The East Carolinian, January 28, 1999







Thursday
High: 72
Low: 49
Friday
High: 64
Low: 48
BZfc
Online Survey
Do you think the sororities
ban on funding alcoholic
parties will be effective?
www.tec.ecu.edu
W(t wrcsttVf Loti prTarw lor
lt�o events mGni'millf.
Se &s 12
THURSDAY, JANUARY 28,1999 VOLUME 7. ISSUE 33
Student
raises
$100,000
John Pittman reaches
un
Sl'SANNK M 11. R NICK VIC II
ST AH WRITKR
ohn Pittman recently surpassed the
.100,000 mark in raising money for the
iniversity through the telefund office.
Pittman responded to an advertisement
hree years ago from the telefund office
ooking for people to call ECU alumni to
sk for monetary support for the universi-
y. He has been working there ever since,
naking phone calls and more recently,
upervising.
"I wouldn't have been able to do it with
.ut the competition, especially Crystal
Vhittington. We really worked off of each
ther Pittman said.
The money received is given to certain
cademic departments or student life pro-
rams on campus that the donor chooses to
ielp the development of each division.
"Alumni are excited about receiving the
alls said Carolyn Harmon, annual fund
lirector. "They are pleased to be talking to
tudents on campus who can bring them to
ouch with ECU since many have been
way for a while
Pittman is the first student employee to
aise over $100,000 through the telefund
ampaigns.
"I think it is extremely significant from
he standpoint that the mark is unprece-
lented said Brian Hardy, annual fund
ssistant director. "$100,000 is obviously a
ignificant amount of money, and it speaks
olumes about his (John's) dedication to
he university
Pittman said that by working in the
elefeund office, he developed a loyalty to
he university.
"It is a good place to work and to meet
riends Pittman said.
ECU is one of only three schools in the
tate that has this kind of program to raise
noney. UNC-Chapel Hill and NC State
re the other two.
Online kiosks serve as information centers
One Card gains
access to cyber stations
Tommy Yarroroicm
ST At I- WH ITKR
What are those large electronic boxes at
Mendenhall, The Wright Place, the
Computing Center, or The Galley at Jones
Residence Hall? They are ECU online kiosk
machines.
Similar to what you would see in a large mall.
these machines provide us with knowledge
about ECU and surrounding areas.
"Basically according to Bobby Tuggle,
webmaster for the Media Board, "the kiosks
are a source of information for students, fac-
ulty and visitors about ECU when on cam-
pus. The kiosks give ECU students informa-
tion about calender events, such as Barefoot
on the mall, concerts, varsity sports sched-
ules, facts about ECU, the Student Store
online, and even the East Carolinian
online
Other applications included within the
kiosks are adviser information, course
grades, unofficial transcripts, registration
schedules, financial aid status, and anything
having to do with ECU.
"We are also going to conduct a survey on
more of the student needs in the near future
"We are also going to conduct a
survey on wore of the student needs
in the near future
Paul Gipson
head ol Web Oevelopmeni
said Paul Gipson, head of web devetapmeru
in Computing and Information Systems.
Gipson also mentioned that more kiosks
will be added, including one called
Cybercafe, which, among other things, will
enable students to play games interactively
with students from other schools.
So next time one of these machines arc
seen, stick the ECU One-Card into the slot
and check it out. It could save some time
walking around campus, and help students
find coveted information. If there are any
suggestions, ideas or concerns about the web
kiosk, feel free to email Gipson at gip-
son@mail.ecu.edu or call 328-6401.
Sophomore Tina Johnson and sophomore business major Rob Servativs use the online kiosk at the Wright Place.
PHOTO BY MICHAEL SMITH
New building design completed Demarco loses back pay
Science and Technology,
largest structure on campus
Sl'SANNK Mll.RNKKVICII
SI UT WRI I'KR
'he design phase for ECU's new science
nd technology building was recently com-
leted.
The new building will be the largest and
tost expensive on the main campus.
"We are at the end of the design phase
nd are getting ready to start the construe-
on design said Bruce Flye, director of
acility Planning.
A leading reason for this project is an
icrease in enrollment in chemistry and
idustrial technology. Currently the
ianagan Building houses the schools, but
was recently identified as one of the two
orst academic facilities in the UNC sys-
;m.
The project is expected to cost over $52
lillion which will be provided by the
ieheral Assembly. ECU does not expect to
:ceive the state money until the end of
next year's session in August or September.
The science and technology building
will be 259,000 square feet, only second in
size next to the ECU School of Medicine
Brody Building which is 476,329 square
feet, Flye said.
"This one is probably a little more com-
plex than the Brody building with more
sophisticated laboratories, said Flye.
Construction is expected to take about 2
12 years, and should, at the earliest, be
ready for the
2002 fall
semester.
The
building will
provide lec-
ture halls,
laboratories
and offices
for the
Chemistry
Department
and the
School of
Industry
and
Technology
which are
currently in the
Flanagan Building.
The science and technology building
will be located between 10th Street and the
General Classrooms building, partially set
on Faculty Way.
According to Flye, the beauty of placing
the facility on the road is that it will not dis-
turb many trees in the arboretum bordering
10th Street. The new building will use
existing trees in the area to form an "inte-
gral" part of the design.
Former
View of the recently completed
PHOTO COURTESY OF FACILITY SERVICES
plans for the new Science and Technology building.
Ruling based on
badbehavior
Pktkr Davvvoi
ASSISTANT K1S Kill TOR
In a recent hearing, a stunned Sal
Demarco lost the rights of a former
ruling which granted him back pay
of unemployment benefits from
ECU.
The Employment Security
Commission voted i-2 to deny the
benefits to the fired professor after review-
ing the case stating that the ruling was
based on the "totality" of bad behaviors
which the former professor demonstrated
through the final stages of his career at
ECU.
Demarco has seen many incidents in
which he feels he was set up in his actions.
He has made claims that slips and articles
have been continuously placed into his per-
sonal files claiming that he had done
numerous acts which he was never repri-
manded for or even confronted about until
the university had brought charges against
ECU professor Sal Demarco turned down by EEOC.
Flit PHOTO
him.
"They were laying a paper trail on me so
that they could argue that there is a pattern
of misconduct Demarco said.
After losing his rights to collect unem-
ployment benefits from the school,
Demarco became worried that he may have
to return money received from the states
unemployment benefits commission. The
ESC however, decided that Demarco did
not have to return that money which totals
over $8,000.
SEI DEMARCO PAGE 2






2 TturttoV. Jwuity 28. 1999
news
briefs
news
Tht East Carolinian
Thursday, Ji
CONSERVATIVE
GROUP CHALLENGING
N.C. COLLEGES ON
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION
RALEIGH (AP) Colleges that
continue to use racial considera-
tions as a factor in admissions are
on shaky legal ground, a conserva-
tive think-tank said Tuesday.
"They should be getting legal
advice that they can be sued if they
do not change their policies said
John Hood, president of the John
Locke Foundation.ztor Dick
Robinson, assistant to the presi-
dent for legal affairs.
SUSPECTS ROBBED
TO SUPPORT THEM-
SELVES DURING
COLLEGE
Calif. (AP) � Two college stu-
dents allegedly robbed two local
businesses at gunpoint in hopes of
stealing enough so they wouldn't
have to work while attending
school.
Anthony Louis Criscofani, a
senior philosophy major, and fresh-
man Emma Rose Freeman, a
promising writer, were arrested
Friday and could be expelled from
the University of California, Santa
Cruz.
They are charged with robbing
a hair salon Jan. 16 and a Costco
warehouse store in Santa Cmz five
days later. An elementary school
teaching aide, Craig Dickson,
illegedly drove the getaway car.
.
SADDAM VOWS
REVENGE, BUT URGES
PATIENCE
BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP)
President Saddam Hussein vowed
Tuesday to retaliate for the dam-
age and casualties that U.S. war-
planes inflicted on the city of
Basra, the official Iraqi News
Agency reported.
Saddam urged the Iraqi people
to be patient in the battle against
the I'nitcd States, saying that
eventually victory will be on Iraq's
side.
"Your blood will not go in vain
he said in an address carried by
INA.
Iraqi officials says 11 people
were killed and 59 wounded when
missiles hit in and around Basra,
350 kilometers (230 miles) south of
Baghdad.
U.S. officials said one missile
fired at Iraqi air defense units that
were threatening American aircraft
may have gone astray and killed
civilians. But they said the results
of the attack were still being inves-
tigated.
INA said Saddam's speech was
directed to the citizens of Basra. In
the three-page address, he told the
city's nearly one million people,
who were hard hit by the 1980-
1988 Iran-Iraq War and the 1991
Gulf War, that they were "his
beloved and brothers
"Be patient, our beloved and
brothers, victory will be with those
who are patient said Saddam.
The Iraqi president lashed out
at Arab leaders, saying they have
opened their "ears to listen only to
the voice of the devil" meaning
the United States and closed
their minds to "the voice of right
"Your blood will blossom in
the tree of freedom, resistance and
victory Saddam said.
Minister, dean lectures on
Christianity and culture
Leonard addresses
role of spirituality
Demarco
IIIIIIIIMIIMI illllll i,1IJ(! I
"I was relieved, since this is
money which I have been in usinn
to pay for my lawyers bills
Demarco said.
Al McSurely, Demarco's attor-
ney, was a
little unsure of the definitive
final ruling on the issue without
having the final ruling in hand.
"At this point we really don't
know the details of what they
said McSurely said.
Demarco has speculation as to if
the commission even actually had
much review of the case without
being biased. Demarco went on to
add that since the deciding vote-
was from an alumni of ECU, it is
possible that he may have been set
up.
University attorney Ben Irons
seems to think things were won
from a reasonable point and fair
standard.
" I have had no contact with any
member of the commission Irons
saidI would not question the fair-
ness of the committee. "
Correction: An error appeared
in the Jan. 26 issue of TEC.
The ECU Panhellenic Council
governs sororities only.
NEED SOME
EXTRA
CASH??
COME APPLY FOR A
JOB WITH US AT THE
EAST CAROLINIAN ON
THE SECOND FLOOR
OF THE STUDENT
PUBLICATIONS
BUILDING
"The Great Disappointment" is
the title that some historians use to
refer to the public's reaction to reli-
gion when prophecies of the second
coming of Jesus in the year 1844
Jason Mkkkii.i.
STU'f W KI I l: K
Dr. Bill Leonard, dean of the Wake
Forest University Divinity School
and Baptist minister, came to ECU
on Monday as part of the seventh
annual Jarvis Lecture on Christianity
and Culture in order to address the
role of spirituality in the lives of
Americans
Leonard's lecture, "Spirituality in
America: Faith or Fad?" was origi-
nally published as an article of the
same name in the periodical
"Religion and American Culture
The focus of Leonard's lecture was
the increasing dominance of spiritu-
ality in Americans' spiritual interest
to what he called "The Great
Disappointment of 1844.
"Why ran V people simply have a
generalized spirituality apart
from rituals?"
Katie Knight
sophtimnn!
went unfulfilled; droves of people-
gave up their faith when they felt it
brought them nothing.
Although the audience that came
to hear Leonard speak was predomi-
nantly comprised of older members
of the community, there were a
number of ECU students in atten-
dance.
One student, sophomore Katie
Knight, asked Leonard, "Why can't
people simply have a generalized
spirituality apart from rituals?" to
which Leonard responded that he
felt that religious behavior was by
nature ritualistic. "He was very
open-minded in his responses
despite the fact that he was person-
ally affiliated with the Baptist
church Knight said. She also felt
that overall his responses were "too
ambiguous" and that he tended to
"skin around issues
Another student who attended
the lecture, sophomore Joey
Zawasky, said that he too felt that it
was "difficult to pinpoint Leonard's
position on certain issues such as
Leonard's opinion about whether
pluralism was a positive or negative
phenomenon.
Although several inquisitors tried
to persuade Leonard to comment on
what he felt were the implications of
the growth of spirituality and plural-
ism in America, Leonard stated that
he merely wished to "illustrate some
specifics in the phenomenon of spir-
ituality in America as opposed to
passing judgment on other people's
actions and motives in an increasing-
ly spiritual and pluralistic society.
Who said you couldn't find
a meal for a $1 anymore?
Beginning Wednesday, January 20th,
at the First Pentecostal Holiness Church in Greenville, you can
join us for a time of food, fun and fellowship. Every Wednesday atj
5:45PM we will be serving a meal - and it's only a BUCK! All
college students are welcome. After the meal we will have Cuttini
Edge Youth Church to feed your soul. So come and bring a friend!
We're located off Evans Street on 100 Plaza Drive - behind
Overton's Sports Center or call 756-3315.
Don't have a buck, COME ANYWAY! We'll see you there! j
1!
Don't wait until graduation
to start your career!
offers everything you need to start building a solid
career. Our top-selling product line is as innovative as our!
entrepreneurial environment. Add to that our fresh approach o
doing and generating business, and you can look forward to a
bright future I We have full-time openings available, and offer a
variety of work schedules to fit your needs.
If you're interested in an outstanding
opportunity in Customer Service, Retail �
or Outside Sales, visit.XHJXtf at our :
JOB FAIR
Thursday, February 4,1999
12pm-7pm at the ALLTEL Call Center
103 E. Arlington Blvd, Greenville :
Our management team will be on hand to answer your questions and talk
with you one-on-one about your career potential with us. If you cannot I
attend, please send your resume directly to: ALLTEL Communications, l&c.
Atten: Employment Center, 10100 Sardis Crossing Dr Charlotte, NC ,
28270. Fax: 704845-7422; E-mail: NC Employment@ALLTEL.com Eqjjal
Opportunity Employer MFDV Please visit our website at
www.alltel.com
FEBRUARY 4-9,1999
MCGINNIS THEATRE � EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
EAST CAROLINA
T H E A
TICKETS
GENERAL PUBLIC S9 and $8
CHILDREN $6 and S5
ECU FACULTYSTAFF S8 and $7
ECU STUDENTS $6 and S5
10 CHUG! TICKE1S, CALL 252 328 6829
awce
D
r e i e n
t�
m
ft
NEWI
2p
MAS
Sun:
Wed
ALL
Fr. Paul Vaetft
Healthcare is a growing and
exciting career field. As a
volunteer, you can get a head
start by learning job skills and
gaining experience while you
help people in need. With
more than 100 volunteer areas
to choose from, there's sure to
be a position that fits your
interests. Call Pitt County
Memorial Hospital Volunteer
Services at 816-4491 today.
You'll be glad you did.
www.uhseast.com
D
G
75
No
E�
UnlwnHy Hearth WRKKtmCammi Includes Pitt County Memorial Hojplul, East Carolina University School of
privjte practice physicians, community hospitals and other health affiliates'
or
Thi





Thursdiy, January 28, 1999
news
Tha East Caroiiniaa
, you can
sdnesday atj
CKI All
lave Cutting,
ing a friend)
ehind
1
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uatiffl
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lilding a solid
ative as our!
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forward to a
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Retail '
ur ;

