The East Carolinian, January 21, 1999







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THURSDAY, JANUARY 21 ,1999 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 31
Commemoration of MLK Day
Community gathers in
tribute to King
C R a l o D . Ram i: v
SENIOR WRITER
While numerous members of the commu-
nity gathered to celebrate the feats of Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr. with candlelight vig-
ils' and plays, one tribute that will be
remembered for years is the renaming of
West Fifth St. in the civil rights leader's
name.
Last year County Commissioner Jeff
Students
celebrate
MLK Day
Events on campus make
public aware of King's
accomplishments
Savage and Bennie Rountree, Pitt county
president of the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference(SCLC) led the
crusade to change the name of Fifth St. to
honor King.
The process of changing the name of
West Fifth St. was met with controversy.
Many Fifth St. residents and business own-
ers opposed the renaming of the street, but
the Greenville City Council voted in April
to adopt the changes.
According to Rountree, many other loca-
tions were given consideration before the
final decision was made to change West
Fifth St.
"In the beginning we had less com-
plaints about Fifth St Rountree said.
Many in opposition said Fifth St. was
one of Greenville's oldest and most famous
West Fifth St.was recently renamed
Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
PHOTO BY MICHAEl SMITH
streets. Others complained about changing
the numeric sequence of streets in the
downtown area.
Businesses complained that they would
incur expenses involved in changing func-
tional items like letterhead. Businesses and
organizations affected include Globe
Hardware, NAACP, The Percolator and
Park Theater.
Some said the renaming may cause prob-
lems with road maintenance, since the area
between Albermarle Road and Memorial
Drive is a state maintained road. However,
Greenville's city planner disagrees.
"On a minor change like this the state
probably wouldn't have any problem
accepting the name change said Harry
Hamilton, Greenville city planner.
Organizations including the Board of
Jason Mkrkii
s i a i writer
Over the past week ECU has provided
many interesting opportunities for students
and the public to celebrate Martin Luther
King Day.
Students and faculty have worked hard
to produce a unique way for those who were
interested to look back and commemorate
the life of King through plays, vigils,
speeches and other events.
Professor Reginald Watson of the
English Department recently wrote a play
entitled "I've Been to the Mountain Top
and It Don't Look So Good It was per-
formed in Mendenhall Student Center on
Martin Luther King Day. The play focuses
on King rising from the dead in 1999 only to
find out that his dream of racial harmony
has not been achieved. Watson, who has
written two other plays, felt that the turnout
was great, with almost every seat in the
auditorium filled.
" I wanted to help in spreading the message
and symbol of Martin Luthet King through
the play so that I could educate and enter-
tain Watson said.
Later in the day, people of all races
worked together to promote King's memo-
ry and his teachings through a candlelight
vigil. The vigil began at the top of College
Hill and was followed by a march across
campus. A program was later performed
which featured music performed by the
ECU Gospel Choir. Those who attended
the program after the march were addressed
by Dorothy Spruill Redford, site manager of
Somerset Place, a historic plantation site on
Lake Phelps in Washington and Tyrrell
counties. Redford spoke of the importance
of African Americans to have knowledge of
and celebrate their rich heritage. She also
stressed the importance of living our dai'y
lives with King's ideals in mind, not just
one day out of the year.
Na-im Akbar, mentor for ECU's
Ledonia Wright African American Cultural
Center, said that the turnout as well as the
response from those in attendance was
Students enjoy beautiful weather in-between classes
PHOTO BY HIKE JACOBSEN
encouraging. Akbar hopes that events like
these, as well as the upcoming events
scheduled in February, which is Black
History Month, will increase peoples'
understanding of racial diversity.
"We live in a diverse society and we
need to promote that diversify and respect
each others' heritage as we move toward the
'one society' that King spoke of
The events were sponsored by the KCV
Student Union Awareness Committee, the
National Pan-Hellenic Council, the
I ,edonia Wright African American Cultural
Center, Allied Blacks for Leadership and
Equality, and the Martin Luther King
Observance Committee.
"We live in a diverse society and we
need to promote that diversity and
respect each others' heritage as we
move toward the 'one society' that
King spoke of
Ackbar
Professor Reginald Watson
English Department
Sponsors hoped that these programs
helped provide students with a chance to
gain a better understanding of the life and
times ofthe civil rights leader and his ideas.
Three students attend
African-American
Leadership Conference
Addressed issues of past and
present leadership models
Rag ha ei. H io don
STAFF WRITER
Three ECU students attended the fifth
annual National African-American Student
Leadership Conference in Holly Springs,
Mississippi, Jan. 16-18.
This year, the conference was designed
to address issues of liberation and analysis
of African-American leadership models
past and present. Students from across the
U.S. attended, representing areas ranging
from Texas to Iowa. Most attendees came
from predominately white campuses, in an
effort to learn how to communicate effec-
tively with all races. The theme of speak-
ers this year was "Where Do We Go from
Here: Chaos or Community?" Held at the
historically Black Rust College, over 500
students attended the workshops and lec-
tures.
