The East Carolinian, February 4, 1999






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Thursday:
High: 62
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Online Survey
www.tec.ecu.edu
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"Are you tiring of the Budweiser frog Super
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83 Yes 16 No
Carolinian
Who can
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4.1999 VOLUME 74. ISSUE 35
Sports page 11
rustees
meeting called
Enrollment
increase discussed
P K I I: R 1) A W 1 0 T
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Recently, Chancellor
Richard Eakin called a special
Board of Trustees meeting to
discuss, possibilities of the
university's enrollment
increasing to 27.0(H) by the
end of the next decade.
Eakin is seriously commit-
ted to the cause and appears
determined to increase the
number of students at ECU to
25,000 by 2008.
" It is quite conceivable
that we could have 25.000 stu-
dents in 2008 Eakin said.
"With incredible determina-
tion, effort and drive, it would
be worthwhile to commit to a
goal of 27,000 students
While an extra 9,000 stu-
dents does seem interesting,
Eakin did clarify that these
goals would not be easy to
reach. Increasing the number
of students would also require
many additions to the univer-
sity. Some issues are an
increase in funds for scholar-
ships, new academic pro-
grams, and new facilities for
the school, such as that of the
Science and Technology
Building, which is currently in
early stages of development.
Board members also sec
potential for an increase of
students enrolling in the uni-
versity but
in order to
ensure the
strategy's
success,
Gene
Rayfield,
chairman
of the
Chancellor Eakin board,
file photo said that
these
increases will come only with
hard work and determination.
Rayfield said that the trustees
want to aggressively pursue
increased enrollment, while
increasing school standards at
the same time. He suggested
that the trustees hold meet-
" is quite conceivable
that we could have 25,000
students in 2008
Richard Eakin
Chancellor
ings to consider growth
strategies especially in
Health Sciences and athlet-
ics.
James Hallock, vice chan-
cellor of health sciences and
the vice chancellor of
Academic Affairs Richard
Ringeisen, helped clarify
some of the undergraduate
program additions and other
SEE CHANCELLOR. PAGE 2
Bussing it home from campus
ACLU
chapter started
New organization
run by students
Many students use the ECU bus system as their mode of transportation, both to and from classes.
PHOTO BV MIKE JACOSSEN
Kristv Daniel
staff writer
A new chapter of the
American Civil Liberty
Union (ACLU) is being
formed for the benefit of
ECU students.
According to Deborah
Ross, executive director of
ACLU of North Carolina in
Raleigh, ACLU is designed
to protect and defend civil
and constitutional rights of
citizens.
ACLU was started in
1968, when UNC-Chapel
Hill decided they wanted a
communist speaker to give
a speech. At the time,
North Carolina had a law
against communists speak-
ing at universities.
Therefore, they held the
speech on Franklin Street
thus forming the ACLU,
which decided the law was
against civil rights and
sued. They won the case
and have been fighting for
civil rights since.
"We care about peoples
rights and the constitution.
We engage in such things
as lawsuits, we lobby at the
legislature and do public
education work Ross said.
The ECU chapter will
serve students who feel as
if they have been unjustly
treated by the university.
Clementine Tran, an
ECU junior majoring in
psychology, decided that
ECU needed this chapter
to help inform the students
of their rights.
" I wanted to help make
the students aware of their
civil rights as students and
citizens and make sure
their rights and privileges
haven't been violated in
any way Tran said.
" I felt the students
needed to get involved
politically. They need to
know the government
affects us as students" Tran
said.
Archie Smith, professor
at ECU, works with the
Greenville chapter of the
ACLU. He is helping Tran
introduce the ECU chapter
to the students.
"I think the students
deserve a place of forum,
somewhere to express their
opinions regarding civil lib-
erties Smith said.
Elizabeth Hayek,
sophomore at ECU major-
ing in marketing, said, "I
think the persons involved
in bringing the ACLU
chapter to campus should
be commended for their
interests in our students
rights and privileges
As of right now, the
ECU chapter is in the
process of getting approved
by the state chapter in
Raleigh. They intend to
hold their first meeting
Feb. 18.
Reinhart named ALE hands out 85 tickets this weekend
hospital medical director
Hind at POm
Heart Center
Devon White
STAFF Will 1KB
Dr. Richard Reinhart
PHOTO COURTESY OF
NEWS BUREAU
Dr. Richard Reinhart, a native
of Strongsville, Ohio, has been
named associate dean for clinical
affairs and medical director of the
ECU School of Medicine
Physician Group Practice Plan.
"Dr. Reinhart has demonstrated
the interpersonal skills, the techni-
cal understanding and the commit-
ment to lead our clinical programs
into the next century said Dr.
James Hallock, vice chancellor for
Health Sciences and dean of the
School of Medicine. "I'm delight-
ed that he has accepted the chal-
lenge
Reinhart previously served asjjin
interim medical director and is now
the director of the cardiac catheter-
ization lab at The Heart Center at
Pitt County Memorial Hospital,
the cardiovascular database for
PCMH and the ECU medical
school.
Before joining
the ECU faculty in
1993, Reinhart
spent 13 years in
clinical, academic
and leadership posi-
tions at the
Marshfield Clinic
in Marshfield, Wis.
He earned his
undergraduate
degree at Kent
State University and his medical
degree from Ohio State. He then
completed his internship, residen-
cy and fellowship as a cardiologist
at Duke University.
For two years Reinhart served
as a lieutenant with the U.S. Navy
Medical Corps. While stationed at
Shepard Air Force Base in Texas,
he was. a clinical instructor for the
joint Navy-Air Force training for
physician assistants.
"He brings the strength of
sound clinical skills and a strong
emphasis on improving access and
quality of care for our patients
said Dr. Ann Jobe, senior associate
dean of the ECU School of
Medicine. "He has excellent expe-
rience in managed care from his
experience at the Marshfield Clinic
in Wisconsin. And he's a team play-
er who will get the job done
Greenville inundated
with underage drinkers
S US ANNE M I LENK I. VIC II
STAFF WRITER
Agents with the North Carolina
Alcohol Law Enforcement agency
(ALE) made 85 arrests on 91
charges related to underage drink-
ing last Friday and Saturday.
Ten agents worked undercover
to survey business at five estab-
lishments that sell beer and wine
in the Greenville area, said John
Simmons, ALE district supervisor.
Charges included the sale of
alcohol to persons underage,
unlawful possession of alcohol,
possession of fake identification,
driving while intoxicated, posses-
sion of marijuana, public urination
and fighting.
Carla, a freshman at ECU who
received a drinking ticket last
weekend, said that as much of a
hassle it is for students to pay the
fines, they have to face the conse-
quences of their actions.
"ALE is only doing its job
Carla said.
SEE ALCOHOL. PAGE 2
Drinking amoung college students often leads to many underage arrests.
PHOTO BY JACOB 6ARM0N
Hundreds of educators gather at conference
Three professors speak
on language arts
Terra Steinb-eiser
STAFF WRITER
Starting today, hundreds of educa-
tors from across Eastern North
Carolina will gather to attend
ECU's 17th annual Mary Lois
Staton Reading and Language Arts
Conference. The conference is
funded annually by a grant from
Dr. Mary Lois Staton, a professor
emeritus who taught elementary
education for 27 years at ECU. The
theme of this year's conference is
"Preparing for Third Millennium
Literacy The Presenters include
Maya Ajmera, the author of
"Children from Australia to
Zimbabwe and other children's
books; Dottie Hall, the author of
"Making Words, Making Words
textbook writer Laster Laminack,
and Dr. Barbara Scott and Dr.
Michael Vitale, both of ECU's
School of Education. Vitale will be
presenting with some teachers from
the area's public schools on the
topic of direct instruction reading.
"There will actually be two parts
to the presentation Vitale said.
"The first part will focus on reme-
dial instruction for middle grade
students, and the second half will
concentrate on teaching tech-
niques for instruction of children in
1
kindergarten through fifth grade
The School of Education
endorses the conference as part of
an effort to keep opportunities for
professional growth open to teach-
ers. The main focus is on reading
and literacy education. Teachers
who teach in public schools around
Eastern North Carolina are invited
to the conference to learn new
teaching approaches and tech-
SEE CONFERENCE PAGE 1





2 Thurrtiy. Fibtyiry 4. 1998
news
The Eiit Cirolinh
news
briefs
HUNT CALLS ON
LEGISLATORS TO
MAKE SCHOOLS BEST
IN COUNTRY
RALEIGH (AP) Legislators
should carry out their commitment
to get teacher salaries to the
national average and take on a new
commitment to make North
Carolina schools the best in the
country by 2010, Gov. Jim Hunt
says.
"Never before in our history
have we set such an ambitious
goal Hunt said in his State of the
State address to a joint session of
the Legislature Monday night.
"And never before have we need-
ed a statewide effort of this scope.
Our future is at stake
Both Republican and
Democratic legislative leaders
praised Hunt's emphasis on edu-
cation, and Republicans said he
was right in calling for no tax
increases this year.
"The governor has given us a
strong charge to move North
Carolina forward said Senate
President Pro Tern Marc Basnight,
D-Dare.
Hunt said he would issue an
executive order asking the
Education Cabinet, which he
chairs, to develop a set of goals to
make the state's schools the best
in the nation by the end of the
next decade. He said he wanted
the goals set by Sept. 1.
"I may not be running for any-
thing, but I haven't run out of
ambition for North Carolina said
Hunt, who is in his last two years
as governor. "I'm not interested in
building a legacy. I'm interested in
building our future
Hunt said he wants four things
from the Legislature this yean
increased funding for Smart Start,
the third installment of a four-year
plan to raise teacher salaries to the
national average, improved school
safety and an end to social promo-
tions.
Hunt provided no specifics for
paying for his proposals but said
there would be enough money this
year. He will present his budget
next week.
FORD WORKER DIES
IN EXPLOSION AND
FIRE AT PLANT
DEARBORN, Michigan (AP)
Ford Motor Co. scrambled to
bring in generators and get its
River Rouge complex back in
operation after a deadly explosion
halted work there and slowed pro-
duction at other Ford plants
around the United States.
River Rouge contains a
Mustang assembly plant as well as
parts factories that make such
things as engines, doors, hoods
and glass. If production doesn't
resume quickly, work will be
slowed at 16 of the No. 2
automaker's 20 North America
assembly plants.
The explosion at a power sta-
tion Monday killed one person.
Fifteen other workers remained in
critical condition Tuesday. The
cause of the blast was under inves-
tigation, but authorities suspected
a boiler explosion.
Many of the 10,000 workers at
River Rouge awaited word on
when they could return to work.
Ford assembly plants in several
other cities were also asked to
scale back production.
River Rouge manager Art Janes
wouldn't speculate on when pro-
duction at the complex might
resume. "I just can't tell you until
we push the button and see if it
works he said Tuesday.
Chancellor
continued from page 1
possible additions which could
bring an increase number of stu-
dents to ECU. Proposals such as
an expansion of the
Communications Department,
other additions in programs such
as Coastal Sciences , as well as a
bachelor of science program in
Allied Health Sciences.
Donald Neal, vice chairman of
the faculty told trustees how they
decide which programs will help
further students needs as well as
the needs of the school. Neal said
that the school and faculty hope to
grow stronger through programs
on this foundation in order to
attract better faculty and students.
"It all comes down to image
and the ablate to market this
image to the world Neal said. "If
we build a strong, positive image
of ECU, the students will come
Alcohol
continued from page 1
Simmons said the effort is pan
of an ongoing, statewide program
aimed at decreasing the sale of
alcohol to minors. ALE agents will
go undercover again in February
and March to perform operations
similar to those of this past week-
end.
Most of the charges are misde-
meanors that carry a fine but some
carry the penalty of suspended dri-
vers licenses. ALE is also targeting
stores that sell to minors which can
result in the lose of their license to
sell alcohol.
"This is a huge problem
Simmons said. "We're interested
in nipping it in the bud so it does-
n't escalate any further. The pro-
gram has been very successful so
far
Some businesses involved allow
undercover agents inside posing as
employees or customers. Other
have officers in the parking lot
monitoring the business.
"They (ALE) just like to keep
checking on us said the manager
of Jolly Roger's Revenge conve-
nience store. "Sometimes it's a lit-
tle too much
Conference
continued from page 1
niques.
'Teachers have to earn continu-
ing education units each year and
this conference is a good way for
teachers to update their skills said
Betty Wheatley, conference direc-
tor.
"The conference really does
cover a wide spectrum of topics
dealing with reading and language
arts said Professor Kathcrine
Misulis, reading coordinator and
graduate program director at ECU.
"We're really excited about the
whole event The conference will
be held Feb. 4-5 at the Ramada
Plaza and Hilton Inn in Greenville.
IRAQ BANS ITEMS
MARKED WITH U.S.
FLAG FROM ENTERING
COUNTRY
BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP) Iraq
has banned any product carrying a
picture of the American flag from
entering the country, the daily
Babil reported today.
The newspaper, owned by
President Saddam Hussein's eldest
son, Odai, quoted an unidentified
Trade Ministry official as saying
such products are forbidden "wher-
ever they come from
New Habitat for
Humanity forms
Making diffemce
with new chapter
Terra Steinbeiser
staff writer
ECU who want to help out to raise the money
needed to build the
Suzanne Butcher
Habitat for Humanity of Piti County.
Habitat for Humanity is a new
opportunity on campus for stu-
dents who wish to be involved and
make a difference in the lives of
others.
Freshman Michael Aho is in the
process of founding an ECU chap-
ter of Habitat for Humanity.
Habitat for
Humanity is a
nonprofit orga-
nization that
helps people
build homes
who otherwise
would not have
the means to do
so. Although
the chapter is not yet officially rec-
ognized as a university organiza-
tion, over 100 students have joined.
"Last semester was pretty much
all planning Aho said. "This
semester we're working on becom-
ing an official campus organization
and applying to be an official cam-
pus chapter through Habitat for
Humanity International. By fall
semester we should be having
meetings and working on projects
on a regular basis
Other campus organizations and
students wishing to volunteer right
away, should contact the Habitat
for Humanity of Pitt County.
"We get lots of groups from
ECU who want to Help out said
Suzanne Butcher of the Habitat for
Humanity of Pitt County.
"Fraternities, sororities, the
Teaching Fellows and the
Construction Association have all
helped out here before
When the ECU chapter is fully
functional, members will work
closely with the Pitt County affili-
ate. "Our chapter can't do much on
its own Aho said. "Pitt County is
our guiding light
Even while the ECU chapter is
still just starting out, its members
already have big plans.
"We're going to work a few
Saturdays at some
home sites in the
"We get lots of groups from area and at the resale
shop on 10th Street
homes Aho said.
According to the
ECU Student
Volunteer Program
Director Judy Baker, Habitat for
Humanity International offers
opportunities for sadents to go to
different places around the world
over Spring Break to work on
home-building projects. The ECU
chapter is tentative.y planning to
send a group to Michigan in March.
For more information about the
ECU Chapter of Habitat for
Humanity, please contact Michael
Aho at 328-3553.
WWW.TEC.ECU.EDU
I the l � �
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Lewinsky interview reveals little
Washington � House Republican
prosecutors questioned Monica
Lewinsky for less than five
hours Monday in a session likely to
determine the course, if not the
outcome, of President Clinton's
Senate impeachment trial.
Lewinsky offered no sig-
nificant new insights into Clinton's
attempts to conceal their affair, and
the president's lawyers, who were
present at the
deposition, chose not to ask any
questions, according to a person
who was briefed about the inter-
view. The president's team had
planned not to ask questions if the
lawyers felt the prosecutors had
broken no new ground, said sever-
al Democratic sources familiar with
the preparations.
One of Clinton's private
attorneys, Nicole Scligman, ended
the session by reading a brief
expression of regret on behalf of
the president, said the source, who
spoke only on condition of
anonymity. Citing strict secrecy
rules, neither the lawyers nor four
senators who presided over the
deposition revealed any details
about the testimony of the former
White House intern, whose sexual
trysts with Clinton sparked the
yearlong scandal that threatens his
presidency. But Democratic and
Republican senators have said they
did not anticipate explosive revela-
tions from a witness who has told
her story to investigators and pros-
ecutors 22 times before. And with-
out anew hook, prosecutors have
acknowledged, they will have a
difficult if not impossible time per-
suading the Senate to convict
Clinton and eject him from office.
Republican and
Democratic senators emerged from
the presidential suite of the
Mayflower Hotel on Monday after-
noon to announce only that
Lewinsky's latest interview about
s
J Arti 6 t�Ml�I Migrant of Tin M Ctratinim
t
ficer
ung

