The East Carolinian, January 26, 1999







Tuesday
High: 55
Low: 37
Wednesday
High: 68
Low: 34
Online Survey
Does ECU need a new
football coach?
57 Yes 47 No
www.tec.ecu.edu
Do you think the sororities' ban on funding
alcoholic parties will be effective?
Carolinian
Help Crime Stoppers, the Greenville Police Department
and the Ed1 Police Department, identify this woman
wanted for credit card fraud. Page 3
TUESDAY. JANUARY 28,1999 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 32
Support Professors write about impeachment
given to
disabled
University improving
support for handicapped
Political scientists sources in
Clinton proceeding
K r i s t y Daniel
STAFF WRITER
Being away from home is a challenge, but
imagine if that challenge was compounded
with a disability.
The university offers a great deal of sup-
port and services to help in aiding these
disabled students. Much of the support and
aid comes from the Department for
Disability Support Services.
ECU is home to around 365 disabled
students. According to Liz Shilliday, asso-
ciate director for the Department for
Disability Support Services, "It is not a
requirement for the disabled students to let
the university know they are disabled
when enrolling. Therefore, we only know
the number of students who are disabled
that have come to us for support, and not
the total number
The Department for Disability Support
Services offers services such as mobility
training for the blind or visually impaired
and interpreting services and Portable
Telecommunication Devices for the deaf.
Hearing impaired students are provided
with sign language interpreters and the
visually impaired are provided with things
such as books on tape and items in larger
print.
In addition to Disability Support
Services, the university also offers four
handicap accessible dorms and six handi-
cap accessible dining halls. ECU Transit
"When the new level of the stadium
was built, ramps were added for the
disabled, as well as elevators, to
allow them to get up to the new level
Bruce Flye
Facilitator for Planning and Design
S U S A N N E MlLENKEVICH
STAFF WRITER
Two members of ECU's Department of
Political Science are sources for information
about the impeachment proceedings
against President Clinton.
Dr. Tinsley Yarbrough has completed a
manuscript for a book about Supreme Court
Justice William Rchnquist, who will preside
at the impeachment hearings.
"I teach constitution law here and wrote
the book because of a simple part of inter-
est in the Supreme Court Dr. Yarbrough
said.
Although the book contains no informa-
tion regarding the proceedings against
Sororities
go sober
Panhellenic stops
endorsing alcoholic events
President Clinton, it does look at the
Rehnquist court which is presiding over the
hearings.
"The timely book
on Chief Justice
Rehnquist solidly
reaffirms Yarbrough's
reputation as a pre-
eminent judicial
"I am happy to talk to people
because I am a student of
scholar. His research American politics and have an
brings national credit
and recognition to interest in all American politics Senate impeach
am a student of American pol-
itics and have an interest in all
American politics Dr.
Yarbrough said.
Dr. Sean
Kelly has been
making presen-
tations at ECU
and other
schools that
focus on the
Dr. Yarbrough
Department of Political Science
the department of
Political Science at
ECU said Dr.
Richard Kearney,
chairperson of the
Political Science
Department.
The book is set to be published and
released by late 1999 or early 2000 by the
Oxford University Press.
"I am happy to talk to people because I
ment process
compared to
judicial proceed-
ings.
"The proceedings are very
much unlike each other and
are opposite of what you would find in the
court room Kelly said. "It is a source of
some frustration, and some people do not
see the process as being legitimate
Dr. Kelly has been on some television
Dr. Tinsley Yarbrough, Political Science professor, completed a
manuscript about Clinton's impeachment hearings.
PHOTO BY MICHAEL SMITH
programs including on WCTI, an ABC affil-
iate station, and has talked to the local
republican party as a source of information
about the impeachment proceedings.
"It is something where you get calls
SEE POLITICAL SCIENCE. PAGE 2
Beautiful days bring out bikers
Amy Sheridan
NEWS EDITOR
has eight handicap accessible busses and
one van.
Renovations to many of the dorms and
other campus buildings are underway to
make ECU a more handicap accessible
university.
Beginning last year, ECU started to ren-
ovate dorms and campus buildings by
adding elevators. Jarvis Hall's renovations
will start this year. Once renovations arc
complete, Jarvis will be equipped with an
elevator.
According to Bruce Flye, director of
Facilities Planning, Jones Hall is the next
dorm in line to have an elevate installed.
The Austin Building and Rawl Annex
are two campus buildings that have recent-
ly been under construction.
ECU Transit has eight of their 18
busses available for the use of disabled stu-
dents. They are equipped with lifts for
access to the bus.
"The last five busses we have bought
have been accessible. When we replace the
old buses with new ones, they will also be
accessible said Joey Weathington,
SEE DISABLED. PAGE 2
The ECU Panhellenic Council, the
organization which governs campus
sororities and fraternities, has passed a
resolution to co-sponsor only events
held on fraternity property that are alco-
hol-free.
This resolution is set to take effect
in the fall of 2000.
Amanda Garner, the Panhellenic
president, said that she did not want the
tragic events blamed on alcohol at other
campuses to occur at here.
"We hope this resolution will show
the administration, faculty and students
of this campus and other campuses that
wc arc aware of the current issues involv-
ing alcohol across the United States
Garner said.
Assistant Dean of Students Laura
Sweet was delighted when the Council
decided to pass the new resolution, origi-
nally brought about by the students and
voted on in mid-October.
"I think that they will have activities
at the Fraternity and Sorority Houses that
will be much more wholesome Sweet
said.
ECU is the second school in the
nation whose Panhellenic Council passed
this measure. The university followed
suit only a week after University of
Florida at Gainesville passed a similar
measure.
The National Panhellenic Chairman
has cited ECU as progressive in the com-
bat against excessive alcohol use. In
addition, Amanda Garner received a let-
ter of commendation from the Chairman
of the National Panhellenic Conference.
Some members of Fraternities and
Sororities feel differently and object to
the resolution. "I hate to upset the
administration but most incoming stu-
dents are coming to ECU to have a good
time. Let's be honest we're not at
Harvard said Jeff Larson, senior, mem-
ber of Sigma Phi Epsilon. "This will
influence students negatively towards
the Greek system. Numbers are decreas-
ing gradually already. This will not sal-
vage ECU or the Greek reputation.
People have an idea of what ECU is all
about, I say capitalize on the advantages
of the school�the fun
PHOTO BY MIKE JACOBSEN
Internet sells students books
Varsitybooks.com
rivals book stores
Amy Simpson
staff whiter
There seems to be some
competition on the horizon
for the ECU Dowdy
Student Stores and the
University Book Exchange
(U.B.E).
That competition is
called VarsityBooks.com, a
new college text-based
bookstore on the Internet
that provides an online
option for buying text-
books. That means that
now there is an open mar-
ket for textbook sales,
whereas before there were
only the two student stores.
VarsityBooks.com offers
prices as low as 15 percent
to 40 percent below sug-
gested retail price, a tempt-
ing offer to economy-bound
ECU students. Both U.B.E.
and ECU Student Stores
charge a 20 percent margin
on all high enrollment text-
books. Although
VarsityBooks.com only
offers new textbooks, its
prices equal that of some of
the used books at the uni-
versity bookstores. In a
comparison of the three-
options offered to students
at ECU, VarsirvBiKiks.com
saved $30 after deducting
shipping and handling.
To access the catalog,
students can go online to
www.VarsityBooks.com
and select ECU from the
list of universities. Then
they select the class and
course number from the
alphabetical list of depart-
ments. Every once in a
while thete may be a differ-
ent edition, or paperback
instead of hardcover.
VarsityBooks.com
replaces sales tax with ship-
ping and handling charges.
It is a relatively new
entity, subsisting on credit
card payments only, and not
set up to p.ocess cash or
check payments, making it
difficult for those students
on financial aid or scholar-
ships. The ECU Dowdy
Student Stores accepts
everything except Discover
and American Express.
Moreover, U.B.E. is unable
to take One-Cards and
American Express.
"1 don't feel it
(VarsityBooks.com) is a
problem as of right now,
because the program is so
new said Wanda
Scarborough, director of the
ECU Student Stores.
So far VarsityBooks.com
has made little if any differ-
ence to the Student Stores
sales. U.B.E. does not yet
perceive VarsityBooks.com
as a threat because the web-
site does not sell used text-
books.
Several students at ECU
think VarsityBooks.com
sounds like a good idea, but
they said they are still more
likely to continue to shop at
the university bookstores.
"The long lines are a
drag, but at least I am guar-
anteed service freshman
Kalcb Hobson said.
VarsityBooks.com is not
the only online service
available. The Student
Stores are teaming up with
follett.com to offer more to
the students at large.
V
Austin Bunch becomes Assistant to Chancellor.
PHOTO COOBTESY OF NEWS BUREAU
New help
for Eakin
Austin Bunch named
Assistant to Chancellor
Devon White
STAFF WRI TF.R
Austin Bunch, a veteran university faculty
member and administrator, has been
named Assistant to the Chancellor for
Constituent Relations at ECU.
"With his particular job he brings a
wealth of experience in the areas of the
university that need the most attention
SEE BUNCH. PAGE 3





2 Tan�iv. Jinmry 28, 1999
news
briefs
Construction of
I Austin continues
SHAW UNIVERSITY TO
AWARD DON KINGr
HONORARY DOCTORATE
GREENVILLE, S.C. (AP)
The next rime the Department of
Public Safety takes your drivers
license picture, smile. You don't
know who might see it
The Public Safety Department
has sold 3.5 million of South
Carolina driver's license photos to a
New Hampshire firm for $5,000.
Image Data, LLC, said it plans
to use the photos in a nationwide
system. The system is designed to
prevent check fraud by transmit-
ting the images to store clerks veri-
fying customer identities.
The firm bought the entire
database of 2.6 million driver pic-
tures, names and addresses for
$5,000, or less than two-tenths of a
cent per picture. It's paying a
penny per record to periodically
update its system as new drivers
get their licenses.
LAKE MARY, Fla. (AP)
Police found a black-and-white
fiberglass cow that was stolen from
a Chick-fil-A billboard on
Interstate 4.
Aside from missing an car, the
cow was in good shape when found
in an open
BANGKOK, Thailand (AP)
Rising unemployment from the
Asian economic crisis still threatens
social unrest and could stall
reforms undertaken by hard-hit
countries, a World Bank vice presi-
dent said Thursday.
