
HELP WANTED
WILLING TO trade free horseback
riding for occasional stable help.
Must have previous experience with
horses. Call 756-5784 after 6 p.m.
DELIVERYSALES HELP needed.
Apply in person at Mattress Plus,
606 E. Arlington Blvd. No phone
calls please.
POOL MANAGERS and Lifeguards
with great people skills needed for
the summer of 1999 in the Triangle
area. Additional offices in the Balti-
more, Richmond, Philadelphia. DC,
Atlanta. NJ, and Nashville areas.
Please contact Lisa at 919-878-3661.
OTHER
SPRINGBREAK BEACHES Dayto-
na, Panama City. Padre, Miami, Can-
cun, Jamaica. Bahamas, etc. All the
popular hot spots. Best hotels, pric-
es, parties. Browse www.icpt.com.
Reps earn cash, free trips. Call Inter-
Campus 800-327-6013
SUBLEASE: 1 bedroom. 2 blocks
from campus on Summit St.
$350month. Pets okay with fee. If
interested, call Stacey or Greg at
752-7967.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION: Thurs-
day 11 a.m12:00 noon. The Center
for Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering this workshop on
Thursday, Feb. 18th. If you are inter-
ested in this workshop, please con-
tact the Center at 328-6661.
THE BRYAN Adrian Basketball
Camp Registration is now open for
The 21st Annual Bryan Adrian Sum-
mer Basketball Camp. Boys and girls
ages 5-19 are eligible. Locations in-
clude: Hickory. NC: Rocky Mount.
NC; Charlotte, NC; Greensboro. NC;
Elkin. NC and Raleigh, NC. Included
on the camp staff are: Jerry Stack-
house(Pro). Antawn Jamison(Pro).
Vince Carter(Pro). and Steve Wo-
jeiechowski(Pro). For a free brochure
call 704-372-3236 anytime.
GAMMA BETA Phi will meet at 5
p.m. Thurs. Feb. 19th in the social
room at Mendenhall Student Center.
STRESS MANAGEMENT Work-
shop: Wednesday 3:30-4:30. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering this work-
shop on Wednesday. Feb. 24th. If
you are interested in this program,
contact the Center at 328-6661.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
EAST CAROLINA University's
twenty-ninth annual Speech Lan-
guage and Hearing Symposium will
be held at Rock Springs Equestrian
Center and Jockey Club on February
18th and 19th. The symposium is
sponsored by East Carolina Universi-
ty Chapter of the National Student
Speech Language Hearing Associa-
tion in cooperation with ECU Dept.
of Communication Sciences and Dis-
orders and Eastern Area Health Edu-
cation Center (AHEC). Guest speak-
ers include Carol Flexer, Ph.D. and
Jean Blosser, Ed.D both professors
from University of Akron, Ohio. Dr.
Flexer will be presenting on 'Man-
agement of Infants and Children
with Hearing Loss" on Thursday from
8:45a.m5p.m. Dr. Blosser will be
discussing "Expanding Service Deliv-
ery Options to Achieve Treatment
Outcomes" on Friday from 8a.m
12noon. Anyone interested in at-
tending may contact the department
at 328-4405.
"DONT LET the Flame Burn Out"
Wed. Feb. 24, 4 p.m. Mendenhall
Student Center Underground. Learn
how to stay motivated through a
long semester. Also learn how to
keep an apathetic group from keep-
ing you down. Keep the flame burn-
ing
PASTOR JAMES D. Corbett of
Community Christian Church will be
ministering at an OASIS (Older Ac-
tive Saints In Service) Fellowship on
Sat Feb. 20th at 1 p.m. This fellow-
ship is designed to minister to adults
50 years old and older, teaching
how to maintain a victorious Chris-
tian life and remain active in their
service for the Lord and will be held
at Community Christian Academy,
2009 Pactolus Road in Greenville,
Refreshments and socializing will be
available. For info, call 551-9143.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop; Thursday 3:30-5PM The
Center for Counseling and Student (
Development is offering this work- f
shop on Thursday. February 18th
and Thursday, the 25th. If you are in-
terested in this program, contact the
center at 328-6661
BECOMING A Successful Student-
Note-Taking: Tuesday 3:30-4:30. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop on Tuesday the 23rd.
If you are interested in this work-
shop, contact the center at 328-
6661.
BECOMING A Successful Student
Note-Time Management: Monday
3:30-4:30. The Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development is of-
fering the following workshop on
Monday. Feb. 22nd. If you are inter-
ested in this workshop, contact the
center at 328-6661.
FEBRUARY CONTRA Dance! Willis
Bldg 1st and Reade Sts. Live music
by Old-Time String Band: Elderberry
Jam. Caller: Art Langrish. Free less-
ons 7-7:30 p.m Dance 7:30-10:30
p.m Sat Feb. 20. Students $3.00.
public $5-6. Come alone or bring a
friend. ECU Folk and Country Danc-
ers, 3280237.