ind
i
jalify
e
ill
e at
f for
FEBRUARY 4-9,1999
MCGINNIS THEATRE- EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
EAST CAROLINA
Tut Ann
TICKETS
GENERAL PUBLIC S9 ond $8
CHILDREN $6 oral $5
ECU FACULTYSTAFF $8 ond $7
ECU STUDENTS $6ond $5
10 CHARGf TICKHS, CALI 252 328 6829
OsMce
0
i'&9
?&
her affair with Clinton fell far short
of the eight hours allotted by the
Senate.
Sen. Mike DeWine (R-
Ohio) told a throng of reporters
and photographers waiting outside
the
historic hotel that the deposition
lasted from 9:03 a.m. to 3:14 p.m
including a one-hour lunch
break and several shorter ones.
Senators will be able to
view a videotape of the deposition
at four separate locations on
Capitol Hill
beginning at 8 a.m. today, DeWine
said. He and a rotating crop of
three Democratic senators were
appointed to preside over the
deposition.
House prosecutors said
before Monday's deposition that
they hoped Lewinsky could clear
up some
inconsistencies and shed new light
on Clinton's effort to conceal their
relationship. They are
expected to use her words later
this week in an attempt to per-
suade senators to call her to testify
on
the Senate floor. At the very least,
the House Republicans have said,
they hope to air portions of the
videotape in the trial.
Clinton's lawyers are dis-
inclined to erant a public forum to
against Clinton.
Instead, Bryant said, he
would focus on the obstruction of
justice charge. House prosecutors
have
said he would ask Lewinsky about
conversations she had with Clinton
before she filed an affidavit
denying their affair and about the
president's attempt to help her
find a job.
Lewinsky told the grand
jury that no one told her to lie or
promised her a job in exchange for
her
silence in Paula Jones' sexual-
harassment suit against Clinton.
But House prosecutors
have argued that the president did-
n't have to be direct to signal
Lewinsky that he wanted her to
hide their relationship.
They also have tried to
build a circumstantial case that
Clinton asked his friend Vernon
Jordan to find Lewinsky a job as
encouragement to keep her quiet
House prosecutors will question
Jordan, a high-powered
Washington attorney, during a
deposition today on Capitol Hill.
The next day, they will
depose Sidney Blumenthal, a
senior White House adviser.
Write a Letter to the Editor
and let your view he heard!
Bring all letters to
our office which
is located on the 2nd Floor of
The. Student Publications Building
ORT
MMMMMMMM
"ScnoocbU
ff�?
Monday, February 8, 1998 at 8:OOpm
Hendrix Theatre - MendenhsH Student Center
East Carolina university
Sponsored by ECU Student Union
Lecture committee
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KISSING
Featuring over 28 different
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4 Tiwrrtn. Fifcrawy 4. mi
H�SL
Till East Carolinian
Greenville Utilities will be
working in the gravel parking lot
adjacent to Harrington field begin-
ning Monday, Feb. 8. The work
will require the lot to be closed for
5 days in order for concrete duct
banks to be poured.
Access to Frisbee Golf Course
and Bunting Track will be via
Berkley Drive turning onto
Blackbcards Alley. There will be
no access of Charles Boulevard
starting Friday, Fcb.5 until Friday,
Feb. 12.
Thursday, Feb. 4
A pre-conference workshop on
teaching children to read will be
held today starting at 2 p.m. at the
Hilton Inn as pan of ECU's annual
Mary Lois Staton
ReadingLanguage Arts
Conference. The workshop is
about Effective Phonics. Contact:
Betty Wheatley, Mary Lois Staton
ReadingLanguage Arts
�Conference 752-5483.
� The East Carolina Dance
'Theatre will present its annual per-
formance in McGinnis Theatre
through February 9. The Dance
Theatre will Showcase ECU per-
formers in jazz, modern, tap, and
caippus
briefs
ballet Public tickets are $8 and $9
and are available through the
Playhouse Box Office by calling
328-6829.
Friday, Feb. 5
The School of Music will be
hosting its annual band clinic. Staff
parking spaces on the east side of
Fletcher will be closed in order to
facilitate the loading and unloading
of buses.
Sunday, Feb.7
The annual Celebrity REaders
Theater will perform at 3 p.m. in
the Brody Building Auditorium.
Local celebrity readers include
Nancy Jenkins, TV anchors
Roseanne Haven and Allen
Hoffman and many other readers
from the community. The perfor-
mance is sponsored by the Friends
of Joyncr and Shcppard Libraries,
tickets are $15 in advance and $18
at the door. Conuct: Dwain
Teaguc, Joyner Library, 328-5515.
Monday, Feb. 8
Christina M. Pulchalski, M.D.
will conduct a lecture on
"Spirituality and Medicine The
lecture will be at 12:30-1:30 p.m. in
2w-50 Brody and is free to the pub-
I Photo bditor Needed
Photoshop � Illustrator � QuarkXPress
Responsible � can meet deadlines
Own transportation � Photography skills
2nd floor Student
Publications Building
or call 328-6366
Been Drooling
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Join the Production Team
Try your hand at design
i the
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line i� �
eastcarolinian
Production Assistants: Motivated people willing to work in the
mornings, in between the hours of 9 to 5. No experience necessary
Production Layout: Open to CA MAJORS with experience in
Photoshop, and Quark XPress. Get recognition for your work on
Covers of special additions as well as on our new Tabloids
Inquire at the East Carolinian, 2nd floor of the Student Publications
Building Across from Joyner Library
-fBJ
Harris Teeter
lie. For more information call 816-
2797
Route 66 - A Road to
Remember, a travel documenter
narrated by its producer, filmmaker
Charles Hartman, will be shown in
ECU's Hendrix Theater, Feb. 9, at
4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. A film dinner,
presented by costumed servers will
be served in the Mendenhall
Student Center Great Room at 6
p.m. The dinner will feature beef
stroganoff, green beans, mashed
potatoes and apple pie. Tickets are
$5 for the screening and $16 for the
dinner. Both tickets are available at
ECU Central Ticket Office by call-
ing 328-4788 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS
The East Carolina Dance
Theater will present its annual per-
formance in McGinnis Theater
through Feb. 9. The Dance
Theater will showcase ECU per-
formers in jazz, modern tap and bal-
let. Public tickets are $8 and $9 and
are available through the ECU
playhouse Box Office by calling
328-6829.
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Just when you think we have set foot in the right direction toward equality between men
and women, someone has to step up to the plate and prove us wrong.
Pirate baseball has begun a new student support group called the Diamond Girls.
The title alone insinuates a crew of women wearing tight outfits running around on the
baseball field. It seems as if someone has watched one episode of WCW Monday Night Nino
too many. The Athletics Marketing Department claims that they are looking for any stu-
dents�male or female � who would be willing to work hard and dedicate themselves to the
team.
Dedicate themselves to what? From the ad alone, which was printed in TEC on Jan. 21, no
one gets a clear understanding of what the baseball team is looking for. What we can interpret
is that Pirate baseball is looking for a way to entice high school boys to join the team through
sexual means. Why can't the team just use its reputation and possibly the potential player's
love of baseball as a recruiting device?
How can the marketing department be so naive in believing that any man would want to
join an organization called the 'Diamond Girls'? Sure, the ad claims that this organization is
open to all students "without regard to race, religion, sex, creed or handicap but that door
of opportunity was immediately shut after Athletics Marketing decided on that name. Not
many guys�or girls for that matter� would like to associate themselves with an organization
whose name is best suited on the box of a porn flick.
In our opinion, the Pirate Cheerleaders are athletes whose purpose consists of motivating
the crowds through cheers and choreographed aerial moves. What do the Diamond Girls have
to offer? According to the ad, their "duties" include attending home games, taking part in pro-
motional events and assisting the coaches and team during recruiting visits. What does that
mean? A big breasted girl shoving herself in the face of a defenseless high school boy, con-
vincing him that Pirate baseball is his calling?
If this is not the intention, the marketing department needs to go back to the drawing board
and come up with a clearer- and less sexist- idea for its organization.
LETTER
to the Editoi
Parking and Traffic enrages commuter
As a commuter, I cannot compre-
hend how I can pay for a parking
decal, but many days I have
nowhere to park. Every year I pay
the outrageous amount for a park-
ing decal, and the parking gets
worse and worse. I believe that
ECU Parking and Traffic Services
sells more decals than they have
spaces. Gust drive by the commuter
lot in the morning.)
Instead of adding spaces, they
seem to be taking them away. This
brings me to the question: "Where
does all the money go that they get
from decals and rickets?" It looks to
me that it goes toward the salaries
of the parking officers because no
matter where I go on campus, there
is an officer writing another ticket.
Parking and Traffic Services
should stop spending all their time
writing tickets and add spaces, or
how about improving our parking
lots? Have you ever been to the lot
behind Belk Residence Hall?
There has been a pothole there for
years which gets bigger and bigger.
When it rains, you can plant fish in
there and you'll have an ECU fish-
ing hotel
Besides the parking problems.
they have some of the rudest
employees. I have heard students
say that they have been cursed at
by officers. If they can't add spaces
or improve the condition of our lots,
they should take the money and
survey the student body. If they do,
I guarantee they'll realize how
many students are enraged with the
parking situation on campus.
Brent W. Anderson
Senior
Communications
"Evil news fly faster than
good
�Thomas Kyd
English dramatist
1592
OPINION
Ryan
Kennemur
Computer ate his column
Afoap have an even bigger
problem. They're called
nightmares.
Well, here I am, retyping my col-
umn. The computers here at The
East Carolinian (which can be
rearranged to spell "Anal
Theoreticians") are nothing less
than crappy. I swear they were
designed by Hider. This fascist
machine deleted my words just as
soon as I wrote my final punctua-
tion mark. Had you been given the
chance to read the article, you
would have no doubt been enlight-
ened by my usual edge-of-your-
seat hard hitting topics (this week
was to be about onions and people
with bad breath) and my serious
and straightforward style. But, see-
ing as how the story was deleted,
you'll just have to take my word for
it It was incredible, astonishing,
and loads of other really big words.
Probably the single most important
document that I or anyone else has
ever written, or ever will.
So, you'll just have to make due
with this one. I have had a lot. of
trouble sleeping lately, and I don't
exactly know why. At first, it was
due to the train whistling its whis-
de at two in the morning. I have
never quite understood why they
have to do this. If you're not smart
enough to stay off the tracks, you
really shouldn't have the privilege
of legs to begin with.
Also, there are these people
next door that can't hear their
music unless it is loud enough to
pierce through their Abcrcrombie
toboggans and the impenetrable
haze of marijuana smoke.
No, now I have an even bigger
problem. They're called night-
mares, and you're not supposed to
have them at my age, or even your
age.
It's so strange. When I was
younger, I was afraid of the usual
things. The "bogeyman the
"boogcrman and the "man that is
neither bogey nor booger, but defi-
nitely a case study in terror I was
afraid of Chucky, the "My Little
Buddy doll with a knife and a
scorching case of herpes Yes, he
really bothered me.
I always had this dream that an
alien from the Reese's Pieces com-
mercial would drag me through the
house and throw me in the trash
can, and the next morning I would
wake up in the dumpstcr and won-
der if it was really a dream.
But now, I am dreaming of
grown-up things. Two nights ago, I
dreamt that I was a total failure
with no recognizable future, and
my occupation had something to
do with "hot apple pies Then, I
was having a great dream about �
being in a pool with a naked
Marian Carey, but I woke up in the
middle of it. Have you ever had a
dream that you wanted to continue
after you woke up, but it rums into
like the exact opposite of the last
dream? Well, when I fell back
asleep, I was shooting pool with a
naked Drew Carey. Not quite the
same.
So if you have a weird dream
that you'd like to share, write to me
at rtk0623@mau.ecu.edu. I'd love
to hear about it. At any rate, have a
great day and don't trust any small
woodland creatures.
OPINION
Christopher
Coppedge,

He is very smooth and careful
to ask only for jumper cables,
but by the time you hear his
whole story, you end up
donating some money to his
cause.
Want to hear about a great scam? If
you park in the West Campus grav-
el lots you might already know this
one. There is a very good scam
artist on the loose and you may be
his next victim. I know because it
happened to me.
It starts out simple and inno-
cent, "Hey buddy, you got any
jumper cables in your car?" Most
people I know do not usually carry
jumper cables in their cars so the
common response is no. This
African American male maybe
around his late twenties looks pret-
ty harmless. He asks if you have a
minute, at which point you should
leave, and if you stay he proceeds
to tell you his story. First he tells
Con artist lurks in gravel lots
you that he works for the universi-
ty and that he has identification to
prove it, but most people do not
ask to see it. Then the story and
acting get better; he says his battery
is dead and all he needs is a jump.
His wife and kid are sitting in the
car waiting for him. I cannot
remember exactly why but the
police are unable to help him. He
has just moved here from New
Jersey and docs not know anyone
in Greenville. To get his car towed
he needs $80 but he only has $70.
He never really asks you for any
money, but he repeatedly states he
is only ten dollars short. He also
started to mention his watch and
jewelry and how much it cost like
he was going to sell it to me.
He is very smooth and careful to
ask only for jumper cables, but by
the time you hear his whole story
you end up donating some money
to his cause. This happened to me
last semester and I gave him a cou-
ple dollars, thinking I was doing a
good thing. I realized that he could
have been lying but I was probably
in a good mood that day. A couple
of days ago, I as I was walking back
from the parking lot, the same guy
approached me in the same way,
"Hey buddy This time I said no
and did not stick around, but I
think he did get the next person to
stop.
t
I cannot believe I fell into this
guy's trap. I have heard that he has
approached many people out in the
parking lot and uses the same lines
on them. He is a good actor, very
convincing and pulls sympathy to
his cause. However you should not
stick around to hear what he has to
say. Next time I see him I will
probably call the police, and I
encourage everyone else to do the
same.
I hate to say that you shouldn't
trust anybody, but I think it might
be at that point. I am always skep-
tical of people, but I usually trust
the good in people. Sometimes you
get burned because of this. This
guy makes me mad because now I
don't want to stop and help any-
body out, and some people really
do need help. The worid is getting
so sick and twisted that you cannot
help out your fellow man or woman;
without the thought of getting hus
ded or hurt. It is really sad that is
has come to this, but I don't think I
am going to let just one person;
change me. I do encourage people
to listen to some people but not to
get into a situation where may be in
trouble or you are giving out
money. There are still some good
people out in the world and hope-
fully the bad ones won't make you
forget that, like the jumper cable
Mm





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TUnivL Frtr-rv 4. 1999
Tin Eut Carolinian
Four Seats Left
Jason Latour
Ants Marching
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Chris Knotts Life on Tuesday
Chris Knotts
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peasants
WE PROUDLY SUPPORT VWMB 91.3
THE ONLY RIAL "NEW MUSIC"
RADIO IN GREENVILLE.
COOL LINE 752.5855
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SUNDAYS ARE OPEN MIC NICHTStt!
Jfe
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420(fiNDNowR)RsofciHiNGiflv
SAT
i parking lot ii
Mozaic
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The parking lot in front of Peasants which is marked Nancy Jenkins (Major)
extremely poorly- is private- they are towing O90.00 per Ron KImble (City Manager) 0 329-4432
tow24hre. And tell them- This is wrong & you would appreciate their
If you have been towed call Mr. Holec. (City help to stop this from happening to other people-Be Nice
Attorney)
T NEXT
L TUES
Tues 9th-ScIileiglioJ
Reality Check
"Hey, I went off campus to look for a place to
live. Wow, it's going to be expensive�the place
I can afford isn't near anything�and those
security deposits will use up alt of my money
w 1r� Sf,
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� Why wander into the unknown? Why wonder where
your next meal is coming from and how you're going
to keep up with the bills?
O
Campus residents:
o
r Watch your mailbox for more
information on Return to
C � Campus Living Sign-Up
February 15-19.
'H�
Up
UNIVERSITY HOUSING AND CAMPUS DINING SERVICES � TELEPHONE: ECU-HOME; ECU-FOOD