"The economic crisis has bur-
dened the people of Asia, especial-
ly the poorest, and it may threaten
. the necessary reforms for economic
recovery Jean-Michel Scverino
said. "We observe anxiously social
unrest and wonder if structural
reforms will be jeopardized
1 Speaking to 200 delegates from
Asia-Pacific countries to open a
two-day meeting on social issues
arising from the crisis, Severino
urged regional governments to
(Jevelop active social and economic
policies to reduce the impact on
people.
Otherwise, unemployment is
ijfkely to rise and incomes fall as
companies continue to close down
(r adapt to the new realities in the
region, Severino said.
I Thailand's Prime Minister
(Jhuan Leekpai said in a speech
that rising unemployment, now
about 10 percent of the labor force,
fas the most serious problem for
the country.
Elevator part of
ongoing renovation
Tkrra Stkinbkiskr
STMf WRITKII
Over the past few months the
sights and sounds of construction
near the Austin Building have
become familiar to ECU students.
An elevator is being built in the
Austin Building as part of an ongo-
ing program to make all of the
buildings at ECU handicap acces-
sible.
"The state of North Carolina
allocates money every year for
repairs and renovations said
Facility Planning Director Bruce
Political Science
continued 1mm page 1
frequently about information
since it is the first encounter with
impeachment for many people
Dr. Kelly said.
Kelly has also been looking at
the impeachment of federal judges
and how similar those cases are to
that of President Clinton.
"Making presentations at ECU,
the local community and other uni-
versities have helped scholars, stu-
dents and lay persons work their
way through the thicket of
impeachment and all the complex
and misunderstandings in the pro-
ceedings Dr. Kearney said.
Disabled
continued Irom page 1
I Bureau of the Census
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Recruiting to fill
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Computer Specialists
Mathematical Statisticians
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Administrative Specialists
Decennial Specialists
Geographers
Relevant college degree or
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I Salary range
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I January 29th
110:00 am � 7:00 pm
land
I January 30th
110:00 am - 5:00 pm
To schedule an interview or
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please call 1-800 638-6719
between 8:30 am - 4:30 pm
Monday - Friday
U.S. cKI�n�hlp tt rtqu4red
Austin
Flyc. "We try to
build one elevator a
year to let us get full use
of the buildings for all
students
The Austin elevator project,
which began four months ago, is
coming along relatively quickly.
"So far we've added a lobby and
the brick work and internal parts of
the elevator are complete said
Rob Edmundson, a general con-
tractor for Best Contracting Inc.
"It takes a long time to get an
elevator shaft in the ground, but
Austin is coming along fast Flye
said. "It took a very long time to
build the elevator addition on Rawl
because of some unforeseeable
problems with the contractor
When the project is finished it
will look very much like the eleva-
tor annexation that was put into the
Rawl last year. While the construc-
director of ECU Transit.
"When the bus drivers are hired,
and later in each semester, they
have training. And, last semester it
was in conjunction with the
Disability Services to aid the stu-
dents Weathington said.
Minges Coliseum and Williams
Arena are also handicap accessible.
"When the new level of the sta-
dium was built, ramps were added
for the disabled, as well as eleva-
tors, to allow them to get up to the
new level Flye said. "Williams
Arena has some accessible seats
and when the new addition on the
north side of the football field is
done, there will be additional seat-
ing for the disabled
It is impossible to compare
ECU's handicap accessibility to
other universities. But, Shilliday
said, "I am very proud of where the
university is with its accessibility on
the campus
Building due to be finished in February.
PHOTO BY MIKE JACOISEH
tion may seem like an inconve-
nience right now, students realize
the need for such an addition.
"I think it's great that the uni-
versity is taking steps to make the
school more accessible to handi-
capped students freshman Kathy
Haun said. "It's appalling how
many public places still are not
fully available to people with dis-
abilities
Even though ECU is making
progress, ir is a slow process that
can only be done one building at a
time. The elevator in Austin
should be finished and ready for
use by the end of February.
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� Hamburger Steak Plate $3.95
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� Shrimp & Trout Combo $4.95
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All of above served with choice of
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Don't have a buck, COME ANYWAY! We'll see you there!
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Iiroliniin
3 TytUiy. January 28. 1999
news
Tki East Cwthtt� -
u can
lesday at
! All
e Cutting
a friend 11
nd
here!
phenalia
ors
-0753
:nc.com
Do you know this
woman?
Help Crime Stoppers, the
Greenville Police Department and
the ECU Police Department iden-
tify this woman. She is wanted for
questioning in regard to ATM card
theft and fraud. If you have any
information that may help police
please call the ECU Police at 328-
6215 or Crime Stoppers at
758-7777.
If you stand for
Equality, Justice, and Truth
toe
ng
ic.
anning
iers
vre
eley Dr.
said Jody VVhichard, member of
Advisory Board Committee.
"I am impressed with the cam-
pus and the friendliness of people
Bunch said.
Bunch, former executive assis-
tant to the President and Executive
Director of Public Relations at
Mississippi University for Women,
began his new position at ECU on
Jan. 19. He succeeded Emmett
Floyd, who resigned last spring to
seek a seat in the General
Assembly. Bunch is now the chief
liaison between Chancellor Richard
Eakin and external constituents
such as government officials, the
university Board of Visitors and the
county and city local government.
"I am very pleased that Austin
Bunch is joining the East Carolina
administration. He brings a wealth
of experience in virtually every
facet of higher education and will
be a valuable addition to our staff
Eakin said.
Bunch served at Mississippi
Correction:
In the Jan. 21 issue of TEC we
incorrectly spelled a student,
Na'im Akbar's name. We apolo-
gize for any inconvenience.
University for Women for 11 years
in various roles in institutional
advancement, public service, con- j
tinuing education and as head of
the Division of Interdisciplinary
Studies. Previously he was at the
University of Mississippi as a facul-
ty member and administration.
"Austin Bunch brings an impres-
sive resume from the University of
Mississippi and the Mississippi
University for Woman Eakin said.
He obtained a bachelor's degree
from the University of Mississippi
and a doctorate from Georgia State
University.
ECU wants you to serve
on a Student Judicial Board
This is your opportunity to serve your fellow students
and gain valuable experience making solid,
well-thought-out decisions.
Requirements include:
�Minimum 2.0 GPA overall
�Must be in good standing with the university
�Must have good decision making skills
�Commitment to a fair and just judicial process
Information can be picked up at 201 Whichard or
Student Government Offices, 2nd floor MSC.
Applications are available beginning Thurs
Jan. 21 and end Mon. Feb. 8, by 5pm.
"If you can't not wriA good,
apply wiihin'V
Editors Needed
Copy
� Must have excellent grammar & editing skills
� English majors preferred
� Apply at toe second floor of Student
Publbrfions Building or call 328-6366
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"Stnoocfr11
Vy �
Monday, February 8, 1999 at 8:OOpm
Hendrix Theatre - Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University
Sponsored by ECU Student Union
Lecture Committee
KISSING
Featuring over 25 different
atyles of kisses, like
- the lip-o-suction klsa
- the upside-down kiss
- the Trobrlan islands kiss
- and the vacuum kiss.
� Vv
Advance Ticket Prices:
Public - $3.00
ECU Student - Free
when valid ECU ID la presented
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in advance of the show.
All Tickets at the Door - $5.00
mmo
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Every day, handicapped students at ECU face remarkable challenges that most of us would
never dream of. Not only do these students deal constantly with new obstacles, but they must
also stand with their heads up as some people stare and gawk quietly.
While many of us concentrate on holding doors and other acts of pity for the disabled, TEC
feels that we should put our attention toward improving facilities on campus.
As we begin a three-part series covering the challenges faced by the handicapped and
dealing with lack of facilities equipped to adequately meet their needs, the school has recently
purchased a number of new buildings, trees, Sonic Plazas, as well as beautiful neon lights for
the library, but wheel-chair-bound students still have to navigate around an obstacle course to
get from the handicapped parking to a building's entrance, including our own Student
Publications building.
Areas such as College Hill, along with other dorms, are almost vacant of wheelchair-
accessible areas.
While their numbers may be smaller than other groups, the roughly 400 disabled students
at this university face more disadvantages than most. In this technological age of
advancement, and ECU one of the top 25 most wired college campuses around, it's ironic that
many students cannot reach computer labs, such as the one in Aycock's basement, because of
the stairs leading to the area.
While the school has had many advancements in the past several years, still many changes
need to be addressed. Many of these people are among the bravest most strong-willed people
in the community, and to this TEC dedicates this series to those who have stood up in the face
of adversity instead of quitting at the sight of obstacles.
OPINION
Ryan
Kennemur
Squirrel attacks helpless Ryan
LETTER
to the Editor
Article missing important pieces
Aww. He thinks my Adidas
are a mate. How cute.
There's something going on
hereand I just can't figure out
what it is. I'm going to let you guys
in on a secret. I'm embarrassed to
say it, but I just need to tell
somebody. Okayhere goes, (deep
breath)
The other day, I was with a
classmate of mine walking past
Joyner Library (official motto:
"You'll never find the entrance. Ha
I la llaaah) It was a rather
beautiful day in the neighborhood,
and indeed a beautiful day for a
neighbor. All of the beauty quickly
ceased, however, when out of the
blue a squirrel bum-rushed me. He
was rtinning at top-crittcr-spced,
and he stopped about two feet
away from me.
I looked at my classmate and
said something like "I don't believe
you've met my friend Mr. Fuzzy.
Well, apparently Mr. Fuzzy didn't
like his new nickname, and he
pounced on my shoe. I, as a semi-
normal person, began to sift
through my internal brain files and
look for any info for remedying a
rabid squirrel attack. This took
about 10 seconds, at which time my
classmate told me to look at what
the squirrel was doing. My idea that
he hated me was proven
completely false. Indeed, he really
seemed to care for mc.or at least
my footwear.
My first thought was "Aww. He
thinks my Adidas are a mate. Mow
cute The first words to come from
my mouth, however, were
"Ewww
Well what would you do, Bubba?
I picked up my foot, but the
squirrel's lust was stronger than
mere gravity. 1 began to wave my
foot back and forth, gently so as not
to hurt the little booger, but it only
seemed to make it worse. I was
getting angry, and the little
castaway was having the ride of his
life.
Finally, I decided to use a stick
to pry him off my foot. There was
only one thing more disgusting at
that time than a squirrel trying to
make love to my shoe, and that was
a squirrel that succeeds in making
love to me shoe. I got him off my
foot and he scurried up a tree, no
doubt to smoke a small pecan-
flavored cigarette. We walked the
rest of the way to Mendenhall in
silence, just as I had hoped.
The reason for my writing this is
the simple fact that the weather is
throwing everything off balance.
