The East Carolinian, February 11, 1999






Efo
Thursday:
High: 73
Low: 37
Friday:
High: 75
Low: 50
Online Survey
www.tec.ecu.edu
Was your power bill too expen-
sive over December break?
"Do you read unsolicited SPAM mail?"
25 Yes 75 No
Carolinian
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11.1999 VOLUME 74. ISSUE 37
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Two students arrested in drug bust
Police confiscated
between 80-100 pounds
Peter Dawvot
assistant news editdr
Two ECU students were arrested
this week for drug and weapons pos-
session.
A small drug arrest early Tuesday
morning led Pitt County Sheriffs
officials to roughly 75-100 pounds of
marijuana worth over an estimated
$88,000, numerous weapons, and a
total of five arrests, two of which were
ECU students.
Police originally went after Marco
Antonio Mondragon on Monday
night with a warrant for his arrest
from tips given by D.H. Conley stu-
dents who were busted earlier this
year for marijuana possession.
When deputies entered
Mondragon's house on 57 Country
Club Dr they found two pounds of
marijuana and seven small plants
under heat lamps in a bedroom, but
no sign of Mondragon. The search
then led to the house of ECU stu-
dents Robert Joseph Woodruff and
Stephanie Bradshaw Woodruff,
where police found Mondragon and
large quantities of marijuana.
Police first discovered a bag of
marijuana belonging to Jamie Garza,
a Texas native. They later returned
to the house with a search warrant to
find three pounds of marijuana under
the end of a table in the den at the
Woodruffs' home on 1440 Rodney
Rd. Another seven pounds were later
discovered in the garage, according
to Jeff Haddock, supervisor for the
Sheriffs Narcotics Unit of the Pitt
County Police Department.
K-9 officers continued to search
the property, where they soon locat-
ed two nylon bags filled with 55, 1-
gallon sized plastic bags of marijuana
in the hood of a truck in the driveway
" never believed that much
pot could come through a
college town
Jason Cox
Freshman
of the Woodruffs' house. Haddock
said that each 1-gallon bag weighs
between 1 and 1.5 pounds. When
asked, no one claimed ownership of
the truck, however, deputies found
Garza's checkbook and wallet in the
cab of the vehicle.
Deputies seized $900 from Garza
as well as over $1,400 from the
Woodruffs, including an assault rifle,
a sawed off shotgun and three hand-
guns. Stephanie Woodruff told offi-
cers that some of the cash seized
came from her pell grant checks, but
it is unsure at this rime if the money
from the grants was used in purchas-
ing the drugs.
SEE DIIUS BUST PACE 2
Stephonio Bradshaw Woodruff
Robtrt Joseph Woodruff
nil photo
cotnTcsr of OKOMUE r.o
Kiss and
tell
Students kiss for a
cancer cure
R A C II A E 1. II I (I I) O N
STAFF WHITER
ECU students prepare to pucker
up as Alpha Kappa Psi, a newly
established business fraternity, will
be hosting its first annual Kiss-Off.
The event is being held on
Saturday, Feb. 13, as a pre-
Valentine's Day warm-up, in
Christenbury Gym at 5 p.m. The
" sounds like a great way to
raise money and it is an
appropriate celebration for the
upcoming holiday
April Avina
Fieshman
Kiss-Off is sponsored by several
area organizations such as Frito
Lay, Pepsi and Applebecs. Radio
stations 103.7 and 96.3 will be
broadcasting the live countdown to
the simultaneous kiss. The price
of admission is $2 at the door and
all proceeds will go to benefit the
American Cancer Society.
"Both couples and singles arc
invited to come out and join the
fun while they support a great
cause said Christopher Moffitt,
president of Alpha Kappa Psi.
They will also be holding a raf-
fle for prizes including tennis balls,
cameras and free dinner passes. A
raffle ticket is included in the price
of admission and additional tickets
can be bought for $1. T-shirts will
be sold for $8, with a raffle ticket
included in the price of the shirt.
"It sounds like a great way to
taise money and it is an appropriate
celebration for the upcoming holi-
day freshman April Avina said.
Those planning the event ate
hoping to fill the gym to its maxi-
mum capacity.
"We were a bit surprised when
we were approached with the
idea said Tori Griffin, a represen-
SEE KISS-OFF PAGE 3
Winter power bills anger students
Residents fat
overcosts
Devon White
staff whiter
. With some balances more
than doubling and others
approaching $500 last month,
about 1,000 of GUC's 50,000
customers questioned their
latest bills.
In January and mid-sum-
mer, when residents tend to
use more power heating or
cooling in their residences,
there is usually steady traffic
in the downtown office and
back-to-back calls to service
agents.
With temperatures reach-
ing high 60's lately and heat-
ing units not running as
often, people are wondering
what the problem is. Some
customers have forgotten the
period of frigid weather in
, December that had their
heaters pumping. That right
there is enough to make a bill
increase.
But where does that leave
ECU students who were not
here during that time period?
Jonithan Brantley, a junior
majoring in Biology, lives in a
house near campus with 5
other people. Over Christmas
break, while the house was
empty, their bill almost dou-
bled.
"Sometimes it seems like
our bills are higher when we're
not even there. How can that
" want to know why the
wattage for last month was
higher than this month and
we were not even here
Kristen Thor
Senior. Health and Fitness Major
be?" Brantley said.
Many students are ques-
tioning their bills and want an
explanation.
"I want to know why the
wattage for last month was
higher than this month and we
were not even here said
Kristen Thor, a senior majoring
in Health and Fitness.
GUC Energy Services
Supervisor,Andy YaKim.said
SEE GUC ENER6Y SERVICES PAGE 2
Sophomore Seth White checking his apartment's utilities meter himself.
PHOTO BV SARAH CHRISTIE
Ailey Dance Troupe to perform
Ensemble will dance to
so Id-out crowd
Peter Dawvot
assistant neks editor
A sold-out house will be given the
opportunity to view one of the pre-
miere dance ensembles in the
nation.
The Alvin Ailey Repertory
Ensemble, one of the nations best
known modern dance groups will
perform at Wright Auditorium on
Friday, at 8 p.m.
The Repertory Ensemble which
began its debut in 1974 was first put
together as a way to help talented
students from the Alvin Ailey
Center make the
transition from
the studio to the
stage. The pro-
fessional troupe
emphasizes the
spirit and energy
of young talent
along with cre-
ative visions of
today's emerging
choreographers.
Under the artistic
direction of
Sylvia Waters,
members present
performances across the nation
each season.
Among the Ensemble members
are dancers from throughout the
U.S the Virgin Islands, as well as
Mexico and South Africa. It
includes some of the best perform-
Alvin Ailey Dance Troupe performance sold out.
PHOTO COURTESY OF MEN0ENHALL MARKETING
ers from the Alvin Ailey Dance
Center and is, dedicated to the
enrichment of the American mod-
ern dance heritage and the unique-
SEE DANCING PAGE 3
UNC-System proposes
new applications
Plan offers alternative
route for students
Terra Steinbeiser
staff writer
The University of North Carolina
system is proposing a new admis-
sions applications process to help
deal with the growing number of
prospective students.
The idea behind the new sys-
tem is if a student is not accepted
into the university of his or her
choice, their application will auto-
matically be sent off to alternate
schools for consideration.
While some people think that
the new process will help to reas-
sure students they will get into
school somewhere, others feel it
will create too much standardiza-
tion of the applications.
"I think it's a great idea said
Brandon Stecker, a high school
junior. "It's really going to save a lot
of time and trouble and stress for
students
The new application process is
just one of the adjustments the the
UNC system is considering to
SEE NEW APPLICATION PAGE 4





ThurUiy.
2 nwfUty.frttwyll. 1999
news
Thi Ettt Carolinian
n�ws
briefs
MICHAEL JORDAN TO
ANNOUNCE CHAPEL
HILL RESTAURANT
CHAPEL HILL (AP) Michael
Jordan is expected to announce
this week that a deal has been
signed for his third restaurant,
which will be built across from his
alma mater.
The restaurant at 202 W.
Franklin St. is expected to be
about 13,000 square feet. It is
expected to open by the end of the
year.
NC WITNESS
DESCRIBES FAST JET
IN ALPINE VALLEY
CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C. (AP)
Jurors in the court-martial of a
Marine pilot accused in last year's
gondola tragedy in Italy donned
helmets today and took turns sit-
ting inside the same type of jet
involved in the crash.
The eight officers joined Capt.
Richard Ashby, lawyers, the judge
and a Marine camera crew in fly-
ing by helicopter to the Cherry
Point
KIDS WHO LIVED
: THROUGH SHOOTING
ACT OUT A DRAMA ON
L THE ATTACK
�iBEND, Oregon (AP)Under the
Tjlow of the stage lights, the skinny
teen-ager in camouflage fatigues
exults in the action-hero rush he
ielt when he gunned down his par-
ents at home and shot his class-
mates in the school cafeteria.
; If the new play "Bang, Bang,
I You're Dead" sounds a lot like last
lyear's Oregon school shooting, it is.
;But its raw power comes from the
least, 13 students who actually lived
through the shooting at
ISpringfield's Thurston High
i School.
SERBS TOLD TO
ACCEPT PEACEKEEP-
ING FORCE OR FACE
NATO ATTACK
WASHINGTON (AP) The
Clinton administration said
Tuesday that Serbia would be
making a "big, big mistake" if it
rejects a NATO peacekeeping
force in Kosovo as part of any
peace agreement with ethnic
Albanians.
THAI GOVERNMENT
SUSPENDS NUCLEAR
RESEARCH REACTOR
PROJECT
BANGKOK, Thailand (AP)
Thailand has scrapped plans to
build a nuclear research reactor
until the developer can provide
adequate safety analyses and risk
assessments, a government
spokesman said on Tuesday.
Drug Bust
continuid from pagi 1
Garza and the Woodruffs were
released on $55,000 bonds, and
face possible suspension from
school. Laura Sweet, associate
dean of students, clarified the con-
sequences of actions the school
may take.
"What we generally try to do is
separate the crimes. Cases of pos-
session we usually handle through
a rehab program Sweet said.
"Others we try to separate from the
institution; we don't tolerate that
from our student body
Many ECU students, though
not completly surprised that others
are dealing, are amazed that such a
large amount has been seized.
"I never believed that much pot
could come through a college
town said Jason Cox, a freshman
business marketing major. "You
hear about these problems in big
cities but People just don't think of
Greenville having these prob-
lems
While this is not the largest drug
bust ever in Pitt County officers,
certainly are not complaining about
the recent accomplishments.
"Any time you can take 50
pounds of marijuana off the streets
I think that's a pretty good lick
Haddock said.
Undercover Narcotics officer
withthe Pitt Countyb sherrifs
office said than they are happy
with the way the bust went.
" This is a pretty substantial
bust for us, it was one of the
largest said the officer. " We arc
pretty pleased with way things
went
GUC Energy Services
continued from page 1
that even though students are not
there, energy is still being used.
GUC's Energy Services Division
offers free assistance in helping
their customers to conserve energy.
"We are glad to come to apart-
ment complexes or dormitories to
inform students of how to save
energy Yakim said.
The workers conduct surveys
and audits of structures, checking
for possible leaks and ways to use
less energy. The four-member
department is booked for the next
two weeks.
The department conducted 46
surveys last month, 42 in
December and 42 in November.
Officers check for everything form
toilet leaks to dirty air filters.
"We are one of the few in the
state that offer help to understand
any high bill concerns Yakim
said.
One important tip to help lower
your bill is to keep your thermostat
between 65 and 68 degrees.
Heating and cooling accounts for
about 80 percent of the average
bill, Yakim said.
"There are just so many things
that people can do to save on their
bills he said.
Gettysburg
site of
Professors Long, Palmer
to take students
Tommy Yarborouoh
staff writer
A weekend tour of the battlefield at
Gettysburg, Pa site of the bloodiest
battles ever fought in the Western
Hemisphere, will be led by Professors
David Long and Michael Palmer of
the ECU history faculty this spring.
During the Gettysburg Weekend
tour, Long and Palmer will escort his-
tory buffs and students through signif-
icant locations at Gettysburg, while
narrating the events of the July 1-3,
1863, battle, now recognized as the
turning point of the Civil War.
The tour group will depart from
Greenville Friday, April 9, and return
Sunday, April 11. The Gettysburg
Weekend group will be allowed to
enter areas normally restricted to the
public. Palmer and Long will explain
the tactical, topographical, logistical,
technological and command factors
that played a part in the battle and its
outcome.
Also featured in the tour will be a
devotional service led by ECU
Methodist Chaplain Scott Wilkinson
and a reenactment of Lincoln's
address at the November 1863 dedica-
tion of the Gettysburg cemetery.
In addition, the group will be
shown the Ronald F. Maxwell film
"Gettysburg" aboard the bus en route
from Greenville to Pennsylvania.
The 3,500-acre Gettysburg
National Military Park features more
than 1300 monuments, among them
the North Carolina Memorial on
Seminarv Ridee. placed in memorv of
the more than 15,000 North
Carolinians who fought Gettysburg,
nearly half of whom were killed,
wounded or captured during the bat-
tle.
Fee for non-students who wish to
join the tour is $125, plus hotel
expenses. ECU students will be
charged $75.
CORRECTION: The the
Feb. 4th edition of TEC we
incorrectly stated that the
ACLU did not have its chapter
yet Intact the chapter was char-
tered on Dec 12 1998.
CLARIFICATION: In the
Feb. 2nd issue ofTEC we stat-
ed that the university did not
own the rights t� the pirate logo.
University Attorney Ben Inns
says,
"The maner in which the
logos are to be used is the
responsibility of the Chancellor.
The Chancellor has delegated
to the Athdetic Director and his
subordinates the athority to
make day-to-day decisions
reguarrJing the use of the logos
-Sophisticated.
-Energetic.
-Precise.
-Dedicated to the presentation of
Amercan modem dance and the
uniqueness of black cultural
expression.
IDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1999 8:00PM WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
Advance Student Tickets $10
FacultyStaff Advance Tickets $16
Tickets at the Door $20
annwi ncxrr orfict houhs � - Frfd�y ixm to 6�opn
I58.32J.47M or 1J00.EOJ JWTS; Dotfoodl HloHrod KM
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VALENTINE'S DAY
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February 11.1999 In
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What: I
When: I
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ittt Carolinian
3 Thuraiay. ftbruiry 11. 1898
news
Ths tut Carolinian
Kissflff
coniinued from pigi 1
campus
briefs
turers'