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7 Thursdiy, February 4,1G
features
Thi East CaratWit
Bridge Club formed on campus
Bridge club members model off their new shirts
PHOTO BY BRIDGE CLUB
This game is not for
grandma anymore
Phillip G ilk us
STAFF WRITF.B
Enjoy a good game of cards? Need
a chance to unwind after classes
with a friendly group? The ECU
Pirate Bridge Club, which is about
to start classes for beginners, wel-
comes members of all experience.
"We encourage faculty, staff and
students to come and play said
Nancy Zeller, assistant professor at
the School of Education who
founded and sponsors the bridge
club. We especially want to get
more students interested in this
game
The Pirate Bridge Club has
been in place since October 1997
and now contains almost 30 mem-
bers. Zeller, a Life Master of the
American Contract Bridge League
(ACBL), instructs advanced begin-
ners in duplicate-style bridge
games, a style which involves large
groups of players, and coordinates
practiceplay sessions.
"At first I thought bridge) was a
'grandma game but it's really fun
said senior Kathryn Sprinkle, presi-
dent of the bridge club. "It takes a
lot of thought. I would encourage
people to come and play
For people who are beginners, or
who have never played before, a
bridge course it taught by Ann
Webb, a Silver Life Master of the
ACBL. New players are taken
through a bridge book, which is
provided free of charge by ACBL.
Those who complete the instruc-
tion receive a free t-shirt.
"Right now we have two groups
playing. One is the beginning
group, and the other is people who
are still getting use to the game
said Alycia Gibson, treasurer. "We
just play for fun and get used to
scoring and everything
One purpose of the bridge club
"We encourage faculty, staff
and students to come and
play. We especially want to
get more students interested in
this game
Nancy Zeller
assistant professor
is to revive interest in the card
game. They hope to make students
aware of the fun and rules of this
strategic card game.
"It's the 'chess' of card games
Zcller said. "Students who have
played whist, hearts or spades
already have the foundations for
bridge
The first inter-group tourna-
ment took place on Dec. 7, with
first place going to Shannon Lee, a
staff member at CIS. During
Christmas, members of the bridge
club went to the Greenville
Duplicate Bridge Club and com-
peted.
There is hope that the bridge
club will be able to go to tourna-
ments in Wilson and here in
Greenville in the coming months.
It is also planned to have games
over the Internet.
Meetings for the bridge club
take place at Mendenhall Student
Center on Mondays from 7 p.m9
p.m. The beginners class' will be
held Feb. 8 in the Social Room.
"Bridge is the greatest card
game in the world; I hope people
will come and join us Zeller said.
Health
Annual
SHS getting word
out on safer sex
Education sponsors Second
Sexual Responsibility Week
Phillip Gilfus
staff writer
With Valentine's Day right around
the comer. Health Education at
Health Services will be sponsoring
the Second Annual ECU Sexual
Responsibility Week.
This week is held in conjunction
with National Condom Week, but
Health Education started Sexual
Responsibility Week in order to
make a broader focus on the issue
of safer sex.
"We want to show students all
their options, not just focus on con-
doms said Beth Credle, health
education graduate assistant. "It is
also good for students to practice
abstinence
Starting Monday, Feb. 8, stu-
dents will be able to send up to two
"Valentine grams" to one another
on campus. A booth will be set up
in front of Health Services for this
purpose.
"People can send a message
along with a Hershey Kiss or Hug,
and a male or female condom said
Heather Zophy, director of Health
Education at Health Services.
"This will all be for free
These "Valentine grams" will
be delivered to on campus students
at their dorms on Friday.
Students will also have the
opportunity to "create-a-date
Students who stop by the table in
front of Health Services can cre-
atively come up with a date that
would be both sexy and safe.
On Tuesday at 7:30 p.m a dis-
cussion group entitled "Ask the
Sexperts" will take place in
Mendenhall Student Center,
Room 244. Dorothy Buder, assis-
tant professor at the ECU school of
Medicine, department of
Obstetrics and Gynecology; David
Knox, sociology professor and Ella
Fields-Bunch, a representative
from the Pitt County Public Health
Center will be the prominent
experts leading the question and
answer period.
Anonymous questions may also
be submitted and turned in to
either the Health Education booth
on Monday or Tuesday or immedi-
ately before the discussion begins.
Condom games and giveaways
will take place on Thursday, at the
Health Education booth. One con-
test is "Condom Match" in which
students must identify which labels
go to which condoms. Winners will
receive a free t-shirt.
"We hope this will encourage
students to read condom labels bet-
Student Health offers ideas for safe sex.
PHOTO BY HEALTH SERVICES
ter Credle said.
During the entire week, infor-
mation will be available on absti-
nence, safe dating and contracep-
tion at the Health Education booth.
"Health Education is also open to
give programs at any residence
halls Zophy said. "We just want
to get the information out to stu-
dents
Sexual Responsibility Week
begins Feb. 7-13.
Activities for Sexual
Responsibility Week
(Feb. 8-13)
- Feb. 8-10:
Students can send �.
"Valentine grams"
"Create-A-Date" Conte�
�Feb. 9:
"Ask the Sexperts" at
Mendenhall Student Center
Feb. lit
Games and activities
at Health Education Booth in
front of Health Services
Winner of X2reate-Ap�te"
published in Tie East
CaroUnian
- Feb. 12:
"Valentine grams"
delivered to residence halls
See Spot.
Joyner introduces
Special Collections
Source unknown to
many students
Daniel Ketchum
contriiuting writer
For the scholar and historian, one
of the hidden treasures of ECU is
the Special Collections section of
Joyner Library. Here, for those
willing to do a bit of digging, exists
a wide array of materials encom-
passing a variety of interests and
needs.
The Special Collections are
divided into four main areas. The
first of these is the Manuscript
Collection, which contains letters,
diaries, photographs and numer-
ous other items with great research
potential. The Manuscript
Collection concentrates on four
things, the fust being materials
from or related to North Carolina
(the North Carolina Collection on
the third floor of Joyner is a pan of
Special Collections).
The second part of the
Manuscript Collection is com-
posed of military papers.
According to Donald R. Lennon
of Special Collections, the large
number of naval papers in this col-
lection are, "the largest repository
outside the military There is also
a considerable amount of material
in this section related to the U.S.
Civil War.
A third area of interest covered
by this collection are materials
accumulated by the tobacco
industry and its employees. These
include documents
from many different
parts of the world,
such as China and
Rhodesia, where
this industry has
had a presence.
The fourth cate-
gory in the
Manuscript
Collection is mis-
sionary records.
Like the previously
mentioned tobacco
records, these mate-
rials come from all
over the world, and
objects reflecting the day-to-day
operations of this university, aft
well as the activities of some of its
previous students and faculty. Fofr
those wishing to do research in
either the Manuscript Collection
or the University Archives, it wflj
be necessary to use the card cata-
log in the manuscript room, since
(with a few exceptions) this mater
rial is not yet in the computer cat
1
r�
" is an accumulation of pub-
lished material dealing with
Communism by both the left
and right
Donald R. Lennon
Special Collections
alog.
The third section of Special
Collections is the Rare Book
Collection which, while small at
present, is again growing thanks to
contributions from the Friends of
the Library. Books are found
about maritime architecture (and
maritime studies in general) as
well as some travel accounts of the
18th and 19th centuries. In addi-
tion, there are a number of works
relating to slavery, many pub-
lished before 1865.
The fourth section is the
Hoover Collection, which is a vast
assortment of items relating to
international Communism and
radicals.
"It is an accumulation of pub-
lished material dealing wit
Communism by both the left and
includerecords
returnedfrom
Africa,South
Americaand the
Orient.
Material des-
tinedfor the
M a n uscript
Collection must first Senior J�ff Yeirfest takes advantige of Special CoHscdqm.
RLE PHOTO
be carefully organized,
itemized and protect-
ed against deterioration. It can
arrive at the offices in boxes, cases,
bags or in one case, even a barrel.
The archivist must sort through
the documents, organizing them
as best he or she can (since they
are rarely in any sort of order). The
scheme used is usually either top-
ical or (more frequently) chronc-
logical. In those instances where
the paper is acidic and destroying
the document, it is sent to the lab
downstairs to neutralize the acid
and prevent further decay.
The next section of Special
Collections is the University
Archives. Records and memorabil-
ia of ECU from its eariy years to
the present day are stored here.
There are business office records,
yearbooks, photographs and other
right Lennon said.
It would be a mistake
assume that you will only fini
information relating to the afore
mentioned topics in Specia
Collection. Many boxes contain
ing materials unrelated to dies
broad categories exist and
available to students. For instance
the university has a sizable collec
tion of documents relating t
George Washington Carver.
The Special Collections
Joyner Library are generally ai
underused but very valuabh
resource that will provide pleasan
surprises for those who choose
make use of them.
IF YOU ARE GOING TO BE SEXUALLY ACTIVE.
Ubt A CONUUM t VbKY UMt!
Student hearth offers ideas for safe sex
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1





8 Thursday. Fibrvary 4.1889
features
Tkt Eiit Carolinian
Unlikely suspects charged Cologne
SANTA CRUZ, California (AP) -
She wore a Spice Girls t-shin, her
blonde hair cut in a conservative
bob. His striped sweater was clean
and neat.
Detectives figured the pair who
allegedly pulled off two armed rob-
beries weren't run-of-the-mill
criminals.
But even they were surprised to
learn the suspects were students at
the University of California, Santa
Cruz, and their alleged getaway
driver an elementary school teach-
ing aide.
Emma Rose Freeman, 18, a
National Merit Scholar, is accused
of pointing a .380-caliber Bcretta
semiautomatic handgun at a terri-
fied stylist while robbing a hair
salon on Jan. 16 with her boyfriend
Anthony Louis Christophani, a
senior philosophy major.
Five days later when a security
guard at a Costco warehouse store
asked to see receipts for a boom
box and Walkman-like stereo sys-
tem, she allegedly turned to him
with the gun and said: "Back off.
Don't do anything stupid
On Wednesday, it was Freeman
who shook with fear as a judge
warned that she faces a long prison
sentence if convicted of the two
armed robberies.
Christophani and Craig
Dickson, 23-year-old roommates,
posted bail earlier on the same
charges. But Judge Heather Morse
raised Freeman's bail from $25,000
to $150,000 as prosecutors filed
additional charges of brandishing
the weapon.
"I'm devastated her mother,
Linda Freeman, told the Santa
Cruz Sentinel from their home in
Southern California. 'This is a girl
who was a National Merit Scholar.
Her only offense was to brake for a
squirrel. Then there was a total
change after she went to college
Santa Cruz police Sgt. Steve
Clark said Freeman had told detec-
tives that she needed money so,
"she could concentrate on her art
But as she clutched tissues in
her shaking hands, Freeman told
the judge Wednesday she had
taken out student loans to pay her
college tuition.
Police were checking to sec if
SEE ROBBERIES PAGE 9
reveals thief
ABERDEEN, South Dakota (AP)
- A would-be casino robber foiled
by his own cologne has received
seven years behind bars.
Jerold Nissen of Aberdeen
wore a Halloween mask as he
entered the casino Nov. 4 with a
loaded gun, said Ken Vams, assis-
tant Brown County state's attor-
ney. When Nissen announced the
robbery, a casino clerk recognized
his cologne as that of a regular
patron and addressed Nissen by
name.
"She told him to take the mask
off, that it wasn't funny Vams
said.
"He put the gun away, took the
mask off, sat down at a machine
and played lottery for a few min-
utes
The robbery attempt was
reported the next day, when casi-
no officials noticed phone lines
had been cut A search of Nissen's
truck turned up the mask, gun and
wire cuppers, Vams said.
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Rot
(he three mat
suspects in crii
communities.
"We don't j
involving UCS
cutor Gretche
imagine that
usually busy s
getting into tro
Clark said
that the robbei
piece of pape
plate of their j
be college stud
of their demear
Doug Fox,
appointed at
thought the ju
prison time to!
he said, "then
prospect that s
time in state pi
State law m;
tences for anyc
during a crime,
to 26 years in
prosecutors saic
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dixie.com
9 Thursday, February 4. 1999
features
Tht Eait Carolinian
Robberies
continued from paga B
the three match descriptions of
suspects in crimes in neighboring
communities.
"We don't get that many cases
Texas man says he drank blood jan says Las Vegas
of victim on devil's request on eve 0f destruction
involving UCSC students prose-
cutor Gretchen Brock said. "I
imagine that's because they're
usually busy studying instead of
getting into trouble
Clark said officers suspected
that the robbers, who had taped a
piece of paper over the license
plate of their getaway car, might
be college students, "just because
of their demeanor and their dress
Doug Fox, Freeman's court-
appointed attorney, said he
thought the judge brought up the
prison time to scare his client. But
he said, "there is a serious, real
prospect that she will serve some
time in state prison
State law mandates prison sen-
tences for anyone who uses a gun
during a crime. Freeman faces up
to 26 years in prison if convicted,
prosecutors said.
ED1NBURG, Texas (AP) - A
South Texas man said the devil
told him to kill a teenager and he
later drank the boy's blood, accord-
ing to a videotaped confession
played for jurors Tuesday.
Pablo Lucio Vasquez is accused
of killing and mutilating David
Cardenas. The 12-year-old was par-
tying with Vasquez and others on
the night of April 17-18 when he
was killed.
His body was found five days
later, scalped and dismembered
under some aluminum slabs in a
vacant field in Donna.
Vasquez, 21, said he heard voic-
es throughout the killing.
"One side of my head said, 'You
did wrong Vasquez said on the
tape, which was recorded on April
23, the day after he was arrested.
"The other side said, 'Keep doing
it Keep doing it
In the tape, Vasquez said he and
Andy Chapa, also accused of
Cardenas' murder, were both
drunk that night. Vasquez told
investigators he had also had
cocaine and marijuana then.
After hitting Cardenas with a
metal pipe, Vasquez recalled, he
slit them boy's throat with a knife.
Vasquez said he then hoisted the
boy on his shoulder and drank the
blood that was flowing freely from
Cardenas' wound.
Afterward, Vasquez said, he and
Chapa carried the victim to the
vacant lot and tried to bury him.
"My face was covered with his
blood Vasquez said. "He was say-
ing something. He was mumbling
or something
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Vasqucz told police he tried to
remove the boy's head with a shov-
el, but denied mutilating the body.
The defendant said he was sorry he
killed Cardenas and that he
thought of suicide after the murder.
"I wanted to kill myself, too
Vasquez said on the tape.
Robbery is the official motive in
the killing since the boy's jewelry
was taken.
The timing of the killing and
the way the boy was killed led
Donna police to speculate on a link
to the occult, however.
Seven others are accused in the
crime. Chapa, 15, is charged with
capital murder and will stand trial
as an adult Six others, including
two teenage girls, are accused of
helping to cover up the killing.
LAS VEGAS (AP) -Is Las Vegas on
the eve of destruction?
A Southern Nevada man seems
to think so.
A man who identifies himself
only as David says the city will be
destroyed at midnight in the year
2000. He has created a web site
espousing his views. - .
The creator of the Las Vegas-
based Internet site,
www.antichrist.com, boasts more
than 250,000 hits since going online
June 6, 1996. He's predicting an
earthquake will destroy the city
and says he'll go down with the
disaster.
"I promised I would give my life
for the cause David told the Las
Vegas Review-Journal, refusing to
give his last name because of
alleged death threats. "I'll be gone,
but at least I'll leave knowing that
this place will finally be fixed
He says the pyramid-shaped
Luxor resort will be destroyed to
prove "the existence of
GodSatan
Hotel officials aren't taking
much stock in the prediction.
Sarah Ralston, a spokeswoman
for the Luxor's parent Circus
Circus Enterprises, Inc. said she
was surprised at the space devoted
to the Luxor on the Internet site.
But she doesn't think it represents
any kind of threat to the company's
business interests.
"We do our best to monitor the
Internet to find information that
might potentially be damaging to a
property she said. "Frankly, with
something like this, I don't think
end-of-the-world enthusiasts are a
big part of our customer base.
"You know, you don't want to
make light of a person's millenni-
um-driven beliefs, but I don't think
it's something that would have a
broad reach to instill a sense of
fear Ralston said.
Small Kansas town gets chuckle
AGRA, Kan. (AP) - Vandalism usu-
ally provokes little humor among
those who have to view it. But for
many people here, a recent episode
has been, well, uplifting.
About two weeks ago, someone
scaled the water tower in this town
of about 300 and painted a "v" and
an "i" in front of the town's name,
resulting in "viAgra" � as in the
impotency drug.
"Mostly people are laughing
about it and joking about it said
Becky
Stegmaier, a waitress at a nearby
diner. "I don't think anybody is
mad, except maybe the mayor.
They just painted the water tower
this summer
Mayor Merle Barnes said he
isn't angry and that the newly
acquired lettering will likely stay
for a while.
"As far as I'm concerned, it'll be
there until it gets painted again.
I'm not going to go up there and
paint it Barnes said.
Repainting the tower would cost
about $1,200.
The paint job has earned the
town some national recognition, as
Paul Harvey reported the recent
events on his radio program this
week.
"We're actually having a good
time with it here said Lannie
Nelson, who lives near the tower.
"For a town the size of Agra to get j
on Paul Harvey, that's really some-
thing it's been fun
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10 Thursday. Ftbnnry 4. 1993
features
Till Eail Carolinian
Salmon wants Reagan sface on Mt Rushmore Robbers try to getaway with loot in stroller
PHOENIX (AP) - An Arizona con-
gressman says he has come up with
the best way to immortalize former
President Ronald Reagan.
Republican U.S. Rep. Matt
Salmon said Saturday he's readying
a bill that would alter Mount
Rushmore National Monument to
include Reagan's face.
Mount Rushmore in South
Dakota bears the faces of four for-
mer presidents: George
Washington, Thomas Jefferson,
Abraham Lincoln and Theodore
Roosevelt
Salmon announced his bill
before a gathering of some 400 del-
egates at the state Republican con-
vention here.
Salmon, who voted to impeach
President Clinton last month,
revealed his plans while urging del-
egates to stay loyal to the GOP's
conservative principles Reagan
GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. (AP)
-Two robbers were unsuccessful in
their getaway during a recent rob-
bery attempt. This getaway, using
a baby stroller to carry the loot with
a baby inside, didn't get very far.
Mesa County sheriffs deputies
arrested Joseph W. Murray, 19, and
Jamie A. Foust, 18, shortly after
they allegedly broke into a home
and stole a shotgun, a .243-caliber
rifle, a bulletproof vest and jewelry
Wednesday.
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11 Thursday. Fssrasry 4.1999
sports
Pirates upset number-one Old Dominion