There's something wrong when it's
t-shirt and shorts weather in the
middle of January, and there is
really something wrong when the
small woodland creatures go into
heat three months early. And it's all
due to this Global Warming
Theory. My idea is that we should
just forget about this theory all
together. In fact, let's just not listen
to any new theory that scientists
throw at us. Think about it. Every
time those white-coated people
come up with a prediction for the
future, such as the Greenhouse
Effect, erosion of the beaches and
holes in the Ozone, they always
seem to come true! So my idea
is.Jet's just not think about it If
we don't think about it, maybe it
won't happen! Just a thought. Well,
I am getting sleepy. I think I'll go
back to my bomb shelter, er, I mean
my dorm room and take a nap.
An article in the Dec. 8 edition of
The East Carolinian entitled
"Group combats drinking
problem" contained some
erroneous information that I would
like to correct in this response. In
March 1998 The Center for
Counseling and Student
Development hired a staff member
who specializes in substance abuse
counseling and prevention issues.
The ankle incorrectly stated that
ECU was "looking into the
possibility" of doing so. This
position has allowed the university
to expand Its response to alcohol
and other drug abuse.
The article reported that "the
number of drinkers at ECU is
below the national standards A
more accurate statement would
read that the 1997 CORE survey
demonstrated that alcohol
consumption at ECU was very near
the national norms. Even though
our students' drinking behaviors
reflect the fairly responsible
patterns found at other universities,
our group is looking for ways to
address abusive drinking. We are
interested in having students join
IMPACT in this effort. Students
may call 328-6661 to help.
Bob Morphet
Center for Counseling and
Student Development
OPINION
Columnist
Stephen
Kleinschmit
French too cozy with Iraq
Write, cu Letter
to tk& EcUtor
Got something to say? Need somewhere to
say it? Bring your letter to the easfearolinian
located on the 2nd floor of The Student
Publicatiqns Building
No doubt when we took on
Iraq in Desert Storm,
coalition forces had to face
Iraqis with the same
equipment that the French
had sold to them.
I believe that the French are
taking an anti-American and anti-
NATO stance in some of their
political and military aims. One of
the most concerning aspects of
their government is that they sell
military weapons , to terrorist
countries.
Inl986theU.S.S.Stark,a U.S.
Navy frigate, was severely
damaged when an Iranian fighter
bomber fired a French-made
Exocet anti-ship missile at the
Stark, killing several American
sailors. France knowingly sold
these powerful weapons to the
enemy of its supposed ally, who if
I remember correctly, saved them
from certain extermination in
WW2. That doesn't to seem to be
very grateful response from a
country who owes its entire
existence to us.
No doubt when we took on Iraq
in Desert Storm, coalition forces
had to face Iraqis with the same
equipment that the French had
sold to them. And no doubt at
least several of the Americans shot
down over Iraq and Kuwait were
shot down with French missiles.
This past December, during what
has been humorously dubbed
"Operation Desert Shield Me
From Impeachment the only
two countries who did not support
the bombings were the former
Soviet Union and France. This
puzzles me. How can France
expect global peace and
tranquility if it sells weapons to
terrorists and supports keeping a
madman in charge of a doomsday
arsenal of chemical weapons?
I feel that we should put the
same economic sanctions on
France as we do on Cuba. I feel
that such an ungrateful country
should not be considered a friend if
it does crap like this to all of its
neighbors who are looking out for
it. And if they're ever in a war again,
I say bah humbug! Let 'em rot!
f 5 Tueiday. Jam
Four Seats
'))
, 3-D
iP
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"In my country, the journalist
is forbidden from seeking out,
writing and speakim the
truti
Yoi
BIl
Tournam
ECU at!
February
If you
Billi
Tue F
Mender
(Men's ant
�Omar Belhouchet
Algerian newspaper editor
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CI n�r�linliB
r, 5 Tueiday, January 28.
1999
! Seats Left
Jason Latour Life's Meanings
Tin Ear Cvdmm'
Kevin Jordan
I got him off my
ed up a tree, no
a small pecan-
We walked the
) Mendenhall in
nl hoped,
my writing this is
at the weathet is
ing off balance.
g wrong when it's
weather in the
ry, and there is
wrong when the
features go into
i early. And it's all
Jlobal Warming
is that we should
t this theory all
et's just not listen
ty that scientists
ik about it. Every
:e-coated people
prediction for the
the Greenhouse
" the beaches and
one, they always
rue! So my idea
think about it! If
bout it, maybe it
st a thought. Well,
py. I think I'll go
shelter, er, I mean
id take a nap.
ACROSS
1 In tavor of
4 Parasitic
arachnid
8 Afford
opportunity
14 Atmosphere
15 Gumbo
ingredient
16 Iroquois League
tribe
17 Distinctive fabric
patterns
19 Eurasian plum
20 Coral isle
21 At the ready
23 Eccentric piece
24 Hawaiian island
25 Little piggy
26 Follow closely
29 Org of Giants
31 Much removed
33 Leg joint
34 Nova
37 Loose fat
39 Lemon drink
40 Dangling
ornaments
52 1990-92 Frencr 12 Marnege vow
Open winner 13 Khaki shade
54 Strange 18 Biases
56 Lathers 22 Blue ducks
60 Floral neckwear 27of Lebanon
61 excellence 28 Holds on to
62 Anwar of Egypt
63 Beaver or
dog, at times
66 Condition at
oceanside
68 Blackout
69 Car on call
30 S. Dey TV
series
32 Estimator
34 Mixes up
35 Watercraft
36 Swing to and fro
38 Free turn
70 Yours and mine 41 Brownstone
71 Toed the line
72 Adam's garden
73Clemente
DOWN
1 Of the Vatican
2 Lariat
3 Belted hunter of
the sky
4 Soothed
entrance
43 J.F. Kennedy's
vessel
46 Allegretto-
adagio
separator
49 Margin for error
i
1231 18A5G7s a10iiu
14"la
17F1a2728
50J22I23
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40� 49�i
44��57sam
4�i 651
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08:
71hr
53 Blockade
55 Not look
forward to
57 Mexican
sayonara
58 City west of
Venice
59 Severe
63 Sticky
substance
64 Essence
65 Crimson or
scarlet, e.g.
67 Chopping tool
rench missiles.
er, during what
ously dubbed
rt Shield Me
:nt the only
did not support
:re the former
I France. This
n can France
peace and
lls weapons to
nrts keeping a
of a doomsday
weapons?
should put the
sanctions on
n Cuba. I feel
nitcful country
dered a friend if
his to all of its
looking out for
er in a war again,
Let 'em rot!
alist
out,
he
Z�.
It's TOURNAMENT TIME!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
BILLIARDS BOWLING CHESS
TABLE TENNIS RACQUETBALL
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent
ECU at regional competitions to be held at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va
February 19-21 1999. All expenses paid by Mendenhall Student Center.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out!

BilHardS (Nine-Ball)
TueFeb. 2 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center
(Men's and Women's Divisions)
Bowling
Chess
Wed Feb. 3 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
Multi-Purpose Room
Table Tennis
Thur Jan. 28 6:00 p.m
Mendenhall Multi-Purpose
(Men's & Women's SinglesTeam Divisions)
Mon Feb. 1 6:00 p.m.
The Outer Limitz
Mendenhall Bowling Center
(Men's and Women's Divisions)
ise Room
Racquetball
Registration Deadline - Wed Jan. 27
Student Recreation Center
(Mixed Doubles and Men's & Women's SingleTeam Divisions)
ThPro i a $2 00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the
SSiSSSm Desk, the Billiards Center, and THE OUTER LIMITZ Bowl ng Center
SSTme ground floor of Mendenhall Student Center, as well as at the Main Desk of the
tSm ReaUon Center. Call the Student Activities Office. 757-4711, for more information. J
IFC Spring 1999 Fraternity
Rush
Jan. 25-29, 1999 7-10pm
bids extended after 9pm Friday, Jan. 29
-����
AIO Alpha Sigma Phi - Delta Zeta House
AIO Delta Sigma Phi - 510 E. 10th St.
AX Delta Chi - AA1T House
0X Theta Chi - 312 E. 11th St.
KA Kappa Alpha - 500 E. 11th St.
KZ Kappa Sigma - 700 E. 10th St.
AXA Lambda Chi Alpha- 500 Elizabeth
nKA Pi Kappa Alpha- Sigma Sigma Sigma House
riKO Pi Kappa Phi-803 Hooker Rd.
IIAO Pi Lambda Phi-410 Elizabeth St.
ZAE Sigma Alpha Epsilon - Zeta Tau Alpha House
ZOE Sigma Phi Epsilon-505 E. 5th St.
EN Sigma Nu - 501E. 11th St.
En Sigma Pi - 506 E. 10th St.
TKE Tau Kappa Epsilon - 951 E. 10th St.
PBI Phi Beta Sigma - 800 W. 5th St.
DKT Phi Kappa Tau- 409 Elizabeth St.
OKF Phi Kappa Psi-Alpha Phi
U Student Kecreai
Friendships are
common,
but Brotherhood
lasts a lifetime.
Go Greek I






�Tatsay.J.s.try2e. 1999
features
7 Tmidiy, Jinuan
The East Carolinian
Joyner assists students through college career
Helping students for
tomtyyears
Phillip (in.ns
STAFF IIITII
Having trouble with your classes?
Unsure about your major? Need to
just lie down and vent your frustra-
tions about college life to some-
one? Don Joyner, Assistant Dean
of Undergraduate Studies, can
help students with those problems
and others. He has worked at ECU
for over twenty years and has
helped many students find out
who they are, what they want to
be, and where they are going with
their lives and careers.
Upon entering Joyner's office,
a comfy couch sits waiting for a
student to stretch out on it and
either complain about their hor-
rendous schedules or to ask what
they should be doing with their
lives.
"I want students to be comfort-
able Joyner said. "They can just
plop on the couch and I'll try to
guide them through the maze that
ta higher education
Among his many duties,
Joyner coordinates a seminar for
freshmen, GOAD 1000.
This seminar he assists first year
students develop their academic
skills, learning processes, career
decision-making and personal
attributes essential for student suc-
cess.
The course was real informa-
tive said Jamie Newsom, an
ECU sophomore. "The best part
was getting to know Don
"He taught stuff about school
that you wouldn't normally learn.
It was very helpful Newsom said.
Joyner is also in charge of the
Academic Intervention Program.
Students who are in academic dif-
ficulty, which includes students
with a GPA under 2.0, go to a
workshop to improve their skills.
Over 1200 students came to
Joyner's workshop during the first
week of this semester.