The SGA sponsored the trip taken by
delegates Yalonda Thigpen, Tiffany Lee
and Na'im Ackbar, who were ECU's first
representatives to attend. The SGA
became aware of the opportunity through
information that was sent to the Cultural
Center and presented to them through
Ackbar.
"The conference gave us a good chance
to network and improve our skills in lead-
ership Lee said. "It also allowed us to
take a look at some of the racial problems
and issues that other schools are address-
ing
"We need to bridge the gap between
the various ethnic groups
Ackbar
ECU student and community activist
Ackbar, ECU student and community
activist, spoke on the importance of
African-American students forming com-
munity alliances. His lecture was attended
by over 80 students and he emphasized the
importance of education equaling a
Justmen wanted Fifth Street to be changed
all the way from 10th Street to Memorial
Drive instead of only a portion ofthe street
"I don't think people were against nam-
ing the street after Martin Luther King
Savage said. "They just didn't think a sec-
tion of a street should be changed
"Rocky Mount, Kinston, Wilson and
New Bern had less controversy when they
changed streets (to Martin Luther King)
Rountree said. "It was disappointing. This
issue always gets a lot of feedback
The new signs were erected Jan. 15 on
King's birthday.
An evening
with the
Gospel Choir
Student Union bring
Richard Smallwood
Amy Sheridan
NEWS EDITOR
Richard Smallwood
flit PHOTO
The ECU Student Union Populat
Entertainment
Committee is
bringing to ECU's
Wright
Auditorium "Am
Evening with ECU
Gospel Choit fea-
turing Special
Guest Richard
Smallwood
On Saturday,
Jan. 23 at 8:00 p.m.
Richard Smallwood,
the world-class com-
poser, pianist and arranger who has
changed the face of gospel music, will
appear in Wright Auditorium with the
ECU Gospel Choir.
Richard Smallwood has attained his
impeccable status by combining classical
movements with traditional gospel to
arrive at a mix that Smallwood could only
claim as his own. At age five, he was play-
ing piano by ear; at seven, Smallwood
began his formal training, and at age
eleven he formed his first gospel group.
Smallwood has degrees in both vocal"
performance and piano from Howard
University. At Howard, Smallwood found-
ed the Celestials, the university's first
gospel group. The Richard Smallwood
Singers were the first black gospel group to
go and perform in the Soviet Union.
Smallwood began his recording career
in the late '70s with an album simply titled
"The Richard Smallwood Singers This
debut project spent 87 weeks on
Billboard's Gospel chart. The next project,
"Psalms received a Grammy nomination.
Two years later Smallwood was also nomi-
nated for another Grammy for "Textures
, SEE G0SPEI PAGE I





3 Thundiy, J�n
2 Tti�r�Jiy. Jimtry 21, 1998
news
Tin East Carolinian
news
briefs
.
GREENSBORO, N.C. (AP)
The Atlantic Coast Conference
and city of Greensboro hope to use
this year's NCAA East Regional
championship as a warmup for a
future Women's Final Four.
In a bold move in an area
known as a hotbed for ACC men's
hoops, ACC commissioner John
Swofford said Tuesday the league
will submit a bid by the end of the
month to host the 2004 Women's
Final Four at the Greensboro
Coliseum.
"I think this is an opportunity
�for the city of Greensboro and sur-
rounding area to really put itself on
�the map in terms of women's bas-
ketball and its support of women's
basketball Swofford said of this
year's regional final, which will be
rplayed March 20 and 22.
: Communitv suonort and.atten-
dance at the event will play huge
roles in whether the Greensboro
Coliseum will be a legitimate con-
tender for a future Final Four, said
Swofford and Bernadette
McGlade, ACC assistant commis-
sioner for women's basketball and
chairwoman of the NCAA Division
I Women's Basketball Committee.
& "This will be a great measuring
�.stick McGlade said. "We have
talked about wanting to be in the
7,000 to 8,000 in attendance, and if
Greensboro gets to 12,000 then the
i city makes a huge statement for
women's basketball.
"The regions that have started
doing that are getting favorable
nods in terms of getting other
NCAA championship events she
added. "There are certain limita-
tions in Greensboro, but being a
. hotbed for women's basketball can
overcome those
Swofford said Greensboro
would likely be competing against
a number of cities for the Final
Four bid. including regional foes
Charlotte and Atlanta.
"I think the city is certainly big
enough here Swofford said of
Greensboro, "What is helpful is
the history of hosting these kinds
�of events here and hosting them
very of our ACC schools
Graphic
i
Advertising Designer
and Layout Designer
needed at the
East Carolinian.
Apply at the TEC
office on the second
floor of the Student
Publications Building.