Basketball gets first
CM win of season
Senior Writer
eric COUCH
For twenty years the Pirates have
always come away from Norfolk,
VA with a loss; that was until
Monday night
For the first time since 1979,
ECU beat Old Dominion on their
home floor and they did it when
they needed it the most. This 67-62
win for the Pirates marked the end
of a 10 game CAA road game losing
streak.
While on the subject of streaks.
Ladies
i

4
-5
for the second straight game the
leading scorer for the Pirates was
junior forward Evaldas Joeys with
16 points. Joeys also made shots in
the clutch by hitting two free
throws with five seconds left in the
game.
"It's good to have him (Joeys)
said Alphons van Ireland. "He adds
. �� jre depth and he can use his good
quickness to score
As for the game, the Pirates led
30-20 at the half but started out
slow to begin the second half of
play. The Monarchs charged out of
the locker room and jumped out in
front of ECU 43-39. This game
would stay close as the two teams
would trade baskets for the remain-
der.
After a Joeys three-pointer, the
Pirates took the lead 46-43 with
102 left in the game and would
never look back. Brandon Hawkins
and David Taylor would hit key
baskets to mount an ECU 12-0 run
before the monarchs could fight
"I think we have started to
eliminate some mistakes we
have been mating
Jos Doolsy
iMcatck
back.
Down the stretch the Pirates
would make six of eight shots from
the free throw line to seal the win.
"I think we have started to elim-
inate some mistakes we have been
making said Joe Dooley, head
coach. "We're seeing more and
more of this in practice and in
games. It's obvious that when you
do this, you are going to give your-
self a win
Winning also has to be practiced
mentally and that's what might
have made the difference, accord-
ing to Garrett Blackwelder.
"In our prac-
tices we have
focused more on
ourselves rather
than the other
team
Blackwelder said.
The Pirate
defense also
deserved praises
on Monday as ODU was held to 38
percent from the floor and 38 per-
cent from three-point'land. ECU
was also able to hold the big man,
Cal Bowdler to just two field goals
and 10 points on the night.
"We contested all their shots
van Ireland said. "We went out
there on defense and really played
hard. They're a really good team
and you get more excited when you
play a team like that.
"We have played Georgia,
Evansville and UW-Green Bay, all
of which have quality teams. But
ODU has the best balance of any
team we have played. They have a
good inside-outside game, and all
the intangibles. There is no doubt
in my mind that they are one of the
top 64 teams in the country
Next, the Pirates will have a
week off before playing against
Virginia Commonwealth on Feb.10.
ECU Leading Scorers vs. ODU
PLAYER FG-FGA
Evaldas Joeys6-13
Brandon Hawkins 4-8
David Taylor2-4.�
FT-FTA .MREBOUNDS .7 .POINTS 16
.3-4 5414 .�tO
Source: ECU Sports Information Department
I
MehinandVeney
kadblowout
Stephen Schramm
senior writer
"With excellent execution on both
;the offensive and the defensive side
:of the court team, the women's bas-
ketball court cut the SeahawkY
�Kings,
f The ECU women's basketball
team easily defeated the Lady
feahawks of UNC-Wilmington, 80-
2, Tuesday night.
The Pirates jumped to an early
.lead holding the Lady Seahawks to
.only one field goal in the first eight
.minutes. The Pirates were execut-
ing perfecdy in offense. The ECU
lead grew to 12 with 14 minutes to
play in the first half.
"Our triangle offense was work-
ing really well early on ECU head
"That's the best we've played
defensively in a game this year
Oat Gibson
Woman Ittad bttaaibiH coach
coach Dee Gibson said.
While the Pirates were running
their offense with precision, UNC-
W had no answer for the Pirates' sti-
fling defense.
"That's the best we've played
defensively in a game this year
Gibson said.
The Pirates defense forced the
Lady Seahawks into mental mis-
takes and more tentative offensive
play.
"We were not in attack mode. If
you are not in attack mode on
offense, its going to be a long
night UNC-W head coach Bemie
Flax said.
With eight minutes left the
Pirates began a 13-2 run that essen-
tially ended the game. The run
started with Misty Home's three-
pointer and ended when the Pirates
had built up a 21-point lead with
three minutes left At halftime the
lead was still 19 points.
"We were not very smart defen-
sively and we were a step slow on
offense. They really shut us down
and beat us to the punch Flax
said.
The Lady Seahawks opened the
second half with an 8-4
run that almost put the
game in jeopardy.
"We weren't focused
Gibson said. "When we
go into halftime with a
big lead we can't just
think that the game is
over. A lot of times for us
it is, because we win a lot
of our games in the first
half. But we can't do that
SEE WOMEN BASKETBALL
�he a
Determined Lady Pirates gave their all in Tuesday nights game against the UNC-Wilmington Seahawks.
PHOTO BY SARAH CHRISTIE
"Diamond Girls" to World Summer Games come to North Carolina
receive new name
Controversial name
to be changed
Frank Hendricks
staff writer
In an attempt to better the Pirate
baseball program, ECU's Athletic
Marketing has devised a plan, The
Diamond Girls.
That was the name of the new
volunteer program until Chancellor
Eakin, who was not available for a
comment, told the department to
change the name.
The Diamond Girls were
designed by sports marketing to be
a support group for Pirate baseball.
They are only part of a plan to
improve Pirate baseball, which also
includes bringing in lights for a
more professional atmosphere.
The volunteer program is for any
student who is qualified, regardless
of sex, race, religion, creed or hand-
icap. The Diamond Girls will pri-
marily serve as marketing assistants
and official hostesses of Pirate base-
ball. Their duties will include:
attending designated home games,
handling promotional events, and
assisting the team and coaches dur-
ing recruiting visits.
Chris Loney, assistant market-
ing director, would not comment on
why the name was being changed.
Loney took the idea from other
successful programs such as
Auburn's Diamond Dolls and
Wichita State's Shocker Girls.
"The program is something to
improve the edge in recruiting
Loney said. "The students will
carry the recruits around campus
and sit with the recruit and his fam-
ily at the games The volunteers
"Theprogram is something to
improve the edge in
recruiting
Chrit Loney
Assistant marketing director
will be educated about the campus
and will answer any questions that
the recruit and his family may have.
Though the name will soon be
changed, the fact that the program
SEE SASEBAU PAGE U
Volunteers and
spectators needed
Blaise Den us
senior writer
The 1999 Special Olympics World
Summer Games are the largest
sporting event in the country and
will bring athletes from around the
world to compete in Raleigh, North
Carolina.
About 7,000 athletes represent-
ing 150 countries will be competing
from June 26 to July 4 in North
Carolina's Triangle region. With an
event of this size. Special Olympics
coordinators will need 40,000 vol-
unteers to lend their services. ECU
students interested in this reward-
ing experience will have many
opportunities to get involved.
"I just encourage everyone who
can to take advantage of this oppor-
tunity said Nancy Mizc, director
of ECU Recreational Services. "It
would be an experience volunteers
would never forget
Athletic teams from outside the
United States will be housed in
host-town communities throughout
North Carolina the week before the
games begin. According to
Greenville host-town chairman
Dean Foy, athletes will train for
their events and learn more about
the American culture during this
time. The campus of ECU will host
the 48 member delegation from
Japan.
"Hosting the Japanese will be a
good learning experience Foy
said. "You have such an idea of
what a special athlete is, but you
only see yours.
"Meeting others will give you an
idea of what Special Olympics real-
ly involves
According to Foy, Japanese ath-
SEE SPECIAL OLYMPICS PAGE 14
Lockout will affect students' NBA support
Jordan'sretirement
also plop role
Morgan Hefner
staff writer
We all know that Jordan and
Rodman are gone, and that the
Bulls' chances of winning
another NBA Championship
tide are, oh well, let's just say as
likely as ECU going to the Final
Four.
But there are plenty of other rea-
sons to watch the NBA this season.
One of which is that with the sea-
son being shorter, each game carries
with it play-off
implications.
Another great
reason to watch
the NBA this
season is the
return of Spree,
a.k.a. Latrell
S p re c we 11.
Trouble and con-
troversy
seem to
plague
�isnTmHH ; �
individual, and that is what we as
Americans find the most entertain-
ing. Much has occurred in
Spreewell's life since the choking
of his old coach, P.J. Carlcsimo.
Morgan Hefner
After being charged with
reckless driving he went
home to Milwaukee, let his
Afro grow out and started
adding muscle to his lean
frame.
It will also be interesting
to see who steps up to fill
Michael's Air Jordans. Kobe
Bryant, Kevin Garnett, Tim
Duncan, Grant Hill, and of
course, Allen Iverson are all
willing and able. This new
generation of phenoms has
not yet had the chance to try
and live up to his Airness
because they have been try-
ing to beat him ever since
SEE I
I PAGE 14
Michael Jordan shows off his famous
HIE PHOTO






12 Thirdly. Fihrury 4. 1989
spoils
Thl Ent Cirollnin

rec center
briefs
Four-on-four Volleyball
Recreational Services will be
sponsoring an indoor Intramural
Four-on-four Volleyball program
which will take place during
February and March.
The registration deadline is
Tuesday, Feb. 16 at 5 p.m. in 128
SRC. All ECU students, faculty
and staff are eligible to participate.
In order to enter, team captains
should complete a roster and turn it
in by the deadline date. Rosters
must include a team name, the
team representative's address and
phone number, names and social
security numbers for all players (a
minimum of four are required), and
the signature on the back side of
the form, the 'Participation
Contract'
Individuals who have not yet
joined a team but would like to get
'recruited should provide player
information to the Recreational
Services offices in order to be
placed on the 'Need A Team' list.
The format is expected to be
round-robin followed by a single
elimination tournament with each
division. Men's, Women's and Co-
Rec divisions will be offered.
Games will begin on Monday, Feb.
22 and will be played Sunday
through Thursday in the SRC. The
rules of USA Volleyball will be in
effect with ECU Intramural Sport
modifications.
For further information please
contact Joanna Ezzell or David
Gaskins at the Student Recreation
Center at 328-6387.
Recreational Services sponsor
inaugural Foosball Tournament
The Department of
Recreational Services will be spon-
soring a Foosbwl Tournament
which is ooen to all currently
enrolled students as well as faculty
and staff.
This activity, also known as
table soccer, is being offered by the
Intramural Sports program for the
fust time this spring. Competition
will be available for men and
women in separate singles divi-
sions provided that the number of
entries is sufficient. Interested par-
ticipants should complete the
appropriate entry form and include
full name, social security number
phone number, and address prior to
the entry deadline on Tuesday,
March 2 in 128 SRC. The tourna-
ment will take place on
Wednesday, March 3 at 8:00 p.m. in
the Mendenhall Student Center
games room on the lower level. All
players should report to the playing
area at this time with their ECU
One Card to be presented prior to
participation. Participants should
also bring a small supply of quarters
to play in scheduled matches.
Schedules will be finalized after
the check-in of players has con-
cluded. The format of the activity
will be determined by the numbers
of entries. A match will consist of
the best 2 out of 3 games. Each
game winner will be determined
by the best 5 out of 9 balls. Play will
be governed by the United States
Table Soccer Association (USTSA)
Rules. A copy of these rules are
available in the Intramural Sports
office at SRC for any players inter-
ested in reviewing the rules in
detail.
While foosball has not been
played as an Intramural Sports
activity in the past, the game has
been played on an informal basis in
the MSC games room in the past.
Foosball or table soccer is an
action-packed recreational activity
that is fast-paced but involves lim-
ited physical exertion. It can be
olaved bv virtuallv anvone and is
extremely popular on many cam-
puses. The game consists of a table
which is a miniaturized soccer field
and "players" who are attached to
rods which extend outside the
table. The participant manually
turns the rods to control the players
in an attempt to score a goal as in
traditional soccer. The opponent
also controls hisher players and
positions them defensively when
not in possession of the ball. Quick
thinking and good eye-hand coor-
dination are useful skills to possess
but the activity is one that can be
enjoyed by all. For further informa-
tion, please contact Joanna Ezzell
or David Gaskins at Recreational
Services at 328-6387.
Annual NCAA Basketball
Tournament Pick 'Em Contest
Beginning on Monday, March 8,
the Department of Recreational
Services will offer their highly pop-
ular NCAA Basketball Pick 'Em
contest with competition available
in the Men's andor Women's tour-
naments.
It is difficult to isolate a sporting
event which is more hotly debated,
discussed, or of greater interest
within the media and among the
general public than the NCAA bas-
ketball tournament. Entries may
be picked up at 128 SRC and must
be turned in by the deadline on
Thursday, March 11 at noon. After
the initial pairings are determined
on Selection Sunday, participants
complete a tournament bracket by
selecting winner for each of the 63
games. Points are accumulated for
accurately chosen teams who
advance to the next round using a
method of ascending value for each
succeeding round of play. One
point was given for each correctly
SEE REC BRIEFS PAGE 14
FEBRUARY 12, 1999 9 PM - 2 AM
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
4 Fun Flicks Video Karaoke
Salsa and Merengue Dance
vDJ Dance w 3. Arthur
? Loo-Zee-Anna Laser Tag
Bourbon Street Bingo
Lady Luck Casino
King Cake
Glow Bowling
Cajuni
Students may
and guest must
using their valid ECU One Card. One adutt guest wttl b� admitted with a guest pass. Student
together. Guest passes will be available beginning Monday; February 8 through Friday, February 12,
1999" at the Central Ticket Office from 8:30am to 6pm and Todd Dining Hail Meal Plan Office from 9am to 5pm. On February
12, guest passes will be available at the Student Recreation Center from 5pm to loom.
FINEST STUDENT
HOUSING AVAILABLE
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NEW CONDOMINIUMS
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members, 1
r (institution
In thefin
campaign, th
dlrs 3.1 millii
IOC membe
bid team tra
to public rcl
ume bid boo
ber.
No one h
millions spc
team were i
records illusi
the Olympic
cities, the ne
The IOC
expel six of i
improper gif
Salt Lake Ci
Since the
IOC membe
the IOC has
Igation to in
�cities for th

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13

Thursday. Fibruiry 4.1989
sports
Tat East Caraltaiaa
Price Was high in Atlanta's bid for Olympics Wbmens Basketball Baseball
Cj J m. comifluid from pigi 11 continuwl ffom pia
ATLANTyyCAP) In the two yean
before Atlanta won the 1996
Olympics; tax records show its bid
team spent $7.8 million to lobby
International Olympic Committee
tmembers, The Atlanta Journal-
Constitution reported Tuesday.
In the final nine months of its
campaign, the Atlanta group spent
dlrs 3.1 million on everything from
IOC member visits to Atlanta and
bid team travels around the globe
to public relations and a five-vol-
ume bid book for each IOC mem-
ber.
No one has suggested that the
millions spent by Atlanta's bid
team were improper, but the tax
records illustrate the high cost of
the Olympic bidding war between
cities, the newspaper said.
The IOC recently moved to
expel six of its members for taking
improper gifts and payments from
Salt Lake City bidders.
Since the scandal, four other
IOC members have resigned and
the IOC has expanded its investi-
Igation to include the candidate
cities for the 19 through 2006
Games.
Dick Pound, chairman of the
IOC's investigation, has said he
sent letters to two dozen bid com-
mittees of winter and summer
games requesting details of any
suspected misconduct by IOC
members.
Dick Yarbrough, spokesman for
the Atlanta bidders, said they had
not received the letter, but mem-
bers of Atlanta's committee
planned to meet Tuesday to draft a
response.
"We went about it the right way
and our letter's going to basically
reflect that he said Tuesday. "We
hope to have it finished as quickly
as possible
Atlanta bid officials have stead-
fastly maintained that they con-
ducted their campaign within the
rules and that no IOC members
abused their position.
But Atlanta's competitors are
speaking out about excesses.
Manchester officials complained
about visiting IOC members trying
to collect twice or three times for
expenses for a single visit to the
candidate city in England.
And Toronto officials said 26 of
69 IOC members who visited that
city broke IOC rules by bringing
more than one guest, coming more
than once or staying longer than
allowed. They said the most bla-
tant abuse by IOC members was
the
misappropriation of travel
expenses and airline tickets or pass-
es that Toronto officials provided.
Atlanta's bid campaign was run
almost entirely on private dona-
tions from philanthropies and cor-
porations, and on merchandising.
More than dlrs 12 million was
taken in during the four-year fund-
raising campaign, according to the
returns the newspaper obtained
from the nonprofit Georgia
Amateur Athletics Foundation.
The GAAF was created in 1987
to manage the bid effort and was
headed by Billy Payne and then-
Mayor Andrew Young. The GAAF
was the predecessor to the Atlanta
Committee for the Olympic
Games, which was incorporated in
1991 after Atlanta won the Games.
The bid group, known as the
Atlanta Organizing Committee,
spent din 376,545 on the four-day
trip to Tokyo for the International
Olympic Committee's vote award-
ing the 19 games, the Journal-
Constitution said after reviewing
the tax records. The AOC picked
up part of the tab for more than 300
Georgians who accompanied the
bid team to Tokyo.
The Atlanta bid team - core
group of nine led by attorneys
Payne, Batde and Horace Sibley
along with Young and volunteers
Ginger Watkins and Linda
Stephenson traveled to IOC
members' homelands and played
host to them and their families in
Atlanta.
In the last nine months before
the vote, the bid team members'
visits to 85 of the 87 voting mem-
ben on the IOC cost din 401,694.
The bid team spent din 646,879
on 68 IOC members' visits to
Atlanta an average of din 9313
per visitor �during the nine-
month period.
against the Old Dominions of the
world
The Pirates responded to the
UNC-W run. ECU put together
eight unanswered points and put
the game out of reach for the
Seahawks.
Down the stretch, the Pirates
relied on the experienced leader-
ship of juniors Waynetta Veney and
Danielle Mervin to ice the victory.
"We felt we had an advantage in
our guards size-wise, and we felt
we had an advantage inside
Gibson said.
The advantage inside was
Melvin. She had a career game,
scoring 20 points and grabbing nine
rebounds.
The win was the most lopsided
since a loss the Pirates suffered at
the hands of American in late
January. The loss gave the Pirates a
new attitude, an attitude that man-
ifested itself in their two most
recent wins.
"We left our losing attitude in
D.C Veney said. "When we step
on the court now, we feel that we
can win
SEXUAL RESPONSIBILITY WEEK '99
i

SAFE VALENTINE-GRAMS
Complete with your choice of male or female condom,
dental dam, or Hershey's Kiss or Hug!
Let your sweetheart or friend know you care!
VALENTINE-GRAMS ARE FREE DELIVERY A VAILABLE TO
(Limit 2 per person) STUDENTS IN DORMS
CREATE-A-PATE
Use your imagination to come up with ideas for
a safe, sexy Valentine's day date.
Best entries will be printed in The East Carolinian!
See Dick. $ee Jane.