4-ON-4 Volleyball entry deadline -
Tue. Feb. 16. 5p.m. 9 the Student
Recreation Center main office, room
128
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING:
Tuesday 11am12noon.The Center
for Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering this workshop on
Tuesday, Feb. 23rd. If you are inter-
ested in this workshop, please con-
tact the Center at 328-6661.
wifflm
caneun-JarnaioBaharnas
w $in $s?
n
SPRINGBREAK
i - -4�v
ho�mihi HHns or fst drinks
Jamaica Cancun Florida
South Padre Bahamas Barbados
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7 Mghtt � Air. HoM � free food & 30 Mrs of Drinks
Spring Break Travcl-Our 12th Year!
1-800-678-6386
Attention
Honors Students
The following Honors Students need to
report to the Honors Program ASAP:
(GCB 2026, 8-5 , M-F)
1) Those graduating in May with either
General Education or University Honors.
2) Recipients of Undergraduate Research
Assistantships.
L





v&txmgnm-m
It's written in the stars
Everyone wins with campus living!
ite s
m
HI
c
O
o
T

Take advantage of your chance to reserve a room in
the residence halls and a meal plan for next year
during Return to Campus Living Sign-Up.
Be sure to bring your sealed Cash on the Spot game
card with you to Return to Campus Living Sign-Up
for your chance to win cash on the spot. Everyone
walks away a winner with campus living!
Plus, you'll be entered in the 1999-2000 reach
for the stars Campus Living Sweepstakes.
Return to Campus Living Sign-Up,
going on now, February 15-19
10:00 a.m6:oo p.m
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RESIDENTS WHO SICN-UP FOR 1999-2000
ARE ELIGIBLE TO WIN. SEE RULES AT SITE FOR MORE DETAILS.
UNIVERSITY HOUSING AND CAMPUS DINING SERVICES
TELEPHONE: ECU-HOME: ECU-FOOD
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I





CO
'Arts & Entertainment Magazine of The East Carolinian
Thursday, February 18,1999
D. Miccah Smith
Fountainhead Editor
High on a desert plain littered with scrap
metal, bones and broken glass, a figure hunches
against a biting wind. Weaponless, she's locked in
combat with a tall, muscular man whose face is
shielded behind a protective mask. Without a word he
lunges at her, drawing a sword from a scabbard on his
belt.
Her only hope for survival is in the roll of the dice.
Welcome to the world of modern role-playing. No
longer the pastime of black-dad teenagers whose
trademarks were bad grades and worried parents,
role-playing has exploded into a creative, lucrative
industry that gives ordinary people with imaginations
the chance to have extraordinary adventures.
Games can be played anywhere, at any time, and with-
out the aid of any technology more advanced than the
common pencil. All players need is a designated
"game master" ("GM" for short), a book of rules and
suggestions for the game they're playing, some dice,
pencils and paper.
One of the most popular role-playing styles is called
"table-top gaming Players rely on books to guide the
creation of characters who have unique strengths,
weaknesses and personalities. The "GM" narrates a
scenario of his or her own creation, complete with pit-
falls and battle sequences, and the players, who are
See Role, continued on page 7
Role-Playing
In the world of fantasy, anything can happen
Trinket: a cheap,
badly made hem
CD Review
"Shakespeare
in Love
dream on
Movie Review
Everybody
knows some guy
who's got this
poster in
his room
Video Review
TheCassatt
String Quartet
makes beautiful
music tonight
wvdrkffdz
fountainhead � 2nd Floor Student Publications Building Greenville, NC 27858 � Phone 328-6366 � Fax 328-6558 � Advertising 328-2000 � www.foumainhead.ecu.edu





Ryan Kennemur
Senior Writer
Trinket
A lot of people have come to me and
asked why I always review CDs that
rate highly on the Ryan Scale. The
answer isI dorft know. Thus, 1 have
decided to appease the masses and
review a CD that I feel has no bear-
ing on American society.or even
Ethiopian society.
Trinket is a Georgia band that is the
self- proclaimed "classic rock band
for the 21st centuryTTo teD you the
truth, an ideal that Trinket's promo-
tional team obviously isn't too fond
of, this disk has nothing close to clas-
sic rock about it. How could it be,
saeing as they describe themselves
as a mixture of U2 and Jane's
Addiction, which is like mixing acids
and basesonly this time, there's no
explosion. Just a bunch of loud gui-
tars (with cheesy effects) and trite
lyrics.