"I'm big on
organizationJoyner said. "But the
most important thing that I try to
tell students is to go to class. Bad
grades are usually accompanied by
bad attendance
There is also the Academic
Difficulty Report Program which
sends a survey to every professor
who has at least one freshman (stu-
dents who have under 32 hours) in
their class. The definition of acad-
emic difficulty includes poor test
scores, unsatisfactory homework,
and excessive absences.
Even though students may not
be doing well in their classes,
Joyner tries to get students back on
track.
"I want to raise academic self-
esteem in students Joyner said.
"I try to teach students to take
responsibility for their grades
Joyner also teaches a free study
Joyner works to help confused students through acedemic intervention.
PHOTO BY MICHAF.IL SMITH
skills workshop which touches on
career exploration, reading for
comprehension, note-taking, test-
taking, and time management
Joyner spends a lot of time
referring students to Career
Services and the Center for
Counseling and Student
Development
"Don) is terrific, warm and
compassionate professor said
Laura Sweet Assistant Dean of
Student LifeDean of Students. �
"Students are his number one pri-
ority and he makes them feel com-
fortable
Joyner also serves as an academ-
ic advisor for fifty students and
advises two fraternities and one
sorority.
Perhaps what keeps this man
busiest are students who are strug-
gling and who come to him for
guidance.
"My motto is 'Come into my
office for sixty minutes and walk
out with a major Joyner said.
This native of Henderson, a
small town north of Raleigh, is a
graduate of the ECU School of
Business. He worked for Equifax
Corporation for three years until
he decided he wanted to do some-
thing more meaningful in his life.
So he came back to ECU to
receive his masters in counselor
education.
Joyner's first job at ECU in
SEE J0YWR.PACE 7
Joyner teaches a workshop for students in acedemic distress.
PHOTO BY MICHAEL SMITH
Rec Center offers adventure
programs to non-athletes
Expensive fortune tellers
flrresre.fi for fraud in NY'
Variety of pro-ams
fill quickly
tltlC.A SlKKS
IgtfJ vmiiKk
What comes to mind when asked
your opinion on the Student
Recreation Center (SRC)? I'm sure
if you are not athletic, you are quick
; to decline an invitation. The
I thought of exerting energy into rid-
ing a bike that goes absolutely no
where does not excite you one bit.
i Heck, you may even be a part of
the few who have never stepped
I foot in the
i place, at least
not past the
beverage stand.
Well, contrary
to what you may
think, the Rec.
Center has a lot
to offer couch
potatoes and
athletically-
challenged indi-
viduals that
attend ECU.
Rec. Services
isn't all about
competition
said Steve
lobbitt,
Adventu re
Programs
Director. "We
offer many
alternative
activities
through the
Adventure
or swim 500 meters to participate in
these activities.
"(The adventure program is a
good way to meet new people
said Jason Floyd, student employee
at SRC. "It's a really great program
and I encourage everyone to sign
up
There are drawbacks to pro-
grams that aren't filled.
"If not enough students sign up
for the big trips like skiing and
snowboarding, the trips get can-
celed said Zina Briley, student
employee at SRC.
One concern students may have
about the programs are the safety
factors involved. Are the programs
safe for the students new to the
activity? Yes, they are. According to
through extensive training in the
areas of leadership and safety
Bobbitt said. "There are also intro-
ductory classes offered to the inex-
perienced
Participants atttend pre-trip
meetings so they can be introduced
to the activity and become aware of
the risk involved and what should
be expected.
High-perceived risk activities,
which include rock climbing and
rafting, are well taken care of as far
as safety is concerned.
"Rafting trips are contracted
out Bobbitt said .
This ensures that the students
are under the direction of trained
professionals.
The adventure programs are a
The Rec
Center offers
these programs
which are tar-
geted toward
students who are interested in pro-
grams beyond intramural activities
such as backpacking, canoeing,
scuba diving and road trips have
been organized to accommodate
the adventure seeker in you. You
don't have to be able to run a mile
NEW YORK (AP) - Sonya Cruz
and Estee Lee should have been
able to see trouble coming.
Instead, the women were arrest-
ed Wednesday and charged with
bilking thousands of dollars from
clients in a fortune telling scam.
The arrests are part of an ongo-
ing crack down - dubbed
"Operation Crystal Ball on for-
tune tellers who tell customers
they're cursed and that the evil
spell can lie lifted with more visits
and an extra fee, police said.
Cruz and Lee allegedly told cus-
tomers, who showed up for read-
ings at their homes, that they were
cursed or had other problems that
required repeat visits.
Investigators said that Cruz, also
known as Signora Rita, had a for-
tune telling show on the radio and
also placed ads in a newspaper to
attract clients. A sign outside her
Baysidc home said she was a psy-
chic reader.
Meanwhile, Lee was welcoming
customers to her $3,000-a-month
apartment on Manhattan's Upper
East Side.
She had a "nice lifestyle said
Deputy Inspector Robert A.
Martin, commanding officer of the
NYPD's Special Investigations
Division.
In some cases, the women
allegedly charged customers more
than $1,000 to remove a supposed
curse or heal problems, such as a
drunken husband, Mar n said at a
news conference.
Some people lost as much as
$30,000 in three other cases of scam
fortune tellers, said Lt. Robert
Groth, commanding officer of the
department's Special Fraud Squad.
The women also allegedly
charged customers for analyzing
samples of bath water or dirt in an
effort to find a cure for a supposed
ailment, Groth said.
Anonymous tips triggered the
investigation, leading undercover
cops to the women's homes, policfc
said. Instead of having their palms
read for a one-time fee, investiga-
tors were told to come back for
more.
"Once you cross the line and tell
people they are cursed and
charge exorbitant fees it's ille-
gal said Groth, explaining that at
that point, it's no longer for "enter-
tainment purposes
Lee, 43, and Cruz, 34, wer
charged with scheme to defraud,
grand larceny and fortune telling
They "never relieved any of the
problems said Groth. They "just
caused financial problems
Stuffed furry bear causes
trouble for toy companies
Student Recreation Center provides opportunities for wistful couch potatoes, too.
Bobbitt, the percentage of injuries
sustained while participating in the
Adventure Programs are compara-
tively less than those sustained
while participating in Intramural
activities.
"All of our staff have becn
great alternative to the competitive
sports. According to Bobbitt, the
trips are a lot of fun. Students usu-
ally enjoy getting away from cam-
pus, interacting with other stu-
SEE ADVENTURE. PAGE 7
TUALATIN, Ore. (AP) - A toy
company here has a message for
competitors in Texas and
California: Don't mess with an
Oregon bear. Purr-Fection by MJC,
a family-owned business with a line
of 289 stuffed animals, has hauled
the companies to U.S. District
Court to protect its copyright on
Fudge Bear. Marty Castro Sr
designer of the furry-faced toy,
holds the copyright on various ver-
sions of Fudge, which has fake
mink fur, and on a related Ted E.
Bear.
The toys might be small, but the
business is big: Castro says the
company sells several million dol-
lars' worth of cuddly critters each
year.
Now the company wants That's
a Good Idea! in Canton, Texas, and
JS Toys and Emily Toy Collection
of Compton, Calif to stop making
knock-offs of Fudge.
MJC lawyers wrote to That's a
Good Idea! telling them to stop
selling the look-alike bears, but the
Texas company "has willfully and
deliberately ignored this notice
the suit said.
Meanwhile JS Toys has been
making, importing and distributing
the bears, according to the suit
Lawyers say those companies
should know the bears are under
copyright because the bears have
hang tags that say so.
The suit, which was filed
Thursday, says it is no accident that
the That's a Good Idea! bears bear
a strong resemblance to Fudge.
The Texas company's Graze
Bear and Papa Bear W. are "unaur
thorized copies and 'knock-offs' of
MJC's Fudge the court papers
say. The suit also claims that That's
a Good Idea! "purchased hundreds
of MJC's Fudge bears" before
making illegal copies.
The Tualatin company wants an
accounting of profits from the sale
of any Fudge-like bears, and the
award of triple damages to Castro of
MJC, as well as unspecified puni-
tive damages.
It also asks the court to order the
companies to destroy any bears in
stock and recall them from stores;
MJC also wants the companies
ordered to stop all advertising, mar-
keting and sales efforts that
infringe on the copyright
2
Q-





TkttMtCmlWw
7 Tundiy, Jinuaty 26. 1899
r
stress.
lers
JY:
acer or dirt in an
e for a supposed
1
as triggered the
ding undercover
n's homes, police
iving their palms
le fee, investiga-
come back for
;s the line and tell
cursed and
fees it's illc-
explaining that at
longer for "entef-
s
Cruz, 34, wet;
leme to defraud,
I fortune telling
elieved any of the
3roth. They "just
)roblems
ises
ciies
company's Graze
ear W. are "unauj-
ind 'knock-offs' of
the court papers
i claims that That's
jrchased hundreds
?e bears" before
ipies.
company wants an
ofits from the sale
ke bears, and the
images to Castro of
unspecified puni-
e court to order the
;stroy any bears in
them from stores,
ts the companies
ill advertising, mar-
ales efforts that
:opyright j
East Carolinian
Wouldn't it be cool if you had
your own radio station?
Guess what?
Write a Letter to the Editor
and let your view be heard!
Bring all letters to
our office which
is located on the 2nd Floor of
Thg Student Publications Building
Want A
Challenge?
OFFICER
Start your career off on the right foot by enrolling in the Air Force
Officer Training School. There you will become a commissioned
officer in just 12 weeks. From the start you'll enjoy great pay,
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a career in the Air Force can take
you, call 1-800-423-USAF, or visit
our website at www.airforce.com
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PUISC
AYNUTIC CLUB
�Slanton Square
752-5239 'ftJMltMnMWt'hn
call today!
SUPERBOWL SPECIAL
Brand New Luxury Apartments
NOW LEASING
7S2-9995
?
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adventure
coniinuid frm P�� 8
dents, and meeting new people.
The Adventure Program me
guaranteed to cure any mid or
major cases of boredom. You know,
the feeling you get when you're
tired of studying and you just warn
to get out of Greenville. Program
arc filling up quickly, o if you plan
to participate, sign up as early a
possible.
Joyner
continuad liom site B
1979 was as an University
Residence Counselor, which is
similar to the resident hall coordi-
nators of today. He did this for
nine years and came to know the
students very well.
"This was the most fun said
Joyner. "I loved it"
In 1988, Joyner began coordi-
nating freshman seminars. Next,
he became Assistant Director of
Orientation. In 1991, Joyner was
promoted to Director of
Orientation.
Joyner joined the Department
of Undergraduate Studies in 1994.