IN FRONT OF ECU STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE
FFRRIIARV 8TH. 9TH fc 10TH 11 00AM-1 OflPM
ASK THE SEXPERTSHi
If you have questions, this is the place to ask them!
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9TH 7:30PM
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iVh,
was going to be known as the
Diamond Girls has caused quite a
stir.
"I think that there is already
enough sexism in ECU sports
today without raising the question
of sexual enticement to recruit
players said Lillian Robinson,
director of Women's Studies. "I
can see why the name is being
changed
Some of the Pirate baseball
players are having mixed feelings
about the subject.
"For bat girl purposes I think it
is a good idea, but I don't believe
that it should be used for recruiting
purposes said Travis Thompson,
a senior pitcher for the Pirates.
Many of the schools that use simi-
lar programs have different
aspects. Auburn's Diamond Dolls
are not even allowed to step onto
the field while other schools use
the volunteers as bat girls.
Head coach Keith LeClair
thinks that the program is a good
idea.
"This program has been tai-
lored after something that other
schools have had success with, and
these schools do so with female
volunteers LeClair said.
To become involved in the pro-
gram, you must apply before
Friday, Feb. 5 at 5 p.m. All appli-
cants will receive an interview,
with the process beginning on
Feb. 8. The sports marketing
department wants up to 30 dedi-
cated volunteers.
There will be a new name for
the program before it begins.
"We are changing the name,
but one has yet to be decided
upon said Angic Wellman, direc-
tor of Athletic Marketing.
Applications can be picked up at
Pirate basketball games or at the
sports marketing office.
CONDOM GAMES
Come test your condom knowledge for prizes!
IN FRONT OF ECU STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE
THURSDAY, FEB. 11TH 11:00AM-2:00PM
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14 Tlmridn. fitmry 4,1898
Special Olympics
coniinutd (ton pigi II
letes will be housed in ECU dorms
and use the campus dining and
recreational facilities.
"ECU is working together with
us providing the athletes with
housing, food and a place to prac-
tice Foy said. "It has been really
good having ECU as an ally
Some ECU students are already
planning to volunteer their rime for
World Games and support the mes-
sage of this event
"I would volunteer because it's a
great cause ECU senior Alicia
Raynor said. "These individuals
have a right to do as much as every-
one else does
Athletes are competing at worid
class levels in events such as weight
lifting, track and field, soccer and
cycling. According to Foy, a good
majority of these athletes compete
in regular world competition in
their individual events.
"These individuals are treated
as athletes not looked at as if they
arc special Foy said. "I saw a
Special Olympian dead-lift 600
pounds and that is the level of com-
petition you see at these games
Mize believes Special Olympics
provides many unique opportuni-
ties and advantages for the resi-
dents of North Carolina.
"The value of this event is that
it creates awareness Mize said.
"You see these individuals as ath-
letes and you sec what they can do
instead of what they can't
Mize believes there are many
lessons to be learned from this pop-
ulation and how they approach life.
"They have such a good attitude
and appreciate life much more than
we do Mize said. "It really puts
things in perspective
An event of this size requires
many fund-raisers in addition to the
support of state and local agencies to
be successful. ECU sororities and
fraternities have in the past often
contributed to the fund-raising
process according to Mize. The
ASMO company of Greenville is
under Japanese management and
has helped to fund a large portion of
the Japanese delegation coming to
ECU.
Interested volunteers can contact
Dean Foy at 329-4541.
.
NBA
sports
Tha East Carolinian
continuld from pigi 11
they joined the league. Now that
Jordan is gone, it opens the door for
one of these young players to take
the baton into the next century the
same way Jordan took it from
Magic. True, there will never be
another Jordan. But then again,
there will never be another Bird or
Dr. J either.
Students here at ECU have their
own opinions involving the goings-
on in the NBA. When asked if
Jordan's retirement would affect his
watching of the NBA this season,
one student agreed.
"The Lockout will affect my not
watching the NBA said junior
Eric Lane.
Sophomore Patrick Watson had
a similar opinion that not Jordan's
retirement but the players' strike
was responsible for his disappoint-
ment in the NBA.
"No, Jordan's retirement will not
stop me from watching the NBA. It
is due to the players' reluctance to
play Watson said.
Other students expressed their
feelings about the loss of Jordan.
"When Jordan left he took a lot
with him graduate student John
Shelton said.
Students also have their picks
for the team that will dethrone the
Bulls this year as new World
Champions. Most students picked
a team from the West, and that
team is Houston. After the Lockout
the Rockets signed former Bull
Scottie Pippen to add to their
already strong roster that includes
two of the NBA's 50 Greatest
Players of All Time, Charles and
Hakeem.
The East has its own World
Champion Contender as well.
Many sports writers, and students
alike are saying that Indiana is the
team to beat in the East Reggie
Miller and Mark Jackson will run
into stiff competition when they
meet the Knicks in the Playoffs.
With players like Ewing, Starks,
Oakley and Spreewell the Pacers
may have a tough time matching
up.
Students around East Carolina's
campus are reluctant to watch the
NBA this season because they see
the players arc more worried about
themselves than the fans and the
game that has brought them fame
and fortune. But it does not matter
if you are going to watch the games
or not, since the season will go on
and a champion will be crowned.
Who will it be?
rec briefs
continued from page 12
picked first round winner, two
points per team which advances to
the "Sweet 16 three points for
each team which reaches the
"Great Eight four points for
identifying each "Final Four"
team, and five points for accurate-
ly forecasting winners in the semi-
final and final games. The contest
champion is the individual who
garners the largest amount of
points throughout the tournament.
If more than one participant is
tied with the same number of
points, a tiebreaker will be
employed. If the ECU team quali-
fies for the tournament, partici-
pants select the winner and final
score for 'the team's first round
game. If ECU does not make the
Centerpiece Designer
Needed at
the East Carolinian
Freshman quarterback
Garrard to rough up season
�Mi���iiimti�n
IWMWXt
Apply at TEC office on the
second floor of the Student
Publications Building
Centerpiece
Designer
NEEDED
Photo
positions
available
�required experience w photography
�owns camera equipment
�good organizationtime management skills
�apply at 2nd floor student publications
building or call 328-6366
tournament field, the final score
and winner of the National
Championship game will serve as
the tiebreaker.
This contest is open to all ECU
students, faculty and staff.
Standings for the event will be
posted on each Tuesday through-
out the tournament on the bulletin
board adjacent to Court 1 at SRC
to allow participants to periodically
track their progress. T-shirts will
be awarded to the winners of the
Pick 'Em for both the men's and
women's NCAA tournaments.
Among the total of 73 individuals
participating last year include top
prognosticators Todd Boyd and
Dana Long who will return again
this year. For more information
please contact Candice Voigt or
David Gaskins at Recreational
Services at 328-6387.
Broncos
bring bucks
DENVER (AP- The
Denver Broncos have given their
city more than just bragging
rights. The football club had
infused the local economy with
more than $120 million, the
Denver Metro Chamber of
Commerce estimates.
The figure includes money
spent on food, drink, rickets and
parking as well as T-shirts, hats
and other merchandise. The
chamber estimated that $50 mil-
lion came from out-of-town visi-
tors to games.
"It's retail; it's entertainment;
it's tourism; it's a number of
things said Steve Coffin, execu-
tive vice president of the chamber
of commerce. "There's an
increased demand for Broncos
products because of the Super
Bowl
Estimates on the take from this
year's championship season were
not available. But there could be
another increase when construc-
tion on the new football stadium
begins this year. Coffin said.
Beyond the boost to Denver's
local economy, officials have said
the Broncos have an immeasur-
able effect on how national televi-
sion audiences see the city.
"Image-wise, the impact is
tremendous said Rich Grant,
spokesman for the Denver Metro
Convention and Visitors Bureau.
"People associate Denver with a
winner. That's a great image to
have
Mi
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Recreational Services "
SPRING99
A New Year! A New You! S
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
Phone: 328-6387
Hotline: 328-6443
www.recserv.ecu.edu
Fitness
Personal framing Special
For the month of Feb.
4 sessions only $50 (saves $14)
feiChi
Feb. 16-March 11 SRC 238
$15 mem. $25 non-mem. Reg. Feb 1-12
TTh 12:05- 12:50 PM
Learn to Ploy Squash
Feb16 and 18 SRC Courts 7&8
FREE$10 non-mem. Reg. by Feb. 15
TTh 5:30 - 6:30 PM
ECU Fitness Expo
Feb. 19-21 SRC
$59 students$99 others
Reg. by Feb. 18
Lifeguard Training I
Feb. 15-March 5 SRC Pool
$110 mem.$130 non-mem.
Reg. by Feb. 1-12
MWF6:00- 10:00 PM
Squash Class
Feb. 23 - March 11 SRC Courts 7&8
$10 mem.$20 non-mem. Reg. by Feb. 22
TTh 5:30 - 6:30 PM
�� � 2
A.R.I.S.E.
Climbing Wall
Feb.4 7-9 PM SRC
Wheelchair Basketball Practice
Feb.6 11 AM -noon SRC Forum Free
WheelPower Dance
Feb.7 3-5 PM SRC Free
Kayaking Workshop
Feb. 13 1-3 PM SRC Pool
WheelPower Dance
Feb. 14 3-5 PM SRC Free
Wheelchair Basketball Practice
Feb.20 11 AM-noon SRC Forum Free
WheelPower Dance
Feb.21 3-5 PM SRC Free
Intramurals
4-on-4 volleyball entry i
Feb. 16 5.00 pm SRC 128

Adventure
Kayak Roll Clinic
Feb. 15 $5 students Reg. by Feb. 12
Uwhame National Forest BKkjiackmi
Feb.19-21 $48 students Reg. by Feb. 12
WlntergreenDaySkifrip:
Feb. 19 $15 students Reg. by Feb. 17
Pilot Mountain Day Climbing Up
Feb. 20 $25 students Reg. by 12
North Carolina Zoo tip
Feb.21 $15 students Reg. by Feb. 12
II� and Cmmsss Basics
Feb.22 Free Reg. by Feb. 19
It's not too late!
Workout for 26 of 38 Days for 20 Min. per day.
February 1 - March 10
You get: T-shirt and a chance at other greet prizes.
Any activity in the SRC Counts!
Sign up at the Fitness Desk
SRC weight training area!





16 Thundiy, February 4. 1999
classifieds
Tht East Carolinian
FOR REN!
FEMALE ROOMMATI wanted,
sub-leasing a nice, fully furnished 3-
bedroom house, $350 a month, eve-
rything included. Looking for some-
one dependable: non-smoker, dean
and honest. Call Gail at 767-2996.
106 STANCILL DRIVE. 2 bedroom.
1 bathroom, brick duplex central
heatair, near ECU. $425 month.
pets extra with fee. Call 363-2717.
LANQSTON PARK Apartments:
$100 off deposit 2 bedroom. 1 bath
apt. free watersewer, all applianc-
es, washerdryer hook-ups. over
900 sq.ft. Available now $425. Call
768-1921.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom. 1 bath apt.
Only $360.00 per month, on Co-
tanche St. directly across from new
ECU Rec. Center. Call 767-3191.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$285month. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apts 125 Avery St. in Green-
ville - 5 blocks from campus. 758-
6696.
WALK TO ECU. 3 bedroom, gas
heatAC; call 321-4712.
PINEBROOK APARTMENTS, 1-2
BRs available, water, sewer, cable in-
cluded. Reduced Deposits Novem-
ber, December. On-site main-
tenance, management, ECU bus
line. 9-12 month lease, pets allowed.
7584015
DUPLEX. 2 BDR, 1 Bath, heat
pump, private drive, close to cam-
pus, no pets please. Call 766-8444
or 366-7799.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom, in-
cludes watersewer, $276. Call 321-
4712.
NAGS HEAD, NC-Get your group to-
gether early. Relatively new house in
excellent condition; fully furnished;
washer 8- dryer dishwasher central
AC; available May 1 through Au-
gust 31; sleeps 8-$2200.00 per
month. 767-860-1632
WESLEY COMMONS South: $100
off deposit 2 bedroom. 1 bath apt.
free watersewer, washerdryer
hook-ups, 6 blocks from campus.
Available now $440. Call 768-1921.
approx. 900 sq.ft
washsrdrytr hooKupa, central haatalr,
t blocks Irani esmpua.
Other Apartmanta Also Available
�All Properties have
24 hr. emergency maintenance-
I
L.
call 758-1921
. WALK TO ECU. 1.2.3. or 4 bed-
' room, available May to Aug. Now
renting. Call 3214712.
i BEECH STREET Villas - Three bed-
; room, two bath apartments, close to
' campus, with laundry room, stove,
refrigerator, and dishwasher. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC 766-6209.
CANNON COURT Two bedroom. 1
12 bath townhouse. Includes stove,
refrigerator, dishwasher, washerdry-
er hook-up, on ECU bus route. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC. 75tV6209.
CONDO FOR Rent: 2000 sq.ft. con-
do, newly renovated, 3 bedrooms, 1
12 baths, washerdryer hook-up.
Available immediately. 752-1899
daytime, 561-2203 pager nights.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom. 1 bath apt.
$275.00 per month, free watersew-
er, range, refrig. pets OK. Call 758-
1921 ask for Ken.
GLADIOLUS GARDENS One, two.
and three bedroom apartments. Free
cable. Located on 10th Street. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC 756-6209.
SUBLEASE REEDY Branch across
from Papa John's on 10th Street,
800 sq.ft 2BR. $395month. 'Low
Utilities, walk to ECU, bus route.
WD. plenty of parking. $100 off de-
posit. ASAP, call 329-7010
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2866

