The East Carolinian, February 9, 1999






Ejo
Tuesday:
High: 67
Low: 37
Wednesday:
High: 70
Low: 47
Online Survey
www.tec.ecu.edu
Do you read unsolicited mail sent
to your email account?
"Do you have a Valentine for
Valentine's Dey?"
70 Yes 29 No
Carolinian
Men's basketball feels the heartbreak of
defeat against JMl.
See Sports page 8
TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 8.1999 VOLUME 74. ISSUE 36
Man chased, arrested after burglarizing Fletcher
May be linked to six
other break-ins
Kristy Daniel
staff writer
A 21-year-old Greenville resident
was arrested after he was chased
from Fletcher Hall across campus
into the Roly Poly sandwich shop.
Police are not sure if this is the
person who has been involved in
the many break-ins which have
occurred during the past few weeks
on campus involving residence hall
rooms which had been left
unlocked or unattended, six of
which took place in Aycock Hall.
Akil J. Willoughby, of 1929
Norcott Circle, led ECU police
Historian
to speak
Lucas addresses spirit,
atmosphere of games
Terra Steinbeiser
staff writer
Olympic historian Dr. John Lucas
comes to ECU to speak on the
Olympic movement, as well as his
own Olympic and coaching experi-
ences.
Lucas, a professor emeritus at
Penn State University, has had
plenty of experience with the
Olympic movement over the past
40 years from covering the games
from a coaches perspective, to
"Although I never actually
competed in the Games, I
worked as a coach, American
State Department specialist
Dr. John Lucas
Olympic Historian
working with the press in covering
events surrounding the Olympic
Games.
"Although I never actually com-
peted in the Games, I worked as a
coach, American State Department
specialist, journalist and official
historian Lucas said.
Lucas' lecture, entitled
"Pursuing an Olympic Ideal" will
cover a broad range of topics.
"Lucas will be speaking about
Olympic spirit, or the idea behind
the Olympics; the history of the
Games since the time of the
ancient Greeks; and some of the
problems facing the Olympics
today like bribery, commercialism
and drug use said Dr. Steve
Estes, chairman of the Department
of Exercise and Sports Science.
SEE OLYMPIC SPEAKER 2
officers on a chase Thursday after
breaking into a Fletcher Residence
Hall room. The chase ended in the
shop when officers found him in
the women's bathroom after he had
broken the sink in his attempt to
escape through the restaurant's
suspended ceiling.
Willoughby was charged with
breaking and entering, larceny,
resisting arrest, trespassing and
possession of stolen goods. He was
placed under a $12,500 bond.
The only stolen was a pocket-
book which was recovered when
he threw it at one of the officers.
Willoughby apparently entered
the building by persuading some-
one to let him in the residence hall
through the front door, a violation
of the ECU housing policy.
The chase began after a resident
in Fletcher Hall noticed
Willoughby entering unlocked
rooms.
Susan Gregorovic, manager of
the Roly Poly, was in the restaurant
at the time and was surprised by
the events which occurred. Along
We need the help of students to
make us aware of any suspi-
cious activity which may
occur
Tom Younce
Assistant Director of the ECU Police
with the shattered sink, the suspect
also tried to exit out of a locked
glass door but ended up shattering
that also. Gregorovic upon realizing
the police were after him called
the police to the scene, while
Willoughby ran to the ladies
room.
"I yelled, 'he's in here
Gregorovic said.
Gregorovic later discovered
that Willoughby was also a sus-
pect in a robbery that had taken
place earlier that morning.
"I went to the magistrates
office and they said that he was
also a suspect in another robbery
that morning said Gregorvic.
Tom Younce, assistant director
of the ECU Police Department,
said that Willoughby will probably
have to pay for the damage which
he caused to the restaurant.
Officers arrested Willoughby,
who was taken into custody and
sentenced with a set bail of $12,500.
"We are not sure at this point if
the suspect was responsible for the
Robber led police to Roly Poly where he was apprehended.
PN0T0 BY PETER DAWTOT
other robberies at this point
Younce.said. "We need the help of
students to make us aware of any
suspicious activity which may
occur
After Willoughby's arrest, locks
in Aycock Residence Hall were
changed as a possible way to deter
crime from happening in the resi-
dence halls.
Emanuele Amaro, director of
University Housing, said that the
break-ins at Aycock are still under
investigation.
Younce believes students play
key roles in preventing such crimes
from becoming more common-
place.
Too warm to study inside

CIS responds
to spamming
Unwanted email
causes annoyance
A student studies by the fountain at the Wright Circle during an uncommonly warm February afternoon.
PHOTO BY MICHAEL JACOBSEN
Housing Services updates facilities
On-campus laundry
to accept One Card
Kristy Daniel
staff writer
To better serve on-campus resi-
dents, Housing Services is renovat-
ing facilities, making laundry costs
inclusive and planning to offer a
substance free living environment.
Each yean, Housing Services
administers two surveys to on-cam-
pus students to determine what
kind of adjustments need to be
made. Such issues as renovations,
additions and laundry are addressed
in these surveys.
Housing Services and Facilities
Planning, Design, and Construction
have been making the necessary
renovations to classroom buildings
and residence halls.
Jarvis has been under construc-
tion since the summer of last year.
"Students felt like they were
being nick led and dimed when
it came to doing laundry
Manny Amaro
Director of University Housing Services.
The construction includes adding
an elevator, air conditioning and
more modem bathrooms.
Jarvis will be complete in 2000,
and then Jones will be closed for
construction. They will install a
new sprinkler system, elevator and
air conditioning.
Facilities are not the only
aspects of on-campus living receiv-
ing a facelift. Surveys revealed that
in addition to updating facilities.
Housing Services could also update
its customer services.
Housing along with Web
Services are offering new incen-
tives this year to on-campus resi-
dents. One is that cost of laundry
will be added in with housing costs.
In surveys, residents complained
about having to use quarters.
"Students felt like they were
being nickled and dimed when it
came to doing laundry said
Manny Amaro, director of
University Housing Services.
Students will have to do is insert
their One Card to wash their
clothes. Housing will be able to
track if off-campus students are
using the services.
In addition, if an on-campus stu-
dent is using their card more than
usual, they will be questioned.
"I think doing laundry this way
will be easy sophomore Jennifer
Scates said. "I often have a hard
time finding quarters. Although I
feel, if off-campus students use the
services, it won't be fair to those on
campus. It will take up the time of
people living in the dorm
Housing will also offer a sub-
stance free hall in Fletcher next
year as requested by incoming
freshman. This means there will be
no alcohol or tobacco allowed.
Tommy Yarborough
staff writer
Unsolicited email is piling up in
student accounts.
Email is a tremendously power-
ful communications tool, used by
millions of people in thousands of
positive ways. Unforunatery, such a
powerful tool has the potential to
be used in other, less productive
ways.
Someone sending email incurs
no incremental costs; sending one
message costs about the same as
sending 100 messages. Some peo-
ple use this feature to send mes-
sages to thousands, even millions of
people at once.
Unfortunately, this leads to
spamming, the popular internet,
nickname for junk email.
Limited mailbox space is proba-
bly the biggest reason students
have a problem with spam email in
their campus accounts. If a sudent's
mailbox is full, he or she may not
"A lot of the unsolicited email
on campus are actually
mistakes
John Hudson Jr.
Director of Information Technology " �
be able to send or receive any i
sages. Many students are not tamfl
iar with moving and deleting mes-
sages in their mailboxes, so it can
be frustrating dealing with unwant-
ed email, particularly when the
System Administrator messages
continue to pile up warnings
against full mailboxes.
"A lot of the unsolicited email
on campus are actually mistakes
said John Hudson Jr director of
information technology st
a
4