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Centert
nville :
istions and talk
I you cannot
nunications, l(ic.
arlotte, NC ,
LTEL.com Ecjjal
(ETS
and $8
and $5
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8 6829
ng and
A.s a
t a head
kills and
hile you
With
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's sure to
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ounty
rolunteer
today.
i
i
alth affiliates
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
LOCATION: 953 E. 10TH ST. (BOTTOM OF COLLEGE HILL AT EAST END OF CAMPUS)
WELCOME,
�prin4 Semester ?tu3entsH
FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL US 757-1991
MASS SCHEDULE:
Sun:1 1:30am and 8:30pm
Wed: 5:30pm
ALL MASSES ARE AT THE CENTER
Fr. Paul Vaeth Chaplain ft Campus Minister - For more inhumation about these and other prootims, mil Of visit daily between 8:30am ond 11 pm.
1 2 PRICE
WINGS!
TONITE & EVERY THURS. NITE
AFTER 9PM DINE IN ONLY
AS ALWAYS, NO COVER CHARGE!
$1.99 Hi Balls!
$1.75 Heinekens!
.75 Pink Margaritas!
Every Thursday!
DOWNTOWN
GREENVILLE
757-1666
t No Fiesta Could Be Better Than
? Chico's!
If you stand for
Equality, Justice, and Truth
ECU wants you to serve
on a Student Judicial Board
This is your opportunity to serve your fellow students
and gain valuable experience making solid,
well-thought-out decisions.
Requirements include:
�Minimum 2.0 GPA overall
�Must be in good standing with the university
�Must have good decision making skills
�Commitment to a fair and just judicial process
Information can be picked up at 201 Whichard or
Student Government Offices, 2nd floor MSC.
Applications are available beginning Thurs
Jan. 21 and end Mon. Feb. 8, by 5pm.
Thursday, Jan.28
Religious Arts�The East
Carolina Religious Arts Festival
gets under way at the School of
Music and runs through Saturday.
Evening performance events will
be held at Memorial Baptist
Church. An organ and trumpet
recitals scheduled for 8 p.m.
Contact: Jeanette Fishell, 328-6851
Safety on Job Sites�the ECU
Center for Applied Technology
will hold a health and safety semi-
nar from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the
Willis Building. The topic of this
seminar is "Respiratory
Protection Contact Mark Friend,
ECU Center for Applied
Technology, 328-6708
All About Quilts�A lecture pro-
news
briefs
gram about the National Quilt
Exhibition�on display in ECU's
Gray Gallery�will be held at 5
p.m. in the auditorium of the
Jenkins Humanities Center. The
quilts are on display at the School of
An through Feb. 13.
Friday, Jan 29
Concert�The FolkArts Society
of Greenville will sponsor a concert
with guitarist Del Ray at the Willis
Building at 7:30 p.m. Ray's style
combines blues, jazz, and hillbilly
boogie.
Jazz�ECU's popular Jazz at
Night program gets under way at
Mendenhall Student Center at 8
p.m. ECU student musicians along
with faculty 'jazz professor Carroll
Dashiell will perform instrumental
SPRING BREAK '99 � PANAMA CITY BEACH, FLORIDA
Its all good!
peach CtA'ff '
And this Spring Break,
it's all here
Coll us toll free
1-800-224-GULF
Located next door to
Spinnaker & LaVela, the
Boardwalk Beach Resort is
Spring Break Headquarters
for Panama City Beach,
Florida And as host to Si's
Beach Cluh '99, you'll be
immersed in the center of all
the non stop party action!
So party with thousands.
but sleep with the best!
Gulf front
octommoootiont
Froo post to
Spinnaker �. LoVrio
Roit to Sport!
iitratod loach
Club'99
and vocal selections. Advance tick-
et purchase or advance pickup of
free student tickets is encouraged.
Saturday. Jan JO
Basketball�The Pirates will
play the Tribe from William and
Mary at 7 p.m. at Minges Coliseum.
This game is billed as Faculty and
Staff Appreciation Night. Faculty
and staff may purchase up to five
tickets for $5 each.
Performing Arts�A performing
trio composed of pianist Joseph
Kalichstein violinist Jaime Laredo
and cellist Sharon Robinson will
perform chamber works by Haydn,
Beethoven and Shostakovich at 8
p.m. in Wright Auditorium. Call
328-4788 or long distance at 1-800-
ECU-ARTS.
It seemed like a good idea
ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW ar www.SPRINGBREAKHQ.com
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ECU Bus Line
Pirates Cove
33051. tOth Street � Greenville, NC 27858
1 i89 Irinms .�latL&MlJCmr






4 Thursday, January 28, 1899
news
The East Carolinian
Pope arrives in St Louis after
triumphant visit to Mexico f ifs TOURNAMENT TIME!
ST. LOUIS (AP) � Pope John Paul
II arrived in St. Louis today for his
fifth visit to the U.S. mainland and
immediately compared America's
old battles over racism and slavery
to new ones over abortion and
euthanasia. "America faces a similar
time of trial he said.
Recalling the U.S. Supreme
Court's 1857 Dred Scott decision,
which reduced slaves to property,
the pope said there is today "a cul-
ture that seeks to declare entire
groups of human beings consid-
ered 'unuseful' to be outside the
boundaries of legal protection
At the airport ceremony the
start of a 30-hour stay in St. Louis,
following his triumphant five-day
trip to Mexico he also called upon
Americans to "open wide your
hearts" to less fortunate people.
The pope was greeted by
President Clinton. "For 20 years
you have lifted our spirits and
touched our hearts Clinton said.
"For 20 years you have challenged
of us to think of life not in terms of
what we acquire for ourselves but
in terms of what we give of our-
selves
The president quoted a Polish
phrase that means, "May you live a
hundred years and more And he
added: "May you continue working
and teaching and lighting the way.
Welcome to the United States
Then the pope and the presi-
dent met privately in a hangar,
while Hillary Rodham Clinton
greeted cardinals assembled for the
pope's visit.
The pope has criticized U.S. pol-
icy on the death penalty, abortion
and economic sanctions against
Cuba and Iraq, and on Monday the
Vatican condemned an American
missile attack on Iraq. In a state-
ment, spokesman Joaquin Navarro-
Valls said the bombing "confirms
once again" the pope's view that
military measures "don't resolve
problems in themselves, rather
they aggravate them
The differences shouldn't
dampen the pope's welcome for
the visit. As many as 600,000 peo-
ple were expected to turn out; more
than 530,000 Catholics live in the
St. Louis area.
When the papal plane landed at
Lambert Airport, young people
waiting at the Kiel Center to join
the pope in a youth rally this
evening reacted with a rousing
cheer.

vi
V7l
Sports
Pad
Tonightu
Downtown Greenville
Every Thursday
Ladies Free All Night
Block Party J

Ladies Night
Free Admission w ECU ID
(For guy's until 12:30)
Karaoke in Splash
Dance in Sharky's
$1.00 Bud & Natural
$1.25 Mixed Drinks
$1.50 32 OZ. Southpaw Draft
S
ECU Men 's
Lacrosse Club
Interested Practice
Starting
Soon
The ECU Men's Lacrosse
Club team is looking for
new players. Join us at an
information and season
opening meeting.
For more information,
Ben Kley and Chris
Burgress at 752-9806, or
contact the Recreational
Services at 328-6387
Interest meeting
January, 28th
9:00 pm
SRC Room 202
i
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
BILLIARDS BOWLING
CHESS TABLE TENNIS
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent
ECU at regional competitions to be held at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va
February 19-21,1999. All expenses paid by Mendenhall Student Center.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you jhe opportunity to find out!
Billiards Nine Bam
Tue Feb. 2 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center
(Men's and Women's Divisions)
Bowling
Chess
Wed Feb. 3 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
Multi-Purpose Room
Mon Feb. 1 6:00 p.m.
The Outer Limitz
Mendenhall Bowling Center
Men's and Women's Divisions
i Table Tennis
Thur Jan. 28 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Multi-Purpose Room
loom �W
(Men's & Women's SinglesTeam Divisions)
There is a $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the
Mendenhall Information Desk, the Billiards Center, and THE OUTER LIMITZ Bowling Center
located on the ground floor of Mendenhall Student Center, as well as at the Main Desk of the
v Student Recreation Center. Call the Student Activities Office, 757-4711, for more information
FEBRUARY 12, 1999 9 PM - 2 AM
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
Fun Flicks Video Karaoke
Salsa and Merengue Dance
vDJ Dance w J. Arthur
Loo-Zee-Anna Laser Tag
Bourbon Street Bingo
Lady Luck Casino
King Cake
Glow Bowling
Cajunj
Students may attnd fnMety using their valid ECU One Card. One adult guest wilt be admitted with a guest pass. Student
and guest must eWftogether. Guest passes will be available beginning Monday, February 8 through Friday, February 12,
1999, at the Central Ticket Office from 8:30am to 6pm and Todd Dining Hall Meal Plan Office from 9am to 5pm. On February
12, guest passes will be available at the Student Recreation Center from 5pm to 10pm.

ii
:
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represent
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J
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www.harristeeter.com
The Best Is What Were All About!
MS oz Restaurant
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ouffiew
Everyone knows that technology is paving the way for more accessible information.
An incredible fact, though, is that so many ECU students are either unfamiliar with what's
Been made available or simply don't know how to use all the new computer systems.
The online kiosks, often misinterpreted to be money machines, located at The Wright
flbce, the Computing Center, Mendenhall and The Galley, are the latest example of this type
I iff advancement
All kinds of information can be received by just slipping in your ECU One-Card. It's
I possible to pull up your financial aid status, registration schedules, and even research into the
school's history.
The applications are diverse, but the impact is simple. Now anyone who's on campus,
whether it's to teach a class, go to a class, or check out the sights, can find out answers to his
or her questions fast
This is especially advantageous to freshmen and transfer students who are least acquainted
with the campus and all the school's events. But these kiosks can also benefit those who have
been here a while by the services they provide in convenient locations.
Overall, this is certainly a project that adds meaning to "Pirate Pride Sure, there may be
seme quirks that students still find agitating, but this is a stepping stone toward increasing fun
and decreasing the rime it often takes to get information.
What's important to remember is that these kiosks, or any other form of helpful technology,
is only profitable if it's used. So be sure to pull out your One-Card next time you're around a
kiosk and discover all that it uncovers for you.
OPINION
Columnist
Chris
Lasers point to cheap fun
The little red dot is virtually
harmless. The places that laser
pointers are most commonly
used, outside the business
world, are at sporting events
and movies.
Those little red dots finally made
somebody mad. Laser pointers
Nave been outlawed in Greenville,
and I bought mine the same day
they passed the law. Outlawed may
be a strong word for what has really
happened. All over the United
States many local governments
have started to pass laws against the
Me of laser pointers to minors. How
sad is it to be under 18? You can't
vote, drink, smoke or even buy laser
pointers.
Most of the laws make it illegal
to sell laser pointers to minors and
Ar point the beam on people's faces.
Fines range up to $500 and jail
terms up to 90 days for the
�1
violation. As harmless as they seem,
misguided use can make laser
pointers potentially dangerous.
Direct eye exposure can cause
irreversible damage to the retina.
Many police officers feel that the
little red dot can be potentially
dangerous because it is the same as
a laser sight This can cause the
same problem as the realistic
looking water guns; the officers
shoot a child accidentally thinking
their own lives are in danger.
I think that the laser pointers are
more of a nuisance than an actual
problem. Most people dislike laser
pointers on them because in the
movies where the little red dot
lands the bullet is sure to follow. I
think most people believe too
much in what these movies depict.
Unless you have reason to believe
somebody wants to kill you � then
you may be justified. The little red
dot is virtually harmless. The places
that laser pointers are most
commonly used, outside the
business world, are at sporting
events and movies. In the past year
virtually every televised basketball
game and wrestling event I have
seen, has had a dot on somebody's'
face. People have good aim and a
steady hand too, I've seen some
basketball players at the free throw
line with a motionless dot on their
heads for at least ten seconds. This
is not as easy to do as it seems. Of
course this is funny for a couple of
minutes, but becomes tiresome and
annoying. Especially at the movie
theater. That is the one thing at the
movies that really upsets me. Once
or twice on the screen is fine, but
the continuous dot roaming the
screen is really annoying. There is
no reason to have the dot on the
screen for the whole movie.
These new toys are cheap,
useful and are fun to play with. I do
think that some people have gone
overboard using the little red dot to
annoy everybody, but passing laws
is a little excessive. For safety
reasons I can see some regulations,
but a hefty fine and jail? That's a bit
absurd. If laser pointer owners use
their toys in a respectful way I think
that most people don't have a
problem with them. For the most
part people enjoy the occasional dot
on the forehead of a professor or
actor on the screen. I know I do,
that's why I went and bought mine.
'We believe that everyone�even dissenting
voices�has a right to be heard and respected
and that to find the common good we must
begin by acknowledging our deepest
differences.
OPINION
Columnist
Marvelle
Sullivan
Tobacco an excuse to collect
is not the governments job
to care what an individual
does in regard to his or her
health and then regulate based
on that concern.
Cigarette�smoking, manufacturing,
pricing, taxing, and every other
imaginable appendage has caused
quite a few political debates, lawsuits
and anti-smoking campaigns over
the past few years. Even though it
seemed that Clinton was viciously
throwing tobacco in the spotlight and
that a lot of the rhetoric was
ridiculously singling out tobacco as
the primary ill of society, it was all
excused by most as a governmental
attempt to promote the public's
health while alleviating the
supposedly enormous financial
burden cigarette smoking had placed
on the government's health care
programs.
After the last few months' events,
it should be crystal clear that
cigarette smoking is no longer a
health issue to our government, but
an attempt to raise money for
exorbitant spending programs. The
45 cent increase in December was
the result of a settlement between
the cigarette manufacturers and state
and local governments. The $260
billion settlement is to be paid over
25 years, and is to serve as a
contribution to the costs of the
effects of smoking which the state
claims is an overwhelming portion of
its health care budget. This is
indeed a questionable claim by the
states who now want to funnel the
money into programs that have
nothing to do with health care or
smoking. In fact, some sates are
debating on how they'll even spend
that much money. I thought they
needed it because smoking was such
a strain on their budget! I guess it
isn't. It probably never was.
To make matters worse, the
federal government saw the money
given to the states and wanted a
piece of the action because, after all,
they pay for half the health care in
this country. As it is, the federal
government receives 24 cents off
every pack of cigarettes sold. That
amount is schedule to rise to 39 cents
in 2002. Nevertheless, Clinton has
just proposed a new 55 cent tax on
cigarettes. Is this tax to help pay for
health care or to curb smoking?
No. The administration says the
new tax would be for all the
programs and spending Clinton
wants, but doesn't want to put in the
budget. It's absolutely absurd and
quite shameless.
Even on the off-chance that all
these taxes and tax proposals were a
sincere attempt to curb smoking, it is
not the government's job to care
what an individual does in regard to
his or her health and then regulate
based on that concern. If health was
a legitimate concern, then the states
would sue and the the federal
OPINION
Columnist
Stephen
Kleinschmft
False advertising frustrating
It's crap like this that keeps
more people from going to
college.
I am constantly amazed at how
people will lie right to your face
when it comes to advertising,
particularly certain places here in
Greenville that seem to have no
honesty at all.
During this past year, I shopped
at the mall several times and went
into stores with banners that said
"Everything in the store fifty
percent off and found that there
was only one rack of old t-shirts
with such catchy phrases as "Can't
touch this" or "I'm not as think as
you drunk I am I apologize to
those stores because I must have
innocently misunderstood what
"everything in the store is fifty
percent off' means. After all, it's
pretty easy to misinterpret.
Certain tobacco shops advertise
tobacco "water pipes "funnels"
and "whipped cream chargers
They will ask you to leave if you
call them by what they really are
� bongs, beer bongs and nitrous
whippets. They have old Army gas
masks attached to water pipes. Is
this the responsible way to smoke
tobacco? Does anybody hit a glass
four-footer to enjoy a nice batch of
Bugler? And has anybody ever
seen anyone make their own
whipped cream? I guess they'll just
have to keep on stocking those
tobacco crack pipes.
The bookstores advertise that
they have the lowest possible
prices. I went to U.B.E to find a
book for a geography class that I am
taking. Last semester I checked the
price and it was a little over $20.
This semester it was $35. The same
small, spiral bound book almost
doubled in price in less than a
month. It's crap like this that keeps
more people from going to college.
LETTER
to the Editor
IFC president: resist stereotypes, rush
-Janybndra
Public school official.
It's that time of year again. This is
the time of the year when Greek
men are recruiting new members
for their organizations, otherwise
known as rush. There are 18
fraternities on ECU's campus and, I
urge each and everyone of the male
students to go by as many houses
this week as possible to see if
fraternity life is for them.
Most of you may see banners
hanging from trees or numerous
fraternity men coming up to you
and inviting you to their houses,
but you really do not understand all
that is involved in this recruitment
week. First of all, if you do visit a
house during this week, it in no
way binds you to join that house, or
any house for that matter.
Some of you may only have seen
the "Animal House" type image in
fraternity living, and that is keeping
you away. If you just come and visit
these houses you will realize that
this is not true. If you are looking
for that type of group, I urge you to
look elsewhere because we are not
interested in recruiting people that
are just in it for the alcohol. We all
enjoy having a good time but
realize that an education is the
main reason we are here.
Here are facts that you may not
know about fraternity men: eighty
percent of Fortune 500 executives
are fraternity men. Seventy-six
percent of current United States
senators and congressmen are
fraternity men. All but three
United States presidents since 1825
have been fraternity men. Even on
ECU's campus, the majority of
leaders are affiliated with the
Greek system. So if you are
interested in making the most of
your four years here at ECU, I am
asking you to throw away your
stereotypes, and I am giving you a
personal invitation to visit any or all
18 of our fraternities at ECU. If you
have any questions, please call the
IFC office at 328-4706.
Brian Tuck
IFC President ,
government would heavily tax fasi
food, alcohol and caffeine. It is nc
secret that the government place;
taxes on imported goods so we'll in
turn buy the domestic versions,
therefore manipulating the
consumer's purchases through
regulation. The tobacco action,
though, is different because it is a
blatant political stab and an
underhanded move by our
government, in particular Clinton
and his followers.
This issue is infuriating not just
because of the financial aspect, but
because Clinton purposely
demonized tobacco, not really
because of the health effects but
because he could collect money and
a few public relations points. It is no
coincidence that tobacco is a staple
of the Southern economy, which is
not an avid supporter of Clinton's
values and politics.
Admittedly, cigarettes aren't
exactly an ingredient for a long life
filled with good health. This is a fact
of which we are all quite aware. The
administration's denonization of
cigarettes under the guise of health
prevention and promotion has got to
stop. Clinton and the others need to
admit tobacco rhetorc is meant to
collect money without stepping on
supporter toes. Then they need to
pick on something els: and leave the
tobacco companies alone.
Four Seat!
Comsi
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Life on Tu
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706. ;
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Four Seats Left
Jason Lalour
Chris Knotts
Life on Tuesday
Chris Knotts Ants Marching
Victoria Kidd
YOU KNOW I'VE BEEN �
OH A REAL L0SINO STREAK fVf
WITH THE LAP1ES LATELY. �
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When you wish upon a star
You could wind up a winner in
the 1999-2000 REACH FOR THE STARS
Campus Living Sweepstakes!
tt s
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This is just the first phase of the 1999-2000 reach
for the stars Campus Living Sweepstakes. Mark your
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UP. 99-140






