The East Carolinian, February 16, 1999







Tuesday:
High: 66
Low: 30
Wednesday:
High: 68
Low: 42
Online Survey
www.tec.ecu.edu
"Oid you have a Valentine for
Valentine's Day?
"Was your power bill too expensive over
December break?"
75 Yes 25 No
Carolinian
ECU swings into the next generation of dance
See Features page 6
TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 16,1999 VOLUME 74. ISSUE 38
9
African-American students often feel invisible on campus
Blacks say campus attitude
often one of indifference
Editor's Note: This article is the
first of an ongoing look at race relations
at ECU.
Tommy Yakborough
STAFF WRITER
ECU has made great strides toward draw-
ing more black students to campus.
In a recent article concerning race rela-
tions in the "Daily Reflector some blacks
feel they are invisible at ECl
"ECU has done a good job of recruiting
(African-American) students said gradu-
Faircloth
prepared
for court
Former Playhouse
manager goes to trial
ate student Adrian Cox. "But, they've got
to go further than just getting numbers
Since 1963, when Laura Marie Leary
became the first African-American student
enrolled full time at ECU, the ranks have
expanded to a 1998 enrollment of 2,160
which is about 12 percent of the student
body.
Brian Haynes, assistant vice chancellor
for Student Life and director of Minority
Student Affairs, said there are about 17 uni-
versity-recognized organizations geared
toward black students.
"That number has dramatically
increased over the past few years Haynes
said.
But, according to some blacks, that is not
enough.
"From my perspective, I think that the
climate is one of a bit of indifference Cox
said, noting that his observation applies to
both black students and the university offi-
cials.
Rushane Jones, a junior studying politi-
cal science, says he came to ECU from a
mostly white high school, so he was accus-
tomed to being the minority in a class of,
say 30 students. Jones said that this is
also the case in many classes at ECU.
But for black students who come
from high schools where the racial mix is
more even, ECU can be quite over-
whelming.
"They don't know how to take it
Jones said. "We lose a lot of them that
way
Cox suggests that, left to their own
devices, students from different ethnic
and racial backgrounds "self-segregate
driven by a natural need to gravitate to
those people who look like them.
English professor Reginald Watson
points out what he considers one of the
main problems on campus.
"Number one, minority faculty he
said, citing the disproportionate num-
ber of black students to African-American
faculty members.
In the fall of 1997, when black students
made up nearly 12 percent of the student
Students congregating outside of Fletcher Hall.
PHOTO 11 SARAH CHRISTIE
body, black faculty members accounted for
40 teachers, not quite 3.5 percent of the full
and part-time faculty roster.
"So there is a lack of what you might call
role models Watson said.
"The reason for more faculty
members he said, echoing Cox's
remarks, "is that students want to
search out someone who looks like
them
That becomes especially true
when students might be facing
their first time away from home in a
potentially high-pressure environ-
ment, Watson said.
"ECU needs to have more activ-
ities that integrate more segments
of the population on campus said
Watson. "That way, you have more
interaction
SEE MINORITY PAGE 2
Kris t y Dam f. i
staff writer
Former ECU Playhouse manager
Gary Faircloth is prepared to go to
trial Feb. 22 for the embezzlement
charges brought against him last
June.
Faircloth, an employee of the
university since 1987, pleaded not
guilty on four felony counts of
embezzlement and one count of
forgery related to the embezzle-
ment of funds from the East
Carolina Theater Fund.
Faircloth's court date was set
during his arraignment in the Pitt
County Superior Court.
Faircloth, 47, is accused of
embezzling over $23,000 from the
fund and was fired from the uni-
versity on July 31.
According to reports, ECU
closed the theater foundation
account and transferred the
remaining balance of approximate-
ly $70,000 to its main fund raising
arm, the ECU Foundation, when
suspicions arose.
According to Ben Irons, attor-
ney for ECU, all evidence regard-
ing the case has been handed over
to the SBI.
"I am not actively involved
with the case, but the district attor-
neys office is working with the SBI
and the prosecution on the case
Irons said.
SBI agents filed the charges
after an ECU probe discovered
differences in the foundation's
books.
Faircloth's replacement, Jeffrey
Woodruff, managing director of
the East Carolina Playhouse, said
he came after Faircloth was gone.
He is no way involved in what is
going on with the case and
Faircloth only knows what he has
heard and read in the paper.
In addition to pleading not
guilty, Faircloth waived a probable
cause hearing and denied accusa-
tions and charges against him.
Preacher's annual visit sparks heated debates
Birdsong's insists
enrage students
Erica S i k e s
STAFF WRITER
The mall preacher Gary Birdsong came
again this year to speak to a full crowd of
enraged and inspired spectators.
On Feb. 11, 1999, students gathered
around to carry on the spring tradition. Gary
Birdsong, an annual visitor of ECU could be
found on the mall with a crowd surrounding
him.
Many witnesses to Birdsong's testimony
and evangelism have seen a handful of out-
rageous accusations and judgments. When
junior Michael Smith inquired about
Birdsong's credentials, he replied that he
was a graduate of Christ to the Nations Bible
College in Dallas, Texas. Birdsong has no
official ministerial certification and is non-
denominational. He specializes in campus
ministry.
ECU is one of the top schools on
Birdsong's list to reform because of its party-
school reputation. However, that was not his
only pet peeve. He adamantly protested
many touchy subjects including abortion,
homosexuality and interracial marriages.
"I don't think it's wise Birdsong said
when asked his opinion on interracial dating.
He claims that it causes confusion within
the family, thus disrupting the balanced
structure of the family.
Birdsong proceeded to give his advice by
declaring that women should be subservient
to their husbands.
When attacked by the female crowd,
Birdsong replied, "When you meet a man
like mc, you'll want to submit also
Birdsong also believes that a true
Christian should be intolerant to homosexu-
als, non-Christians and "those who sit in
hell's fire
One of Birdsong's main doctrines is that it
is man's duty to make righteous judgments.
According to Internet research on the
Satanic Bible, it is one of the satanic com-
mandments to judge.
Birdsong's theories also include areas as
far-fetched as the decline of males' grades is
as a result of masturbation. He is also quick
to denounce the females standing in the
crowd wearing shorts and tank tops.
"Women are emotional and will believe
anything Birdsong said. "All they do is nag,
"Women are emotional and will
believe anything. All they do is nag,
nag, nag
Gary Birdsong
Visiting Evangelist
nag, nag.
Carrie Thornton, an elementary educa-
tion major quickly refuted Birdsong's
preaching.
In defense of the students at ECU,
Thornton said, "God is a God of wrath, but
God is a God of love. God doesn't want his
word screamed at his people, he wants it pre-
sented with love
When asked if he would be returning to
ECU, Birdsong's response was "I'm going
back to Chapel Hill. That's where the
queers are
Female student in the middle of campus refuting Birdsong's passionate preaching.
PHOTO BY MIKE JACOBSEN
Coke, Pepsi battle for exclusive high school contract
Pilot program set
up in six schools
Steve Midgette, junior philosophy major and Joe Hakooz, junior communications major,
buy the universities only choice, Pepsi, left to right)
PHOTO B� MIKE JACOBSEN
Devon White
STAFF WRITER
Once again Coca-Cola and
Pepsi are at war, but this
time it's for an exclusive
high school agreement.
The Pitt County Board
of Education voted to set
up a pilot program in six schools to
test three soft drink vendors. Pepsi,
Coca-Cola and Dennis Foods will
compete to see which one earns the
most money.
For the past year, the school
board has been exploring whether
an exclusive agreement with one
vendor or a competitive market
would better serve the county's
19,600 students.
"The success of failure of the
pilot project will determine the
next step the school board will
take said Public Information's
Officer
P
Barry Gaskins.
In November, representatives
of Coke, Pepsi and Dennis Foods
went before the school board's
Finance Committee to pitch the
merits of an exclusive contract with
their companies.
After hearing from each compa-
ny, the committee discussed the
idea of establishing test runs in a
few schools to measure each ven-
dor's performance. The committee
recommended to a full board on
SEE KNI PAGE 2