Despite of the awards he has
received, including the
Panhellenic Faculty of Year 1980,
Panhellenic Outstanding Faculty
1994-1995, and many S.G.A.
awards, his most prized recogni-
tions are kept in a bottom drawer
in his office.
In a folder marked "Gift of
Happiness Award a countless
number of cards and letters from
grateful students fill his drawer.
"I think Don Joyner is the best
thing at ECU said Jamie Dove,
senior. "He makes himself avail-
able to students and works on a
one-to-one basis
Joyner is content with his role at
ECU now and hopes to continue
helping students.
"I'm just real happy now
Joyner said.
758-1048
2601 E. Ash St.
Open 24 hrs
� x
at the
Great Room
Mendenhall
8PM
Fri. Jan. 29
at the PU
Mendenhall
10 PM Sat. Jan. 30
UTILITIES INCLUDED � FULLY FURNISHED
Private Bathroom
ic 4 Bedroom 4 Bathroom
Individual Leasing
Roommate Matching
Designer Interiors
State of the Art Amenities
Tournament
Action
All events:
6PM start
Pirate Underground Presents:
theemmagibbsband
(Deadhead Bluegrass)
12 Act Poetry play
At the hendriN theatre
8pmTues.feb.2
Hendrix Theatre
Table Tennis
Thurs. Jan. 28
Me
Bowli
Mon. Fe'
Outer Limi
Chess
d. Feb.3
Room
liards
s. Feb. 2
s Center
Mendenhall Room 244
Smoke Siguali
Free Cable
Free Computer lab
Free Monitored Alarm
ECU Bus Line
Pirates Cove
3305 E. 10 Street � Greenville. NC 27858
K-11
Wed. Feb. 3
8PM
NEGOTIATOR
i
iKFltSlt
JM. 28,29,30
For a good time call:
ECU Student Union Hotline
O 252.328.6004 or
visit us here:
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I Tutidiy, Jinuity 26, 1999
sports
The East Carolinian
Pirate swimmers continue winning
Women get rwenge
over Richmond
TRACY 11 A I R K
ASSISTANT SHUTS KDITCH
The Lady Pirate swimmers
rebounded from last year's defeat
by the Richmond Spiders to win
convincingly this time.
After such defeats as Richmond
defeating the Pirates 97-145 and
setting them back last year, the
women won 154-91 to get some
payback.
"The women had lost the last
two years to Richmond, including
pretty badly last season, so we
wanted to come out strong and
show them who was the best said
head coach Rick Kobe in a Sports
Information interview. "We swam
really fast and had a great meet
Two of these fast competitors
were seniors Allison Holland and
Niki Kreel who led the women's
Men's Swimming & Diving
Victorias
Andy Byrnes
Matt Jabs
Claes Lindgren
50 Yard Freestyle
21.71
100 Yard Freestyle
47.61
200 Yard Freestyle
1:44.08
1000 Yard Fr
10:05.13
200 Yard Butterfly
1:55.31
200 Yard Backstroke Jacob Hartsell
2:03.35
200 Individual Medley Mike Julian
2:01.52
Women'
Victoria
200 Yard Fn
1:55.75
500 Yard Freestyle
5:08.01
1000 Yard Freestyle
Claes Lindgren
400 Medley Relay
3:34.22
HartselLRichard Chen
Brian Flory, Les
Harrison
Ryan Baldwin wins the three meters diving contest on Saturday against Richmond.
PHOTO BY SARAH CHRISTIE
team with two firsts, one second
and one third-place finish and
aided in the 400 medley and 400
free relays.
The men also captured a dra-
matic win, defeating the Spiders
139-82. The men's fifth consecu-
tive victory continued their domi-
nance over Richmond. They now
have a 23-0 all-time record against
the Spiders.
Among other impressive statis-
tics, the men earned at keast the top
two spots in the first five events
while well on their way to the lead
position of 83-17.
For the second week in a row,
sophomore Claes Lindgren won
Three Meter Diving Ryan Baldwin
251.7
200 Yard Backstroke
2:06.53
200 Yard Breaststroke
2:26.13
200 Yard Butterfly
2:09.14
200 Individual Medley
2:11.26
400 Medley Relay '
4:00.02
Men's basketball keeps
losing at Trask Coliseum
Seahawks celebrate
ei$ith straigit victory
Kkic Co re ii
.KNIOI WIITKI
The "War at the Shore" proved to
be fatal for ECU as UNC-
Wilmington's Stan Simmons lit up
the Pirates for 25 points and tallied
up his sixth 20-point game of the
season.
Even down the stretch when the
Pirates were forced to foul, it was
UNC-W who hit 17-21 from the
free throw line to put the nail in the
coffin.
Despite a late rally by the
Pirates, ECU could not tame the
Seahawks in the first contest of the
season between the two rivals.
ECU dropped to a record of 9-9 (3-
5) with the 70-59 loss.
A packed house at Trask
Coliseum was present to watch this
heated game. The 6,100 fans saw a
back and forth competition in the
first half with each team taking its
turn with the lead. In that first half
the Pirates were able to shoot 55
percent from the floor, but that did
not carry over to the second half.
The win for the Seahawks was
their eighth straight victory against
ECU at Trask Coliseum.
The bright spots for ECU were
the plays of Garret Blackwelder
and Brandon Hawkins.
Blackwelder, a junior from Mount
Olive N.C played all 40 minutes
and scored 19 points by shooting 7-
17 for the game. The Morganton,
NC freshman Brandon Hawkins
had a hot hand in the second half
and helped the Pirates rally late
with his 12 points.
"Our guards did some things
well and I liked the way they
played head coach Joe Dooley
said. "The thing with having young
guys on the court, especially on the
road in a tough place to play, is they
will do some good things and some
bad
ECU was hot late in the second
half as they went on a 10-0 run that
cut the lead to five with a huge
three-point basket by another
freshman, Kenyatta Brown.
However, that would be the end of
the ECU run and they did not pull
any closer to the Seahawks.
"We had some opportunities at
the end that we just didn't convert
on Dooley said. "We were down
by just five at one point and didn't
convert. We didn't do some of the
things we needed to win. The
other thing that hurt was we didn't
get much production out of our big
guys
Coaches as well as players
showed signs of frustration after the
loss.
"We are not where we want to
be Blackwelder said at a press
conference on Saturday. "We need
to get better
The Pirates will get a chance for
some sweet revenge against the
Seahawks when UNC-W comes to
Greenville on Feb. 20 at Minges
Coliseum.
Up next for ECU will be yet
another chance for some revenge
against William & Mary who
defeated the Pirates 69-66 on Jan.
16.
ECU will definitely want to
improve on their shooting. The
Pirates combined for 38 percent
from the floor in the match up on
January 16. Also on that day,
William and Mary's Randy Bracy,
last year's scoring leader in the
CAA, scored a game-high 24 points.
The Pirates will have to stop
Bracy and the rest of the Tribe in
order to split the season in wins
between the two teams. The game
will be in Greenville at Minges
Coliseum and the tip off is sched-
uled for 7 p.m.
IWMayHj�nMMjMMKIIMHga
PIRATE Highscorers vs. UiMCW
Points Rebounds Assists
Dana Fuller
Dana Fuller
ourtney Foster,
r, Holland
enne Cross
Heather Hagedom
Niki Kreel
Brooke Wise
Allison Holland
Amy Hendrick,
Kneel,
Cammy Crossen,
Foster
two events that included the 200- men continued to display their against UNC-Wilmington at 2 p.m j
yard freestyle and the 200-yard but- skills. at Minges Aquatic Center. This
terfly. Wrapping up the season, the will also be their last dual meet i
After Kobe decided to swim the Pirates will be preparing for their before the CAA Championships I
last three events as exhibitions, the last show of action this Saturday scheduled for Feb. 18-20.
Pirates begin track season on strong note
Runners compete at
Vrr�nia Tech
S I K I' 11 K N S t: 11 R A M M
si Milk WKIT i:h
With another school-record break-
ing performance from Michelle
Clayton, the women's team com-
peted in their second meet for the
semester.
The women traveled to
Blacksburg, VA for the Virginia
Tech Invitational, where the Lady
Pirates were pitted against many
of the country's top track pro-
grams.
"The meet was very competi-
tive. All of the top teams on the
East Coast were there said
Charles "Choo" Justice, head
women's track coach . "We did
very well. This is as well as we
have performed this early in the
season ever
The Pirates were led by the
unmatched Clayton, who set a
new school record in the weight
throw with a toss of 59'8 14 The
throw also established a new
NCAA provisional qualifying mark
for the senior. Clayton placed third
in the event, the highest finish
among the college competitors.
First and second place were taken
by professional throwers.
Another Pirate who raised some
eyebrows at the meet was fresh-
man Toni Kilgore. Kilgore finished
eighth in the triple jump with a
Results From the Virginia Tech Invitational
Women
Michelle Clayton, 3rd, 59' 814"
Margaret Clayton, 11th, 47' 2 12"
Toni Kilgore, 8th, 40' 0"
Michelle Clayton, 5th, 46' 8 34"
Men
Darren Tuitt, 15th, 22.32
Damon Davis, 10th, 48.31
Lawrence Ward, 15th, 48.84
Maryland-Eastern Shore Invitational
Toni Kilgore,
Leana Anding,
11th, 18'
18th, 17'
Nicky Goins, 14th,
Rasheca Barrow, 17th,
Kiona Kirkpatrick, 16th,
Abrial Hayes, 28th,
ECU � 11th,
7"
9 12"
7.74
25.42
57.05
5:17.14
3:55.50
Brian Bell
Justin Poretti,
Von Johnson,
Stuart Will,
!4th
8th,
9th,
10th,
1:58.12
1:59.41
2:00.32
2:0045
David Balon, 6th, 4:26.56
Stuart Will, 7th, 4:26.56
Steve Arnold, 14th, 4.31.06
Justin England, 14:56.2
ECU 2nd, 3:11.06
jump of 40' 0 The jump quali
fied her for the ECAC indoor,
championships in February.
"She was only a couple of inchn
es away from breaking the school
record Justice said. "The only!
girls who beat her were pros or All-
America ns
Kilgore's feat was surprising
because it came so early in the sea-
son.
"Usually, most of the perfor
mances come late in the indoor
season in February Justice said.
"The way we train we don't
expect these performances this
early
The Pirates also had strong
showings in the sprint events
and the 4x400 meter relay.
"I think we did pretty good
Justice said. "We still have a few
kids who will come along a little
further. I think we could place
pretty well in the ECAC and
have some shot at winning the
conference
The men sent half their team
to Blacksburg and sent the oth-
ers to the Maryland-Eastern
Shore Invitational. It was the
first time that the men's teams
competed this semester.