I LOVE YOU
with a LoveLlne ad
ROOMMATE WANTED
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share a
huge, beautiful house one block
from campus. Washerdryer, big
yard, icemaker. cable, 4 bedrooms, 3
baths, kitchen, dining room and 2
dens. 758-2048.
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE
Needed to share apt. close to cam-
pus, student preferred. Must be re-
sponsible & clean 8 like pets. Total
expenses per month will not exceed
$270. 762-0009.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP to
share 3 bedroom. Washer, dryer,
dishwasher, Dockside. 14 utilities,
cable. Student preferred. $250
month, call 757-8781
ROOMMATE WANTED. $260 plus
13 cable and utilities, 3 bedroom in
Dockside. Ask for Grant or Justin,
7640937.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 3
bedroom townhouse and 13 utili-
ties. 2 blocks from campus. Contact
Allyson at 757-8767 or Krystal at
329-1412.
ROOMMATE WANTED, preferably
female to share beautiful new 3 bed-
room house on ECU bus route. Inex-
pensive rent. Call us toll-free 0 1-
800-624-8154 or 758-8710.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: black 1994 Diamond
Back Outlook mountain bike. Like
new) Includes manual and Avenir u-
lock. $200 or best offer. Call 328-
3740.
PREPAID
PHONECARDS
(NCCA)
JOO
minutes, for $jo.oocord,
That's 10CENTSMINUTE,
lents,
hen
bei
Matt
(0(252)752-0511 or Brad
(0(252)329-1218, pli
event we .ire busy wit h
other calls
YOU CANNOT BEAT THIS
PRICE!
BLACK LAB pups, no papers, six
weeks old. all shots. Call 7524039.
$30 each.
NEW APARTMENT? Need furni-
ture? I have a cream futon couch
($126). hunter green loveseat (sleeps
2 $200.00). papasan chair with
cushion ($40.00). brown rocker
chair ($30.00). white halogen floor
lamp ($20.00), double box springs
and mattress set ($70.00). hunter
green bakers rack ($20.00). All
items are less than two years old
and are in great condition. Selling
furniture due to marriage. Call to in-
quire or make offer Contact Kristen
at 3554808 during any hours. If no
answer, please leave message.
CUSTOM PRINTED T-shirts. Profes-
sion printers since 1981. Competitive
rates. Free shipping. Full art depart-
ment. We accept digital files in most
formats. 800-272-2066 culture-
work8.com
ADORABLE ROTTWEILER -
Shepherd puppies for sale Only
$25. They're growing quick and
need a loving and caring home!
Please call 561-7690 for more de-
tails.
AAAI Spring Break Panama City
$1291 Boardwalk room with kitchen
near clubsl 7 parties-free drinks!
Daytona $1491 South Beach $1291
Cocoa Beach $1491 springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
FOR SALE
UPDATE: STUDENT desk, slightly
used, missing one drawer handle.
$75 with small office chair thrown
in. Perfect for studying, reasonable
negotiations possible. 752-6899.
leave message.
AAAI SPRING Break Bahamas Par-
ty Cruise! 5 nights $2791 Includes
meals a parties! Awesome beaches,
nightlife! Departs from Florida! Can-
cun a Jamaica $3991 springbreak-
travel.com 1-800-678-6386
OAK WATERBED bookcase head-
board with dresser and mirror. Best
offer. Call 756-8075.
D.J. FOR HIRE
NYC O.J. READY TO
HYPE UP YOUR PARTY
For all functions & campus
organizations
Call J.Arth'ur @ 252412-0971
HELP WANTED
GREENVILLE REC. a Parks Spring
Tennis Programs Registration starts
223. Youth: Novice 1(ages
6a7)MW 6-5:45p 38414. No-
vice llfages 788) TTH 5-5:45p 39-
416. AfterschoolKages 10-14)
MW 4-5p 38414. Afterschool
llfages 15-18) TTh 4-5 p 39415.
Jr. Boys Team(ages 11-14) M-Th 4-
5:30p 31422. Adult Beginner 1
MW 6-7p 38414. Beginner II
TTh 7-8p 39-415. Morning begin-
ner MW 9-10a 38414. Interme-
diate 1 MW 7-8p 38414. Inter-
mediate II TTh 6-7p 39414.
Morning intermediate MW 10-11 a
38414. Call 3294569.
CHILDRENYOUTH MINISTER po-
sition available. Part-time with poten-
tial for fulltime Send resume to J.
Respess, Winterville Baptist Church,
PO Box 1669, Winterville, NC 28590.
FRATERNITIES. SORORITIES a
Student Groups: Earn $1000-$2000
with easy 3 hour CIS Fund Raiser
event. No sales required. Fund
Raiser days are filling up, so call
today. Contact Chris 800-8294777.
SPRING BREAK 991 Cancun' Nas-
sau " Jamaica. Travel free and make
lots of Cash! Top reps are offered on-
site staff jobs. All-inclusive deals. 32
hours Free Drinks. Special Discounts
up to$100 per person. Lowest price
guaranteed. Call now for details!
www.classtravel.com 800-838-6411
NEED SUMMER help at Hatteras
Beach. Free housing. Need two
males or females for retail seafood
market. Bonus offered. Call 252-986-
2215 or e-mail riskybSinterpath.com
PIANO PLAYER for small church.
For details, call 766-3730 before 9
p.m.
GIVE US TIME
TO REPAY
YOUR LOAN.
After just three years in
the Army, your college loan
could be a thing of the past
Under the Army's Loan
Repayment program, each
year you serve on active
duty reduces your indebt-
edness by one-third or
$1,500, whichever amount
is greater, up to a $65,000
limit
This offer applies to
Perkins Loans, Stafford
Loans and certain other
federally insured loans
which are not in default
And this is just the first of
many benefits the Army
will give you. Get the
whole story from your
Army Recruiter.
756-9695
ARMY.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE:
www.goarmy.com
��
FOR YOUR MAN'S VALENTINE GIFTI
OWE QUALITY, CLASS, STYLE
CHUCK OUTOUKBSai
STORE WIPE SALE

Tommy, Nautlca, Pbh -AU. THEPESTl
ShlrCo, Pints, Je�ns, Shoes, Etc

(kamStltjmiCem
ffceakj fknjjl�V OOOMO
HELP WANTED
STUDENT NEEDED to care for 8
year old. Must have own transporta-
tion. Child care background pre-
ferred. Creativity and personality a
plus. MonFri. 2:45-6p.m. Please call
321-0886.
PIANO PLAYER for small church.
For details, call 756-3730 before 9
p.m.
1999 INTERNSHIP8I Don't get a
summer job Run a summer busi-
ness. www.tuitionpainters.com. tui-
paintSbellsouth.net or 800-393-
4621.
FREE RADIO $1250. Fundraiser
open to student groups a organiza-
tions. Earn $3-$5 per VTsaMC app.
We supply all materials at no cost.
Call for info or visit our website.
Qualified callers receive a Free Baby
Boom Box 1-800-932-0528 x 65.
www.ocmconcepts.com
GREENVILLE RECREATION and
Parks Department Adult Soccer Offi-
cial's Meeting. The Greenville Re-
creation and Parks Department will
be holding an organizational meet-
ing for all those interested if officiat-
ing in the Spring Adult Soccer
Leagues. Position pays $12-$ 16 a
game. Clinics will be held to train
new and experience officials. How-
ever, a basic knowledge and under-
standing of the game is necessary.
The meeting will be held Thursday.
February 4. 1999 at 6p.m. at Elm
Street Gym. Experience require-
ments, clinic schedule, and game
fees will be discussed. For more in-
formation, please call the Athletic Of-
fice at 3294550 between the hours
of 2p.m7p.m� Monday thru Friday.
CRUISE SHIP Employment - work-
ers earn up to $2000 month (w
tips a benefits). World Travel! Land-
Tour jobs up to $5,000 -$7,000
summer. Ask us howl 617-336-4236
Ext.C63623
GREAT JOBI Child care provider
needed for 5-10 hours per week. Ex-
cellent pay for experienced student
with references and own transporta-
tion. Call 355-2682. leave message.
MOTHER'S HELPER twice weekly,
prefer help MondayWednesday
mornings. Occasional babysitting as
needed. Call 756-8076. may leave
message. References requested.
$7.00 PER hour plus $160.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina. (Nags Head). Call
Dona for application and housing
info 800-662-2122.
MODELS FOR portfolio. Reputable,
artistic, amateur photographer seek-
ing slim young women for portfolio
photos. References available. Send
note, photo (if available), address,
and phone for immediate reply. Paul
Hronjak. 4413 Pinehurst Drive. Wil-
son. NC 27896.
SPRING BREAK Panama City
Beach. �Summit � Luxury condos.
Next to Spinnaker. Owner discount
rates. 404-355-9637.
GREEK PERSONALS
PI KAPPA Phi. the 70s bid night so-
cial was so much fun! Thank you for
everything. Love, Alpha Delta Pi
SIGMA ALPHA Epsilon. Phi Tau,
and Alpha Zeta Delta - what a mem-
orable Super Bowl! We'll challenge
you again anytime. Love, Chi Omega
THANKS QINNY for letting us have
officer's retreat at your house. We
had a great time. Love, your Alpha
Phi sisters
THETA CHI - Congratulations on all
your new members, and thanks for
letting us share bid night with you.
We had a blast! Love. Alpha Phi
SIGMA PHI Epsilon - Thank you for
an awesome initiation party) We all
had a great time. Let's do ft again
soon. Love, the sisters of Chi Omega
ALPHA DELTA Pi would like to
thank Pi Kappa Alpha for the bid
night social last Saturday. We had a
great time. Hope we can get togeth-
er again soon!
DELTA CHI would like to thank Al-
pha Delta Pi for the house during
rush. You guys kick ass. Love, the
brothers at delta Chi
CONGRATULATIONS NEW Chi
Omega sisters: Whitney Bishop.
Stephanie Bond. Lori Brantley,
Stephanie Dedrick. Shanann Fisher,
Leah Fundora, Leanna Fundora, Mel-
issa Gibbons, Ginger Gilbert, Dana
Herring. Emily Holtz. Katie Leavitt.
Megan McLaughlin. Courney Meak.
Jill Morgan, Lisa 0;Connor. Mamie
Oursler. Lisa Parker, Sarah Pearson,
Lauren Selim, Laurel Sigman. Patton
Smith. We are so proud of you.
THE BROTHERS of Delta Chi would
Ilk to thank Zeta Tau Alpha and Al-
pha Zeta Delta for a great bid night
last week. Love, the brothers of Del-
ta Chi
GREEK PERSONALS
FOUND FEMALE German Sheppard
puppy at Brewstar Bldg. Call 752-
0408. 717-7460 or page 764-5693.
SPRINGBREAK BEACHES Dayto-
na, Panama City, Padre. Miami, Can-
cun, Jamaica. Bahamas, etc. All the
popular hot spots. Best hotels, pric-
es, parties. Browse www.icpt.com.
Reps earn cash, free trips. Call Inter-
Campus 80O327-6013
SPRING BREAK 991 Cancun Nas-
sau Jamaica 'Mazatlan- Acapulco
Bahamas Cruise ' Florida' Florida
South Padre. Travel Free and make
lots of Cash! Top reps are offered
full-time staff jobs. Lowest price
Guaranteed. Call now for details!
www.classtravel.com 800838-6411
ANNOUNCEMENTS
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: Thursday 3:30-6PM. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering this work-
shop on Thursday, February 11th. If
you are interested in this program.
contact the center at 328-6661.
TEST PREPARATION: Monday
3:304:30.The Center for Counseling
and Student Development is offering
this workshop on Monday, February
8th. If you are interested in this
workshop, please contact the Center
at 328-6661.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
STRESS MANAGEMENT work-
shop: Wednesday 3:304:30. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering this work-
shop on Feburary 10th. If you are in-
terested in this program, contact the
center at 328-6661.
HEY STUDENTS. The Greenville-
Pitt County Special Olympics is cur-
rently recruiting volunteers for the
following sports: Bowling, swim-
ming, volleyball recreation camp,
track and field, and Special Olympics
Spring Games. For more informa-
tion, contact Kelvin Yarrell or Dean
Foy at 3294844 or 3294641.
COME AND see what you have
been missing! Interact table from
Student Leadership, outside Wright
Place 2-224. Learn a have fun.
TEST ANXIETY: Tuesday 11a.m
12p.m The Center for Counseling
and Student Development is offering
this workshop on Tuesday. February
9th. If you are interested in this
workshop, please contact the Center
at 328-6661.
GAMMA BETA Phi will meet on
Thursday Feb. 4th at 5p.m. in GCB
1031.
NICOTINE CESSATION (Part II):
Tuesday 3:304:30. The Center for
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering this workshop on
Tuesday. February 9th. If you are in-
terested in this workshop, please
contact the Center at 328-6661
tu
rf1
Say
"I LOVE YOU"
with a LoveLlne ad.
Only $2
worldt raveliinks.com
(888)9097044
HCAJM4H0 "Out OF f.1 Djf NKS
Jamaica Cancun Florida
South Padre Bahamas Barbados
Lowest Prices Best Meals
CALLTODAYI1-800-426-7710
WEffliim
$sn $m s?
florid .��
CAMPUS REPS SICN UP ONLINE !
18002347007
www.endtcsssummert ours, coin
Sonng Bra Travel wu t of 6 kmr buMttun Ki W US in 1M8 to t�
r�09rwedto�ftitirg
Bahamas Party
Cruise $279
S CBN � MOM MM � fm Pert � MudM T�M
Panama $119
City- Bo. HoMtv km Sunton & Mora
Jamaica $439
7 Hrghtj � Air HoW � Save $150 on Food A Drwki
Cancun $399
7 Mojrti � Air HoW . Fnw Food 4 30 Hn of Dflrta
Spring Break Travel-Our 12th Year!
1-800-678-6386
It's cheaper than a tatoo.
And hurts less, too.
LoveLines
Stop by The East Carolinian office before Monday at
5 p.m. to send your love a message for Valentine's Day.
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SATION (Part II):
0. The Canter for
Student Develop-
this workshop on
i 9th. If you are in-
workshop, please
ir at 328-6661
ncun Florida
hamas Barbados
iBut Meals
-800-426-7710
M Food & 30 Hn o Ortoki
(d-Our 12th Year!
�1i

The EM Carolinian
ICEMENTS
AQEMENT work-
ay 3:30-4:30. The
seling and Student
offering this work-
' 10th. If you are in-
rogram, contact the
M.
8, The Greenville-
ial Olympics is cur-
volunteers for the
i: Bowling, swim-
recreation camp,
id Special Olympics
For more informa-
rin Yarrell or Dean
or 329-4541.
e what you have i
iteract table from I rnc
tip, outside Wright t,
am 6 have fun.
Tuesday 11a.m
ter for Counseling
ilopment is offering
i Tuesday, February
interested in this
contact the Center
Phi will meet on
h at Sp.m. in GCB
.�1i
msfl
w

v
3
z-
-
-
s
.a way
ofsayin
"Be Mine" for Valentine's Day
that's cheaper than a tatoo.
COMPLETE THIS FORM
AND BRING IT TO THE
MENDENHALL STUDENT
CENTER INFORMATION
DESK OR THE EAST
CAROLINIAN OFFICE
BEFORE FEBRUARY 8
AT i-nu
Ml 3 KM.
COMPLETE THIS FORM AND BRING IT TO OUR OFFICE OR DROP IT WITH YOUR PAYMENT IN OUR BOX AT THE INFORMATION
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k BXWffWy Qt-Mlt T WHTS NWf�fc WtTH TMf PXVXfXON Off' fTUPttlT iXffff
Febny 12,1999,9.00 p.m. - 2:00 a.
Lady Luck Casino and the Royal Street Poker Parlor
Black-jack, Poker and the Big Wheel are back. Multi-Purpose Room and Cyni
Lounge, 9p.m2a.m.
Fun Flicks Video Karaoke and Billiards
Create your own music video complete with costumes and video backgrounds. Play a
game or two 01 pool while you wait to strut your stuff. Pirate Underground, 9p.rn2a.rn.
Loozy-Anna Laser Tag
Test your skills while obliterating total strangers. Social Room, 9p.m2a.m.
Bourbon Street Bingo �
Don't miss your chance to scream "BINGO at the top of your lungs. MSC Dining
Hall, 9p.m2a.m. MT j.
Cajun Buffet
Free Cajun cookin' at our all-yeu-can-eat buffet MSC Dining Hall, 1 lp.mla.m.
Glow Bowling
Jam to music as you bowl under black lights with custom glow-in-the-dark pins
and balls. Outer Limitz, 9p.m2ajn.
DJ Dance
Your favorite deejay, J. Arthur is back! Great Room 11 p.m.
Salsa and Merengue Dance
Everyone's into salsa and Latin dance. Now's your chance to see why. Instructors will
be on hand to teach your feet Room 244, i0p.mla.m.