2 Tmrtiy. Ettrwry 8.1889
HftWS
Th� Ent Carolinian
news
briefs
CIVIL RI6HTS
COMMISSION WILL NO
LONGER DISCUSS
CIVIL WAR COURSE
GREENSBORO (AP) A Civil
War course at Randolph
Community College is no longer on
the agenda of a public forum origi-
nally scheduled in response to that
course, civil-rights leaders say.
The forum has been pushed
back to late March or April and like-
ly will cover school redistricting,
police brutality, public housing and
.claims that a mall's anti-loitering
policy targeted black people.
"As far as the issue in Randolph,
that's dead and gone Wyatt Kirk,
chairman of the state advisory com-
mittee to the U.S. Commission on
Civil Rights, said last week.
Kirk said that the commission's
role is to investigate civil-rights
issues of broad public concern. As
time passes, he said, the college
course taught by the Southern her-
itage group Sons of Confederate
Veterans appears less and less sig-
nificant in terms of civil rights.
Kirk said Thursday that he could
not say what new information
changed the federal commission's
perception, only that he believed it
had overreacted.
POLITE BEHAVIOR
GETS ROBBERS
CAUGHT
BIRMINGHAM, Alabama (AP)
Two teen-age girls charged with
robbery were extraordinarily
polite, so polite they got caught
The girls walked into a shoe
store Thursday and asked
employee Sonya Graham for a pen
and paper. One wrote a note, then
handed it to the worker, saying,
"I'm sorry to do this. You're so
nice
The note said: "I have a gun in
my pants, give me all the money
"You came at a bad time the
worker said. "I have a customer to
wait on The would-be robbers
offered to wait, police said, so the
worker walked to the back of the
store and triggered the store's
silent alarm system. She then
went back to the counter and
stalled the suspects until police
arrived.
Olympic Speaker
continued from pagi I
The Olympic Committee
makes it possible for Lucas to give
speeches every year at college
campuses nationwide, in order to
clarify exactly what the entire
atmosphere' concerning the
Olympics is involved in. This
allows students and faculty to have
a better understanding of the
Games as well as be able to possi-
bly get an understanding of the
controversy currently surrounding
the Games.
Lucus has spent much of his life
dedicated to the spirit of the
Olympics. In addition to his career
as a college teacher and coach,
Lucus has been a U. S. State
Department specialist and journal-
ist He has been involved with the
Summer Olympics since 1960 and
served as official historian for the
last four.
"It's easy for any school to get
Dr.Lucas to come and give a lec-
ture Estes said. "All we had to do
was call him up and invite him
Even so, ECU has a special
advantage over many other
schools.
"Dr. Lucas is a friend of Dr.
Walker here at ECU said Nancy
Elden, assistant to the president
and executive director of the ECU
Walker Center, Albert A. Delia .
"Lucas is also very interested in
the work that goes on at the L.T.
Walker International Human
Performance Center
Lucus' visit is perfect in timing
since ECU was recendy chosen as
one of only three sites in the coun-
try in which athletes for the
upcoming summer games will
begin an American training ses-
sion.
Lucas will be speaking at 7 p.m.
on Feb. 11 in the Willis Building.
Spamming
continued from page 1
Computer Information Services
(CIS), the department that runs
campus email. "The Microsoft
Exchange system allows users to
send messages to a number of
recipients at one time Since
space is limited in each mailbox,
the email that, is sent erroneously
becomes an irritation to the recipi-
ent"
Hudson does not think there is
a problem with spam email.
"What we are trying to do now
is limit the number of recipients a
person can send to he said.
"There will not be any effect on
the regular user, and it will keep
the unsolicited mail in check
"Education is key saidWoody
Bolton, director of operations at
CIS. "Since most of the unsolicited
email is within the Exchange sys-
tem, students need to learn how to
use their email so they don't mis-
takenly clutter another student's
mailboxes
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Hussein
dies of
cancer
AMMAN, Jordan (AP) � King
Hussein of Jordan, who became a
key force for stability in the turbu-
lent Middle East in more than four
decades as ruler of his strategically
placed nation, died on Sunday fol-
lowing a battle with cancer. He
was 63.
Official Jordanian TV
announced the death, showing a
portrait of the king draped with
the nation's flag. In Amman,
mosque loudspeakers began
sounding verses from the Koran,
the Muslim holy book, in a sign of
mourning.
People scurried, sobbing,
through rain-soaked streets, and a
disraught crowd of hundreds gath-
ered at the hospital where Hussein
died. Elderly women wailed and
shook with grief, while men cried
into their red-and-white head
scarves, wrapped around their
faces in a traditional gesture of
mourning. Guards blocked their
way, but there was no confronta-
tion, for some guards were weep-
ing as well.
Elsewhere, people came
together in quiet mourning.
The king died just before noon
in his bed at the King Hussein
Medical City. Jordan's Cabinet
immediately met and proclaimed
Crown Prince Abdullah king, a
day after he was named regent.
The new king was sworn in
four hours later in a solemn cere-
mony at Parliament. Lawmakers
wore their red keffiyehs wrapped
around their faces.
"The kingship was transferred
constitutionally to Crown Prince
Abdullah in view of His Majesty
King Hussein's death said a
Cabinet statement read over state
TV.
Queen Noor and Hussein's
children were all with him when
he died, a senior palace source
said. The immediate cause of
death was heart failure brought on
by complications from cancer, the
official said.
The king had been on a respi-
rator, which was not switched off
until after his heart had stopped
and his brain function completely
ceased, a medical source said.
"This is God's judgment and
God's will the 37-ycar-old
Abdullah told the nation in a
solemn address less than an hour
after the death.
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LQNCEST KEG PARTY
kLlWEEKlONG-O
February 9
Tuesday a glimpse of America
at a rime when a major eastwest
highway cut through the middle of
small towns and big cities, instead
of around them, will be the screen
presentation in Mendenhall
Student Center. Filmmaker
Charles Hartman will narrate his
film Route 66 � A Road to
Remember at 4 p.m. and at 7:30
p.m. An optional theme dinner will
be served at 6 p.m. Tickets to this
Travel-Adventure Film and
Theme Dinner program are avail-
able at the Central Ticket Office in
the student center or by calling
328-4788.
February 11
Thursday, Dr. John Lucas, his-
torian for the International
campus
briefs
Olympic Committee, will give his
views on the Olympic movement at
7 p.m. in the Willis (Regional
Development) Building. Lucas, a
native of Boston, has been a long-
distance runner, college teacher,
coach, U.S. State Department
Specialist and journalist He has
been involved in the summer
Olympic games since 1960. His
visit to ECU is hosted by the L.T.
Walker International Human
Performance Center. Contact: Al
Delia at 328-6650.
The student center will stage its
annual Mardi Gras night starting at
9 p.m. and continuing until 2 a.m.
Friday. This alcohol free program
provides students with a fun time
that includes free food, games and
prizes. Contact: Heather Marshall
at 328-4766.
�4
One of the most popular and
critically acclaimed dance compa-
nies in the country will perform in
Wright Auditorium at 8 p.m
Friday, 13. The Alvin Alley,
Repertory Ensemble is an attrac-
tion brought to ECU by the
Alexander Performing Arts Series.
Public tickets are $20, tickets for
faculty are $16 and tickets for stu-
dents are $10 from the Central:
Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center. For tickets call
328-4788. For media information,
all the marketing office for the
University Unions at 328-4766.
3 Tuaiday, fib
Chapel Hill to decide on
ending ban on Burma
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) �
This politically progressive town
will decide next week whether to
end its 2-year-old stand against the
government of Burma.
The Town Council will consider
a resolution Monday night to drop
Chapel Hill's prohibition against
using the services of those who do
business with the Southeast Asian
military dictatorship, also known as
Myanmar.
The debate comes two months
after a federal judge in
Massachusetts declared similar reg-
ulations in that state unconstitu-
tional. The judge said they infringe
on the U.S. government's power to
conduct foreign policy. A plaintiff
in that case, the National Foreign
Trade Council, has asked Chapel
Hill to rescind its Burma oolicv.
because of them.
Burma's government stands
accused of massive human rights
abuses, including torture, rape and
slavery. The country's military
holds power in defiance of a free
election in 1990.
Opposition leaders in Burma
have called for international sanc-
tions. Human rights activists have
persuaded 22 U.S. cities and coun-
ties, Chapel Hill and Carrboro
among them, to go along.
Carrboro has no plans to repeal
its Burmese ban, officials said. The
town joined an appeal Friday of the
Massachusetts decision in a friend-
of-the-court brief led by larger
cities.
"I think even though it makes
for good political jokes, this is real-
ly, really serious stuff Carrboro
Alderman Jacquelyn Gist said.
"From my point of view, it's big
business telling us who we have to
buy from. I resent that, and it's
scary
Some officials believe measures
like theirs and Carrboro's are large-
ly ineffective, merely creating
aggravation and more paperwork
rather than having an impact.
In Carrboro, the sanctions have
forced officials to swear off the use
of shipping services offered by
Federal Express and United Parcel
Services, said Katherine Duncan,
the town's purchasing officer. The
town also avoids using Kodak film.
Beaul
& Gr
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lor �d
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appening
at
� Two-thirds oF ECU students
consume Four or Fewer
drinks when they drink
� More than halF oF ECU
students drink alcohol
twice a month or less.
� One-third oF ECU students
preFer to attend parties
where alcohol is NOT served.
What's happening with
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Italian witnesses to
testify in court-martial
CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C (AP)
Twenty-two Italians who say they
saw a Marine Corps jet flying too
low and too fast over a village are
expected to be the first witnesses
in the court-martial of the jet's
pilot.
The Italians will be witnesses in
the court-martial of Capt. Richard
Ashby, charged in the deaths of the
20 people who died last February
with the jet snapped a gondola car
cable over the village of Cavalese.
In addition, at least 21 relatives
of victims are coming at United
States' government expense to
watch the trial. There are a few
seats in the small courtroom for
family members; a video feed with
translators has been set up in
another building on this sprawling
eastern North Carolina base.
Opening arguments will be pre-
sented to a jury of eight superior
officers chosen to hear the case
when court convenes at 8 a.m.
Monday.
"We will get to the end of this
trial without ambush, without jock-
eying for position said the judge,
Lt. Col. Robert Nunley. "We're
going to be fair
Ashby, 31, of Mission Viejo,
Calif, was at the controls of the
EA-6B Prowler jet on Feb. 3, 1998,
when its wing cut the cable sup-
porting the Mount Cermis gondola
in which 20 people were riding.
Ashby and his three-man crew
were based at a the Cherry Point
Marine Air Station and assigned to
the Aviano, Italy, air base for flights
over Bosnia.
The gondola crashed to the
ground and dismembered victims,
killing people from Italy, Poland,
Belgium, Germany, Austria and the
Netherlands.
A military investigation con-
cluded the deaths were the fault of
the crew's recklessly flying low and
fast in violation of flight rules. The
altitude restriction for the area was
at least 1,000 feet and the cable was
hit at 370 feet.
Defense attorneys say Ashby
didn't know the cable was strung
across the vallev until seconds
before hitting it. The gondola was
erected in 1966.
Defense lawyer Frank Spinner
said Ashby's map didn't have the
gondola on it and that he was ham-
pered by an optical illusion that
made him think he was higher than
he was. There also is a question
about whether the plane's radar
altimeter worked properly.
Last week. Spinner complained '
that the jury makeup wasn't fair to'
Ashby because it didn't have jet'
combat pilots on it. The jury panel i
"We wilt get to the end of this I
.i
trial without ambush, without.

jockeying for position"
Lt. Col. Robert Nunley
Judge
does include three pilots with"
experience in larger jets and heli- '
copters. .
"I have sincere questions now"
about whether Capt Ashby can get '
a fair trial, given the issues of this '
case Spinner said.
Ashby faces a maximum possi- -
ble sentence of more than 200
years in prison if convicted of 20 :�
counts of involuntary manslaughter �
as well as charges of destruction of
private and military property and
dereliction of duty.
Ashby's navigator, Capt. Joseph
Schweitzer, 31, of Westbury, NX,
faces the same charges as Ashby,
plus 20 counts of negligent homi-
cide. His trial is scheduled to begin
March 1.
Both also are charged with
obstruction of justice over a miss-
ing personal videotape shot during
the flight. j
The Prowler's two back seat;
crewmen were charged, but the
charges later were dismissed.
Centerpiece Designer Needed atFreshman quarterback Canard to rough up season A
HlI'flHfki AHl'illl 11(1
�jit Ha.e Knowledge of
Apply at TEC office on the
second floor of the Student
Publications Building
3-
Centerpiece
Designer
NEEDED
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ClSiJrl��jisBra
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Pasta � Pizza � Salads � Sandwiches � Homemade � Soups � Desserts
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Dining Room Open
Mon-Thurs 1030AM-9PM Fri 4r Sat 1030AM - 10PM
Closed Sundays � Full ABC Permits
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1,2 & 3
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CAU TODAY 1510
355-2198
BridWCird.