2 Tusssy. Fssrtsry 11.1889
news
briefs
SURVIVORS OF SKI
GONDOLA TRAGEDY
COME TO U.S.
SEEKING JUSTICE
ATLANTIC BEACH, N.C. (AP)
�Walking barefoot in the white
sand by the gently rolling Atlantic
surf, Marina Renkewttz tries to
forget for a moment why she is
here.
When a U.S. Marine Corps jet
sliced through the cable of an
Italian ski gondola a year ago, Uwe
was killed, along with the
Renkewitzes' 23-year-old daugh-
ter, Mandy, and her fiance. With
her surviving daughter, Sindy,
Mrs. Renkewitz has joined family
members of other victims who
came to Camp Lcjeune for the
court-martial of the pilot, Capt.
Richard Ashby.
MAN CHARGED IN
OFF-DUTY OFFICER'S
SHOOTING
FAYETTEVILLE � A third sus-
pect was arrested here Saturday in
connection with the shooting of an
off-duty Lillington police officer in
a convenience store.
Jabon Phillip Johnson, 20, of
Fayetteville was arrested by a
Fayetteville police officer who
noticed a man matching the sus-
pect's description. Johnson was
taken into custody for Lillington
police.
HOT RACE IF MRS.
CLINTON RUNS
WASHINGTON (AP) � With the
impeachrhent trial over, first lady
Hillary Rodham Clinton will give
serious thought to running for the
Senate from New York next year,
senior White House officials said
Sunday. Democrats and
Republicans alike predicted a ter-
rific race if she steps in.
SHARPTON CRITICAL
OF MAYOR'S ROLE
NEW YORK (AP) �The Rev. Al
Sharpton chastised Mayor
Rudolph Giuliani on Saturday for
trying to "duck his responsibility"
in the death of a West African
immigrant shot 19 times by police.
During a meeting at the
National Action Network in
Harlem, Sharpton repeated his call
for the mayor to suspend four
plainclothes officers from an elite
police unit that gunned down
Amadou Diallo with 41 shots.
IRAQ SAYS IT HAS
ABILITY TO ATTACK
U.S BRITISH BASES
ABROAD
BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP) � The
Iraqi government declared Sunday
that it could attack American and
British bases in the Gulf that are
used to launch airstrikes against
Iraq.
"We, by help from God and
support from the sons of our glori-
ous Arab nation including true and
sincere nationals in Saudi Arabia
and Kuwait have the ability to
attack the sources and means of
aggression from whatever region
Iraqi television said, quoting a
statement from President Saddam
Hussein and senior leaden.
The statement came amid a
simmering war of nerves with the
United States and Britain over "no-
fly" zones imposed in northern and
southern Iraq.
Minority
continued from page 1
Something as simple as a uni-
versity-sponsored party that plays a
wide array of music could be a
crossroad where minority and
white students mix and learn about
one another, he said.
Watson wants the university
officials to say, through some ges-
ture or another, "we want you; we
value you; we want your contribu-
tions
Not all black students agree that
the university is at fault
"The problem is not the univer-
sity said an anonymous black
senior student. "It's the black stu-
dents. From what I see, blacks here
alienate themselves. What else can
the university do to integrate the
students? We have casino nights,
Mardi Gras, Barefoot on the Mall,
intramural games, two huge cafete-
rias and a big-ass recreation center
for students to meet and learn
about each other
"A lot of the white kids came
here from private schools or pre-
dominately white schools he
,AAfA "T'kir K.�,k� lit-rlrt rr r�o
r - 0.
blacks. Most African-Americans
who are in college, with the excep-
tion of some inner-city kids, had to
except being a minority throughout
their scholastic careers, so why do
they think that college will be any
different? College is a place where
educated people come to further
their own careers, not to sit around
and complain about the blackwhite
ratio at a social gathering
Pepsi
continued from page 1
February 8, that the three soft
drink handlers each try out their
products at one high school and an
accompanying middle school,
allowing equal competition among
the companies.
According to Public Information
Officer Barry Gaskins, the test will
determine factors such as commis-
sion rates, profit margins, customer
satisfaction, the mechanics of
vending machine placement and
accessibility.
After receiving the OK from the
school board the internal soft drink
committee will now develop a plan
for the pilot program. Members of
the committee include high school
and middle school principals, ath-
letic directors as well as child nutri-
tion specialists. The parameters of
the test, including the number of
be decided by the committee.
The pilot probably will not be
launched until next school year in
the fall due to time restraints. So
far Dennis Food is the only one of
three vendors that has agreed to
participate in the program.
Manager of Coca-Cola of
Greenville's cold drink division,
Mike Langley, delivered a 50-page
report to the finance committee in
Nov. The report outlined his
framework for a "partnership"
between the company and the
school system. The bottom line of
the proposal held more than
$190,000 in cash profits and ser-
vices for the schools.
Vice President of sales and mar-
keting for Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co.
of Greenville, Steve Crouch, did
not bring bottom-line price quotes
to the meeting.
Owner of Dennis Foods in
Virginia, Dave Dennis, laid out a
plan that he projected would bring
more than $225,000 to the schools
through the sale of soft drinks
alone. Dennis offered to provide
not only his products, but also
Coke and Pepsi, in his deal.
"This pilot is definitely a way to
generate revenue for the schools
said Gaskins.
news
Tin Ent Carolinian
Brown & Brown I
ATTORNEYS AT I AW
1ruth,Equality,Justice
102B East. Victoria Ct.
Bedford Park, Greenville
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
-Under Age Possession
�Possession of DrugsParaphenalia
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�Free Consultation
Phone 752-0952 752-0753
e-mail - ghb.greenvillenc.com
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Greenville's largest van
ffinelTi@afe
2905 E 5th Street, Greenville, NC � (252) 6954020
Pastt � Pizza � Salads � Sandwich � Homemade � Soups � Desserts
Dine In or Take Out � Boxed Lunches Available
Dining Room Open
Mon-Thurs 1030AM-9PM Fri b Sat1030AM - 1UPM
Closed Sundays � Full ABC Permits
of imports and fine wines
TRAVFI-ADVENTURE FILM
AND THEME DINNER SERIES
ATFAtTCARniiuA university
Peru-The Mysterious journey, Buddy Hatton
Tuesday, February 23, 1999'
Take a cinematic journey to ancient Incan ruins, the
Amazon jungle, and the capital city, Lima.
Dinner Menu: Orange salad wjri onions and olives, broiled bass with lemon-
oregano vinaigrette, breast of chicken supreme, hearts of palm in tomato sauce,
Brazilian rice, manjar bianco (Peruvian cream pudding), com bread
Buffet dinner served at 6:00 p.m. in Mendenhall Student Center's Great Room.
Film screenings at 4:00 and 7:30 p.m. in Mendenhall's Hendrix Theatre. Film
and dinner tickets sold separately. ECU Central Ticket Office 252-328-4788,
1-800-ECU-ARTS, or deafspeech-impaired access 252-328-4736. Monday-Friday,
8:30 a.m6:00 p.m.
Please make your
dinner reservations
by February 18, 1999.
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the
piRA
te experience
(there is a little RA in all of us)
University Housing Services is now-
accepting applications for
1999 - 2000
Resident Advisor positions
As compensation, RAs receive a free single room, a 9 meal
advantage account, and a $10S stipend per semester. The
position is considered a scholarship worth a cumulative
total of approximately $4500. Please keep in mind
that in order to be considered for the position you must
meet the following qualifications:
i Be at least a second semester freshman at the time of application
i Have a clear judicial record with OHSDean of Students office
i Have a least a 2.S overall grade poiiit average
Applications can be picked up at a
Coordinator's office or at 100 Jones Hall
The deadline for applying is March 5th
For more information please call
Jeff Novak at 32S-6144
You drank.
You danced.
You had sest)
ryiissiftj
Some-rh'nj �
?
Free Pregnancy Tests
Call Carolina Pregnancy Center 757-0003
209-B South Evans Street (downtown near Courthouse)
www.attic-nightclub.com
Uptown OlMnvw
i�p ion Mkm �m ��
209 E. 5th St.
752-7303
WEDNESDAY
S2.00 adv. tix w ECU ID 9-9:30
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I ADV. TIX AVAILABLE AT CD ALiFf �
WASH PUB � EAST COAST MUSK &
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99x Cancer Society Benefit � Special Guest Slip Joint � $8 Adv. Ttx
Friday
Local 420
In the new
Pteonix Room
sssssssass
50 YE4R ANNIVERSARY
Tuesday - Thursday Specials
� Hamburger Steak Plate $3.95
�Shrimp Plate $3.95
� Shrimp A Trout Combo $4.95
� Shrimp A Clam Strips $4.95
� Shrimp Deviled Crab $4.95
�ShrimpCrab Cake$4.95
All of above served with choice of
two sides: Baked Potato, French Fries,
Slaw, String Beans or Applesauce.
Peck of Steamed Oysters
with free crab leg cluster
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Fried Frog Legs $3.95
BEER A WINE
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Sunday 1 2.40 Noon - lftOO PM Greenville, NC 27834
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Clinton rebuilds after impeachment
WASHINGTON (AP) � After a
year of scandal and shame,
President Bill Clinton now must
try to rebuild his tarnished presi-
dency. Surprisingly, he may discov-
er some unlikely allies among the
Republicans who tried to force htm
from office.
No matter what, Clinton will go
into the history books with the
humiliating distinction of being
only the second president ever
impeached. His challenge is to
make historians write in the next
paragraph that he was a successful
president nevertheless.
Republicans are in trouble, too.
Their zest for impeachment back-
fired and angered voters, who con-
cluded they were more interested
in lynching Clinton than in fixing
Social Security and heath care.
Republicans sagged in the polls as
Clinton soared.
Clinton and his Republican
adversaries share a common need
to convince voters that they can get
things done. The president wants
to repair his legacy; the
Republicans want to save their
political skins. Both sides are
angling for advantage in the 2000
elections.
"The Republicans ate a des-
perate for success as Bill Clinton
is said Democratic consultant
Dane Strother.
"Is there going to be personal
affection? No said Ralph Reed, a
Republican strategist. "Is there
going to be a mutual institutional
desire to get something done to
save themselves in 2000? Yes.
Clinton doesn't want to lose the
White House, and the Republicans
don't want to lose the Congress.
They're more apt to lose if they get
nothing done
Wednesday Feb. 17
Blood drive sponsored by the ECU
National PanHellenic Council at
Mendenhall between noon and 6
p.m.
A public lecture entitled Celtic Myth
and English Language Fantasy
Literature: Possible New Directions
will be givent at 3 p.m. in room
1026 of the General Classroom
Building. The speaker is Charles
W. Sullivan, an ECU English pro-
campus
briefs
fessor. Contact: Dr. Sullivan 328-
3756
Thursday Feb. 18
The Cassat String Quartet will per-
form at 8 p.m. in the A. J. Fletcher
Hall. Tickets will be sold at the
door.
Friday Feb. 19
Jazz night at Mendenhall Student
Center gets under way at 8 p.m. in
the Great Room. Music will be pro-
vided by the ECU Jazz Ensemble.
Public tickets are $2.50 student
tickets are free.
Sunday Feb. 21
N.C. symphony will give its Happy
Birthday Jazz concert, at 4 p.m. in
wright Auditorium. Concert is
billed as the 100th birthday tribute
to George Gershwin and Duke
Ellington. Tickets are $25 at the
door.
Need
a massage?!
The ECU. Physical Therapy dub b sponsoring a night
of massages. All you have to do b purchase a ticket!
WHEN: Tuesday, February 16th, 1999 5:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
WHERE: ECU Belk Health Sciences Building on the comer of Charles
Blvd. and Greenville Blvd.
HOW MUCH ARE TICKETS: ONLY $3.00 for iOnrin. and you can buy up to 30 rrrin
TO PURCHASE TICKETS: Ask any PT student you see! We will also be selling
� tickets around campus (In front of bookstore and at
Sj Belk. OR, you can get a ticket AT THE DOOR for $4.00
for 10 mini!) So come on, bring your friends
and relax wftt. a Great Massage
Lunch Special
1 1 am-2pm
TURKEY
on a Bagel of your c' oice
ofhr good now through Sunday 221
doughnuts bagels
300 E. Tenth St.
830-1525
Open 24 hrs.
-