8 Thursday. January 28. 1999
features
9 Thursday, Jan
The East Carolinian
Joyner's additions
benefits students
Editions to Joyner Library are soon to provide students with more readily available resources and space for work.
FILE PHOTO
Facilities to improve
quality of resources
Erica Sikks
staff writer
It's the quietest place in
Greenville. The scenery is an
inspiration for any term paper due
the next day. It's the Joyner
Library, and for the frequent visi-
tors to this place, there is good
news. Those of you who have yet
to set foot in there, listen up.
For the past few months, Joyner
Library has been under construc-
tion and there have been improve-
ments made to benefit students.
The renovations have been com-
pleted in three parts, according to
the Director of Academic Library
Services, Carroll Vamer.
"The first two parts, which
included the construction of the
new library and the Sonic Plaza,
have been completed Vamer
said.
The third part, the actual reno-
vating of the west wing is under
way. The construction is complete
and workers are in the process of
installing shelving and furniture.
The transition of 1.3 million books
began last semester. The building
will remain open during the reno-
vations.
The new facilities will include
more space for existing services,
new computers and a new copy
center.
"One obvious addition will be
the 80 new workstations said
Peter McCracken, a reference
librarian. "There will be more elec-
tronic resources and space for stu-
dents to write papers
According to Vamer, these
workstations will have Word pro-
grams and Netscape Internet
access.
There will also be 36 new study
groups consisting of about nine
people according to subject.
"With more group study
rooms all over the library, looking
for places to work will be easier
said Deborah Stanley, a reference
librarian. "There is also more space
where we can bring back govern-
ment collections, documents and
older books and journals that were
in storage
According to Vamer, Joyner's
hours of operation could possibly
change.
"There are currently two inter-
nal committees examining the pos-
sibility of extended hours Vamer
said.
This has been a request
because of the increasing demand
on Internet services and because of
Joyner Library's new status asla
"There will be more electronic
resources and space for stu-
dents to write papers
Peter McCracken
refeience librarian
Doctoral Two Research University
Library. The possibility of 24 hour
access to the first floor will be
determined by student and faculty
input and the committee's deci-
sion.
The renovations are expected
to end sometime before Spring
Break. The new building will be
dedicated on Founder's Day,
March 8. Those unfamiliar with
the library's abundance of
resources should definitely check
out the new facilities.
Campus clubs benefit area
Organizations give
back to community
Phillip Gilfus
STAFF WRITER
Let it never be said that ECU does
not give back to the community.
Many service clubs and organiza-
tions on campus provide charity to
Greenville and the surrounding
areas. Students and faculty have
found a way to take time off from
school and work to help make lives
better for people in the area.
One such club is the East
Carolina Ambassadors. This group
is an extension of the ECU Alumni
Organization. The current 50
members of this club help with all
alumni functions and also act as
official representatives of the uni-
versity.
The Ambassadors are visible at
many activities at ECU. They
serve as ushers at concerts and
spring and fall commencements.
They also work during open hous-
es answering visitors questions
along with other various jobs.
In the community, the
Ambassadors have adopted
Biltmore Street and help keep it
clean. They have also started to
work with local schools by helping
provide tutors.
The Ambassadors have an
annual membership drive. In order
to be a member one must have at
least a 2.5 GPA. The Ambassadors
currently meet every Wednesday
in the Mendenhall Student
Center.
Another major service organiza-
tion at ECU is Alpha Phi Omega.
Rechartered 16 years ago, this coed
club is going strong.
"We believe in providing ser-
vice to the community and service
to the nation said Jason Wimmer,
president of Alpha Phi Omega.
"We accept any service project that
comes along
"We try to get out in the com-
munity as much as possible.
We work a lot with the
American Cancer Society and
area nursing homes
Jason Wimmer
President of Alpha Phi Omega
The current big project for
Alpha Phi Omega is the 2000 Goal
Project, created by former
President George Bush and retired
General Colin Powell. This project
involves collecting 2,000 canned
goods by the year 2000. At this
time, Alpha Phi has managed to
collect 1,000 cans. This food is
scheduled to be distributed before
the holidays to the Ronald
McDonald House, Children's
Miracle Network and other chari-
ties. Most of the cans were collect-
ed through membership pledges,
but they hope to place collection
boxes on campus and around the
community.
"We try to get out in the com-
munity as much as possible. We
work a lot with the American
Cancer Society and area nursing
homes said Wimmer.
Currently, Alpha Phi Omega
includes 32 active members, seven
advisors and 15 recendy-inducted
pledges.
East Carolina Friends is a cam-
pus organization that tries to reach
out to the youth in Greenville.
They provide children who need
attention or someone to talk to
after school with a "big brother" or
"big sister By sending out appli-
cations to surrounding schools,
East Carolina Friends finds kids to
play games with, go to the movies
with or to just have a good time
with. The members work mosdy
on a one-to-one basis. Anyone who
is interested in this program
should see Linda Mooney at
Brewster 409A.
For more information on all
other organizations on campus,
stop by Mendenhall Student
Center room 109 or call 328-47.
New Book assists students
before graduation time
Authorprwides
career advice
Nina M. Dry
FEATURES EDITOR
As college students, our main prior-
ities include completing four years
of higher education, and obtaining
a great paying job once we gradu-
ate. For some this might sound like
an impossible feat, but there's a
new book out that makes the
career search more feasible.
Author Keith F. Luscher has
written "Don't Wait Until You
Graduate! How to 'Jumpstart' Your
Career While Still in School Sure,
there are many career guides avail-
able to assist students with com-
pleting their resumes, cover letters
and even tips for their first job
interviews, but Luscher's book
takes on a different aspect.
"The books I've seen focus on
the vehicles of job hunting
Luscher said. "Those elements
aren't as important as how people
know your talent and personali-
ty
According to Luscher, no one
can describe and tell about them-
selves in a single page. Building
careers and connections is a long-
term process.
"No one is assured of anything
in today's economy, which alone is
reason to start working as soon as
possible Luscher said. "It is vital
for students to make building rela-
tionships, service and professional
work a cornerstone of their college
experience
Luscher said a career is not
about finding a job, but serving a
need.
"Don't Wait Until You
Graduate is not a book about job
hunting Luscher said. "It is about
what students must do long before
" hope students gain a clear
understanding that there are
plenty of small steps students
can take today that can have a
huge impact on their life
tomorrow peace of mind
knowing that opportunities in
the form of needs exist every-
where, reassurance in that net-
working is not just another
game of cold calling and busi-
ness card passing, and a new
self understanding
Keith Luscher
Author of "Don'i Wail Until You Graduate
the job hunt begins
"Don't Wait Until You
Graduate shows students how to
build an impressive resume by tap-
ping into business and volunteer
opportunities long before gradua-
tion day.
"This book is really ideal for
underclassmen, especially fresh-
men and sophomores Luscher
said. p
Luscher was inspired to writfe
this book during a period when hfc
himself was unemployed, trying tj
provide for his family. He said he
had to go through the process df
networking. ;
"When I was in college I was
always worried about what I was
going to do Luscher said. "So
many resources available appeared
to focus more on procedures anil
tricks, while missing what I graduh
ally learned to be at the heart of real
career development: identifying
needs and filling them and buildink
strong relationships in the process
Besides understanding the conj-
cept of filling a need, Luscher has
other issues that he hopes the reaaV
ers of his book learn.
"I hope students gain a clear!
understanding that there are plenty!
of small steps students can takej
today that can have a huge impact
on their life tomorrow peace df
mind knowing that opportunities;
in the form of needs exist every-
where, reassurance in that network!
ing is not just another game of colrj
calling and business card passing,
and a new self understanding
Luscher said.
Today Luscher is a creative
director at a consulting firm for
non-profit organizations worldwide,
is an editor for Network News and;
has been helping students recog-
nize and achieve their career goals
through public speeches at a variety
of student and education baset
organizations.
Web site ideal for students
Animalhouse.com
offers many services
Phillip Gilfvs
staff writer
Look out, American Online, there
might be some competition on the
horizon. The web page http:ani-
malhouse.com offers a wide variety
of information, online services, and
forums for college students across
the nation.
The web site is open to anyone,
but only members receive full
access. Membership is free and
offers e-mail, daily contests and
assistance in building personal web
page.
The first section to explore,
"News and Views keep students
up to date about current events and
allows them to post their opinions
on the Internet using newspapers
linked to the site, including USA
Today and Daily Variety. E-Zine,
an on-line magazine containing
articles about entertainment, fash-
ion, lifestyle, literature, musie and
weliness, is also available. The
College Press Exchange also offers
a campus news area that includes
stories from over 1,600 colleges and
universities across the nation.
"Since the web site's launch less
than two months ago, animal-
house.com has continued to satisfy
the needs and wants of college stu-
dents from coast to coast said
Stephanie Rudnick of Edelman
Worldwide, the company which
produces the site.
Students are encouraged to
speak their minds in a forum called
"BackTalk where issues range
from Ken Starr to one-night stands.
Users need to only type in their
city and state for a complete local
weather forecast.
"Shots is a section for trivia
buffs. Here they can find out that
ivory soap only floats by accident
and that 68 percent of college stu-
dents get "trashed" at least once a
year.
"Over 250,000 college members
have signed up as members of the
web page Rudnick said. "The
site welcomes over 300,000 unique
visitors a week
Over 50 on-line radio stations
"Since the web site's launch
less than two months ago, ani-
malhouse.com has continued to
satisfy the needs and wants of
college students from coast to
coast
Stephanie Rudnick
Edelman Worldwide
are broadcasted on the site, includ-
ing stations from Western Carolina
and UNC-CH. Soon the page will
include the animalhouse.com radio
station, airing live and on line. It
will play alternative rock, and lis-
teners are encouraged to submit
�their requests to the virtual DJs.
"This site intends to offer insid-
er information on campus life said
Stacey Johnes, also from Edelman
Worldwide.
Campus news, college surveys,
U Magazine and the animal-
house.com newsletter all inform
students about the happenings of
various colleges and universities.
"Workbiz" provides job assis-
tance, including resume building
tips and interview suggestions. The
site also includes information on
jobs, job hunting, career stages,
negotiating, promotions, and
changing careers, as well as links to
business sites.
A lifestyle section has informa-
tion on health issues, horoscopes,
recipes, personal ads, technology
articles. "Love Buzz" has articles,
advice and anecdotes about rela-
tionships and sex.
"Area" offers up-to-date details
on 4,000 destinations and travel-
related happenings worldwide.
The site also includes information
about travel and tips on hotel
accommodations, moving and
sports opportunities.
Animalhouse.com also provides
an on-line mall. A customer can
purchase such items as music,
movies, computers and condoms
with the point and click of a. mouse
button.
Music news and free music sam-
ples are convenient for anyone to
download, as well as movie pre-
views and local television sched
ules.
There is easy access to a chat
area. Here six rooms are available
for use, as long as chatters follow
the "house rules Information on
soap operas, movie release dates
and reviews are also on the site.
For all the Sony Playstation and
Nintendo 64 junkies out there, the
"Games" section provides an abun-
dance of information about arcade
games, reviews, shareware, news
and preview.
So far over 250,000 college stu-
dents have signed up as members,
and that number is expected to
grow with the number of services
the site offers.
"The average stay at animal-
house.com consists of about 21
minutes Johnes said.