'
JOE STUDENT EARNS
HIS BEADS
1:30 a.m.
King and Queen Coronation
To be master or mistress of all this merriment, fill out an application at the Information
Desk before 10:30 p.m. Winners will be coronated at 10:30 p.m. in the Lady Luck
Casino.
HowtoGetlnToMardiGras:
Students need only present a valid ECU One Caid to enter Maidi Gras. Students may bring an
adult friend, but must obtain a guest pass prior W the event Guest passes will be available
February 8-12 at the Central Ticket Office from 8:30 am-6pm and at the Todd Dining Hall Meal
Plan Office from 8am-5pra Guest passes can also be picked up at the Student Recreation
Center from 5pm-10pm on Friday, February 12. Student must accompany guest for admittance.
I had it all planned. I, Joe Student, made a New Year's
Resolution. I was going to MARDI GRAS. I had heard
about it from my buds. They brought back the beads,
the stories, and more stories. My buddy Slick, went
down south for the festivities and brought back
stories of a hellacious time, meeting other college
students, and gettin' it on with the partying and
the aura of New Orleans. It was all I could think
about, so this is the year that I do it.
,L!NA UNIVERSITY � A B V
Mardi �jras Mask Contest
ECU Dining Services Presents the annual Mardi Gras Mask Contest!
Create and make your own version of a Mardi Gras mask and enter to win:
First Prize - $100 cash; Second Prize - $50 Advantage Account; Third Prize - $25 Advantage
Account The rules are simple:
1. You must be a registered ECU student to enter,
2. Store bought masks are not eligible;
3. The mask must be wearable;
4. In the spirit of Mardi Gras, everything else is up to your imagination.
The entries will be accepted during the week of February 8-12 at Mendenhall Dining Hall
and will be on display there through February 12. Judging will occur and winners will be
announced at Mardi Gras.
I checked into flights - way too expensive, so I
i thought I would drive. My car is your typical
college car; it can only make it from home to the
Minges Parking lot. I called Slick to see if he
could go again, but he has to work, can you
believe it? I exhausted my resources on all the
parties over break and the hotels in New Orleans
weren't cheap, still I was not to be denied. That is
when I saw the ad in the East Carolinian. ECU
CELEBRATES MARDI GRAS - FRIDAY,
FEBRUARY 12, 1999 - EVERYTHING IS FREE WITH YOUR ECU ID.
I was so excited as I read on
Free Cajun buffet, free beads, free Video Karaoke, free dance lessons, the Lady
Luck Casino (maybe I can still get lucky), Bourbon Street Bingo, Loozy-anna
Laser Tag, DJ Arthur, and free prizes.
I had just wandered into the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. I was on
Easy Street and to make it even better I can get a guest ticket with my ID. I
think I'm going to invite Slick; he deserves a good time at ECU's Mardi Gras in
Mendenhall Student Center, Friday, February 12, 1999 from 9:00 PM to 2:00 AM.
Now with the money I didn't spend I think I will try and save up for a GREAT
Spring Break Trip. I wonder if there's a free one out there somewhere. If there
is I'll find it.
1
The Origin of African-
American Heritage
mor m
In 1926, Carter G. Woodson known as the "Father of Negro History introduced
Negro History Week as a reaction to racism and to emphasize the many contributions
that Negroes had made in the development of civilization. The week originally
chosen by Woodson to celebrate Negro History Week fell during the weekhich
included the birthdays of Frederick Douglas, African-American abolitionist, and
Abraham Lincoln, signer of the Emancipation Proclamation.
The 1920's have been characterized as the "Gay Twenties" but for African-Americans
this was not the case. America was deeply segregated and there was a tightening of
Jim Crow Laws that further segregated a divided country. In an attempt to ease
some of the racial tensions Woodson wanted to use Negro History Week to educjjte
all Americans about the rich contributions made by African-Americans.
Over the years, Negro History Week has undergone a number of changes. In 1976,
the entire month of February was set aside as African-American History Month.
Generally, African-American History Month is observed with speeches, lectures,
films, presentations, theatrical performances, exhibits and historical information.
Each year a national theme for African-American History Month is selected by the
Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and History. This year's theme is
5
oj
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'Arts & Entertainment Magazine of The East
last Carolinian � m
I
wMnkfim.
Thursday. February 4,1999
:
.
Mohamcd Hussein
Senior Writer
If you appreciate tap, jazz, modern dance or
ballet, don't miss this year's dance produc-
tion, "Dance '99 at McGinnis Theater.
Featured in the works will be guest appear-
ances by two artists, Mark Dendy and Tomi
Galaska.
Dendy, a North Carolina native, is now a New York
choreographer and an ECU
guest artist-in-residence. The performance that he
choreographedRound About Free-For-All at the
Azerbaijani Truck Stop Cafe features 12 dancers in a
dynamic performance of changing movements.
Dendy is well known for his work and is highly sought
after for his talents.
Guest artist and former faculty member Galaska has
constructed a fresh jazz performance named
"Passionate Fire nostalgic of the late Bob Fosse's
work. Galaska describes this work set to music by
Michael Camilo as "sweet, sexy and fierce
Faculty members Joe Carow and Cindy Mancini will
join together to create a timeless ballet following the
five movements of Dvorak's "Serenade Opus 22
Carow also choreographed a classical piece set to a
waltz for two couples.
"This perfoi mance has a little of something for every-
See dance, continued on page 6
Catch the ECU School of Dance's spring performance in Hendrix Theatre
Indie star Elliot
Smith is on his
way to greater
popularity
4BP
CD Review
The Prime of jHHBtfj
and exefiin �
interpretaliinjt I
a Bible Ell
Movie Review
Video Review
ECU basketball
gets in the game
imam
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wkrMridt
fountainhead � 2nd Floor Student Publications Building Greenville, NC 27858 � Phone 328-6366 � Fax 328-6558 � Advertising328-2000-www.fountainhead.ecu.edu






VJcUxJlv-
ECU In Final Four
Stephen Schramm
Senior Writer
To me the thing that makes
college basketball so great is
not the titanic programs with
their rosters full of high-school
Ail-Americans and home are-
nas that seat thousands. It's the
small colleges whose teams toil
in anonymity until they get a
bid to the NCAA Tournament
as a seed in the teens. These
are the teams who make
March so maddening. It's
about time they found their
way into a college basketball
video game.
Final Four '99 is the first col-
lege basketball game put out
by 989 Studios for the Sony
Playstation. 989 is the compa-
ny behind such titles as NFL
Gameday and NBA Shootout.
For their first crack at the col-
lege basketball market. Final
Four '99 is a solid start
Every previous college basketball
game has included only the teams
from the country's major confer-
ences. The total number of teams
never climbed too far above 150.
�toofour topped all of their
rivals by incorporating almost 300
teams to chose from. Almost every
Division One team, no matter how
obscure, found their way into the
game, in addition to the usual col-
lege basketball heavyweights such as
North Carolina, Kentucky and Duke
the game also has the less storied
programs such as the Fighting
Camels of Campbell, the Eagles of
Monmouth and, most importantly,
the Pirates of ECU.
Up to now, most college basketball
games have played like choppy step-
children of that company's NBA title.
This trend continues with Find Four
V9. The game is easy to learn and
easy to play. The fast rate of play and
the relative ease with which one can
score leads to many exciting and
high-scoring games.
One of the game's only downsides
would be the graphics. The game
does not have the detailed graphics
of most other Playstation games. For
instance, details such as the players'
facial features and writing on their
jerseys appear blurry.
Another problem is the inane play-
by-play delivered by former Indiana
Hoosier gnat and current TV ana-
lyst, Quinn Buckner. Buckner has a
unique knowledge of the game of
basketball earned through decades
of being in the game as a player and
later as a coach. Ifs a shame that
none of this was used in the game.
Buckner's comments range from the
ridiculous, "N BC, Nothing but cord
to the just plain stupidStriiiiing
muuuuuuusic
Blurry graphics arid unfortunate
commentary, however, do not keep
Final Four from being a truly fun
game. But the lone fact that one can
play a season with ECU makes the
game worth purchasing. And almost
300 teams complete with accurate
uniforms, home floors and rosters
makes Final Four "99 the best college
basketball game on the market.
�1t. iqi .� iMiam�ic�initi
11.000 cam �m fcajaw mi nmm ?.0DO caan at t�
AnwLRoysler Editor in Chief
Heather Burgess Managing Editor
Miccah Smith Enter
CalebRote Assistant Editor
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Ryan Kennemur
Music Guv
At last year's Oscars, you
may have seen him uncom-
fortably sandwiched
between Cdine Dion and Trisha
Yearwood. You may have heard his
single "Miss Misery" while viewing
"Good Will Hunting If these two
instances don't apply to you, then you
probably have had no contact with the
likes of melody-guru Elliott Smith.
Smith was once the front of his own
band, a little Portland, Ore. based
garage rock quartet called Heatmiser.
CD Review
He co-wrote the band's songs and,
multi-instumentalistthatheis,
brought an eclectic and eerie under-
tone to every song. Though their
albums were critically applauded, the
group never took off on the success
standpoint. For their last alburnMic
City Sons the cover featured nothing
but airplanes, signifying their depar-
ture from the group that they tried for
years to establish a name for. The rest
of the band went on to other things,
such as forming smaller local groups
or raising families.
Smith decided that he was not done
with the musk business. He began his
solo career in 1995 with a mainly
acoustic but highly melodic self-tided
outing. He followed up with two
albums ("EitherOr" and "Roman
Candle") over the next two years, and
gathered a small following on the West
Coast It was in this time that he
befriended movie director Gus Van
Sant.who hired him to head the
soundtrack of his movie "Good Will
Hunting for which he (Smith)
received an Oscar nomination.
Fresh from mis success, Smith was
recruited by a brand new record label,
Dreamworks.
Seeing as how he was now backed
with the money of three of the richest
men in the world, Elliott saw his
chance to make the album that he
would have made long ago had he
been able to afford all of the back-up
instrumentalists and special effects.
When his newest album "XO" begins
with "Sweet Adeline it sounds like
every other one of his albums,
acoustic and quiet. All of this changes
in about a minute and a half, upon
which time his breathy voice is over-
taken by a barrage of percussion
instruments and piano in an almost
apocalyptic outburst
It doesn't take a musical genius to hear
that his biggest influence is the
Beatles, what with the elaborate
melodies he structures. His delicate
See rewiew. continued on page 7
Its Your Place
To Examine Issues
TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 2 AT 8 P.M. IN HENDRIX
THEATRE
Watch a provocative two-act play, Brotha, that
explores the problems of inner-city life. The drama
examines the difficulty of confronting issues of love
for self and others through poetry, choral speaking,
and controversial dialogue. Admission is free with
your ECU One Card.
lb catch A Filch
FEBRUARY 4-7 AT 8 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Pleasantville (PG-13) is a little eerie, a little funny,
and a little provocative at the same time. You and a
guest get in for free with your ECU One Card.
To Seriously Party
FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 12 AT 9 P.M. AT
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
It's the next best thing to being down on Bourbon
Street. It's ECU'S annual Mardi Gras bash.
Gambling, food, dancing, bingo, video karaoke, laser
tag. bowling. Cajun buffet, OJ dance. Salsa and
Merengue dance, and more. Best of all, it's free!
Your ECU One Card gets you into the party of the
year, ff you want to bring an adult friend, just pick
up a guest pass Feb. 8-12 at the Central Ticket Office
(MF 8:30am-6pm), the Todd Dining Hall Meal Plan
Office (M-F 8an5pm), and on Fob. 12. Student
Recreation Center from 5pm-10pm.
To Learn the Really
Important Things
TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 9 AT 8 P.M. IN HENDRIX
THEATRE
Even the most experienced kissers can learn a thing
or two about locking lips. Check out this multi-
media presentation. Lifedemosl Present your ECU
One Card to the Central Ticket Office in advance of
the show, and gat in free. AN tickets at the door $5.
To Hit the Highway
TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 9 AT 4 P.M. AND 7:30
P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Gas up the car and meander across America in the
Travel-Adventure Film and Theme Dinner movieRoute
66 - A Road to Remember. Your ECU One Card gets
you in free. You can order an optional gourmet, all-
u-can-eat theme dinner for only $12. but you need to
order by 6pm today.
&
Mavel at a
nee Troupe
Dynamic
FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 12 AT 8 P.M. IN WRIGHT
AUDITORIUM
Dedicated to expressing the uniqueness of African
American expression through dance, this is one of
the most critically acclaimed dance companies in the
nation. Advance student tickets are available at the
Central Ticket Office for $10, but hurry, tickets are
going fast. All tickets at the door are $20
MSC Hoars: Mon-Thurj 8 �.mtl miFri 8 mMidnight; Sit, Noon-Midnight. Sun, Ml p.m.
I
��ar�





Miccah Smith
Fountainhtad
Editor
What's the
first thing that comes to mind
when you think of the word
"kiss"?
"Love says Catherine
Disher, freshman elementary
ed. major.
"Good says Jeremy Marlowe,
a freshman sports medicine
major.
"Lips says Janashah
Whitfield, a sophomore major-
ing in elementary ed.
" Women says Walter Stallings, a
freshman pre-engineering major.
Check out "The Art of Kissing a hip
and entertaining crash course in
romance, and William Cane's name
will be on your brain the next time
you lock lips with your sweetie.
Cane is bringing his special blend of
slow-motion video dose-ups, live
demonstrations and, of course, audi-
ence participation to Hendrix
Theater at 8 p.m. on February 8.
When you get a gander at kissing
techniques like the upside-down
kiss, the Iip-o-suction kiss and the
Trobriand Islands kiss, you'll want to
grab your sweetheart on the spot
and practice.
Audience members will get to see
two of their fellow students practice
on each other, and will be given a
chance to try it themselves.
"I always ask people in the audience
if they want par t icipat ion says
Cane. . .
But technique is only one of the sub-
jects covered. Cane also offers tips on
avoiding kissing diseases and
improving your kissabilhy.
"We aim to help says Cane. "We give
advice for men on what you can do
to please the majority of women,
and vice versa
A somewhat safer and sweetly inno-
cent alternative to sexual intimacy,
kissing can provide a sense of con-
nectedness and excitement without
the dangers and emotional compli-
cations that can accompany sex.
As DrRussFederman, director of
ECU Mental Health Services testifies,
"Erotic Contact with someone you
wants your extra time
and your kiss!
love is pleasurable Pleasure within
a healthy loving relationship is posi-
tive
Considered the world's authority on
kissing, Cane, a Boston College
explainsWe show a video of it in
slow-motion so you will not miss a
thing
As for me mysterious Trobriand
Islands kiss, it's caused more than
English professor and former attor-
ney, has published two books ("The
Arts of Kissing" and "The Book of
Kisses"), and had appeared on over
200 television and radio shows. His
research has been featured in Elle,
Glamour and Self Quite frankly, the
man knows what he's talking about. '
So what's his favorite kiss? The lip-o-
suction. '�
"The man sucks the upper lip while
the woman sucks the lower lipOwe
I
its share of reactions across college
campuses.
"We save that one for last in the
show, because we've had three stu-
dents faint in the past says Cane.
"Well have a stretcher on hand
Also on hand will be a Canadian
documentary team, and if you s
up, who knows? You could end up
smooching your honey on Canadian
:�'�:
H n
Movie Review
Caleb Rom
� M Assistant Editor
m
T. Surely most of
jj you who read
BW this have had
the experience
during the Easter holiday of
sitting in the family living
room watching some bearded
dude reading some stone
tablets. That's right folks,
Moses is the man I am refer-
ring to and the age-old story
the movie portrays is called
"The Ten Commandments
Recently, the film company Dream
Works released a cartoon version
telling the same Bible story of
Moses. The final outcome was "The
Prince of Egypt an animated film
much shorter than its predecessor.
The story-line of the film was good
of course, and I say this mostly
because should I shun it, I believe
that I would be reserving a place for
myself in Hell.
Many potential scenes were left out,
perhaps because of time constraints
or budget. For instance, there was no
mention of Moses making bricks
without straw as well as other tidbits
that may have added to the complex
story.
"The Prince of Egypt" is indeed a
cartoon, however it is following a
current trend of cartoons, such as
"Antz"and"A Bug's Life, which are
geared toward an adult audience.
In my humble opinion, the movie is
enjoyable for people of any age
because it depicts a story in a format
most all of us grew up with: anima-
tion. It was also easier for the direc-
tor to create such scenes as the
Bunting Bush, the Pillar of Fire and
the parting of the Red Sea. Also,
since it was an animated feature,
these scenes were more realistic
because the entire movie was unre-
alisticdoes that make sense to
everyone dse or just me?
One aspect that "The Prince of
Egypt" could have done without was
the singing. Cartoon films common-
ly feature singing characters, but in
this case, they went a little over-
board. Somebody must have enjoyed
the musk because the movie
inspired the production of three sep-
arate soundtracks, a score, inspira-
tional and contemporary artists, and
a Nashville soundtrack consisting of
country performers.
The greatest benefits of the film
are its durable story line and the feet
that it educates the viewer with a
Bible story. This is not a movie for
devout Christians only; even an
agnostic could find enjoyment in
this film too.Till next time
television!
answers to Tuesday's East Carolinian Crossword
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nan raaau snanna
QDnnraQno ???dhei
?aaaw guu ana
anaon uaa ncman
?qh ana anoa
G3HODO QUaG DDE
nnDQoaa aaaEEaa
DUL3 WODU riDflGDM
mnn uou aanaa
Baacoa ciBEirannnQ
amtfBuu aann sea
t'
ifefe'iifrj-ii
T I I