The opening tradtUnbehaved is
not so bad, save for a few little whiny
vocals. The chorus sounds pretty
cool, until you sit down and read the
ryricsWait for the change in the
unafraidWhat comes next from the
unbehaved
I've really tried to find a deeper
message, but the latter sentence
totally throws off any chance of that
The next songBruised Violet Days
though it uses a Beatles chord, is the
beginning of the end. It starts with a
Hole-ish riff that leads to nowhere,
prompting the vocals to come in and
kill the song even more with micro-
phone effects a la Cher's new song.
The next few songs sound like they
are trying desperately to be the late-
great Refreshments, especially the
songThrowaway Culture which I
kind of like for that reason. But the
lyric, which coincidentally is the
band's staple lyric on their press
release, "And I won't apologize that I
can't be defined is just bothersome
to me. Ml give you a definition, guys.
"Good which is defined in the Ryan
dictionary as "not your music"
The remainder of the disk is pretty
crummy as well. There are a couple
of bright nickers along the way, such
as hard-to-detest "Burgundy Shine
an acoustic, harmony-driven ballad
that sounds like it would be more
suitable for a Third Eye Blind album.
This is pure teen-pop, and it was a
good idea for them to include it on
the album. Someone may actually
buy it, now.
And the song"Haunt Pallenberg
which refers to Keith Richards'flame
Anha PaDenberg, is one of the best
Oasis songs that they never wrote.
Soaring guitars and background
Rolling Stoney "hoo-hoos" make it a
fairly interesting listen. Thissong
alone accounts for two points on the
Ryan Scale.
Just for the record,Trinket isn't horri-
ble, just a little half-baked. They just
need to consider musk and figure
out which direction they want to go
with it So far, the half-rock and half
teen-beat just doesn't work. And you
know something's up when one of
the best things the press release says
about the band isTheir lyrics are
delivered with startling darityf' If I
were Trinket, on the next album, I'd
be vying for something more like,
Their musk is good
Amy LRoyster Editor in Chief
Amanda G. Austin Managing Editor
Miccah Smith Editor
Caleb Rose Assistant Editor
SttptanitWMockO
RussBbckhiniljywil
Janet Respess AnwIttMf MMtQV
Bobby Tuggle
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MferiH Buttnj. ECU. Batfk, 2M8M383 f� i��
OI8B 328 6386
2 Trursday, February 18.1999
Video Review
Kubridds horror masterpiece is a
Patrick McMahon
StagVratr
The Shining
From the demented and enigmatic
mind of director Stanley Kubrick
comes the warped and cinematic
filmThe ShiningTThe combina-
tion of Jack N icholson's acting and
Kubrick's direction hit me like a
glancing blow to the groin. You
think at first that it didnt really do
anything, but after a brief moment
it drops you to your knees. The
movie gets at you from the very
beginning with horrendous psychk
visions from Danny and the eerie
manner in which Nkholsorfs char-
acter Jack Torrence creeps into
insanity.
Using cityscape and mountain set-
tings, me scenery awed me from the
very beginning. The quick changing
and effortless transition from day to
day and month to month work well
with the excellent script The dia-
logue, however, begins to take on an
old, stale odor, leaving the viewer in
a half laugh and a half-agitated
groan at the script's campiness.
The character of Danny was out-
standingly portrayed, even though
at times the kid's over-acting tended
to be a bit much. The scene where
the character talked with the cook
about tfie "shining" was probably
one of the calmest, yet spookiest
parts of the film.
Comic relief in the film was provid-
ed in a unique way from the charac-
ter of Wendy. As the stereotypical
ignorant, weak and powerless
Sat Sliming, continued on page 3
Its Your Place
To Experience Art In
Progress
NOW UNTIL FEBRUARY 25 IN THE
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER GALLERY.
Join artist Ann Shengold and Rudie, her spiritual
guide dog, for dreaming, questions, conversations,
silent sitting, laughing, tea. meditation, dog petting
and more as they develop a mobile art work about
soul nourishment.
Catch A Filch
FEBRUARY 18-20 AT 8:00 P.M. AND FEBRUARY
21 AT 3:00 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Urban legends (R) There's a campus killer on the
loose who's making urban legends, like the one
about eating pop rocks and soda at the same time to
make your stomach explode and the one about a psy-
cho with an axe stepping into the backseat of your
car at a gas station. You and a guest get in free
when you present your valid ECU One Card.
To JaHe A Mysterious
Journey
TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 23 AT 4 P.M. AND 7:30
P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Unlock the secrets of Peru in the Travel-Adventure
Film and Theme Dinner movie Peru-The Mysterious
Journey. Your ECU One Card gets you in free. You
can order an optional gourmet, all-u-can-eat theme
dinner for $12. but you need to order by 6pm today.
MSC Hours: MonThurs 8 a.mll p.m Fri 8
To Get Motivated
WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 24 AT 4:00 P.M. IN
THE MENDENHALL UNDERGROUND
How do you keep your motivation through a long
semester? How do you avoid burn out? Learn tech-
niques to avoid burn out and keep your motivational
flame bright.