IS
3$l
')
AME
Stem
JUET
reservattve.
stonier.
t�, 1999. ,
WE HAVE THE Cl
YOUR VALENTINE'S BLUES
Drop us a few lines sharing
Your worst Valentine's experience or Why you are
so desperate for a Valentine and WIN
Drop off your entry in our studios in
the basement of Mendenhall for your
chance to win the WZMB Valentine's
Experience. Check us out at the
LIVE REMOTE Friday, Feb. 12 in front
of the Wright Place. And check
out our new website for concert
updates & chances or win tickets
wvir1rv.wzmb.ecu.edu
Various AWESOME gift packages
Tickets to the hottest shows around
Hed(Pe)& System of
the Down
Dad Brains
Beaux Arts Ball
Rusted Root
Nantucket
Clutch and Drown
Eve 6
tative from the American Cancer
Society. "But any type of commu-
nity support always helps
The event is estimated to last
around an hour, including the kiss
and the raffle.
"We are hoping to generate
more interest in our fraternity
through the event Moffitt said.
�"�There will be another informa-
tional meeting and an opportunity
'for students to join after Saturday
The interaction with the busi-
ness community will help Alpha
Kappa Psi establish relationships in
the area, as well as work to raise
funds for a worthy cause.
The Alpha Kappa Psi fraternity
is a coed national organization
which was founded in 1904. It has
175,000 members and alumni
� across 260 campuses nationwide.
As of now, they are still a colony,
which means that there is no rush
or pledge period, and whoever
joins this semester will be consid-
ered a founding member. The
requirement is to be a business or
business related major.
The fraternity is interested in
exposing its members to the "real
worid" ahead of time. They work
toward orienting themselves to the
business world they will enter
upon graduarion.Alpha Kappa Psi
also offers a national database for
its members, which will help
search for a job.
"My mother passed away from
cancer, as well as family of many
other members, so we are hoping
to raise awareness and money for
the American Cancer Society
Moffitt said.
This the first event of its kind
for the American Cancer Society
direcdy involving the ECU cam-
pus.
Feb. 11
Dr. John Lucas, historian for the International Olympic Committee, will
give his views on the Olympic movement at 7 p.m. in the Willis (Regional
Development) Building Lucas, a native of Boston, ha been a long-dis-
tance runner, college teacher, coach, U.S. State Department Specialists
and journalist. He has Been involved in the summer Olympic games since
1960. His visit to ECU is hosted by the L.T. Walker International Human
Performance Center. Contact: Al Delia at 328-6650
Singer Perry Smith will be accompanied by pianist John O'Brien in a
recital at 8 p.m. in the Recital Hall of the AJ. Fletcher Music Center. The
program is free and open to the public.
Feb. 12
The woman's basketball team from ECU will play George Mason
University at 7 p.m. in Minges coliseum.
The student center will stage its annual Mardi Gras night starting at 9,
p.m.and continuing until 2 a.m. This alcohol-free program provides stu-
dents with a fun time that includes free food, games, and prizes. Contact:
Heather Marshall 328-4766
Volunteers Needed
The Bone Marrow Foundation, Inc. a nonprofit organization estab-
lished to assist patients and families financially, is looking for volunteers to
help with fund raisers, advertising, and mailing. If you are a devoted, hard
working individual that is interested in doing something for a worthwhile
Dancing
continued from page 1
ness of black cultural expression.
The Ensemble, which is pan of
the 1998-99 S. Rudolph Alexander
Performing Arts Series, will feature
segments choreographed by Alvin
Ailey such as "Escapades which
is a blend of modern, jazz and bal-
letic styles. Carrol Woodruff, of the
Marketing department for the the-
ater groups, has said that the series
includes an average of 8-10 shows
per year with events that go into
planning 12 to 18 months in
advance.
"We've been doing this for
about 37 years and it has become a
very well respected series
Woodruff said.
Junior Brandon Hopper hopes
to witness an exciting performance.
"I'm excited about the perfor-
mance and I think it will be a good
way to get a better understanding
of black spirituality Hopper said.
"It fits in well with the other events
surrounding black history month

THE LEGENDARY
COLLEGE NIGHT
EVERY TUESDAY
1.00 DRINKS
ALL NIGHT
LONG
LADIES GET IN FREE
WITH A COLLEGE ID OR MEMBERSHIP
ONLY $3 FOR GUYS
WITH A COLLEGE ID.
LOCATED IN GREENVILLE ACROSS THE GREENE ST. BRIDGE
CALL 757-2789 FOR MORE DETAILS
BRING THIS AD IN AND RECEIVE
A FREE MEMBERSHIP





4 Tlwmiy. Hkt�n 11,1199
llviY
Thi Ent Carolinian
New Application
continuid from pigi 1
accommodate the estimated 31 per-
cent increase in enrollment that is
expected by 2008. The Board of
Governors also has plans to restore,
renovate and build a number of
buildings on all 16 campuses.
Updating science labs and residence
halls wiO be one of the most impor-
tant parts of the project
The students are at the doorstep.
What are we going to do to accom-
modate them?" said Molly Broad,
BOG President.
Larger schools like UNC-Chapel
Hill and N.C. State are worried about
the large influx of students, but ECU
and other smaller schools like
Western Carolina University are
actually looking to increase enroll-
ment. Just recently, Chancellor
Richard Eakin held a meeting of the
Board of Trustees to consider growth
possibilities, especially in'the areas of
Health Sciences and athletics. "With
incredible determination, effort and
drive, it would be worthwhile to
commit to a goal of 27,000 students
by 2008 Eakin said.
EARN $$$
You can earn money while contributing to the future of medicine. We need
healthy individuals to participate in medically-supervised research studies to help
evaluate new medications. YOU may be eligible. You have to meet certain criteria
to qualify for a study, including our free medical exam and screening testa.
See below for our current study opportunities.
PPD PHARMACO
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m
I
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ALPHA KAPPA PS1
The Professional Business Fraternity
fir&A nmidl KiMoff
Please come out and show your support. Not only
will you be helping Alpha Kappa Psi, but you will
also be helping the American Cancer Society.
�' i:
tSOOElY
When: February 13,1999,5:00-6:30pm.
Where: Christenbury Gymnasium (East Carolina)
Admission: $2.00 (Raffle Ticket Included)
Live coverage by: Sponsored by:
Hpplebee'sl
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'atalog
onnection
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with sweet deals at
Village Green
Apartments
Drop by Friday, Feb. 12th for our
"Show Some LOVE, Donate BLOOD" Drive!
Food, Fun A Free Stuff from 12 - 5
Look for the Red Cross Bus at the office!
A SWEET 12 DEPOSIT DEMJ!
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Call or stop in for details
Eastbrook & Village Green Apts.
204 Eastbrook Drive
Greenville, NC 27858
(252) 752-5100
gKs we appro
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I recently read in
C bserver about tri
p in to expand EC1
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d irds of admissio
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fi lgled programs
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Nil Ent Carolinian
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Thundiv. F.bruifv 11 1B99
opinion
Tfci Em Circlinim
eastcarolinian
Amy L.Royster Editor
Amanda G. Austin Managing Ediior
Amy Sheridan NmEdiiv
PETER DAWYOT Assistant Ntwi Editor
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Emily Little Hud Cm Edhor
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Sanrtnrj die ECU rMMNMy urrct Ifltt. die Em Carolirrren pubtrstrts 11.000 copras errer, Tuesday end Thursday The hod editorial m iidi edition a die oen
ton ol he maromy of the Eonortal Board and is arrrrtao hi nrm try Erjrtonel 8oerd members. Tbe East Catrdiruan aratcernes lenars to Ida editor, limned to 0
words which may be orjtad lor decency or bravrry The East Catrjbrrten reserves the irjht to adfl or reroct tenors (or publication All letters most be signed
Letters should be addressed to. Opinion editor .The East Carolinian. Student Publications Building. ECU. Graemtfle. 778b843o3 For information, col
lW.3ZJ.a36B
oumcw
SpVs we approach Valentines Day, we at TEC have been giving more and more thought to
tjaK fact that even though it is a special day to those who have love in their lives, it can be a
drag when you don't have anyone to share it with. Many students have been there, sitting
le in your room, watching movies about people in love, and eating pizza with red peppers
It look more and more like little hearts every time you look at them.
fell, cheer up! We have come up with a few good ideas for the lonely-hearted folks. Instead
'doing nothing, you could do something such as
jearn the basics of a foreign language. We believe that this will be a fruitful activity, seeing
apiow it can promote communication between diverse communities. Pig-latin does not count,
I
�the way.
raaT
Guys, you can stop worrying about the fact that Mary-Beth-Sue-Ellen doesn't care for your
(jompany, not to mention your body odor that is so bad that it interferes with satellite trans-
missions, and take a trip down to the Rec Center to pump iron, run the track, or just play rac-
(juetball, even though you don't know the rules.
! You can also get together with some friends with similar odors and go to the Silver Bullet,
r establishment where you can actually buy some female attention. Hooray for America!
5 Girls, you can get together with some of your friends and take out all those little memory
lioxes that you keep under your bed - the one that had all that special stuff that your little
Rookie gave you before he dropped you like a bad habit. Place all that stuff into a trash can
ttnd torch it Friends-style. That should make you feel better, and maybe you'll meet a nice
firefighter because of it.
b
There are many other alternatives, but we can't think of them right now. Just try not to
b
i
think about it, or pretend that it is some other holiday, like Flag Day, St. Patrick's Day, or
'(Relationships Are For Losers" Day. If all else fails, take in a movie, preferably with Steven
Segal. We think his movies are great.
OPINION
Columnist
Stephen
Kleinschmit
Face if we're a party school
we start raising our stan-
dards too high, we will lose
I good students who decide
'ey are too smart to go to a
party school.
?
I recently read in the News and
C bserver about the Chancellor's
p an to expand ECU over the next
li i years and to increase the stan-
d irds of admission. Well guess
v, wt I think of that - phooey. I am
ji st a bit skeptical of all these new
fi lgled programs and how they
win be implemented.
Here is a non-politically correct,
real world representation of what
ECU is to the average NC Citizen:
a moderately large, moderately
selective public sch toI in the mid-
dle of Tobbacoville, with a great
bar scene, and filled with students
who couldn't get into Chapel Hill,
but didn't want to go to
Appalachain or Charlotte. And as
much as we deny it, we cannot
rival large prestigious schools
because of our "party school" stig-
ma.
Let's face it, we are a decent
university in a party town. If we
start raising our standards too high,
we will lose good students who
decide that they are too smart to go
to a party school. Our largest
redeeming factors are our School of
Medicine, School of Education
and our School of Business. The
most of the other programs are
underfunded and mediocre, so we
can have a better athletics depart-
ment
And if the enrollment does
increase substantially in the next
ten years, there will be no guaran-
tee that the education will get any
better. Of course the school will
get more money, but parking is
already a problem, many of the
campus buildings would have to be
added on to, and we'd need con-
struction of at least ten or more
new residence halls, including
maybe some like Ambler Johnson
at Virginia Tech, which houses
over 1,000 students alone. And of
course, it will be reflected in our
future tuition rates.
I personally wouldn't want to
see this place get any bigger.
Greenville doesn't have the
resources or the housing to hold
another 10,000 students. Rent on
existing apartments would double.
Tuition and those mysterious
"fees" would skyrocket. The edu-
cation will not get any better
unless we add more technical pro-
grams, and possibly have a school
of engineering. Then we could
really be a world class institution.
OPiNior
(Columnist
Ryan
Kennemur
A letter to Ryan's true love
' wine you and dine you,
and you will start to quiver. I
know you will. I'm that good.
Dear Honeybunny,
This Sunday is Valentines Day, the
day of love. Not the kind of love
that Bill Clinton has for fine cigars,
but the kind of love that can only
exist between a man and a woman;
you and me. You need to do what
any good-natured woman would
do, and that's leave that chump
and come home to me. I'm serious.
And why wouldn't you?
Everybody knows that I'm the
choicest cat in the whole college.
Think about it. I got it all. A phat
ride, a letter jacket with my Ping-
Pong medals all over it, and a vast
array of knowledge of how to
please a woman, which you obvi-
ously are.
I think you're dope. I know you
feel the same about me. Why are
we wasting'time, baby? We both
know how hot we'd be together.
We could walk down the street,
and everybody would be like,
totally staring at us, you know? It
would be like that movie
Footloose, except without all that
dancing and stuff. I'd be Kevin
Bacon, and you'd bethat one girl.
You know the one.
And about all those rumors. They
ain't true. Susan didn't mean any-
thing to me. She's got some sort of
brain malfunction or something,
sugar. You can't trust anything she
says. Same thing about Brittney. I
only wanted us to be friends, but
she wanted more, and my homey
MC Russell will attest to that fact,
my love. She was like, all over me
when we went to the pizza place. It
was embarrassing, and I was all,
"Look chick, you better cool it.
Everybody knows that I ain't with
you. You'd better recognize But
she kept on trying to kiss me, so I
just took her home, but nothing
happened. Trust me, sweetbuns.
I'd never do that to you.
And another rumor that I'd like to
put to rest is this one. I have never
worn a dress, and I doubt I ever
will, unless you ask me real nice,
baby. I can't make it clear enough
that I will do absolutely anything it
takes to get your love, girl. I will
pamper you to the point that you
will go crazy, like a badger. I'll wine
you and dine you, and you will
stan to quiver. I know you will. I'm
that good. You'll see.
I'll escort you to the new Italian
place, Finelli's I believe it's called.
There I will allow you to order any-
thing your pretty heart desires. You
can even get the Filet Mignon, if it
is your wish. And you will have gar-
lic breadall you want. And if you
want to order an extra baked pota-
to with your meal, please don't
hesitate. I will carry extra packets
of sour cream in my coat pockets,
just in case you need it. That's just
my way of saying that I will take
care of your every need.
Just to recap, I will be your love
slave. I'll take you home and put
on some Barry Whitc.that one
song that he does about love. You
know the one. Just leave that fool,
and I will show you what a real
man can do. Give me one chance,
and I will do all the things you and
your girlfriends talk about during
your little slumber parties with all
that junk on your faces. Please
dumpling, be my valentine, and
I'll give you the best five to seven
minutes of your life.
Yours in love and everything that
goes with it,
Ryan Dee Oh Double Gee
OPINIOI
'Columnist
Marvelle
Sullivan
Lovers need fulfillment
is a natural tendency of
everyone-and a healthy ten-
dency-to seek happiness and
fulfillment.
It is no secret that Valentine's Day
is looming around the corner. For
some, it is a day to draw pink and
red hearts all over the 14th block of
the calendar, and alas, for others, it
is a day to completely fill the same
block with a black marker. Despite
the amusing irony of the official day
of love being represented by a saint
who was martyred, the fourteenth
of February winds up becoming
the be end all, be all of our feelings
for another individual.
It is also ironic, although not as
amusing, that many relationships
have a tendency to fall apart around
this time of year. It is probably
because with the pressure of the
"big day" comes a kind of account-
ing of what the relationship
means�or what it doesn't mean
anymore.
Why does Valentine's Day cre-
ate so much pressure for everyone?
After all, it is meant to be the
embodiment of happiness and ful-
fillment through a loved one. The
pressure stems not from trying to
love but rather trying to be loved. It
is a natural tendency of everyone�
and a healthy tendency�to seek
happiness and fulfillment, and the
easiest avenue to that is through
someone else. Even though that is
the easiest way, it is certainly not
the best. No one can ever love any-
one unless they can be happy with
themselves. To seek acceptance
from someone else in the attempt
to accept yourself, while on the sur-
face may be sufficient, will lead to
problems and emptiness down the
road.
V
Looking for someone to com-
plete you and fill a void in your life
is also futile. A companion should
compliment your life and goals�
not supplement them. This may be
a disappointment, but when the
girl in "Jerry Maguire" told him
that he completed her, that was the
tip-off that the whole relationship
was off-balance. If there ever is a
time to find completion, it is not
when you are in college. The rate
of individual change in college is so
frequent and constant that invest-
ing time and interest in someone
can be futile.
On the bright side, many people
have and do find fulfillment and
happiness, so Valentine's Day is not
a morbid day of inventory of the
soul for everyone. The key is not to
settle for happiness or fulfillment,
but to wait until someone comes
along that meets both aspects of a
relationship. If you are not one of
the blessed individuals who have
found both, on Sunday it's like that
old song instructs: "If you can't be
with the one you love, love the one
you're with