Jl
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&
&
so
The Buccaneer
I Still Know What You Did Last
Summer R
Daily: 70,9:30
Sat-Sun: 1:45,4:20,7:00,9:30
Psycho R
Daily: 7:15, 20
Sat-Sun: 1:00,3:05,5:10,
7:15,920
Vampires R
Daily: 70,930
Sat-Sun: 20,430,7.fl0,9:30
Carolina East 4
ABug'sLife C
Daily: 7:15,930
Sat-Sua 10,3:05,5:10,
7:15,930'
EnemyOfThe State R
Dairy. 70,9:45
Sat-Sun: 10,4:00,7:00,9:45
JackFrost PG
Dairy:7:L5
Sat-Sun: 35,7:15
Mighty Joe Young PG
Daily: 7:00,9:40
Sat-Sun: 15,40,7.00,9:40
The Water Boy PG-13
Daily: 9:20
Sat-Sun: 10,5:10,9:20
CarmikeU
A Civil Action PG-13
Daily: 1:15,45,70,9:45
AtRrstSight PG-13
Dairy: 10,3:45,7:00,95
Gloria R
Dailv: �00,430,70.930
In Dreams R
DaBy:130,�IO,7�5,25
Patch Adams PG-13
Daily: 1:30,4:15,70,9:45
Stepmom PG-13
Daily: 1:15,4:10,75,9:50
TheFacukyR
Dairy: 20,430,700.9-J2O
The Prince Of Egypt PG
Daily: 10,3(6,5:10,7:15,930
The Thin Red Line R
Dairy: 10,4:30,8:15
VarsityBmea R
Virus R
Daily: 1:45,4:15,7:05,930
YouVeGotMail PG
Daily: l00,40,70,930
Video Review
Real men watch "Goodfellas"
"Goodfellas"
Patrick McMahon
Staff Writer
What do you get when you put Joe
Pesci, Robert DeNiro, Ray Liotta and
Paul Sorvino in a film directed by
Martin Scorcese? Pure and utter bril-
liance. This rat pack of "mobster-
esque" standouts come together in the
1990 wiseguy movie "Goodfellas the
defining film of each of their careers.
Based on Nicholas Pileggi's book,
"Wiseguy the film brings the viewer
through a twisted web of mob vio-
lence and deception.
Through the dever narration of Henry
Hill (played expertly by Ray Liotta) the
story begins to unfold as the viewer
witnesses a young Hill get involved
with the local wiseguys and begin to
work his way up in "the Family Comic
relief in an otherwise brutal film is
hard to come by, but the moment that
sticks out the most comes fairly early
in the movie. After hooking up with
the local bosses to fence stolen ciga-
rettes, a young Hill is busted by the
cops and appears before a judge for his
Scoflnt shows how nob n reiffy b in "GoodMss"
hearing. Of course the judge is taking
money from the bosses to leave them
alone (what kind of mob movie would
it be without it?), so Hill beats the first
of many charges that lay ahead in his
life. When leaving the courthouse, Hill
is greeted by everyone in "the Family?
The main boss, Paulie Cicero, yells jok-
ingly to Hill's lawyerYou popped his
cherry
The movie shows graphically the
highs and lows of mob life. From
murder to drug addiction to adultery,
everything is laid out in a stunningly
realistic yet cinematic smorgasbord
of greed and selfishness. Under
Scorcese's watchful eye, the film pro-
ceeds with a precision and direction
rarely seen in gangster movies. At
about two and a half hours, the story
moves faster than a beer on penny
draft night at the Elba
The most compelling performances of
the entire cast came from Robert
DeNiro and Joe Pesci. DeNiro, as the
cold and calculating killerthief Jimmy
Conway, shines in his role with daz-
zling skill. Picture his performance in
Casino and multiply it by 10. That's
how good he is. And what would a
mob movie be without Joe Pesci? In
the role of psycho-sociopathic lowlife
Tommy DeVito, he is the humor, vio-
lence, fear, insecurity, and chutzpah of
the whole film rolled into one tiny ball
of fire.
In all, this is the greatest mob movie
ever made (at least as for as I'm con-
cerned). The all-star cast and bullet-
proof direction makes this a must-see
for any gangster fan. To all you people
who think Tarantino is the master of
gangster flicks, sit back and watch the
show from the Scorcese side. You
won't be disappointed.
with Barnes and Nobte
to bring book reviews to
Wednesday's Fountainhead

Carolinian
TOTTntfWoftMM7rnn�Tffi m
We are looking for fellow book lovers to read and review
best sellers for a good cause. Each Semester we will donate
these best sellers to the Ronald McDonald House where
they will be available for the family members of terminally
ill children to read.
If you would like to write a review
please call Miccah at 328-6366
:
�'�!�(
mgnynk
mats , .





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'
ARIES:
(March 21-April 20)
Your manner is quite pleasing and
others see you as being accepting -
don't let them down. This week will
probably showcase your determined
spirit; when you have something to
fight for you win.
TAURUS:
(April 21-May 21)
Follow your hunches regarding
money matters, especially those situ-
ations you have no real experience
with.
GEMINI:
(May22-June21)
You tend to worry about money and
would be better off being careful
how you spend discretionary
income. Think big this week. Your
charming self will open new doors
for you - everyone wants you
around, because everyone likes to
feel good. You'll accomplish alot.
CANCER:
(June 22-July 23)
You need to get things done, but
nobody else seems to want to go
along with the program - looks like
you're on your own.
LEO;
(July24-Afigust23)
Your ability to be objective will hdp
you to resove a (airly sticky situation
between two co-workers. Romance is
in the air - your love life couldn't be
any better. Guard against intense
feelings of jealousy, there really is no
cause for such strong reactions.
VIRGO:
(August 24 - September 23)
Disappointments in your lovclife are
painful, but you realize that you are
not at fault for what happened. Don't
drive yourself too hard at work week,
because you won't receive the credit
clue.
LIBRA:
(September 24 - October 23)
Keep yourself busy this week and
don't think about depressing things.
A change is coming in the near
future.
SCORPIO:
(October 24 - November 22)
However hard it may be, try to be
charitable to those who give you a
hard time. Your warm and under-
standing personality will shine
through, and those around you will
respond favorably.
�i
SAGITTARIUS:
(November 23 - December 21)
Finish up old projects at home and
in the workplace, before starting new
ones - or everything will catch up
with you. Youll accomplish alot and
people will be caught up in your
enthusiasm. If you have been quar-
reling with family members, its time'
to set things straight.
CAPRICORN:
(December 22 - January 20)
There will be plenty of variety, so
there's little chance of being bored.
Both friendship and group endeav-
ors will dominate - your ability to
cooperate comes in handy.
AQUARIUS:
(January 21 - February 19)
Spend time working on routine mat
ters, and you will be surprised how
well the week will go. It's possible
that you may be under pressure in
the workplace, but that never slows
you down; continue at your own
pace.
PISCES:
(February 20-March 20)
Family issues are most on your
mind. Older people depend on you
for certain feedback. Your thinking
maybe just a bit fuzzy, and you are
inclined to go off on flights of fancy -
it's okay to do so. Your jealousy of a
mate is tacky, keep your cool.
IF THIS WEEK
IS YOUR BIRTHDAY:
It seems as if you are work-
ing harder than ever lately.
And that each task requires
twice the time and effort it
would normally take.
Things to
Downtown
4 Thursday
Live Jazz at Staccato's
The Insect Rebellion OJ spinfest at Backdoor
5 Friday
Oas Mag, Maintain, Aggravators, Strung Right
Hand at Backdoor
6 Saturday
Nameless, Spazms, Centercut at
Backdoor
Lake Trout and DJ Who, 11pm 7am Rave
at The Attic
7 Sunday
Open Mic night at Peasant's Cafe
The Groove Riders at The Courtyard
Tavern
9 Tuesday
Studio 54 night at the Attic
Slip Joint at Boli's
10 Wednesday
Comedy Zone at The Attic
Thursday, February 4,1999 5





4 Thursday
Dance'99"at8p.m.inMcGiiinis
Theatre
"Pleasantville" at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
Theater
5 Friday
Dance'99"at 8 p.m. in McGinnis
Theatre
g
-Symphonic Wind Ensemble and Jazz
Ensemble A at 8 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium
"Pleasantville" at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
Theater
6 Saturday
"Danced at 8 p.m in McGinnis
Theatre
-Eastern District High School and
Junior High Honors Band concert at 8
p.m. in Wright Auditorium
"Pleasantville" at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
Theater
7 Sunday
"DanceW at 2 p.m. in McGinnis
Theatre
PieasantvuVat 3 p.m. in Hendrix
Theatre
8Monday
"Dance "99" at 8 p.m. in McGinnis
Theatre
91iesday
Dance "99" at 8 p.m. in McGinnis
Theatre
-Travel-Adventure Film: Route 66- A
Road to Rememberat 4 and 7 JO
pm in Hendrix Theater. Theme dinner
at 6 p.m. in the MSC Great Room
10 Wednesday
-Sundance Cinema: "Dirty Work" at 8
p.m. in Hendrix Theater The Arcadian
-Trio at 8 p.m. in A. J. Fletcher Recital
Hal
one, with some jazz to ballet to mod-
ern tap dance said )eff Woodruff,
managing director of the ECU Dance
Theater.
Another piece in the performance is a
whimsical dance set to the music of
Fats Waller. Dawn Clark's "Magnetic
Personality" tells us about little myster-
ies, like what happens to your fridge
magnets when the lights go out.
Pat Partalion's "Connections" is set to
music by Peter Ostroushko of the
"Prairie Home Companion The dance
is an exquisite piece made for a trio of
female dancers.
"Mixed Signals by Patti Wks, is a
new modern work connected with our
interpretations of physical gestures.
She demonstrates to us how different
gestures have distinct meanings in cer-
ODDITIES
Strippers raise
money for
Leukemia Society
MILWAUKEE (AP) The executive
director of the Leukemia Society of
America's Wisconsin chapter is a bit
miffed about a fund-raiser for the
group planned by a group of strip-
pers, but isn't objecting to the event.
"You don't want to dissuade people
from raising money for your cause,
but you always want it to be in good
taste Bede Bart h said Tuesday.
"We are grateful for the donation, but
it is always better to check with us
Tirst before using our name
Barth said she learned of the party
by reading a newspaper advertise-
ment
A stripper who performs under the
name Candee Apples said she called
the society last week to ask permis-
sion before placing the ad, but
apparently no one got the message.
"Well have pretty girls hanging out
in cocktail dresses, drinking beer
with die guys she said. "My mom
died of leukemia and I just wanted
to do something nice for the society
6 Thursday, February 4,1999
l r�ti j ;i i
Apples said she figures it will cost her
$10,000 for decorations, food and
drinks for the Super Bowl Sunday
event and any money left over, which
she hopes will be about1,000, will
be donated to the Leukemia Society.
She also said a surprise party at
which the strippers will dance is
planned after the main event.
76-year-old man in
middle school
marching band
EUGENE, Ore. (AP) Through
the blare of rowdy kids tuning
their instruments, the 76-year-
old man with regal white hair, a
black cane and a tarnished
French horn slowly makes his
way to his seat in the brass sec-
tion. � ' I ' ' '
Retired pipe fitter John Suta is in his
third year with the Roosevelt Middle
School band. The eighth-graders he
plays with no longer see him as an
oddity, but as an inspiration who
plays with a passion for musk and
thick fingers gnarled by a lifetime of
See oddities, continued on page 7
Dance, continued from pagel
tain contexts.
"DanceW will continue the long
legacy of superior performance and
excellent choreography that has made
the series extremely popular with stu-
dents.
"I've heard a lot of wonderful things
about the ECU dance department and
I'm really looking forward to seeing
this performance. The medley of acts
really interests mer said freshman
Brian Mcgirtn.
"People will enjoy the varietyT said
Woodruff.
Tickets for'Dance"99" are on sale now
at the McGinnis Theater box office. You
can get them in person or through the
box office phone line at 328-6829.
The show opens at 8 p.m.on Thursday,
Feb. 4, and runs through Tuesday, Feb.
9. The McGinnis Theater box office is
open Monday through Friday from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Check out the ECU
Department of Theater and Dance
online at
www.fheatre-dance@ecu.edu.
FEBRUARY 12, 1999 9 PM-2AM
�Ka0(d0
G)��A
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
Fun Flicks Video Karaoke
?Salsa and Merengue Dance
vDJ Dance w J. Arthur
? Loo-Zee-Anna Laser Tag
Bourbon Street Bingo
Lady Luck Casino
King Cake
Glow Bowling.
Cajun Buffet
King and Queen
Students may attend for tree by using their valid ECU One Card. One adult guest will be admitted wtth a guest pass. Student
and guest must enter together. Guest passes will be available beginning Monday. February 8 through Friday. February 12.
1999, at the Central Ticket Office from 8:30am to 6pm and Todd Dining HaU Meal Han Office from 9am to 5pm. On February
12, guest passes will be available at the Student Recreation Center from 5pm to 10pm.
���b �
iiikBHiM





ne dinner�
KmPeasant's
ork"at8 ArcadianFebruary9 Schleigho: Don't try to pronounce it! If your orthodontist was a hippie, you might have heard this kind of subdued
Recitaljam-jazz issuing from a speaker behind a potted plant in his office.
Come to think of it, if you've ever
shopped at Harris Teeter at 8 on a Monday evening, you may have heard the same type of stuff sandwiched between instrumental renditions of
t office is
yfrom he ECU"Jeremy" and "Smells Like Teen Spirit They just released a third albumfn
Dancethe Interest of Time
Student
uaiy 12,
February

I �iiil Preview
Peasant's
February4
Block: He's fast, fresh and anti-folk. At
least, that's what his press release says
about him. The NY native has a guitar
and is not afraid to use it. Let's just
hope he doesn't turn out to be Sheryi
Crow's male counterpart!
Tuning is Everything" is his second
album
oddities, continued from page 6
hard work.
"He is exactly like a middle school
band player, even though he is older,
said 13-year-old Anna Richardson.
"Without musk I would just as soon
be dead Suta said, summing up a phi-
losophy that through the years has led
him to take up opera, the piano and
the harmonica.
And it was what drove him to walk
into the middle school's beginning
band dass and ask for the chance to
learn how to play a horn he had always
loved. Without hesitating, the teacher
told him.Take a seat
Since then, Suta has advanced from
"Mary Had a Little Lamb to
Beethoven, from sixth-grade to eighth-
grade band.
Josh Mack took over leadership of the
Roosevelt band program this year and
inherited Suta I just knew he had to
be there, Mack said.
Suta's love for music goes back to his
childhood in Aurora, HI when his
mother would sing songs in her native
Hungarian.
He grew up studying singing with an
accompanist for the Chicago Opera
and speaking German, Hungarian,
Romanian and Italian in his immi-
grant neighborhood.
After World War II, he studied to
become an opera singer, but soon dis-
covered his love of music wasn't
enough to pay the bills, so he raised
two sons on a pipe fitter's wages.
But music never left Suta's life. After he
retired, he teamed with a friend on
piano and sang at weddings, picnics
and senior centers. And on his own he
even sang the national anthem at a few
University of Oregon basketball games.
Through the years, he always remem-
bered the days when his brother and a
friend would go house to house at
Christmas, playing carols on a violin
and French horn.
Those memories came flooding back
four years ago when he spotted an old
French horn in a Salvation Army store.
"I had that horn in my ear Suta said.
"I saw the tag. It said 85 bucks. I said
to the lady What's your best price. I
don't have 85 bucks in my budget. Will
you go $75?" She said Yes
He tried a few adult classes to learn the
instrument but they were all too
advanced. That's what led him to
Roosevelt.
Despite heart trouble and nerve dam-
age in his legs that make it difficult to
walk, Suta rarely misses practice and is
&ecome a member.
Launch your
organization
in-to cyber&pace.
WWW.
clubhouse.
at every concert
The young horn players look to him
for guidance and, in turn, they help
him.
About a year ago, he stumbled in the
small cluttered house where he lives
atone, falling on his French horn and
crushing the bell. He dropped the
instrument off at a local music store,
not knowing how he would afford to
pay for the repairs.
When Suta returned to the store the
next day, the horn was fixed the
Roosevelt Middle School band mem-
bers had pitched in to pay for the
work.
"It almost knocked me over, Suta said,
cryingYou hear about all the things
youngsters do, all this and that But
you don't hear the beauty of the chil-
dren
review, continued from page.2
lyrics are rivaled by few, usually
dealing with emotionally distraught
characters and lonely underdogs.
There is no real recurring style to
this record. Smith seems bent on
using his newfound financial back-
ing to shower us with a wide range
of styles ranging from simple
acoustic ballads ("Pitsdeh") to wist-
ful a cappella ("I Didn't
Understand") to semi-rockers ("A
Question Mark") to pianostring
compositions, such as "Waltz 2"
and "Baby Britain
"XD"is one of 1998's best, and if you
are a fan of complex Beade-esque
melodies, then it is not to be missed.
It appears that Elliott Smith is one of
a rare breed, the singersongwriter
that is too preoccupied with how he
feds his music should sound than to
play down to the masses. Lefshope
that others hear this album and fol-
low him in his quest for musical
integrity.
WMB
weekly top hits
15.MXPX
"Never Learn"
14. Ben Lee
"Cigarettes
13. Groop Dog Drill
"Personal"
12. Tin Star
"Head"
11. In Their Eyes
10. Hipbone
"Radios"
9. Fear of Pop
"In Love"
8. Fighting Gravity
"Forgotten"
7. Lagwagon
"May 16"
6. Jason Faulkner
"Eloquence"
5. Cowboy Mouth
"Whatcha Gonna
Dor
4. Zebrahead
"Get Back"
3. LimpBizkit
"Faitl
2. Ani Dtfranco
"Angry Anymore"
1. Soul Coughing
"Circles"
�)� .1
1 '
; I . �
Thursday reburary 4,1999





piuitifxG)inrpfflF
Go to AAw.cjrr5use:ecuedw 3nd
Thenieiitefyour
yvM easy-
Aione more free service of the ECU Student Media
events calendar link,
our campus calendar.


Title
The East Carolinian, February 4, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 04, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1320
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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