4 Tu.id.v F.hruirv 16. 1999
opinion
eastcarolinian
Amy L.Rovster Edntv
Amanda G. Austin Minajrng Editor
Amy Sheridan NewsEdiior
Peter Dawyot AssistantNe�sEditor
Nina Dry Features Editor
Mario Scmkkmm i-kk SponsEditor
Tracy Hairr Assistant Sports Editor
Chris Knotts Stall Illustrator
Robert J. Moore Layout Designer
Stephanie Whitlock Ad Design Manager
Janet Respess AdwnismgManager
Riss Blackburn LayourDesigner
Serving mi ECU ccirwrni sinci 1925. f East Carolinian cjwshas 11,000 cop� wiry fuasday and TlvMlay Tr� read aditcnal m mci adiuon '1 rhi onm
on cl mi maturity at in Editorial Board and a wrmrr. in turn By Editorial Board mrmties Thi Ease Caravan eaicomes lanara to ma toto- ttid to 250
worcs. eMn ay oa aditad 'or fltcmcy or oriyity rtn Ean Carolinian maim ttn riant to inn or raiact lyriiiy tor oubncatian An nt.tar iijrJ oi signed
.amis would Si aooiautd to. Cpm�n Hitot .The Eel Caroiiman, Studam Puoticawyis EMdirg. ECU. Gramniia. 2IBS8-43S3 r Homtiron call
2H321B88
OUNICW
We find it ironic that the Millennium Bug may come to bite the technological world in its
proverbial ass.
With the advances of technology and the Internet over the past ten years it is difficult to
imagine a world void of these conveniences. Yet according to many information technology
specialists the Y2K problem could cause serious inconveniences to businesses, industries and
our day-to-day lives. Despite the fact that information technology experts realized the Year
2000 problem was imminent over ten years ago, it is now 10 months until the year 2000 and
many have just begun to prepare for problems. Whether you believe the Millennium Bug will
bring an end to the world as we know it or that it will cause a mere hiccup, everyone should
use this as a lesson for the new millennium.
When the Internet is old hat the new millennium will be serving up more outrageous
advances like gene therapy, cloning and cryogenics (the practice of freezing a dead diseased
human in hopes restoring life at some future time when a cure for the disease could possibly
be found.) It is imperative that as we experiment we also think of the long term consequences
and potential pitfalls of our technological inventions.
This century, the Millennium Bug and all its problems was caused by a simple oversight in
setting the dates of computers. If we do not mix caution with our experimentation the next
a
p century could bring even worse problems. A simple oversight in computers is one thing, an
i
"oversight" in someone's genes is a different ball game. If we do not learn to plan better, imag-
I
ine what the dooms day fanatics of the year 2999 will be predicting.
OPINION
Columnist
Preacher battles students
, say to you boy, let's
go look at some Playboys,
and drink some beers, and
later we '11 go out and chase
some women
Well once again, ECU has allowed
a loud mouth, hell fire and brim-
stone preacher to come and raise a
ruckus on the Mall of our great
university. I had a great time mess-
ing with this guy, and I am sure a
few of you did too. Here are some
of the highlights of this past
Thursday's shenanigans.
I was walking to class
when I first noticed him bad
mouthing some guy. Then he stut-
tered to me "I, I, I say to you boy,
let's go look at some Playboys, and
drink some beers, and later we'll
go out and chase some women
And I gave an obligatory "Amen"
just to spite him. That's when he
started screaming something
about fornicating and burning in
hell and blah, blah, blah. I saw lips
moving, but I really couldn't hear
anything.
Again, later that day, I
decided to go back to the mall and
see everybody else mess with the
guy. The funniest thing was that
about 20 people would all scream
at this guy, and people would sit
there and raise their hands waiting
to be recognized, like they were in
class or something.
I had to throw in my 10 cents
worth, and of course I sank to his
level by engaging him with Jim
Jones survivalist jokes about
drinking cyanide-laced Kool Aid
to escape from all the black CIA
helicopters that arc carrying
cocaine for the Mob.
But the hardest thing to
accept is that this guy did his job.
Just as any writer can elicit a great
response by writing on a hot sub-
ject, this guy was able to heat peo-
ple up, and they we.it around the
rest of the day pissed off at how
A)
someone could be so hateful. This
is how he operates. You may not
understand it when you're sitting
there screaming it out with the
guy, but if you arc like me, you
went home that night and might
have agreed with something the
guy said.
Case in point. Abortion is
a emotionally and physically
painful procedure. Nobody wakes
up one day and says "Oh goody,
I'm having an abortion But yet,
people would argue with this guy
over abortion, and make it seem
like it's better than winning the
lottery. I don't approve of the way
in which he delivers his message,
but I agree with the message.
Maybe the reason that we
avoid people like him is not
because we ate too good for him,
but because we are not good
enough. College students stray
from our religious upbringing and
our sense of decency and morality,
and just roll with the crowd. We
are not good enough to hold on to
our beliefs, so we criticize anyone
who reminds us of our shortcom-
ings. Hey, I admit it, I hate being
wrong.
Thi hit Ciroljni. 5 Tuiidiv. F.h
Four Set
OPINION
Impeachment views across the nation
From the Asbury Park (N.J.) Press:
After his acquittal yesterday, President Clinton
asked people to forgive him Perhaps eventually
some, who opposed his removal from office while
holding their noses, might.For those whose hatred
goes back to the draft and not inhaling, Clinton's
only hope would be to believe in miracles.
As for Ken Starr, Linda Tripp, Henry Hyde and
company, there are three words of wisdom to which
all those who hold them in low esteem should
adhere: If you can't say anything nice about som-
body, don't say anything at all.
From The Dallas Morning News:
The U.S. Senate's gathering at noon Friday lacked
the dramatic suspense that surrounded Andrew
Johnson's narrow escape from impeachment in
1868. There were clear signs all week that the
Senate would not remove President William
Jefferson Clinton from office on grounds of perjury
and obstruction of justice. Perhaps the only surprise
was that neither charge gained a majority of guilty
votes.
Still, when high noon arrived, and the chief jus-
tice of the United States asked in a solemn voice,
"Senators, how say you the hushed chamber
showed the gravity of the vote ahead.
That solemnity and order Friday should help
Americans feel proud of their country, despite the
ugly matters that brought the vote. This nation
relies upon process, not bayonets, to resolve its con-
flicts.
From the Detroit Free Press:
And now it's Kenneth Starr's turn. Between the
philandering president and the obsessed prosecu-
tor, it is the prosecutor who has been the greater
threat to the values of the republic.
Now it's time to shut down the inquisition,
write finis to the tawdry drama, and send Starr
himself back into the private sector, where he can
console himself with million-dollar fees from the
clients and associates who have long hoped he
could bring down Bill Clinton. It does not excuse
Clinton to say that Starr has been the prosecutor of
thoughtful jurists' nightmares. Back in 1940, con-
servative Supreme Court Justice Robert Jackson
issued the classic warning against the rogue prose-
cutor "who will pick people that he thinks he
should get, rather than cases that need to be pros-
ecuted who would search the lawbooks or set the
bloodhounds sniffing to find any offense, no mat-
ter how technical or trivial, to pin on his target.
Jackson could hardly have described Starr better.
Write, cu Letter
to ikes Editor
Got something to say? Need somewhere to
say it? Bring your letter to the easfcarolinian
located on'the 2nd floor of The Student
Publications Building
i