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12 page 11599 12.49 PM Page 1 (1,1)
12:49 PM Page 1 (2,1)
FEBRUARY 12, 1999 9 PM - 2 AM
�ka0do
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
Fun Flicks Video Karaoke
Salsahd Merengue Dance
v DJ Dance W J. Arthur
Loo-Zee-Anna Laser Tag
ourbon Street Bingo
King-Cake
Glow Bowling
Cajun Buffet
King and Queen

Students may attend for free by using their valid ECU One Card. One adult guest will be admitted with a guest pass. Student and guest must enter together. Guest passes will
be available beginning Monday, February 8 through Friday, February 12,1999, at the Central Ticket Office from 8:30am to 6pm and Todd Dining Hall Meal Flan Office from 9am
to 5pm. On February 12, guest passes will be available at the Student Recreation Center horn 5pm to 10pm.
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Valentine's Day on Campus Greek system
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Valentine's Day brings out
both the best and the worst in students. Some indulge in gifts and love, while others say it is over rated and miserable.
PHOTO BY JACOB GABMON
J Students speak out on
their opinions
I'M II. I. I I' (i 1 1.1 I'S
S I I I � RIT F. R
It's that time of year again where
stores are decorated in red, pink
and white, candy and stuffed ani-
mals are in abundance and roses are
in high demand.
With Valentine's Day almost
here, F.CU students all over the
campus arc cither planning for a
romantic night that will be remem-
bered forever or a day of lonely mis-
ery.
Some students arc actually look-
ing forward to this day.
"I like Valentine's day this year
because it is the first year I actually
Students' Top 10 Valentine Gifts
1) 1lowers
Z) Romantic Dinner
3) Lingerie
4) Jewelry
5) Candy
6) Perfume or cologne
7) A bottle of wine
8) Night around town
9) Poetry
10) Homemade card
have a valentine that loves me
said Lynn Ford, sophomore.
"I love any holiday that gives my
boyfriend the chance to spoil me
said Barbie Morse, junior.
For those who do not have that
special someone in their lives or
just dislike the whole mushy aspect
of it, this day can be agonizing to
tolerate.
"Dress in black and protest
said Bay Scroggins, sophomore.
"I think Valentine's Dayl is not
good unless you're with someone
said Mary Brinson, junior.
"Valentine's Day is stupid this
year because I don't have a valen-
tine said Bernice Bailes, sopho-
more.
Then there are those who just
sec Feb. 14 as another day that has
been overly commercialized.
"I don't see why the one day
matters said Rebecca Scott, fresh-
man. "People should be showing
their love the other 364 days of the
year
"It's a mushy commercial day.
Whoever decided to make money
on it is a genius said G.W. Barker,
junior. "I'm going to wait until the
day after when the candy's on sale
and appease the sweet tooth god
The mention of Valentine's Day-
can either cause one's heart to flut-
ter or make people mutter. For
those who remain clueless about
what to get their valentine, there is
still time left to get that perfect gift.
If you have the Internet at your
disposal, there are many sites to
help increase your chances for love.
For a simple, free gift, log on at
www.cyberflowers.com and e-mail
your beloved a lovely bouquet.
There are bouquets for that special
person in your life, as well as for a
friend.
In order to get the full on-line
valentine experience, try www.hap-
pyvalentinesday.com. This site
offers a list of stores that sell a vari-
ety of valentine gifts and also offers
How to Say "I love you" in Different
Languages
- Te re-quiero � Argentine
Spanish
- Moo graugh hoo � Gaelic
- Ich liebe dich � Formal
German
- Je t'aime � French
- qamuSI laqu' � Klingon
(though loud snarls and grunts
will do)
- Ninikupenda � Swahili
- Rwy'n dy garu di � Welsh
Source: vrww.tu-
chemnitz.delpolovepAtm
different gift ideas. Other features
include an advice spot titled "Ask
Dr. Luv" and a fun and games sec-
tion. Dr. Gilda Carle, a.k.a. "The
Love Doc is a psychotherapist
who answers questions from those
who are lovelorn. The fun and
games area offers such features as a
classified section, and a list of the
best and worst pickup lines.
F'or those who are against the
day of love this year, there are sev-
eral anti-Valentine's Day sites
available. There is a list of such
pages at
www.westworld.comclsonmeco
lumnslinks.html. The plans for an
"Anti-Valentine's Day Party" are
available at www.source.syr.edu.
They suggest such things as wear-
ing all black and not inviting any
couples to the party.
How did this Hallmark-boost-
ing, lace-filled holiday begin?
Historically, there were three St.
Valentines. The most famous one
was a Roman priest who lived dur-
ing the third century. The emperor
Claudius II had decreed that no
marriages would take place so his
army would fill up with men. His
reasoning was that if men did not
marry, they would not mind joining
the army. Valentine started to
marry people in secret, until he was
discovered and executed. He was
canonized and his saint day became
Feb. 14.
SEE V-DAY PACE 8
Ambassadors contribute to campus
Members are official
hosts of university
F. R i c A S i K i: s
STAFF WRITBR
There are various organizations on
campus that exhibit what our uni-
versity is all about. One of the
many arc the Ambassadors.
"We are the official hosts of
ECU said Angie Lynch, Secretary
of Ambassadors. "We are a student
service organization dedicated
toward building esprit de corp
between students and alumni
Recently, the Ambassadors
inducted 26 students into the orga-
nization at the ceremony, held at
the Hilton in Greenville.
Ambassadors work closely with
the chancellor and alumni relations
as a group.
Chancellor Richard Kakin was
an honorary guest at the inductions.
"Ambassadors are a very impor-
tant part of ECU liakin said.
"They serve as official hosts to our
guests as well as providing a num-
ber of other services that enrich the
University
"The spirit of cooperation given
by the ambassadors is something
that my wife and I, in particular,
appreciate as we greet university-
guests throughout the year Eakin
said.
Ambassadors also participate in
various service events such as work-
ing concession stands at home foot-
ball games, tutoring, and street
clean-ups. For their participation
each Ambassador receives a certain
amount of service hours. In com-
pletion of 75 accumulated service
hours, a service pin is given. On the
night of inductions, eight
Ambassadors received their first
pin. The second pin was presented
to those who had accumulated over
234 hours. Amy Van Voltenburg,
Justin Bailey, and Myeisha
McQueen were among the three to
receive this pin. The third pin,
named the Purple Pirate Pin, was
presented to Elizabeth Rooney,
who has been a member of
Ambassadors for five years now.
She received this award for accu-
mulating over 468 hours. The ser-
vice hours of each Ambassador are
recorded through a checklist policy,
in which each member is expected
to fulfill a certain amount of events.
"I feel like we have a good group
this year and the amount of pins we
gave out was really indicative of the
caliber of people we have recruited
for Ambassadors said Amy Van
Voltenburg, checklist coordinator.
During Homecoming 1998,
Ambassadors participated in and
won a house decorating competi-
tion. Ambassadors won the Spirit
Cup , which was achieved by col-
lecting an enormous amount of
canned goods.
Jon Strickland, an Ambassador,
also represented the group as this
year's Homecoming King.
"I think it's exciting. We do a lot
for the school said Elizabeth
Woodromc, inductee. "We are a
diverse group of people who are all
in it to make the University a better
place
For those interested in becom-
ing an Ambassador, stop by the
Alumni Center and pick up an
application.
Fraternities and
sororities volunteer
Erica Sikes
staff whiter
Epsilon Sigma Alpha sisters participate in Clean the Streets program.
PHOTO COURTESY OF EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA SORORITY
When you hear the words 'fraterni-
ty' or 'sorority what comes to
mind? Keg parties? Alcohol hing-
ing? The movie, Animal House?
When Brian Tuck, the president of
the Inter-Fraternity Council wrote
a letter to the editor in defense of
the reputation given to fraternities
as alcoholics and troublemakers,
there was much consideration
given to the fraternities and sorori-
ties as pos-
itive role
models
and com-
ni unity
contribu-
tors. He
encour-
aged stu-
dents to
leave
behind
the stereo-
types and
join a fra-
tern i ty
because of
the posi-
tive experi-
ences they
offer instead
of joining for a good time. He even
went as far as telling the thrill seek-
ers of the university to look else-
"Woriing at the Soup Kitchen
was the most rewarding expe-
rience as a sorority because we
were able to see the influence
that it had on the people we
were helping, and how a little
bit of our time had such an
impact on them
Carrie Brewer
Piesidenl ol Sigma Sigma Sigma
where if they were only interested
in a good time because the IFC is
not only "interested in recruiting
people that are just in it for the
alcohol
Many sororities and fraternities
on campus have made an effort to
eliminate these stereotypes while
lending a hand to the community.
Annually, Phi Kappa Psi raises
money for the Greenville
Community Shelter through a pro-
gram called Kool-Aid, in which the
brothers contribute and raise
money to put on a concert.
"Our ultimate goal is unity and
returning good deeds to the com-
munity, which is a common pur-
pose that all fraternities share said
David Bucci, public relations chair-
man of Phi Kappa Psi
"Three weeks prior to last year's
concert, the Greenville
Community Shelter was broken
into and about $4000 worth of dam-
age was done, so the donation
could not have come at a more
opportune time Bucci said.
"It feels great to give something
back to the community said
Tyler Bryan of Phi Kappa Psi.
Theta Chi is another fraternity
that is a large contributor to the
community.
"Every spring, we participate in
a fund-raiser for the Special
Olympics where we ride a seesaw
for 24 hours aaid Mick Smith,
Theta Chi member.
This event will occur this
semester on March 27-28 from 11
a.m. on Saturday until 12:30 p.m.
on Sunday. The brothers will gath-
er on the corner of Greenville
Boulevard and Red Banks Road to
collect money from passersby.
According to Smith, the brothers
approach people and ask if they
would like to contribute funds to
the Special Olympics. Generally,
the public response is overwhelm-
ing and they are more than willing
to give to a good cause.
"For the past five years, Theta
Chi has been the largest contribu-
tor to Greenville's Special
Olympics said Eddie Jappell,
Theta Chi chaplain. "We also try to
send at least 15-20 brothers to vol-
unteer at the Special Olympics
Alpha Phi sorority gives back to
the community by participating in
various volunteer activities.
"We've volunteered for the
Boys and Girls Club, Sunshine
Gardens and Adopt-a-Highway
said Angie Stender, president of
Alpha Phi.
This sorority is more focused
toward the volunteer aspect of
community service rather than
fund-raising. The hands-on experi-
ences the members receive prove
to be rewarding and individually
satisfying.
Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority rais-
es money for the Robbie Page
Memorial in Texas and Chapel
Hill. This is a play-therapy pro-
gram for children suffering from ill-
nesses. At Christmas, they volun-
teered at the Homeless Shelter and
the Soup Kitchen. For the most
part, they try to do community ser-
vice at least once a month. Their
service goal this semester is to work
with underprivileged children.
"Working at the Soup Kitchen
was the most rewarding experience
Epsilon Sigma Alpha sisters make
ornaments for family support network.
PHOTO COURTESY OF EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA
as a sorority because we were able
to see the influence that it had on
the people we were helping, and
how a little bit of our time had such
an impact on them said Carrie
Brewer, president of Sigma Sigma,
Sigma.
� .
i
H�v���i' .
�T