Yet another impressive event
of the day was the 400 meter
dash at Virginia Tech. Former
Ail-American, Damon Davis,
drew the dreaded lane one in his
heat.
SEE TRACK PAGE 10
Countless Super Bowl parties soon to begin
MIAMI (AP) The image is
frightening: sports writers stoked
on free beer dancing to the music
of Big Bad Voodoo Daddy. It could
only happen at the Super Bowl.
The Daddies will perform for
the media Tuesday at one of the
countless parties leading up to
Sunday's game. Some 150,000
people are coming to town, and
most hotels are requiring a four-
night minimum stay, which means
plenty of time to kill before kick-
off.
The result is a week long exer-
cise in excess. No one's complain-
ing' '
"There's so much going on
said Alex Munoz, executive direc-
tor of the South Florida Super
Bowl Host Committee.
"You can go to a Super Bowl,
not go to the game and still have a
great time Since Pro Player
Stadium's capacity is 75,000, many
visitors obviously are making the
trip for reasons other than attend-
ing the Denver-Atlanta game.
"You don't want to go through
life drunk, fat and stupid said
Jeff DeForrest, a local radio talk-
show host. "But if you do, Super
Bowl week is the way to do it
DeForrest has survived a dozen
Super Bowls, but this one might
be his toughest test yet.
For starters, there's not one
media party, but two. They're
sanctioned by the host committee,
as are a cook-off for charity with
top chefs from NFL cities show-
casing regional cuisine, and a
three-day beach party held by the
NFL Players Association. The
bash on the beach is expected to
attract many former and cuHrent.
players.
"Not all of these guys get tick-
ets to the game, and there are a lot
of them in town Munoz said.
"They'll go there and hang out
and watch the game
There are also concerts and VIP
gatherings, as well as countless
parties not considered official
events.
"I heard rumors that Michael
Jordan is throwing a party Munoz
said, "and Deion Sanders is having
The biggest bash is the only
one hosted by the league - the
annual commissioner's party.
Invitations are free but limited,
and one broker is selling them for
$850 apiece.
Some 5,000 of Commissioner
Paul Tagliabue's closest friends -
the media, employees of NFL
teams and other guests - will
attend the soiree Friday at the
Miami Beach Convention Center.
The event requires 154,000 square
feet of floor space, the equivalent
of eight football fields.
"We put an equal emphasis on
three elements: decor, food and
entertainment said Sue
Robichek, who is planning her
fourth commissioner's party. "This
year it's an undersea adventure to
exotic shores. We'll have three
stages of simultaneous entertain-
ment plus smaller stages with live
music
The media party featuring Big
Bad Voodoo Daddy also includes
ice skating in a downtown Miami
park. Munoz declined to reveal
how he'll produce an ice rink in
80-degree weather.
On Sunday, the action moves to
Pro Player Stadium. Major corpo-
rations such as Coca-Cola, General
Electric and Toyota will host par-
ties before and after the game in a
corporate village that includes 20
tents.
"Each one has a different
theme, from Key West to Palm
Beach, to depict the area said
Barton G. "We're bringing boats
and 20-foot palm trees into the
tents, and we'll have a pool with
synchronized swimmers in one of
them G. said. "I'm trying to fig-
ure out how to heat the water so
they don't freeze
G. also plans a menagerie of
subtropical animals.
"We'll have flamingos, iguanas
and alligators he said. "The
biggest alligator is a five-footer,
and then there are babies people
will be able to hold
That's tough to top, but one
other event will try.
"The biggest party is Sunday at
6:18 p.m Robichek said.
That's when the game kicks off.
D





The East Carolinian
y Foster,
lolland
e Cross
Hagedprn
ndrick,
Crossen,
igton at 2 p.m j
Center. This
List dual meet!
Ihampionships!
8-20.
LOte
'he jump quali
ECAC indoor,
February.
couple of inch-i
king the school
lid. "The only!
vere pros or All-
was surprising
early in the sca-
of the perfor
: in the indoor
y Justice said,
rain we don't
rformances this
also had strong
; sprint events
eter relay.
id pretty good
: still have a few
me along a little
we could place
he ECAC and
at winning the
t half their team
id sent the oth-
iryland-Eastern
lal. It was the
le men's teams
:mester.
npressive event
the 400 meter
Tech. Former
Damon Davis,
:l lane one in his
PAGE 10
egin
:tton moves to
Major corpo-
�Cola, General
will host par-
the game in a
it includes 20
; a different
West to Palm
le area said
wringing boats
trees into the
e a pool with
ners in one of
i trying to fig-
t the water so
menagerie of
lingos, iguanas
: said. "The
a five-footer,
babies people
top, but one
ty is Sunday at
k said.
�ame kicks off.
9 Tuitday, January 26. 1999
Tin East Carolinian
LoveLines
ur key to the perfect
Valentine's Day
Watch for details in next Tuesday's edition of The East Carolinian.
Koumikova wins with
less double faults
FEBRUARY 4-9,1999
MCGINNIS THEATRE. EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
EAST CAROLINA
THE A
TICKETS
GENERAL PUBLIC $9 ond $8
CHILDREN $6 ond $5
ECU EACULIYSTAFf $8 and 57
ECU STUDENTS $6 and $5
10 CHARGE IKKEIS, (All 252 328 6829
ctsMce
D
h t' e J e h tJ
'S9
t6
MELBOURNE, Australia (AP)
Hundreds of people waited in line,
hoping one of the 6,000 unreserved
seats in Court One would open up.
And it was only a third-round
women's doublesmatch.
One of the players was glam-
orous Russian 17-year-old Anna
Koumikova, but for a change she
wasn't the star of the show.
Even her double faults weren't
remarkable as she and 18-year-old
Martina Hingis, the two-time
defending Australian Open singles
champion, beat veterans Monica
Seles, a four-time singles winner
here, and Jana Novotna, who has
won a total of 73 doubles titles on
the women's tour.
With Hingis as the anchor, the
youngsters prevailed 7-6(11-9), 6-3
Sunday, and the cheers were divid-
ed among the four, players.
In her singles matches here,
Koumikova has received thump-
ing, roaring, whistling support from
capacity crowds - despite double
faulting 31 times while beating
'apan's Miho Saeki in the second
ound and 14 times in defeating
Germany's Andrea Glass in the
third.
Her fans also have lustily
cheered her opponents' misses, but
that wasn't the case Sunday as
spectators shouted, "Go, Monica
and "Come on, Jana
She served only four double
faults Sunday, but held service only
once in five games. Double faults,
two each, were the problem in two
games. In another, she missed an
overhead and Hingis netted a vol-
ley on the crucial points. Then win-
ners by Seles and Novotna did her
in.
But Seles, the only one of the
four who didn't serve and volley,
dropped serve four times, and
Novotna three times.
The 30-year-old Novotna hit �
few brilliant shots, but also suffered
a continuation of the errors that
plagued her in a 6-3, 6-0 third-
round singles loss to Spain's Maria
Antonia Sanchez Lorenzo.
In the quarterfinals, Hingis and
Koumikova meet American Nicole
Arendt and Dutch player Manon
Bollegraf.
V
HEY!
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Choices?
Love Working in the Lab?
Already Have
CHEM 1150, 1160? Anatomy &
Physiology, Microbiology
Here's a Suggestion! Find out about
CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE
Call or Coma to the Department Office for more
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ROOM 308 BELK BUILDING
328-4426
Deadline for applications for Fall 1999 is Fob 1,1999
Be sure and catch the latest
production by James Chapman
("Black Man Rising "Woman
with Wings "Our Young
Black Men are Dying and
No One Seems to Care)
Tuesday, February 2,1999 at 8:00pm
Hendrix Theatre-Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University
Sponsored by the Student Union
Cultural Awareness Committee
loA
An emotionally gripping
drama that examines the
difficulty of confronting
issues and love for
self and others.
Advance Ticket Prices:
Public-$3.00
ECU Student - Free
when valid ECU ID is presented
at the Central Ticket Office
in advance of the show.
All Tickets at the Door - $5.00






10 Tuatdiv, January 26, 1898,
sports
Thi Ettt CifQliniin
Track
cominued Ifom page 8
"Damon ran well in lane one
and it is a terrible lane to draw
head men's coach Bill Carson said.
"He led the race until the last three
meters. He just used himself so
much. If he had been in lane five
he would have won
Davis wound up 10th overall.
Behind Davis was freshman
Lawrence Ward who placed 15th.
Ward was the second fastest fresh-
man at the meet. He finished
ahead of many, more sought-after
freshmen, and demonstrated his
extreme talent in the quarter-milers.
ECU'S depth in the 400 did not
go unnoticed by their competitors.
"We have talent in the quarter
Carson said. "We have six talented
quarter-milers. Some of the other
coaches there came up to us and
said "Man, you guys have got some
horses
The Pirates showed their depth
in the 400 by placing second in the
4x400 meter relay. ECU placed
first among college teams, beaten
only by a team of professional run-
ners. Despite their success in the
400, the Pirates were not yet at
their best in many events. The
squad that went to Maryland-
Eastern Shore had a more disap-
pointing meet except for some
strong performances by the Pirates'
distance runners. This slow start
may be attributed to the lack of an
indoor practice facility on campus.
"Wc don't have the conditioning
of the teams that have indoor
tracks. When the weather gets cold,
they can still train but we have to
pull back Carson said.
But even without the indoor
track, the team can still work to
improve for future meets.
"What we've got to do is devel-
op some depth Carson said. "The
kids we sent to Maryland-Eastern
Shore. We've got to get something
out of them
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Washer and dryer included. Living
room, dining room, front porch and
screened back porch. Pets OK. Call
830-9502.
STANCILL DRIVE. 2 bedroom. 1
bathroom, brick duplex, central
heatair. near ECU. $425 month,
pets extra with fee. Call 353-2717.
CONDO FOR Rent: 2000 sq.ft. con-
do, newly renovated, 3 bedrooms, 1
12 baths, washerdryer hook-up.
Available immediately. 752-1899
davtime. 561-2203 pager nights.
GLADIOLUS GARDENS One. two.
,8nd three bedroom apartments. Free
Cable. Located on 10th Street. Call
Wainright Property Management
'LLC 756-6209.
LANGSTON PARK Apartments:
$100 off deposit: 2 bedroom. 1 bath
"�apt. free watersewer, all applianc-
es, washerdryer hook-ups, over
900 sq.ft. Available now $425. Call
758-1921.
TREE 1ST month rent. Players Club.
