The East Carolinian, February 2, 1999






Thursday:
High: 63
Low: 50
Friday:
High: 63
Low: 50
Online Survey
www.tec.ecu.edu
"Are you tiring of the Budweiser frog Super
Bowl commercials?"
'Do you support Stltct 20007"
83 Yes 16 No
Carolinian
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 2 ,1999 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 34
NWA wrestJers rumbied at Aycodc Middle School
Friday night with Lodi as the main attraction.
Sports, Page 9
Athletics owns
Pirate logo rights
Revenue not shared by
university at large
Peter Dawvot
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Questions have arisen over the
ECU Athletics Department's abili-
ty to mass market the use of the
Pirate logo.
The logo, owned by the
Athletics Department, has generat-
ed over $100,000 from sales last
year alone. Lee Workman, assistant
athletics director, said that the logo,
owned by the department since
1984, now has roughly 250 different
sponsors who use the ECU name
when marketing products.
Supporters include companies
such as Pepsi and supermarket
chains such as Winn-Dixie.
Disabled student
critiques campus
Shawn Hessee shares
his experiences
Kris t v a n i e
s 1 I F W K I I K H
Nineteen years ago Shawn Hessee,
sophomore at ECU, was born three
months premature, causing his
lungs to be underdeveloped.
Because of this. Hessee has
lived his life with Cerebral Palsy.
"When I was born, my lungs
were underdeveloped and I was
given oxygen Hessee said. "The
amount of oxygen I was given
affected my brain and caused me
to have Cerebral Palsy
Hessee has problems with his
motor skills. For example, he has
trouble buttoning his shirts and
tying his shoes.
He lives in central campus and
has an electric wheelchair that easi-
ly transports him around campus.
Hessee says he has difficulties
with the campus. One of the prob-
lems is where his classes are locat-
ed. When he is traveling across
campus, he often has to go out of
his way to get to the building.
"Sometimes seating can be diffi-
cult Hessee said. "In General
Classroom Building, the wheel-
chair seating is in the back of the
room. It makes me feel isolated
He did comment on how well
the campus bathrooms are handi-
SEE SHAWN HESSEE PAGE 2
Legality of Athletics
web page questioned
Advertising on private
site earns extra money
Peter Daw v o t
assistant news editor
Recent events involving the
Department of Athletics have
prompted questions about the
legality of the actions of a web
page hosted by the ECU athletic
department.
ECU pirates have set up a pri-
vate web page through Eye
Integrated. Moreover, this offers
the athletics program to not only
offer their web page at a private
site, but also gives them a chance
to incorporate advertisements into
the page, something that they
could not do on the university's
web page. State rules disallow the
use of web pages by non-profit
organizations to promote advertise-
ments, but Says nothing about
departments setting up their own
private pages in order to circulate-
more advertising dollars from
sponsors.
ECU, however, is not the only
school taking advantage of this
loophole. Others such as UNC-
Chapel Hill, Appalachian State
and many others across the nation
seem to be following a growing
trend of athletic programs which
have broken away from the
school's main web page.
Angie Wellman, director of
Athletic Marketing, was not com-
fortable with giving out the total
price that the athletic program has
SEE ATHLETICS WEBPAGE PAGE 3

Leaf oimching weather returns to campus
What makes this case so unique
is not so much the number of sup-
porters as the owners of the trade-
mark. Most other universities own
the licensing as well as the logo,
allowing the school to receive the
money generated from sales from
sponsorship, and distribute funds
according to places that they are
deemed needed.
ECU, however, does not actual-
ly own its trademarks or logos. The
logos are owned by the Athletics
Department, which oversees pos-
session of all funding received from
the sales; therefore, they are
allowed to distribute sales profits
any way they deem appropriate.
None the less, the school has
seen an increase in the number of
sponsors since the Athletics
Department's acquisition of the of
the sponsorship rights.
SEE ATHLETICS LOGO PAGE 2
i v� i, i at
�' �� m 1 Dt '

s W &;
PHOTO BY MIKE JAC06SEN
Hearing impaired students speak out
Disability Support
Services offers help
I) r. V () VV H I T E
s I I l �� I l h K
Have you ever imagined what it
would be like if you couldn't see,
hear or even walk?
There arc around 365 students
with a disability on this campus that
could tell you what that feels like.
Although Disability Support
Services offers a wide range of
assistance, they cannot aid the stu-
dents with becoming familiar with
other students. Being a stranger to
the campus is difficult enough, but
to accompany that challenge with a
disability is a factor that most of us
cannot begin to comprehend.
I had the opportunity to spend a
couple of hours with Christy
Burleson, a junior majoring in busi-
ness management, who is hearing
impaired. She explained to me,
through an interpreter, what it was
like to have a disability. Being deaf
has not held her back in any way.
Christy wants people to understand
that she is as capable as any other
person. She goes out with her
friends and loves to go dancing.
"We try to show that we can do
a lot of normal things too, just as
everyone else Burleson said.
Although it may be difficult
sometimes to communicate with
others, there is always a way.
Disability Support Services sup-
plies a sign language interpreter to
accompany all hearing impaired
students to class. In lecture classes,
it is often difficult for Christy
because she is having to look three
different places at once: the inter-
preter, the teacher and the prob-
lem. More frustrating than any-
thing for her is when people
become aware she is deaf, they
automatically assume she can not
offer any assistance to them.
There arc 23 registered hearing
impaired students on campus.
Although the Disability Support
SEE DISABILITY SUPPORT PAGE 3
Delia Liuzza interprets for a deaf
student during a class in Graham 301.
PK0T0 BY MICHAEL SMITH
University's use of Eastnet recognized
Electronic network
service provider praised
Tommy Yarboroi'Gh
stake writer
Universities in a publication titled: Eastnet fulfills that mission of
Commitment and Success: A colleges to "help students succeed.
Compendium of Best Practices at to support them in a learning envi-
W-ftlfc
Eastnet, an electronic network ser-
vice provider operated and main-
tained by the ECU School of
Education, Micro Teaching Center,
was recognized as one of the "Best
practices" among the members
institutions of the American
Association of State Colleges and
AASOU Institutions
During the associa-
tions annual meeting in
San Fransisco, presi-
dents and chancellors of
public institutions were
presented with an agen-
da for action that asked
them to "ensure that
they could assess the
quality of their educa-
tional product, that their
institutions were serving the com-
munities and regions where they
arc located, that they were taking
steps to ensure access and diversity,
and that they were making efforts
to communicate to the public and
policy makers what they were
doing
ronment that best meets their
"We provide that service be free to
public school teachers
Gregg F. Lowe
Media producer for the Micro Teaching Center
needs and to prepare them for both
the work force and the world
Eastnet was designed and con-
structed by Cregg F. Lowe, media
producer for the Micro Teaching
Center. The Micro Teaching
Center is a service unit in the
School of Education. It provides
Micro Teaching experiences for
prospective teachers as well as tech-
nical support to the faculty and staff
of the School of Education.
Lowe said Eastnet's first big ser-
vice was providing educators with
access to the internet.
"We provide that sen ice be free
to public school teachers he said.
"Web services and e-mail were
added later
Charles Coble was dean of the
School of Education when the pro-
ject got off the ground.
"I honestly believe it's a model
for the nation he said. "I was
proud of ECU then and I'm proud
of it now for supporting it
"We know that it's a very, very
good vehicle said Marilyn
Sheerer, current dean of the School
of Education. "I'm glad they recog-
nize it
SEE EASTNET. PAGE 4

:





2 Tmsisv. Frtfiinr 2. 1888
news
Tin Euf CtMllnl.n -
3 Tuesday. Fi
news Board of Governors prepares
briefs
NC DRIVING CLASSES
OFFERED AS ALTERNA-
TIVE TO COURT
GREENSBORO (AP) In 17
North Carolina counties, motorists
caught violating state traffic laws
can hit the books rather than face
the judge.
At Guilford Technical
Community College, students pay
$145 for a four-hour refresher
course.
"So what do you do if everyone
else is speeding around you?"
Greensboro Police officer Debbie
Butler asked a class of 16 speeders
atGTCC.
"Speed with them, 'cause you'll
get run over if you go too slow
Kenneth Perdue answered.
"You tell that to the officer
when he pulls you over Buder
said with a laugh.
This is defensive driving, a
course drawing attention from dri-
vers, attorneys and public officials
in North Carolina. The students,
ticketed for speeding or violating
minor traffic laws, take a one-night
refresher course to avoid paying
more for auto insurance or worrying
about points on their license. When
they successfully complete the
course and pass a test, the district
attorney agrees to reduce the
infraction to improper equipment,
punishable by a fee and court costs.
The course is better than an
increase in insurance rates, said
George Ferguson, the course's
coordinator at Rockingham
Community College.
THREE CHARGED
IN SLAYINGSOFTWO
REPUTED GANG LEADERS
:
� ORLANDO, Florida (AP)
' Police have charged three men
� with murder in connection with
� the execution-style shooting of
1 two reputed gang leaders.
i The three were being held
� without bail at the Orange County
; jail Sunday. They were each
; charged Saturday with two counts
; of first-degree murder.
"It was a gang hit said
Orlando police Lt. Cheryl
DeGroff-Berry. "It definitely was
drug related
SUSPECT CHARGED
FOR RAPING, KIDNAP-
PING MISS WORLD
TEL AVIV, Israel (AP)
Prosecutors charged a suspect
Sunday in the rape of an 18-year-
old Israeli who won the Miss
World beauty contest.
Uri Shlomo, an Israeli citizen
who immigrated to Israel from
Egypt in the 1970s and also goes
by the name Noor Shlomo, has
said he is innocent
Linor Abargil has said Shlomo
raped her in Milan on Oct. 6, two
months before she was crowned
Miss World in December.
Abargil was in Milan audition-
ing for modeling jobs when she
asked Shlomo, who operates a
travel agency there, to arrange for
a flight back to Israel.
After Shlomo told her there
were no flights from Milan to
Israel, he offered to drive her to
Rome to catch another flight,
Abargil said in her statement to
police.
Abargil said shortly after the
two were outside Milan, Shlomo
pulled off the highway and raped
her at knifepoint.
for new wave of students
UNC system expects
48,000 new students
Dkvon White
staff w�itr�
Eva Klein, a higher education con-
sultant, recommended to the Board
of Governors that the University of
North Carolina should consider
shoring up it's under-enrolled
schools instead of closing them as it
addresses infrastructure problems at
its 16 campuses.
Klein also told them that when
baby boomers' children reach col-
lege age in 10 years the UNC sys-
tem can expect 48,000 new stu-
dents. She said that time is run-
ning out to bring buildings and
facilities up to par.
Several board members, includ-
ing member and former governor
James Holshouser, reacted enthusi-
astically to Klein's ideas at
Thursday's workshop.
"I think you just opened the
door and we ought to charge right
through Holshouser said.
Instead of considering whether
to shut down some of the smaller
campuses, Klein said UNC officials
should direct students to them and
increase their enrollment, which
would be the first step toward
preparing for the coming wave of
students. She shared introductory
findings from her study of the 16
campuses which revealed a trouble-
some mosaic of outdated buildings,
deficient science labs and residence
halls.
"This university is undercapital-
ized for the assignment that we
face. The students are there at the
doorstep. What are we going to do
to accommodate them?" said BOG
President Molly Broad, of the
report
No dollar figures are available
because the study is not complete.
Yet, a separate state report esti-
mates $700 million in repairs are
needed to improve buildings to the
level at which they were intended
to operate. The final tab is expect-
ed to be more than $1 billion.
All of Klein's findings must be
submitted by the board to the State
Legislature by April 15 so a decision
can be made. The report will be
accompanied by a plan for fixing
problem areas.
"The board engaged in a very
interesting first discussion of poten-
tial opportunities which led to no
conclusions, but opened up dia-
logue for many new ideas Klein
said. "All of the campuses are work-
ing very hard to put together a lot of
information
Athletics Logo
continued from page 1
"Over the last five years since
ECU has been more visible, win-
ning bowl games as well as
improving athletics, that is when
we have seen a rise in sales
Workman said.
Though this has been going on
for quite some time, the depart-
ment has had few complaints, pos-
sibly because few people in and
outside the university know of the
practices. Very few universities in
the area actually have turned the
licensing and logo ovev to another
area of the school. N.C. State
Director of Computer Records
Shawn Hessee
continued Irom page I
cap accessible.
Hessee receives help from
Disability Support Services. They
find someone to take notes for him
and they make sure all of his class-
es are accessible. He is offered
alternative test taking which
includes oral tests. Student Health
Services offers physical therapy for
a minimal cost for him.
Hessee feels more of the resi-
dence halls need to be more hand-
icap accessible. Since none of the
residence halls on College Hill are
handicap accessible, it is hard for
Hessee to make friends that live
there.
When visiting his friends in
Gotten, they have to help him up
and down the stairs.
Hessee isn't able to hold his tray
in the dining hall. In Mendenhall
the staff always gets his tray and
food for him.
"They are a great staff Hessee
said. "They always help me. I
think other dining services should
model after them
Hessee also has a problem going
downtown. Most of the stores
aren't equipped with a handicap
ramp, and he often has to go in
through the freight entrance.
He has been to clubs before, but
it is such a hassle when he gets in,
he doesn't like to go.
Many of his friends don't even
see his wheelchair and Cerebral
Palsy when they look at him.
"I have known Shawn for a year
and a half sophomore Holly Hall
said. "Every time I see him he is
always cheerful. He always shows a
great deal of confidence about his
disability, enough to talk about it"
Hall takes Hessee to the mall
and at Christmas she wrapped his
presents for him.
Wendy Herron, RA for Gotten
Hall, who has also known Hessee
for over a year said, "I am very
proud of him. He is an inspiration
to us all
Hessee feels the campus is very
handicap accessible. However, he
said, "They need to continue to
strive with the construction to
make things a little better
Roger Depo was surprised by the
fact that ECU did not own the
rights to the logo.
"I had assumed that the school
had the rights and has always
"Over the last five years since
ECU has been more visible,
winning bowl games as well as
improving athletics, that is when
we have seen a rise in sales"
Lee Workman
Assistant Athletics Director
Greenville's
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CALL TODAYIII
355-2198
1510 Bridle Circle
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Pasta � Pizza � Salads � Sandwiches � Homemade � Soups � Desserts
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owned the rights Depo said.
Others throughout the university
system also believed that the school
was in charge of ownership of the
rights to schools' logos and licensing
rights. UNC-Greensboro does not
receive the total funding the way
the ECU athletics program does.
Ty Buckner, assistant director at
UNC-Greensboro, said that they
arc not as independent as ECU, but
find royalties to contribute to the
athletics program.
"The University owns the
licensing rights Buckner said.
"Royalties we receive from the
games go towards improving the
athletic program and to student
scholarships
RouteJifL
A Road to Remember
Get your kicks on
Route 66. (Ask your
mom and dad what
that means.)
All-you-can-eat dinner menu:
Caesar salad, fried chicken, beef
stroganofF, green bean casserole,
mashed potatoes, apple pie, rolls,
corn muffins, water, coffee, and tea
fc
� "
Tuesday, February 9, 1999 Hendrix Theatre, 4pm & 7:30pm
TRAVEL ADVENTURE FILM
& THEME DINNER SERIES
Tfo�sli'fiviAfrErr
HOW YOU GET THERE
Films are free to students with a current, valid ECU One
Card. Dinner tickets are $12 each. To reserve your dinner
ticket come to the CT0 in Mendenhall Student Center by
Thursday. February 4,1999 and pay with cash, a meal
card, or your declining balance. Dinner will be served at
6:00pm In the Great Room.
CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE HOURS Monday - Friday 8:30am
to 6:00pm 252.328.4788 or 1.800.ECU.ARTS:
Deafspeech impaired access 252.328.4736
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If you're interested in an outstanding
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JOB FAIR
Thursday, February 4,1999
12pm-7pm at the ALLTEL Call Center
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Our'management team will be on hand to answer your questions and talk
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ALL
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All of above served with choice of
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3 Tu�td�y. Fibtuiry 2, 1999
news
Tht East Cirtliulm
mber
& 7:30pm
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Reality Check
"Hey, I went off campus to look for a place to
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Why wander into the unknown? Why wonder where
your next meal is coming from and how you're going
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UNIVERSITY HOUSING AND CAMPUS DINING SERVICES � TELEPHONE: ECU-HOME; ECU-FOOD
up 99-140
Disability Support
coniinued from paga 1
Services supplies an interpreter
upon request, it is often a demur.
There are only 5 full-time inter-
preters and 10 free-lance inter-
preters throughout the community.
Out of the 23 registered students
17 of those use interpreters.
"We try to show that we can do
a lot of normal things too, just
as everyone else
Christy Burleson
junior majoring in business management
Students not only need the
interpreters for class, but for also all
programs offered on campus that
they wish to attend.
"Our greatest challenge is to
make sure that all of the hearing
impaired students have access to
interpreters said Liz Shilliday,
associate director of Disability
Support Services.
There is a sign language club
that many of the deaf students par-
ticipate in. It is a great way for
them to meet people and get other
students involved.
Beth Henriksen, a club mem-
ber, said "1 have made many good
friends by going to the club meet-
ings. It is a wonderful experience
The club has many events
planned and encourages everyone
to join in their fun.
"It's not a disability unless one
allows it to be a disability
Athletics Webpage
coniinued Iron paga 1
spent in setting up the web site.
However, she did say chat the con-
tract was agreed upon through a
partial cash deal along with mem-
bership into the Pirate Club, which
helps sponsor athletics at the uni-
versity.
The popularity of the page is a
plus for advertisers.
Advertisements which run for
prices between $3,000-$ 18,000
have encouraged many possible
sales. Companies such as Taco Bell
and Pizza Hut are among some of
the advertisers on the page. These
companies have managed to get
over 52,000 exposures by people
who have viewed the web site by
promoting bannec advertisements.
Other schools like UNC-
Greensboro, have began to look
into the option of also starting up a
private web site for their athletic
programbut are currently under
review from the school which is
questioning the legality of the
plan.
"Currently the university is
debating right now as to what to
do.
"They have never had to deal
with this type of advertising before
since the addition of web pages in
a fairly new form of advertising"
said Ty Buckner, assistant athletic
director.
Lee Workman, assistant athletic
director of Promotion and Special
Events, is involved with the ECU
web page. Workman does not see
any problems with the page being
used as a way for the university to
make money through the use of
advertisement Also she said that
the university has had no com-
plaints or problems concerning the
athletic departments decision to
start up of the page.
"Greensboro is a different ath-
letic program Workman said.
"Within the athletic realm differ-
ent universities do different things
at different levels
Roger Depo, director of
Computer Resources at N. C State
has seen many other schools in the
ACC which have followed this pat-
tern of transition to another page
for a chance to boost revenues.
"Up until recently, it was very
questionable to do advertising on
the web Depo said. "We do not
get pay from the state legislature or
from tuition. We pay for everything
ourselves through revenues from
games
Currently, N.C State is among
one of the few schools in the ACC
which are not on a private web
page for their athletic program.
ECU attorney Ben Irons said
that there is nothing illegal about
the web page and that the athletic
program has done nothing wrong.
Irons said that the school has
looked into the matter and is plan-
ning to set up guidelines for which
these web pages must follow.
"We have been working on an
advertising policy which would
make all of this clear so that we
would know that this would be
absolutely clear to everyone
Irons continued by seeing no
fault in the programs page.
"The primary concerns we have
is to use the university resources to
advertise. It might indirectly link
you to someone elses advertise-
ments, but the purpose of this
(web page) is to show people more
about our sports program Irons
said.
www.clubhouse.ecu.edu
Brand New Luxury Apartments
Now Leasing
utilities included fully furnished
Priyate Bathroom
4 Bedroom 4 Bathroom
Individual Leasing
Roommate Matching
Designer Interiors
State of the Art Amenities
Free Cable
Free Computer lab
Free Monitored Alarm
ECU Bus Line
Pirates Cove
3305 E. If Sow � Oenvife, NC 27858
i � �





4 Tmiay, Fitrmry 2. 1899
Eastnet
cominuBd from page 1
Sheerer said Eastnet was "really
ahead of the game" in its role as
integrator and recourse provider for
online education in the region.
Sheerer also said the ECU
administration has made a commit-
ment to provide $50,000 for replac-
ing and repairing equipment and to
fund help-desk support
Helen Parke, the science and
technology center's director, has
overseen an Eastnet project that
allows educators and pupils to enter
a"virtual field trip" to an estuary.
HOWS
Tht Esst Carolinian
with real-time video images broad-
casted through the Internet from
the Outer Banks location.
Randy Yerrick, an ECU profes-
sor who also teaches earth science
to students in the 11th and 12th
grades at D.H. Conley High
School, has used Eastnet from the
beginning. At that time, the main
attraction for teachers was Internet
access.
"When it first came in there
were just absolutely no Internet
connections whatsoever he said.
"It was an absolute godsend when
it first arrived
The Eastnet Web site is
www.eastnet.ecu.edu
Brown & Brown
YiTORN! YS
campus
briefs
Tuesday Feb. 2
A two-act poetry play will be
performed at 8 p.m. in the student
center and will consider how
young people are dealing with the
problems in their lives. The play
Brotha! It was written by James
Chapmyn who also wrote Womyn
With Wing and Black Men Rising.
Advanced public tickets are $3 at
the Central Ticket office in
Mendenhall Student Center.
Student tickets are free.
Sigma Tau Delta, the English
honor society, will hold its first
annual used book sale in front of
the Wright Place Tuesday and
Wednesday to raise funds to
attend the national conference in
St. Louis in March.
Thursday Feb. 4
The ECU dance theater will
present its annual performance in
McGinnis Theatre through Feb.
9th. The Dance Theatre will
showcase ECU performers in jazz,
modern,tap and ballet. Public tick-
ets are $8 and $9 and are available
through the playhouse box office
at 328-6582.
A faculty will feature
Christopher Ulffers on bassoon
and Elizabeth Ulffers on piano at 8
p. m. in the A.J. Fletcher Recital
Hall. The program is free and open
to the public.
Friday Feb. 5
Several hundred educators will
attend ECU's annual Mary Lois
Staton Reading Language Arts
Conference at the Hilton Inn and
Ramada Plaza. Sessions will
include appearances and presenta-
tions by children's book author
Maya Ajmera and text book writers
Dottic hall and Lester Laminack.
Laminack will give the keynote
address at 8:55 a.m. entitled
Leading Children to Literate
Lives: Teaching in Troubled
Times. Ajmera, a Greenville
native and author of Children
Form Australia to Zimbabwe will
be featured at 11:40 a.m. author's
luncheon.
1ruth,Equality,Justke
102B East. Victoria Ct.
Bedford Park, Greenville
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Under Age Possession
�Possession of DrugsParaphenalia
�Drinking in Public
�Felonies and Misdemeanors
�Free Consultation
Phone 752-0952 752-0753
e-mail - ghb.greenvillenc.com
Lessons That
A Lifetime.
OFFICER TRAINING SCHOOL
Put that college degree to use by enrolling into the Air Force Officer
Training School. Upon successful completion of the Officer Training
School, you will become a commissioned Air Force officer with
earned respect and benefits like - great starting pay, medical and
dental care, management and travel
opportunities. For more on how to qualify
and get your career soaring with the
Air Force Officer Training School, call
1-800-423-USAF, or visit our website at
wwwjirforca.com www.airforce.com
AIM HIGH
FEBRUARY 4-9,1999
MCGINNIS THEATRE. EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
EAST CAROLINA
THE A
D
TICKETS
GENERAL PUBLIC $9 and $8
CHILDREN $6 and $5
ECU FACULTYSTAFF $8 and $7
ECU STUDENTS $6 and $5
TO CHAIEE TICKETS, (All 252 328 6829
cmce
e n
t

n�
a way of saying
"Be Miije" this
Valentines Day that's
cheaper than a tatoo.
a . �. ?? � v . � ?. �,� a
COMPLETE THIS FORM
AND BRING IT TO THE
MENDENHALL STUDENT
CENTER INFORMATION
DESK OR THE EAST
CAROLINIAN OFFICE
BEFORE FEBRUARY 8
AT 5 P.M.
S-
COMPLETE THIS FORM AND BRING IT TO OUR OFFICE OR DROP IT WITH YOUR PAYMENT IN OUR BOX AT THE INFORMATION
DESK IN MENDENHALL STUOENT CENTER. LOVE LINES WILL RUN IN THE FEBRUARY 11 EDITION OF THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Phone
ID.
Address.
ONLY FIRST NAMES OR INT I A L �. MA Y BE USED.NO LASTNAMES.
$2 for 25 words or1i34S6
fewer 5t each for78a101112
each word over 25131416161718
All ads must be192021222324
prepaidI2.27282830
Messages may be rejectededited on basis of decency. Only first names, or initials may he
used. The paper reserves the right to edit or omit any ad which is deemed objectionable,
inappropriate, obscene or mislead- No purchase is necessary to enter the contest.
DEADLINE
FEB. 8 5 P.M.
� �
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Tutidiv Jim
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' For each of
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3RMATI0N 10LINIAN 1
E S 6 12 18 24 30 11i i i
Tmidiv Jinuir. 28 1899
opinion
TUEnlCinlUUl
i