8Tk�rrfy. Ftknwy 11. 1988
features
Thl East Carolinian
9 Thundiy, Fil
Love Quotes
1. "There is only one kind of
love, but there are a thousand
different versions
-La Rochefoucauld
2. "If love is the answer, could
you rephrase the question?"
-LUyTomlin
3. The greater the man's soul,
the deeper he loves
-LeonardoDa Vinci
4. "Love is like the measles; we
all have to go through it"
-Jerome Jerome
5. "Love sought is good, but
giv'n unsought is better
-Shakespeare
7. "All life is just a progression
toward and then a recession
from one phrase � 'I love
you"
- F. Scott Fingernld
a "When you're in love, it's the
most glorious two-and-a-half
days of your life
-Richard Lewis
9. "Thousands have lived with
out love, not one without
water
- W.H. Auden
10. "Some people never say the
words 'I love you' but like a
child they're longing to
be told
- Paul Simon
covering the
Celt
Drug dealer's faith in
psychic sends him to jail
MODESTO, Calif. (AP) - A drug
dealer who got bad advice from a
psychic could spend as many as 10
years in prison after rejecting a plea
bargain.
Bernardo Arroyo, 26, was con-
sidered a minor player in one of
Stanislaus County's largest drug
rings. Federal prosecutors offered
him a deal that would have result-
ed in a two-year prison sentence
for his involvement with the Tello
family.
He was convicted late last
month of conspiracy to distribute
methamphetamine, as well as a
separate charge of distributing
methamphetamine.
Arroyo rejected the deal after a
Modesto psychic assured him that
he would never spend a day
behind bars. Arroyo then waived
his right to a jury trial and placed
his fate in the hands of U.S.
District Court Judge Oliver W.
Wanger.
A drug agent said Arroyo, the
only defendant who is not related
to the Tellos, was assured by the
psychic that he never would be
convicted.
For an extra $8,000, the agent
said, the psychic offered to put a
curse on Servatius and the drug
agents who investigated the case.
He said Arroyo didn't want to
spend the money and declined.
Top CreateDate
Student Submissions
1. A picnic under the moonlight
in the middle of the football field.
Wine and watching the stars
2. Go to Carowinds and stay all
day long � you'll have fun. Your
partner is sexy when wet and too
tired to have sex.
3. To cook together.
4. Surprise your partner with a
goldfish in a bowl and ask, "of all
the fish in the sea, would you go
out with me?" then take a nice
walk and have your picture made
together.
5. Take date to the beach for
the weekend. Have a picnic on the
beach and walk in the moonlight.
6. Dinner for your sweetheart at
Christine's with Valentine bal-
loons. Once you go back home,
light several red and pink candles
and let the candles light the apart-
ment.
7. Be prepared. Have a safe sex
pack prepared. It can include con-
doms, K-Y Jelly, Spcrmicidc and
dental dams (if you like that kind
of thing).
8. Decorating dorm room (or
any room) with garland and other
decorations and having a romantic
dinner cooked by a friend, served
by another friend! Talking about
lots of stuff! Hanging out!
9. A romantic candle lit dinner
with slow jazz music, candles, bub-
ble bath, back rubs and tender
hugs and kisses.
10. Drive down to the beach
and spend a romantic day fishing.
V-Day
continued from oaoa 7
February was the month when
ancient ceremonies dealing with
love took place that may have con-
tributed to the creation of
Valentine's Day. This included
celebrations of the Roman god-
dess Juno to the Medieval belief
that mid-February was the time of
year birds began to pair.
Valentine's Day is a special day
to show someone how much you
care. So whether you are single
this year or you're spending the
day with a sweetheart, take the
rime to show your love.
Valentine's Special for Dos!
Includes sampler of
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11AM - 5 PM only $17.95
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MARYVILLE, III. (AP) - Alexia
Eberhan thought her stomach was
giving her fits. The nurse at
Anderson Hospital didn't know
what to think.
So excuse Eberhart's surprise
when a 6-pound, 9-ounce baby
started making her way into the
world late Wednesday night.
After feeling ill with stomach
pains, Eberhan had her parents
take her to the hospital.
Eberhart's mother, Almeda
Lahr-Well, said that while her
daughter was in the examining
room, the doctor came out looking
for her to tell her the head was
crowning. "I said, 'What head?
"He said, 'The baby's head "I
said, 'What baby?" Lahr-Well
said.
Ken Smith, trauma nurse spe-
cialist, said nurses didn't suspect
Eberhan was pregnant in pan
because she didn't look pregnant.
"She had a flat sumach Smith
said. "It wasn't noticeable because
the baby had already dropped into
the birth canal
Eberhan said she had not
gained any weight and never had
morning sickness or any of the
other obvious signs that would
have alerted her to a pregnancy.
Her father, Ralph WeU, called
the birth a miracle.
"The baby was almost full-
term, but for Alexia to have had no
knowledge about it and no prenatal
care, it's a miracle to have an appar-
ently healthy baby he said.
Sigma Gamma Rho
Presents: "The Dating Game"
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561-RENT or 531-9011
NOW TAKING AfrWCWlOW FOB (MIL





10 Taettday, February 11. 1999
sports
Reserved seating for club members

Students confused about
reasons for benefit
Morgan Hefner
staff writer
There is a growing concern within the
ECU student body regarding the reserved
seating for Pirate Club members at home
basketball games.
Those who have attended ECU games
at Minges Coliseum will recognize these
seats as the purple seats with backs on
them.
Free tickets are given to students who
present a valid ECU One Card at the tick-
et office prior to each home game. When
the student section fills up no more free
tickets are given to students until 15 min-
utes into the game. After that, additional
seats that have not been sold are given to
students.
This policy applies to all the seats in
the coliseum except those reserved by the
Pirate Club. These seats are not given to
students even if all other sections are full.
"Excellent said Dennis Young, Pirate
Club director, when asked to describe his
reserved seat for Pirate home games. This
seat is used by Young at every home
game. Young also said that he was not
aware if students were allowed to sit in
unoccupied Pirate Club seats or not.
Some students who attend many of the
Pirates' games do not understand why
they cannot sit there if the seats are not
being used by Pirate Club members.
Senior Mike Albergini, who has attended
every home game this season and has
even traveled to Wilmington to see the
Pirates in action is one of many students
who feel disadvantaged.
"The students seats are not as com-
fortable as the seats with backs on them
Albergini said. "Students should be
rewarded for coming to games
ECU senior David Crater also thinks
students should be able to sit in die pur-
ple seats if they are not being used by
Pirate Club members.
"East Carolina and the basketball
games should be about the students
Crater said.
The consensus among the student
body here at ECU is that the students
make up this university and should be
able to use the seats when they are vacant.
Most ECU basketball games are not
sellouts. But the ones that are usually fill
the enure facility, and this includes the
Pirate Club's seats.
The Pirate Club gives alumni a chance
to support their alma mater through both
giving money to the sports programs here
at ECU, and by allowing them to give
their vocal support at games along with
current students. Although the basketball
program does not draw the same fan sup-
port as the football program, the games
are still important and the Pirate Club is
an organization that helps support basket-
ball and the university.
Reserved seats for Pirate Club members slay empty during most of ECU's basketball home games.
PHOTO BY MICHAEL SMITH

Adam Gaffey ranks among top 25 in country Club
Pirate swimmer Adam Gaffey ranks high among NCAA Division 1
PHOTO BY JACOB GARMON
Pirate swimmer
has higfi hopes
Blaine Deniiis
senior writer
Ranked in the NCAA top
25 in two events, Pirate
swimmer Adam Gaffey is
causing waves in the CAA
conference and around the
country.
According to the NCAA
Division 1 rankings,
Gaffey is 17th in the 500
meter freestyle and 18th in
the 1650 meter freestyle
events. With a winning
record throughout the sea-
son and the top 25 results,
Gaffey has high hopes for
the Conference
Championship Feb. 18-20
in Charlotte, N.C.
"I want to come out
with all guns firing and do
a good job for the school
Gaffey said. "My goal is to
win conference in my two
events and then go to
Nationals
The Conference
Championship will
determine which
swimmers go on to com-
pete at the national level.
Gaffey believes his aggres-
sive attitude and mental
strength will help him suc-
ceed at both these events.
"I swim well at the big
meets Gaffey said. "I
train very hard and get
pumped up. I really don't
like to lose
Although Gaffey is
expected to do well in both
the 500 and 1650 freestyle
events, he is more confi-
dent with a longer race like
the 1650.
"It's the longest race
they swim anywhere
" want to come out
with all guns firing
and do a good job for
the school
Adam Gaffey
Piraie Swimmei
Gaffey said. "My time is
better and we really train
hard for that event. We
don't go in unprepared
Often praised for his
natural talent, Gaffey is
quick to credit much of his
success to the coaching
staff here at ECU.
"Ninety percent of my
success is that I have really
awesome coaches Gaffey
said. "Coach Moody
knows what I need and is
real excited during prac-
tice
Pirate swim team
coaches are impressed with
Gaffey's hard work and
have high expectations for
his future at ECU.
"His work ethic is great
and he is a very coachable
swimmer assistant coach
McGee Moody said.
"When he goes in the
water you know that he is
going to win. He has the
potential to go a long way
Gaffey ended the '99
regular season with two
individual wins against
UNC-W on Jan. 30. Even
though the Pirates lost the
meet, head coach Rick
Kobe is pleased with
Gaffey's performance and
expects him to make the
NCAA Championship.
"Talent, there is no sub-
stitute for talent Kobe
SEE SWIMMING PAGE II
sports
for all
Rec Services have more
activities for students
Tennis teams begin spring season as victors
Men and women won every
singles match over Asheville
Mario Scherhal1 fer
sports editor
Both tennis teams started the season with a
'Blitzkrieg' by winning all their matches in
an impressive and quick manner.
ECU's men's tennis team hosted its first
match of the young season, defeating UNC-
Asheville 4-0, while the Lady Pirates won
with an imposing score of 5-0 over the
Bulldogs.
"I didn't know how solid UNC-Asheville
was and I was very pleased with the way we
played said Tom Morris, ECU head men's
and women's coach. "We played hard and
fair and we did a lot of things we were work-
ing on very well
The women's team captured five singles
victories, all in straight sets, and the men's
team decided the battle early by winning
the points for the doubles competition and
by winning the following three singles
matches.
According to Morris, Lady Pirate fresh-
men Hrushida Kamthe, Carolina Torres,
and Meredith Spears, who won their singles
matches at the No. 1, No. 2 and No. 4 posi-
tions, respectively, were nervous before
their matches but did in no way disappoint.
Junior Asa Ellbring and the remaining
senior Catherine Morgan rounded out the
Pirate victory by winning their matches in
straight sets, too.
The men's team took the lead by win-
ning the doubles matches at the No. 2 and
the No. 3 positions with Michael
HuezStephan Siebenbrunner and Dustin
"We know that the doubles are
important in our matches
Siebenbrunner
senior
HallDerek Slate representing the success-
ful couples.
"We know that the doubles are important
in our matches said Siebenbrunner, senior.
"That's why we work on it during practice
Roope Kalajo, who defeated UNCA's
Ivan Lalic 6-3. 6-2 at the No. 1 singles posi-
tion, proved to be ECU's top player on the
team. Oliver Thalen and Hall decided the
match up with the Bulldogs by winning
their'matches at the No. 3 and the No. 4
positions, respectively. The remaining
games of Siebenbrunner, Slate and Huez
were halted thereafter.
"My problem so far is that I need a set to
get started said freshman Michael Huez,
who is supposed to be the best-conditioned
player on the team. "After that first set I felt
confident though and would have won the
match if if wouldn't have been halted.
'The team proved to be in good shape.
We have to wait for upcoming tougher
matches to say anything besides though
The Pirates will next host Barton College
on Wednesday, Feb. 17 at 2:30 p.m. on
ECU's tennis courts. The Lady Pirates will
host Mt. Olive College and Campbell in a
double-header on Saturday, Feb. 20 at 9
a.m. and at 1 p.m respectively, in
Greenville.
ECU
OPPONENT
MEN
WINNER
SCORE
Roope KalajoIvan lalicECU6-3.6-2
Stephan SiebenbrunnerBrandon Shupe4-6
Oliver ThalenJimmy LangtonECU6-4, 6-2
Dustin HallScott PrubysECU7-6, 6-0
Michael HuezZack MolinaECU6-4, 2-0
Derek SlateJeff GrimmECU6-3. 1-0
I)
If
WOMEN
Hrushida KarntheJunelle Watson ECU6-3,6-2 1
Carolina Torrestaum HastayECU6-3,6-2
Asa EllbringStephanie ShubaECU6-2,6-2
Meredith SpearsNancy UvasayECU6-1,6-3
Catherine Morgani nrthECU6-0, 6-0 �4, 2-1
n Department
Jean V. Wiiakton
STAFF WRITER
Do you have an interest in playing
sports but did not quite get the schol-
arship you were hoping for?
Maybe you played a little soccer,
rugby or lacrosse ifi high school and
you're looking for some intercolle-
giate competition. Well, the ECU
club sports department is the place
for you to put your athletic talenf to
the test.
Club sports offers students, facul-
ty and staff a way to compete in a
variety of sports while allowing for
leadership opportunities. From soc-
cer to kayaking, volleyball to Tae
Kwon Do, club sports has something
for every athlete at any skill level.
Gray Hodges, head of club sports,
said that Recreational Services sup-
ports teams by providing equipment
and practice spaces. Hodges also said
that each team submits a budget for
the year requesting funding for trav-
el expenses, tournament fees and
new equipment.
For all participants, each team has
a detailed constitution that outlines
specific requirements, such as GPA.
Candice Voigt, co-captain of the
women's ultimate frisbee team,
Helios, said that they arc always
looking for new players. The team
keeps recruiting members who have
some general athletic ability but are
open to anyone willing to learn and
wants to become involved.
"We always want new players who
will be dedicated to the team Voigt
said.
This year the Helios' goal is to
make it to the national tournament in
Colorado in May.
Voigt, now coach and administra-
tor for the team, got involved three
years ago because, "the sport is just
so much fun
And now she feels it's a popular
way to exercise, meet new people,
travel and compete
"I really love competing with a
team I'm dedicated to Voigt said. "I
eat, sleep and dream frisbee
Club teams are entirely controlled
by team members. Captains run
practices, set up matches and orga-
nize tournament trips.
Ben Kley, co-captain of the men's
lacrosse team, played in high school
and said that their team is full of
SEE CLUB SPORTS PAGE 11
11 Thundi'
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:rs
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its
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A R T O N
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me intercolle-
11, the ECU
it is the place
iletic talent to
indents, facul-
compete in a
: allowing for
es. From soc-
;yball to Tae
ias something
skill level,
of club sports,
Services sup-
ig equipment
idges also said
i a budget for
iding for trav-
snt fees and
:ach team has
that outlines
uch as GPA.
aptain of the
isbee team,
y are always
rs. The team
ers who have
bility but are
; to learn and
ed.
v players who
team Voigt
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ournament in
.1 administra-
volved three
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t's a popular
new people,
eting with a
Voigt said. "I
ibee
:ly controlled
lap tains run
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of the men's
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m is full of
AGE tl
11 Tksrsdsy, Fsbrssry 11, 1889
sports
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Film wants Duke in ads
DURHAM (AP) A Nike film
crew is in Krzyzewskiville, gather-
ing footage for six television com-
mercials to runduring the NCAA
basketball tournament.
Most of the footage was shot at
Duke Monday, although not all the
spots are about the Duke team.
The crew was wrapping up
Tuesday by shooting shooting tape
of students in Duke's annual bas-
ketball tent city, named for men's
basketball Coach Mike
Krzyzewski, where students gather
each season to camp for tickets.
"There's so much energy and
enthusiasm and heritage here at
Duke University around basketball
and, obviously, Duke is a Nike
team and we're proud of the associ-
ation said Simon Pcstridge, a
spokesman for Nike. Nike pro-
vides Duke's basketball team with
uniforms and shoes, although play-
ers may choose to wear other shoe
brands said Mike Cragg, a
spokesman for Duke's Athletics
Department.
Duke's status as the nation's No.
1-ranked college basketball team in
the latest Associated Press poll, is
also a big reason for Nike's interest
in featuring the team in ads.
Coach K will appear in one ad.
University of Connecticut Coach
Jim Calhoun and Tubby Smith,
who coaches the defending NCAA
champs, the University of
Kentucky Wildcats, will appear in
other spots. Actress Ashley Judd, a
Nike is paying the standard
$3,000 per day tee and extra for,
additional police or traffic control
support, Duke officials said.
They're also adding additional
tents. "Since most of the tents were
taken down after the Carolina and'
Maryland games, Nike is going to
mix some tents in to make it look
like it normally would said Duke
spokesman Cabell Smith.
Swimming
continued from page 10
said. "He works hard, has a good
attitude and likes what he is doing.
Put those things together and you
swim fast
Gaffey has provided leadership
with the example he sets in the
water and has worked hard to
encourage his fellow team mem-
bers.
"He kind of gets us started
senior swimmer Richard Chen
said. "If he wins we all get pumped
up and motivated
As a junior transfer student from
Orlando, Fla Gaffey has one more
season at ECU. Gaffey has been
one of the Pirate's most successful
swimmers and has accomplished
many ohis goals. However, he still
has many achievements on the
horizon like the Olympic Summer
Games.
"The Olympics cross my mind
everyday Gaffey said. "It is defi-
nitely a goal, but I am trying to
keep everything in perspective
NC Charlotte Motor
Speedway sells its name
CONCORD, N.C. (AP)
Charlotte Motor Speedway, long
known for its innovations in
Winston Cup racing, today became
the first track on the circuit to sell
its name.
The track will be renamed
Lowe's Motor Speedway under an
agreement with Lowe's
Companies Inc the nation's sec-
ond-largest home improvement
retailer. Officials with the company
and Speedway Motorsports Inc
which owns the track, said the deal
is worth $35 million over 10 years.
"This opens the flood gates
said SMI president Humpy
Wheeler, whose company also
operates Atlanta, Bristol, Las Vegas
and Texas motor speedways, as
well as Sears Point Raceway.
Today's announcement does
not affect SMI's other properties,
but company officials said they
expect other tracks on the Winston
Cup circuit to follow suit. Wheeler
said the Atlanta and Texas tracks
"This opens the flood gates
Humpy Wheslsr,
SMI President
would be the two other SMI prop-
erties most likely to sell their nam-
ing rights in the coming months.
While selling the naming rights
to stadiums and arenas has become
SEE CHARLOTTE SPEEDWAY PAGE It
Club Sports
continued Item page 10
include 13 different teams from
four different types of martial arts.
Anyone interested in playing a
sport or starting up a new sport is
encouraged to contact Recreational
Services at 328-6387 or visit the
web site at www.rescerv.ecu.edu.
Be sure to come out and support
club sports this season.
experienced players who
wanted a chance to compete
without a lot of pressure. Now
the men's lacrosse team prac-
tices four days a week at the
new Blount Fields Complex.
During the spring, this
complex will be host to an
number of club events includ-
ing the ultimate frisbec tour-
nament for men and women,
Ultimax 29.
The Student Recreation
Center will be the meeting
grounds for a martial arts com-
petition in April that will
Spring Club Sport Available at ECU
woman � rnsoaa rvsaoe
Martial Arts -Goju Shorin Karat, Isshinyu Karata. la Kwon Do, 1W CM Chaun
Man a and Woman's ucroaa
KayaMn
Underwater Hockay
Man's and Woman's VWtaybaH
Man a and Woman's Swemmlno
Rugby
Club Sport Event at ECU Thlsj Smtr
Men's Lacrosse va. UNC-Chartotta Sat Fab 17 at Blount RaWa
Rugby vs. UNC and Fort Bragg Feb. 27 at Blount Fide
UrtimaxM March 20-21 at BlountFfaWe
Swim Meet April 10 at SRC
MartialArts April 24 at SRC
ML
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1