A Taariiv fatmifv 9 H88
opinion
It! E"� Cirnlinl
eastcarolinian
AMV L.RoySTER Editor
AMANDA G. AUSTIN Managing Mtot
Amy Sheridan PtrmMcw
Peter Oawvot Auottm N�wt Edimi
Nina Dry Mm Ediw
Emily Little HMCMrMa
Mario Scherhalfer Spara Editor
Tracy Hairr Assistant Sports Ediim
Chris Knotts Staff iikisirator
Robert Moore Laywt Onignw
Stephanie Whitlock MDuign
Janet Respess Aiwwng Managar
Russ Blackburn Layout Designer
BOBBV TUCGLE Webmaster
Smng rht ECU contmgrw, wo B2S. the ten Carotateri pubtanie 1.000 rap nary tuKdn end Ttindif Tin Had ednonel m ma ednion a die oetn
w o( t tnirofltv of the EdtiwMl Board md wtnen in Din by Editorial Board flterneen. Tin Em Cvohnv wetatrnM liflm to hi idnar. Imnd to 2SD
wrti, �n(ii fmy bt idnid tar decency at btwiy Tlte Ear Carotoaan twrw dat nftt to att or reject Icon hr putrantin. M Wan ma bi ugned
limn titoukl Da lOdrmtd to: Qpiiion idttat .Thi Em Carolinian. Student notottona Butrdng. ECU. Gdamnr, 27858-053 For rformotat. oH
152321.6386.
oumew
Even though February is Black History Month, most white students will only be exposed
to the snippets of black history information that R.A.s will post on the dorm bulletin boards or
an occasional speech on the lasting effects of Martin Luther King.
February will pass in a haze of parties, class work and extra-curricular activities, and white
students will miss their best chance to learn something about our nation's most influential
minority, as they have done every other year.
But we at TEC believe that this month is a great opportunity to do research on black histo-
ry. We take geniuses like Duke Ellington and George Washington Carver for granted every
day of the year, without stopping to ask why these people did what they did, and how their
social conditions helped to influence them. Don't let February go by without learning some-
thing about black history, even if you just skim a biography or chat about it with a professor.
The objective of this editorial is not to pound guilt into your brain for the suffering of
African-Americans throughout history, but to open your eyes to the value of the suffering, and
ft �.
41 �
� the unique and noble people who emerged on the other side.
ggi As students, the lessons we can learn from black history are unlimited. We can learn that
J; courage and perseverance triumph over hate and ignorance. We can learn that people who are
; -treated like animals do not become animals; they achieve an even greater nobility once they
; j!
! ; realize their true powers. We can also learn that with intelligence, style, eloquence and just the
� ?�
' : right amount of civil disobedience, a group of outcasts can change their nation for the better.
� ji
; jjj The contributions of African-Americans to our country go beyond science, music and liter-
' II
, ;ature to something more fundamental. The will to survive, even excel, on what is given to you
"�
! is a valuable skill we can all admire.
'
� : Try reading a work by Toni Morrison or Richard Wright, watching "Mississippi Burning" or
�v
i'The Color Purple or attending Friday's performance of the Alvin Ailey Dance Ensemble
� v
I ijat Wright Auditorium. There are ways to participate and learn. Don't let them go by unnoticed
jlthisyear.
WrU& 0 Letter
to tke Editor
!
if

Got something to say? Need somewhere to
say it? Bring your letter to the easfearolinian
located on the 2nd floor of The Student
Publications Building
OffiL m � Good
UN tttlDt)
OPINION
Columnist
Stephen
Kleinschmit
Immoral world needs guns
V they would think twice
if they knew that Granny had
a Beretta 9mm in her purse.
I like guns. I think they are cool.
They make a loud noise and put
holes in things. I get my testos-
terone fix each month by going to
my reservist drills and shooting
machine guns and cannons. And
though I'm having fun doing it, I
know there is a purpose to it. Let's
face it, people need guns.
I know many of you women,
and even some guys don't like
guns, and are even scared of them,
but having a gun is a critical part of
safety in our immoral society. The
problem with gun control is that
the only people who have guns are
criminals. Think about it. If you
pass a gun control law, the only
people who will follow it are the
good, law abiding citizens. And
now the criminals still have guns.
And they know all the law abiding
citizens with wives and children
have none.
Such is the case in cities like
Washington D.C. and New York.
Crime is rampant because people
are defenseless against their
assailants. Well, guess what. I bet
they would think twice if they
knew that granny had a Beretta
9mm in her purse. As a matter of
fact, in Florida, where they imple-
mented a more casual concealed
carry law, crime has dropped con-
siderably, especially violent crimes.
Granted, everybody shouldn't
have a gun. Alcoholics, stalkers,
felons and mentally unstable peo-
ple are among these. And I don't
really understand why anyone
would need a machine gun either.
There are good people like me
that may like to hunt or shoot at
paper targets. I personally would
never want to shoot anyone.But if
you try to rob me at gunpoint, or
break into my house, I will shoot
you and not think twice about it.
In an ideal world, there would
be no need for guns. But in an ideal
world, we could all sit at the beach
all day and drink margaritas and
play volleyball. But humanity is
imperfect, and we sometimes have
to expect the worst from people.
Hope for the best, prepare for the
worst.
LETTER
to the Editor
Find truth about on-campus parking
"Parking and Traffic enrages com-
muter (TEC 2499). What else.is
new? I read the preceding editorial
tide and thought to myself, "What
has Parking and Traffic Services
done now?" I was tempted not to
bother reading the editorial, bt I
was bored in ethics class so I read it
anyway. Seems to me, it is time for
students to find out what old tricks
Parking and Traffic is up to.
Brent W. Anderson, a senior
communications major, seems to
think that Parking and Traffic is
selling more parking decals than
the school has spaces. Well, my
soon-to-be-friend is right. I cannot
say what they have done this acad-
emic; year, but they have done this
in the past I am a resident and
refuse to purchase a parking decal
or even to park on campus. I sug-
gest that if at all possible, ride your
bike or take a bus to and from class-
es. From what I hear, it is much
more convenient. Why spend all
that hard-earned money on a park-
ing decal from the school where
you already spent countless hours
on tuition, housing or rent, food,
books and other necessities?
As pan of my freshman English
class last year, I found myself writ-
ing a paper titled "University
Liability Concerning Flooding in
ECU Parking Lots While the the-
sis of this paper obviously deals
with flooding, there are many facts
concerning the campus and parking
that many of you may want to know
about. I invite all of you to read this
paper, enlighten yourselves and
form your opinion of Parking and
Traffic. The URL for the paper is
http:members.tripod.com-yingy
angtigers328flood.htm or visit my
homepage at http:members.tri-
pod.comyingyangtigers. If you
have any comments please feel free
to contact me at
yingyangtigers@yahoo.com or at
328-3495.1 can give you the names
and phone numbers of people you
can complain to. Even better, come
to one of my club meetings every
second and fourth Wednesday at
5p.m. in room BN-109. It is the
Environmental Conservation
Organization.
David Merrill
Sophomore
BiologyPhilosophy Major
"Freedom is not given. I
believe we must earn freedom.
We must take freedom. We
must demand and preserve
freedom
Fletcher Prouty
author
1992





ii gm Cirnlinli.
1
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1
J
uns
ial concealed
dropped con-
iolent crimes,
dy shouldn't
ics, stalkers,
unstable peo-
, And I don't
why anyone
te gun either.
ple like me
it or shoot at
onally would
myone.But if
gunpoint, or
, I will shoot
ice about it.
there would
lut in an ideal
: at the beach
argaritas and
humanity is
netimes have
from people,
epare for the
king
' Parking and
r the paper is
lcomyingy
n or visit my
'members.tri-
ers. If you
lease feel free
me at
o.com or at
ou the names
f people you
i better, come
setings every
Wednesday at
09. It is the
Conservation
Major
I
im.
ve
5 Tuitdiv, Fibruirv 9. 1999
comics
Tha East CmttUJH
Four Seats Left
Jason Latour Everyday Life
MikeUtwin
Life on Tuesday
Chris Knotts
VApt you're nerd uke
�&M is rrwiiHe 6uyn�r's
xwes. wwr f tie we tw
LoVe" UtB ATMVSfiP nug
FEBRUARY 12, 1999 9 PM -2 AM
�A0DO
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
Fun Flicks Video Karaoke
Salsa and Merengue Dance
vDJ Dance w J. Arthur
Loo-Zee-Anna Laser Tag
Bourbon Street Bingo
Lady Luck Casino
King Cake
Glow Bowling
CajunBul
md Queei
ooO'
nd foLfterusing their valid ECU One Card. Ona adult guest wW be admitted with a guest pass. Student
and guest must eWlogettier. Guest passes will be available beginning Monday February 8 through Friday, February 12,
1999 at the Central Ticket Office from 8:30am to 6pm and Todd Dmtnrj Hall Meal Plan Office from 9am to 5pm. On February
12, guest passes will be available at the Student Recreation Center from 5pm to 10pm.
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ACROSS
1 Aromalic wood
6 Tycoon Turner
9 Neighbor of
Togo
14 Martini garnish
15 Top trump
16 In the
neighborhood
17 Singing
chipmunk
18 Half a bikini
19 Breathing
20 Omits
22 Facets
23 Sticky Stuff
24 Big pigs
26 Approved
30 Bellies
34 Epic tales
35 Love-tit
36 Scoffer's
comment
37 Memo acronym
38 Uproar
39 Verne's captain
40 Ritzy rock
41 Repair a hem
42 "The Taming of
the"
43 Get too thin
45 Trivial
46 Plot of land
47 Mechanical
tooth
48 South American
beast of burden
51 Monazite metal
57 Soft down
58 Inventor
Whitney
59 SmaH crown
60 Cheat
61Alamos
62 Lawn-care tool
63 Relative speed
64 Casual
agreement
65 Selling point
DOWN
1 Anthracite, e.g.
2 French pronoun
3 Operatic prima
donna
4 Tel -Jaffa
5 Bridge miscues
8 Forbidden
7 Light Ian
8 Coup de grace
9 City on the
Clyde
10 Alternative to
standard
medicine
11 LSD, to users
12 Church part
13 Beer picks
21 Grassy ground
25 Whiff
26 Type of orange
27 Deejay Casey
28 Old World lizard
29 Kisser or mush
30 Concur
31 Film critic Roger
32 Rial to spot a
comet
33 Ostentatious
35 Ascetlcally
38 Carolina cape
39 Org. of Lightning
and Flames
41 Actor Montalban
42 Herbal quaff
44 Arose
48 "The Raven-
poet
47 Fresh and firm
48 Took off
49 Bologna money -
50 Genesis
charcater
52 Lotion ingredient
53 Helpful hints
54 Recycled
clothes
55 Poplar or plane
58 Bret or Moss
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Answers in this weeks Fountainhead