Thi Ent Ctmlinii i 5 Tmtdiv. fibrmrv is. 1999
comics
Tta EMtCwatjnjM
1
fcir1
lation
enry Hyde and
visdom to which
:em should
ce about som-
ind the chief jus-
i a solemn voice,
lushed chamber
:ad.
day should help
mtry, despite the
ote. This nation
to resolve its con-
the prosecutor of
ack in 1940, con-
: Robert Jackson
: the rogue prose-
lat he thinks he
: need to be pros-
wbooks or set the
offense, no mat-
)in on his target,
bed Starr better.
r
ere to
linian
lent
Four Seats Left
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feb. 18th.19th.20th
& 21 st at Hendrix
���
A HEART POUNDING, EDGE
OF YOUR SEAT TREAT
URBAN LEGEND
8PM
feb. 24th at Hendrix
���
8PM
feb. 19th at Mendenhall
Great Room
JAZZ AT NIGHT 8PM
� . �
For a good time call:
ECU Student Union Hotline
@ 252.328.6004 or
visit us here:
www.ecu.edustudent union
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ACROSS
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5 Learned
monkey-style
9 Strong cotton
thread
14 Make booties,
e.g.
15 Turkish money
16 Being dragged
17 Waste time
18 Fossil fuel
19 Sudden
increase
20 Tiny dwelling
22 Forest units
23 Purchase
alternative
24 Abscond
25 Shucks!
28 Music master
31 Colorado tribe
32 Morals
35 Sebaceous cyst
36 POW possbly
37 Swindles
38had enough!
39 Plus
40 Andes herd
41 On the briny
42 Blues or
Cardinals
44 Outer covering
45 Vexes
46 Brawl
49 Tropical porch
51 Sideshow
performer
55 Select few
56 Turner ot
"Peyton Place"
67 Flintstones' pet
58 Poionius,
Laertes, et al.
59 Trans-Siberian
RR Stop
60 Melviiie novel
61 Constant anxiety
62 Mine
excavations
63 Song ending?
DOWN
1 Squea! to a halt
2 Remove ties
3 List ol fees
4 Adler and
Benson
5 Aluminum com
pany
6 Too devout
7 Rub out
8 Dip in the
landscape
9 Lethargic
10 Habituates
11 hip to urban
ways
12 Box seat
13 She sheep
21 Conform strictly
24 Visages
25 Mountain iions
26 Work period
27 Starring in a
show
Answers inthis weeks Fountainhead
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32 . Island, NY
33 Assam and
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34 Haw's partner
37 Superlatively
chancy
41 Before
43 Speaks
pompously
44 Witness
46 "Vice"
47 German dadaist
48 Plumbing
problems
49 Swan lady
50 Arkln or King
51 Fail utterly
52 Duration
53 Slaughter in
Cooperstown
54 Cheer
appening
at ECU?"
� Two-thirds of ECU students
consume four or fewer
drinks when they drink.
� More than half of ECU
students drink alcohol
twice a month or less.
� One-third of ECU students
prefer to attend parties
where alcohol is NOT served.
What's happening with
Ltd"
EAST
CAKOtlNA
UNIVERSITY
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6T�Mdiy. February IB. 1999
features
The Eut Camlinan
Swing dancing gains
popularity on campus
Freshmen Mary Beth Webster and Blake Braswell dance the night away at the Methodist Center every Tuesday night.
PHOTO BY SCOn WILKINSON
Lessons given at
Wesley Foundation
Nina M. D r v
FEATURES EDITOR
The new rave that has been sweep-
ing the nation in commercials and
music videos has finally reached
ECU. Swing dancing is here. Fear
not if you do not know how to
swing because lessons are given at
the Wesley Foundation by Rev.
Scott Wilkinson.
Wilkinson considers himself to
be very much into swing, and when
he came to ECU last summer, he
began inquiring about it.
"I was used to going to swing
dances nearly every weekend in
either Durham or Greensboro
Wilkinson said. "I couldn't find
anything here in Greenville, yet
everybody seemed really interest-
ed '
It just so happened that the one
of the rooms at the Wesley
Foundation had a large dance floor
area, and Wilkinson decided to give
lessons himself.
"Since I am a slow learner in
dance, I am a good teacher
Wilkinson said. "I teach the dance
steps slowly and make sure stu-
dents are comfortable. When peo-
ple leave my class, they know how
to swing
According to Wilkinson, 50 stu-
dents showed up the first night last
semester and the Wesley
Foundation has been swinging ever
since.
During the late 1920s, swing
dancing began in the ballrooms as a
spin off of the popular dance, the
Charleston, in I larlem, New York.
As this new, yet no named dance
continued to grow in popularity, a
New York Times reporter went to
the Savoy Ballroom to sec what all
of the fuss was about. Mind you,
this was the same time that Charles
Lindbergh took his historic flight
over the Atlantic. When the
reporter asked the kids the name of
this new dance, one of them,
remembering the headline of the
paper that morning entitled, 'Lindy
Hops Atlantic called out, "Why,
it's the Lindy Hop
The name stuck and throughout
"It's a nice environment where
you don't have to worry about
impressing other people like at
a club
Bryan Jarvis
Sophomore
the years it began to branch off into
other dances such as the East Coast
Swing (better known as the
Jitterbug) and Shag.
In the 1950s, bebop and rock
became the new fad and swing
music and the dancing faded out.
In the 1980s, swing dancing
resurfaced in Europe when dancers
saw the movie, Animal Crackers,
where the actors were doing the
Lindy Hop. The Europeans con-
tacted the United States in hopes of
finding people who remembered
the dance and came up with
Frankie Manning, one of the origi-
nal dancers in the movie. From
there, Manning began traveling all
over the world holding swing dance
workshops and participating in the
rebirth of swing.
"I took a workshop with
Manning last year in Durham
Wilkinson said. "He sees his mis-
sion as almost spiritual
Wilkinson recently conducted
his own swing workshop at a
national student conference for col-
lege students from all around the
US.
"The students talked about dif-
ferent swing clubs around their uni-
versities Wilkinson said.
According to Wilkinson, college
students are becoming very inter-
ested in swing dancing.
"It seems as if students are tired
of modern dancing and jumping
around Wilkinson said. "Swing
has technical moves you do with a
partner, and you actually dance
"It's hard to dance when you are
at the club said junior Lorainc
Helms. "There's no actual tech-
nique like in swing dancing
"There's other places that teach
swing for $20 an hour, but here it's
free for anyone said junior Jaime
Wilkins.
"It's a nice environment where
you don't have to worry about
impressing other people like at a
club said sophomore Bryan Jarvis.
"Everyone is clean and sober�it's
an enjoyable thing to do
Beginning lessons are offered
every Tuesday night at 7:30 p.m.
followed by intermediate lessons
for those looking for more of a chal-
lenge at 8:30 p.m. at the Wesley
Foundation. For more information
call 758-2030.
Students participate in
campus exchange program
Study abroad
opportunities abound
Erica Sikes
staff writer
Imagine yourself in a whole new
world with new faces, beautiful
places and exotic sceneries. ECU
has made this possible for students
to study in other countries through
the International Studies Program.
"ECU has provided various
opportunities to students for the
last 25 years said Linda
McGowan, oversees opportunities
coordinator.
According to McGowan, approx-
imately 30-35 students participate
in the ECU exchanges each year.
Some go for one semester while
others go for the full year.
A lot of preparation goes into
studying abroad. McGowan
encourages students to begin the
thought process at least eight to
nine months in advanced.
Once it has been decided that
the student is ready to go abroad,
McGowan holds information and
advising sessions.
"I explain the options students
have when they study, work and
travel abroad McGowan said. "I
also spend time with students in
the application process
Through the exchange program,
students do not have to worry about
extravagant tuition fees. Studying
in another country is the same
amount as studying here at ECU.
"Participating in the exchange
program gives students a different
view of the world McGowan said.
"It also allows students to look at
their own country in a different per-
spective.
Samantha Dunn, an English
major, received the opportunity to
study abroad at the Manchester
University in England. She was ini-
tially introduced to International
Studies when her older sister par-
ticipated in the program. According
to Dunn, her experiences there
were very interesting.
The major language differences
that she encountered were found
primarily in the British slang.
"Their slang words were quite
different than ours Dunn said.
For instance, when the British
say that a man was 'pissed they
mean he was intoxicated.
A few other cultural diversities
from the American way of life that
Dunn recognized were in the edu-
cational system.
'The classes were very differ-
ent Dunn said. "I only went to
class on Mondays and Tuesdays
and had the rest of the week to
myself
Although Dunn only attended
one semester, she was able to inter-
act with students of other cultures
as well as the British. Her three
roommates were German, Polish
and African.
When asked if they would opt to
study abroad, the opinions of stu-
dents varied.
"It would be weird being in a
strange place where I wouldn't
know anyone and all the unfamiliar
surroundings said Cindy Horrell,
freshman.
Other students seemed
enthused at the idea of studying in
another country.
"I would try it out for a semester
just to get the experience said
Vinny Cardillo, graduate student.
"I think it would be an awesome
experience said Robin Skipper,
Junior.
Anguilla
Belize
rmany
England
Italy
Italy
Japan
Russia
Art and Dance
May 20June 11
Cultural Studies-
Jme 13-Juky 5 :
Business
July 21-3!
Literary London
May31-June22
Early Childhood
Education
May 16-29
Religion and
Culture
May 21-June 5 ;
Education
July2-22
Russian Media
Junt25-Jub)t2
"dates are subeet to chanp
Any students interested in
studying abroad or participating in
the ECU exchange program should
contact Linda McGowan at the
Office of International Affairs at
328-1937.
Todd, Mendenhall to host
NASCAR Night this week
Event sponsored by
Housing and Dining
Phillip Gilfus
staff writer
Race fans, start your engines. ECU
Housing and Dining Services are
presenting a NASCAR night on
Feb. 17. Students will be able to
experience all the fun and excite-
ment of the racetrack through
NASCAR simulators, giveaways,
and remote control car racing.
Students will be able to go to
either Mendenhall and Todd
Dining Hall for chances to view
Mark Martin's Valvoline Ford
Taurus and Chad Little's John
Deere Ford Taurus race car simula-
tors, which were made available to
ECU by Pepsi. The semi-trucks
that will deliver the simulators to
the two dining halls will be decorat-
ed in full NASCAR style and staff
members will be available to talk
about NASCAR and to show how
the simulators work.They will be
available for students to ride, free of
charge, from 11 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.
"The purpose of this event is to
celebrate living on campus said
Frank Salamon, director of Dining
Services.
Inside the simulators, practically
all the safety equipment required
by NASCAR is in place, including
padded roll bars, removable steer-
ing wheels, steel encased rubber
gas tanks and braced Lexan win-
dows.
Students who wish to skip wait-
ing in line for the simulators will be
able to win passes in their residence
halls. Each hall is sponsoring a Sony
Playstation Tournament. There
will be one male and female and
winner who will compete in a
championship tournament during
the NASCAR dinner at the dining
halls.
'There will be four controllers
during the tournaments in the resi-
dence halls said Jones Hall RA
Jason Evans. "Prizes for the cham-
pionship winners will be Jeff
Raffles are currently being held
at the Wright Place, Todd, and
Mendenhall for prizes. Students
who correctly guess the winner of
the Daytona 500 race will all be put
in a separate bucket, and a grand
prize winner will be drawn.
To keep with the NASCAR
theme.Todd and Mendenhall will
be serving fried chicken, corn dogs,
nachos grande, root beer and the
dessert display will have cakes
shaped like race cars.
"The dinner for NASCAR night
Nascar simulators will be at Mendenhall and Todd Dining Hall tomorrow.
PHOTO BV MICHAEL SMITH
Gordon leather jackets, while the
grand prize is a playstation
Also, for the Return to Campus
Living Sign-Up, 60 simulator pass-
es have been randomly mailed to
students. More passes will be given
away during the Feb. 15-16 Campus
Living Sign-Up in Fletcher lobby
and Sweetheart's at Todd.
will coordinate with food at the
racetrack said Aramark location
manager, Brandi Heatherly.
Also during dinner, you can
enjoy the movie "Days of
Thunder race remote control cars
and play NASCAR arcade games.





7 Tutldiy. Februiry 16, 1989
features
Tki East CartlMM
The East Carolinan
n

ram
:
program
Dates
to and Dance
Hay 20-Jtms 11
Cultural Studies
W 13-Jufy 5
business
'uh 21-31
jiterary Londoii
May3l-Jmue22 �
Jarly Childhood
iducarion
May 16-29
Religion and
Culture
May 21-June S ;
iducation
'ufy2-22
Russian Media
Iune2$-Jlyi2
t to change
interested in
participating in
: program should
cGowan at the
:ional Affairs at
3St
:ek
:ntly being held
ice, Todd, and
rizes. Students
;s the winner of
ce will all be put
;et, and a grand
e drawn.
the NASCAR
V-lendenhall will
cken, corn dogs,
n beer and the
fill have cakes
rs.
NASCAR night
II tomorrow.
ith food at the
remark location
eatherly,
inner, you can
ie "Days of
note control cars
arcade games.
ASH WEDNESDAY
Attention
Honors Students
The following Honors Students need to
report to the Honors Program ASAP:
(GCD 2026, 8-5 , M-F)
1) Those graduating in May with either
General Education or University Honors.
2) Recipients of Undergraduate Research
Assistantships.
Brand New Luxury Apartments
Now Leasing
752-9995
?UTILITIES INCLUDED FULLY FURNISHED
?Private Bathroom
4 Bedroom 4 Bathroom
Individual Leasing
Roommate Matching
Designer Interiors
State of the Art Amenities
Free Cable
Free Computer lab
Free Monitored Alarm
ECU Bus Line
Pirates Cove
3305 E. 10m Street � Greenville, Nt 27658
covering the
Catchphrase contest makes profit for
Nebraska students
GENEVA, Neb. (AP) - Ever catch
yourself saying, "like, you know" a
lot?
Geneva High School senior
Jessica Reinsch won $1,000 for tap-
ing a 15-minute radio interview
during which that annoying phrase
- "you know" - was uttered 61
times.
Before the Nebraskaland
Foundadon's "You Know" contest,
Reinsch was aware of how often
she heard the phrase, "but it didn't
ever connect that it was that annoy-
ing she said.
"Now I hear it all the time she
said. "I catch myself now. It seems
weird
The contest, open to Nebraska
students from kindergarten
through 12th grades, was set up to
raise awareness among young peo-
ple about the meaningless phrase.
It stems from the morning
Nebraska native Barney Oldfield
heard 117 "you knows" during a
60-minute radio show.
"It was an oral abomination
said the 1933 University of
Nebraska School of Journalism
graduate, who now lives in Beverly
Hills, Calif. Oldfield and his wife,
Vada, contribute the cash awards.
Trucker unsatisfied
with escort services:
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) - A
Kansas truck driver is in the
Oklahoma County Jail after com-
plaining to police that he didn't get
his money's worth from a prosti-
tute.
Authorities said Jarrod Lee
West, 24, of Newton, Kan called
police about 8 p.m. Tuesday to
complain that the woman left
before he was finished and he
wanted half of his $80 returned.
"He told me that she was his!
date and that she did not perform
the services that he asked for, so he
wanted his money back a police
officer wrote in a report.
West was arrested on a public
lewdness complaint and remained!
in the Oklahoma County jail
Wednesday.
The officer arrested Meza'
"Misty" Jayne87 Miller, 24, of
Oklahoma City, on a complaint of
engaging in a public act of lewdi
ness, police said.
GROUP THERAPY"�
4 PEOPLE
4 SHOTS
1 PITCHER
1 LOW PRICE
SPORTS PAD
FOR All
EVERY TUESDAY NIGHT
8 & 8-BALL POOL
TOURNAMENT
STARTS AT 10:30pm
CASH POT
� �
PIRATE
UNDERGROUND
MURAL
COMPETITION!
Design and Paint
a mural for the
Pirate Underground
$500 PRIZE
Submissions (i.e. ideas and tight sketches)
must be received by March 8th, 1999
All materials for the final project will be supplied.
The project starts after spring break.
For more information contact
the Student Unon offices at 328.4715.
4v�tr
For a good time call the Student Union Hotline at 252.328.6004,
or visit our website at www.eci.edustudentunion.