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TRACY llAIRR AsiiMmSpomEditor
CHRIS KNOTTI Stall ItusnaRR
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STEPHANIE Will! LOOK MCwignManagx
JANET RKSPBSS Adwniiing Managn
kiss Blackburn EirwnDrognn
BOIRY TUROI.E Wtbmasiei
ttakj itw ECU MBmwl fMd SH. lln Em CinArnw publishes 11.000 capm Ml limdli slid thwsdss ll� !��� lAMMl in Mdi swi is �
opmian ol Ihs nljOnlY ol It �"�! flosrt wd it willw in lurn by Ednwul Botfd TCfllNn tin Em Cinflt,n MttoMMS Itltsrs 10 tlN dim. kRMSd 10
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Limn should bt iddnsud to Opmon sdiw .Ihs EM CirokMO. SMkm Puokinom BwMmi ECU. Gfstnwh 1JW843S3 Foi mtofliwion. csP
ouwiew
For each of the five games that ECU's football team lost last season, Pirate head coach Steve
Logan gets over $1,000 more this year and in the years to come.
His new contract, which was also extended until January 1, 2003, promises him $140,000 a
year with a bonus of $19,994 for an ECU bowl game appearance and an additional $5,000
bonus if the Pirates win more conference games than any other team in Conference USA.
That sounds like a good deal for Logan.
It also sounds like the Athletics Department, who suggested the raise, and the Board of
Trustees, whose members approved the new contract, go the way of accomplishment-based
extra appreciations for Logan in the form of the bonuses. In other words, if ECU wins, Logan
will get more money.
On the other side of the contract, there is nothing mentioned that he will get paid less
money if the Pirates have a negative season, which nobody hopes for.
Don't get us wrong. We think that Logan does a good job on and off the field and deserves
the raise. But do ECU professors get a pay-raise if more of their students pass their biology
classes than those students of the biology professors at NC State? Do ECU professors get
incentives if their students do a better job than other professors' students?
If the Athletics Department wants an accomplishment-based contract for our football coach,
we think that it should be a two-way contract. In other words, he also should get paid less if
we have a losing season and don't make it to a bowl game. If the money is supposed to
encourage a winning season, does that mean he hasn't been working as hard under his current
Pav?
Our football program brings in a lot of money to ECU, and we can be proud of it and our
coach. We will see some great teams in Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium this coming fall; we have the
schedule we were looking for for such a long time. Logan helped to establish a football
program that is one of the fastest growing in the country. We think that he deserves a healthy
salary.
Coach Logan makes more money than most of us will ever make, and he does an amazing
job in a town that takes football very seriously. But which is it - that the money provides
incentive for a better year, or that it's simply a reward for heading the most popular and
profitable organization at the university?
The more money the university forks over to football, the less money it offers to academic
programs. It seems that the officials with clout have forgotten that this institution is, after all,
a university, and the vast majority of students on this campus have come to take advantage of
a program other than football.
Wrbte & Letter
to ike. Editor
Got something to say? Need somewhere to
say it? Bring your letter to the eastScarolinian
located on the 2nd floor of The Student
Publications Building
A
:
OPINION
Columnist
Stephen
Kleinschmit
Superbowl XXXIII boring
Oh yeah, there was something
interesting between the
commercials- the game.
I have to admit, this year's Super
Bowl was a real yawner. You
couldn't have hand picked two
teams that were any less
interesting then the ones that
played in Sunday's Super Bowl
XXXIII. As always, there were the
high points and the low points to
the game, so here are my views on
the 1999 championship game.
The pregame show had KISS!
This was cool because it's hard to
get the NFL to show cool stuff
like that. And as always, there are
those interesting commercials that
are actually more entertaining
than the game itself. It would be
nice to see the fud Bowl again.
And I know some of you saw the
special effects that FOX put on
the tube. A couple of us guys were
confused when we saw billboards
coming out of the end zones, but
we quickly realized it was just a
prop. Duh!
The half time shows were
alright. I'm not into Stevie
Wonder, Gloria Estefan or that
swing stuff, so I switched to MTV
Celebrity Death Match. We had
another TV on, and it was
switched to some WWF stuff.
There was some guy fighting
another guy with a gimp mask on.
Half-time had a very cheesy,
staged Springer-esque appeal this
year.
Oh yeah, there was something
interesting they had between
commercials- the game. From
what I collected, there were two
teams, one from Atlanta and one
from Denver. The Atlanta Falcons
liked to dance some annoying
little shuffle (a.k.a. the dirty bird),
and Denver was trying to get
another win so this guy named
Elway could get another Nintendo
game named after him. The most
interesting person during the
game was Atlanta's kicker who, by
my calculations, had never seen a
football before. I don't feel bad for
him though. He made more
money this year alone than most of
us would if we lived to be 812.
OPINIO
Marvelle
Sullivan
Elway should quit while ahead
If he leaves now, he will be
remembered as a player at the
top of his game. The negative
aspect of remaining will
dampen his already legendary
status.
Phrases like "Quit while you're
ahead "Always leave them
wanting more and "There can be
too much of a good thing" were not
coined and are not frequently
recited just because they are
catchy. Those phrases are famous
for the simple reason that they
contain a world of truth that can be
applied to almost any kind of
situation. One of these classic
situations would have to be sports.
It is no secret that the Denver
Broncos emerged victorious over
the Atlanta Falcons in the Super
Bowl on Sunday. As momentous as
it was and is that the Broncos are
back-to-back champions in a sport
which rarely sees such a feat, one
question has practically
overshadowed the whole Super
Bowl and its aftermath: Is John
Elway going to retire from
professional football? This
question has -fans and
commentators in an absolute
frenzy to speculate on and predict
Elway's decision for the next
season.
Rather than second guessing
Elway, commentators and sports
fans alike need to be asking a
much more appropriate question:
Should John Elway retire? Most
everyone (especially Denver fans
and owners) want Elway to stay.
Their reasoning isn't totally flawed
and actually possesses merit worth
consideration. Their contention is
that Elway has now joined the
ranks of the "greats" like Montana
and Bradshaw by winning two
Super Bowls in a row, which of
course is a tremendous
accomplishment and honor, but if
he stays he has the opportunity to
do what no quarterback has ever
done before: lead a professional
football team to three Super Bowls
in a row.
It couldn't get any better, right?
Three would put Elway and the
Broncos in a league of their own, so
to speak. Not only would it be
financially beneficial, but it would
gain an incomprehensible amount
of respect and notoriety
throughout the sports world and
beyond.
Elway probably has a very
strong urge to play another season,
but there is an undeniable flip side
to that decision. Elway is 38 years
old and has been playing for 16
years. Even though some claim he
played like a 24-ycar-old on
Sunday, the reality i$ that he jjss
38. The chance that he ana the
Broncos will have another
successful season without many
injuries, owner strife, trades, eta,
lessens each year.
Even if Elway played
comparable to his peak, the team's
overall performance is not totally
dependent on him, so the Broncos
could fail despite or in spite of
Elway. If he leaves now, he will be
remembered as a player at the top
of his game. The negative aspect
of remaining will dampen his
already legendary status. Of course
the positive effect of winning
another one is astounding, but it's
too much of a long shot to give up
what Elway has going for him now.
It is no secret that professional
sports are centered around money
and fame. They are both necessary
evils to keep the players
performing and the spectators
watching.
John Elway's temptation to play
"one more time" is naturally
overwhelming. Right now he
should be thinking, "Do I want to
be remembered with Michael
Jordan and Joe DiMaggio, or put in
the history books beside 'what's-
his-name-again'?"
"The censor's sword pierces
deeply into the heart of free
�Earl Warren
Supreme Court Justice
1961
kMMi





comics
6 Tytidiv. Frtruirv 2.1988
Tin Em CwoKirtiH
Four Seats Left
Jason Latour
Everyday Life