6 Tuesday, February 9. 1999
features
Mental Health Services Mumim achieves
aids suffering students

Mental Health located in the Student Health Services building.
PHOTO BY JACOB GARMON
MHSprwides
psychiatric assistance
PlIIM. IP GlLFUS
STAFF WRITER
Along with all the fun and excite-
ment college life may bring, there's
also the everyday stresses that can
bring students down. While some
take things in stride others may
have a difficult time dealing. Here
lit ECU, Mental Health Services
(Ml IS) is available to help any stu-
dent who may be suffering from a
psychological illness that impairs
their ability to accomplish daily
Ktivitics.
For over seven years, MHS has
been helping students deal with
Crises in their lives. By paying stu-
dent health fees at the beginning of
eiuh semester, there are no addi-
tional diarges to the services pro-
vided by MHS.
We're i safe place where one
c�n be hiinest about what they
iieed said Dr. Jane Ross, staff psy-
chologist at Mental Health.
like any other mental health
'i'V. any information that is
,ri during therapy sessions is
I" strictly confidential.
t�bler,ls and Iftue, That aie
dr. with at Mental Health
.Service
Acute depression i$
- Suicidal thoughts
Feelings of anxiety or panic
I 'nusual mood swings '
- F.xcessive sleep orijH
Marked difficulties with
attention and concentfati
- Fiseiing out of control over
one's thoughts or behaviors
I rrirtfotial or confused
thinking
No information about a student
being treated is ever released to a
faculty member without their
express written consent, even if a
staff member were to inquire after a
student.
"While the Center for
Counseling and Student
Development deals with students
who have the normal stresses of col-
lege life, we see students whose
daily functioning is being affected
said Dr. Russ Federman, director of
"If students are unsure who
they should see for help, they
just need to call to find out
who they should go to and
what help they need
Or. Ross Federman
Director of Menial Health Services
Mental Health Services.
"If students are unsure who they
should see for help, they just need
to call to find out who they should
go to and what help they need
Federman said.
All services are made by
appointment, except in cases of
crises when walk-ins are welcomed.
Mental Health also works closely
with Pitt County Memorial
Hospital, especially in cases of self-
injury, where help is given within
24 hours, if they are placed in psy-
chiatric hospitalization.
to students when need can be doc-
umented.
As for the future of Mental
Health Services, Dr. Federman has
many aspirations.
"I hope to have a doctoral clini-
cal psychology internship program
that would be done jointly with
Services provided by MHS are strictly confidential.
PHOTO BY JACOB GARMON
Cases seen by Mental Health
services in Fall 1997:
- Mood Disorders
(Depression, Bipolar) -
over 100
- Aaxiety - ovW 40
disorders
�Soutrr: Ifivisitm of Student
Most therapy sessions with staff
psychologists last 45 to 60 minutes
and the average length of treatment
is six to eight sessions.
Mental Health is also fully-
equipped with medication samples.
This helps the staff psychiatrists
determine which medications
would be the most effective to a
student before a prescription is
given.
"In cases where mental health
issues are limiting students' capaci-
ties to meet the demands of college
life, psychiatric medication pre-
scriptions are often very helpful
Federman said.
Any medication prescriptions
must be purchased by students
through retail pharmacies. In some
cases, financial assistance is given
Mental Health Services and the
Center for Counseling and Student
Development Federman said.
A new wing will be added to the
Student Health Center next spring
which will enable MHS expand its
office space.
Located on the second floor of
the Student Health Center, MHS is
on call 365 days a year, and its oper-
ating hours are from 8 a.m. to 5
p.m Monday through Friday.
Students who wonder whether
or not they have a problem serious
enough to be seen by Mental
Health should call the office at 328-
6795.
"I think Dr. Federman has been
able to create a good model for
community mental health here
Ross said.
prime career goals
Cruz opened art
gallery last summer
Erica Sixes
staff white
As graduation becomes more of a
reality to some of us, the dream of
acquiring all that we hope for once
we get out into the real world
becomes overwhelming. For
Derrick Cruz, however, a 1998
ECU alumnus, this has not been an
impossible feat
Cruz stumbled upon luck when
his former boss offered to sell him
some property to open his own art
gallery. This was one of Cruz's
goals he wanted to achieve upon
graduation. This past summer,
Cruz and his wife, Michele,
opened their gallery which is locat-
ed on Main Street in Tarboro, NC.
Tarboro and the surrounding
area is replete with talented artists
of all different disciplines who are
all hungering to have a forum to
sell and display their art Cruz
said. "Being central to the Rocky
Mount, Greenville, and Wilson
area, and close enough to the North
Carolina Coast, makes Tarboro an
ideal place to open this gallery.
The care that patrons of this town
have taken to keep the downtown
active, while preserving some if its
charm, makes Tarboro a pleasant
place to visit and work in
"It takes a tremendous amount
of work for both he and his wife to
accomplish so much said painting
and drawing professor Dr. Paul
Hartley, Cruz's adviser.
Cruz, a native of Caguas, Puerto
Rico, possesses genuine talent, cre-
ativity, artistic skills and a knowl-
edge of diverse cultures, making
him a true representative of his
Hispanic culture.
Cruz's senior show's theme
included the phrase, afioflao, which
he says means "spoiled brat" in
Spanish. Cruz and Mark Cooley,
who received his MFA in painting,
presented a joint senior show at the
Cruz Gallery last semester. Cruz's
artwork that was presented in
Cooley and Cruz's senior show is
presently on display and will
remain throughout the month of
February at the Rocky Mount
Playhouse.
"He's very thoughtful and com-
mitted as an artistCooley said.
"He is not only interested in get-
ting work that sells, but more inter-
ested in showing pieces with value.
He also doesn't use the gallery for
personal reasons, but instead uses
it to promote other artists
Cruz and Cooley's senior show
was marketed with the tide being
"ft The "ft" is the only letter that
differentiates the Spanish alphabet
SEE ALUMNUS PAGE 7
Math professor
participates in film
David Pravica uses
academic knowledge
Phillip Gilfus
staff writer
Imagine that you have been inex-
plicably transported to the inside of
a giant cube. There are different
rooms to explore, but people in
your group have been getting mys-
teriously killed. You need to find a
way to get out, and suddenly some-
one comes up with an answer
Math. This is the basis for the
movie "Cube whose screenwrit-
ers consulted ECU Math Professor
David Pravica.
� "Cube" was written i by
Vincenzo Netali and Andre Bijelic
of Ryerson College in Toronto.
These two film students knew
Pravica and decided to give him a
call when they began writing the
screenplay.
"There was a small question by
the authors about prime numbers
Pravica said. "After we discussed
some tricks and traps that they
could use in the film, I just got
more and more into it"
The movie's plot contains a
diverse group of characters moving
through "safe" and "trap" rooms.
The mathematician in the group
soon figures out that there are pat-
terns about which rooms are dan-
gerous and starts working on a
numerical formula in order for the
group to escape from the cube.
"The screenwriters wanted to
design a movie using one set said
Shaun Johnson, a member of the
ECU Films Committee. "They
also wanted the characters in the
movie to use a numerical sequence
in order for them to find out a way
from the cube
Pravica was the only expert con-
sulted for the mathematical con-
structs contained in the film.
Through a series of letters, e-mails
and faxes, the math professor tried
to described the formulas and con-
cepts that would be need in the
movie.
"I was more involved in the
beginning of the film Pravica
said.
He was able to see the full evo-
lution of the film. The early ver-
sions that he previewed contained
more math than the later and final
versions.
"I liked the earlier versions bet-
ter, scenes that they took out along
the way contained a lot of the math
parts Pravica said. "I also wasn't
happy with the music they chose, I
guess I just had a different vision of
the film
In order to show everything that
he intended for the film, and to
explain some parts that may have
ended up on the cutting room floor,
Pravica is setting up a special sec-
tion on his web page devoted to
"Cube He admits that it may
have been difficult for the screen-
writers to get the total picture of
what he was trying to explain to
them. To get the full mathematical
story, log on to his web page at
http:www.math.ecu.edu-pravi-
ca.
"Cube" is an art film, so the plot
can be used as a simile for our
everyday lives, but says Pravica, "I
wouldn't read too much into it
This film also portrays how impor-
tant everyone is a group can be.
"The formula in the film is so
difficult that the mathematician
can't figure it out In the end, the
idiot savant of the group finds the
solution Pravica said.
"Cube" was one of four films in
Toronto chosen by Norman
Jewison Producers, who have done
such films as "In the Heat of the
Night" and "Jesus Christ
Superstar Pravica wanted to bring
this psychological, math-suspense
film to ECU. He spoke with one of
the writers, Vincenzo, and tried to
work it out with the ECU Films
Committee, but time ran out.
However, Dale Jacobs, assistant
professor in the English
Department, brought a review of
the film to the Films Committee,
and the twelve-person body voted
to make it part of the Sundance
Cinema program. ECU students
will be able to see the film on Feb.
10 at Hendrix Theatre at 8 p.m.
Vj
�-
i �






7 Tuiidiy. Fabruary 9, 1999
features
Th� Eltt Carolinian
;ves
oals
boro a pleasant
wk in
tendous amount
: and his wife to
h said painting
essor Dr. Paul
viser.
f Caguas, Puerto
mine talent, de-
ls and a knowl-
ultures, making
tentative of his
show's theme
afloflao, which
poiled brat" in
I Mark Cooley,
IFA in painting,
nior show at the
emester. Cruz's
presented in
senior show is
play and will
: the month of
Rocky Mount
ghtful and com-
tCooley said.
terested in get-
but more inter-
eces with value.
: the gallery for
ut instead uses
artists
y's senior show
the title being
only letter that
ranish alphabet
I PAGE 7
or
ilm
volvcd in the
film Pravica
se the full evo-
The 'early ver-
wed contained
: later and final
:r versions bet-
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3305 E. 10 Sowl � Gremille, NC 27858
Alumnus
continued from pigi 7
from the English alphabet This is
symbolic to Cruz's life, as he has
had to cope with remaining a part of
his heritage as he takes on the typi-
cal American practices. This sym-
bol recurs in several of Cruz's paint-
ings and is incorporated with other
shapes or symbols that represent
other family members.
Cruz received his bachelor of
fine arts in painting. As a student at
ECU, he worked various jobs both
full and part-time and was able to
maintain an above average grade
point landing him on the Honor
Roll.
"Derrick was a terrific student
Hartley said.
According to Hartley, Derrick
was always taking on extra respon-
sibilities while simultaneously jug-
gling his studies, his artwork and
jobs.
"He is a very admirable stu-
dent Hartley said.
Cruz also revitalized ECU's
Painting Guild by becoming its
president. While in office, Cruz
organized the visit of Sidney
Goodman, a famous artist, to speak
to the art students and also led
other great projects and beneficial
programs for the art department.
In 1990, Derrick graduated from
Rocky Mount Senior High School.
Prior to graduating from high
school, Cruz made a name for him-
self when he was awarded two
National Scholastic Gold Key Art
Awards, by Barton College in
Wilson, NC.
Looking back, Cruz thinks o
what he could have done to
improve his direction toward his
goals.
"You should have a dear direc-
tion and conviction about what your
artwork means to you and what you
want to accomplish with it Cruas
said. "Try to be as prolific as possi-
ble while in school and also try to
get involved and team the business
side of art and become involved in
it before you leave school so that
you don't become another statis-
tic
He initially gives this advice to
thriving art students but also
encourages students of the various
other disciplines to do the same.
Cruz is currently employed by
Vanstar in Rocky Mount, NC.
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"H
8 Taeaaey. Fibfyiry 9. 1999
s
ports
ans crav
The East Carolinian
9 Tuesday,
Smaller schools have
more attractive games
L

i
Eric Couch
senior writer
With the emergence of the 1999
ECU football schedule, questions
have risen about the integrity of the
men's basketball schedule.
Many basketball fans on campus
feel that ECU could have a better
non-conference schedule before
beginning their conference play.
ECU's schedule has been com-
pared with schedules from schools
such as UNC-Charlottc, UNC-
� Greensboro, and UNC-
Wilmington. All of these programs
� have marquee match-ups before
their conference games begin.
� ECU's basketball fans wonder why
: the Pirates never have a similar
attractive schedule.
UNC-G has had a very tough
schedule this year and they have
definitely played some attractive
names. Wake Forest, Tennessee
and top-ranked Duke were hosts to
UNC-G earlier this season. They
lost all three of these games by 30
points or more, but students still
had the opportunity to play some
big-name schools.
UNC-C had games against
Miami and Virginia Tech at home,
and even went to overtime against
the Tarheels on national television
in Chapel Hill. UNC-C has bene-
fited from being in Conference
USA, but they tuned up for that
conference by playing some tough
teams.
And as for our good pals down in
Wilmington, a school half the size
of ECU, they played the Bearcats
of Cincinnati on the road, and then
went on to play Princeton at home.
Students are asking, if this CAA
team can get well respected teams,
why can't we?
"It would be a nice change to
see some of those teams on our
non-conference schedule
Heather Smith said. "It would even
increase the seemingly nonchalant
" would like to see us play
some larger schools at home
Laura Barbour
ECU Junior
attitude among many students
toward ECU's basketball games
For the last couple years, ECU
has faced off with Georgia, and this
year South Carolina was the
Pirates' most awaited non-confer-
ence games. These have been good
games for the Pirates but the fans
want more.
"I would
like to see us
play some
larger schools
at home
junior Laura
Barbour said.
"Georgia and
USC are good
teams, but
we played
them away. I
think that our
conference
and our pro-
gram are
strong and we
have a great atmosphere for college
basketball
Many students believe that our
atmosphere is good for great col-
lege basketball. They think it
would be even better if well-
respected teams came to
Greenville.
"It's very difficult to get those
NON-CONFERENCE SCHEDULES
ECU
at Jacksonville St.
at Campbell
SW Louisiana
at Liberty
App, State
at Wisconsin-Green Bay
Evansville
at S. Carolina
at Georgia
Francis Marion
UNCC
Next Level All Stars
Charlotte Royals AAU
at Boston U.
at Old Dominion
Miami
George Washington
Kent
Virginia Tech
at Davidson
VMI
at North Carolina
UNCG
at Nebraska
at Wake Forest
St. Francis
Francis
m& Mary
arolina A&T
at Tennessee
at William & Mary
at Duke
Coastal Carolina
Source: ECU Sport information Department
teams to come to Greenville
Athletics Director Mike Hamrick
said. "We could always play those
teams on the road, but that would
not do much for students and sea-
son ticket holders
Many students disagree, and
think that playing good teams
would only help the program.
Pirates lose in heartbreaker to JMU
Buzzer beater sinks
hopes for basketball win
�I.
1
Frank Hendricks
staff writer
-I.
All
i.
ib.
o.
Alfred Hitchcock's movies cannot
be more exciting than the final
minute in ECU's nailbiter against
the Dukes.
JMU guard Eugene Atkinson
found teammate Chatney Howard
standing wide open on the left wing
with less than one second remaining
in last Wednesday's game. Howard's
ensuing jump shot found the bot-
tom of the net before the buzzer
sounded and the Pirates were left
with another loss in front of a crowd
of 4,458 at Minges Coliseum.
The Pirates led for most of the
second half, but shot very poorly
down the stretch. The Pirates were
one for eight from the floor and
three of seven from the foul line on
their last 15 possessions. The
Pirates, led by Evaldas Joeys' 16
points, did have a chance to win the
game, though. ECU point guard
Alico Dunk, who had eight assists,
tied up JMU's Jabari Outtz for a
defensive jump ball with 32.6 sec-
onds to play. Pirate coach Joe
Dooley had a plan.
"I told the guys to look for
Evaldas Joeys or David Taylor
with about 10 seconds left Dooley
said.
Taylor got the ball but was
blocked by JMU center Rob
Strickland with 4.5 seconds left on
the clock. The Dukes then drove
the length of the floor and found a
wide open Howard.
"I just kind of lollygagged down
the side and came open Howard
said.
Howard's buzzer beater sealed
the loss for the Pirates.
"On the final play, we had a
defensive lapse and Howard hit a
tough shot said Taylor, who
poured in 12 for the Pirates. "We've
had a lot of close games and we
need to find a way to pull them
out
The Pirates (11-10, 5-6 CAA)
have another tough game ahead of
them when they travel to
Richmond, VA on Wednesday to
face the Virginia Commonwealth
Rams. The Rams (11-13, 5-6 CAA)
are coming off a big win against
William and Mary.
"We have a lot of work to do for
next week's games. We don't want
to play like we did tonight Dooley
said.
Pirate high scorer Evaldas Joeys stretches for a rebound in ECU's close loss against JMU Wednesday night.
PHOTO BY MICHAEL SMITH
Men's track wins 4x800 at New
� �
York's Madison Square Garden
Teams prepare for
Vtrgnia Tech meet
Stephen Schramm
. SENIOR WRITER
jWhile the women's track team
,�tayedin Greenville over the week-
-end, the men's team competed in
, two invitationals to prepare for the
Virginia Tech meet.
. The ECU Men's Track Team
headed to Lincoln, Neb. this week-
end for the Frank Sevigne Husker
Invitational, where they were
t�cel by their talented 4x400
meter relay squad. The team of
James Alexander, Darrick Ingram,
Lawrence Ward and Damon Davis
.rocketed into the finals. In the
finals the Pirates finished second
behind the squad from Oklahoma.
; �fe got beat pretty substantial-
ly laid BUI Canon, head men's
track coach.
Individually, the Pirate 400
meter runners had mixed results.
.Davis went to the finals and fin-
ished fourth overall. Ingram cruised
to a win in his heat. However, his
time was not fast enough to give
him a trip to the finals.
"Ingrarn" didn't go out hard
enough Carson said. "He won his
heat by a good 20 meters, but its a
time thing and he didn't make it
"James (Alexander) saw what
happened to Ingram and he went
out real hard Carson said. "He
went out too hard and just died
In the 200-meter relay, ECU's
Darren Tuitt placed sixth in the
finals despite battling a cold.
"Tuitt ran well the first day
Carson said. "He had an awful cold.
In fact, we had to take him to the
emergency room in Wilson on the
way back. His throat closed up on
him
Despite his team's slight adver-
sity, Carson is still content with his
team's performance.
"I'm very pleased at this point in
the season Carson said. "We
made some mistakes. One went out
too fast and another went out too
easy. We're tired and we're not
training, but I'll tell you one thing.
We're fast and we're healthy
Other members of the team
went to the Millrose Games in New
I York City. The Pirates made their
first appearance at the Games and
did not disappoint. They won the
4x800 meter relay held at Madison
Square Garden.
Next week the Pirate men and
women travel to the Virginia Tech
Invitational. The Virginia Tech
Invitational provides a good shoot
for many ECU athletes to qualify.
"Everyone is trying to qualify
and break school records said
ECU's Rasheca Barrow.
The ECU women have not
competed since last weekend. The
team has been preparing for the
meet.
"It's one of the meets where
we're pretty rested and we've been
training for it said Charles Justice,
head women's track coach. "We're
looking to run our best times and
qualify for the Eastern
Championships(ECAC)
The men, too, are looking at the
Virginia Tech Invitational as a
chance to qualify. Britt Cox, who
was out for the weekend due to
injury, looks to qualify at the
Virginia Tech meet
"I'm running the 55 or the 60
and I should qualify for the IC4A's.
That would be straight Cox said.
Tennis season ready to
take off today
New players and coach
are onboard
Amber McAllay
staff writer
With a new head coach and new
players, ECU's tennis teams are
ready to start a new season.
The season starts today as both
teams take on UNC Asheville at 2
p.m.
"I hope for a good year. There is
continued improvement and we
are ready to play said Tom Morris,
head coach.
The teams have practiced a lot
throughout the pre-season. With
the completion of a new indoor
facility, the tennis teams are able to
practice independent of bad
weather conditions.
"We have been using the indoor
court when it rains said Catherine
Morgan, women's team captain.
"We have been doing a lot a things
together to get into good shape
The teams have also added a
few different ways to prepare
themselves for upcoming matches.
"We practice three hours a day
and work on conditioning said
Michael Huez, sophomore.
After a 10-10 record last year,
the teams are hoping for a better
year.
"We are hopeful and looking for
improvement Morris said. "The
players are very healthy after a few
nagging injuries. They are the
strongest ever. We are focused,
positive, and ready to play
With the loss of Mona Eek and
Anne Svae, Morgan is hopeful that
the new recruits will help fill that
void. The players are confident
toward their first match.
"We have two new recruits and
are strong throughout Morgan
said. �
As always, we expect to win
Huez shares Morgan's opti-
mistic outlook.
"Victory Huez said. "We are
facing a tough opponent, but we
should be able to beat them
Among the players to look for
are seniors Kenny Kerby (captain),
Roope Kalajo, Stephan
Siebenbrunner, Derek Slate and
newcomers Huez and Dustin Hall.
"We play good football teams,
why not good basketball teams?"
Donny Johnson said. "It would
only help us
As for future home games,
Hamrick says that we have West
Virginia and Wisconsin-Green Bay
on for the 1999-2000 schedule.
Logan is
optimistic
Football program
recruits new talent �
G
4PE
4 SI
1 PI
1 LC
OF
Blaine Den its
senior writer
Head coach Steve Logan wasn't
just smiling for the cameras when
he discussed his 28 new recruits
and the future of Pirate football. ;
Wednesday at ECU's Sports
Medicine complex was the first
day high school football players
could sign national letters of intent
and decide which college campus
and stadium they will call home
this fall. Logan is optimistic about
ECU's new recruits, and the
atmosphere around Pirate football
"There is a general Jense of
enthusiasm around the program
right now
Steve Logan
Head Football Coach
is positive.
"We've got a bunch of bright
new faces Logan said. "There is a
general sense of enthusiasm around
the program right now
Every coach has goals going into
the signing period, and Logan
believes the '99 recruiting class will
fill some important positions on the
Pirate team.
"We needed to get some num-
bers in our offensive line and our
defensive backfield Logan said.
"Those were the two areas we were
really concerned with going in
Corey Schmidt and Buddy
Smith were both recruited from
North Carolina high schools for the
outside linebacker position. These
talented athletes show promise for
the future of Pirate football.
"I am really excited about those
two kids Logan said. "I really
think they are going to play a lot of
football here
Schmidt is a 6-foot-5-inch out-
side linebacker from Gary, N.C. and
weighs 280 pounds. According to
the ECU Sports Information
Department (ECU SID), as tearr)
captain his senior year, Schmidt led
the team to an 8-3 record and was
named Tri-Seven All-Conference. !
Smith, a native from Louisburg,
N.C also plays outside linebacker.
According to the ECU SID, Smith
led his team to become the Tar-
SEE FOOTBALL PAGE 9