fit ftirrtty. faiftry 11. 1999
sports
Till Elit Carolinian
Charlotte Speedway
coniinuid from pigi It
commonplace in team sports, the
Lowe's deal represents a fust for
stock car racing's premier circuit.
Charlotte, a 1.5-mile super-
speedway built in 1960 in the north
Charlotte suburbs, also was the first
facility in Winston Cup racing to
offer stock publicly and the first to
build luxury suites and condomini-
ums.
This will do nothing but help
our identity Wheeler said. The
folks at Lowe's are great marketers,
and that's what we need in this
sport. We've got another couple
levels to go up in this sport, and I
think they can help take us there
Lowe's, based in North
Wilkesboro, N.C has 487 stores in
20 states. The company already
sponsors a Winston Cup team and
Lowe's spent an estimated $30
million in racing last year and
expects that figure to climb to $40
million this year, chairman and
chief executive officer Bob Tillman
said.
This makes perfect sense for
us because we both have the same
target market Tillman said. "Of
all sports marketing activities, this
one yields the highest return of all
because the fan loyalty is greater in
NASCAR than any
other sport
Wheeler said the money from
the name change would be used to
add seats, roads and parking at the
track, which will be able to seat
about 156,000 people for the next
Winston Cup race, the Coca-Cola
600 in May.
w j A Paint your Own Pottery Studid
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two paint for the price of one
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�19$





13 Thurtdiy, fibruiry 11,1899
sports
Tin Ettt CtrsNniM
�-�.
Photographer
positions
available
�required experience w photography
�owns camera equipment
�good organizationtime management skills
�apply at 2nd floor student publications
building or call 328-6366
Express Taxi
439-0333
2400 S. Memorial Drive
Greenville, NC 27834
Fax 252-321-4829
Local
Ride the Express
Long Distance � 24 Hour Service VisaMC
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rU
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CALL TODAYIII
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ATTORNEY AT LAW
DWI, Traffic, and Felony Defense
? Aapaaat Public Defctder 18-1993
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?Has Represented Thousands of Individuals
in Distort and Superior Criminal Courts
Member - Pitt County Criminal Defense Bar
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� 24 hour message service
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F FLORIDA I
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Any 6-pack of 12 oz. Cans of any
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Falcons
player
charged
�-�
MIAMI (AP) Another Atlanta,
Falcons player is taking a legal hit1
Receiver Tony Martin, 33, whou
caught five passes in the Falcons'
34-19 Super Bowl loss to Denver-
returned to Miami on Monday
appearing in court in shackles tau
face money laundering and con
spiracy charges. � i
Pro Bowl safety Eugeneu
Robinson was arrested the night
before the Super Bowl on charges'
of soliciting oral sex from a femalen
undercover police officer. "j?
Robinson is due back in court
March 2, but Martin is potentially
is in much deeper legal trouble. ��
"I'm not guilty of anything?
Martin said after being released oK
dire 250,000 bond. "This who7
thing is ludicrous. After this trial k
over, I will be cleared
Martin's legal troubles spring
from his longtime relationship
with Rickey Brownlee, a convictjf
ed drug dealer known as
mayor of Opa-Locka" for
Robin Hood style.
"He would pass out turkeys at
Thanksgiving, give bicycles to liry
de kids. But he was also selling"
heroin and cocaine Willianft
Mitchell, special agent in charge ate
the DEA's Miami office, said
when Brownlee was arrested in!
January 1998.
Martin was under investigation
for months. His name appeared
Monday on the thud superseding
indictment in the case, which also
involves cocaine and heroin traf-
ficking.
The receiver is not accused ofj
involvement in Brownlee's drug
business. Prosecutors said h�,J
wrote checks to lease luxury carjj
and pay legal fees for his frienP
because Brownlee's lawyer
wouldn't take cash. ��
In a Jan. 6 interview, Martirri
insisted he was no longer a target I
of the investigation.
"It was just speculation he
said at the rime. "It wasn't evenj
true. Really, it was just garbage. I !
knew in my mind that I didn'ul
have anything to worry about 1
Brownlee allegedly gave cash"
to Martin for deposits on the cataj
and the attorneys' fees. After hi�
financial records were subpoez
naed, Martin stopped payment oriJJ
a dire 175,000 check to the attor-V
neys and showed a copy of the
subpoena to Brownlee's associates,
according to the indictment.
Martin gave thousands to con
ceal the scheme, prosecutors said.
Martin thanked the Falcons
organization for support.
Spokesman Charlie Taylor said
the team had no comment
Acquired by the Falcons from
San Diego last June, Martin led
Atlanta with 66 catches for 1,181
yards and six touchdowns this sea-
son. He added nine receptions for
192 yards in the playoffs as the
Falcons reached their first Super
Bowl in franchise history. Martin
teamed with Tenance Mathis to
give the Falcons the NFL's sec-
ond-most productive pair of
receivers in terms of yardage.
:
1 "Yon. Buffy, 1 totally cai 1 � believe they really printi I my letter to the editor1


1 eastcarolinian

� -
1 OKI 111 MO RI







14 Tavtity. Fearaary 11. 18t9
FOR RENT
TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$286month. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apt� 126 Avery St. in Graen-
viae - 6 blocks from campus. 768-
ASOJt
OOSfO.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom, in-
cludes watersewer; $276. Call 321-
4712.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom. 1 bath apt.
$275.00 par month, free watersew-
er, range, rafrig. pats OK. Call 768-
1821 ask for Kan.
ROOMMATE WANTED
South: $100
off deposit: 2 bedroom. 1 bath apt.
free watersewer, washerdryer
hook-ups. 6 blocks from campus.
Available now $440. Call 768-1921.
SPACIOUS 2 bedroom apt. 2
blocks from ECU. Available for short
term lease. Call Dogwood Hollow �
762-8900 .
DUPLEX. 2 SDR. 1 Bath, heat
pump, private drive, close to cam-
pus, no pets please. Call 766-8444
or 365-7799.
BEECH STREET Villas - Three bed-
room, two bath apartments, close to
campus, with laundry room, stove,
refrigerator, and dishwasher. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC 766-6209.
WALK TO ECU. 3 bedroom, gas
heatAC; call 321-4712.
LANGSTON PARK Apartments:
$100 off deposit 2 bedroom. 1 bath
apt. free watersewer, all applianc-
es, washerdryer hook-ups. over
900 sq.ft. Available now $426. Call
768-1921.
PINEBROOK APARTMENTS. 1-2
BRs available, water, sewer, cable in-
cluded. Reduced Deposits Novem-
ber, December. On-site main-
tenance, management, ECU bus
line. 9-12 month lease, pets allowed.
758-4015
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom. 1 bath apt.
Only $360.00 per month, on Co-
tancha St. directly across from new
ECU Rec. Center. Call 767-3191.
CANNON COURT Two bedroom. 1
12 bath townhouse. Includes stove,
refrigerator, dishwasher, washerdry-
er hook-up. on ECU bus route. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC. 766-6209.
ROOM FOR rent. Large house
wbig yard, volleyball court, much
parking, fenced inrNeed roommate
ASAP. 4th Street vary near campus.
Call 762-1222.
CONDO FOR Ram: 2000 sq.ft. con-
do. newly renovated. 3 bedrooms, 1
12 baths, washerdryer hook-up.
Available immediately. 762-1899
daytime. 661-2203 pager � nights.
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE
Needed to share apt. close to cam-
pus, student preferred. Must be re-
sponsible 8 clean 8 like pets. Total
expense par month will not, exceed
$270. 762-0009.
DRESSER AND matching hutch.
$70. Call 768-6796 after 5:30p.m.
1990 GEO Storm for sale by owner.
90.000 miles, in good condition.
Asking $2700 or best offer. Call Lau-
ren at 830-3803 if interested.
PORTABLE BROTHER word proces-
sor with printer. Word processing,
spread sheets, scheduler calendar
calculator. $100 OBO. Call Joanna
at 355-9225.
FOR SALE
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
t HEAD, NC-Get your group to-
gether early. Relatively new house in
excellent condition: fully furnished:
washer 8 dryer dishwasher central
AC; available May 1 through Au-
gust 31: sleeps 8-$2200.00 per
month. 757-860-1532
GLADIOLUS GARDENS One. two,
and three bedroom apartments. Free
cable. Located on 10th Street. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC 766-6209.
106 STANCILL DRIVE, 2 bedroom.
1 bathroom, brick duplex, central
heatair. near ECU. $425 month.
pats extra with fee. Call 353-2717.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for 2 bed-
room. 1-12 bath townhouse. Fully
furnished. Close to campus.
$236month plus half utilities.
Please call 321-7762 between hours
of 10a.rn.and 6p.m.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 3
bedroom townhouse and 13 utili-
ties. 2 blocks from campus. Contact
Allyson at 767-8767 or (Crystal at
329-1412.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. Malefe-
male. Available March 1st! Tar River
Estates, in walking distance to cam-
pus. 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms,
kitchen, and living room. Rent
$266mo. 12 utilities. Ask for
Chris at 762-1621 or leave message.
ROOMMATE NEEDEDI Share 3
bedroom house with only 1 room-
mate and 1 cat. 3 miles from cam-
pus, one year old. Private bathroom
and phone line. Nice yard. 768-7826.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 3 bedroom. 2 bath house on
ECU bus route. Rant $220. includes
washer and dryer. 3280471
ram to
SKYMVE!
(t1fl)4M-2224
Tht East Carolinian
FOR SALE
STUDENT DISCOUNT for auto de-
tailing. Don't like to clean your car?
Let us do it. Professional and experi-
enced. Pick up avail. Call Tim for
prices at 931-9166.
SERVICES
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED
SPRING BREAK 991 Cancun' Nas-
sau ' Jamaica. Travel free and make
lots of Cash! Top raps are offered on-
site staff jobs. All-inclusive deals. 32
hours free Drinks. Special Discounts
up to$100 per person. Lowest price
guaranteed. Call' now, for details!
www.classtravel.com 800838-6411
1999 INTERNSHIPS! Don't gat a
summer job Run a summer busi-
ness. www.tuitionpainters.com. tui-
paintSbeilsouth.net or 800-393-
4621.1
CRUISE SHIP Employment - work-
ers earn up to $2000 month (w
tips 8 benefits). World Travel! Land-
Tour jobs up to $5,000 47.000
summer. Ask us howl 517-336-4236
Ext.C53623
1988 HONDA Prelude SI. 124.600
miles, 5-speed, sunroof, very de-
pendable. $3700 or best offer. 757-
1949.
AAAI Spring Break Panama City
$1291 Boardwalk room with kitchen
near clubsl 7 parties-free drinks!
Daytona $1491 South Beach $129!
Cocoa Beach $149! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-6786386
ADORABLE ROTTWEILER -
Shepherd puppies for sale Only
$20. They're growing quickly and
need a loving homel Please call 561-
7690 for more details (8a.m to4p.m.
preferably)
TWO LOVESEATS for sale. Pull out
into beds. $200.00 for both OBO.
Also willing to sell separately. Call
931-0487.
AAAI SPRING Break Bahamas Par-
ty Cruise! 6 nights $2791 Includes
meals 8 parties! Awesome beaches,
nightlife! Departs from Florida! Can-
cun 8 Jamaica $3991 springbreak-
travel.com 1-800-678-6386
CUSTOM PRINTED T-shirts. Profes-
sion printers since 1981. Competitive
rates. Free shipping. Full art depart-
ment. We accept digital files in most
formats. 800-272-2066 culture-
works.com
LOOKING FOR something to give
your sweetheart for Valentine's Day?
How about a massage? The ECU FT
program is holding a massage clinic
Tuesday Feb. 16th from 5-9p.m. at
the Belk Bldg. on Charles Blvd. Ad-
vanced tickets are $310min. or
$410min. at the door.
i (252)329-1218,
YOU CANNOT BEAT THIS
PRICE!
wanted to
share 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom apart-
ment 2 blocks from school. Rant
$266. Washerdryer included. 12
cable, 12 utilities. 12 phone. Avert-
able at end of this semester. Make
plans now. Cat! Emify. 329-0886.
FOR YOUR MAN'S VALENTINE &IFTI
�f
GIVE QUALITY, CLASS, STYtB '
CHECK OUTOUKBKSI
STORE WIDE SALE
Tommy, Nautica, Fblo -ALL THE&E&V
Shirto, PUmiSb, Jeana, Shoee, Eta,