Mike Litwin
Life's Meanings
Kevin Jordan
���.
fAfendenhall Student Center
fHannayubraif
� gallery talk
' Fri.Feb.5 �"
6PM
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Mon. Feb
8PM
$3 Advance Ticket Prices �
for public. Free for ECU
students with valid ID.
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1 Issue a ticket
5 Lateral part
9 Use the rink
14 3-digit phone
numbers
16 Praise
17 Treasures
18 Bungling
19 Ogled
21 Merriment
22 Italian sausage
26 Reasons by
deduction
28 Ponce de
29 Dramatic scene
33 Fancy cravat
35 One-armed
bandits, briefly
36 Pair
39 Parts of speech
40 Take a toad off
41 Warning signal
43 Some MDs
44we all'
46 Jessica of "Rob
Roy"
47 High-flown
speech
49 Anna of "Nana"
50 Birthplace of
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53 Expresses
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55 "Hud" co-star
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56 Capital of the
Bahamas
60 Accepted as fact
62 Night rays
67 Sleep soundly?
68 Teachers
69 To the point
70 Shoppers
delight
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DOWN
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eager, briefly
2 Personal
pension $$
3 Part of AT&T
4 Vichy water
5 Amen
6 Not working
7 Moose's kin
8 To be, to
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9 Schuss
10CarradmeTV
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11 Astaire's sister
12 Sot
13 Colorado Park
15 Peaceful
20 Menu plan
22 Informal
language
23 Fabler of yore
24 Set of points, In
math
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27 Twangy
30 Something of
value
31 Russian
pancake
32 Gambling
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52 Relish
54 Bio horn
57 Ed of "Daniel
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59 Spirit
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lead-in
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64 Big name In .
��mail
65 Med. scan
66 Mach jet
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at ECU?-
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consume four or Fewer
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twice a month or less.
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where alcohol is NOT served.
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LIMA
7 Tuisday, February 2, 1989
features
Tkt I i�t CanllilM
Binge drinking plagues
college campuses in force
Students often binge drink.defined by four to five or more drinks at one sitting, on the weekends.
PHOTO BY JACOB GARMOND
i
Organizations ban to
curb dilemma
Pini.i.ii' On.H'S
STARK WRITKH
Over the past year, college campus-
es recognize binge drinking as a
growing problem. Serious injuries
and fatalities plague students due
to alcohol poisoning and overdoses.
Here at ECU, steps are being taken
to curb this problem and educate
students to avoid becoming another
statistic.
; Even though national
researchers agree that binge drink-
ing is a problem, many argue over
the "official" definition of binging.
j "There are a wide-range of defi-
nitions whether one talks to
researchers or people on the
street said Donna Walsh, director
a? Health Promotion and Well-
Being.
When a person consumes five or
ijiore drinks at one sitting, then
they are considered to be binge
drinking. But given that men and
women have different weights and
metabolism rates, there is a need for
revision of that definition.
After a national study by Dr.
Henry Wechsler of the Harvard
School of Public Health was
released, it was decided that binge
drinking should be considered five
drinks in one sitting for men, and
four drinks for women.
In his survey, Wechsler reported
that in 1997, 34 students died on
campus after drinking excessively.
According to the 1997 CORE
Survey done at ECU, 34 percent of
the 603 students surveyed reported
that they binge drink. While this is
lower than the national number of
42 percent, it is still considered to
be a problem for the campus.
"ECU students think that every-
one drinks and it is what everybody
else does Walsh said. "But
they're wrong, it's not what every-
one does. It isn't the norm
The survey further showed that
students thought that 47 pjercent of
their peers drink at least three
times a week. In reality, that num-
ber is 17 percent of students.
Another dangerous effect of
binge drinking is the more a person
consumes, the higher their toler-
ance for alcohol becomes. This
means that a person will be able to
drink more alcohol before becom-
ing intoxicated. After this occurs,
health and social problems begin to
appear.
"What we are currently doing on
campus to combat binge drinking is
to bring more awareness about it
said Heather Zophy, director of
Health Education at Health
Services. "There's been education-
al programming in the residence
halls and some student organiza-
tions have called in speakers for
more information on the topic
Health Services, in conjunction
with University Housing, has creat-
ed a project called Healthy U. This
programs creates a series of weekly
flyers about various topics that are
placed in every residence hall.
"We always try to do several on
alcohol Zophy said.
A newly created committee enti-
tled Intervention to Make Positive
Alcohol Changes Together
(IMPACT), headed by Robert
Morphet, a counselor at the Center
for Counseling and Student
Development, has set out to accom-
plish goals that have been set for
the next five years. Staff and stu-
dents have joined forces to increase
programs and to bring information
about the serious problem of binge
drinking to every student.
"Our primary goal is to reduce
binge alcohol use Morphet said.
"We want to try to impact student
behavior
Different approaches are being
taken to curb binge drinking such
as student education, health fairs,
and creating healthy alcohol alter-
natives.
Also, several alcohol workshops
are being held at fraternities, sorori-
ties, and residence halls by the
Center of Health Promotion and
Well-Being. The Alcohol-101 CD-
ROM is available at all computer
labs. This CD gives facts on drink-
ing and addresses what to do when
one is confronted with a person who
is abusing alcohol. ,
A new CORE Survey is being
scheduled for this spring. It is
hoped that this new report will
show whether there has been an
increase or decrease in drinking on
campus. Until the survey is com-
pleted, there is no way of knowing
if ECU students are changing their
behavior.
"When people stop drinking
socially, then they are on the road to
alcohol abuse Walsh said.
Across the Miles chronicles ECU
�student's experiences abroad weekly
in the Features section. We have
ashed only that participants honestly
convey their semester or year overseas
In some places, it's hard to tell
whether I'm in Japan or America.
The many-storied buildings are
stacked together, especially in the
bjig cities, that there's really not
rhuch difference in certain areas.
You might be thinking, "Well,
airen't the signs all in Japanese?"
Surprisingly, a lot of them aren't.
� There are a lot of foreigners in
Japan and a great deal of them use
English. For the aid of foreigners,
most of the signs used for public
�s
y
transportations systems are written
in both Japanese and English. The
regular English-speaker should
have no problem getting around
Tokyo with a map. A lot of busi-
nesses even make it a point to use
English in their advertising. Some
businesses even choose English
words for their company names.
I In Japan, foreign languages have
!L
become a requirement in schools.
Most people I've spoken to here
have studied three or more years of
English in schools. English is
required for admission to many, if
not all colleges. Actually, a lot of
people here try to talk to me in
English when they first meet me
and find out that I am American.
As expected, it's usually not very
fluent English. Most schools teach
English, but not many of them have
a native speaker as a teacher.
Pronunciation of English is very
difficult for the Japanese, consider-
ing that Japanese has about half the
sounds that English does. Even
though many of the sounds in both
languages are completely identical,
sounds like "th" and "r" are never
learned correctly, so what started
off as a "happy birthday" ends up as
"happy bahs-day
A lot of words, like "birthday"
are often brought into the Japanese
language. However, the pronuncia-
tion is so different from the original
that it's hard to learn, even if it's
possible to pronounce the word cor-
rectly in the Japanese language. For
example, "radio" can technically be
.
said correctly in Japanese, but in
the translation, the pronunciation
got switched to "rah-jee-o" instead.
Sometimes, even the meaning of
these borrowed words changes.
"Mansion" in Japanese is the name
of a kind of apartment. "Smart"
doesn't refer to intelligence, but
rather the to fashion sense. Little
quirks like that make it a little bit
harder when "English" words are
used.
Not only that, even when the
English language is written, some-
times, it's just a little bit odd. Stuff
that sounds weird, like "Set aside
enjoyment time with your friends
which I saw on an advertisement on
a drink machine is pretty common,
but I suppose that's to be expected.
English is a pretty difficult lan-
guage, even American people make
simple mistakes like spelling "lose"
as "loose or using "farther"
instead of "further Even with all
that, it's still admirable that the
Japanese are almost as comfortable
with English as they are with their
own language.
Sometimes, however, it
becomes a little alarming to people
like myself. English is a trendy fad
to teenagers here. The other day I
saw a girl with a t-shirt with yellow
and black stripes with the message
"Warning - Girl Like I wouldn't
be able to tell that from looking at
the front of her shirt anyway. Just
the other night, I ran into a elemen-
tary school girl who was wearing a
shirt advertising skateboards. The
name of the company was some-
thing she'd probably get slapped for
if she wore it in the United States.
In fact, I've seen lots of people
wearing t-shirts with profanity on
them that would send the Christian
Coalition up in arms.
I'm not sure how many people
actually know what these shirts say,
but most people would probably
just look the other way if they did.
It's not much of a problem here.
As an American, I just keep
reminding myself that since these
people have been studying English
for about as long as I've been study-
ing Japanese, I probably sound just
as weird. For now, I'll just look for-
ward to moving back into my
"mansion" in the United States.
Andre Germain
- I
Students visit set of 1
Dawson's Creek
Theater majors receive
hands-on experience
E KI : A SI K1 s
JTAPP WHITP.il
Are Joey and Dawson going to get
back together? Will Andie and
Pacey ever get through a day with-
out fighting? Questions like these
cross many viewers' minds every
Wednesday night Howevcr.there
are many factors that are involved
in the award worthy production,
Dawson's Creek, that the audience
just doesn't see.
Students from the theater
department had the opportunity to
visit the set in Wilmington, NC.
"It's interesting to talk about
things that are in a book, but it's
better to see it live said Roger
Bright, assistant professor. "It gave
the students the opportunity to see
what it's like on an actual set. The
students received more from this
hands on experience
They were able to see behind
the scenes footage, get advice from
the show's performers and talk to
Kevin Williamson, the writer of the
show and ECU graduate.
"Williamson gave us a tour
around the set, showed us how
they tape episodes and other tech-
nical aspect of the show said Jim
Bray, an ECU senior. "It was very
interesting
"Jim Bray and I hung out in
Kerr Smith's (Jack) trailer said
Kristin Koesling, an ECU senior.
"We talked to his real girlfriend
who is also an ECU graduate. She
had wonderful advice. We could all
relate to her
"We talked to Williamson for
three hours Koesling said. "It was
very interesting to hear his take on
the same teachers we have now
Williamson, who studied theatre
and film, has written the movies
Scream, I Know What You Did
Last Summer and The Faculty.
His themes have always been
directed at the teenage horror
genre.
When the idea to do a television
series came up, Williamson con-
templated the teenage horror
theme, but instead decided to do a
show about normal teenagers living
in a small town, having to deal with
real problems. This idea came
from Williamson's own experi-
ences with a friend who would
cross the creek to visit him. The
story was picked up by the Warner
Bros, network and launched to
almost immediate success by the
Cast of Dawson's Creek
mi inn
target audience of teenagers and
young adults.
"It's a great show said Cindy
Horrell, an ECU freshman. "It
actually deals with problems that
real teenagers face day to day
"Dawson's Creek is a great show
that tells people the reality of love,
sex, parents, or even dealing with
the fact that you might not have
parents said Mary Beth Fleming,
an ECU freshman. "Even the
whole high school trauma that
young teenagers face is depicted
"Dawson's Creek is an entertain-
ing show. It portrays a lot of prob-
lems that high schoolers and young
adults deal with in real life. The
relationships and the problems are
easy for the most young people to
identify with in their lives said
Angie West, a student at ECU.
I checked my e-mail and found
that no one seems to want to know
anything about jolly ole' England.
In response, I hopped on a plane to
visit Paris for a week. Since I only
spent a week in Paris, I feel that I
am unqualified to make any gener-
alizations about life there. As an
obnoxious American, however, I
will do it anyway.
To start, Paris is a beautiful city.
It is full of attractive monuments,
pleasant parks and streets lined
with sandstone facades
Everywhere there are cathedrals,
museums and palaces for your
enjoyment. And, in the middle of it
all, surrounded by beautiful green-
ery and pools, is a large, metal,
M.
pointy eyesore that the locals call
the Eiffel Tower. Upon seeing this
hideous creation, I questioned why
it symbolized the city which was so
entrenched in beauty. Here is a
busding metropolitan city which is
unspoiled by the horrors of red
brick or the sheer ugliness of sky-
scrapers. And, in the middle of it all
is what seems to be antithesis of
the beauty of the city.
I must note, however, that out-
side the city doesn't maintain its
splendor. The farther outside the
city you get the more the buildings
get dirtier and more dilapidated.
The people look more unsavory
and there is a lot of dog excrement
all over the sidewalks. It's like
vacationing in a safe section of the
Bronx. Also, inside the city center,
there is a restriction on the height
of buildings. All structures stay
under seven stories. Therefore, all
the ugly skyscrapers are outside of
town.
While I was there, the Eiffel
Tower was closed because of a
strike, which may explain my hos-
tility towards it So, I checked out
the Louvre and the Musee d'Orsay
instead. The Louvre was immense
and is probably of no interest for
anyone unless they like art If you
like art, or just really big buildings,
then this is heaven. If you want to
see 17th century Dutch paintings
or Muslim art, you got it
The Musee d'Orsay, on the
other hand, specializes in 19th cen-
tury French paintings, especially
the great impressionists. Oh yes,
and my girlfriend and I had to go to
Disneyland Paris too, partially for
curiosity about why the park is hav-
ing financial troubles.
At the park, everything is in
both French and English and often
only in English. Everyone speaks
English as well as French. It's just
like home, except that I am per-
ceived as an arrogant rude
American.
Everything in Paris was very
expensive, even more so than
England. I tried to avoid eating out
or buying anything. One restaurant
offered a meal for 229ff, around
$40. Canned drinks were lOff, or
around $2.
It's hard to imagine a place
where meals can cost more than
lodging. Now I'm back in England
where it is expensive and cold. I
think I prefer France.
Cheers,
JamesBlake Norman