Ths East Carotinian
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Francis
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riessee
iam & Mary
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football teams,
ketball teams?"
aid. "It would
home games,
we have West
nsin-Grecn Bay
0 schedule.
in is
listic
program
m talent '
D E N11) s
WRITER
re Logan wasn't
le cameras when
28 new recruits
Pirate football. ;
it ECU's Sports
:x was the first
football players
il letters of intent
i college campus
f will call home
optimistic about
:ruits, and the
id Pirate football
teraJense of
nd the program
ow
ogan
ill Coach
bunch of bright
said. "There is a
ithusiasm around
ww
i goals going into
�)d, and Logan
suiting class will
: positions on the
get some num-
ive line and our
it Logan said,
vo areas we were
ith going in
It and Buddy
recruited from
;h schools for the
position. These
how promise for
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:ited about those
i said. "I really
ig to play a lot of
-foot-5-inch out-
n Cary, N.C. and
Is. According to
ts Information
J SID), as team
'ear, Schmidt led
1 record, and was
ill-Conference.
from Louisburg,
itside linebacker.
iCU SID, Smith
iccome Hie TaP'
LL PAGE 9
9 Tutidiy, February 9, 188S
sports
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Women's basketball team
falls twice on the road
Slow start and much
respectsealODUloss
Jean V. Wharton
STAFF WRITER
This weekend proved to be a
heartbreaker for the women's bas-
ketball team as they traveled
through Virginia.
On Friday, the Pirates fell to
William & Mary 77-57 and then
finished the weekend with a 89-60
loss to Old Dominion on Sunday.
Looking for a second win
against the Tribe, center Beth
Jaynes felt optimistic going into the
weekend. Jaynes said that the team
was working on having a better atti-
tude and coming out strong early in
the game. The Pirates failed to do
so in the first half, trailing by 13
points. But, the Pirates were able
to close the gap as the teams went
into the next half still with Tribe
leading 32-26.
The second half was another
struggle for the Pirates as the Tribe
pushed on with three consecutive
baskets by Quintina Walker. In the
end, William & Mary topped off
ECU and improved to 11-10 overall
and 4-7 in the CAA.
ECU's Cecilia Shinn and
Waynetta Veney led the team with
12 points each. The Pirates fin-
ished with 19 of 24 at the free
"We mere really inconsistent,
and we didn 't follow the
coach's game plan
Bath Jaynes
Ctmtr
throw line.
The team continued touring
Virginia to take on the 11th ranked
Monarchs of ODU. The Pirates
were looking to score their first vic-
tory against this CAA foe.
According to Jaynes, the team
was hoping to be a tougher com-
petitor for the Monarchs. However,
the Pirates were unsuccessful as
ODU came out strong in the first
half.
"We were really inconsistent
Jaynes said. "And we didn't follow
the coach's game plan
The Pirates might have secured
a win, but Jaynes said that they did-
n't mostly because of needing
improvement in "defense and
rebounding
When the teams broke for half-
time ODU had the lead, 43-24.
The Pirates were soil unable �
stop the Monarchs in the second
half as ODU's Lucienne Benhieu
scored eight points in just two min-
utes. Benhieu finished out the
game with 26 points over the
Pirates. ECU failed to make up
points and lost by 29.
This win marks 270th win for
coach Wendy Larry, making her the
most successful coach in ODU
women's basketball history.
The weekend losses put ECU
12-10 overall and 5-7 in the CAA,
The Lady Pirates will jump back
into action this weekend at home
vs. George Mason on Friday, Feb.
12, at 7 p.m. and again vs. American
on Sunday, Feb. 14, at 2 p.m. at
Minges.
Football
continued from page B
Roanoke Conference Champions
and was named to the All-
Conference ceam his senior year.
Schmidt and Smith were par-
ticipants in ECU's football
camp during the summer.
Logan believes this camp is
becoming more important in
the recruiting process each year.
"I had 52 kids my first
year of camp and now we're up
to 400 Logan said. "We are
getting recruiting prospects and
I can't tell you how excited I
am"
Logan has relied on keeping
talented players from local high
schools close to home by
recruiting them to ECU. This
year's class is no different.
"These local guys are always
the fabric we start with Logan
said. "They have been good to
us and I know these kids will
come in and play hard
Kicker Bryce Harrington is an
individual recruited from outside
North Carolina who will add
strength to the Pirate special teams.
Harrington attended high school in
Merrit Island, Fla and recorded a
career long field goal from 54 yards.
Harrington will probably be one of
the few players to see action next
season as a true freshman.
Including Wednesday's signing
period, the off season has been
extremely productive for ECU foot-
ball. Pirate fans can look forward to
some new faces on the field and a
competitive schedule this fall.
"Every football team very
quickly begins to take on a person
ality during the off season and this,
particular group of kids have been
refreshingly positive and upbeat
Logan said. "The kids are excited
about the schedule. They see it and
know they have to get ready
Ski safety disputed after judge decision
BRECKENRIDGE, Colo. (AP)
Serious ski injuries are on the
increase, and longtime skiers worry
that too many people are skiing and
snowboarding too fast. Critics say a
judge's recent ruling could set ski
safety on a slippery slope.
District Court Judge David Lass
ruled on Jan. 15 that a former Vail
Associates employee could not be
prpsecuted for reckless manslaugh-
ter for skiing too fast Lass said that
"skiing too fast for conditions or out
of control" docs not automatically
justify homicide charges in fatal
accidents.
One day after Lass issued the
ruling, a teen-age skier launched
off a jump here and struck and
killed a 60-year-old snowboarder.
The teen also died in the accident,
which a U.S. Forest Service official
blamed on excessive speed. Both
victims were highly regarded local
residents.
Skiing under control is the No. 1
item on the National Association of
Ski Areas' code for skiers and snow-
boarders. Now, some worry that
Lass' ruling has taken the fear of
prosecution away as a deterrent to
irresponsible skiers.
"It's liable to make it a lot more
dangerous said Ann Watson, 73,
of Snowmass Village. Three years
after her femur was smashed in a
collision with a skier who fled, Mrs.
Watson still hasn't recovered
enough to ski.
There were 26 fatalities last
year, the lowest level since the
1989-90 season.
Johns Hopkins researcher Dr.
Jeffery A. Hadley, in a recent study,
says there may be twice as many
injuries as reported because the Ski
Patrol sees less than half the vic-
tims. Many of the unreponed
injuries, however, are likely to be
minor.
Lass upheld a county court rul-
ing dismissing charges against
Nathan Hall in the Vail crash. He
"It's liable to make it a lot
more dangerous
Ann Watson
fteidem of Snowmass Village
said skiing recklessly isn't very like-
ly to cause fatal accidents. Other
factors, such as drug or alcohol use,
could be used as grounds for charg-
ing someone in a mountainside
crash, but simple speed is not
enough, he said.
Deputy District Attorney Rob
Wheeler said he is considering an
appeal.
"I think it is a dangerous prece-
dent said Jim Chalat, a Denver
lawyer who handles many lawsuits
against skiers and ski companies.
He noted California courts have
made it difficult to pursue civil
cases against reckless skiers and
snowboarders. The two states'
decisions "create an atmosphere in
which there is no personal responsi-
bility
Vail Municipal Judge Buck
Allen, who saw Hall frying down
the mountain before he crashed
into Alan Cobb of Denver, killing
him, said: "If the Skier Safety Act
doesn't cover this it'needs id be
rewritten
Allen recalls "watching him
(Hall) ski by I don't know if you
could call that skiing there is no
way he could have stopped. He
was bouncing off the moguls, sit-
ting way back on his skis
John Wilson, Rocky Mountain
regional director of the Ski Patrol,
declined to comment on the
judge's ruling. But he said even
helmets aren't enough to guarantee
safety.
"Things are pretty strange.
People are pretty strange. They are
so rude said Wilson, a 34-year-old
volunteer ski patrol veteran. Skiers
and snowboarders may soon be
wearing flak jackets and body
armor, he said.