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9 Thursday. January 28. 1989
features
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(AP) - Nobody was more surprised
than Joe DiMaggio when he saw a
television report that he had died.
"He was livid his lawyer and
neighbor Morris Engelberg said
Monday.
"Then I made him laugh. I said,
'Joe, we must be in heaven togeth-
er
The two were watching a tape of
"Gunfight at the OK Corral" -
DiMaggio's favorite Western - at
the baseball great's home in
Hollywood, Fla on Sunday.
They happened to stop the tape
just when the report appeared as a
"trawl" across the screen during
"Dateline NBC
NBC ran another crawl about 20
minutes later, saying its previous
report was inaccurate. The network
later said a technician in the New
York control room inadvertently
sent the item.
NBC was trying to speak with
DiMaggio family to apologize but
hadn't reached anyone yet, spokes-
woman Alex Constantinopole said
Monday.
DiMaggio, recovering from
pneumonia and lung cancer surgery
on Oct. 12, already was upset by a
story in the New York Daily News
that described him as bedridden
and in grave condition.
The lead doctor on the team
that treated the 84-year-old Hall
Famcr during his 99-day hospital
stay disputed the Daily News
report.
"He is progressing nicely since
his discharge from Memorial
Regional Hospital one veek ago
Dr. Earl Barron said in a statement
to The Associated Press. "Over the
weekend, his physical therapy has
progressed to the point that he is
walking. Reports of his condition
worsening are not true
Engelberg, who lives next door
SEF DIMAGGIO. PAGEIO
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LAKE MARY, Fla. (AP) - Police
found a black-and-white fiberglass
cow that was stolen from a Chick-
fil-A billboard on Interstate 4.
Aside from missing an ear, the
cow was in good shape when found
in an open pasture Thursday, offi-
cials said.
Last week someone pried the
cow from the billboard, where it
was bolted to a railing.
The 125-pound cow stands 6-
fcet high, is 10-fcet long and 4-fcet
wide. The thief left behind another
cow, the one painting the fast-food
chain's "Eat MorChikin" slogan.
Scminole County Sheriffs
spokeswoman Deannu Brown said
�nirlinrities haven't yet found the
person who stole the Holstein,
which was valued at $8,000.
"We're relieved that our cow has
been safely found said Marsha
Dickinson, marketing director for
Central Florida CHck-fil-A.
The cow was expected to return
to its perch on the billboard Friday,
Dickinson said.
Thief has
no luck
WEST NEW YORK, NJ. (AP) -
In crime as well as law enforce-
ment, timing, it seems, is every-
thing.
Remberto Oliver found that out
Tuesday as he broke into an apart-
ment where police were already
inside, questioning someone else
about another crime, police said.
"While the guys were inside,
someone decided to commit a bur-
glary Capt. Richard Maggi said.
"He pried open the dtxtr, and lo
and behold, our detectives were
inside already
Officers were investigating the
theft of meat and other items from
the La Primera del Yayabo Meat
Market, in which someone broke
into an adjacent building and used
a sledge hammer to bash a hole
through the wall into the market.
The entire meat case was wiped
our, and hundreds of dollars worth
of beef, pork and chicken were
stolen.
Detectives developed informa-
tion that a possible suspect lived in
an apartment on 60th Street.
While they were there, question-
ing Rafael Guevara, they noticed
someone prying the apartment
door open.
In walked Oliver, right into the
arms of waiting detectives.
He was charged with burglary.
Police say he picked the apartment
at random.
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10 Thursday. January 28. 1999
features
Till East Carolinian
1 Thursday, Ja
True Millennium begins in 2001
PHILADELPHIA (AP) - Maybe
you had nodded off by then, but
toward the end of his State of the
Union address President Clinton
made a blooper.
"Barely more than 300 days
from now he said, "we will cross
that bridge into the new millenni-
um Even the leader of the free
world can't get it straight.
The hoopla surrounding Jan. 1,
2000, which has swept up every-
one from cruise organizers to reli-
gious zealots to heads of state,
ignores one simple fact: Jan. 1,
2000. is not the start of the millen-
nium.
"You can make a common
sense case for celebrating 2000
because of all the zeros said
Steven J. Dick, an astronomer and
historian at the U.S. Naval
Observatory in Washington. "But
that doesn't change the fact that
the millennium starts in 2001
The Naval Observatory, which
is the keeper of the Master Clock
of the United States, has become,
by default, the referee for the
great millennial debate.
DiMaggio
continued Irom gage 9
to DiMaggio and visits him at least
once a day, called the newspaper
report "absurd
"He's walking. He's taking ther-
apy Engclbcrg said. "And he will
be at opening day
Yankees owner George
Steinbrenncr said last week when
DiMaggio was discharged from the
hospital, "Joe will certainly toss out
�og gooei
Find it in our classifieds.
Only 5? for 25 words
with a vai'd student I.D.
"We're just inundated with
calls from people arguing on both
sides Dick said.
The scholar responsible for the
confusion is one Dionysius
Exiguus, a sixth-century monk
who devised the calendar now in
use throughout the world.
Dionysius Exiguus ("Dennis
the Short") was a Roman. Romans
did not have the concept of zero.
So when he devised the calendar,
he started with the year one.
"You have to go through the
year 10 for a decade, you have to
go through
the year 100 for a century, and
you have to go through the year
1000 for a millennium Dick said,
who was watching the other night
when Clinton made his gaffe. "We
all cringed he said.
"Oh, dear said Sue
Vogelsinger, of the White House
Millennium Council, when
Clinton's error was pointed out.
"He's obviously referring to the
SEE MILLENNIUM. PAGEII
the first ball
The Yankees open their home
schedule April 9 with a day game
against the Detroit Tigers.
"That's my goal now - to have
Joe at opening day Engelberg
said. "My first goal was to have him
get out of the hospital, and that
happened. A lot of people didn't
think it would. He's miraculous
Steinbrenncr � had wanted
DiMaggio to throw out the ceremo-
nial first pitch at last fall's World
Scries, but DiMaggio was in the
hospital by then.
MATCH POINT
When building a campfire,
clear a 5-foot area around
the pit down to the soil.
REMEMBER, ONLY YOU CAN
PREVENT FOREST FIRES.
You drank.
Yoii danced.
Youhadsext)
miss'h9
Free Pregnancy Tests
Call Carolina Pregnancy Center 757-0003
209-B South Evans Street (downtown near Courthouse)
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CENTER INFORMATION
DESK OR THE EAST
CAROLINIAN OFFICE
BEFORE FEBRUARY 8
AT 5 P.M.
a way of saying
"Be Mine" this
Valentine's Day that's
cheaper than a tatoo.
COMPLETE THIS FORM AND BRING IT TO OUROFFICE OR DROP IT WITH YOUR PAYMENT IN OUR BOX AT THE INFORMATION
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�tt Carolinian
Of�aV
d
LAW
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topping Center
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istudents
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ouponj
:epted
1 Thursday, January 28, 1999
features
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TATTOOING BY AWARD WINNING ARTISTS!
From downtown, go straight down Dickinson Avenue
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Super Bowl Sunday Bash
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live Music by the Groove Riders at 7pm
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Advance Student Tickets $7
FacultyStaff Advance Tickets $12
Tickets at the Door $15
SATURDAY, JANUARY 30, 1999 8:00PM WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
Millennium
coniinued from page 10
idea that popular sentiment is
looking to the year 2000 as the start
of the millennium
In a handbook to be distributed
to cities that want to be designated
Millennium Communities, the
White House council has included
a section clarifying the "chronolog-
ical quandary
"Our instincts tell us to cele-
brate on December 31, 1999 it
says. "But logic says that every mil-
lennium is made up of 1,000 years.
. . . The third millennium begins
on January 1,2001
White House millennium
events began in 1997 and will con-
tinue through Jan. 1, 2001, strad-
dling the gap between emotion and
logic. The Vatican in Rome, which
is expecting a crush of visitors for
Christianity's third millennium,
has also sidestepped the question
of the great event's timing, sched-
uling observances from December
1999 to January 2001.
And in Philadelphia, where a
Millennium Clock on the east side
of City Hall is counting down the
seconds to the "faux" millennium,
the celebration will run a full 18
months, wrapping up with a City
Hall bash on Jan. 1, 2001, the real
millennium.
Is anyone really going to let the
facts get in the way of a good party
this New Year's Eve? Hardly.
Plush venues all over the world are
planning mega-bashes for Dec 31,
1999, from cruises along the inter-
national date line to parties at the
Eiffel Tower.
The Naval Observatory will cel-
ebrate the millennium by reviving
the tradition of dropping a "time
ball" at midnight (a la Times
Square) from a staff atop its main
building.
The observatory will drop the
ball twice: once on Dec. 31, 1999,
and again a year later. "We realize
the popular sentiment Dick said,
chuckling.
"And here at the observatory,
we're going to celebrate 2000 and
2001
Money found in mail
S. RUDOLPH ALEXANDER
PERFORMING ARTS SERIES
III1HI S r, illliM; lime mi �itw

CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE HOURS Monday - Friday 8:30am to 6:00pm
2S2.328.478t or 1.800.ECU.ARTS; Deafspeech impaired access
252.328.4736 Student discount tickets will be available with ECU One Card
at the Central Ticket Office until 6pm on the day of the event, providing,
tickets remain. All tickets at the door are full-price.
TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) - A number
of rural residents were at once
amazed and puzzled when they
found $100 bills in their mailboxes
- some as many as three.
"I was very surprised said Paul
Dennis, who found two in his
One resident reported the finds
to the Pima County SherifTs
Department.
Sgt. Brad Foust, a spokesman,
said officers had no idea why the
money was left or who might have
put it in the mailboxes.
Write a Letter to the Editor
and Jet your view be heard
S
t's
ORMATION ROLINIAN 1
E S e 12 18 24 30 11i i
Bring all letters to
our office which
is located on the 2nd Floor of
Tte Student Publications Building
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Ssit'� ��' � ah-��'��'� �
12 Thursday. January 28, 1999
sports
Thi East Cuollniin
Dunk and Jaynes take command of Pirate court
Basketball's senior
leadership influences team
Bl.AINK Dkniis
STAFF W�ITK�
If you lead them, they will follow. Point
guard Alico Dunk and center Beth
Jaynes are both lone seniors on their
respective basketball teams and show
intelligence and courage in the leader-
ship roles they have taken this season.
Senior athletes must often perform
additional responsibilities and set posi-
tive examples for younger players. Jaynes
and Dunk have proven themselves both
on and off the court and have continued
the tradition of pride and excellence in
Pirate athletics.
Dunk is a multi talented athlete from
Ayden, N.C. who was born with a bas-
ketball in one hand and a football in the
other. A gifted athlete. Dunk was a
superstar at Ayden-Grifton High School
averaging 27.5 points over the last 10
games of his senior year.
"All I ever had around growing up was
a basketball Dunk said. "I grew up
playing football and basketball, but I
really didn't think I was big enough for
football
Dunk's family has always been central
to his personal and athletic life. After
completing a successful freshman year at
the University of Tennessee, his family
ties played a key role in bringing him to
the Greenville area and to ECU.
Alico Dunk's Career Statistic
YEAR
1994-95
1996-97
1997-98
totals
G-GS
27-10
27-1
27-26
81-37
FG-FGA
23-70
21-80
43-107
87-257
Pet
.329
.263
.402
.339
(3-pt) FG-FGAFT-FTARebAvg.AstSt).B
2-1124-4351-1.96425I
5-2923-3537-1.456332
16-5328-4760-2.27829il
23-93
75-125
148-1.8
"My family has always been there tV
me and they really pushed me athletical-
ly Dunk said. "Playing close to honfc
where my family can come see me is tne
main reason I came back
Many athletes have influenced Dunji
throughout his career including former
ECU players Tony Parham and Othello
Meadows, who both helped Dunk find'a
home on the Pirate team. A hero to mil-
lions, Michael Jordan also influenced
Dunk and showed him a level of excel-
lence to strive for.
"Everybody looks up to Michael
Jordan Dunk said. "He set the standard
for playing basketball and I really respett
him
Dunk's positive attitude, dependabili-
ty and leadership has drawn the respett
of players and coaches alike. Assistant
SEE BASKETBALL. PAGE 13
Pts.avg
72-2.7
0-2.6
130-4.8
272-3.4
198
87 8
Alico Dunk's Career Highs
Rebounds:
Assists
FGsMade
FG Attempts:
3-pt held goals made:
3-pt field goals attempted:
FTeMede
.14 vs. �St. Joseph's, 112597
5 vsMiss. State, 21895 & 5 vs. UNC Asheville, 122097
7vs! XSU, 2495
6 vs St. Joseph's, 112597
8vsUNC Asheville, 112297 & St. Joseph's 112597
'3 vs . iUNC Asheville, 112297
.7 vsUNC Asheville, 112297
.8 vsLiberty, 11498
Source: ECU Sports information Department
Senior Beth Jaynes (middle) waits for a rebound
Women's hoops
prepare for JMU
Second half blackouts
blamed for losses
Knit: Cm cm
SF.NIOB WalTF.H
The Lady Pirates lost their last
two conference games, but now
have a chance to redeem them-
selves against James Madison.
In the game against George
Mason, ECU did not shoot well
and it really cost them. The Lady
Pirates managed to shoot only 39
percent from the floor and only 17
percent from the three-point line.
After taking a 39-28 lead into
halftime, GMU did not allow
ECU to score for an entire five
minutes of the second half. When
the women's basketball team got a
bucket, it was freshman Allison
Trapp with the hot hand, which
turned to add up to 16 points.
Point guard Waynctta Vcney also
added 13 points of her own, but it
was the players of GMU that had
four different players scoring in
double figures.
Two days later, the same prob-
lem seemed to torment ECU in
the match up with American
University. Just as GMU had hurt
the Pirates in the second half, it
was American who outscored
ECU 19-6 in the first nine minutes
of the second half. This seemed to
be a big problem during the last
few games and the Lady Pirates have
been addressing this in practice.
SFi W0MENS BASKETBALL PAGE 13
Mister Mi-American looks for title
Ingram among schools
all-time best
STKI'IIKV Sen II a mm
StAIIIK tt HI I t H
In only two years of collegiate
competition junior Darrick Ingram
has placed himself among the
greatest track athletes in ECU's
illustrious history of the sport.
Ingram enters this season as the
two time defending CAA 200
meter champion and two-time All-
Amcrican in the 400 and 4x400
meter relay. This year Ingram has
his sights set much higher.
"Right now, my goal is to win
the national championship and
win in the Penn Relays Ingram
said.
Head men's track coach Bill
Carson attributes Ingram's success
to his "gifts speed and size.
"He's almost 6'5" and very fast
and he's got an element of tough-
ness Carson said.
Ingram's development into a
national caliber runner can also be
attributed to his mindset.
"He's a great motivator and he
works hard and shows great deter-
mination said teammate Britt
Cox.
"He was more of a 200 meter
runner coming out of high
school, but when we saw his
size, we pushed him more
towards the 400
Bill Carson
Men's track coach
When Ingram cameo ECU as a
Derrick Ingram
File Photo
lanky 200 meter
runner, Carson
began to feel his
gifts were not
being used to their fullest.
"He was more of a 200 meter
runner coming out of high school,
but when we saw his size, we
pushed him more towards the 400.
The size and toughness comes into
play more in the quarter. His
toughness, his speed and his size
makes him very good in the quar-
ter Carson said.
In addition to changing events
after arriving in college, Ingram
also had to change the focus and
intensity of his training.
JUNIOR
From: Lumberton N.C.
High school: Lumberton High School
Career Highlights:
7997:
Ail-American in the 4x400 meter relay
CAA Champion in the 200 meters
CAA Champion in the 400 meters
Named Conference Most Valueble Performer
7998:
Ail-American in the 400 meters
Ail-American in the 4x400 meter relay
CAA Champion in the 200 meters
Source: ECU Sports Information
13 Thursday, J
21)00 E. 10th s
bastgate Shopi
Across From H
nchlnd Stain G
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r
"In high school speed can take
you a long way. In college every-
body's got speed. So to become
faster you've got to train more. It's
more intense training and more
weights Ingram said.
All of Ingram's work almost
resulted in the ultimate reward last
Sff TRACK. PAGE lb
HEY!
Confus
Choices
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Already I
CHEM 11
Physiolo
Here
Cl
Call oi
Deadline
Ultimate frisbee drafts new players
Team members enjoy
perks of travel, fun
Blaise Dkmis
staff Karma
Football, basketball, and soccer all
rolled into one high-flying, heart-
pounding sport is what ultimate
frisbee is all about.
Both the ECU men's and
women's ultimate frisbee club
teams are having successful seasons
and arc looking for new players to
join their journey to the National
Championship. Throughout Feb.
individuals interested in playing
this exciting new sport are invited
to come out and practice with the
teams.
Ultimate frisbee not only pro-
vides the opportunity to play a
rapidly growing and challenging
sport, but offers players the chance
to travel and meet people while
staying in excellent physical condi-
tion. Both the men's and women's
teams compete in tournaments up
and down the East Coast in an
attempt to reach the National
Championships, which are held in
Boulder, Colorado this year.
ECU Recreational Services, an
organization that is funded by stu-
dents' fees, assists club teams
financially. According to SRC coor-
dinator Cray Hodges, the men's
ultimate frisbee team was allocated
$3,220 for the spring semester
while the women's team received
$2,240 respectively for their travel-
ing expenses this year.
"Each club team comes up with
a budget and we will then look at
it Hodges said. "But each club
also does fund raising on its own
and each club also charges particu-
lar dues which helps them with
some of theirfosts
According to the men's team
president Jeff Wilhelm, the club
charges each new member of the
team a one-time due between $35-
$40.
"Twenty dollars goes straight to
"The new recruit will also
receive a nice jersey, a warm
up sweater and a frisbee for
his money"
Jeff Wilhelm
Men's leam president
Uliimaie Irisbee
Ultimate Players Association,
which is the governing body of col-
lege ultimate frisbeef Wilhelm
said. "The new recruit will also
receive a nice jersey, a warm up
sweater and a frisbee for his money.
6
"We also host another ultimate
tournament again this spring with
more than 20 teams which will
additionally help our budget. As a
matter of fact, we will have a great
budget this semester and we will
be able to spend some money on
social gatherings and we will give
out some free, printed T-shirts
Wilhelm said new recruits will
have the chance to work one-on-
one with seasoned frisbee players
to prepare for tournament play
beginning in March.
"During the spring we will work
with the new players on the game,
the throws and physical condition-
ing Wilhelm said. "Then in
March we will start to go to a lot of
tournaments
Wilhelm believes the team is
ready for new players and current
team members will work hard to
get everyone ready for action.
SEE UUTWATE NHtKI. MK13
Loti promotes
upcoming event
I
WCW wrestler Loti prepares to rumble.
S t A v � K k p o k T Aycock Elementary at 7:00 p.m.
The wrestler is also promoting
an upcoming SCWA event to be
held in Greenville March 25.
WCW wrestler Loti, an ECU alum-
nus, returns to Greenville this
weekend, for an NWA match at
I