8 Teeeday. Febiaary 16. 1999
sports
The East Carolinian
Pirates earn back-to-back wins for season victory
Jaynes adds 34 points
in her last home games
Jean V. Wharton
STAFF WHITER
By showing a lot of love for the game on
Valentines Day, the Lady Pirates came
out of the weekend with two back-to-
back wins on home turf.
Friday the Women's hoops broke
their loosing streak in the CAA by nar-
rowly beating George Mason 52-51,
then jumping back into action on
Sunday to defeat American University
90-85.
The Pirates were looking to notch a
big win over GMU after two road losses
last weekend. The Patriots proved to be
a tough competitor for ECU as the two
teams went neck in neck during the first
half.
Senior center Beth Jaynes led the
Pirates in scoring with 12 points during
the first half.
Neither team broke away for a big
lead. In the first half they tied 14 times
with no lead larger then five points. At
the half GMU had captured the lead at
31-29.
The second half was another 30 min-
utes of tough play for both teams. ECU
managed to hold on to a lead thanks to
strong defensive play.
"We had a great defensive effort in
the second half said Dee Gibson,
ECU head coach. "We did a good job
shutting them down
"We had a great defensive effort in
the second half
Dee Gibson
The game came down to the wire
with ECU up by one and the Patriots in
possession of the ball. A last minute
GMU time out with 24 seconds remain-
ing was not enough for the Patriots to
score.
ECU won 52-51, lead by Jaynes with
15 points.
ECU vs. Amerlean
NAMETOT-FG3-PT REBOUNDSTOTAL
F6FGAFGFGATOTPOINTS
Waynetta Veney0702412
Danielle Melvin511001421
Both Jaynes6900519
Misty Home3635311
Joana Fogaca150152
Allison Trapp380017
Cecilia Shinn1100713
Teana McKiver3400713
Jennifer Moretz121133
Nikki Brown000000
SourctECUSports Information Dapartment

Feeling confident off of Friday's win,
the Lady Pirates took to the floor at
Minges again on Sunday.
"We've been really pumped up off of
the George Mason game said Danielle
Melvin, junior forward.
ECU was able to gain a significant
lead over the Eagles but could not hold
on due to turnovers. At the half the
women hung on to a narrow 37-36 lead.
Jaynes lead the Pirates with 11 points
in the first half. This game marked the
end of Jaynes' ECU career as she
played in her final home game.
The second half was played at the
foul line. ECU took an early lead but
was slowed down by foul trouble. But,
setting a season high 40 of 46 at the
line, the Pirates were able to hang on to
the lead during the second half.
As the clock counted down ECU
had the lead and went to the foul line
again with forward Waynetta Veney,
securing the win.
Melvin led the team in scoring with
a career-high 21 points. Jaynes added 19
for the Pirates.
This game marked the 14th win for
the Lady Pirates, which stands for the
first winning season in six years.
"This has been a big goal, it feels
good Gibson said.
This set of victories provides the
Lady Pirates with confidence
going into the CAA tournament,
held in Richmond from March 3-
6.
"We needed to be in good
standing come tournament time
said Melvin.
Gibson and her team move to
14-10 overall and 7-7 in the CAA.
The Lady Pirates travel to
Richmond on Feb. 19 and then
finish out the regular season on
Feb. 24 at Virginia
Commonwealth.
With a career high 21 points, Danielle Melvin led the Pirates in their win over American University Sunday afternoon.
FILE PHOTO
ISwimmers gear up for championship