To Catch A Ride
Need to catch a
ride for week
ends or holi-
, days? Stop
by and check
out the Ride
Rider Board at
the foot of the
stairs in the lower level of Mendenhall Student
Center.
To KnocH Em Down
Give your Monday a boost from
, 1:00-6:00 p.m. with SO cent
bowling (shoe rental included).
Turn Wednesdays and Fridays
into discount days by rolling 10
"frames for just $1 (shoe rental
included) between 1:00-6:00 p.m.
Outer Limitz Bowling Alley in Mendenhall Student
Center's basement
a.mMidnight; Sat Noon-Midnight; Sun 1-11 p.m.







The Cassatt String Quartet returns
Tin
jMrtM wi �luim migMnurt ot gUiw�r
Mohamed Hussein
Senior WWter
Tonight one of Americas most dis-
tinguished string ensembles, the
Cassatt String Quartet,will perform
in the A.J-Fletcher Recital Hall as
part of a residency at the ECU
School of Musk.
The group will be staying in
Greenville throughout the week of
Feb. 15-21 presenting master classes,
seminars and sectional rehearsals
with ECU music majors and Pitt
County Schoolsjt
This will be the ensemble's second
stay at ECU, much to the excitement
of the School of Musk.
"Ifs incredible said Carroll DashM
Jr, director of Jazz Studies in the
School of MuskThis is a great
opportunity to interchange muskal
ideas and concepts between students
andfacultyr
The ensemble, whose name is
derived from that of American
Impressionist painter Mary Cassatt,
is originally from Manhattan but has
performed extensively all over the
world. Previous performance venues
include New rks Carnegk Hall,
Paris'Theatre des Champs-Erysees
andtheMaeda Han in Tokyo. The
group has also performed on radio
stations such as WGBH, WQXR and
WNYC out of New York, as weU as
Radio France.
"The quartet is terrifk and they are
truly enjoyable to listen to said Jeff
Jarvis, chairman of the Instrumental
Department of me School of Musk
The four members of the group are
violinists Muneko Otani and Jennifer
Leshnower, vMist Mkhiko Oshima
and cellist KeneyMikkelsen.
The group has won numerous
awards including a Tangkwood
Chamber Musk Fellowship, the
Wardwell Chamber Music
Fellowship at Yale, first prizes at the
Fischoffand Cokman Chamber
Musk Ompetitions, and two top
prizes at me Banff International
Quartet Competition.
The quartet has a residency at ECU,
meaning that they come to the cam-
pus twke a year to engage in teach-
ing and performing.
"We are fortunate to have them as
residents for two years nowT Dashkn
said
Tonight's three-part performance
win feature works by Haydn,
Beethoven and Borodin.
The Cassatt Quartet has recorded for
a number of major labels such
as Phillips Classics, CRI and New
World.
"This should be a wonderful perfor-
mance said Jarvis.
Tickets can be purchased by calling
the School of Musk at 328-6851.
Shining, continued from pag 2
female protagonist, Wendy made the
film funny, something which it dear-
ly lacked. Her simpk, yet stunning
performance was absolutely out-
standing. She made the character
come alive as a ditz but she also gave
that ditz relevance. Wim her perfor-
mance, the character of the femak
"damsel in distress" was to be forev-
er changed. Her presence was
admirable.
The movkhasanke plot build-up
that is steady without being overty
fastwchoppy Jacks skwJe�nt
into psychotk behavior wrapped me
up in his madness whik at the same
time advancing the storyline with
excellent precision.
There was one part of the movk
that left me disappointed, though.
The ending was realistic yet not
dramatklne utter simptkiry and
quickness left me in a confused, sur-
realistk state of disbelief, leaving
jack alive and only the cook dead
was no fun at all Even the wife,
Wendy, was abk to get away. Where
is the fun in that? The only gore in
the movk came from Jack and
Restaurant
That's good eatin
Ryan Kennemur
Professional Eater
FineUi'sCafe
As a professional journalist, I feel
that it is my obligation to get out
there in the real world and experi-
ence things firsthand. This, in my
opinion, is the only way to be truth-
ful with the information that I am
reporting. So, you can imagine my
excitement when I found out that
my newest assignment was to
review the new Italian restaurant in
towa I grabbed a date (my girl-
friend, so V.s not like she had a
choice) and scooted on over.
When you walk into Hnelh's Cafe,
located at 2905 E. 5th Street, you get
overtaken by the aromas of an array
of spices common to most Italian
eateries. Looking around, you see
an obvfous pastel motif The dining
area is small with about 14 tables of
various sizes, so I suggest you get
there before 5 pm for dinner.