Carolinian
rt
been there fir
I me athletical-
close to home
; see me is trie
luenced Duri)
:luding former
m and Othello
:il Dunk find'a
A hero to mil-
Iso influenced
level of exed-
p to Michael
et the standard
I really respefct
e, dependabiK-
wn the respett
te. Assistant
WE 13
Ik. Pts.avg
72-2.7
0-2.6
130-4.8
272-3.4
22097
i97
tie
hool
r relay
rs
rs
le Performer
r relay
rs
13 Thursday. January 28. 1989
sports
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PAGE 15
HEY!
Confused about Career
Choices?
Love Working in the Lab?
Already Have
CHEM 1150,1160? Anatomy &
Physiology, Microbiology
Here's a Suggestion! Find out about
CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE
Call or Come to the Department Office for mere
information-
ROOM 308 BELK BUILDING
328-4426
Deadline for applications for Fall 1999 to Fob 1,1999
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Basketball
continued from page 12
men's basketball coach Barry
Sanderson says Dunk has definite-
ly been the team leader and has
come out and worked hard every-
day.
"There isn't anyone who comes
in contact with Dunk who doesn't
like and respect him Sanderson
said. "He is such a good person
and good guys are fun to coach
According to Dunk, he tries to
lead the team and make sure
everyone is giving 100 percent.
Dunk has made his job look easy
while adjusting to the pressure felt
as a lone senior player.
"I feel the pressure of everyone
looking up to me Dunk said. "I
just try to be a role model to the
young guys and lead by example
Jaynes always gets the job done
on the coiirt and she isn't afraid to
kick some butt when some butt
needs to be kicked. An aggressive
attitude and dedication to consis-
tently improving help her lead a
talented and dangerous Lady
Pirate basketball team.
"Beth (Jayies) adds
experience because she has
been here through the down
years head coach Dee
Gibson said. "She adds a
perspective that some of us
don't have. Her role is to be
a leader on and off the
floor
Jaynes said she began
playing basketball almost
before she could walk and
that her family has always
been very involved in her
career. She attended North
Forsyth High School just
outside Winston-Salem,
N.C. where she crushed many
school records. She became the
school's all-time leading scorer and
also holds the record for most
points in a single season.
"My parents have always been
supportive Jaynes said. "My dad
first started me out and coached
my fourth-grade little league
team
Jaynes has learned a lot about
herself as a. person and an athlete
through her career at ECU. She
has always tried to challenge her-
self jnd work to Kich the next
level.
"I have learned to manage my
time well and to push myself
Jaynes said. "No matter how hard
you work you can always push
yourself that extra mile
Jaynes has learned some of her
aggressive attitude from one of her
heroes of the game, Charles
Barkley. She respects Barkley'o no
nonsense attitude and how he will
go out there and do whatever he
has to.
Head coach Dee Gibson sees
some of Barkley's killer instinct in
Jaynes' style of play. Gibson says
Jaynes is somewhat
of a wise guy and
keeps the atmos-
phere loose and
relaxed.
"Beth is mean and
she likes to punish
her opponents on the
floor Gibson said.
"She is also playing
with a lot more confi-
dence this year
Jaynes has played
many key roles for
this year's team. She
is a leader, provides a
strong rebounding
presence in the paint,
and is a scoring threat
as well.
"I'm not the vocal
type. I try to lead by
example Jaynes
said. "It's weird
being the only aciiiui,
but I really enjoy it"
With so many
accomplishments,
Jaynes has much to
be proud of.
Alico Dunk gives 100 percent with a free throw.
FIU PHOTO
Beth Jaynes Career Stats
1997-98 26-5 67-140 .383 0-5 60-82 .610 85 3.3 14 it
totals 79-5 115-282 .417 1-6 104-164 .635 200 2.5 37 335 4.2
Jaynes Single-Game Career Highs
� - 15 vs. UNCC (11-29-97)
Scoring ifi-98)
?b�und8A vsS'wake Fo'rrest (12-2-97) and vs. Furman (12-19-95)
Aif 4 vs. Davidson (12-20-98)
Steals 4 vs. VCU d-7-96) and vs. GMU (1-17-97)
Source: ECU Sports Information Department
Ultimate
Frisbee
cuntinueil Irom paijc 12
"We are really conducive to
getting new recruits on the team
Wilhelm said. "The new guys will
get lots of personal attention. Wc
can really bring their game around
if they will stay focused
Candacc Voight, president of
the women's club emphasizes the
love of the sport and the fun team
members have.
"It is a new sport and you don't
need a lot of experience to learn
Voight said. "We want everyone to
have fun and grow as a team. It's
just really fun
' The challenge, excitement and
unique character of the sport of
ultimate frisbee has caused it to
spread to college campuses
throughout the United States and
Canada.
"I encourage anyone to give us
a call and try out the sport said
Mike Wiegan, a veteran frisbee
player. "Whatever you want you
can achieve on this team and we
arc going to have a lot of fun
New players who join the
men's or women's frisbee teams
should also be prepared for suc-
cess since both clubs have a tradi-
tion of winning and competing
nationally.
"We have made Nationals nine
out of the last 12 years and we real-
ly want to step it up this season
Wilhelm said. "Winning is some-
thing we are used to
The men's and women's clubs
will be accepting recruits through-
out Feb. Anyone interested in
playing this popular new sport can
attend an official meeting on Feb.
4 at 5 p.m. in the Student
Recreation Center or contact Jeff
Wilhelm at 752-3492.
Cincinnati players may sue
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) � A
former University of Cincinnati
basketball player may proceed with
his lawsuit accusing the school of
damaging his reputation with a
lengthy investigation of his athletic
eligibility, a judge ruled.
Charles Williams, a point guard
from Los Angeles, says he wants to
clear his name.
The Ohio attorney general's
office asked the Ohio Court of
Claims to throw out Williams' law-
suit, but Judge Fred Shoemaker
notified Williams' lawyer by mail
Monday that Williams can go ahead
with the lawsuit against the state
school.
Shoemaker heard arguments by
lawyers for both sides in October.
Williams sued in May, accusing the
university of breach of contract,
defamation, negligence, negligent
supervision, civil conspiracy and
intentional infliction of emotional
distress.
He wants at least $175,000 in
damages.
Tonya Ivory, Williams' god-
mother, said the lawsuit will be
allowed toprocced on all the allega-
tions except a negligence claim
that the judge threw out.
James Wesncr, the university's
general counsel, was away from his
office when called for a response
this morning.
The dispute resulted from the
university's investigation into
Williams' eligibility to play for the
school. It grew into a general inves-
tigation of Cincinnati's basketball
program that resulted in the team
being placed on probation for two
years.
Williams was withheld from
competition starting Feb. 26, 1997,
and never played again for the
Cincinnati Bearcats. He argued
that the university had made him a
fall guy for its problems, and that
the probe damaged his ability to
play basketball elsewhere.
The Ohio attorney general, rep-
resenting the university, argued
that there was no precedent in
Ohio for a student athlete to sue his
university for a violation of an
NCAA eligibility rule.
The NCAA ultimately suspend-
ed Williams for all but the final six
games of the 1997-98 regular sea-
son in October 1997 after the uni-
versity completed an eight-month
investigation into the basketball
program.
Williams, who started 25 games
of the 1996-97 season, was found to
have received extra academic ben-
efits during the summer of 19
that violated NCAA rules.
In addition, Williams received a
round-trip airline ticket, a ticket to
a Cincinnati Bengals football game
and meals from a university profes-
sor that were deemed improper
extra benefits.
Denver prepares for rowdy crowd
DENVER (AP) � City officials
are planning another celebration il
the Denver Broncos win the Super
Bowl Sunday. And Denver police
officials say they are ready to bring
out the tear gas in the event if
things get out of hand after the
game, such as last year's riotous cel-
ebrations.
Lt. Judy Will told Lower
Downtown residents that police
officials believe drunken, rowdy
fans will again try to tear up the
town if the Broncos beat the
Atlanta Falcons.
That will bring a swift police
response, including tear gas, Will
said.
After the Broncos beat the
Green Bay Packers in last year's
Super Bowl, out-of-control partiers
milled through the streets of Lower
Downtown, swinging from street
lights, lighting bonfires and tipping
over parked cars.
Andrew Hudson, spokesman for
Mayor Wellington Webb, said such
actions leave the city "with a black
eye
Officials said they believe a rela-
tively small number of people were
responsible for problems.
"Most law-abiding people found
the people that were doing that
pretty disgusting Hudson said.
"It's idiotic. It's that kind of behav-
ior that is going to get people hurt
and get people arrested
City Councilwoman Debbie
Ortega said officials are encourag-
ing residents to watch the game at
home. Police also plan to close
streets, if necessary, and may red-
bag parking meters to keep cars off
the streets.
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I





Thi iiit CaralMa
14 Tawrtiy. Jww M. il��.
Womens
Basketball condition improves
CMiimrf Iron MH �
�We're working on stepping up
and playing both halve of the
�game junior Danielle Melvm
rsaid. "We are a young team and
we have been working on being
: more consistent.
In the contest against
American, the Eagles had a 23
! point lead, but the Pirates were
I able to chop that lead down to it,
�- but that is as close as they got
b Veney was the high scorer for
b the Pirates with 21 points. Again,
n Trapp tacked on 14 points while
senior forward Beth Jaynes added
i' u points.
' After this game, the Lady
Pirates had a team meeting to
decide what they can do better
and how they can do it They will
be looKing to improve when they
- meet JMU this Friday.
Head coach Dee Gibson is
- looking for the Pirates to change
- their attitudes on the floor.
i "We have got to come ready to
play, " Gibson said. It's nothing
physical, it's our mentality that
i we're trying to change. It's all
' about attitude
In the last meeting with JMU,
- the Pirates won the contest 70-61.
There were many things that the
' Pirates did well, but one thing
i that was not so good was rebound-
' ing.
"They were killing us on the
offensive boards Melvin said.
"We've been on the road a lot
senior center Beth Jaynes said.
"Some people are injured. We
basically have been playing with
only eight players in those
games
The Lady Pirates will try for a
sweep when they travel to
Harrisonburg, Va. to take on James
Madison at 7 p.m.
(AP) One of Joe DiMaggio's
doctors said the New York Yankees
great is making progress in his
recovery from lung cancer surgery
and postoperative infections that
nearly killed him.
"He is progressing nicely since
his discharge from Memorial
Regional (i
Hospital one week ago. Dr.
Earl Barron said in a statement
faxed to The Associated Press on
Monday. "Over the weekend, his
physical therapy has progressed to
the point that he is walking.
Reports of his condition worsening
are not true
DiMaggio also was recovenng
from the shock of seeing a report on
television that he had died.
"He was livid his lawyer and
neighbor, Morris Engelberg, said
Monday. "Then I made him laugh.
I said, 'Joe, we must be in heaven
together
The two were watching televi-
sion at DiMaggio's home in
Hollywood, Fla when the report
appeared as a message across the
screen during the Dateline NBC
program Sunday. NBC said a tech-
nician in the network's New York
City control room had inadvertent-
ly sent the report.
Yankees owner George
Steinbrenner said last week when
DiMaggio was discharged from the
hospital that DiMaggio will toss out
the first ball when they open their
home schedule April 9.
Duke, FSU play in Jacksonville
'7
Blue Devils, Tar
Heels meet again
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP)
Duke went ahead with a plan
Tuesday to move its 1999 home
football game against Florida State
to Jacksonville.
The teams will meet Oct. 2
at Alltel Stadium, the home of
the Gator Bowl, the annual
Florida-Georgia game and the
Jacksonville Jaguars.
Jacksonville is about three
hours away from Florida
State's home in Tallahassee.
The Blue Devils are
expected to make about $1
million for selling their home
game.
"I know as a former college
football player that there is
nothing like the thrill of playing in
a pro stadium said Duke athletic
director Joe Alleva. "This game
will allow our kids to experience
that next year. The game is also
good for the ACC in expanding our
presence in the state of Florida and
in solidifying our recruiting base in
the Jacksonville area
Duke earned $1 million to play
its 1995 game against the
Seminoles in Orlando. Afterward,
former Duke coach Fred
Goldsmith said the Blue Devils
"It's an area that loves great col-
lege football and one that I'm quite
familiar with Franks said. "I'm
excited about this opportunity and
certainly encouraged our athletic
director to schedule this game in
an important
area for our
know as a fanner college football player that there
is nothing Hie the thrill of playing in a
pro stadium
Joe Alleva
Duke Athletics Director
would never move another home
game.
But two months ago Goldsmith
was fired, replaced by former
Florida assistant Carl Franks. He
and Allevax quickly began consid-
ering another move.
alumni and
fans Franks
said.
I lomc of
Florida
State's sec-
ond-largest
alumni club,
Jacksonville
has been try-
ing for years
to bring the
Seminoles to the 73,000-seat Alltel
Stadium. Their last appearance
was in 1989, when they lost 30-26
to a Southern Mississippi team led
by Brett Favre.
DURHAM, N.C. (AP-
Ordinarily, they would have every
reason to be complacent.
After all, the Duke Blue Devils
are ranked No. 2 in the country.
They have a winning margin of
26.3 points a game and seven
straight double-digit victories in the
Atlantic Coast Conference.
But this is no ordinary stretch.
Duke faces three top-10 teams in
13 days, and next up is No. 10
North Carolina on Wednesday
night. And nothing is ever ordinary
when these schools meet.
"It's a lot Duke coach Mike
Krzyzewski said. "We knew this
stretch would be a chance for our
team to grow because we'll be play-
ing such big games
The Blue Devils (19-1, 7-0
ACC) are coming off a "2-88 over-
time victory against No. 9 St. John's
on Sunday at Madison Square
Garden and had only two days to
get ready for the Tar I leels (17-4, 5-
2).
Duke, riding a 14-gamc winning
streak, will travel to N.C. State on
Saturday for its final game in
Reynolds Coliseum before playing
host to No. 4 Maryland on Feb. 3.
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SUPERB OWLSPECIAL
OPEN 24 HOURS
758-1048,
0000 10th Street
Be sure and catch the latest
production by James Chapman
("Black Man Rising "Woman
with Wings "Our Young
Black Men are Dying and
No One Seems to Care)
Tuesday, February 2,1999 at 8:00pm
HendrixTheatre-Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University
Sponsored by the Student Union
Cultural Awareness Committee
V

�&A
An emotionally gripping
drama that examines the
difficulty of confronting
issues and love for
self and others.
Advance Ticket Prices:
Public-$3.00
ECU Student - Free
when valid ECU ID is presented
at the Central Ticket Office
in advance of the show.
All Tickets at the Door - $5.00
15 Thursday,
w
2 OUTDC
I
Hi





It C�raM�in
ille
,ves great col-
ihat I'm quite
les said. "I'm
portunity and
I our athletic
this game in
an important
area for our
alumni and
fans Franks
said.
I lomc of
Florida
State's sec-
ond-largest
alumni club,
Jacksonville
has been try-
ing for years
to bring the
,000-seat Alltel
st appearance
they lost 30-26
jsippi team led
15 Thursday. January 28, 1999
s
Tfct East Carolinian
JustbrowsiMg
www.tec.ecu.edu
Duke
continued Itom page 14
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"Coach wanted us to play the
best teams, so when postseason
came we are already acclimated to
teams as talented as us Duke cap-
tain Trajan Langdon said.
This will be the 21st time since
1985 that Duke and North Carolina
will play each other, with both
ranked in the top 10. Last season
there were three great games while
both were among the nation's top
four teams.
Duke has lost 10 of the last 12 in
the series. Still, few would argue
that Duke is a heavy favorite for
' this game at Cameron Indoor
Stadium, where the Blue Devils
have won 32 straight.
"This is a game where we l�ave
to keep going whether we get
blown out or whether it's a close
game North Carolina coach Bill
Guthridge said. "We have to be
ready for our next game, too,
because it's how you do in the reg-
ular season that gets you into the
NCAA tournament.
"I don't know of any advantages
that we have Guthridge .added.
"We have made good improvement
these last three games, but in
studying Duke it's really hard to
find a weakness. They are strong
inside, they are strong outside and
they play good defense
Krzyzewski warns of making too
much of this matchup, pointing to
last year's No. 1 vs. No. 2 show-
down in Chapel Hill that Duke lost
by 24 points.
Track
continued from page 12
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season, a national champi-
onship. Ingram was in the
NCAA's in the 400 when disaster
struck.
"I was in the last 100 meters
and I stepped on the line twice
and was disqualified. I was disap-
pointed at the time and I am still
kind of disappointed. But when I
think about it, I made it to the
finals, made All-American and
finished sixth in the country and
that makes me proud Ingram
said.
This season, Ingram will not
only be competing against his
opponents, he will also be com-
peting against history.
"He already compares favor-
ably to some of
the other great runners we've
had over the years and he's got
two years left. He could leave the
school as the most awarded ath-
lete in school history Carson
said.
Ingram is within reach of
breaking the school record for
most All-American honors which
is currently held by former ECU
track Brian Irvin and his six All-
American honors.
"We've had a lot of great track
athletes here and even an
Olympian, that would mean a lot
to me Ineram said.
.
:ed
i
30
MMMMMMMM
"StnacfcH
"Smooch!
vy Vv
Monday, February 8, 1999 at 8:OOpm
Hendrix Theatre - Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University
Sponsored by ECU Student Union
Lecture Committee
TfeArtof
KISSING
Featuring over 25 different
styles of kisses, like
- the lip-o-suction kiss
- the upside-down kiss
- the Trotorian Islands kiss
- and the vacuum kiss.
ffff
Advance Ticket Prices:
Public - $3.00
ECU Student - Free
when valid ECU lo is presented
at the Central Ticket Office
in advance of the show.
All Tickets at the Door - $5.00
'
B, � t T
J