10 Tujtday. February 9. 1999
� muwi '�f " ��
classifieds
The Eut Carolinian
FOR RENT
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GREEK PERSONALS GREEK PERSONALS ANNOUNCEMENTS
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close to campus, with laundry
room, stove, refrigerator, and
dishwasher. Call Wainright Prop-
erty Management LLC 756-6209.
CANNON COURT Two bed-
room, 1 12 bath townhouse. In-
cludes stove, refrigerator, dish-
washer, washerdryer hook-up, on
ECU bus route. Call Wainright
Property Management LLC, 756-
6209.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom, 1 bath
apt. Only $350.00 per month, on
Cotanche St. directly across from
new ECU Rec. Center. Call 757-
3191
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom, in-
cludes watersewer; $275. Call
321-4712.
��ii. ��'$. '��
DUPLEX. 2 BDR, 1 Bath, heat
pump, private drive, close to
campus, no pets please. Call 756-
8444 or 355-7799.
109 STANCILL DRIVE, 2 bed-
room, 1 bathroom, brick duplex,
central heatair, near ECU. $425
month, pets extra with fee. Call
353-2717.
CONDO FOR Rent: 2000 sq.ft.
condo, newly renovated, 3 bed-
rooms, 1 12 baths, washerdryer
hook-up. Available immediately.
752-1899 daytime, 561-2203 pager
nights.
GLADIOLUS GARDENS One,
two, and three bedroom apart-
ments. Free cable. Located on
10th Street. Call Wainright Prop-
erty Management LLC 756-6209.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom, 1 bath
apt. $275.00 per month, free wa-
tersewer, range, refrig. pets OK.
Call 758-1921 ask for Ken.
WALK TO ECU, 3 bedroom, gas
heatAC; call 321-4712.
ROOMMATE WANTED
LANGSTON PARK Apartments:
$100 off deposit: 2 bedroom, 1
bath apt. free watersewer, all ap-
pliances, washerdryer hook-ups,
over 900 sq.ft. Available now
$425. Call 758-1921.
WESLEY COMMONS South:
$100 off deposit: 2 bedroom, 1
bath apt. free watersewer, wash-
erdryer hook-ups, 6 blocks from
campus. Available now $440. Call
758-1921.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. Malefe-
male. Available March 1st! Tar
River Estates, in walking distance
to campus. 2 bedrooms, 2 bath-
rooms, kitchen, and living room.
Rent $265mo. 12 utilities. Ask
for Chris at 752-1621 or leave
message.
ROOMMATE NEEDEDI Share 3
bedroom house with only 1 room-
mate and 1 cat. 3 miles from cam-
pus, one year old. Private bath-
room and phone line. Nice'yard.
758-7826?.�
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE
Needed to siare apt. close to
campus, student preferred. Must
be responsible & clean & like
pets. Total expenses per month
will not exceed $270. 752-0009.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
to share 3 bedroom, 2 bath house
on ECU bus route. Rent $220, in-
cludes washer and dryer. 329-
0471
ROOMMATE WANTED, prefer-
ably female to share beautiful
new 3 bedroom house on ECU
bus route. Inexpensive rent. Call
us toll-free @ 1-800-624-8154 or
758-8710.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP to
share 3 bedroom. Washer, dryer,
dishwasher, Dockaide, 14 utili-
ties, cable. Student preferred.
$250 month, call 757-8781
�ALE ROOMMATE wanted,
sublease 2 bedroom. 1 bath apart-
ment on 10th St. No deposit.
$197 50mo. Cabte, vm,er
included, 12 other utilities Avail-
able now. Call Andrea at 757-
0617.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
3 bedroom townhouse and 13
utilities. 2 blocks from campus.
Contact Allyson at 757-8767 or
(Crystal at 329-1412.
ROOMMATE WANTED. $250
plus 13 cable and utilities, 3 bed-
room in Dockside. Ask for Grant
or Justin, 754-0937.
FOR SALE
BLACK LAB pups, no papers, six
weeks old, all shots. Call 752-
4039. $30 each.
UPDATE: STUDENT desk,
slightly used, missing one drawer
handle, $75 with small office chair
thrown in. Perfect for studying,
reasonable negotiations possible.
752-5899, leave message.
AAA! Spring Break Panama City
$1291 Boardwalk room with
kitchen near clubsl 7 parties-free
drinksl Daytona $1491 South
Beach $1291 Cocoa Beach $1491
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-
6386
DAPPED
DAN'S
i; IS PPO IDrAS
VlY f. I.OTIII
AAAI SPRING Break Bahamas
Party Cruisel 5 nights $2791 In-
cludes meals & parties! Awesome
beaches, nightlifel Departs from
Floridal Cancun & Jamaica $3991
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-
6386
PREPAID
PHONE CARDS
(NCCA)
Phonecard(s) from
NCCA(National Calling
Cuds Associates). 300
minutes, for $30.oocard,
That's 10CENTSMINUTE,
great for college students,
grandparents or when
traveling, limited number
available. Call. Matt
1(252)752-0511 or Brad
'(252)329-1218, please
leave message in the
event we are busy with
other calls.
YOU CANNOT BEAT THIS
PRICE!
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(919)496-2X24
CUSTOM PRINTED T-shirts.
Profession printers since 1981.
Competitive rates. Free shipping.
ull art department. We accept
digital files in most formats. 800-
272-2066 cultureworks.com
DRESSER AND matching hutch,
$70. Call 758-5795 after 5:30p.m.
PORTABLE BROTHER word
processor with printer. Word pro-
cessing, spread sheets, scheduler
calendar calculator. $100 OBO.
Call Joanna at 355-9225.
1988 HONDA Prelude SI,
124,600 miles, 5-speed, sunroof,
very dependable, $3700 or best
offer, 757-1949.
FOR SALE: black 1994 Diamond
Back Outlook mountain bike. Like
newl Includes manual and Avenir
u-lock. $175 or best offer. Call 328-
3740.
SERVICES
LOOKING FOR something to
give your sweetheart for Valen-
tine's Day? How about a mas-
sage? The ECU PT program is
holding a massage clinic Tuesday
Feb. 16th from 5-9p.m. at the Belk
Bldg. on Charles Blvd. Advanced
tickets are $310min. or $410min.
at the door.
D.J. FOR HIRE
NYC 0 .3. READY TO
HYPE UP YOUR PARTY
For all functions & campus
organizations
Call J.Arthur @ 252-412-0971
STUDENT DISCOUNT for auto
detailing. Don't like to clean your
car? Let us do it. Professional and
experienced. Pick up avail. Call
Tim for prices at 931-9165.
FRATERNITIES. SORORITIES &
Student Groups: Earn $1000-
$2000 with easy 3 hour CIS Fund
Raiser event. No sales required.
Fund Raiser days are filling up, so
call today. Contact Chris 800-829-
4777.
MODELS FOR portfolio. Reputa-
ble, artistic, amateur photogra-
pher seeking slim young women
for portfolio photos. References
available. Send note, photo (if
available), address, and phone for
immediate reply. Paul Hronjak,
4413 Pinehurst Drive, Wilson, NC
27896.
$7.00 PER hour plus $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Lar-
gest rental service on the Outer
Banks of North Carolina. (Nags
Head). Call Dona for application
and housing info 800-662-2122.
PART-TIME help needed. Local
law firm seeking part-time investi-
gator's assistant. Must have valid
NC drivers license and reliable
transportation. Flexible hours. If
interested call 752-2000, ask for
Becky.
1999 INTERNSHIPS! Don't get
a summer job Run a summer
business. www.tuitionpaint-
ers.com. tuipaint@bellsouth.net
or 800-393-4521.
FREE RADIO -1- $1250. Fundraiser
open to student groups & organi-
zations. Earn $3-$5 per VisaMC
app. We supply all materials at no
cost. Call for info or visit our web-
site. Qualified callers receive a
Free Baby Boom Box. 1-800-932-
0528 x 65. www.ocmcon-
cepts.com
NEED SUMMER help at Harteras
Beach. Free housing. Need two
males or females for retail sea-
food market. Bonus offered. Call
252-986-2215 or e-mail riskyb@in-
terpath.com
EARN EXTRA Cash 111 Make
your own hoursll Responsible
students to marketmanage Citi-
bank promotions on campus. Free
giveawaysl Earn $400 week.
Call Ann at 1-800-950-8472 ext.
118.
TUTORS NEEDED: Do you have
a 3.0 or better GPA? Are you inter-
ested in becoming a tutor for the
Office of Student Development-
Athletics? We need individuals
capable of tutoring any & all lev-
els (0001-5999) in all subject ar-
eas, especially the following:
ACCT, ANTH, ASIP, CHEM, CSCI,
DSCI, ECON, EMST, GEOG,
MATH, MGMT, MKTG, PHIL, &
PHYSI. Undergraduate students
are paid six dollars an hour ($6)
and graduate students are paid
seven dollars an hour ($7). If this
sounds like the job for you, join us
for an orientation meeting on
Thursday, February 11th, room
236-B Ward Sports Medicine
Building. If you have any ques-
tions, please contact Isfia Wil-
liams at 328-4691.
SPRING BREAK 99I Cancun
Nassau Jamaica. Travel free and
make lots of Cash I Top reps are
offered on-site staff jobs. All-in-
clusive deals, 32 hours Free
Drinks. Special Discounts up
to$100 per person. Lowest price
guaranteed. Call now for detailsl
www.classtravel.com 800-838-
6411
HELP WANTED
ATTENTION: IMMEDIATE
openings to earn $10 minimum
per hour. We need clean-cut
guys, girls, friends andor couples
for clean-cut job. 2 nites per week
6:30-10p,m. Call 355-2521. We are
renting a local hotel conference
room during hiring so you must
ask for Lori Taylor.
PART-TIME help needed. Local
law firm seeking part-time clerical
help. Must have general office ex-
perience. Flexible hours. If inter-
ested call 752-2000, ask for Becky.
CRUISE SHIP Employment -
workers earn up to $2000 month
(w tips & benefits). World Travel!
Land-Tour jobs up to $5,000 -
$7,000 summer. Ask us howl
517-336-4235 Ext.C53623
PIANO PLAYER for small
church. For details, call 756-3730
before 9 p.m.
STUDENT NEEDED to care for 8
year old. Must have own trans-
portationChild care background
preferred. Creativity and person-
ality a plus. MonFri. 2:45-6p.m.
Please call 321-0886.
SPRING BREAK Panama City
Beach. �Summit � Luxury condos.
Next to Spinnaker. Owner dis-
count rates. 404-355-9637.
ENDLESS SUMMER
UMIMMMA
canCon'Jawaica-Bahcwas
if
m
-w y �
CAMPUS REPS - SIGN UP ONLINE !
18002347007
www.cntilcsssummertours.com
CONGRATULATIONS TO the
new girls of Alpha Xi Delta: Sara
Boyer, Erin Flagg, Stephanie Fort,
Stephanie Howard, Ashley Jock-
son, Carol Overby, Emily Wil-
liams, Kyla Yates. We love you I
CONGRATULATIONS TRACY
McLendon & David Creech for be-
ing lavaiiered. Sorry for the delay,
but you know the family's got nut-
tin' but lovel Tanya, Kristina, Cole,
Jess, and Jennl
ALPHA PHI - Thank you so much
for letting us use your house for
rush and for all of the hospitality
that you showed us. Phi Kappa
Psi
PI KAPPA Phi, thanks so much
for the social on Thursday. We
had a blast. Love, the sisters of Al-
pha Xi Delta
KAPPA SIGMA, Chi Omega, and
Kappa Alpha, the Quad was a lot
of fun I Hope we can get together
again soon I Love, Alpha Delta Pi
DELTA SIGMA Phi would like to
thank the sisters of Sigma Sigma
Sigma for a great social. We had a
great time. Thanks for coming.
WAY TO go, Chi Omega Basket-
ball Team, on your first win of the
season.
SIGMA PHI Epsilon, thank you
for the pre-downtown last Tues-
day! We had a great time. Love,
the sisters of Alpha Delta Pi
BIOLOGY T-SHIRT Contest.
2199 to 21200. Prize: dinner for
two at Applebee's plus free t-shirt.
Rules: No use of university trade-
mark. Submit any concepts for
front & back designs in black &
white to BS119. Questions? Call
BGSA, 328-1836.
SPRINGBREAK BEACHES Day-
tona, Panama City, Padre, Miami,
Cancun, Jamaica, Bahamas, etc'
All the popular hot spots. Best ho-
tels, prices, parties. Browse
www.icpt.com. Reps earn cash,
free trips. Call Inter-Campus 800-
327-6013
SPRING
SpmBreTr�rt��lot8imi�&i�nn��mtfwU5inI998lob�
recogniifd fw outlawing tthicj by Councrf 0 Bettw Burnt $1 Bureaus'
Bahamas Patty
Cruise $279
5 djryt � Mott Mult � Fre� Partwi � tadudct Taxes
Panama $119
City- Boartfrnft, HoMay ton Suntpnt t Mom
Jamaica $439
7Ntott H0WSmf150cmFood&Drinki
Cancun $399
7 Wohtt � AirHoW � Fret Food 30 Hrs of Drinks
Spring Break Travel-Our 12th Year!
1-800-678-6386
SPRING BREAK 991 Cancun
Nassau Jamaica Mazatlan
Acapulco Bahamas Cruise
Florida Florida South Padre.
Travel Free and make lots of
Cashl Top reps are offered full-
time staff jobs. Lowest price
Guaranteed. Call now for detailsl
www.classtravel.com 800838-
6411
i �-1. � H
hou!� Homi Ofst Dmr&
Jamaica Cancun Florida
South Padre Bahamas Barbados
lowest Prices Best Meals
CALL TODAY! 1-800-426-7710
1 SPRING BREAK
Ks . ikh'ksoi ikii drinks:
I am : FREE IVips & $$$$$!
till. .I.IIIKlil.l. I l.tlill;l,J(;illl;nlns. IS nhuillUS
I Mnl PricesBesI Mtill Plan
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ATTENTION FACULTY & Staff 11
Beginning next month. Exercise
Wisely and Aqua Fitness are back
at the SRC. Both classes are de-
signed and reserved exclusively
for you! Registration information
is available maw at the Dept. of
Recreational Services, 328-6387.
Classes begin March 8.
TEST ANXIETY: MONDAY
3:30-4:30p.m The Center for
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering this workshop on
Monday, February 15th. If you are
interested in this workshop,
please contact the Center at 328-
6661.
TEST ANXIETY: Tuesday
11a.m12p.m The Center for
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering this workshop on
Tuesday, February 9th. If you are
interested in this workshop,
please contact the Center at 328-
6661.
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: Thursday 3:30-5PM.
The Center for Counseling and
Student Development is offering
this workshop on Thursday, Fe-
bruary 11th. If you are interested
in this program, contact the center
at 328-6661.
STRESS MANAGEMENT work-
shop: Wednesday 3:30-4:30. The
Center for Counseling and Stud-
ent Development is offering this
workshop on Feburary 10th. If you
are interested in this program,
contact the center at 328-6661.
4-ON-4 Volleyball entry deadline,
Tues Feb. 16, 5p.m. @ the Stud-
ent Recreation Center main office,
room 128.
NICOTINE CESSATION (Part II):
Tuesday 3:30-4:30. The Center for
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering this workshop on
Tuesday, February 9th. If you are
interested in this workshop,
please contact the Center at 328-
6661.
ECU COLLEGE Republicans will
be meeting Wednesday, February
10 at 6 p.m. in room 1012 of the
General Classroom bldg. Stand up
for your true beliefs and principles
and come join us.
POET DEBRA Dean Tuesday, Fe-
bruary 9th at 7 p.m GCB 1032.
Free to all
B-GLAD (Bisexuals Gays Lesbi-
ans and Allies for Diversity) meets
every Wed. @ 7:30 p.m. in room
GCB 3008. So come on out and
join the fun. Make new friends
and make a difference.
SOMETHING DIFFERENT: Par-
ticipate in the National Student
Exchange. ECU students can
choose from more than 140 public
colleges and universities across
the country for an exchange of
one or two semesters. Cost for tui-
tion and fees remain the same.
Find out more at International Af-
fairs, 306 E. Ninth, Thursday or
Friday 3:30 p.m
ALL GOLDEN Key members! We
will meet today at 5:30 in GC 1012.
Please come and join us!
"YES! YOU Are Creative Wed-
nesday, Feb. 10, 4p.m. Menden-
hall Student Center Underground.
Don't confuse creativity with artis-
tic ability. While you may not be
the next Picasso, everyone is crea-
tive. Come & learn how to discov-
er your creativity.
REMINDER: SQUASH class be-
ing taught at the SRC Feb. 23-
March 11. Registration informa-
tion available at the SRC 328-6387.
SPRINGBREAK
ffm
CANADA
MOLSON
PARtYW SUN
�SN0� $N.0tf
� DAVNIGHTS
LIFTLODGING
PARTIESLIVE BANDS
� J369
1-800-999-SKI-r
www.skitravel.coml
-�
we want
tocover
Did you see news happen?
Did you make news happen?
Do you belong between our covers?
Call easlcaroliiiian at 328-6366.