The menu is overflowing with items
that are appeasing to each of the five
senses, with the exception of hear-
ingunkss you count the crunch of
the never-ending garlk bread bas-
ket The appetizers are around $5
and indude the soup of the day (in
my case, spicy southwestern bean
soupthatwasoutof this world) and
fried calamari strips, just to name a
couple.
Findlfs is the home of the best
lasagna I have ever eaten, for a rea-
sonabk $8.75, and it comes with a
salad and aU the garlk bread you
Danny's flashbacks to the previous
caretaker's exptohs. Granted, gore is
not necessarily needed in a film to
build suspense, but a littk blood and
guts at me hand of Jack could help.
In att, the movk was ertertaining
and captivating, and only the ending
left me angry and wanting more.
Under different circumstances,
maybe the movk would not have
become a fiworite of mine but Jack
Nicholsons performance was just
too good. He pushed the movk
from mediocrity to an instant das-
can eat Other pastas include cheese
ravioli, Unguine with clam sauce,
and a special create-your-own-
pasta, which allows you to choose
one of four types of noodks and one
type of sauce for $6.95, with extra
toppings (such as grilled chicken
arid shrimp) for about $2 extra.
Also on the menu is seafood, whkh
is mainly a catch of the day, (it was
grilled Mahi-Mahi when I was
there). And if surf isn't your thing,
men you may be interested in the
turf entree, which is an 8-oz. Filet
Mignon for $14.75, a luxury that
isn't easily afforded by college kids,
but always a crowd pleaser.
If you are in the mood for some-
thing a littk lighter, FineUfs also
boasts an enormous list of sand-
wiches, from the college favorite
steak and cheese to a grilled cheese
sandwich with four types of cheeses.
These range from $5.75 to $7 JO in
price.
The service was absolutely impecca-
bk. Our waiter was fantastic. He
made us fed like we were the only
customers in the restaurant, whkh
coinckkntaUy we were, but I fed like
he would have done so anyway.
FineUfs Cafe is a welcome addition
to the Greenvilk restaurant commu-
nity. Ifyou want the taste of Villa
Roma, but without the outlandish
prices, I highly recommend it Also,
don't skip dessert The Tiramisu
was outstanding. As I said in the
beginning, the dining area is smaU
(whkh accounts for the loss of a
half-point) so get there early.
Actually, this is one reporter who
wouldn't mind the wait
answers
to Tuesday's East Carolinian Crossword
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Trusd.FebrY 18,899 3






CARMIKE
A Civil Action PG-13
Daily: 1:15. 4:05, 7:00, 9:45
Blast From The Past PG-13
Daily: 1:20,3:50, 7:00, 9:30
Message In A Bottle PG-13
Daily: 1:15,4:00, 7:00, 9:45
My Favorite Martian PG-13
Daily: 1:00,35,5:10,7:15,
9:20
Patch Adams PG-13
Daily: 1:30, 4:15, 7:00, 9:45
Payback R
Daily: 1:45,4:15,75,9-35
Saving Private Ryan R
Daily: 1:00, 4:30, 8:00
Shakespeare In Love R
Dairy: 10, 3:45, 75,9:40
She's All That PG-13
Dafly: 12:50,235, 50,75,
9:15
Simply Irresistible PG-13
Daily. 10,35,5:10,7:15,
fc20
The Prince Of Egypt PG
Daily: 12:50,2:55, S0
Varsity Blues R
Daily: 20,4:30, 7:00, 9:30
You've Got Mail PG
Daily: 75, 9:30
ojna
4
At First Sight PG-13
Daily: 70,9:45
Sat-Sun: 1:30,4:15,70,9:45
Stepmom PG-13
Daily: 75, 9:35
Sat-Sun: 1:15,40,7:05,9:35
The Thin Red Line R
Daily: 9:15
Sat-Sun: 10,4:30,8:15
Unconditional Love R
Daily: 7:00, 9:30
Sat-Sun: 1:45,4:15, 7:00,9:30
BUCCANEER
Enemy Of The State R
Daily: 7:00, 9:45
Sat-Sun: 10,40,7:00,9:45
The Rugrats Movie G
Daily: 70,9:30
Sat-Sun: 1:00, 3:00, 5:00,
70,90
The Water Boy PG-13
Daily: 7:15,9:20
Sat-Sun: 1:00, 3:05, 5:10,
7:15,9:20
4 TnursdaK February 18.1999
Free Time
18 Thursday
-Cassatt String Quartet at 8
p.m. in A. J. Fletcher Recital
Hall
19 Friday
-Jazz at Night at 8 p.m. in
the MSC Great Room
20 Saturday
-Family Fare: The
Adventures of Corduroy at 2
p.m. in Wright Auditorium
23 Tuesday
-Travel-Adventure Film
Series: "Peru-The
Mysterious Journey at 4
and 7:30 p.m. in Hendrix
theatre. Theme, dinner at 6
p.m. in the MSC Great
Room
-Symphonic Band & Concert
Band at 8 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium
Movie
Shakespeare In Love good, not great
4
D. Miccah Smith
Fountamhcad Editor
"Shakespeare in Low"
OK. let me start off by say-
ing that nobody in Renaissance England
ever looked this good. Having voiced my
opinion on this matter, 1 can feel more
secure now in assuring you that this
movie is cute, funny, visually delightful
and altogether transparent 1 can't imag-
ine why this movie is one of the most,
talked-about of the year.