8 Twttey. FtkfMtv 2. IS
features
Tki Eiit Carolinian
T fl
Lawyer represents many wearing sasquatch suit.
Missing inflatable beer
can found at fraternity
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) - A
mystery involving a missing 20-
fbot-by-10-footinflatable replica of
a Coots Light beer can has been
solved.
In Sept, a local store reported
the disappearance of the giant
inflatable sign. The towering silver
beer sign was displayed on the lot
of Phi Delta Theta Fraternity
House, and University of Arkansas
police pulled the plug on the inflat-
able can Monday.
Phi Delta Theta chapter adviser
James A. Penix would not sav how
the sign ended up at the fraternity
house. He said fraternity members
only assisted police in recovering
the sign.
Chris Walters, a sales executive
for Coors of Western Arkansas,
said, "It the inflatable balloon
sign actually belongs to the brew-
ery. I had about given up on getting
it back. We were about to pay
$3,500 to replace it
Sgt Gary Grain, a spokesman for
the campus police, said no arrests
were made.
YAKIMA, Wash. (AP) - A lawyer
says he represents a man who wore
a monkey suit in the famed
Sasquatch film that has been
offered as proof of the existence of
Bigfoot a newspaper reports.
More questions have been
raised recendy about the authentic-
ity of the jerky film footage from
1967 that purportedly shows a star-
ded Sasquatch retreating into the
northern California woods.
The film was shot by the late
Bigfoot expert Roger Patterson and
his partner, Bob Gimlin, both of the
Yakima area.
Recendy, Cliff Crook of the
Seattle suburb of Bothell and Chris
Murphy of Vancouver, British
Columbia, have argued that the
footage is nothing more than a guy
in a monkey suit. They contend a
belt buckle is visible when the film
is enhanced with a computer.
That theory appears to be bol-
stered by Zillah lawyer Barry M.
Woodard, who told the Yakima
Herald-Republic he is representing
a Yakima man who says he wore a
costume for the Patterson-Gimlin
film.
Woodard said his client has
passed a lie-detector test to prove
it, the newspaper reported in
today's editions.
Woodard described the man
only as a 58-year-old lifelong resi-
dent of the Yakima Valley who
approached him a few months ago
after a network news program
called questioning the authenticity
of the old film.
The man wanted help negotiat-
ing a deal for rights to his story,
Woodard said. He also wanted to
explore any legal issues from his
involvement in the hoax.
Woodward provided a statement
from retired Yakima police officer
Jim McCormick, a certified poly-
graph examiner who administered a
lie-detector test Thursday to
Woodard's client Thp test showed
the man was telling the truth when
asked about having worn the
Bigfoot suit in the 1967 film,
McCormick wrote.
Patterson died in 1972. His
widow, Patricia, declined comment
Friday.
Gimlin, who still lives in the
Yakima area, did not return tele-
phone calls.
Ray Crowe, executive director of
the Portland, Orebased Western
Bigfoot
Society, said he's confident
Woodard's story will be debunked.
"I think this is a good film. As far
as the Bigfoot community is con-
cerned, that was a real animal
Crowe said.
The plaster casts Patterson and
Gimlin made from footprints they
insisted came from the creature
have become the benchmark by
which all other purported Bigfoot
sightings are judged.
Bob Swanson, who now lives
near Seattle, owned Chinook Press
in Yakima back in the mid-1960s
and agreed to print 10,000 copies of
Patterson's first book, a history of
Bigfoot sightings and evidence.
That was before the 1967 film.
With sluggish book sales and a
large printing bill still unpaid,
Yakima suddenly became a hotbed
of Bigfoot activity, with sightings all
over the area, Swanson said with a
chuckle.
Man steals Viagra tabs
US may use wasps to fight chemical weapons
CROWN POINT, Ind. (AP) - A
Lake County man has been
charged with stealing 3,500 tablets
of the impotency drug Viagra from
the Merrillville self-storage facility
where he worked.
Mark Steven Drisner, 21, of
Griffith was arrested Thursday at
the Merrillville police station after
confessing to twice using master
keys to two storage units leased by
Viagra maker Pfizer Inc. to steal the
pills.
Lake County Detective Tim
Wardrip said the pills, which were
valued at about $35,000, have not
been recovered but that Drisner
was cooperating with police.
"I really don't want to say any-
thing more than that
tion is continuing Wardrip said.
Pfizer sales representatives rent-
ed two storage lockers at the U-
Haul self-storage facility in Nov.
One representative noticed 1,600
of the pills missing from a locker on
Dec. 17.
A second sales representative
found an additional 1,900 pills
missing Dec. 29. The pills retail for
$10 each, Wardrip said.
Drisner, who had worked at the
storage center for about a year, was
being held Thursday night at the
Lake County Jail in Crown point
on two counts of theft, each a Class
D felony.
He was scheduled for a bond
hearing today in Lake Superior
TIFTON, Ga. (AP) - Chemical and
biological weapons can be
unleashed silently and quickly,
with the only warning coming
through faint odors in the air.
The first line of defense against
such attacks may soon be wasps
that are traditionally found in
Southern cotton and tobacco fields.
Researchers hope the sophisticated
olfactory senses the bugs use to
find prey can be trained to detect
toxins in the air.
"We're trying to take advantage
of the millions of years of evolution
that nature has provided and see if
we can put it to use said Alan
Rudolph.
"We're trying to provide more
information about our environment
for defense purposes
Rudolph oversees the Defense
Advanced Research Projects
Agency's controlled biological sys-
tems program, which has about 75
scientists - including a handful in
Tifton - testing the feasibility of
using live organisms to protect
Americans from terrorist and mili-
tary attacks.
The project is being funded by
Arlington, Va based DARPA,
whose mission is to maintain the
United States' superiority in
defense technology.
The research is taking a three-
pronged approach:
- Training living organisms, such
as wasps, to sniff out toxins and
explosives.
- Hooking organisms up to mon-
itors that read their responses to
dangerous chemicals.
-Designing robots whose move-
ments are patterned after animals
and whose control centers could be
inspired by the human nervous sys-
tem.
Already, U.S. Agriculture
Department scientists in Tifton
have demonstrated that parasitic
wasps known as Microplitis can be
taught to sniff out such hazards as
TNT and mustard gas.
"We have found they can detect
all of these chemicals and we get a
better response with experience
said Joe Lewis, a USDA entomolo-
gist who has been studying pest
control with beneficial insects for
more than 20 years.
Scientists at Iowa State
University are taking a different
approach. They're studying the
electrical impulses that occur when
the antennae of the Microplitis are
exposed to explosives and toxins.
They observe the changing impuls-
es on an oscilloscope.
"When there are no chemicals
present the signals are very sta-
ble said Jun Wei Zhu, an ento-
mologist and chemical ecologist "If
chemicals are present you'll have
dips and peaks
Eventually, the antennae might
be connected to tiny instruments
and incorporated in "biosensor sys-
tems" that could check for haz-
ardous substances.
"One of the things the Defense
Department is interested in is see-
ing if we can make a biosensor
detector to find land mines Zhu
said.
Plug into the source
www.tec.ecu.edu
MMMMMMMM
"Smacfcn
fff�
Monday, February a, 1999 at 8:OOpm
Handrlx Theatre - MandanhaH Student Canter
East CaroHna University
Sponsored by ECU Student Union
Lecture Committee
.TmArtof
KISSING
ff?f
Featuring over 25 different
styles of kisses, like
- the lip-o-suction Mae
-the upside-down kiss
- the Trobrlan Islands kiss
- and the vacuum kiss.
i

�f��
Advance Ticket Prices:
Public � $3.00
ECU Student - Free
when vend ECU ID Is presented
at the Central Ticket Office
In advance of the show.
AN Tickets at the Door - $5.00
11
I
.�
9 Tuesday. I
P
Men's
"Raise the
return of Evi
theWsforE
ECU was
out of some
the Pirates b
Mary with a
In his fir
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game and p
Pirates. Joey;
a step by scoi
seven rebour
the last nine
Fo(
rais
Contr
bonuses
Mario ;
SPO
ECU's Board
approved a
extension and
football coach
The decisii
raises Logan
annually from
tract was also
2003. Additic
approved a $5,
if ECU win:
games than
Conference U
son and a bor
team goes to a
by the NCAA.
Logan hop
will serve as ai
will get the
Lo
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Mario Si
SI'OR i
The Romai
Gladiators, to
wrestlers, and
chance to see
last Friday.
Lodi, a pr
for World
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alumnus, retu
town Friday
together with
National W
(NWA) at Ayo
Brad Cain,