Mental training,
shaving cream helps times
B I. A I N K D E MI'S
S K IO R WRITER
Just when they thought it was safe to get back
into the water, other CAA teams must face the
attack of the ECU Pirates.
Charlotte, North Carolina's Mecklenburg
Aquatic Center will hold this year's Conference
Swimming Championship from Feb. 18-20.
Pirate swimmers are gradually resting their
bodies and preparing mentally for the battle
that lies ahead.
"We visualize our individual races said
Richard Chen, senior swimmer. "Everybody
'does their mental thing on their own. I try not
io think about it until I'm on that deck
According to Chen, team members have lots
if energy and for the most part the atmosphere
around the pool is relaxed. Chen believes that
the real energy does not come until you reach
ihe Championship and nervousness can begin
io affect a swimmer.
�� "I'm nervous as hell Chen said. "I sit in
ihe corner and read a book to get my mind off
;of the race
In spite of the pressure to perform
well at the Conference
Championship, head coach Rick Kobe
is confident and believes his team is
always ready.
"We want to have a great team
meet Kobe said. "We want everyone
to swim fast and that's it
Even though the women's team
has been plagued with injuries
throughout the season, freshman
swimmer Courtney Foster is focused
on her goals and optimistic.
"My goals are taped on the ceiling
above my bed Foster said. "Every
night as I go to bed I tell myself that I
can win. I hope everyone does their
personal best, and if we win confer-
ence on top of that then that is great
too
The Seahawks of UNCW defeated the
Pirates to end this year's regular season on Jan.
23. Hoping to avenge that loss, the Pirates aim
to crush their toughest competitor and win the
Conference Championship.
"We look to beat up UNCW Foster said.
"As a team, we look to them to take the con-
ference lead if we don't
Over the past two weeks, male swimmers
have shaved their bodies to achieve more
speed in the water. All team members are
beginning to decrease their distances in prac-
Pirate
swimmers prepare for their championship meet Feb. 18-20.
FILE PHOTO
tice, eat well and rest mentally and physically.
This method is known as tapering and helps
swimmers conserve their energy. If the system
works, these athletes feel their best physically
and are able to swim faster at this decisive
event.
Swimming has always been a winning tradi-
tion at ECU and the '99 Pirates look to contin-
ue this trend while improving on impressive
conference finishes last season. The women
SEE SWIMMING PAGE 9
gets first win since May
;SAN DIEGO (AP) Tiger Woods
;will remember his Buick
Invitational win for a lot of differ-
ent reasons.
There was the 15-foot eagle
putt on No. 18 that finally put
away Billy Ray Brown and gave
Woods a two-stroke victory, his
first since May. There was the 17-
under-par weekend. Perhaps most
�importantly, though, were the
family members and friends in the
gallery.
Woods' nine-month victory
drought ended, fittingly, back
home in sunny Southern
California.
"It means a lot to me to do this
krfront of, in a sense, a hometown
crowd Woods said Sunday after
his round of 7-under 65, which
came in perfect
"You can't really say enough how
much that really affects you, to see
people that you do know, and are
out there supporting you
Tiger Woods
Professional Golfer
weather oruthe heels of his
Torrey Pines South Course record
62�his best round as a pro�on
Saturday.
"You can't really say enough
how much that really affects you,
to see people that you do know,
and are out there supporting
you Woods said. "You don't get
to see it every week as you travel
all over the world. Most of the
time you're alone, you and your
caddy
Woods, thrust both arms in the
air after finishing at 22-under-par
266, tying George Bums' 1987
tournament record for Torrey
Pines.
Woods had gone winiess in 14
tournaments since his last victory,
at the BelJSouth Classic. Brown,
whose only top 10 finish in the last
six years was a win at the Deposit
Guaranty Golf Classic in 1997,
shot a 66 Sunday to finish at 268.
Bill Glasson was alone at third at
270, while Chris Perry, Omar
Uresti and Kevin Sutherland tied
for fourth at 273. .
Brown said he had a fun round
until a bad second shot on 18.
"It was Tiger's tournament to
lose Brown said. "All I could do
was go free-wheel, and he's the
guy who had pressure on him. And
you see how he responded to the
pressure. An eagle on the last hole
is just indicative of the kind of
,� SEE TIBER WOODS PAGE 8
Track team grabs
spotlight at Va. Tech
Pirates wins 4x400
at Kroger Invitational
Stephen S c m r a m m
SENIOR WRITER
ECU went head to head with teams
from around the country and came
out on top at this weekend's Kroger
Collegiate Invitational.
Both the men's and women's track
teams traveled to the meet at Virginia
Tech with hopes of qualifying for the
important meets to come and possi-
bly breaking some personal and
school records along the way. One
athlete who broke records and quali-
fied for the NCAAs was ECU fresh-
man Toni Kilgore.
Kilgore set a new school and per-
sonal record in the triple jump with a
jump of 41'6 12
"I knew she would eventually
jump that far, but I did not expect her
to do it this soon said Chatles
"Choo" Justice, ECU's head women's
track coach. "She will continue as she
gets stronger and more experienced
Another sparkling performance
came from Michelle Clayton. In the
weight throw, Clayton set a new
school record and a new NCAA provi-
sional qualifying mark with a throw of
60' 8 Clayton, ranked 10th in the
country, wound up first among col-
lege competitors losing only to a pro-
fessional. In the shot put, Clayton
placed third.
Kiona Kirkpatrick set a school
record in the 400 meter dash.
Kirkpatrick finished 12th.
"She ran a perfect race. She ran
really well Justice said.
Rasheca Barrow had an exception-
al meet, running well in two events.
In the 200 meter dash, Barrow placed
11th. Her time of 25.11 seconds broke
her personal record and qualified her
for the ECAC Championships later
this month. Barrowfollowed up her
performance in the 200 by finishing
seventh in the 60 meter dash.
In the long jump Kilgore and
teammate Toshima Dabbs took ninth
and 10th place respectively.
In the women's 4x400 meter relay
ECU qualified for the ECAC
Championships and placed eighth.
The men's 4x400 meter relay final
was touted as "the Battle of the
Carolinas" because it pitted squads
from the ECU, the University of
North Carolina and the University of
South Carolina. The battle turned out
not to be much of a race. ECU took
the lead on the second leg and won
by 15 meters.
"Before the race they played this
fight song on the loud speakers and
said it was the battle of the Carolinas.
People were up and screaming.
That's what it's all about said Bill
Carson, ECU's head men's track
coach .
The 4x400 meter relay team of
James Alexander, Darrick Ingram,
Lawrence Ward and Damon Davis
finished first out of 52 teams. The
team is currently ranked ninth in the
nation.
Many of the runners on the 4x400
squad had already competed in the
open 400 meters earlier in the meet.
Davis finished sixth despite drawing
lane two.
Ward won his heat in the 400 as he
had in the past few meets, but like
those meets Ward did not make it
into the finals.
"We're winning heats but we're
not getting into the fastest heats
Carson said.
In the 500 meter dash, Lynn
Stewart placed second while team-
mate Von Johnson placed fourth.
Johnson's time of 1:04.83 qualified
him for the IC4A Indoor
Championships.
In the 60 meter dash, Vaughn
Monroe placed 11th out of 56.
In the 60 meter high hurdles fresh-
man Aaron Harris continued his sur-
SEE TRACK PAGE S ?
9 Tuesday, Feb
swam strong 1
second, while
third.
Team men
and staying pc
pare for the
meet of the s
letes also reali;
and giving it
what really mi
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granted Che
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9 Tuesday, February IB. 1998
sports
Thi Ent Carolinian
l East Carolinian
ry
nday afternoon.
bs
ech
) by finishing
dash.
Kilgore and
bs took ninth
rely.
K) meter relay
the ECAC
ced eighth.
:ter relay final
iattle of the
pitted squads
University of
University of
tie turned out
;e. ECU took
leg and won
;y played this
speakers and
the Carolinas.
j screaming.
ut said Bill
men's track
elay team of
rrick Ingram,
Damon Davis
I teams. The
d ninth in the
on the 4x400
ipeted in the
r in the meet.
:spite drawing
i the 400 as he
eets, but like
not make it
ats but we're
astest heats
dash, Lynn
1 while team-
laced fourth.
4.83 qualified
tA Indoor
dash, Vaughn
tof56.
hurdles fresh-
inued his sur-
Swimming
continued from paga 8
Tiger Woods
continued from page 8
swam strong last year finishing
second, while the men finished
third.
Team members are focused
and staying positive as they pre-
pare for the most anticipated
meet of the season. These ath-
letes also realize that showing up
and giving it your best shot is
what really matters.
"Don't take anything for
granted Chen said. "Just show
There's a whole world
out there.
Explore it with Contiki
Cket-p iLt f' ��(( .�
London
Madrid
$190
$234
Vienna $263
Paris $220
F�r�i an 'ram HalihDurham.ticfi oaf bind on
a FIT pu'tlnir Fi'ti do nol mcluda UMi,which
tan toial bU��tn SI and SlO.lnil Sudani ID
m�bi raquirad Farat ara valid for
departure in March and ara tubjact to change
Kanrlciioni apply Call for our low domatnc fam
and larai to othar world wida
damnation! Don i brfai to order jour
Ewrailpaii!
Travel mmm
DEE: Council on Inierulmul
Educitkxiil Eichant'
l-800-2Council
up and do your thing. You can't
take anything away effort wise
from these guys. Every time we
go out, we give it our best
Both the men's and women's
teams will begin their journey to
Charlotte on Feb. 17 and com-
pete through the weekend to
Feb. 20. After this year's suc-
cessful regular season, the
Pirates do not plan to return to
Greenville empty handed. Some
ECU swimmers are expected
to do especially well, includ-
ing possible NCAA qualifiers
Adam Gaffey (500, 1650 free-
style), Matt Jabs (sprint free)
and Josh Lepree (butterfly)
for the men. The women look
to Courtney Foster (sprint
free), Dana Fuller (distance
free) and Niki Kreel (breast,
IM) for extraordinary perfor-
player he is
Woods came into the
final round one stroke
ahead of Brown, arid quick-
ly took a four-stroke lead
after birdies on three of the
first four holes at the 7,055-
yard South Course.
But he also found him-
self in a dogfight. A bogey
on the par-4 No. 4 and a 35-
foot eagle pitch on No. 9
left him two strokes up on
Brown, who birdied Nos. 8
and 9.
Woods said he felt he
and Brown were basically in
a match-play situation after
Glasson, playing in the
group ahead, didn't birdie
No. 13. Woods and Brown
both birdied 13, putting
Woods at 20-under and
Brown one behind him.
Woods and Brown both had
scrambling pars on No. 15
after errant drives, and
Woods was visibly upset
after a fan took a picture on
his downswing. He drove
deep into the trees on the
left, but had an opening and
recovered nicely with a cut
5-iron shot.
Brown tied Woods at 20-
under with a 6-foot birdie
putt on the par-3 16th,
where Woods' 15-footer
lipped-out.
After both again saved
par with great up-and-
downs on 17, they went
into No. 18 tied. Woods
mastered the par-5s all
weekend. His drive landed
on the first cut of the rough,
which he followed with "a
perfect 7-iron" onto the
green. Brown, meanwhile,
was indecisive with his 3-
iron second shot, hitting it
fat but nonetheless lucking
out.when it landed just to
the right of the big pond
that fronts the green. His
approach shot landed out-
side of Woods' ball, leaving
him a two-pun for par. All
Woods had to do was putt
for his second eagle of the
round and third of the
weekend.
prising season finishing
16th but not qualifying for
the IC4A's.
'That's the guy who's
not qualified yet that we
know can Carson said.
Brian Beil set a personal
Track
continued from page 8
record in the 800 meter run
as did Steve Arnold in the
1000 meters and David
Balon in the mile.
"David Balon has typi-
fied our team this year
said Leonard Klepack,
ECU's cross country and
track coach. "He has
improved
ECU's distance medley
squad set a new school
record, finishing eighth out
of 18 teams.
Results from Kroger College Invitational
MEN
4x400 meter relay.let3:09.68
Damon Davis,400 meter dash.6th47.73
Lawrence Ward.400 meter daah.7th47.93
Lynn Stewart.500 meter dash.2nd1:04.00
von Johnson.500 meter dash.4th1:04.83
Brian Beil,800 meters.19th1:55.22. personal record
Steve Arnold.1000 meters.14th2:32.06. personal record
David Balon.Mile Run,17th4:17.06, personal record
Distance Medley.8th10:10.10. school record
Vaughn Monroe.60 meter dash.11th6.91
Aaron Harris.60 meter high hurdles.16th8.27
WOMEN
Michelle Clayton.Weight throw.2nd60 8 school record
Margaret Clayton.Weight throw.11th47' 3 12"
Toni Kilgore,Triple jump.8th41 6 12'
Saundra Teel,60 meter high hurdles,8:89. personal record
Marshari Williams.60 meter high hurdles.17th9.08.
Kiona Kirkpatrick.400 meter dash.12th56.26, school record
Michelle Clayton.Shot Put,3rd47' 2 12"
Rasheca Barrow,200 meter dash.11th25.11
Rasheca Barrow,60 meter dash.7th7.71
Toni Kilgore,long jump.9th19' 0 12"
Toshima Dabbs.Ing jump.10th18' 9 12"
4x400 meter relay.8th3:53.83
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10 TutJdiy. February 16. 1998
HassifiRris
Tht Ewt Carolinian
FOP FrT
FOR SALE
HELP WANTED
PERSONALS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
� Villas - Three bed-
room, two bath apartments, close to
campus, with laundry room, stove,
refrigerator, and dishwasher. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC 766-6209.
LANQSTON PARK Apartments:
$100 off deposit 2 bedroom. 1 bath
apt. free watersewer, all applianc-
es, washerdryer hook-ups. over
900 sq.ft. Available now $425. Call
768-1921.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$286month. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apts 126 Avery St. in Green-
ville - 5 blocks from campus. 758-
6696.
WESLEY COMMONS South: $100
off deposit: 2 bedroom. 1 bath apt.
free watersewer, washerdryer
hook-ups. 6 blocks from campus.
Available now $440. Call 768-1921.
WALK TO ECU. 1.2.3. or 4 bed-
room, available May to Aug. Now
renting. Call 3211712.
DUPLEX, 2 BDR. 1 Bath, heat
pump, private drive, close to cam-
pus, no pets please. Call 756-8444
or 355-7799.