(iwenythPaltrow.inherroleasameek
and beautiful noblewoman in love wfth a
dashing young Will Shakespeare, does
not exactly stretch her acting ability to its
limits.
Joseph Fiennes makes a realistic, if overly
handsome.Shakespeare.albeitinthe
most surreal of surroundings.
And Ben Affleck in tights is just mm-
mmmgood.
So anyway, this noblewoman falls in love
with Shakespeare's poetry. Naturally she's
engaged toan insensitive aristocrat and
during the course of events she ends up
falling for Shakespeare. So she hatches a
nMtrawiM ntMtt sMra I stowi
scheme to get a role in his new play,
"Romeo and hiber if it kills her.
I approved; the only two people in the
country with perfect teeth belong
together.
You wouldn't believe what part she gets in
the play even ifl tell you, which I won't.
I'll just say that the andro-erotic scenes in
which a musttchioed Pahrow and a near-
ly femininely beautiful Fiennes kiss back-
stage are worth the $6.50 by themselves.
Sumptuous costumes, like that of a lead-
ened-faced Queen Elizabeth,encrusted
with velvet and jewels to the point of
See Love, continued on page 7
w
IK has
with Barnes and
to bring book reviews to
Wednesdays Fbuntainhead
in oar new program
Reviews for ,
Ronald
easti. �
Carolinian
Ronald rrlcDcriald House

We are looking far fellow book lovers to read and review
best sellers far a good cause. Each Semester we will donate
these best sellers to the Ronald McDonald House where
they will be available far the family members of terminally
ill children to read.
If you would like to write a review
please call Miccah at 328-6366
'� �
�SSaV






ARIES:
(March21-AprQ20)
Tact and foresight will further your
career goals. Hand work will pay off
sooner than you think. Your family
life is changing, a bit more rapidly
than you are comfortable with, but
the change will be for the good.
Express your ideas.
TAURUS:
(April 21-May 21)
If you've been feeling depressed, ride
it out and the feeling will be replaced
with the urgency to accomplish tasks
you've been putting off for some
time. You are full of energy, even
aggression, don't overdue it though.
GEMINI:
(May 22-June 21)
Try to stay centered, because all
those around you are in quite a funk.
Co-workers are grumpy and your
mate wants to squabble. This tension
will continue to drain your energy
until you take time out for you-
pamper yourself and buy something
special.
CANCER:
(June 22-July 23)
It's a pretty uneventful week, don't
expect much from those close to
you. Resolve financial questions for
long and short term investments,
easing a loved one's mind. You will
accomplish more than expected,
despite opposition from a foe.
LEO:
(July 24-August 23)
You are on top of the world both
emotionally and physically. Take
advantage of the high energy to con-
vince those around you about an
idea you've been toying with for
sometime. You are surrounded by
love, so show you appreciate it The
pace at work is hectic
VIRGO:
(August 24-September 23)
Many demands will be made on
your time. Watch out just where you
spend your energies and with who.
Share any dreams with your mate -
you are able to read each other's
mind. Your evenings are made for
romance. Expect a battle of wills in
the workplace.
LIBRA:
(September 24 - October 23)
A few authoritarian types may get in
your way, so pursue independent
projects. Your financial outlook is on
the upswing. Pressures at work wfll
probably ease up, and your cheerful
mood contagious. Share the passion
and romance with your lover.
SCORPIO:
(October 24-November 22)
Be sure to think before you speak, or
you may come off sounding like an
opinionated pain in the neck. Take it
easy if you're feeling washed out, the
flu may be coming on. There's noth-
ing happening at work that can't wait
until tomorrow.
SAGITTARIUS:
(November 23 - December 21)
This may not be the best time to
interact with others. You and your
sweetheart experience a clash of
egos, so play it cool. If confused
about your motives, wait until you
are seeing things more clearly to sort
out the situation. A vacation is a
great idea.
CAPRICORN:
(December 22 - January 20)
The people around you need your
help just when you want to hide out
and get your own act together, try to
at least listen to their problems. Play
it cool with colleagues who may
demand a confrontation. Any ten-
sions from earlier in the week seem
to be gone for good.
AQUARIUS:
(January 21- February 19)
A friend with problems may need to
talk. Laughter in this situation will
be the best medicine. A co-worker is
looking for a fight, so try to keep a
low profile and don't be a target
Make sure to think before you speak,
your bhintness may land you in
trouble.