Thi Eisl Citoliniin

i suit.
ommunity is con-
s a real animal
asts Patterson and
m footprints they
rom the creature
le benchmark by
purported Bigfoot
jed.
1, who now lives
led Chinook Press
in the mid-1960s
nt 10,000 copies of
book, a history of
;s and evidence,
the 1967 film,
i book sales and a
bill still unpaid,
f became a hotbed
y, with sightings all
vanson said with a
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osives and toxins.
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a
9 Tiindiy. fibruiry 2, 1988
sports
Thf Eitt Carolinian
Pirates "raise the roof with big win over Tribe
Men's basketball to play
three games in five days
Senior Writkr
eik: couch
"Raise the Roof Night" marked the
return of Evaldas Joeys and the return to
the Ws for ECU's basketball program.
ECU was was able to get better play
out of some of the big guys down low as
the Pirates beat the Tribe of William &
Mary with a score of 61-56.
In his first game after fracturing a
bone in his lower leg, Joeys started the
game and played 33 minutes for the
Pirates. Joeys palyed as if he never lost
.a step by scoring 13 points and grabbing
'seven rebounds after being absent from
the last nine games. After the game,
Joeys felt very good about the healing
injury.
"It feels okay Joycs said. "I goj con-
tact early and I felt kind of lucky
Joeys was not the only Pirate who
came out strong on Saturday. Alphons
van Ierland added 12 points and six
rebounds of his own.
"We are a litde deeper now Dooley
said. "We are obviously happy to have
him (Joeys) back
The Pirates were in command
throughout the majority of the game.
ECU had as much as an 11 point lead
with over nine minutes left in the game.
That lead would not last for long as the
Tribe would storm back and tie the
game with 1:56 remaining.
"We had them on the ropes and they
came back Dooley said. "We probably
should have gone inside more
Nevertheless, the Pirates would find
a way to put away the Tribe for good.
David Taylor and Neil Punt were able
to hit free throws at the end to seal the
Pirate victory.
"We went on a stretch where we did-
n't hit any three pointers, but we were
able to penetrate and score Garrett
Blackwclder said.
Men's Basketball Pirate highscorers:
Player FG-FGAFT-FTAReboundsTotal F&ints
AlicoOunk4-80-0 , ,0-17 6 513 .12 .11
Source: ECU Sports Information Department
Center Alphons van Ierland dunks for two in the close game against William 6 Mary Saturnday night.
PHOTO BY JACOB CABMON
Football coach gets
raise and extension
Contract includes
bonuses for big wins
Mario Sciif. riiaiikk
sports editor
ECU's Board of Trustees recently
approved a one-year contract
extension and a salary increase for
football coach Steve Logan.
The decision, made on Jan. 27,
raises Logan's salary to $140,000
annually from $133,030. His con-
tract was also extended until Jan. 1,
2003. Additionally, the trustees
approved a $5,000 bonus for Logan
if ECU wins more conference
games than any other team in
Conference USA in the 1999 sea-
son and a bonus of $19,994 if the
team goes to a bowl game certified
by the NCAA.
Logan hopes that this bonus
will serve as an extra incentive and
will get the Pirates into a bowl
game.
"We've been bowl eligible two
times now and haven't gone
Logan said. "We'll try to become
eligible again this season
The extra money, however,
won't serve as a stimulator for
Logan to do a better job.
"I think that it doesn't matter.
We all work hard, no matter what
Logan said.
Logan is entering his eighth
straight season as Pirate head
coach, tying the record of Clarence
Stasavich, who guided the ECU
program for eight consecutive sea-
sons in the 1960s.
"I think this contract is a good
deal. It gives everybody a chance
to go the direction we are going.
"The contract also gives me a
chance to be where I want to be
Logan said.
After another winning season
last year (6-53-3 in conference; 42-
37 total), Logan thinks that he
deserves the raise.
"Sure, it's a lot of hard work I
put into it Logan said.
SEE COACH LOGAN. PAGE 10
Lodi returns home
Alumnus resigns three
year WON contract
Mario Sciikriiai'fkr
sports editor
The Romans called them
Gladiators, today we call them
wrestlers, and Greenville got a
chance to see one of their finest
last Friday.
Lodi, a professional wrestler
for World Championship
Wrestling (WCW) and an ECU
alumnus, returned to his home
town Friday night to perform
together with wrestlers from the
National Wrestling Alliance
(NWA) at Aycock Middle School
to host the Mid-Atlantic
Championship.
Some of the money that came
in went to support the school's
athletic department
Lodi, 28, at ECU known as
graduate Brad Cain, recently
resigned his contract with WCW
and talks about his life as a pro-
fessional wrestler.
TEC: How did you get started
in wrestling?
LODI: I wanted to wrestle
since I was a kid. I grew up with
friends who went to watch
wrestling matches every single
weekend at every chance we got.
Three years ago a guy came into
my personal training gym and
asked me if I wanted to help pro-
mote a local wrestling show. Of
course, I loved to give them some
money. The guy who trained a
wrestler wanted to get him in bet-
ter shape. He told me that maybe
if I train him to get his body in
better shape, he
could train me to
become a wrestler.
The guy started
training me and I
had my first match
two month later. A
year and a half later I
went out of the
"Power Plant and
six months later I
Brad Cain. AKA Lodie signs autographs.
PN0T0 BY MARIO SCHERHAUFER
��
SEE WRESTING PAGE 11
Seahawks defeat Pirate swimmers
Seniors honored at
last home meet
R I. A I N K I) K N I I1 S
sknior null
The water temperature at Minges
Aquatic center probably was a few
degrees higher after the exciting
battle between two long-time arch
rival swim teams was over.
Saturday's dual meet with arch
rival UNCW at Minges Aquatic
Center was the last home competi-
tion for the Pirates this season, and
senior swimmers were honored
before an energetic hometown
crowd. The men and women swam
strong and fast all afternoon; how-
ever, victory escaped both teams as
the men lost 132-111 and the
women fell 140-102 to the
Seahawks.
"The two teams slugged it out
and I guess they just had more than
we did said ECU senior swimmer
Richard Chen. "When the elTort is
there you have to learn and then
move on
Adam Gaffey, a junior on the
men's team who won both the 500
and 1000 meter free, is pleased with
the team's performance and feels
members swam really well. He
believes team depth is the key.
"The team did awesome and we
dominated the meet Gaffey said.
"We just ran out of people
The Pirate coaches are also
pleased with the men's and
women's performance in spite of
the loss. The lack of team depth on
the men's side seemed to make the
difference as the final event of the
day, the 400 meter relay, would
determine the winner.
"I am extremely satisfied with
these guys assistant coach Mike
Moody said. "They swam really
well. It comes down to us. having
ECU suffered a close loss decided in the final event.
PHOTO BY JACOB CARM0N
small numbers and that they had
more guys to put in that last relay
According to head coach Rick
Kobe, winning is not the only side
of the story. Kobe says it is always a
good match with UNCW and that
the team will have another shot at
defeating the Seahawks at the
Conference Championship.
"In swimming, you can lose and
still swim very fast, and that is what
we did Kobe said. "There were
some close matches and that was
the difference
This was the women's first con-
ference loss of the season and they
will finish 8-2 overall and 5-1 in the
CAA. Hollie Butler, a junior on the
women's team, believes the team
came together
and kept a posi-
tive attitude.
Butler looks for-
ward to avenging
the loss to the
Seahawks in the
Co n fe rence
Championship
and has only one
regret about this
year's season.
"I would have
asked God to
grant us less
injuries because
we have had so
many this year
Butler said. "If everyone was
healthy I know we would have won
the meet There were so many i
good times, it doesn't matter that
we lost and we still have
Conference to get them
The loss to the Seahawks ended
a streak of back to back wins for the
men and women against College of
Charleston on Jan. 16 and
Richmond on Jan. 23. The men had
an especially impressive meet
against College of Charleston win-
ning 142-93.
"We probably crushed them
worse than any other team ever has
been in the NCAA Gaffey said.
"It was a good confidence booster
to go in against UNCW
The women swam strongest
against Richmond and team mem-
bers felt that meet motivated them
to compete even harder.
"A lot of us had our best times
against Richmond senior Niki
Kreel said. "Everybody has been
strong in every way
Next for the Pirates is a two
week break before the CAA
Conference Championship.
Men's team members will shave
their bodies as a method of decreas-
ing resistance and achieving the
fastest possible times at the
Championship meet. The
Conference Championship will
begin Feb. 18 in Charlotte.
Pirate track dominates at invitationals
Teams win
in eleven events
Stkpiikn Sciiramm
sknior writer
Strong individual showings were
taken for granted lately for both the
men's and women's track teams,
but their strong performances as
teams surprised even the coaches.
The men traveled to Johnson
City, TN, to compete in the Ikon
Invitational while the women trav-
eled to Newark, DE,
for the Delaware
Invitational.
In Delaware, the
ECU women took
home eight first place
finishes in a variety of
events. Leading the
way was Nicky Goins,
who won the 60
meter dash.
"I didn't have the
times I wanted, but I
was satisfied with the
first place Goins
said.
The top five finishers in the 200
meter dash were all Pirates.
Rasheca Barrow took first while
Weldon took second.
"I think we did really well as a
team. Our basic competition was
ourselves. It was a big confidence
boost and it showed us that we are
not too far from our goals
Kirkpatrick said.
The Pirates' Martina Freeman
won the 400 meter dash followed
by fellow Pirate, Abrial Hayes.
Another first place went to the
ECU 4x800 meter relay team, who
beat squads from Georgetown,
West Chester University and the
University of Delaware.
One of the more impressive
individual performances was
turned in by the ECU's
Emmanuelle Quenum in the 4x400
meter relay.
Nicky Goins.
Toni Kllgore,
Toni Kilgore.
Saundra Teel.
Crystal Frye.
"Emanuelle ran very well. She got the
baton and got passed, but she battled back
and got us the lead back
Charles 'Choo' Justice
Head women's neck and Held coach
"Emanuelle ran very well. She
got the baton and got passed, but
she battled back and got us the lead
back said Charles "Choo" Justice,
head women's
track and field
coach.
"We get so
used to having
one kid give
great perfor-
mances that we
take the good
performances
for granted. At
this meet, we
didn't have just
one girl do well,
we had a lot of
our girls do
well Justice
said.
"This meet
was more fun
and there
wasn't as
much pres-
sure to perform well. We're gear-
ing more towards the Virginia
Tech meet, which is do or die
Goins said.
ECU's Michelle Clayton trav-
eled to Johnson City, TN for the
IKON Invitational where she
placed second and set a new
school record in the 20 pound
weight throw. The result put her
among the top 10 throwers in the
country.
The men also traveled to the
IKON Invitational. The men's
squad was once again paced by
their outstanding talent in the 400
ECU First Place Finishes
Delaware Invitational
�. ,60 meter dash, .7.79 seconds
.triple jump .36' 7 12"
Jong jump, 18" 10 34"
.high jump. 5' 2 12"
.shot put42' 4"
Rasheca Barrow, .200 meter dash, . .25.88 seconds
Martina freeman, 400 meter dash, . .1:00.50
Team.4X800 meter relay, 9:47.48
BrfttCox. Justin Eng .60 meter dash, 7.06
and .5000 meter run 14:43.00
IKON Invitational

Team.4x400 meter relay. 3:09.40
Source:ECU Sports Information Department
meters. The 4x400 meter relay
team established an NCAA provi-
sional qualifying mark.
"All we need to do is get the
kids to do it all on the same night. If
we ran on the first night like we did
the second, they wouldn't have
beaten us said Bill Carson, head
men's track coach.
The relay team was led by
senior Mike Miller.
"If we had to chose an MVP for
this week, it would be Mike Miller.
He was consistent in every race he
ran Davis said.





10 Taeaaey. Ftknwry 2. 1S9S
Women beat
JMU 65-62
sports
Tht Ent Carolinian
Gibson says post
players secured win
Tracy Mairr
assistant spurts editor
Monotony is never interesting in
basketball.
' And over the weekend, senior
center Beth Jaynes and sophomore
guard Joana Fogaca deviated from
" their norms capturing career highs
of 20 and 11 points respectively as
ECU defeated James Madison
-University 65-62. Also surprising
were the points scored by the start-
ing guards. Junior Waynetta Veney
scored five and sophomore Misty
' Home, who has shot a three-point-
' er in every other game, didn't score
in this one.
"Our two best guards didn't
shoot as well as they normally do
head coach Dee Gibson said. "But
we had some of our post players,
including Beth Jaynes, really step
up and help us win
The outlook wasn't so optimistic
in the first half, however, as the
Dukes appeared to be out for
revenge after losing against the
Pirates earlier this year.Sixteen
turnovers hindered both teams
from gaining many scoring opportu-
nities.With 4:08 remaining, JMU
was leading 28-18, but the Pirates
rejuvenated the scoreboard when
they outshot the Dukes 6-1, leaving
them just five points behind by
intermission.
This persistence continued into
the second half. After a layup by
junior forward Danielle Melvin,
ECU took the 36-35 lead and didn't
fall back again.
"It's not every night that you can
ask for the players to score 20
points, but you can always try to
play your best defensively Gibson
said. "Overall, this was a defensive
win
Regardless of the team's appar-
ent strength, by the end of the
game the offensive players raised
their shot percentage to 45.8 per-
cent from 34.8 percent in the first
half. JMU recorded 34.4 percent for
the night
"I wasn't surprised at all that we
won Gibson said. "The whole
team really did a terrific job
The Pirates will play conference
rival UNCW tonight at 7 p.m.in
Minges Coliseum.
Though the Pirates have already
defeated the Seahawks this year,
Gibson is worried about con-
fronting point guard Chandra
Watkins.
"She's very good, and if we
could just contain her I think we'd
have a great chance at winning
Gibson said. "But Wilmington has
come off several losses, so I'm sure
that this will be a good contest
Coach Logan
continuad liom page 9
The Pirates advanced to the
. Liberty Bowl twice under Logan's
term with 1995 as the most suc-
cessful year so far. The Pirates, fin-
ishing that year with a six-game
win streak, including a 19-13 win
over Pacific 10 power Stanford in
the St. Jude Liberty Bowl at
Memphis, were ranked No. 23 in
the final USA TodayCNN poll and
were listed at 14th in the New York
Times Computer rankings.
The Pirates face a 1999 football
season with the most attractive
lineup of home games in ECU his-
tory, according to ECU Athletics
Director Mike Hamrick, who failed
to return TEC's phone calls for a
comment on Logan's raise.
"I think that Logan deserved
the raise because both the raise and
the extension of his contract were
warranted by his performance as
head coach and by the performance
of student athletes in his football
program said Jordan Wichard,
chairman of the Board of Trustees
Finance Cornittee. According to
Wichard, the trustees approved the
proposal, which was introduced by
Chancellor Richard Eakin and
Hamrick last Wednesday.
"The Board of trustees felt pret-
ty good about it trustees member
Phil Dickson said. "Logan gives
ECU a promising future. If some of
the close games last season would
have gone different, we would have
made it to a bowl game and we
might have been sitting here trying
to figure out how to keep Logan
According to Wichard, there are
several factors which were signifi-
cant for the introduction of Logan's
pay raise to the Board of Trustees.
"I think that specific opponents
and the strength of the (1999)
schedule were less important than
his past performance and his poten-
tial to provide strong leadership to
the University Division 1A football
players Wichard said.
I Tniidiy
Photographer
positions
available
�required experience w photography
�owns camera equipment
�good organizationtime management skills
�apply at 2nd floor student publications
building or call 328-6366
CAMPUS REP
WANTED
The nation't leader in college
marketing is Making an energetic,
entrepreneurial student for the
position of campus rap. No solas
involved. Place advertising on
bulletin boards for companies such
at American Express, Microsoft
and Columbia House.
? Fabulous earnings
? Part lime job
? Choose your own hours
? 8-10 hours per week
American Passage Media, Inc.
Campus Rep Program
Seattle, WA
800-487-2434 Ext. 4444
Be a par
To join tl
call the i
TheBa
every
in th
j
Be sure and catch the latest
production by James Chapman
("Black Man Rising "Woman
with Wings "Our Young
Black Men are Dying and
No One Seems to Care)
Tuesday, February 2,1999 at 8:00pm
riendrixTheatre-Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University
Sponsored by the Student Union
Cultural Awareness Committee

aVSMib
An emotionally gripping
drama that examines the
difficulty of confronting
issues and love for
self and others.
r
Yoi
Tournam
ECU atr
February
j
If you l
Advance Ticket Prices:
Public -$3.00
ECU Student - Free
when valid ECU ID is presented
at the Central Ticket Office
in advance of the show.
All Tickets at the Door - $5.00
Billi;
(Nine-Ball
Tue Fel
MendenJ
(Men's and'
There is a
the Mende
Bowling (
the Main 1
4711, for i
n
p
h(s
t V
�.
)l





-I I Tnndiy, Fibrmry 2. 1898
sports
Tbi Eut CcnjH

i !
Wrestling
continued from page 9
PREPARE FORTHE STORM.
r- BAREFOOT
IS COMING!
Be a part of the whirlwind
To join the Barefoot Committee
call the Student Union at 328.4715.
The Barefoot Committee meets
every Wednesday from 4 pm - 5 pm
in the Mendenhall Student Center
iT
It's TOURNAMENT TIME!