16 Thursday. January 28. 1993
FOR RENT
NAGS HEAD. NC-Get your group to-
gether early. Relatively new house in
excellent condition: fully furnished:
washer & dryer; dishwasher central
AC: available May 1 through Au-
gust 31: sleeps 8-$2200 00 per
month. 757-850-1532
WESLEY COMMONS South: $100
off deposit: 2 bedroom. 1 bath apt.
free watersewer, washerdryer
hook-ups. 6 blocks from campus.
Available now $440. Call 758-1921.
GLADIOLUS GARDENS One. two.
and three bedroom apartments. Free
cable. Located on 10th Street. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC 766-6209.�
LANGSTON PARK Apartments:
$100 off deposit: 2 bedroom. 1 bath
apt. free watersewer, all applianc-
es, washerdryer hook-ups. over
900 sq.ft. Available now $425. Call
758-1921.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$285month. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apts 125 Avery St. in Green-
ville - 5 blocks from campus. 758-
6596.
BEECH STREET Villas - Three bed-
room, two bath apartments, close to
campus, with laundry room, stove,
refrigerator, and dishwasher. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC 756-6209.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom. 1 bath apt.
$275.00 per month, free watersew-
er, range, refrig. pets OK. Call 758-
1921 ask for Ken.
CONDO FOR Rent: 2000 sq.ft. con-
do. newly renovated. 3 bedrooms. 1
12 baths, washerdryer hook-up.
Available immediately. 752-1899
daytime. 561-2203 pager � nights.
CANNON COURT Two bedroom. 1
12 bath townhouse. Includes stove,
refrigerator, dishwasher, washerdry-
er hook-up. on ECU bus route. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC. 756-6209.
ROOMMATE WANTED
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE
Needed to share apt. close to cam-
pus, student preferred. Must be re-
sponsible & clean & like pets. Total
expenses per month will not exceed
$270. 752-0009.
ROOMMATE WANTED, preferably
female to share beautiful new 3 bed-
room house on ECU bus route. Inex-
pensive nsnt. Call us toll-free 9 1-
800-624-8154 or 758-8710.
MF ROOMMATE needed to share
large 3 BR house 1 block from cam-
pus. Rent 13 bills per month. Call
ChrisLisa at 754-8094.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
small mansion. Must be friendly,
honest, responsible and not mind
smokers or cats. Hardwood floors,
fireplaces, spacious room. bar. wash-
erdryer, fountains, and 2 acre es-
tate. Deposit required. $200 per
month and 14 utilities. Call Chris
752-6947.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share a
huge, beautiful house one block
from campus. Washerdryer, big
yard, icemaker. cable. 4 bedrooms. 3
baths, kitchen, dining room and 2
dens. 758-2048.
$100 OFF
irity Deposit
ewntHlon el thla coupon,
offer �x pi re� 28M not ��M with
any other coupon
-WESLEY COMMONS SOUTH : 1or 2
bedrooms, 1 bath, range, rtfrigarator,
free wetertewer. �wuherdryer hookups,
laundry facilitiee, 5 block tram campus,
IK:2bepoonia,1
irator, dishwaih.r,
free watersewer, approx. 900 aq. ft
washerdryer hookups, central heatair,
6 blocks from campus.
Other Apartments Also Available
-An Properties have
24 hr. emergency maintenance-
call 758-1921
PINEBROOK APARTMENTS, 1-2
BRs available, water, sewer, cable in-
cluded. Reduced Deposits Novem-
ber. December. On-site main-
tenance, management, ECU bus
line. 9-12 month lease, pets allowed.
758-4015
FOR RENT: six bedroom. 3 12
bath, fenced-in yard, pets OK. corner
of 4th and Oak St. Contact Betsy �
329-8558.
STANCILL DRIVE, 2 bedroom. 1
bathroom, brick duplex, central
heatair. near ECU. $425 month.
pets extra with fee. Call 353-2717.
SUBLEASE REEDY Branch across
from Papa John's on 10th Street.
800 sq.ft 2BR. $395month. Tow
Utilities, walk to ECU. bus route.
WD. plenty of parking. $100 off de-
posit, ASAP, call 329-7010
FREE 1ST month rent. Players Club.
Sublease 4 bedroom townhouse
with washerdryer and own person-
al bathroom for only $240 plus 14
utilities. Pool, basketball, volleyball,
tennis courts and gym. Call Derek
for more details at 355-4370
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED 3 bedroom
located close to campus. $135mo
13 utilities. 12 phone. Call Jimmy
at 752-9376 for more information.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 3
bedroom house on block from cam-
pus. Rent 13 bills. Call Katie at
931-0348.
3 BEDROOM duplex, private drive-
way, yard, bedroom partially fur-
nished. Private phone line to bed-
room if preferred. Rent $275. in-
cludes cable. Call Joe 758-7826.
Serious students!
FOR SALE
BA-L PYTHON, very docile. 1 12
years old, 55 gal. tank, stand, com-
plete setup.130 OBO. Please leave
message for Kevin 323-0408. 757-
1087.
AAA! Spring Break Panama City
$129! Boardwalk room with kitchen
near clubs! 7 parties-free drinks!
Daytona $149! South Beach $129!
Cocoa Beach149! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
NEW APARTMENT? Need furni-
ture? I have a cream futon couch
($125). hunter green loveseat (sleeps
2 $200.00). papasan chair with
cushion ($40.00). brown rocker
chair ($30.00). white halogen floor
lamp ($20.00). double box springs
and mattress set ($70.00). hunter
green bakers rack ($20.00). All
items are less than two years old
and are in great condition. Selling
furniture due to marriage. Call to in-
quire or make offer Contact Kristen
at 355-4808 during any hours. If no
answer, please leave message.
CUSTOM PRINTED T-shirts. Profes-
sion printers since 1981. Competitive
rates. Free shipping. Full art depart-
ment. We accept digital files in most
formats. 800-272-2066 culture-
works .com
TWO BOOKCASES, adjustable
shelves: coffee table: student desk.
All in good shape. All together $150.
Bookcases $30 apiece, table $35.
desk $75 OBO. 752-5899. leave
message.
LARGE, BARELY used minifrig for
$60 OBO. Large microwave $40
OBO. Great for the dorm or office.
Call 353-6351.
REFRIGERATOR FOR sale: new
large dorm size fridge with built-in
freezer used only one month. Call
412-1975.
AMCJEEP GRAND Wagoneer
1983 powerful V8. Power windows,
locks, seats, etc. This truck is huge,
fun. Perfect college vehicle. Will last
forever. Call Chris. 752-9038.
JUST IN time for Valentine's! En-
gagement ring, never used. 1.1 car-
at marquis cut. Have appraisal. Seri-
ous inquiries only please. 758-2887.
ask for Todd.
SERVICES
AAA! SPRING Break Bahamas Par-
ty Cruise! 5 nights $279! Includes
meals t parties! Awesome beaches,
nightlife! Departs from Florida! Can-
cun & Jamaica $399! springbreak-
travel.com 1-800-678-6386
PRE-PAID Phone cards. 106 min-
utes for $10. 216 minutes for $20.
For more information or to purchase,
call Kristy at 328-8426.
LEARN TO
CJUtOUU SKY SPORTS
(919)46-2224
classifieds
SERVICES
ABRACADABRA NAILS now open!
$25 full set. $15 fills. $10 mani-
cures. Call 329-7235. or visit our
website http:www.ange
fire.comncAbracadabraNails.
HELP WANTED
GREENVILLE REC. a Parks Spring
Tennis Programs Registration starts
223. Youth: Novice 1(ages
6&7)MW 5-5:45p 38-414. No-
vice (ages 7&8) TTH 5-5:45p 39-
415. AfterschooMfages 10-14)
MW 4-5p 38-414. Afterschool
Wages 15-18) TTh 4-5 p 39-415.
Jr Boys Team(ages 11-14) M-Th 4-
5:30p 31-422. Adult: Beginner 1
MW 6-7p 38-414. Beginner II
TTh 7-8p 39-415. Morning begin-
ner MW 9-10a 38-414. Interme-
diate 1 MW 7-8p 38-414. Inter-
mediate II TTh 6-7p 39-414.
Morning intermediate MW 10-11a
38-414. Call 329-4559.
FREE RADIO $1250. Fundraiser
open to student groups & organiza-
tions. Earn $3-$5 per VisaMC app.
We supply all materials at no cost.
Call for info or visit our website.
Qualified callers receive a Free Baby
Boom Box. 1-800-932-0528 x 65.
www.ocmconcepts .com
LOOKING FOR a part-time job?
Help wanted at Szechual Express, in
the Food Court at the Plaza Mall.
Day hours from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m
night hours from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Apply in person. No phone calls,
please.
PART-TIME work for two: one semi-
experienced for house cleaning: one
for yard work and medium lifting.
Minimum wage 25t. 756-2027
evenings.
LEASING AGENT -Large property
mgmt. co. specializing in luxury col-
lege student housing is seeking self-
motivated, outgoing leasing consult-
ants. Part or full-time. Training pro-
vided. Fax cover letter and resume
to 352-472-1819. attention Rebecca.
SPRING BREAK 99! Cancun' Nas-
sau ' Jamaica. Travel free and make
lots of Cash! Top reps are offered on-
site staff jobs. All-inclusive deals. 32
hours Free Drinks. Special Discounts
up to$100 per person. Lowest price
guaranteed. Call now for details!
www.classtravel.com 800-838-6411
HAVE LITERARY Talent? Help Ex-
pressions Magazine produce its Fe-
bruary double-issue. Submit ideas
on or related to minority love andor
history to: xpressyoself@hotmail.com
Today!
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED:
Very fun work. Flexible part-time
hours (mostly evenings & weekends)
Must have outgoing personality and
reliable transportation Own 35mm
SLR camera a plus, but not essential.
No experience necessary. We train.
$7.00 per hour. Call Tosha at 800-
722-7033.
CHILDCARE WANTED for 2-yr-old
boy. TTh 9-12 or MW 2-5. Patience,
a sense of humor, and self-transpor-
tation are a plus. $7 per hour. 355-
1928.
OFFICE ASSISTANTS needed. Ap-
ply at The East Carolinian. 8-5 Mon-
day-Friday.
TAKING APPLICATIONS for substi-
tutes and full-time teaching posi-
tions. For more information call Har-
mony Child Care at 756-6229. Li-
cense 7455138
EARN EXTRA Cash Make your
own hours Responsible students to
marketmanage Citibank promo-
tions on campus. Free giveaways!
Earn $400 week. Call Ann at 1-
800-950-8472 ext. 118.
PIANO PLAYER for small church.
For details, call 756-3730 before 9
p.m.
Wouldn't it be cool if you had
your own radio station?
Guest what?
YOU DO!
HELP WANTED
MODELS FOR portfolio. Reputable,
artistic, amateur photographer seek-
ing slim young women for portfolio
photos. References available. Send
note, photo (if available), address,
and phone for immediate reply. Paul
Hronjak, 4413 Pinehurst Drive. Wil-
son, NC 27896.
1999 INTERNSHIPS) Don't get a
summer job Run a summer busi-
ness. www.tuitionpainters.com. tui-
paintObellsouth.net or 800-393-
4621.
WANTED: PAYING $6.50 an hour
plus bonuses for qualified telemar-
keters. No Friday or Saturday work.
Hours: 5:30-9 p.m. Monday-Thurs-
day: 4:30-8 p.m. Sunday. Apply in
person 5-9 p.m. Energy Savers
Windows & Siding. Inc Wintergreen
Commercial Park. Suite 0. Firetower
Road. Greenville.
DRIVER & Dispatch positions avail-
able at Restaurant Runners. Perfect
hours for students. Clean driving
record imperative, knowledge of
Greenville streets advantageous. Call
756-5527, leave message.
STUDENTS WANTED, all positions
(bartenders, doormen. JD's. and
managers). Apply in person after
5p.m. at The Sports Pad or call 757-
3881 or 757-3658 for more info.
MALE QUADRIPLEGIC needs as-
sistance with bathing, dressing, lift-
ing and transportation, a.m. hours re-
quired. Excellent opportunity. Con-
tact Marty at 353-9074.
SPRING YOUTH indoor soccer
coaches. The Greenville Recreation
6 Parks Department is recruiting for
12 to 16 part-time youth soccer
coaches for the spring youth indoor
soccer program. Applicants must
possess some knowledge of the soc-
cer skills and have the ability and pa-
tience to work with youth. Applic-
ants must be able to coach young
people ages 5-18. in soccer funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3 p.m. until
7 p.m. with some night and wee-
kend coaching. Flexible with hours
according to class schedules. This
program will run from Mid March to
April. Salary rates start at $5.15 per
hour. For more information, please
call Ben James, Michael Daly, or
Judd Crumpler at 329-4550 after
2p.m.
PART-TIME JOBS AVAILABLE.
Joan's Fashions, a local Women's
Clothing Store, is now hiring. Em-
ployees are needed for Saturdays
and weekdays between 10AM and
6PM, with a particular need for em-
ployees on Tuesdays and Thursdays
(mornings and early afternoons). The
positions are for between 7 and 20
hours per week, depending on your
schedule and on business needs.
The jobs are within walking distance
of the university and the hours are
flexible. Pay is commensurate with
your experience and job perfor-
mance and is supplemented by an
employee discount. Apply in person
to Store Manager, Joan's Fashions,
423 S. Evans Street. Greenville (on
the Downtown Mall).
IN-LINE Hockey Coaches. The
Greenville Recreation & Parks De-
partment is recruiting individuals
with some background knowledge
with in-line hockey or ice hockey. Ap-
plicants will be responsible for
coaching youth in-line hockey
leagues at the Jaycee Park. Some
weekend work required.Salary rates
range from $5.15 to 6.50 per hour.
Starting date is February 1999. For
more information, please call Ben
James, Michael Daly, or Judd Crum-
pter at 329-4550 after 2PM.
FULL OR part-time wait staff wanted
at Lupton's Seafood. Call Bruce Lup-
ton at 752-4174.
GREEK PERSONALS
PI KAPPA Phi � we had fun at the
social on Friday night. Thanks. Love,
the sisters of Alpha Phi
THETA CHI, the social last week
was so much fun! Thanks for every-
thing. Love, the sisters of Alpha Del-
ta Pi
FOR YOUR MAN'S VALENTINE GiFTi
GIVE QUALITY, CLASS. STYLE
CHECK OUT OUR BSal
STORE WIDE SALE