PISCES:
(February 20-March 20)
This week promises to be full of fun,
laughter and friendship. AD you need
to do is be yourself. You may be feel-
ing that everything is against you at
work - the obstacles are only tempo-
rary. If you accept a new challenge,
you can increase your income.
IF THIS WEEK IS YOUR BIRTHDAY:
You prosper in your home life while
cementing your closest bonds. You
learn from the past and have great
hopes for the future, even though
you tend to be indecisive and some-
what insecure at times. You have
very real dreams which help you
understand what is presently hap-
pening.
:
Things to
Do
Downtown
18 Thursday
Live Jazz at Staccato s
99-X Cancer Benefit at The Attic featuring
The Flys and Slipjoint
King Monkey at Peasant's ($10 cover for all
the brew and music you can
consume)
19 Friday
Unsung Authority, Until Today,
Prayer for Cleansing 6 Spazms at
Backdoor
Local 420 with Method 51 at The
Attic
Viperhouse at Peasant's
20 Saturday
Crimescene 13 at Backdoor
Kiss Army at The Attic
Percy Hill at Peasant's
21 Sunday
Open Mic night at Peasant's Cafe
Groove Riders at The Courtyard
Tavern
23 Tuesday
Studio 54 night at the Attic
24 Wednesday
Comedy Zone at The Attic
Thursday; February 18,899 5





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ODDITIES
New book documents horror dates
Peasant's
February 18
Billing themselves as "super-
charged modern reggae
John Brown's Body has made
a good impression on Rolling
Stone with their smoothly
styled dub. I guess "modern"
means "lots of electronic
effects but that didn't inter-
fere with my enjoyment of
their latest album. Among
Them. It's listenable and lyri-
cally well-written, and this is
an honest opinion from
someone who isn't even into
reggae! Check out All Time,
their 1997 debut.
The Attic
February 20
Percy Hill: Once, as a small
child, I owned a tape of
movie themes. One of them
was a disco version of the
"Star Wars" main theme.
That's what the first song off
their new album, Color in
Bloom, sounds like. And it
just keeps getting better.
They use the classic Beastie
Boys wah-wah chicka-chicka
guitar and the trademark
jam-band funky organ, but
with a smooth-jazz feel. I
guess they have to be classi-
fied as "jam band since
their songs go up to 11 min-
utes in length, but don't let
the category fool you.
They've already got three
albums to their credit: Setting
the Boat Adrift, Straight on 'Til
Morning and Double Feature.
NASHVILLE,Term. (AP) Normaat
first figured it was just a sign of
affection when her date kept nuz-
zling her cheek as they danced.
Then she realized his more practical
motive: He was leaning close to spit
tobacco juice into a Styrofoam cup
he held in the hand he'd draped over
her shoulder. Some of the brown
spittle had dripped onto her white
silk blouse.
That's one of 55 stories found in
"Dates From Hell (And a Few
Moments Made in Heaven), a 179-
page, $7.95 paperback book that
might be the perfect Valentine's Day
gift to make sure your significant
other appreciates that all those awful
evenings are a thing of the past
And those without romantic plans
for Sunday can take comfort they are
not alone on the front lines of dat-
ing, said Mike Harris, co-author of
the book along with Victoria
Jackson.
People of all ages sent their dating
disaster tales to the authors' Web
site, reachable at www.dates-
fromhell.com. So plentiful are the
tales of angst that the authors are
gathering anecdotes for a sequel.
"Victoria and I expected them to be
in their teens or 20s. Vfe had not
really thought about the fact that
many people are divorced or wid-
owed. It doesn't get any better or eas-
ier the second time around said
Harris, a cartoonist, illustrator and
writer in nearby Franklin, Tenn.
He told of Rosie, a divorced Oregon
woman in her 50s who met a man
through an Internet chat room and
agreed to see him at a coffee bar. He
claimed he was a trim 6 feet 2 inches
tall and weighed 180 pounds,anon-
drinker and non-smoker with wavy
See Hell, continued on page 7
we want to cover you
Did you see news happen? Did you make news happen? Do you belong between our covers?
Give us your story and appear in our next ad. Call easfeiroliniari at 328-6366.
u





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eb
the
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AW continued from page 6
brownhair.
When a man spoke to her at the cof-
fee bar "every fiber of her body was
saeaming'dorft let this be him
Harris said The man was several
inches shorter, 70 or 80 pounds
heavier and if he ever had brown
wavy hair, it was gone. He also
smelled of booze and cigarette
smoke.
While she tried to formulate a polite
excuse to depart, he invited her to
move in with him because: "I just
hate being on my own since they
released me from the institution
The book was published by
Cumberland House Publishing last
fall. The publishing house would not
release sales figures but were near
the end of the first printing.