You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in

BILLIARDS
CHESS
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent
ECU at regional competitions to be held at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va
February 19-21, 1999. All expenses paid by Mendenhall Student Center.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out!
Chess
Wed Feb. 3 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
Multi-Purpose Room,
was on TV and the rest is pretty
much history.
TEC: What was the "Power
Plant"
like? The Power Plant is a
wrestling training school in Atlanta,
Ga and serves as a prerequisite to
become a wrestler for WCW.
LODI: It's the hardest thing I
have ever done in my life. I was in
the military when I was in college.
I was in the Army Reserve and did
basic training. I served the whole
nine months through desert storm.
Nothing I did during this time
though could be comparable to the
three days at the "Power Plant" try-
out. There were 19 guys in my class
and three of Us made it and they
invited two of us back.
TEC: When came the point
when you decided to become a pro-
fessional wrestler?
LODI: Basically during my first
18 months when I was wrestling for
smaller independent shows and I
met a guy from WCW who told me
that I was wasting my time there.
He said that I could be a "main-
eventcr" on these little shows all
the time, but that I should get out
to WCW and make some real
money. So I went there and tried
out and basically this guy killed me.
But I made it nevertheless. I was
glad because I had to pay $250 for
the tryout and $3,000 for the fee.
TEC: Are you still under WCW
contract?
LODI: I just signed another
contract for three years.
TEC: What's it like being a
wresder, traveling around all the
LODI: I am ideal for this job.
I'm single, no wife, no girlfriend, no
kids. But the fust couple of month
on the road were quite exasperat-
ing. I spent more time on airplanes
and on the road than I wrestled. For
12 months I was on every single
show. I had to be on every single
TV live-show throughout the week
and at the Pay-Per-View events,
too. So I was only home at the most
five or six days a month.
TEC: Where are you from and
what did you do at ECU?
LODI: I was born in Ashboro,
and I went to school here and I also
had my personal training club in
Greenville. I graduated from ECU
in 1993 with a degree in political
science. I still live in North
Carolina.
TEC: How much of wrestling is
real and how much b fake?
LODI: Everything you see if .
real. We do everything. I broke my
ankle back in March. I had two
surgeries on my ankle, I had a
meniscus torn in my knee and had
a surgery there. I was out for seven
weeks. I also have two screws in my
ankle.
I think the biggest misconcep-
tion the fans have is that they never
realize that people get hurt. And it's
a very, very dangerous sport.
TEG Who is your "buddy" on
the show?
LODI: Raven, of course. Raven
is my best friend.
TEG How did you get your
name, Lodi?
LODI: Just spell it backward
and you know the meaning.
The ECU community will get
another chance to get a flair of
WCW wrestling when Lodi returns
to Minges Coliseum on Friday,
March 26.
Billiards
ZCl
(Nine-Ball)
TueFeb. 2 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center
(Men's and Women's Divisions)
There is a $2.00 registration tee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at
the Mendenhall Information Desk, the Billiards Center, and THE OUTER LIMITZ
Bowling Center located on the ground floor of Mendenhall Student Center, as well as at
the Main Desk of the Student Recreation Center. Call the Student Activities Office, 757-
4711, for more information
�rt-o
intimate.
appareI
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on a Student judicial Board
This is your opportunity to serve your fellow students
and gain valuable experience making solid,
well-thought-out decisions.
Requirements include:
�Minimum 2.0 GPA overall
�Must be in good standing with the university
�Must have good decision making skills
�Commitment to a fair and just judicial process
Information can be picked up at 201 Whichard or
Student Government Offices, 2nd floor MSC.
Applications are available beginning Thurs
Jan. 21 and end Moft. Feb. 8, by 5pm.