Sublease 4 bedroom townhouse
with washerdryer and own person-
al bathroom for only $240 plus 14
utilities. Pool, basketball, volleyball,
tennis courts and gym. Call Derek
for more details at 355-4370
��
WESLEY COMMONS South: $100
off deposit: 2 bedroom. 1 bath apt.
free watersewer, washerdrver
hook-ups. 6 blocks from campus.
Available now $440. Call 758-1921.
�WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$285month. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apts 125 Avery St. in Green-
ville - 5 blocks from campus. 758-
6596.
BEECH STREET Villas - Three bed-
room, two bath apartments, close to
campus, with laundry room, stove,
refrigerator, and dishwasher. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC 756-6209.
NAGS HEAD, NC-Get your group to-
gether early. Relatively new house in
.excellent condition; fully furnished:
Jwasher & dryer; dishwasher; central
AC; available May 1 through Au-
gust 31; sleeps 8-$2200.00 per
month. 757-850-1532
CANNON COURT Two bedroom, 1
!l2 bath townhouse. Includes stove,
'refrigerator, dishwasher, washerdry-
r hook-up. on ECU bus route. Call
"Wainright Property Management
1LC. 756-6209.
FOR RENT: six bedroom. 3 12
tiath. fenced-in yard, pets OK. corner
of 4th and Oak St. Contact Betsy �
329-8558
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom. 1 bath apt.
$275.00 per month, free watersew-
er, range, refrig. pets OK. Call 758-
1921 ask for Ken.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
$100 OFF
Security Deposit
wKfi presentation ol thie coupon.
otter expires 2899 not valid with
any other coupon
-WESLEY COMMONS SOUTH: lor 2
bedroom, 1 bath, range, refrigerator,
free watersewer, washerdryar hookups,
laundry facllltlM, S block from campus,
ECU bu service.
-LANGSTON PARK: 2 bedrooms, 1
bath, range, refrigerator, dtshwaeher,
free water�ewer, approx. 900 aq. ft
washerdryer hookups, central heatair,
6 blocks from campus.
Other Apartments Also Available
�All Properties have
24 hr. emergency maintenance-
call 751-1921
ROOMMATE WANTED
ROOMMATE TO share 2 bedroom
townhouse 1.6 miles from PCMH.
Would like graduate student or ca-
reered. Quiet, wooded, beautiful.
Rent $275. 551-3433. Rick, after
6p.m.
ROOMMATE WANTED, preferably
female to share beautiful new 3 bed-
rpom house on ECU bus route. Inex-
pensive rent. Call us toll-free 9 1-
8J00-624-8154 or 758-8710.
MF ROOMMATE needed to share
large 3 BR house 1 block from cam-
piis. Rent 13 bills per month. Call
ChrisLisa at 754-8094.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 3
bedroom house on block from cam-
pus. Rent 13 bills. Call Katie at
931-0348.
ROOMMATE WANTED
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
small mansion. Must be friendly,
honest, responsible and not mind
smokers or cats. Hardwood floors,
fireplaces, spacious room, bar, wash-
erdryer, fountains, and 2 acre es-
tate. Deposit required. $200 per
month and 14 utilities. Call Chris
752-6947
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share a
huge, beautiful house one block
from campus. Washerdryer, big
yard, icemaker. cable, 4 bedrooms. 3
baths, kitchen, dining room and 2
dens. 758-2048.
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE
Needed to share apt. close to cam-
pus, student preferred. Must be re-
sponsible 6 clean & like pets. Total
expenses per month will not exceed
$270. 752-0009.
FOR SALE
LARGE, BARELY used minifrig for
$60 OBO. Large microwave $40
OBO. Great for the dorm or office.
Call 353-6351.
REFRIGERATOR FOR sale: new
large dorm size fridge with built-in
freezer used only one month. Call
412-1974
NEW APARTMENT? Need furni-
ture? I have a cream futon couch
($125). hunter green loveseat (sleeps
2 $200.00), papasan chair with
cushion ($40.00). brown rocker
chair ($30.00). white halogen floor
lamp ($20.00). double box springs
and mattress set ($70.00). hunter
green bakers rack ($20.00). All
items are less than two years old
and are in great condition. Selling
furniture due to marriage. Call to in-
quire or make offer Contact Kristen
at 355-4808 during any hours. If no
answer, please leave message.
JUST IN time for Valentine's! En-
gagement ring, never used. 1.1 car-
at marquis cut. Have appraisal. Seri-
ous inquiries only please. 758-2887.
ask for Todd.
BALL PYTHON, very docile. 1 12
years old. 55 gal. tank, stand, com-
plete setup. $130 OBO. Please leave
message for Kevin 323-0408. 757-
1087.
TWO BOOKCASES, adjustable
shelves; coffee table: student desk.
All in good shape. All together $150.
Bookcases $30 apiece, table $35.
desk $75 OBO. 752-5899. leave
message.
PREPAID CELLULAR phones: Trac-
Fones are finally here! Cellular
phones for the college student on
the move. Phones come with 60 free
minutes for only $100 leather cases
and car chargers optional. Get them
while they're hot Call 252-412-1975
ask for Chris.
FOR SALE: brown sectional sofa
bed. blue recliner and two end ta-
bles. $250 or best offer (will sell
separately). Call 756-5617 for more
info.
AMCJEEP GRAND Wagoneer
1983 powerful V8. Power windows,
locks, seats, etc. This truck is huge,
fun. Perfect college vehicle. Will last
forever. Call Chris. 752-9038.
AAA! Spring Break Panama City
$129! Boardwalk room with kitchen
near clubs! 7 parties-free drinks!
Daytona $149! South Beach $129!
Cocoa Beach $149! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
CUSTOM PRINTED T-shirts. Profes-
sion printers since 1981. Competitive
rates. Free shipping. Full art depart-
ment. We accept digital files in most
formats. 800-272-2066 culture-
works.com
AAA! SPRING Break Bahamas Par-
ty Cruise! 5 nights $279! Includes
meals 8- parties! Awesome beaches,
nightlife! Departs from Florida! Can-
cun & Jamaica $399! springbreak-
travel.com 1-800-678-6386
PRE-PAID Phone cards, 106 min-
utes for $10. 216 minutes for $20.
For more information or to purchase.
call Kristy at 328-8426.
20" RCA television. $135 OBO.
Dorm-size fridge. $50 OBO. Call
830-3605.
HAVE LITERARY Talent? Help Ex-
pressions Magazine produce its Fe-
bruary double-issue. Submit ideas
on or related to minority love andor
history to: xpressyoself�hotmail.com
Today!
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CMOUU SKY SMUTS
(919)496-2224
classifieds
HELP WANTED
GREENVILLE REC. & Parks Spring
Tennis Programs Registration starts
223. Youth: Novice 1(ages
6&7)MW 5-5:45p 38-414. No-
vice !l(ages 768) TTH 5-5:45p 39-
415. Afterschool Mages 10-14)
MW 4-5p 38-414. Afterschool
IKages 15-18) TTh 4-5 p 39-415.
Jr. Boys Team(ages 11-14) M-Th 4-
5:30p 31-422. Adult: Beginner 1
MW 6-7p 38-414. Beginner II
TTh 7-8p 39-415. Morning begin-
ner MW 9-10a 38-414. Interme-
diate 1 MW 7-8p 38-414. Inter-
mediate II TTh 6-7p 39-414.
Morning intermediate MW 10-11 a
38-414. Call 329-4559.
ABRACADABRA NAILS now open!
$25 full set. $15 fills. $10 mani-
cures. Call 329-7235. or visit our
website http:www.ange
fire,comncAbracadabraNajls,
PART-TIME JOBS AVAILABLE.
Joan's Fashions, a local Women's
Clothing Store, is now hiring. Em-
ployees are needed for Saturdays
and weekdays between 10AM and
6PM. with a particular need for em-
ployees on Tuesdays and Thursdays
(mornings and early afternoons). The
positions are for between 7 and 20
hours per week, depending on your
schedule and on business needs.
The jobs are within walking distance
of the university and the hours are
flexible. Pay is commensurate with
your experience and job perfor-
mance and is supplemented by an
employee discount. Apply in person
to Store Manager. Joan's Fashions,
423 S. Evans Street. Greenville (on
the Downtown Mall).
WANTED: PAYING $6.50 an hour
plus bonuses for qualified telemar-
keters. No Friday or Saturday work.
Hours: 5:30-9 p.m. Monday-Thurs-
day: 4:30-8 p.m. Sunday. Apply in
person 5-9 p.m. Energy Savers
Windows & Siding. Inc Wintergreen
Commercial Park. Suite O, Firetower
Road. Greenville.
IN-LINE Hockey Coaches. The
Greenville Recreation & Parks De-
partment is recruiting individuals
with some background knowledge
with in-line hockey or ice hockey. Ap-
plicants will be responsible for
coaching youth in-line hockey
leagues at the Jaycee Park. Some
weekend work required.Salary rates
range from $5.15 to 6.50 per hour.
Starting date is February 1999. For
more information, please call Ben
James. Michael Daly, or Judd Crum-
pler at 329-4550 after 2PM.
LOOKING FOR a part-time job?
Help wanted at Szechual Express, in
the Food Court at the Plaza Mall.
Day hours from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m
night hours from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Apply in person. No phone calls,
please.
COMMUNICATIONS &
CRIM. JUSTICE MJRS:
Build your resume with exi ellenl
experience as an Alarm Monitoring
Agent with I I I unty
Located in Raleigh NC, you will
monitor and respond I" security
alarms in win � nented
call centi i Res as include
handling emergency situal i ind
dispatchiiui emi rsonnel
Customer Servici
also available Exi ellent communi-
cation skills, clean criminal records
& drug screening are required
resumi 10919-743-S679 I
' I Ol AA M I
.
HELP WANTED
TAKING APPLICATIONS for substi-
tutes and full-time teaching posi-
tions. For more information call Har-
mony Child Care at 756-6229. Li-
cense �7455138
LOOKING FOR A PART-TIME job?
The ECU Telefund is hiring students
to contact alumni for the ECU An-
nual Fund Drive. $5.60 per hour.
Make your own schedule. If interest-
ed, call 328-4212, M-TH between the
hours of 3-6PM
LEASING AGENT -Urge property
mgmt. co. specializing in luxury col-
lege student housing is seeking self-
motivated, outgoing leasing consult-
ants. Part or full-time. Training pro-
vided. Fax cover letter and resume
to 352-472-1819. attention Rebecca.
DRIVER ft Dispatch positions avail-
able at Restaurant Runners. Perfect
hours for students. Clean driving
record imperative, knowledge of
Greenville streets advantageous. Call
756-5527, leave message.