While the book focuses on hellish
dates, there are four success stories-
the title's "A Few Moments Made in
Heaven
The book also includes black-and-
white illustrations by Harris, pre-
blind date questionnaires and an
Excuse-O-Meter with suggestions on
how to get out of a second date, such
as: Tm sorry, but I'm in the witness
protection program and the feds are
making me move again.
The authors got the idea for the book
after Ms. Jackson met Harris, who
had drawn a not-very-flattering cari-
cature of her for a magazine. She
thought it was funny.
Ms. Jackson, a former director of the
Federal Reserve Board, is president
and chief executive of
DSSProDiesel, Inc a parts remanu-
facturing and distribution company
in Nashville.
"We started talking about relation-
ships and laughing at each others'
dates Harris said. "The dates are
awful at the time, but they can look
really funny in the rearview mirror"
tme continued from page 4
inspiring nausea add to the movie's
believability. There is no beauty in this
solid, painted, affected creature, only the
power of the State.
Likewise, Fiennes' loose shirt and scuffed
leather jerkin and Palt row's virginal cake-
icing dresses lend them an air of carefree
immortality.
My one real complaint about the film is
the uncomfortable familiarity of extreme-
ly famous and influential historical char-
acters. Shakespeare is a lovelorn man-
child, caught up in a romance that is by
turns bizarre and silly; Queen Elizabeth
herself is just a"deus ex machina whose
rapier wit saves Shakespeare's arse more
than once, and who acts at the whim of
thescnpt
"Shakespeare in Love" is exactly how
you'd expect it to be: charming, but not
quite award material.
, continued from page 1
kept unaware of the consequences of
their actions, manipulate their char-
acters by ad-libbing and making deci
sions. Dice-rolls usually decide how
well a character does in combat with
an enemy.
Senior computer science major and
"GM" Robbie Proseus enjoys the
opportunity to be creative while con-
trolling the basic plot of a game.
"Its something you grow with he
saidTm into actually telling a story
and creating a mood. My current goal
is to scare the heU out of my players
Role-playing has come a long way
since the 80s, when players were con-
sidered young Satanists at worst,
unpleasantly odd at best But sleek
styling, edgy artwork, user-friendli-
ness and character flexibility have
given this underground activity a new
credibility in the 90s.
Dungeons and Dragons still domi-
nates the local market, selling the best
of all games in stock at Hungate's craft
supply store in the Plaza mall.
Freshman Lori Mears first began
playing the controversial and widely
popular game in high school.
"My parents disapproved of it she
said. "They freaked They thought I
was trying to join some kind of
Satan i st cult
Role-players like Mears are used to
being misunderstood by now.
"Nobody understands what it's about
and they think it's our way of trying
to be evil, when we're realty just hav-
ing fun she explained.
Junior Lisa OTJonneD also encourages
an open-minded approach.
"There are disturbed freaky people
who get involved in role-playing she
said "But irs not the fault of role-play-
ing itself
O'Donnell sees role-playing as more
than a way to pass timerfsl right
up there with writing and other cre-
ative arts she said.
Role-playing continues to gain popu-
larity in spite of the negativity sur-
rounding it, and the sheer number of
people who enjoy it are all finding
they have the same thing in common.
That thing, according to sophomore
Kevin Treadway, is a simple desire for
something more exciting than con-
ventional entertainment
"People like to thinkIt allows you to
take an active part in a story he said
"You get to explore worlds you other-
wise would never have a chance to
explore
In these new worlds streetwise angels
duke it out with tricky demons, futur-
istic cyborgs battle feudal lords, one-
armed waitresses from New York
encounter giant alien crabs, and any-
thing, from the wonderful to the hor-
rible, can happen.
"Irs really just an interesting form of
theaterf said Meats.
Most role-players would agree.
become a member.
Launch your
organization
irrto cyber&pace.
WWW.
clubhouse.
ecu.edu
j�W
15.BooRadleys
"Kingsize"
14.MXPX
"Never Learn"
13. Unbelievable
Truth
-Settle Down"
12. Orgy
"Blue Monday"
11. Better Than Ezra
"All the Stars"
10. Hipbone
-Radius"
9. Soul Coughing
"Rolling"
8. John Spencer
Blues Explosion
"Tortw�"
7. Lagwagon
-w�fir
6. Am Drfranco
"Angry Anymore"
5. Cropduster
"Trevor Trailer Trash"
4. FunLovin'
Criminals
"Love Unlimited"
3 Jump Little
Children
"Come Clean"
2. Cowboy Mouth
"Whatcha Gonna Do"
1. LimpBizkit
"MUT
7 Thursday, February 18,1989





Go to www
Then
events calendar link,
our campus calendar.
Tjust that easy.
And it's one more free service of the ECU Student Media.


Title
The East Carolinian, February 18, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 18, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1326
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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