P SHOP
fWtmfjrfmtfi
100000
GREEK PERSONALS GREEK PERSONALS
TUTORS NEEDED: Do you have a
3.0 or better GPA? Are you interest-
ed in becoming a tutor for the Office
of Student Development-Athletics?
We need individuals capable of tu-
toring any 8 all levels (0001-5999) in
all subject areas, especially the fol-
lowing; ACCT. ANTH, ASIP, CHEM.
CSCI, DSCI. ECON. EMST. GEOG.
MATH. MGMT. MKTG. PHIL. 8
PHYSI. Undergraduate students are
paid six dollars an hour ($6) and
graduate students are paid seven
dollars an hour ($7). If this sounds
like the job for you, join us for an ori-
entation meeting on Thursday, Fe-
bruary 11th at 5 p.m. in room 236-B
Ward Sports Medicine Building. If
you have any questions, please con-
tact lshaWlliamsjt328-4691:
TRUGREEN CHEMLAWN, nation's
leader in lawncare, is looking for in-
dividuals interested in part-time cler-
ical work from 5-9 MonFri. $6-$7
an hour. Call 7582352 for interview.
FREE RADIO $1250. Fundraiser
open to student groups 8 organiza-
tions. Earn $3-$5 per VisaMC app.
-We supply all materials at no cost.
Call for info or visit our website.
Qualified callers receive a Free Baby
Boom Box. 1-800-932-0528 x 65.
www.ocmconcepts.com
FRATERNITIES. SORORITIES 8
Student Groups: Earn $1000-$2000
with easy 3 hour CIS Fund Raiser
event. No sales required. Fund
Raiser days are filling up. so call
today. Contact Chris 800829-4777.
PART-TIME help needed. Local law
firm seeking pattrtime investigator's
assistant. Must have valid NC drivers
license and reliable transportation.
Flexible hours. If interested call 752-
2000. ask for Becky.
LOOKING FOR a part-time job?
Help wanted at Szechuan Express, in
the Food Court in the Plaza Mall.
Day hours from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m
night hours from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Apply in person. No phone calls,
please.
87.00 PER hour plus $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina. (Nags Head). Call
Dona for application and housing
info 800-662-2122.
PART-TIME help needed. Local law
firm seeking part-time clerical help.
Must have general office experience.
Flexible hours. If interested call 752-
2000. ask for Becky.
NEED SUMMER help at Hatteras
Beach. Free housing. Need two
males or females for retail seafood
market. Bonus offered. Call 262-986-
2215 or email riskybGinterpath.com
PREPAID
PHONECARDS
(NCCA)
300
minutes, for S30.00 cord,
That's IO CENTS MINUTE,
OTHER
THE CARD Post Report 316. Oli-
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FOUND: YOUNG tabby tomcat with
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SPRINGBREAK BEACHES Dayto-
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popular hot spots. Best hotels, pric-
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, .
GREEK PERSONALS
ZETA TAU Alpha would like to
thank Theta Chi for a great social
last Thursday. We had a blast!
ALPHA DELTA Pi would like to con-
gratulate our newly elected officers:
President-Katie Williams. VP-Layne
Summerfield. Membership Vice
President- Jennifer Galloway,
Treasurer Mary Margaret
Porterfireld. Recruitment VP Alison
Lewis. Rush Cristina Wichtrich.
Social Andrea Young. Philanthropy
Kristen McKeighan. Recording
Secretary Jennifer Jackson, corre-
sponding Secretary Anisa Ghrairi.
New Member Educator Sandy
Jenkins, and all other appointed offi-
cers. Good luck! We know you'll do a
great job! '� , t:H ��
p�T��� 'i �'�
CONGRATULATIONS TO Lee
Anne 'tth'her engagement to Tom
We love you. your Zeta Tau Alpha sis-
ters.
PI KAPPA ALPHA we had a great
time at the social Friday night. Let's
do it again soon. Love, the sisters of
Chi Omega Love, the sisters of Chi
Omega
SIGMA NU, you blew us away with
your heaven and hell social. Wa had
a blast. Hope to do it again soon.
Love. Alpha Phi -
ALPHA DELTA Pi. Kappa Alpha and
Kappa Sigma, thank you for the wine
and cheese social. We had a blast.
Love, the sisters of Chi Omega
PHI KAPPA Tau - We had fun at the
Mardi Gras social. The decorations
looked great. Wall have to do it
again. Love, Alpha Phi
THANK YOU Panheilenic for anoth-
er wonderful banquet. The sisters
and new members of Pi Delta
WELCOME JESSICA and Barra.
Love, the sisters and new members
of Pi Delta
CONGRATULATIONS TO Donna
Gail on your Sigma Nu lavalier to
Jeff! We love you! Love, your Zeta
Tau Alpha sisters
CONGRATULATIONS ZETA Tau Al-
pha on all your Panheilenic Banquet
awards including Chapter Excel-
lence.
CONGRATS TO all the fraternities
on a wonderful rush. Zeta Tau Alpha
CHI OMEGA thanks for the great
time last Friday night. Hope to get
together again soon! Love, the broth-
ers of Pi Kappa Alpha
THANKS DELTA Zeta for a great so-
cial. Hope to have many more. Love,
the brothers of Delta Chi
PANHELLENIC WOULD like to con-
gratulate these sisters of the week:
Alpha Delta Pi-Gena Anderson and
Melissa Barrington; Alpha Phi-Angie
Stender and Jen Mock; Alpha Xi Del-
ta-Katie Adams and Amanda Marko-
vitch; Alpha Omicron Pi-Ashley Set-
tle and Shannon Ortiz; Zeta Tau Al-
pha, Whitney Farmer and Joy Edson;
Chi Omega-Meri Hines and Randi
Sharver; Sigma Sigma Sigma-Jennif-
er Witlow and Anna Walker; and Del-
ta Zeta-Amanda Laws and Michele
Bartlet.
THANKS, SIGMA Alpha Epsilon,
for a wonderful social on Friday.
Can't wait to do it again! Love, the
sisters of Zeta Tau Alpha
GIVE US TIME
TO REPAY
YOUR LOAN.
After just three years in
the Army, your college loan
could be a thing of the past
Under the Army's Loan
Repayment program, each
year you serve on active
duty reduces your indebt-
edness by one-third or
$1,500, whichever amount
is greater, up to a $65,000
limit
This offer applies to
Perkins Loans, Stafford
Loans and certain" other
federally insured loans
which are not in default
And this is just the first of
many benefits the Army
will give you. Get the
whole story from your
Army Recruiter.
756-9695
ARMY.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE:
www.g6army.com
I JIM I l I Kl K1 I
SPRING
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So�� KM im. m ' �"� Oifomi i" �� US m 1 �� �
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Bahamas Party
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5 days � MoB Uoata � Frtt Parties � kxJudes Tmm
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Cancun $399
7 Nigrra � A Holri � Free Food 4 30 Hrs of Orinki
Spring Break Travel-Our 12th Year!
1-800-678-6386
THANK YOU. Sigma Pi. for showing
us a great time at pref. We had a
blast as usual. Love, the sisters of A(
phaXi Delta
ALPHA DELTA Pi would like to-
thank Lambda Chi Alpha for thfl
great aoclal Friday night. Can't waif
to get together again soon!
ANNOUNCEMENTS
BIOLOGY T-SHIRT Contest. 2199
to 21200. Prize: dinner for two at
Applebee's plus free t-shirt. Rules:
No use of university trademark. Subf'
mit any concepts for front & back
designs in black & white to BS119
Questions? Call BGSA. 328-1836.
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
Tuesday 11a.m12noon.The Center
for Counseling and Student Develop
merit is offering this workshop oh
Tuesday. Feb. 16th. If you are inter-
ested in this workshop, please corW1
tact the Center at 328-6661.
en
B-GLAD (Bisexuals Gays Lesbians
and Allies for Diversity) meets every.
Wed. � 7:30 p.m. in room GCB,
3008. So come on out and join the
fun. Make new friends and make a"
difference.
����f' �
ATTENTION FACULTY a Staffll Be-
ginning next month. Exercise Wisely
and Aqua Fitness are back at the
SRC. Both classes are designed and
reserved exclusively for you! Regis-
tration information is available maw
at the Dept. of Recreational Servic-
es. 328-6387. Classes begin March
a;
REMINDER: SQUASH class being
taught at the SRC Feb. 23-March 11.
Registration information available at
the SRC 328-6387.
TEST ANXIETY: Monday 3:30-
4:30. The Center for Counseling and
Student Development is offering this
workshop on Monday. February
15th. If you are interested in this
workshop, please contact the Center
at 328-6661.
SOMETHING DIFFERENT: Partici-
pate in the National Student Ex-
change. ECU students can choose
from more than 140 public colleges
and universities across the country
for an exchange of one or two se-
' masters. Cost for tuition and fees re-
main the same. Find out more at In-
ternational Affairs. 306 E. Ninth.
Thursday or Friday 3:30 p.m
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: Thursday 3:30-5PM. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering this work-
shop on Thursday, February 11th. If
you are interested in this program,
contact the center at 328-6661.
i
1 SPRING Hki:K
11(11 Hs.i, IIOI KSOI I Kl I IIIUNkS'
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ECU COLLEGI
meeting Wedni
6 p.m. in room
Classroom bid)
true beliefs anc
join us.
ACADEMIC IV
day 11a.m12:(
for Counseling
merit is offerir
Thursday, Feb.
ejled in this w
tact the Center
PASTOR JAR
Community Ch
ministering at
fast Fellowship
at 9 p.m. at 1
Memorial Driv
PittGreenville I
per person. Cal
ALPHA KAPI
Business fraten
first annual Val
at Christenbun
Feb. 13th at 5p
towards Ameri
Admission is 9
raffle ticket.
BECOMING A
Npte-Time Ma
3:30-4:30 The
ing and Studer
fering the folk
Tuesday, Feb. 1
ested in this w
center at 328-6
Bi
N
I
Free
Free n
E