FREE RADIO $1250. Fundraiser
open to student groups & organiza-
tions. Earn $3-$5 per VisaMC app.
We supply all materials at no cost.
Call for info or visit our website.
Qualified callers receive a Free Baby
Boom Box. 1-800-932-0528 x 65.
www.ocmconcepts.com
LOSE WEIGHT Now! Up to 30 lbs.
$100 natural, doctor developed. Call
931-7022.
TUTORS NEEDED: Do you have a
3.0 or better GPA? Are you interest-
ed in becoming a tutor for the Office
of Student Development-Athletics?
We need individuals capable of tu-
toring any & all levels (0001-5999) in
all subject areas especially the fol-
lowing: ACCT. ASIP. BIOL. CHEM.
CSCI. DESN. ECON. EMST. GEOG,
JUST, MATH. MGMT. MKTG. PHIL
PHYS, 6 SOCI. Undergraduate stud-
ents are paid six dollars an hour ($6)
and graduate students are paid sev-
en dollars an hour ($7). If this
sounds like the job for you. join us
for an orientation meeting on Tues-
day January 26th. room 236 B
WSMB. If you have any questions,
please contact Isha Williams at 328-
4691 for further information.
FULL OR part-time wait staff wanted
at Lupton's Seafood. Call Bruce Lup-
ton at 752-4174.
CHILDCARE WANTED for 2-yr-old
boy. TTh 9-12 or MW 2-5. Patience,
a sense of humor, and self-transpor-
tation are a plus. $7 per hour. 355-
1928.
SPRING YOUTH indoor soccer
coaches. The Greenville Recreation
it Parks Department is recruiting for
12 to 16 part-time youth soccer
coaches for the spring youth indoor
soccer program. Applicants must
possess some knowledge of the soc-
cer skills and have the ability and pa-
tience to work with youth. Applic-
ants must be able to coach young
people ages 5-18, in soccer funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3 p.m. until
7 p.m. with some night and wee-
kend coaching. Flexible with hours
according to class schedules. This
program will run from Mid March to
April. Salary rates start at $5.15 per
hour. For more information, please
call Ben James. Michael Daly, or
Judd Crumpler at 329-4550 after
2p.m.
The Oakwood School
Nourishing the Growth of Wisdom
EXTENDED DA Y EMPLOYEE
� Supervise children aged 5-12
� Available immediately
� Mondays - Fridays, 2:15 - 5:30 p.m. until June 4
� $6hr.
OFFICE ASSISTANT
� Answer phones
� Deliver school lunches to the classrooms
� Prepare mailings
� Complete other office duties as assigned
� Available immediately
� Mondays-Thursdays 11:15-5:15 until June 4
� $67hr.
Please call 931-0760.
77ie Oakwood School does not discriminate on the basis of race, creed,
color, religion, national and ethnic origin, in its admission and employ-
ment policies, educational programs or any other school-administered
programs.
Tat Etst CtrotmiM
GREEK PERSONALS
SPRING BREAK 991 Cancun Nas-
sau Jamaica. Travel free and make
lots of Cash! Top reps are offered on-
site staff jobs. All-inclusive deals. 32
hours Free Drinks. Special Discounts
up to$100 per person. Lowest price
guaranteed. Call now for details!
www.classtravel.com 800-838-6411
MALE QUADRIPLEGIC needs as-
sistance with bathing, dressing, lift-
ing and transportation, a.m. hours re-
quired. Excellent opportunity. Con-
tact Many at 353-9074.
1-2 PART-TIME tennis instruc-
torattendants needed at River Birch
Tennis Center immediately. Pays
$5.15hr 10-20 hr.wk weekday
afternoons, some weekends. Call
329-4559.
EARN WHILE YOU learn, up to
$1,000.00 wk. Day and night
shifts. Clean, secure working at-
mosphere. Playmates Adult En-
tertainment. 252-747-7686 for in-
terview.
PIANO PLAYER for small church.
For details, call 756-3730 before 9
p.m.
1999 INTERNSHIPS! Don't get a
summer job Run a summer busi-
ness. www.tuitionpainters.com. tui-
paint9bellsouth.net or 800-393-
4521.
MODELS FOR portfolio. Reputable,
artistic, amateur photographer seek-
ing slim young women for portfolio
photos. References available. Send
note, photo (if available), address,
and phone for immediate reply. Paul
Hronjak, 4413 Pinehurst Drive. Wil-
son. NC 27896.
OTHER
SPRING BREAK Panama City
Beach. 'Summit � Luxury condos.
Next to Spinnaker. Owner discount
rates. 404-355-9637.
WANTED: TICKETS for Collective
Soul at Attic on January 29th. Need
up to five. Will pay extra. 252-975-
7968. leave message anytime.
GREEK PERSONALS
ALPHA XI Delta wishes everyone a
great start to the new semester.
TO THE brothers of Delta Sigma Phi
, thanks for the social last Saturday.
Everyone had a great time. Love, the
sisters of Delta Zeta
CONGRATULATIONS TO Tori Forb-
es on your engagementl We are so
happy for you! Love, your Delta Zeta
sisters
CONGRATULATIONS, LEIGH, on
your engagement to Steve. We wish
you both the best of luck. Love, your
Alpha Phi sisters
KAPPA SIGMA! We had a blast
getting together with you guys as al-
ways. Let's do it again soon! Love,
the sisters of Delta Zeta
THE SISTERS of Delta Zeta would
like to wish all of the fraternities a
successful rush.
PHI KAPPA PSI - Thanks for a great
social, and good luck with rush.
Love. Alpha Phi
ITS PARTY TIME!
Semaj Entertainment specializing in
Mix tapes. Music production and mobile
DJing with the latest Hip-Hop, Top 40,
R&B, Techno, and Reggae.
All functions ft campus organizations!
Call J.Arthur @ 252-412-0971

A 1 SiKINC IIKKAK
HOI Ks limits Ot I Kl I DRINKS!
Karn 2 I Kl I Irips & MSSS!
1 iim i n i n y �m�
SPRING
iiiilLU
Song ami 1 �" I � w �"�"� � �� �ia��
�natal � owranam iwa �comi Mar team ����'
Bahamas Party
Cnilse $279
5 Ml � MM Sak � Fm rMM � MMn IM
Panama $119
City He, wtm aa a�mat�
Jamaica $439
Cancun $399
7 am � Mr . HOW � ft Fooa 130 Hrt 4 MM
Spring Break THml-Our 12th Year!
1-800-678-6386
OTHER
SPRINO BREAK 99! Cancun' Nas-
sau ' Jamaica 'MazatJan Acapuico
Bahamas Cruise ' Florida Florida
South Padre. Travel Free and make
lots of Cash! Top reps are offered
full-time staff jobs. Lowest price
Guaranteed. Call now for details!
www.classtravel.com 800838-6411
$$$ MAKE money fastlSSS At
home, easy work, excellent pay. We
will send you free details! Send us a
long self-addressed stamped envel-
ope to: ACE Financial Publications,
3306 Brookline Ct� Greenville, NC
27834. P.S. This really works!
ANNOUNCEMENTS
JOIN PRESBYTERIAN Campus
Ministry on Tuesday nights from 6
p.m. until 8 p.m. at First Presbyterian
Church (at the corner of Elm and
14th Street) for a free home-cooked
meal, good company, and a pro-
gram. If you need a ride or if you
have questions, call Ellen at 758
1901.
BECOMING A Successful Student-
Note-Taking: Tuesday 11-12:00. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop on Tuesday the 26th. If
you are interested in this workshop.
contact the Center at 328-6661.
ALL GOLDEN Key Members! (Fur
first meeting this year will be today
in GC 1012 at 5:30 p.m. Please
cornel Our next meetings will be
Feb. 9th and 23rd.
FREE FOOD! Join the East Carolina
Communications Organization on
Tues. 126 at BW3's. Build your re-
sume. Learn valuable skills. And of
course have fun! Stop by BW3's bet-
ween 4-7 p.m. to learn more about
this new growing organization. Don't
forget. Free Food!L
CHECK OUT the new Fitness Pro-
tection Program at the SRC! In-
centive-based feature with cool priz-
es for participating. Begins Feb. 1.
Register Now!
AEROBICS SCHEDULE hotline:
Need to know when the next stress-
relieving, heart-rate raising, flab-
burning, blood-pressure reducing
aerobics class is? Dial 328-6443 ext.
2 for a current class schedules.
HEALTHY LIVING: Start the new
year right by learning long term,
healthy habits for weight control.
Meets weekly throughout the se-
mester, open to all. Call 32(3-6387 for
price and registration information.
NOON TRACK Attack returns to the
SRC on Jan. 25. Rewards and in-
centives better than ever! Contact
the Dept. of Recreational Services
(328-6387) for registration informa-
tion.
BOWLING REGISTRATION Meet-
ing: Anyone interested in participat-
ing in intramural bowling must at-
tend the registration meeting on
Tues. Jan. 26 at 5p.m. in MSC room
244. Registration will be held Wed-
nesday. Jan. 27 at the Student Re-
creation Center.
RACQUETBALL TOURNEY; An-
yone interested in playing in the rac-
quetball tourney must enter by Wed.
Jan. 27 at 5p.m. in the Student Re-
creation Center main office.
THE BRYAN Adrian Basketball
Camp Registration is now open for
The 21 st Annual Bryan Adrian Sum-
mer Basketball Camp. Boys and girls
ages 5-19 are eligible. Locations in-
clude: Hickory. NC: Rocky Mount.
NC: Charlotte, NC: Greensboro. NC;
Elkin. NC and Raleigh. NC. Included
on the camp staff are: Jerry Stack-
house(Pro), Antawn Jamison(Pro).
Vinca Carter(Pro). and Steve Wo-
jeiechowsMPro). For a free brochure
call 704-372-3236 anytime.
AT THE REQUEST of students and
staff. Parking and Transportation
Services has established a new mo-
torcycle parking area near Menden-
hall Student center. The area is locat-
ed in the southeast comer of the
parking lot south of Mendenhall
Student Center
RACQUETBALL TOURNEY: anyone
interested in playing in the racquet-
ball tourney must enter by Wed. Jan.
27 at 5 p.m. in the Student Recrea-
tion Center main office.
BOWLING REGISTRATION meet-
ing: anyone interested in participat-
ing in intramural bowling must at-
tend the registration meeting on
Tues. Jan. 26 at 5 p.m. in MSC room
244. Registration will be held Wed-
nesday. Jan. 27 at the Student Re-
creation Center.
Watch for TEC's
Coming in the
Feb. 11 edition.





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Title
The East Carolinian, January 26, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 26, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1313
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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