Tommy. Nautica, Polo -ALL THE BEST!
Shirts. Panta. Jeana, Shoea, Etc.
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
AtoftflaakfOettt 7525806
TmedtytlmifhStmlt WO&00

r
o
rr
mt Mfiuirn of Ilw f i� Catoltniw C
n
Tin East Carolinian
GREEK PERSONALS
THANKS TO all the sisters for a
great rush. Love. Pi Delta.
CONGRATULATIONS TO the Omi-
cron Pledge ClassNikki Baker. Katie
Humphrey. Alicia Barnes, Margarette
Duncan. Mary Wright, and Neille
Walker. We love you! The sisters of
Pi Delta
ALPHA OMICRON Pi. thanks for
the social last Friday. We had a blast
and can't wait to do it again. Love. Pi
Lambda Phi
TO THE brothers of Pi Kappa Alpha,
everyone had a great time with you
guys, as usual. Can't wait until next
time! Love, the sisters of Delta Zeta
PI DELTA would like to wish IFC
Good Luck with rush.
PI DELTA, it was business as usual
Saturday night. The Pajama Jammy
Jam was fabulous. Love. Pi Lambda
Phi
THANKS FOR the jammie jam. Pi
Lambda Phi! We had a blast. Love,
the sisters and new members of Pi
Delta
OTHER
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WANTED: TICKETS for Collective
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Bahamas Party
Cruise $279
5 dm �o�Meals� FreeP�rtn- � IndutfeiT.es
Panama $119
City- Boardwalk. Holiday kin Sonspree 4 More
Jamaica $439
� HighS � HHotel � S-w J150 on Food & Dnnk.
Cancun $399
7 Nights "Atr , Hotel � Free Ftwd 4 30 His of Dunks
Spring Break Travel-Our 12th Year!
1-800-678-6386
ANNOUNCEMENTS
SPRING BREAK 991 Cancun Nas-
sau Jamaica 'Mazatlan Acapulco
� Bahamas Cruise " Florida Florida
South Padre. Travel Free and make
lots of Cash! Top reps are offered
full-time staff jobs. Lowest price
Guaranteed. Call now for details!
www.classtravel.com 800838-6411
TEST PREPARATION: Tuesday
11a.m12p.m The Center for Coun-
seling and Student Development is
offering this workshop on Tuesday,
February 2nd. and Monday. Febru-
ary 8th. If you are interested in this
workshop, please contact the Center
at 328-6661.L
TEST ANXIETY: Tuesday 11a.m
12p.m The Center for Counseling
and Student Development is offering
this workshop on Tuesday February
9nd. If you are interested in this
workshop, please contact the Center
at 328-6661.
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION: Tues-
day 3:30-4:30. The Center for Coun-
seling and Student Development is
offering this workshop on Tuesday
February 2nd. If you are interested in
this workshop, please contact the
Center at 328-6661.
AT THE REQUEST of students and
staff. Parking and Transportation
Services has established a new mo-
torcycle parking area near Menden-
hall Student center. The area is locat-
ed in the southeast corner of Jhe
parking lot south of Mendenhall
Student Center
PI DELTA will be holding Open Bids
on February 2. For more information.
call 321-4787 or 754-2161.
PSI CHI - All interested psychology
majors, with an overall GPA of 3.00
or above, are welcome to attend our
first meeting of the semester. Wed-
nesday. February 3rd at 5 p.m. in the
Psi Chi Library, Rawl 302. Hope to
see you
HEALTHY LIVING: Start the new
year right by learning long term,
healthy habits for weight control.
Meets weekly throughout the se-
mester, open to all. Call 328-6387 for
price and registration information.
NOON TRACK Attack returns to the
SRC on Jan. 25. Rewards and in-
centives better than ever! Contact
the Dept. of Recreational Services
(328-6387) for information.
BOWLING REGISTRATION Meet-
ing: Anyone interested in participat-
ing in intramural bowling must at-
tend the registration meeting on
Tues. Jan. 26 at 5p.m. in MSC room
244. Registration will be held Wed-
nesday. Jan. 27 at the Student Re-
creation Center.
RACQUETBALL TOURNEY; An-
yone interested in playing in the rac-
quetball tourney must enter by Wed.
Jan. 27 at 5p.m. in the Student Re-
creation Center main office.
ADVERTISE IN THE
CLASSSIFIEDS.
Advertise in
The East Carolinian
classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE$4.00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional words 5C each
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for 25 or fewer wordsadditional words 5$ each
Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to refuse
fhis rate for any ad deemed to be non-student or business
related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE . . .$1.00
add to above fine rate for either
BOLD or ALL CAPS type.
.All classified ads placed by individuals or campus
groups must be prepaid. Classified ads placed by a
business must be prepaid unless credit has been
established. Cancelled ads can be removed from
the paper ifnotification is made before the deadline,
but no cash refunds are given. The Personals sec-
tion of the classifieds is intended for non-commer-
cial communication placed by individuals or cam-
pus groups. Business ads will not be placed in this
section. All Personals are subject to editing for inde-
cent or inflammatory language as determined by
the editors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE 4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue
or as necessitated by other considerations.

F
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The East Carolinian
91 Cancun Nas-
atlan Acapulco
Florida' Florida
Free and make
eps are offered
Lowest price
iow for detailsl
n 800838-6411
riON: Tuesday
Center for Coun-
Development is
hiop on Tuesday.
Monday. Febru-
nterested in this
mtact the Center
L
Tuesday 11a.m
p for Counseling
ament is offering
uesday February
iterested in this
ntact the Center
IVATION: Tues-
Center for Coun-
Development is
hop on Tuesday
i are interested in
ase contact the
of students and
I Transportation
ished a new mo
a near Menden-
The area is locat-
st corner of the
of Mendenhall
aiding Open Bids
nore information.
1-2161.
ssted psychology
irall GPA of 3 00
me to attend our
i semester. Wed-
d at 5 p.m. in the
M 302. Hope to
U-
: Start the new
ning long term.
weight control,
sughout the se-
Call 328-6387 for
n information.
ack returns to the
Rewards and in-
an ever! Contact
aational Services
�mation.
TRATION Meet-
ited in participat-
jowling must at-
ion meeting on
i.m. in MSC room
ill be held Wed-
the Student Re-
TOURNEY; An-
ilaying in the rac-
ist enter by Wed.
l the Student Re-
in office.
E IN THE
IFIEDS.
I
nian
. .$4.00
5C each
. .$2.00
5t each
: Carolinian
r business
. .$1.00
)r campus
aced by a
las been
ed from
! deadline,
wals sec-
�commer-
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g for inde-
nined by
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IONDAY
ssue
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ebrua
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ITIES INCLUDE:
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sa
1
I i
r Arts & Entertainment Magazine of The East Carolinian
Wednesday; January 28,1999
Miccah Smith
Fountainhead Editor
-M m Robinson Trio will play at Wright
Auditorium Friday as the first of this
semester's S. Rudolph Alexander Performing Arts
Scries offerings.
The trio has toured Europe and the United States for
21 consecutive seasons since its 1977 White House
debut at President Carter's inauguration. ECU students
have a rare opportunity to see these world-class musi-
cians perform some of the best-known and most pop-
ular chamber music ever written.
"These are all internationally known artists says
Professor Charles Bath of the ECU School of Music
Pianist Joseph Kalichstein won the Leventritt Award in
1969,and has solo recordings on the RCA,Erato and
Vanguard labels. Jaime Laredo's violin artistry has
gained him such prestigious awards as the Deutsch
Schalfplatten Prize and Grammy. Cellist Sharon
Robinson gave her first concert at age seven, and has
appeared with several major US symphonies, as well
as the London Symphony and the English Chamber
See inches, continued on page 7
.
Once performed for nobility, this chamber music is a rare treat
Mystikal's new
album maintains
the No Limit
status quo
CD Review
MTV ain't all
bad; check out
Varsity Blues
Movie Review
Look! Toothless
Canadians, eh?
Video Review
Hey, Collective
Soul, to what do
we owe this
great honor?
wkotifflsidz
fountainhead � 2nd Floor Student Publications Building Greenville, NC 27858 � Phone 328-6366. Fax 328-6558 � Advertising328-2000.www.fountainhead.ecu.edu





CD Review
No Limit strikes again
Todd Tallmadge
Senior Writer
Mystikal
After recently guest-appearing on
other No Limit Records albums like
Mia X, Ghetto Commission and
tkmbino Ramify, Mystikal'retu rns
with his third album Ghetto Fabulous.
We last heard him on Silkk the
Shocker's "It Ain't My Fault" and
MastetPs summer hit "Make 'em
Say , �" � '
If you liked his platinum sophomore
album, this new offering will not dis-
appoint yob. The beats are better and
the lyrics are sharper than on his last
album, Unpredictable, from 1997, but
overall it is just another No Limit
album.
I was kind of anticipating this album,
but I was a little disappointed.
The first single "That's the Ripper" is
one of only a few songs that stand out
on this album. The special guest
appearances help keep the CD up and
going but don't stand out above any-
thing else at NLR. The normal No
Limit crew (mastermind Master P,
Silkk the Shocker, Mia X, Fiend, Mac,
C-Murder, and Snoop Dogg) give the
same thing time in
and time out. -
But the appearance
of Busta Rhymes on
'Whacha Want,
Whacha Need gives
that energy and
crazy rhymes that
only Busta can. He
helps add a different
array of lyrics and
beats that No Limit
needs.
Naughty By Nature
comes at you on
"Dirty South, Dirty
Jerz I was glad to
kcsr fiom them, but
I was a little disappointed overall by
the song. I was looking for that hard-
ness of lyrics that Naughty has but
they didn't provide that this time
We last heard them over a year and a
half ago with the joint "Mourn U Til I
join U a tribute song to the late
Tupac.
The smooth vocals of Snoop on the
song "Ghetto Fabulous and again
with Silkk the Shocker on the song
"Let's Go Do It stand out above most
of the others. Take those songs away,
the album starts to run together. Take
the vocals and the beats away from
the songs and it all basically sounds
the same.
The format of No Limit Records is
unique and stands alone. However,
with this cd, they don't do anything
for me. It's just another album from
Executive Producer Master P. He
seems to be putting a new cd out for
the company every two weeks. They
all sound alike.
The only difference is in Snoop's
album because he brought those West
Coast and G-Funk beats to No Limit.
If you like No Limit Records, then this
is one of their few "good" albums, but
I would not recommend it.
Amy LRoyster Editor in Chief
. Heather BurgeW Managing Hitor
MiccahSmith Editor'
Caleb Rose Aant Editor
land Respess MnrttM MiNQCf
Bobby Tub
Swung � ECU ammmti stnca BKjto Emi CantM llMidlli
lUDOcflpm Mm tad mi ttaoW 7.000 coas ot �
bmmdtwn. out ntw am and mwummu mount, an pub
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NfofvieReviav
Varsity Blues presents real characters
Ryan Kennemur
Senior Writer
& varsity Blues
3 out of 4
Possible Ryans
I have to be honest on this
one. I went into the theater
the other day knowing full
well that Varsity Blues is an
MTV movie. I had the feel-
ing that this was going to be
yet another teenybopper from television
bringing hisher pretty race, and nothing
else, to the silver screen. Now if you'll
excuse me, I have to take a bite of this
crow.
Varsity Blues, though not perfect, is a rip-
roarin' football extravaganza that is sure
to appease any sports movie fanatic.
James Van Der Beek plays second-string
Growing u� is hard � do
quarterback Jonathan "Mox" Moxon with
a fiery passion that you will probably
never get to witness on any episode of
"Dawson's Creek, the television series
that he stars in.
All 'Mox" wants to do is to graduate and
get into Brown University, with football
as something to do for fun. The ever-
menacing Jon Voight plays Coach Bud
Kilmer, basically the hero of the football-
crazed small Texas town where the
movie is set.
Every day is business as usual in this
townthai is, until Friday night rolls
around. No telephones are ringing and
no birds are chirping. Everyone in town
is at the West Canaan High School foot-
ball game, where the home team, the
Coyotes (pronounced Ki-yoats), has won
twenty-three straight division titles.
What the town doesn't know, however, is
that Coach Kilmer's technique is rather
unorthodox, what with the pain killers
that he makes the players take and the
steroids that he pumps into their already
finely-toned bodies. All of this in con-
junction with the good old "just shake it
off, boy" medicine adds up to a disaster
waiting to happen.
See MOVIE REVIEW, continued on page 6
To Tahe In a Free Movie
JANUARY 28-31 AT 8 P.M. IN HENDRIX
THEATRE
The Negotiator (ft), an action-thriller starring Samuel
L Jackson and Kevin Spacey as two hot shot police
negotiators will keep you on the edge of your seat.
Your ECU One Card gets you and a guest in for free.
To Hear Some Cool Jazz
FRIDAY, JANUARY 29 AT 8 P.M. IN
MENDENHALL GREAT ROOM
Check out a cabaret-style performance that high-
lights the musical and vocal talents of several stu-
dents and faculty. Carroll Dashiell and students
from the ECU School of Music will perform. Your
ECU One Card gets you two free tickets.
lb Feed Your Soul
SATURDAY, JANUARY 30 AT 8 P.M. IN
WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
They're awesome. Pianist Joseph Kalichstein, cel-
list Sharon Robinson, and violinist Jaime Laredo will
astound you with their musical virtuosity and flaw-
less technique. Come and hear the trio perform the
works of Haydn. Shostakovich, and Beethoven as
part of the S. Rudolph Alexander Performing Arts
Series. Advance student tickets are available at the
Central Ticket Office for $7. All tickets at the door
are $15.
ToWlnCash
SUNDAY. JANUARY 31 AT 6 P.M. AT
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
Try your luck at Bingo Night. Play from 10-12 games
of Bingo for the chance to win $120. You can't win
if you don't play. ECU One Card required.
To Examine Issues
TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 2 AT 8 P.M. IN HENDRIX
THEATRE
Wetch a provocative two-act play, Brotha, that
explores the problems of inner-city life. The drama
examines the difficulty of confronting issues of love
for self and others through poetry, choral speaking,
and controversial dialogue. Admission is free with
your ECU One Card.
To Seriously Party
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12 AT 9 P.M. AT
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
It's the next best thing to being down on Bourbon
Street. It's ECU's annual Mardi Gras bash.
Garrdjjjng, food, dancing, bingo, video karaoke, laser
tag, bowling, Cajun buffet, and more. Best of all,
it's free! Your ECU One Card gets you in. If you want
to bring an adult friend, pick up a guest pass Feb. 8-
12 Julie Central Ticket Office (MF 8:30am-6pm).
the Todd Dining Hall Office (MF 8am-5pm) and the
Student Rec Center on Feb 12 from 5 am to 10 pm.
USE Houn:MonThuri, 8 i.mH pjn Fri� 8 a.mMidnigM Sit Noon-Midnight; SuM-ltpju





$�
Mandorico dishes out the hot stuff
Miccah Smith
Fountainhead
Editor
Sultry latin-ska group Mandorico
packed the stage and surrounding
dance floor at Peasant's with their
spicy, danceable mix of ska, mambo
and salsa rhythms. Their January 13
performance was the Atlanta band's
third gig in Greenville.
The crowd promptly embraced
Mandorico, whose set opened with
the slow-grooving album track
"Familiar HacesrTheband dis-
played a rare combination of vocal
harmonies, high energy-conga
sobs, hypnotic percussion, fabulous
horns and a keen ability to feed on
each other's talent and exultation all
through the performance.
After a break, Mandorico played a
set that included songs from their
new album. Familiar Places. Every
song was crammed the dance floor
with as many people as possible.
"We all have severely different influ-
ences said drummer Chris Fields.
Percussionist Jesse Lauricdla listed
Los Fabulosos Cadillacs and DLG
among his influences.
April Howefl, whose throaty vocals
and bigger-than-life trombone
sound whip the crowd into
ecstasies, was once a member of
North Carolina's Jumpstarts.
Mandorico's wide variety of influ-
ences, experienced musicians, spon-
taneous creative forces and precise
beats should secure the two-year-
old band's future popularity.
DAND PREVIEWS ECLQ THIS WEEKEND
Peasanfs
January 29
I)avidhWsonBaml,featurir�BillLayrrKmofJrffersonStarship.
Nelson has contributed to three Grateful Dead albums, and his
own band offcrc a collage of iryjarrpsydk
tion and straight-up Huegrass. The band has toured extensively,
has two albums and plans to releasea third, called Visions
Under the Moon.