ha Eiit Carolinian
Pi, for showing"
ref. We had i"
le sisters of A(
would like to
Alpha for thcj
jht. Can't waif.
soon)
jntest. 2199
tner tor two at
t-shirt. Rulest'J
rademark. Sub;
r front & back
fhite to BS119
l, 328-1836.
TRAINING
on.The Center
udent Develop"
i workshop on
I you are inter
p, please con
3-6661
i'ji
Gays Lesbians
ty) meets every
in room GCfJ ,
ut and join the
is and make a"
rY a Staffl! Be-
Exercise Wisely"
re back at the .
9 designed and
for you! Regis-
available maw
sational Servic-
s begin March
�H class being
b. 23-March 11.
ion available at
Monday 3:30-
Counseling and
t is offering this
iday. February
erested in this
itact the Center
�RENT: Partici-
al Student Ex-
its can choose
public colleges
ss the country
one or two se-
tion and fees re-
out more at In-
306 E. Ninth.
:30 p.m
or or a Career
3:30-6PM. The
ng and Student
�ring this work-
:ebruary 11th. If
n this program,
t 328-6661.
cun Florida
amas Barbados
' Best Meals
800-426-7710
15 Thuraday. February 11, 1999
classifieds
Tat East CotMm
ECU COLLEGE Republicans will be
meeting Wednesday, February 10 at
6 p.m. in room 1012 of the General
Classroom bldg. Stand up for your
true beliefs and principles and come
join us.
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION: Thurs-
day 11a.m12:00 noon. The Center
for Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering this workshop on
Thursday. Feb. 18th. If you are inter-
ested in this workshop, please con-
tact the Center at 328-6661.
PASTOR JAMES D. Corbett of
Community Christian Church will be
ministering at an Achievers Break-
fast Fellowship on Saturday, Feb. 13,
at 9 p.m. at the church, 1104 N.
Memorial Drive, across from the
PittGreenville airport. Cost is $5.00
per person. Call 551-9143
ALPHA KAPPA Psi Professional
Business fraternity will be holding its
first annual Valentine's Day Kiss Off
at Christenbury Gym on Saturday,
Feb. 13th at 5p.m. Half the proceeds
towards American Cancer Society.
Admission is $2 which includes a
raffle ticket.
BECOMING A Successful Student-
Note-Time Management: Tuesday
3:30-4:30 The Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development is of-
fering the following workshop on
Tuesday, Feb. 16th. If you are inter-
ested in this workshop, contact the
canter at 328-6661.
4-ON-4 Volleyball entry deadline.
Tues Feb. 16, 6p.m. � the Student
Recreation Center main office, room
128.
THE EXERCISE AND SPORT
Science Motor and Physical Fitness
Competency Test is being offered in
Minges Coliseum at 12 noon on
Friday. Feb. 19. Students must bring
an ECU I.D. For information, call 328-
4688.
STUDENTS INTERESTED IN serv-
ing as a University Marshal for the
1999 Spring Commencement may
obtain an application form room A-
16 Minges. Students must be classi-
fied as a junior by the end of the Fall
semester 1998 and have a 3.0 GPA
to be eligible. Return completed
application to Carol-Ann Tucker,
Advisor, A-16 Minges by March 12.
For more information, call 328-4661.
LEARNED OPTIMISM: Wednesday
3:30-4:30p.m. The Center for Coun-
seling and Student Development is
offering this workshop on
Wednesday, Feb. 17th. If you are in-
terested in this workshop, please
contact the Center at 328-6661.
SGA WILL sponsor an information
booth on how to get involved within
the organization on Tuesday. Febru-
ary 16. Applications and members
will be present to answer any ques-
tions. For more information call 328-
4724.
The Eadt Cototwuut'd JduieJCtice
MJ, MY love, I can't express how deeply my love is for you!
You're just too good to be true, can't take my eyes off of you,
you're like heaven to touch, I want to hold you so much
Happy Valentine's Day LYAF, SB
BELLDANDY, WILL you be mine forever? I love you with
all my heart and will always be your Teletubby. Love,
Keichi
CRYS, I love you very much. You are my heart, my soul, my
world! Happy Birthday and Happy Valentine's Day! Love,
your wife forever, Jaynean
ELBERA, MI amor, these wonderful years together have
been a blessing. I love you. You're my other half and
together we're one. Happy Valentine's Baby!
TO BLAKE, I love you very much! You are a part of my heart
and soul now and forever! Love, Brandie
DEAR PATRICK, I hope we have a happy Valentine's Day
together. I love you! Jennifer
BRYAN, THE past seven months have been the best times
of my life! Thank you so much for everything! Happy
Valentine's Day! I love you Love always, Brandy
PETIE, I'VE loved you since the first day I met you. How
couldn't I? You're irresistible. You make my every day
brighter. I love you now and forever. Mary Belle
HAPPY VALENTINE'S, Jason. I'm so glad that we've made it
this far and I cant wait to marry you. I love you. Love,
Marsha
MARSHA, WE have a dream most people can never find,
something real, something divine. I ask of you to share in
this dream, to love me forever as I will love you, to
become a part of my soul, my heart, too. Love, Jason
we want
aCOW
Did you see news happen?
Did you make news happen?
Do you belong between our covers?
Call ra-stcarolinian at 328-6366.
DELTA CHI brothers: Our ghetto fabulous boys, we have
mad love for you. Good luck, pledges, from your two big
sisters! Love, Jen and Lauren
TIF, I hope I can make our first Valentine's Day together
special! I love you! Love, Pat
DELTA SIGMA Phi - Just wanted to send our love to our
favorite guys. Happy Valentine's Day! Zeta love, Taryn,
Megan, and Nikki
SB, YOU are too good to be true! Can't keep my
eyeshands offyou! Love won't let me wait But time is on
our side. MJ
OLIVIA, I love you! Carlos
Happy Valentine's Day to a sweet staff of ad reps: Terese,
Maisha, Mandy, James, Jeff and Jonathan. Thanks for
your dedication and hard work!
STYX, THANK you just for being you. Happy Valentine's
Day! I love you. Dave
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Reality Check
Maybe you can get a bigger place
off campus, but consider the reality
of campus living


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We cook for you. �
We clean up after your meals.
We give you priority on your room and
roommate selection.
We provide all the comforts of home, and then some.
What more could you ask for?
�"
Take advantage of an economical campus
living package that's out of this world.
If you currently live on campus and did not receive your Return to
Campus Living Sign-Up packet or, if you live off campus and would
like to move into the residence halls, stop by the University
y Housing office on the ground floor of Jones Residence Halls
c
to pick up sign-up materials.
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I
'Arts & Entertainment Magazine of The East Carolinian
Thoralay, February 11,1999
A
D. Miccah Smith
Founla'mhead Editor
If you don't have tickets yet for the Friday
performance by New York's famed Alvin
Alley Repertory Ensemble, you're too late!
The long-awaited show, which will showcase some of
the nation's hottest young choreographic and dance
talent, sold out last week.
"We usually sell out three or four events a yearr says
Director of Marketing for University Unions Carol
Woodruff
The award-winning Ensemble, which is an offshoot of
the renowned AlvinAiley American Dance Theater,
has performed in over sixty venues across the country
since its foundation by AlvinAiley in 1974. The troupe
continues to present the most innovative modern
choreography combined with superior talent, dedica-
tion to excellence and a desire to enhance America's
modern dance heritage while preserving black culture
through dance.
"When you see an Ailey performance, there is a
tremendous eclecticism in the style of dance, and in
the music as well says Sylvia Waters, who has served
as the Ensemble's artistic director since 1975. In addi-
tion to selecting dancers, Waters searches for challeng-
ing works by the world's top young choreographers,
ensuring the Ensemble's diversity and aesthetic supe-
riority.
Comprised of only the best and most accomplished
Sm Aim, continued on page 7
Celebrate Black History Month with the Alvin Ailey Dance Ensemble
For everyone
who wants a
little Disco on
their Biscuits
CD Review
Movie Review
Video Review
Collective Soul
came, and some
people actually
stuck around for
the show!
wbtfriiwfe
. ifjuntainhead � 2nd Floor Student Publications Building Greenville, NC 27858 � Phone 328-6366 � Fax 3284558 � Advertising 328-2000 � www.fountainhead.ecu.edu





b
Collective Soul almost
worth the wait
Faaa mM mt at hoar far Gnaactiva Sad
Patrick McMahon
StaffWriter
I really wish I could write this story
as a gleaming tribute to Collective
Soul's concert at the Attk but I just
can't bring myself to lie to all you
faithful Fountainhead readers out
there. It is not that I can't lie (believe
me, I can), it's just that I feel I have to
get this out into the open for all
those people unfortunate (or fortu-
nate, if you look at it that way)
enough to miss the show.
The show began with the
extremely painful-to-watch band
Darba Hood (I hope I got that right),
and their completely unbelievable
style of music. By unbelievable, I
mean unbelievably bad, not good. It
seemed like they were trying Id do
too many sounds at once. They went
from trying to duplicate Pearl Jam's
steady buildup into hysteria to trying
to sound like Alice in Chains. One
particularly amusing scene came
when they sung one song whose
entire chorus consisted of"I wish I
was in New York CityT It seems like
everyone at once began to tell them
to get their "Darba Hood" ass back
there.
Oddly enough, the biggest ova-
tion they got the whole night came
when they finally got off the stage.
Then hell came in the form of a
62- minute wait before Collective
Soul even took the stage. The wait
eventually took its toll on the crowd
and numerous people actually left
because they were tired of waiting.
For all the people who got good and
drunk (among other things) in
anticipation for the show, the wait
was almost unbearable. It was funny
as hell to sit there and watch them
come down from their high, though.
Quick word of advice to The
Attic: next time we have to wait over
an hour between bands, put some-
thing other than a Mike Tyson fight
from ten years ago on the big screen-
See Soul, continued on pane 4
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Amanda G. Austin Managing Editor
Micoh Smith Editor
Caleb Rom Assistant Edhw
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2 Truiley. February ttB99
I ami Preview
Peasant's
Peasant's
February 11
Once Hush: This band is getting some
pretty good college radio air-play, and
fortunately they're part of a trend lead-
ing away from the noxious brand of
three-chord rock that's been the bane
of my existence for the past couple of
yean. Melodic and fresh, yet with a def-
inite '90s postmark, their new album
Superior Machines will probably trans-
late into a great lire show. Check out
their debut album, Say it Anyway.
February 16
Ben Swift Band: This is well-put-
together rock from former solo artist
Ben Swift, plus drums and an unex-
pected trombone. Echoes of Sting, Sade
and Ani Difranco surface in
Chimpanzee, their new and moderately
daring minimalist album with a defi-
nite laid-back appeal. Although mostly
Phish phreaks will probably gravitate
toward the show, Ben Swift Band, with
its subtle nuances, has better things to
do than jam.
lb Experience Art In
Progress
NOW UNTIL FEBRUARY 25 IN THE
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER GALLERY.
Join artist Ann Shangold end Rudie, her spiritual
guide dog, for dreaming, questions, conversations,
silent sitting, laughing, tea, meditation, dog petting
and more as they develop a mobile art work about
soul nourishment.
To Catch A Filch
FEBRUARY 11 & 13 AT 8 P.M. IN HENDRIX
THEATRE
Dirty Work (PG-13) Starring Norm Macdonald. It's
Sick-It's Dirty�It's their job, Mitch and Sam open a
revenge for-hire business. You and a guest get in
free when you present your ECU One Card.
lb Seriously Party
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12 AT 9 P.M. AT
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
Don't miss ECU'S annual Mardi Gras bash.
Gambling, food, dancing, bingo, video karaoke, leser
tag, bowling, and more. Best of all. It's free! Your
ECU One Card gets you in free. If you want to bring
an adult friend, pick up a guest pass February 8-12
at the Central Ticket Office (MF 8:30 a.m6:00
p.m.), the Todd Dining Hall Meal Plan Office (M-F
8:00 a.m5:00 p.m.), and on February 12, at the
SRC from 5:00 p.m10:00 p.m.
To Get Some Worn Done
Work doesn't have to bewellwork. Not when
you have start-of-the-art help at your fingertips. Get
down to business et the Mendenhall Student Center
Computer Lab, located on the ground floor. We've
got Pentium-based computers. Power Macs, color
and laser printers, a scanner and various software
programs to satisfy your homework needs.
To Knock Em Down Under
Blachllght
SATURDAY,
FEBRUARY 13
FROM 8-11 P.M.
Check out the Outer
Limitz Bowling Alley
in Mendenhall
Student Center's
ground floor.
Bowl under blecklight and gorge on all-u-can eat
pizza and drinks from 8:00-9:00 p.m. ($6.25 per per-
son 8:00-9:00 p.m. $5.50 per person after 9:00
p.m.)
To Discover Your Talents
Join organizations, get involved on campus, and
learn how to be e leader. The Student Leadership
Development Office offers e wide range of programs
designed to develop your skills end abilities. For
more information, call 3284796.
Everyt
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Suicide is painless, but comedy is
Cristian Skinner
SMffWriter
Everyone asks, "Which one,
the T.V. show or movie?" I
respond, "The only one: the
movie I'm talking about
Robert Altman's delicious
"MASH
Suicide is painless, but laughter is
priceless. It would take more time
than it's worth to find someone who
has never heard about "Mash Most
of you watched, as your writer did,
the "Mash" series on T.V from child-
hood, but maybe you've never seen
the movie that started everything.
The characters live in a Mobile Army
Surgical Hospital in Korea during the
warconflict in the late forties. They
work, sleep, eat and bathe in tents.
Their patients come from the front
line less than three miles away, and
everyone's life twists up in that envi-
ronment.
"Corporal O'Reilly, Tfou're not billet-
ing these enlisted men in the offi-
cers'area, now, are you?" When the
movie opens, two new surgeons,
"Hawkeye" Pierce (Donald
Southerland) and "Duke" Forrest
(Tom Skerrit) are on the last leg of
their trip to MASH 4077 to begin
their service for the cause in Korea.
They move in with the perpetually
praying Major Robert Burns (Robert
Duvall), who is quickly moved from
their tent and replaced by "Trapper
John" Mdntyre (Elliot Gould). When
"Hotlips"0'Houlihan (Sally
Kellerman) arrives, the stage, set, is
played out
An exasperated Hotlips demandsI
wonder how a degenerated person
(Hawkeye) like that could have
reached a position of responsibility
in the army medical corps
"He was drafted says the chaplain
from a nearby table.
Alternating between surgery and
bunks, Hawkeye, Duke and Trapper's
sophomork, and sometimes mean-
spirited, humor shows up in the
same people who save life after life
in the operating theater. There's one
of keys to the power of this film:
"Suicide is painless" and the life
made livable in the atmosphere of
death. Ifa sweet, dean and comfort-
able movie is what you want, rent the
series. It doesn't have the lyrics of
the theme song, but more impor-
tantly, it fails to make you believe
you're there, in a muddy MASH unit
in Korea.
"Goddamn Army
The movie's irreverence pervades the
room. With the famous theme song
at the beginning, and the quote
above at the end, the flick flips off
the audience and the real life setting
of the seemingly endless life of war.
You end"MASH" feeling a bit
emptied from laughing and from the
very real world created.
Celebrate Mardi Gras,
Ecu style!
Mohamed Hussein
Senior Writer
The great staff at the
Mendenhall Student Center is
counting down till "M-Day
February 12, 1999 marks the
seventh annual East Carolina
University Mardi Gras that
will begin at 9 p.m. and end at
2 a.m.
The staff is planning a wide array of
activities and attractions that will
include Loozy- Anna Laser Tag,
Bourbon Street Bingo, Glow
Bowling, DJ Dance, Cajun Buffet and
Fun Flicks Karaoke.
"This is the seventh annual ECU
Mardi Gras said Carol
Woodruff, marketing director of the
Department of University Unions.
"Students have loved it in the past
and it is becoming an ECU
tradition
Lots of prizes are just waiting to be
won by players all night
"This year's Mardi Gras sounds like
it is going to be as exciting and
fun-filled as the previous year's
said Emily Benton, a junior nursing
major.
One of the attractions, Loozy-Anna
laser lag, lets you test your
skills while blasting away at total
strangers with your laser-powered
guns. This year will also include two
dances. One will include the popu-
lar
DJ J.Arthur, while the other will be a
Salsa and Meringue Dance.
Instructors will also be on hand to
teach the reluctant crowds how to
"The safety and structure of ECU
Mardi Gras really helps me to enjoy
rrryself without having to worry
about the things that might happen
elsewhere said Crystal Upchurch, a
junior majoring in elementary edu-
cation.
Students may attend without having
to pay by using their ECU One Card.
One adult guest will be admitted
with a guest pass. As always, stu-
dents and guests must enter togeth-
er.
Guest passes can be obtained from
February 8-12 at the Central Ticket
Office between the hours of 8:30
a.m. to 6 p.m. and at the Todd
Sm MirdiSrts, continued on pigt 7
answers to Tuesday's East Carolinian Crossword
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oannranDU ???uhq
UkJULBH GUU UMi
nnunn uaa aciDEia
aan uaci anna
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naDLJuan dduuhdilj
nuu waau nnnucn
uPiiira Ciena uiyu
uuann uam nuaan
unn udu oanuu
naaiLLiL naounono
amwryju aunn ana
Hunuas uugu a urn
Thursday February 11. �99 3
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Jam bands proliferate
Caleb Row
Assistant Editor
The Disco Biscuits
Uncivilized Area
A few years back on a sunny
April morn, the world was shocked
when the news of Jerry Garcia's
death spiead throughout the land.
Hippies, Dead fans and others spent
most of that morning mourning. A
few select death-metal fens rejoiced,
but in the end, the world lost a man
who was the center of all that was
hippie-jam band music.
The following day America pon-
dered this question: What are the
Deadheads gonna do now? Whose
tour will they follow in the summers
to come? All evidence pointed to
Phish or Widespread Panic, who
each netted substantially more profit
due to touring that summer. But a
monster was created in the process.
This monster was the emergence
of hippie-jam bands everywhere.
Bands that displayed undertones of
Phish and the Allman Brothers
became a dime a dozen. For many,
this was a good thing because the
influx of these groups filled the void
left by the now deceased Dead.
lam bands began to form in
marry towns in our regional area:
Greenville's Purple Schoolbus,
Roanoke's Red Weather and
Pennsylvania's Disco Biscuits.
The Disco Biscuits are formed
from the purest elements of the jam
band equation: A heap of Phish, sift-
ed together with some Allman
Brothers and a smidgen of God
Street Wine. Mix together in a large
bowl and bake (or get baked) and
you have the Disco Biscuits.
All but two of the songs clock in
at over six minutes in length and
die consist of maybe two verses and
a chorus. The rest is a jam, and let it
be known that jamming is not an
easy task, jazz musicians, who per-
fected the art of jamming, follow a
certain etiquette: don't solo too long,
don't be too loud or obnoxious, etc.
But considering the Biscuits target a
hippie audience, the jams have to
leave a lot of loom for dancing.
The Disco biscuits do have a lot
of talent but they have caught the
plague that many new bands face
today: lack of originality. The song
"Jamillia" from the new album
Vncw&zedArea sounds like a song
that Phish never recorded with its
dancing beat, rolling piano and har-
monized vocals. All of the songs are
exceptionally happy but a handful
grow tired after the first five of the
ten-plus minutes are spent.
The Disco Biscuits are no
stranger to Greenville, for they
graced Peasant's Cafe with their dose
of tunage last Tuesday. Keep an eye
out if they should return; one quali-
ty of jam bands is that their live
shows are often the butt of their
existence. The essence of the liveli-
ness just doesn't translate well onto
the album.
SouL continotd from paoi 2
just a suggestion.
Okay, Collective Soul came out to
a pretty raucous ovation and
jumped right into the music, show
ing more energy than 1 had expect-
ed. I was actually beginning to have
a good time. After running through
the older, big hits like "Precious
Declarationand "World That I
Know? they really began to get into
the newer songs like "Run" off the
Varsity Blues soundtrack and
"Heavy"off their new album
Dosage. The lead singer provided
most of the movement for the band,
jumping and spinning around
almost the entire show, think the
crowd would have been more enthu-
siastic towards the band if they had
not been worn down by the long
wait Even worn down, they let the
band know that they enjoyed each
and every song they played. I
wouldn't go as far to say it was
worm the wait, but it did come pret-
ty damn dose.
i&i .�� i