NAGS HEAD, NC-Get your group to-
gether early. Relatively new house in
excellent condition; fully furnished;
washer & dryer; dishwasher; central
AC: available May 1 through Au-
gust 31; sleeps 8-S2200 00 per
month. 757-860-1632
CONDO FOR Rent: 2000 sq.ft. con-
do, newly renovated, 3 bedrooms, 1
12 baths, washerdryer hook-up.
Available immediately. 762-1899
daytime, 561-2203 pager � nights.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom. 1 bath apt.
$276.00 per month, free watersew-
er, range, refrig. pets OK. Call 758-
1921 ask for Ken.
GLADIOLUS GARDENS One. two.
and three bedroom apartments. Free
cable. Located on 10th Street. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC 756-6209.
106 STANCILL DRIVE. 2 bedroom,
1 bathroom, brick duplex, central
heatair. near ECU. $425 month,
pets extra with fee. Call 353-2717 or
766-2766.
CANNON COURT Two bedroom. 1
12 bath townhouse. Includes stove,
refrigerator, dishwasher, washerdry
er hook-up, on ECU bus 'route. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC, 756209.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom 8t
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
1980 GEO Storm for sale by owner.
90,000 miles, in good condition.
Asking $2700 or best offer. Call Lau-
ren at 830-3803 if interested.
FOR SALE: Ferret with cage and
amenities. Call 363-6974. $200.
CUSTOM PRINTED T-shirts. Profes-
sion printers since 1981. Competitive
rates. Free shipping. Full art depart-
ment. We accept digital files in most
formats. 800-272-2066 culture-
works.com
6'8" IN The Eye surfboard ($250).
Great condition. Six months old. Din-
ing room table wfour chairs ($50).
931-0307, leave message.
NEED A printer? 1995 Apple Style-
writer II, in excellent condition! Will
sell for only $100. Also, 1992 Macin-
tosh monitor (no harddrive). sell for
$60. Call, leave message 329-0390
AAAI SPRING Break Bahamas Par-
ty Cruise! 5 nights $279! Includes
meals Er parties! Awesome beaches,
nightlife! Departs from Florida! Can-
cun & Jamaica $399! springbreak-
travel.com 1-800-678-6386
AAAI Spring Break Panama City
$129! Boardwalk room with kitchen
near clubs! 7 parties-free drinks!
Daytona $149! South Beach $129!
Cocoa Beach $149! sprmgbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
'34 YAMAHA XT600 DualSport.
5,000 miles, excellent bike. $2,000
0B0. Call 353-8958.
'88 YAMAHA Virago 750. low mile-
age, kingqueen seats, new rear tire,
runs great! Call Chris, 758-9245.
LAPTOP COMPUTERTOSHIBA
Satellite Pro 435CDS. Equipped with
hard drive and CD-ROM. Best offer
and it's yours. Call 758-9640.
TWO LOVE8EATS for sale. Pull out
into beds. $200.00 for both OBO.
Also willing to sell separately. Call
931-0487.
1888 HONDA Prelude SI, 124.600
miles, 5-speed, sunroof, very de-
pendable. $3700 or best offer. 757-
1949.
DAPPER
DAN'S
ROOMMATE WANTED
MF ROOMMATE needed to share
3 bedroom house- one block from
campus. Must not mind smokers.
Rent $190 plus 13 util cable. Call
Katie 931-0348.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 3 bedroom, 2 bath house on
ECU bus route. Rent $220, includes
washer and dryer. 329-0471
ONE BLOCK from campus. Female
roommate needed. Must like dogs.
$130 month plus 14 utilities. 757-
1467.
�. i .�dm - m. � � ��
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share a 3 bedroom apartment. Pay
$125 month rent and 14 utilities.
Lease until August. Call 329-1493.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom apart-
ment 2 blocks from school. Rent
$255. Washerdryer included. 12
cable, 12 utilities. 12 phone. Avail-
able at end of this semester. Make
plans now. Call Emily, 329-0886.
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE
Needed to share apt. close to cam-
pus, student preferred. Must pe re-
sponsible & clean & like pets. Total
expenses per month will not exceed
$270. 752-0009.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. Malefe-
male. Available March 1st! Tar River
Estates, in walking distance to cam-
pus. 2 bedrooms. 2 bathrooms,
kitchen, and living room. Rent
$265mo 12 utilities. Ask for
Chris at 752-1621 or leave message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for 2 bed-
mom. 1-12 bath townhouse. Fully
furnished. Close to campus.
$235month plus half utilities.
Please call 321-7762 between hours
of 10a.m.and 6p.m.
SERVICES
STUDENT DISCOUNT for auto de-
tailing. Don't like to clean your car?
Let us do it. Professional and experi-
enced. Pick up avail. Call Tim for
prices at 931-9165.
LEARN TO
kXY$MTS
(lttHH-2224
SPRING BREAK 99! Cancun' Nas-
sau Jamaica. Travel free and make
lots of Cash! Top reps are offered on-
site staff jobs. All-inclusive deals. 32
hours Free brinks. Special Discounts
up to$100 per person. Lowest price
guaranteed. Call now for details!
www.classtravel.com 800-838-6411
HELP WANTED
POOL MANAGERS and Lifeguards
with great people skills needed for
the summer of 1999 in the Triangle
area. Additional offices in the Balti-
more. Richmond, Philadelphia, .DC.
Atlanta NJ. and Nashville areas.
Please Contact Lisa at 919-878-3661.
NEED SUMMER help at Hatteras
qeach. Free � housing. Need two
males or females for retail seafood
market. Bonus offered. Call 252-986-
2215 or e-mail riskybOinterpath.com
WILLING TO trade free horseback
riding for occasional stable help.
Must have previous experience with
horses. Call 756-5784 after 6 p.m.
STUDENT PHOTOGRAPHER want-
ed for wedding. Experience required,
professional photographer is not
necessary. Please call 752-0695,
leave message.
FREE RADIO $1250. Fundraiser
open to student groups 8- organiza-
tions. Earn $3-$5 per VisaMC app.
We supply all materials at no cost.
Call for info or visit our website.
Qualified callers receive a Free Baby
Boom Box. 1-800-932-0528 x 65.
www.ocmconcepts .com
1889 INTERNSHIPS! Don't get a
summer job Run a summer busi-
ness. www.tuitionpainters.com. tui-
paintObellsouth.net or 800-393-
4521.
ON-LINE INFORMATION
Part-TimeJobs
Earn Money And
Resume' Experience
Working For
ONLINE
COLLECTIONS
Earn Up T
Mon-Fri 5 to 9 p.m.
Sat. 8 a.m. to Noon
ONLINE Collections is
looking (or the 5 most
aggressive people on
ECU'S campus to work as
telephone collectors. The
perfect part-time job.
Excellent pay. Ourgrads
get hired based on their
experience working for
us. We also have a few
day slots open if you
have full mornings or
afternoons to work.
Contact Brian Franey at
757-2130.
SYLVAN LEARNING Center is seek-
ing a Spanish and high level Math
tutor. We are looking for a reliable
person who is available MonThurs.
2-7:30. Please apply at 2428 S. Cha-
rles Blvd.
TRUGREEN C HEM LAWN, nation's
leader in lawncare, is looking for in-
dividuals interested in part-time cler-
ical work from 5-9 MonFri. $6-$7
an hour. Call 756-2352 for interview.
$7.00 PER hour plus $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina. (Nags Head). Call
Dona for application and housing
info 800-662-2122.
LOOKING FOR a part-time job?
Help wanted at Szechuan Express, in
the Food Court in the Plaza Mall.
Day hours from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m
night hours from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Apply in person. No phone calls,
please.
CRUISE SHIP Employment - work-
ers earn up to $2000 month (w
tips & benefits). World Travel! Land-
Tour jobs up to $5,000 -$7,000
summer. Ask us how! 517-336-4235
Ext.C53623
FRATERNITIES. SORORITIES 8
Student Groups: Earn $1000-$2000
with easy 3 hour CIS Fund Raiser
event. No sales required. Fund
Raiser days are filling up, so call
today. Contact Chris 800-829-4777
EARN GOOD money and learn at
the same time with an internship in
the financial services industry. Fax
your resume to Jeff Mahoney at 355-
7980 or call 365-7700.
EARN EXTRA Cash Make your
own hours Responsible students to
marketmanage Citibank promo-
tions on campus. Free giveaways!
Earn $400-)- week. Call Ann at 1-
800-950-8472 ext. 118.
PERSONALS
THE CARD Post is seeking ECU'S
police chief's confirmation "that a
warning of trespass cannot be ap-
pealed & will explore the need of
issuing officer to request possession
of pager & right to scan pager
without owner's permission. Tom K.
Drew
JANA, I love you! Happy Valentine's
Day. Will you marry me? You're the
one I need in my life forever. Be
minel Love always, Chris
CAULDER, I love you! Mary
MANDY, HAPPY Valentine's Day to
the girl who holds the key to my
heart. You're my everything) I'll love
you always and forever! Love. Brent
B BUT Babayyou know I luh you!
Happy 2nd Valentine's Day to us. All
my heart. Little E
MARC, YOU complete me. I contin-
ue to search for your wings, for you
wilt always be my angel. By the way-
nice shoes. I love you. Lesley
LEAH. SOMETHING powerful
brought us together and something
wonderful keeps us together. Be my
Valentine and make me the happiest
man alive. Love. Jamie
TO THE most wonderful boyfriends
in the world: Christopher and An-
drew, you're the sweetest things, in
our lives and we love youl Melinda
and Tiffany
BUNNY � For three years you have
had my heart. Will you be mine for-
ever? Will you be my wife? Love al-
ways, your Turtle Girl
GREEK PERSONALS
SIGMA NU, thanks for going the ex-
tra mile to make the Margaritaville
social a blast! We all had a great
time. Love, the sisters of Alpha Delta
Pi
THETA CHI- Thanks for the social
last Thursday. The karaoke was so
much fun. Let's do it again soon.
Love, the sisters of Alpha Xi Delta
CONGRATULATIONS CHI Omega
basketball team on your wins last
week against Alpha Delta Pi. Love,
sisters of Chi Omega
TO ALPHA Delta Pi, thanks for a
great time Thursday in Margeritta-
ville. Can't wait to "get wasted away
again" with all of you. Love, the
brothers of Sigma Nu
OTHER
SPRINGBREAK BEACHES Dayto-
na. Panama City. Padre. Miami. Can-
cun, Jamaica, Bahamas, etc. All the
popular hot spots. Best hotels, pric-
es, parties. Browse www.icpt.com.
Reps earn cash, free trips. Call Inter-
Campus 800-327-6013
SUBLEASE: 1 bedroom, 2 blocks
from campus on Summit St.
$350month. Pets okay with fee. If
interested, call Stacey or Greg at
752-7967.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
BE HERE be there BGLAD (Bisexuals
Gays Lesbians and Allies for Diversi-
ty). We meet every Wednesday at
7:30 in room GCB 3008. Come join
the fun, make new friends and make
a difference.
ASSERTIVENES8 TRAINING:
Tuesday 11a.m-12noon.The Center
for Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering this workshop on
Tuesday Feb. 16th. If you are inter-
ested in this workshop, please con-
tact the Center at 328-6661.
THE EXERCISE and Sport Science
Motor and Physical Fitness Compet-
ency Test is scheduled as follows:
Place: Minges Coliseum (Williams
Arena) Time: 12:00 noon Date: Fri-
day. February 19. 1999. A passing
score on this test is required of all
students prior to declaring Exercise
and Sport Science as a major. Any
student with a medical condition
that would contraindicate participa-
tion in the testing should contact
Mike McCammon or Michelle Brun-
son at 328-4688. A detailed sum-
mary of the test components is avail-
able in the Human Performance Lab-
oratory (Room 371. Sports Medicine
Bldg.). " Students must bring East
Carolina University Student I.D.
PASTOR JAMES D. Corbett of
Community Christian Church will be
ministering at an OASIS (Older Ac-
tive Saints In Service) Fellowship on
Sat Feb. 20th at 1 p.m. This fellow-
ship is designed to minister to adults
50 years old and older, teaching
how to maintain a victorious Chris-
tian life and remain active in their
service for the Lord and will be held
at Community Christian Academy,
2009 Pactolus Road in Greenville.
Refreshments and socializing will be
available. For info, call 561-9143.
4-ON-4 Volleyball entry deadline -
Tue. Feb. 16, 5p.m. O the Student
Recreation Center main office, room
128
THE MEDIA Society presents a Trip
to Film Studios in Wilmington on Fe-
bruary 20. To reserve your place pay
$16 (in cash) by February 18 at 6
p.m. to Kaye Fairweather. The $15
fee covers the cost of transportation,
tour of the film studio, and lunch.
The bus will leave from Clock Tower
area by 8:30 a.m. whether you are
there or not. So. be there. Begin now
to network for future jobs and con-
tacts!
ARE YOU a communications major
interested in a career in TV or radio?
Join the Media Society! Meetings
are every Monday in Joyner East 221
O 3p.m. and are open to all Commu-
nication majors. Come meet mem-
bers at our next meeting and sign up
for a fun semester of trips, speakers
and activities. We'll see you there)!
BECOMING A Successful Student-
Time Management: Monday 3:30-
4:30 The Center for Counseling and
Student Development is offering the
following workshop on Monday, Feb.
22nd. If you are interested in this
workshop, contact the center at 328-
6661.
SGA WILL sponsor an information
booth on how to get involved within
the organization on Tuesday, Febru-
ary 16. Applications and members
will be present to answer any ques-
tions. For more information call 328-
4724.
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION: Thurs-
day 11a.m12:00 noon. The Center
for Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering this workshop on
Thursday, Feb. 18th. If you are inter-
ested in this workshop, please con-
tact the Center at 328-6661.
GAMMA BETA Phi will meet at 5
p.m. Thurs. Feb. 19th in the social
room at Mendenhall Student Center.
LEARNED OPTIMISM: Wednesday
3:30-4:30p.m. The Center for Coun-
seling and Student Development is
offering this workshop on
Wednesday, Feb. 17th. If you are in-
terested in this workshop, please
contact the Center at 328-6661.
ADVERTISE IN
THE CLASSIFIEDS.
IT WORKS!
ma;�
canCOn'oartiaica-Bahawias
CAMPUS REPS - SIGN UP ONLINE I
18002347007
www.cn(lissumm(;ilours,com
EAST CAROUNA University's
twenty-ninth annual Speech Lan-
guage and Hearing Symposium will
be held at Rock Springs Equestrian
Center and Jockey Club on February
18th and 19th. The symposium is
sponsored by East Carolina Universi-
ty Chapter of the National Student
Speech Language Hearing Associa-
tion in cooperation with ECU Dept.
of Communication Sciences and Dis-
orders and Eastern Area Health Edu-
cation Center (AHEC). Guest speak-
ers include Carol Flexer. Ph.D. and
Jean Blosser, Ed D, both professors
from University of Akron, Ohio. Dr.
Flexer will be presenting on "Man-
agement of Infants and Children
with Hearing Loss" on Thursday from
8:45a.m5p.m. Dr. Blosser will be
discussing 'Expanding Service Deliv-
ery Options to Achieve Treatment
Outcomes" on Friday from 8a.m
12noon. Anyone interested in at-
tending may contact the department
at 328-4405.
ASH WEDNESDAY at the Newman
Catholic Student Center Feb. 17 -
Masses with the distribution of ash-
es: 8 a.m. at the Newman Center, 12
Noon in Great Room at Mendenhall.
and 5:30 p.m. at the Newman Cen-
ter followed by soup supper. The
Newman Center is located at 953 E.
10th Street, 2 houses from the
Fletcher Music Building.
FEBRUARY CONTRA Dance! Willis
Bldg 1st and Reade Sts. Live music
by Old-Time String Band: Elderberry
Jam. Caller: Art Langrish. Free less-
ons 7-7:30 p.m Dance 7:30-10:30
p.m Sat Feb. 20. Students $3.00,
public $5-6. Come alone or bring a
friend. ECU Folk and Country Danc-
ers, 328Q237.
BECOMING A Successful Student-
Note-Time Management: Tuesday
3:30-4:30 The Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development is of-
fering the following workshop on
Tuesday. Feb. 16th. If you are inter-
ested in this workshop, contact the
center at 328-6661.
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: Thursday 3:30-5PM. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering this work-
shop on Thursday, February 18th. If
you are interested in this program,
contact the center at 328-6661.
SpmQ &M WH �� 1 of� VM iMM in IN US in 1998 to IM
ncovfcfd to ouWKUfcig Met br Council of Botw BmiMM Bumui1
$279
Bahamas Party
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Panama $119
City- Boaidwak, Hofcdjy hw. Sumprre S More
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Cancun $399
7 rgrrU � AirHoW � Free Food & 30 His of Drinks
Spring Break TravcOur 12th Year!
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'