fl
Attic
January 29
Collective Soul, a band that helped make the "alternative rock" catego-
ry what it is today.
-Since topping the Billboard charts in May 1994 with "Shine the
"ahema-rock band has cut three albums, further muddying the
vvaters between "alternative" music and pop, but has not achieved a
greater degree offame. The sold-out show probably has something
to do with the promotion of their unrdeased fourth album. Dosage.
' �'
l3ecome a member.
Launch your
organization
in-to cyberspace.
WWW.
clubhouse.
ecu.edu
answers to Tuesday's East Carolinian Crossword
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Vkko Review
Swtf stars the original Hansons
Caleb Rose
Assistant Editor
Sfcfjwi
Seeing as how
we're in the
South, it's com-
mon to hear slanderous terms being
used to describe people who migrate
down from the North. It has been
saidYankees are no good for noth-
inand spoken with true Southern
pride. However, one pride of the
North that's worthy of praise is the
sport hockey.
Though it's marginally a
Canadian sport consisting of many
Canadians, it's played and respected
in the US. Way back in good ol' 1977,
a man by the name of George Roy
Hill decided that it would be a good
idea to document such a sport, and
thus Slap Shot was created.
Considering the time period, it
was pretty wise to star Paul Newman
as the lead role. His character, Reg
Dunlap, is the head coach as well as
a teammate of the Charlestown
Chiefs, a struggling minor league
hockey team that is on the verge of
going out of business. The burden of
keeping the Chiefs together becomes
Dunlap's number one goal and
biggest headache.
The film takes place in
Johnstown, PA, which is a small steel
town in the mid-west portion of the
state. For reasons unknown, Hill
decided to use Charlestown as the
town name.
When the Charlestown Steel Mill
lays off a bunch of its workers, the
attendance of the Chiefs games
plummet. The loss of fans causes a
loss of money and forces the Chiefs
GM to negotiate and sell the team.
The negotiations fail, but Dunlap
convinces his teammates that this
would be their last season in
Charlestown because they were
being sold to a buyer in Florida.
Since it is their last season, Dunlap
does everything in his power to
make it the best.
violence is common in hockey,
in fact it's the sole reason some peo-
. �
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The Hanson Brother a goaSes worst nightman! incarnate
pie watch it (like people who watch
auto racing to see the wrecks). The
Chiefs soon learn that violence sells,
so they make it a point to be overly
rough with their opponents. The use
of violence opens the window for the
true stars of the film, the Hanson
Brothers.
The Hanson Brothers were trad-
ed to the team at the beginning of
the season and after sitting the
bench for some time, were finally
given their chance. Their roughness
leads to fights with opponents and
fans, and eventually a few arrests.
The Hanson Brothers represent the
true Canadian spirit of the sport.
The violence produced by the
Chiefs leads to an enormous follow-
ing of fans and town support. In
return for their antics, the Chiefs
become the laughing stock of their
league. The film ends with the team
playing their last game by the "old
time hockey rules However, they
snap in the end and give the fans
one last hoo-rah brawl to end it all.
with Barnes and Noble
�.�'���
toJbritiB book reviews to; sjt &
Wednesday's Fotmtainhead
in oyr newprogram
Ronald McDonald House
We are looking for fellow book lovers to lead and review
best sellers far a good cause. Each Semester we will donate
these best sellers to the Ronald McDonald House where
they will be available for the family members of terminally
ill children to read.
If yon would like to write a review
please call Miccah at 328-6366 i







ARIES:
(March 21-April 20)
Timing seems to be very good, so
it's best to take advantage of pro-
moting a business ideas or career
advancement. Devote a majority of
your efforts to job interests and
you'll be amazed at just how much
is accomplished
TAURUS:
(April 21-May 21)
Misleading news about those close
to you may arise. Be on guard and
make no decisions until you have all
the facts straight. Self-interest will
motivate you, although you may be
torn between wanting to excel in a
particular matter, or share the spot-
light.
GEMINI:
(May22-June21)
Travel is in the works, make sure to
plan your itinerary carefully, creat-
ing some time for pleasure. You'll
come up with an idea concerning
business or relationship interests
that may sound great, but don't
expect everyone else to share your
interest.
CANCER:
(June 22-July 23)
Your view of the immediate future
will benefit your ability to firm up
romantic ties, and encourage super-
visors at work to have added confi-
dence in you. This dependability
you portray inspires faith into those
who surround you. Guard against
poor judgement.
LEO:
(July 24-August 23)
Try to modify your views, if neces-
sary, to ensure peace on the home-
front. Displaying a defensive attitude
may produce actions that may be
regretted later. You may have to deal
with a few headstrong individuals,
and an argument is inevitable.
VIRGO:
(August 24 - September 23)
You may be in the mood to have
things your own way, but it may not
be the best of times to insist on it.
Back off if someone seriously chal-
lenges you. Some inside information
may make it possible to put a few
extra dollars in your pocket, possi-
bly real estate.
LIBRA:
(September 24 - October 23)
A few of your ideas are impractical,
but that doesn't mean you need to
give up completely on them. Irs time
to capitalize on your gregarious
nature and push ahead with any
projects involving your career path -
the more supporters you can gather,
the better.
SCORPIO:
(October 24 - November 22)
There may be an unexpected mes-
sage coming your way that may
momentarily throw you off balance
both emotionally and financially.
Make sure to keep the lines of com-
munication open with family mem-
bers. Financial advice is suggested
regarding any new investments.
SAGITTARIUS:
(November 23 - December 21)
If you use your imagination, there
may be a delightful romantic sur-
prise just around the corner for you.
There may be confusion in regards
to a social or romantic date that
may cause frustration earlier in the
week. Good vibes are developing for
future career goals.
CAPRICORN:
(December 22 - January 20)
You have a chance to strengthen an
important relationship which sig-
nals success for any long range
dependability. Try to keep a tight
rein on your temper and reactions
to others. If you speak before you
think, feelings may be hurt and
explanations will be difficult.
AQUARIUS:
(January 21 - February 19)
Your timing seems to be off, and it
may be difficult to reach someone
you've been trying to get ahold of. If
you do, the conversation may not be
what you expected. You may also
have to readjust your thinking or re-
evaluate your goals, a major deci-
sion is dose at hand.
PISCES:
(February 20-March 20)
Now is as good of time as any to
learn to become thrifty. Think
before you part your hard earned
cash. You have a few far out ideas
and opinions, and if pressed on oth-
ers will only cause confusion and
maybe hostility. Don't push your
luck by saying or doing anything
foolish.
Birthday This Week;
Everything seems to be such a big
chore lately. It may be because you
are physically and mentally run-
down. Start taking better care of
yourself and you'll discover a whole
new you. There may be a lot of pres-
sure on you at work, learn to dele-
gate tasks and leave the work
behind while you are at home.
Things to
Do
Downtown
'
28 Thursday
Conehead Buddah at Peasants
Live Jazz at Staccato's
AggravatorsSpazmsDead Center at Backdoor
29 Friday
Collective Soul at The Attic
David Nelson Band at Peasant's Cafe
(Members of Jerry Garcia Band and New
Riders of the Purple Sage)
30 Saturday
Cravin' Melon at The Attic
Moon Boot Lover at Peasant's Cafe
31 Sunday
Open Mic night at Peasant's Cafe
Super Bowl Party at The Courtyard
Tavern
2 Tuesday
Studio 54 night at the Attic
Groove Riders at Boli's
3 Wednesday
Comedy Zone at The Att
ttic





Miccah Smith
Fountattthead Editor
98 WRAP-UP
1998 will be remembered as
"The Year of the Untalented
Woman Any chick with a
guitar, a piano, a short skin, a
sob story-or hairy pits was
guaranteed an audience, and I
won't insult anyone by nam-
ing names. I'll just say that
had it not been for my dedica-
tion to this newspaper, I
myself could have cut a gold
record.
Tori Amos, Sunny Day Real
Estate, Smashing Pumpkins,
REM, Lorena McKinnett and
PJ Harvey graced an other-
wise glutted music market
with new releases, and classic
acts like Depeche Mode and
KISS hit the tour circuit again.
In movies. There's Something
About Mary garnered the
Gen-X marker. Bruce Willis
found more roles for his
"sweaty guy with a snappy
comeback stock character.
For instance, he was that hero
guy in this summer's disaster
movie Armageddon. But in
the immortal words of David
Spade, I liked it betterwhen
it was called Deep Impact!
99 PREDICTIONS
Let's just get this first item
out of the way right now.
Gene Simmons and Marilyn
Manson will meet face-to-face
onstage in front of a raving
mad audience somewhere in
California. Simmons will
thrash Manson's scrawny little
androgynous self so thorough-
ly that no leftovers will remain
for Prince or Elton John, both
of whom will be waiting back-
stage. Hordes of banshee-like
KISS Army ensigns will
descend upon Manson's 13-
year-old scary kids like the
Red Death. But maybe that's
just wishful thinking
Lillith Fair will become high-
ly commercialized, bringing
m
disenchantment, confusion
and, ultimately, displacement
to entire populations of
patchouli-soaked women and
sensitive men. Coffee-shop
and art-teacher jobs will be
virtually unavailable after
these doleful masses attempt
to reassimilate into the work-
force.
But cheer up, folks! If my
predictions are correct, we'll
be getting a whole new batch
of Bruce Willis movies this
year too! Frankly, I can't wait
to see him punch, kick and
wisecrack his way to yet
another American victory over
those slimy
commiesaliensforces of
nature! Bring it on!
Caleb Rose
Assistant Editor
98 WRAP-UP
The year 1998 had
Wrap-tip continued on page 7
MOMREMW. continued from page 2
The other shoe drops when Coach
Kilmer forces Billy Bob (the big ole cen-
ter) play even though he keeps passing
out. The star quarterback gets his leg
broken when he's sacked by numerous
members of the opposing team.
Enter "Mox who naturally saves the
game with a couple long passes and sly
plays. This turns him into the town's
new star, which of course begins to
make him disregard all the things he
loves, such as his girlfriend and his
dreams of attending college.
I'll not say anything more about the
plot, but I feel like suggesting that this is
not a movie for the ynung'uns.
Drinking, cussing, sex, nudity, whipped
cream bikinis, and all that other stuff
that is associated with being adults are
strewn throughout the film.
Although the main story belongs to Van
Der Beek and Vbight, the movie really
shows its heart when Billy Bob (Good
Burger's Ron Lester) shows up on
screen. He takes a role that would nor-
mally be portrayed as the funny fat guy
and gives it an actual soul with feelings
that can be hurt and a heart that can be
broken with one sharp word.
Some bad aspects of the movie are that
the grown-ups are portrayed as cliche
rednecks that, despite there being a
school right in town, speak like they
have never set foot in one. Also, the
soundtrack shows its MTV-ness a little
too much. Here is a movie set in the
most rural part of Hickviue, and every-
one is listening to Green Day, Fastball,
and the Foo Fighters? It just doesn't add
up with me.
But that's just nit-picky stuff that I have
to throw in because I am, after all, a pro-
fessional journalist. The movie is defi-
nitely worth your six bucks, and possi-
bly even twelve.
we want to cover you
Did you see news happen? Did you make news happen? Do you belong between our covers?
Give us your story and appear in our next ad. Call easlxarolinian at 328-6366.
11





Wrap-up continued from page 6
some ups and downs as far as
music goes. The market was
flooded with a several older
bands pushing on and putting
out new material. Aerosmith,
for one, put out a live record
which didn't sell too well, but
they managed to snag a spot
on the Armageddon sound-
track.
Reunions were big thanks to
Fleetwood Mac and Black
Sabbath. Also there was a
resurgence of pure, well-
structured rock 'n roll with
albums by Fastball, the
Rolling Stones and Hootie
and the Blowfish. My favorite
musical adventure of 1998
was the release of the Wilco
and Billy Bragg collaboration
Mermaid Avenue, a collection
of unfinished Woody Guthrie
songs set to Wilco and Bragg's
musical arrangement.
There were also downers
though. For instance.
Matchbox 20 decided to
release more than one song
on the radio so that it too
could be played every five
minutes for the next 3 years.
Also, Edwin McCain released
some more sappy rock to feed
all of the NC college stu-
dents. Probably the biggest
downer of the "year was the
closed-mindedness of radio
programmers.
99 PREDICTIONS
1999, the big one99 will
most likely be a big year for
music as well. One word will
sum it all up in my humble
opinion: Prince. The man is
legendary, he wrote a song
that will probably top the
charts for the second time
with no alterations. That is
sheer musical genius, folks. I
also think 1999 will be a time
of genre mixing. After all,
VH-1 has been playing a few
Ryan Kennemur
Senior Writer
98 WRAP-UP
Okay, I'm here to talk about
that foul year of our Lord,
1998. I could think of a
plethora of things that more or
less made me ill, but let's not
drone on about those
thingssuch as the home of
the largest group ovulation
that they call the Lillith Fair,
or the fact that Lollapallooza
had such little interest that
they didn't bother to have
one. Or that the HORDE
festival has turned into just
another reason to go to an
amphitheater and smoke pot.
Indeed, those things need not
be mentioned. And of course,
there would be no real reason
to talk about all those little
movies that came out with the
beautiful teenagers getting
hacked up to bits in various
ways, only to find out
thatOH MY GOD! I never
would have suspected it was
the most obvious person in
m
the group!
I feel safer being just aver-
age-looking. That's about all
that happened in 1998. There
may have been a nationwide
scandal in there or something,
but who really cares about
that sort of stuff?
99 PREDICTIONS
This should be a big year in
music, as far as I can tell. The
big deal, however, is going to
be the movie business. Tom
Cruise will be riding high with
such blockbusters as Mission
Impossible 2 and Stanley
Kubrick's Eyes Wide Shut.
Kevin Costner will seek to
regain some of his lost talent
in the Nick Sparks weeper
Message in a Bottle. In liter-
ary news, Elmore Leonard
will bring us a new novel fea-
turing Chili Palmer, the main
character from the bookmovie
Get Shorty. As for theater,
Broadway may be testing the
waters for a new show based
onyou guessed it! Batman.
Sounds like a magical night of
drama to me. And finally, the
Y2K problem. This is the
virus that will threaten to
crash all computers, kill your
pet fish, make you wet your
pants and forget your name
for half an hour, and most
importantly, make you fall
desperately in love with Bill
Gates. My advice: move to
outer space before the big
apple drops on December
31st.
Photo Editor Needed
Photoshop � Illustrator � QuarkXPress
Responsible � can meet deadlines
Own transportation � Photography skills
2nd floor Student
Publications Building
or call 328-6366
Exhibit, continued from page 1
Orchestra. She has collaborated with
Yo-Yo Ma and Itzhak Pcrlman, and
has been featured on several record-
ings.
Friday's program will feature works
by Hayden, Beethoven and
Shostakovich, all written for cham-
ber trios of piano, violin and cello.
According to Professor Paul Tardif of
the ECU School of Musk, Hayden
wrote the first music of this type.
The cello fu net ions as the bass, while
the violin assumes a higher pitch for
a balanced sound.
"I think the piano provides a won-
derful contrast to those other two
instruments says Charles Bath.
"It's marvelous music to play and
marvelous music to hear, because it's
very intimate says ECU School of
Music Assistant Professor Joanne I
Bath. "All of the instruments are
equally important
Chamber music requires much more
than just talent and precision; an
ability to adjust minutely to changes
in the musk played by other mem-
bers of the group is absolutely essen-
tial in such a small ensemble.
"It takes a lot of thinking on a lot of
different levels to be able to play in a
triosays Joanne Bath, who com-
pares trio music to "a conversation
among three people
"Since aD three people are equal, the
three have to do a lot of compromis-
ing
H ighl ights of the evening will
include Beethoven's "Archduke
which Charles Bath calls "one of the
monuments of chamber music
Shostakovich's haunting works,
inspired by Jewish folk musk and
written just after WWII, will strike a
different nerve.
And students will appreciate Hayden
for the sheer joy that chamber musk,
artfully executed, can convey.
Student and youth tickets for the 8
p.ra concert are $7,12 for ECU staff
and faculty and $15 for the general
public.
Free lime
28 Thursday
-TheNegotiator.at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
-Religious Arts Festival organtrum-
pet recital at 8 p.m. at Memorial
Baptist Church
29 Friday
TheNegotiator 8 p.m. in Hendrix
- jazz at Night at 8 p.m. in the MSC
Great Room
-Religious Arts Festival guest organ
recital at 8 p.m. at Memorial Baptist
Church
30 Saturday
- The Negotiator, at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
-Kalichstein-Laredo-Robinson Trio
at 8 p. m. in Wright Auditorium
Religious Arts Festival choral ser-
vice at 2 p.m. at Memorial Baptist
Church
31 Sunday
- The Negotiator, at 3 p.m. in Hendrix
-Bingo Night at 6 p.m. in MSC 244
2 Tuesday
Iirotha free advance tickets with
student ID, at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
Theater
3 Wednesday
-Sundance Theater Swingers, at 8
p.m. in Hendrix
WrlB
15. Eels
"Last Stop: This
Town"
14. Fear of Pop
"In Love
13. Flat Duo Jets
"Blues Wrapped
Around Your Head"
12. Ghoti Hook
"Walkin'on
Sunshine"
II.Soul Coughing
"Rolling"
10. Beck
"Tropicalia"
9. Cake
"Never There"
8. REM
"Lotus"
7. Unbelievable
Truth
"Settle Down"
6. Ben Lee
"Cigarettes Will Kill
You"
5. John Spencer
Blues Explosion
"High Gear"
4. Zebrahead
"Get Back" ,
3. Everlast
"What It's Like"
2. Jump Little
Children
"Come Out Clean"
1j LimpBizkit
"Faith"






www.y jeJgrTeevents calendar link.
ThenuMnterou campus calendar.
nrs just that easy.
And it's one more free service of the ECU Student Media.
MMBBBHBHBK�g
.jaMiitoate


Title
The East Carolinian, January 28, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 28, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1314
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
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