ti-4
'witJlBaraandNabte
Wednesday's rotntainhead
in our new program
'
Reviews for
Ronald
Carolinian
Ronald McDonald Hnu.se
A We are looking far fellow book lovers to read and review
best sellers far a good cause. Each Semester we will donate
these best sellers to the Ronald McDonald House where
they will be available for the family members of terminally
� ill children to read.
If you would like to write a review
B please call Mkxah at 328-6366
4 ThursdaK February 11, B99





0r
ARIES:
(March 21-April 20)
You both look, and feel good; your
high energy and upbeat attitude is
catching on with others. Take advan-
tage of your appeal to make gains in
your personal and professional life.
Ifs a great time to improve relation-
TAURUS:
(April21-May21)
Make it a point of accomplishing
those things that have been on your
to-do list There wiD be great person-
al power for you. A certain amount
of stress will no doubt accompany
your busy schedule; lashing out at
family members will get you
nowhere.
GEMINI:
(May 22-June 21)
Romance is in the air, and that warm
glow from you and your lover will
get you through any unpleasant situ-
ations in the workplace. Get chores
and errands out of the way, creating
extra quality time to spend with
family and friends.
CANCER:
(June 22-July 23)
You might fall in love, so take extra
care with who you shower your
affections on. It's time to consult a
financial planner on any longterm
investments you've been consider-
ing. Your intuition about money is
right on target Avoid criticism.
LEO:
(July 24-August 23)
This entire month will be quite busy
for you, both at home and at work.
You are getting closer and closer to
personal and career goals, so
remember those who have helped
you achieve what you want. Be sup-
portive of family members, especial-
ly children.
VIRGO:
(August 24 - September 23)
Help out wherever you can this
week, but make sure to avoid any
manipulators, all those efforts
should go to a worthwhile cause.
There may be an extra cash flow just
in time for weekend fun you have
planned Enjoy any break from your
usual routine and have fun.
LIBRA:
(September 24-October 23)
You are ready to conquer all obsta-
cles in your way, just make sure not
to hurt anyone. You're likely to find
kindred spirits to further career and
social plans. Major home repairs
may be very necessary. It isn't such a
bad idea to spend some time alone.
SCORPIO:
(October 24 - November 22)
This week will both begin and end
on a high note. You are in tune with
your sweetheart and everything
seems to be running smoothly. You
can move closer to your goals, with a
possible new business partnership
in the offing. Sign that new contract.
SAGITTARIUS:
(November 23 - December 21)
You may need to get away from your
hectic routine and be alone with
your thoughts. It's a great time to
travel. Be confident of successes in
any business dealings. Avoid
unpleasant financial surprises by
going over bank statements for any
discrepancies.
CAPRICORN:
(December 22 -January 20)
A friend challenges you to break out
of your shell and promote yourself
for advancement. You've nothing to
lose, and will be happier in the long
run. Time spent with someone dose
can make your day. The world is
filled with dreamers and doers, be a
doer.
AQUARIUS:
(January 21-February 19)
fery prominent people wiD want
your opinion, so be very careful how
you word any responses. It is hard to
avoid confrontation with those
around you, so it's better to remain
silent than drawn into unnecessary
arguments. Someone close may turn
on you.
PISCES:
(February 20-March 20)
Career advancement is effortless, so
pursue your cherished goals. Co-
workers will welcome your ideas.
Keep your cool in family situations
which may be getting out of hand.
There may be a difference of opin-
ion, causing distance between you
and someone close to you. Be fair.
Birthday this week:
Let the lessons of your past experi-
ences guide you to any practical
applications of your ideas for the
future. It's time to review your job,
relationships and financial commit-
ments, to see how they match up
with your future life goals. Make
plans to change whatever isn't work-
ing-
:
I
Things to
Downtown
9 Tuesday
Studio 54 night at the Attic
Groove Riders at Boli's
10 Wednesday
Comedy Zone at The Attic
11 Thursday
Live Jazz at Staccato s
12 Friday
Xj Hardcore benefit show at Backdoor (20
bands)
The Ditchdiggers at The Corner
13 Saturday
Hardcore benefit show at Backdoor (20
bands)
Nantucket reunion and Conspiracy at
The Attic
14 Sunday
Open Mic night at Peasant's Cafe
Duality at The Courtyard Tavern
15 Monday
Jazz at The Corner
Thursday, February 11,1999 5






MAirJp
1V1UV1C
ew
Caleb Rom
Assistant Editor
It seems that movies are coming
out in pairs these days. "The Last
Days of Disco" pairs with "Studio 54
"Armageddon" is compared to its
� predecessor "Deep Impact and now
"Saving Private Ryan" has a cohort in
"A Thin Red Line Comparing "A
Thin Red Line" to "Saving Private
Ryan" does no justice for this flick; it
is a disturbing entity on its own.
What many critics link together
is the war content and story line of
the soldiers' experiences in World
War II. Minus the hunks (Matt
Damon and Tom Hanks) from the
former, "A Thin Red Line" oflers an
all-star cast, none of which star as
the main character.
The cast, appropriately chosen,
includes Nick Nolte, John Cusak,
Woody Harrieson and Sean Penn,
with cameo appearances by John
m the trenches unnervingly realistic
.
Travolta and George Oooney.
A war documentary is not an
easy task to complete mainly
because the history could be misrep-
resented, the presentation could be
over- glorified by Hollywood and,
considering its historical content, the
viewer may become bored because
they already know what happened
wn cm ilmost mn! to mrmnmt.
(Titanic what?). What was great
about "A Thin Red Line" is that it was
written to express the thoughts of
the men in battle. A diary on film, if
youwilL
These soldiers are in battle for
one of two reasons: 1) they are fight-
ing to keep themselves ah ve in order
to get back home to a loved
onefamily, or 2) they have lost true
friends in battle so the fight to
avenge their deaths.
Nick Nolte's character does a
great job of demonstrating how peo-
ple do not express their true
thoughts; which is a major problem
these days. His thoughts ramble on
about how the men sacrifice so
much for him (he's a general) and
he offers nothing of gratitude in
return. You can learn a lot about peo-
ple through watching this film.
The cinematography is astound-
ing. With each thought, the picture
panns to the subject on the soldier's
mind. Shots of a single candle with a
religious soliloquy and visions of
waterfalls and sunlight peeking
through the jungle trees give way to
thoughts of a paradise at the end of
the war.
What is most disturbing is that,
though I am a junior in college,
movies such as this are the only
knowledge of the World Wars I have
been taught My junior high and
high school classes never touched
the subject so for those like me in
this harsh reality, "A Thin Red Line"
is a true learning experience.
we want to cover you
Did you see news happen? Did you make news happen? Do you belong between our covers?
Give us your story and appear in our next ad. Call eastcarolinian at 328-6366.





0
mpagil
students from the AhdnAiley
American Dance Center, the
Ensemble gives its members a
chance to hone their skills, while
touring with a professional troupe,
in preparation for the challenges of a
career in dance.
"Ahin always felt that his dancers
should be very well-rounded, and he
really embraced several disciplines,
instead of just one explains Waters.
Students of Alley's American Dance
Center study several modern dance
techniques, as well as tap. West
African, yoga and ballet. The
Ensemble members come from the
Caribbean, South Africa, Mexico and
the Bronx, and each retains his or
her individuality while working
closely with others for a solid pre-
sentation.
"You have this kind of global feeling
about who they are and what they're
communicating to an audience says
Waters.
Friday's program will feature two
works by Alley and one by Shen Wei.
The last piece, Ailes "Revelations
has been one of the most enduring
pieces of American choreography
since its premiere in 1960.
Set to spirituals, gospel, song-ser-
mons and "holy blues the piece
traces the sorrows and joys of the
African American experience with a
grace and expressiveness that has
made it popular around the world.
"There's no language barrier there
says VvatersHfs about everyone's
experience. It's a celebration of life
ODDITIES
BAGS OF PANTIES FOUND AT
WORKSTATION
WTirTTIER, Calif. (AP) ftwasrft
Victoria's Secret It was Manuel's.
Manuel Cruz, 45, was convicted last
month of stealing women's under-
wear. He was sentenced to 180 days
in jail and three years probation.
On Monday, Cruz's former boss
called police and said he'd found
2,000 pain of pannes, bras and
pantyhose at Cruz's old work station.
There were three large bags, five large
boxes and three small boxes stuffed
with undergarments, investigators
said.
Last month wasn't the first time Cruz
was arrested for unmentionable
theft.
He was arrested in March with 50
pieces of underwear in his car. He
pleaded no contest then. And he told
detectives he kept the clothing in his
car because he didn't want his wife to
discover it
The second arrest came after some
women saw Cruz take their panties
from clotheslines by using a wooden
stick with a hanger attached. Police
found41 pieces of underwear that
time.
"He really didn't want to disclose
what he did with them, Detective
Mary Hanson told the Whittier Daily
NewsHe said he just collects them.
Cruz helped himself to all kinds of
panties, including G-strings and
French cut Hanson said. He stuck
mostly to white, but also stockpiled
green, purple, orange, blue, hot pink
and polka dot
"We also found a bag that had a few
men's underwear" Hanson said.
Hanson wouldn't release the name of
Cruz's old boss. But, she saidHe
told me when we arrested Cruz that
they couldn't believe it. He told me he
was a model employee
Midi Gas, continued from page 3
Dining Hall Meal Plan Office from 9
am.to5p.rn.
On February 12, guest passes will be
available at the Student Recreation
Center from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.
If you are wondering what to do on
the night of February 12,1999,
check out MardiGras, ECU style!
MAN'S LONG-LOST HIGH SCHOOL
RING CATCHES UP TO HIM
PITTSBURGH (AP) Bob Earnigh's
world travels include a tour of duty in
Vietnam, but his long-lost high school
ring has one up on him.
After graduating from Altoona High
School in 1965, Eamigh shelled out
about $50 for the gold class ring with a
deep red stone, the school's insignia
and his initiabRRE
He lost it sometime in 1967, either
somewhere at Penn State University or
during training for the Vietnam War.
Thirty-one years later, he got a call
from Ken DaVico in Hawaii. He found it
crusted in coral while snorkeling with a
metal detector near the island of Kauai.
Last week Eamigh, 51, got it back.
"I'm almost sure I didn't have it when 1
went overseas he said Monday. "But I
know that I've never been to Hawaii-
that part I would remember
Eamigh said he looks forward to slip-
ping his ring back on his finger when
he gets it repaired.
"Ifs just amazing Eamigh said. "I
never expected to get it badelalways
regretted that I lost it, but I sort of got
over it in 30 years
&&Gom& a member.
Launch your
organization
into cyber&pace.
WWW.
clubhouse.
ecu.edu
Vrltt
weekly top hits
15.Beck
"Tropicalia"
14.FatboySlim
"Rockefeller Skank"
13. Hipbone
"Mow"
12. Mojave3
"Keep it All Hid"
II.BooRadleys
"High as Monkeys"
10. Soul Coughing
9. Dial 7
"AHIWairt-
8. Eels
"Last Stop: This
TwwrT
7. Cowboy Mouth
"Whatcha Gonna
o�r
6. tit Star
"Heod"
5.MXPX
"Never Learn"
4, Uaoellevahle
Tnrth
"Settle Down"
3. Fear of Pop
"totewi
2. Ben Lee
-Cigarettes Will Kill
Yoa"
1. AniDrfranco
"Angry Anymore"
Thursday February 11, B99





When planning
Go towvyw
Then
jjjiplrtneevents calendar link.
piiiJf1foour campus calendar.
Itsjust that easy.
And it's one more free service of the ECU Student Media.


Title
The East Carolinian, February 11, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 11, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1322
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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