12 Ttitfiy. Ftkrutry 2. 1899
classifieds
FOR RENT
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom, in-
cludes watersewer; $276. Call 321-
4712.
LAMOSTON MMC Apartments:
$100 off deposit: 2 bedroom, 1 bath
apt. free watersewer, all applianc-
es, washerdryer hook-ups. over
900 sq.ft. Available now $426. Call
768-1921.
Branch across
from Papa John's on 10th Street.
800 sq.ft 2BR. $39Bmonth. 'Low
Utilities walk to ECU. bus route.
WD, plenty of parking. $100 off de-
posit. ASAP, call 329-7010
1 bedroom. 1 bath apt.
$276.00 per month, free watersew-
er, range, refrig. pets OK. Call 758-
1921 ask for Ken.
CANNON COURT Two bedroom. 1
12 bath townhouse. Includes stove,
refrigerator, dishwasher, washerdry-
er hook-up. on ECU bus route. Call
Wainright Property Management
UX, 756-6209.
106 STANCILL DRIVE. 2 bedroom.
1 bathroom, brick duplex, central
heatair. near ECU. $426 month.
pets extra with fee. Call 353-2717.
WALK TO ECU. 3 bedroom, gas
heatAC; call 321-4712.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$285month. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apts 126 Avery St. in Green-
ville - 5 blocks from campus. 758-
6696.
WESLEY COMMONS South: $100
off deposit: 2 bedroom. 1 bath apt.
free watersewer, washerdryer
hook-ups. 6 blocks from eampus.
Available now $440. Call 7681921.
CONDO FOR Rent 2000 sq.ft. con-
do. newly renovated. 3 bedrooms. 1
12 baths, washerdryer hook-up.
Available immediately. 762-1899
daytime. 561-2203 pager nights.
BEECH STREET villas - Three bed-
room, two bath apartments, close to
eampus. with laundry room, stove,
refrigerator, and dishwasher. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC 756-6209.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted,
sub-leasing a nice, fully furnished 3-
bedroom house. $350 a month, eve-
rything included. Looking for some-
one dependable; non-smoker, clean
and honest. Call Gail at 767-2996.
free wataraawar, epprox. 900 �q. ft
wa�h�rdryer hookups, oantral heatair,
( blocks from campus.
Omar Apartments Also Availabla
-All Properties have
24 hr. emergency maintenance-
call 758-1921
DUPLEX. 2 BDR, 1 Bath, heat
pump, private drive, close to cam-
pus, no pets please. Call 756-8444
or 355-7799.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom. 1 bath apt.
Only $350.00 per month, on Co-
tanche St. directly across from new
ECU Rec. Center. Call 757-3191.
NAGS HEAD, NC-Get your group to-
gether early. Relatively new house in
excellent condition; fully furnished;
washer 8 dryer; dishwasher; central
AC; available May 1 through Au-
gust 31; sleeps 8-$ 2200.00 per
month. 757-850-1532
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 762-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
3 BEDROOM duplex, private drive-
way, yard, bedroom partially fur-
nished. Private phone line to bed-
room if preferred. Rent $275. in-
cludes cable. Call Joe 7687826.
Serious studentsiui
GLADIOLUS GARDENS One. two.
and three bedroom apartments. Free
cable. Located on 10th Street. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC 7668209.
ROOMMATE WANTED 3 bedroom
located close to campus. $136mo
33 utilities, 12 phone. Call Jimmy
jpt 762-9376 for more information.
ROOMMATE WANTED I SERVICES
ROOMMATE WANTED, preferably
female to share beautiful new 3 bed-
room house on ECU bus route. Inex-
pensive rent. Call us toll-free � 1-
800824-8164 or 7688710.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 3
bedroom townhouse and 13 utili-
ties. 2 blocks from campus. Contact
Allyson at 767-8767 or Krystal at
329-1412.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share a
huge, beautiful house one block
from campus. Washerdryer, big
yard, icemaker, cable. 4 bedrooms. 3
baths, kitchen, dining room and 2
dsns. 7682048.
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE
Needed to share apt. close to cam-
pus, student preferred. Must be re-
sponsible 8 clean 8 like pets. Total
expenses per month will not exceed
$270. 762-0009.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom apartment located
at Kingston Plantation. Price includes
rent, cable, water. Laundromat, pool,
clubhouse on site. Needed for
Spring or Summer. 768-6344.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted,
sublease 2 bedroom, 1 bath apart-
ment on 10th St. No deposit.
$197.50mo. Cable, water, sewer in-
cluded, 12 other utilities. Available
now. Call Andrea at 767-0617.
FOR SALE
ADORABLE ROTTWEILER -
Shepherd puppies for sale Only
$25. They're growing quick and
need a loving and caring home!
Please call 561-7690 for more de-
tails.
AMCJEEP GRAND Wagoneer
1983 powerful V8. Power windows,
locks, seats, etc. This truck is huge,
fun. Perfect college vehicle. Will last
forever. Call Chris, 752-9038.
UPDATE: STUDENT desk, slightly
used, missing one drawer handle.
$75 with small office chair thrown
in. Perfect for studying, reasonable
negotiations possible. 752-6899,
leave message.
BLACK LAB pups, no papers, six
weeks old. all shots. Call 752-4039.
$30 each.
CUSTOM PRINTED T-shirts. Profes-
sion printers since 1981. Competitive
rates. Free shipping. Full art depart-
ment. We accept digital files in most
formats. 800-272-2066 culture-
works .com
FOR SALE: black 1994 Diamond
Back Outlook mountain bike. Like
new! Includes manual and Avenir u-
lock. $200 or best offer. Call 328-
3740.
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NEW APARTMENT? Need furni-
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($125). hunter green loveseat (sleeps
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cushion ($40.00), brown rocker
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lamp ($20.00), double box springs
and mattress set ($70.00), hunter
green baker's rack ($20.00). All
items are less than two years old
and are in great condition. Selling
furniture due to marriage. Call to in-
quire or make offer Contact Kristen
at 355-4808 during any hours. If no
answer, please leave message.
PREPAID CELLULAR phones: Trac-
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GREENVILLE REC. 8 Parks Spring
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223. Youth: Novice 1(ages
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415. Afterschool 1 (ages 10-14)
MW 4-5p 38-414 Afterschool
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Jr. Boys Teamfages 11-14) M-Th 4-
5:30p 31-422. Adult Beginner 1
MW 6-7p 38-414. Beginner II
TTh 7-8p 39-415. Morning begin-
ner MW 9-10a 38-414. Interme-
diate 1 MW 7-8p 38-414. Inter-
mediate II TTh 6-7p 39-414.
Morning intermediate MW 10-11a
38414. Call 329-4559.
STUDENT NEEDED to care for 8
year old. Must have own transporta-
tion. Child care background pre-
ferred. Creativity and personality a
plus. MonFri. 2:45-6p.m. Please call
321-0886.
PART-TIME JOBS AVAILABLE.
Joan's Fashions, a local Women's
Clothing Store, is now hiring. Em-
ployees are needed for Saturdays
and weekdays between 10AM and
6PM. with a particular need for em-
ployees on Tuesdays and Thursdays
(mornings and early afternoons). The
positions are for between 7 and 20
hours per week, depending on your
schedule and on business needs.
The jobs are within walking distance
of the university and the hours are
flexible. Pay is commensurate with
your experience and job perfor-
mance and is supplemented by an
employee discount. Apply in person
to Store Manager. Joan's Fashions,
423 S. Evans Street, Greenville (on
the Downtown Mall).
EARN EXTRA Cash Make your
own hours!) Responsible students to
marketmanage Citibank promo-
tions on campus. Free giveaways!
Earn $400 week. Call Ann at 1-
800-950-8472 ext. 118.
GREENVILLE RECREATION and
Parks Department Adult Soccer Offi-
cial's Meeting. The Greenville Re-
creation and Parks Department will
be holding an organizational meet-
ing for all those interested if officiat-
ing in the Spring Adult Soccer
Leagues. Position pays $12-$ 16 a
game. Clinics will be held to train
new and experience officials. How-
ever, a basic knowledge and under-
standing of the game is necessary.
The meeting will be held Thursday,
February 4, 1999 at 6p.m. at Elm
Street Gym. Experience require-
ments, clinic schedule, and game
fees will be discussed. For more in-
formation, please call the Athletic Of-
fice at 329-4550 between the hours
of 2p.m7p.m Monday thru Friday.
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED:
very fun work. Flexible part-time
hours (mostly evenings 8 weekends)
Must have outgoing personality and
reliable transportation. Own 35mm
SLR camera a plus, but not essential.
No experience necessary. We train.
$7.00 per hour. Call Tosha at 800-
722-7033.
LOOKING FOR a part-time job?
Help wanted at Szechual Express, in
the Food Court at the Plaza Mall.
Day hours from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m
night hours from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Apply in person. No phone calls,
please.
CRUISE 8HIP Employment - work-
ers earn up to $2000 month (w
tips 8 benefits). World Travel! Land-
Tour jobs up to $6,000 -$7,000
summer. Ask us howl 617-336-4235
Ext.C53623
$7.00 PER hour plus $160.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina. (Naga Head). Call
Dona for application and housing
info 800862-2122.
HELP WANTED
IBM INTERN8HIPSI Don't get a
summer job Run a summer busi-
ness. www.tuftionpainters.com. tul-
paintBbellsouth.net or 800-393-
4621.
PIANO PLAYER for small church.
For details, call 756-3730 before 9
p.m.
FREE RADIO $1260. Fundraiser
open to student groups 8 organiza-
tions. Earn $3-$5 per VisaMC app.
We supply all materials at no cost.
Call for info or visit our website.
Qualified callers receive a Free Baby
Boom Box. 1-800-932-0628 x 66.
www.ocmconcepts .com
CHILDRENYOUTH MINISTER po-
sition available. Part-lime with poten-
tial for fulltime. Send resume to J.
Respess, Winterville Baptist Church.
PO Box 1669, Winterville. NC 28590.
MODELS FOR portfolio. Reputable,
artistic, amateur photographer seek-
ing slim young women for portfolio
photos. References available. Send
note, photo (if available), address,
and phone for immediate reply. Paul
Hronjak. 4413 Pinehurst Drive. Wil-
son. NC 27896.
SPRING BREAK 99! Cancun Nas-
sau Jamaica. Travel free and make
lots of Cash) Top reps are offered on-
site staff jobs. AIMnclusive deals. 32
hours Free Drinks. Special Discounts
up to$100 per person. Lowest price
guaranteed. Call now for details!
www.classtravel.com 800-838-6411
JOIN THE BBC-The Buffalo Brew
Crew. BW-3 now hiring daytime
cashiers. BW-3, 114 East 5th Street,
apply within, 11-5.
HAVE LITERARY Talent? Help Ex-
pressions Magazine produce its Fe-
bruary double-issue. Submit ideas
on or related to minority love andor
history to: xpressyoselfOhotmail.com
Today!
GREAT JOBI Child care provider
needed for 5-10 hours per week. Ex-
cellent pay for experienced student
with references and own transporta-
tion. Call 355-2682. leave message.
NEED SUMMER help at Hatteras
Beach. Free housing. Need two
males or females for retail seafood
market. Bonus offered. Call 252-988
2215 or e-mail riskybOinterpath.com
SPRING BREAK Panama City
Beach. �Summit � Luxury condos.
Next to Spinnaker. Owner discount
rates. 404-356-9637.
GREEK PERSONALS
THANKS, DELTA Sigma Phi. for the
social last Friday. We had a great
time and hope to do it again soon.
Love. Sigma Sigma Sigma
THANK YOU Panhellenic for a great
time at the awards banquet. Good
Luck in the new year. Love. Alpha
Phi
THANK YOU. Katie Adams and
Amanda Markovitch, for all of your
hard work on Open House. Love, the
sisters of Alpha Xi Delta
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA would like
to thank all the guys who went to
our formal. We had a great time and
hope you did, too.
THANKS. KAPPA Alpha, for the
couples crawl last Thursday. We had
a blast. Love, the sisters of Alpha Xi
Delta
ZETA TAU Alpha - The brothers of
the Delta Chi fraternity would like to
thank you for dinner and for a great
social last week. Let's do it again.
Love, the brothers of Delta Chi
CONGRATULATIONS NEW Alpha
Phi officers, and thanks for a job
well done old officers. Good Luck)
Love, your Alpha Phi sisters.
OTHER
.
�lSPRINGBREAK
III II KS ,V hoi'ksiI I Kl 1 DKINKS!
I aril ' I RKI Iils $$SS$!
' llli.ll I Ill.n h.ics.ll.il. 1111.11
I.itwrsl I'rkl II'l.lll
I sin, li, - -III u�ni�-U-�mm
$8$ MAKE money fastl$$$ At
home, easy work, excellent pay. We
will send you free details! Send us a
long self-addressed stamped envel-
ope to: ACE Financial Publications,
3306 Brookline Ct Greenville. NC
27834. P.S. This really worksl
SPRING BREAK 99! Cancun Nas-
sau Jamaica 'Mazatlan Acapulco
Bahamas Cruise ' Florida Florida
South Padre. Travel Free and make
lots of Cash) Top reps are offered
full-time staff jobs. Lowest price
Guaranteed. Call now for details)
www.classtravel.com 800838-6411
The East Carolinian
PERSONALS
THE CARD Post a citizen to citizen
uncensured public address bulletin
paper creating the ultimate forum on
the subject of education in Wayne
Co. 8 the world to address a po-
tential flawmalpractice in educa-
tion is presently seeking from the
chancellor, vice chancellor, vice
chancellor's associate, chairman of
the psychology dept student presi-
dent 8 student newspaper editor at
ECU their definitions of the word
'forum 8 answers to the question:
Is the forum the foundation of edu-
cation? Will publish responses as
available. Tom K. Drew. PO Box 687.
Goldsboro. NC 27633. Pager 919-
731-1806
January 26, 1999 Mr. Tom Drew.
Post Office Box 587. Goldsboro,
NC27533 Dear Mr. Drew: During the
past few weeks, you have entered
the Spilman Building at East Carolina
University on numerous occasions.
University officials have heard your
concerns and have responded. Nev-
ertheless, you continue to enter Uni-
versity offices and to remain in those
offices for long periods of time. Your
presence in University offices has
caused considerable disruption. You
have interfered with the efforts of
University officials to do their work.
The purpose of this letter is to re-
quest that you cease and desist from
entering the Spilman Building or any
other building or grounds on the Uni-
versity campus. If you need to con-
tact a University official for anv rea-
son, please contact that official in
writing. If you continue to enter the
University campus despite this re-
quest, campus police will be noti-
fied. If you do not cooperate with
campus police, they will initiate the
procedures which could lead to your
arrest for trespass. Sincerely.
Richard R. Eakin, Chancellor.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
PSI CHI - All interested psychology
majors, with an overall GPA of 3.00
or above, are welcome to' attend our
first meeting of the semester. Wed-
nesday. February 3rd at 6 p.m. in the
Psi Chi Library, Rawl 302. Hope to
see youl
TEST ANXIETY: Tuesday 11a.m
12p.m The Center for Counseling
and Student Development is offering
this workshop on Tuesday February
9th. If you are interested in this
workshop, please contact the Center
at 328-6661.
GAMMA BETA Phi will meet on
Thursday Feb. 4th at 5p.m. in GCB
1031.
TEST PREPARATION: Tuesday
11 a.m12p.m. and Monday 3:30-
4:30p.m. The Center for Counseling
and Student Development is offering
this workshop on Tuesday, February
2nd, and Monday, February 8th. If
you are interested in this workshop,
please contact the Center at 328-
6661.
COME AND see what you have
been missing) Interact table from
Student Leadership, outside Wright
Place 2-22-4. Learn 8 have fun.
FRIEND OF Family? If so. join B-
GLAD every Wed. O 7:30p.m. in
room 3008 GC.
HAVE LITERARY Talent? Help Ex-
pressions Magazine produce its Fe-
bruary aouDie-issue. burjmit iaeas
on or related to minority love andor
history to: xpressyoselfOhotmail.com
Todayl
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION: Tues-
day 3:30-4:30. The Center for Coun-
seling and Student Development is
offering this workshop on Tuesday
February 2nd. If you are interested
in this workshop, please contact the
Center at 328-6661.
Stwng BmB Irani MM IN i Mtf MMUM m U US In 1W � bf
neogmnd to emmtej �� by Cowcl it Bit ftwnm BMMI
Bahamas Party
Cruise $279
s em � mm ma) � rm pm � Maaa law
Panama $119
City- Boar owe. HcMiy Inn SumprM t Wort
Jamaica $439
Cancun $399
7 Nighl � Air Hold � Free FoodM Hn of Onnki
Spring Break Travel-Onr 12th Year!
1-800-678-6386
Advertise in
The East
Carolinian
classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE$4.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 50 each
STUDENT LINE AD RATE$2.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 50 each
Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to refuse fhis rate for any ad deemed to be
non-student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE . . .$1.00
add to above line rate for either BOLD or
ALL CAPS type.
.All classified ads placed by individuals or campus
groups must be prepaid. Classified ads placed by a
business must be prepaid unless credit has been
established. Cancelled ads can be removed from the
paper if notification is made before the deadline, but
no cash refunds are given. No proofs or tearsheets
are available. The Personals section of the classi-
fieds is intended for non-commercial communication
placed by individuals or campus groups. Business
ads will not be placed in this section.
All Personals are subject to editing for indecent or
inflammatory language as determined by the edi-
tors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADUNE
4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue
ww
83
me
Enro,
increase
P K I K K
ASSISTANT
Recently,
Richard Eakin
Board of Trus
discuss, possi
university's
increasing to
end of the nex
Eakin is sei
ted to the can
determined ti
number of stuc
215,000 by 200�
" It is qu
that we could I
dents in 200
"With incredi
tion, effort anc
be worthwhile
goal of 27,000
While an c
dents does se
Eakin did cla
goals would i
reach. Increasi
of students wc
many addition
sity. Some
increase in fin
ships, new :
grams, and nc
the school, sut
Science and
Building, vvhic
early stages of
Board mer
potential for
students enrol
I
hosp
Hireda
Heart
I) E V O N
STAFF
Dr. Richard Ri
of Strongsvill
named associa
affairs and me
ECU Schot
Physician Groi
"Dr. Reinhi
the interpersoi
cal understand
ment to lead c
into the next
James Hallock
Health Scienc
School of Mec
ed that he ha;
lenge
Reinhart pri
interim medic;
the director of
ization lab at 1
Pitt County I
the cardiovas
PCMH and
school.
i


Title
The East Carolinian, February 2, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 02, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1317
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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