he East Carolinian
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Speech Lan-
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symposium is
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jses from the
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Sts. Live music
and: Elderberry
jrish. Free less-
ice 7:30-10:30
Students $3.00.
lone or bring a
Country Danc-
:essful Student-
nent: Tuesday
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elopment is of-
workshop on
f you are inter-
op, contact the
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3:30-5PM. The
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abruary 18th. If
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328-6661.
iX
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$279
nfces � Includes lues
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Inn Suntpiw I Mote
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$150onFowJ4 0nnks
i $399
MK) & 30 His of Dunks
-Our 12th Year!
8-6386
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It's written in the stars
Everyone wins with campus living!
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Take advantage of your chance to reserve a room in
the residence halls and a meal plan for next year
during Return to Campus Living Sign-Up.
Be sure to bring your sealed Cash oh the Spot game
card with you to Return to Campus Living Sign-Up
for your chance to win cash on the spot. Everyone
walks away a winner with campus living!
Plus, you'll be entered in the 1999-2000 reach
for the stars Campus Living Sweepstakes.

Return to Campus Living Sign-Up,
going on now, February 15-19
6
4 10:00 a.m6:00 p.m.
H
Up
RESIDENTS WHO SIGN-UP FOR 1999-2000
ARE ELIGIBLE TO WIN. SEE RULES AT SITE FOR MORE DETAILS.
UNIVERSITY HOUSING AND CAMPUS DINING SERVICES
TELEPHONE: ECU-HOME; ECU-FOOD

I
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Ml





Sexual Assault Awareness
Week at a Glance
Monday, February 22
7:00p.m. Keynote Address, Hendrix Theatre
"Is What, I Want What You Want? Promoting Consent and Preventing
Coercion in Intimate Relationships presented by Dr. Alan Berkowitz.
What can men and women do to insure that all sexual intimacy is mutual,
uncoerced and consenting? What are guidelines for ensuring that consent is
present? This lecture provides guidelines for what men can do to prevent rape and
what women can do to reduce their risk of victimization, and what we can all do to
create healthy campuses where sexual assault is uncommon. Dr. Berkowitz has served
as an advisor to The Centers for Disease Control, the U.S. Department of Education,
and professional organizations concerned with problems of drug abuse, AIDS
prevention, and sexual assault.
Tuesday, February 23
7:00 p.m. Self Defense Training, Student Recreation Center Room 240
LaFrance Davis, ECU Police
8:00 p.m. Men's Perspectives: A Discussion for Men Only, MSC Social Room
Led by Dr. Thomas Maple, Licensed Psychologist.
Wednesday, February 24
7:00 p.m. Candelight Vigil for survivors of sexual assault and those who are
supportive of survivors, Resource Room (located behind Student Health Center, entrance
between Student Health and Joyner Library)
8:00 p.m. One Night of Partying: The Role of Alcohol and Drug Use in Sexual Assaults,
Mendenhall Great Room 1 Mr. Bob Morphet, Substance Abuse Counselor
Thursday, February 25
6:00p.m. Take Back the Night March begins at the Cupola. Last year, over two hundred
students participated. This year's goal is to have over 250 marchers!
BC Saf 6! Know How to Prot
Yourself and Your Partner
In the Residence Halls
Lock doors - don't prop open entrances and lock your room door
Know who should be there - don't allow strangers in
Report people who are out of place
Do not leave your full name on your answering machine

ABOUT LAST NIGHT
Last night I was downtown with several of my friends. It was a night
like any other night downtown. ejKftJjjjkaghing and having a
great time. Before I knew what was happening, I began to feel very ill.
I was sleepy, having trouble staying alert. I couldn't understand what
was happening because I had not had very much to drink. I had drunk as
much as I usually drink, but I felt as if I had drank a lot more.
Today I am thankful for my friends. I told one of my friends that I was
feeling really bad. After some general teasing, "lightweight one of my
tends helped me get home safely. One of them even stayed with me
ntil the next morning.
Today I feel like I will neveT be the same again. I don't really have a
lot of memories about what happened to me, but I know it was awful. I
remember feeling numb, as though I couldn't move, couldn't defend
myself. I remember someone was with me, doing things I didn't want
them to do. I remember asking them to stop, saying, "No Today, I,
feel afraid, my world is a very diflnnt place now. Where were my
friends? Where were the people fflppught I could trust?
What will be the end of your story? YoftsSecide. Learn how to protect yourself
and your friends through participating i& Sexual Assault Awareness Week
February 22-February 26.
-
Rape-
are the Facts?
On Campus
Stay in lighted areas
Walk in groups
Be aware of your surroundings
Have keys ready
Have a safety plan
Let friends know your destination and arrival times
Vary your routine - drive or walk different routes every day
Stay out of unoccupied parts of buildings
Be very careful in unfamiliar surroundings or when using outside ATMs at night
On Dates
Stay in control of self
Be aware of chahges in environment
Be clear about what you want and don't want
Don't stay with someone who intimidates, frightens, doesn't listen, or loses self control
Always carry enough change for a telephone call
Don't leave your drink unattended
In Relationships
Continuously assess what you want
Be clear when communicating
Be respectful of partner's boundaries
View each other as equals
Never be passive, coy, or submissive
Always
Clarify desires and intents of both parties
Be assertive
Be aware - pay attention to nonverbals
Approximately two-thirds of all rapes are not reported to the police.
Women are 10 times more likely than men to be victims of rape or sexual
assault.
One-third of all rape victims consider committing suicide.
The majority of rape and sexual assault victims are young women between the
ages of 16 and 24.
One out of every five young women in 2 and 4 year colleges report that they
have been forced to have sexual intercourse.
Less than 2 of reported rapes are false reports.
70 of black victims are raped by black men; 78 of white victims are raped by
white men.
12 of all sexual assault victims are men.
80 of all rapes are perpetrated by male acquaintances; only 20 of rapes are
by strangers.
40 of rapists are married or have a regular sex partner.
Revised from: Facts About Rape (REAL Crisis Center)
And the NOW Legal Defense Fund (April 6, 1998)
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 16, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 16, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1324
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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