The E�it Carolinian
ajor or a Career
iday 3:30-5PM.
Counseling and
nent is offering
i Thursday, Fe-
ll are interested
intact the center
3EMENT work-
' 3:30-4:30. The
sling and Stud-
is offering this
irary 10th. If you
this program,
at 328-6661.
entry deadline,
m. @ the Stud
iter main office.
ATION (Part II):
. The Center for
tudent Develop-
lis workshop on
i 9th. If you are
his workshop,
i Center at 328-
lepublicans will
esday, February
om 1012 of the
i bldg. Stand up
s and principles
an Tuesday, Fe-
.m GCB 1032.
its Gays Lesbi
Diversity) meets
0 p.m. in room
me on out and
e new friends
mce.
FERENT: Par-
stional Student
students can
than 140 public
ersities across
n exchange of
ers. Cost for tui-
lain the same,
nternational Af
h, Thursday or
i membersl We
5:30 in GC 1012.
Din usl
Creative Wed-
4p.m. Menden-
r Underground,
tivity with artis-
ou may not be
veryone is crea-
how to discov-
IASH class be
SRC Feb. 23-
ration informa-
� SRC 328-6387.
It
er
3U
s happen?
va happen?
en our covers?
at 328-6366.
i
11 Tlnriiiy. Fiimiry 9. 1998
sports
-S59

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Reality Check
Maybe you can get a bigger place
off campus, but consider the reality
of campus living
o -
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0
in
C


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We cook for you. �
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We give you priority on your room and
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Take advantage of an economical campus
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If you currently live on campus and did not receive your Return to
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& to pick up sign-up materials.
l At
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Up
UNIVERSITY HOUSING AND CAMPUS DINING SERVICES
TELEPHONE: ECU-HOME; ECU-FOOD
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Wa
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Pet
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Two ECU s
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ECU student;
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SEE KIS


Title
The East Carolinian, February 9, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 09, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1321
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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