Vrfej : ��)S � . -j?M
Lecture on Volunteer tutor training program to begin
;
Christianity Sponsored by Uterucy
To be held at Volunteers
Mendenhallat 730
esiuner
RACHAEL HlGDON
STAFF WRITER
The seventh annual Jarvis Lecture
on Christianity and Culture, which
will encompass the relationship
between Christianity and culture,
will be held at 7:30 p.m. at the
Mendcnhall Student Center.
"The Jarvis series is where we
bring in well known scholars who
are able to comment on the rela-
tionship between Christianity and
culture said Dr. Calvin Mercer,
with the ECU Religious Studies
Program.
"Dr.Leonard is an expert
and keen observer of the
American religious scene
Dr. Calvin Mercer
ECU Religious Studies
"Spirituality in America: Faith
or Fad" will be presented by Dr.
Bill T. Leonard, the dean of the
Wake Forest University Divinity
School. Leonard, who holds a doc-
torate in American Church History
from Boston University, is a
Baptist minister and author or edi-
tor of several books, including The
Nature of the Church and
Becoming Christian: Dimensions
of Spiritual Formation. He became
the first dean at Wake Forest's
divinity school in 19 and was
previously chairman of the philos-
ophy department at Samford
University in Birmingham,
Alabama.
"The religious scene is so com-
plex, complicated and exciting
it is useful to have someone to
interpret it for us
Dr. Calvin Mercer
ECU Religious Studies
"Dr.Leonard is an expert and
keen observer of the American
religious scene Mercer said.
"The religious scene is so com-
plex, complicated and exciting it is
useful to have someone to inter-
pret it for us
The College of Arts and
Sciences in conjunction with the
Jarvis Memorial United Methodist
Church of Greenville provide
funding for the highly attended
series. The speaker, however, is
chosen by the Religious Studies
Academic Committee, which is
comprised of professors from dif-
ferent departments with a "schol-
arly interest in religion according
to Mercer.
The talk is recommended to all
ECU students and Greenville resi-
dents and will be followed by a
question and answer period that
will give audience members the
opportunity to discuss issues with
Dr. Leonard. Mercer also adds
that the ECU Religious Studies
Program offers a major in Religion
through the multidisciplinary pro-
gram.
Devon White
STAFF WRITER
Literacy Volunteers of Pitt County
is holding a volunteer tutor training
workshop beginning on Jan. 28 at 7
p.m. The workshop consists of
four training sessions that will be
held on Monday and Thursday
evenings. Volunteers will learn to
teach functionally illiterate adults
how to read or improve their read-
ing skills. Persons available for
daytime tutoring are especially
needed. The workshop dates are
Thursday, Jan. 28; Monday, Feb.l;
Thursday, Feb. 4; and Monday,
Feb. 8.
"There are many giving, car-
ing and understanding volun-
teers in this community
Literacy Volunteers of Pitt County
Literacy Volunteers of Pitt
County was founded in January
1998 as an extension of Literary
Volunteers of America (LVA-
PQ.The coalition is made up of
business, government, educational
and community leaders from
throughout the county.
'There are many giving, caring
and understanding volunteers in
this community said Toni Blood,
executive director of Literacy
Volunteers of Pitt County.
These members have united to
help raise public awareness about
the tragically high rate (nearly 25
percent) of adult literacy in Pitt
County and to identify and reach
out to those who need assistance
with reading.
The Literacy Volunteers of Pitt
County will announce their goals
for 1999 and report on its success
during 1998 at a special reception
and news conference on Jan. 21 at
the offices of LVA-PC, 504-A
Dexter St. in Greenville.
Members of the public are are
encouraged to attend.
For more information or to reg-t
ister for the tutor training work-
shop please call 353-6578.
Gospel
continued from page 1
Smallwood continued to climb
to the top by receiving a Grammy
Award and Dove Award for his
production of the Quincy Jones'
gospel project, "Handel's Soulful
Messiah
Currently, Smallwood is revel-
ing in the success of "Adoration i
his first effort on his new record;
label, Verity Records.
become a member.
Launch your organization
into cyberspace.
www.
clubhouse.
ecu.edu
Features
Writers Needed
� Must have a min. of 2.0 GPA
� Must have excellent grammar & editing skills
� Must be responsible & Creative!
No previous experience required
Apply at the second floor im
of Student Publications SftMinion
Building or call 328-6366 tdl Ullllldll
!
TIME for a change ?
Try something NEW
New Life Christian Fellowship- Meets Thursdays in GCB 1010 at 7 pm!
Join us
and get a head start on a rewarding career.
Healthcare is a growing and
exciting career field. As a
volunteer, you can get a head
start by learning job skills and
gaining experience while you
help people in need. With
more than 100 volunteer areas
to choose from, there's sure to
be a position that fits your
interests. Call Pitt County
Memorial Hospital Volunteer
Services at 816-4491 today.
You'll be glad you did.
www.uhseast.com
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3 Thundiy, Jmutty 21,1989
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loue working in Lab?
Already Have CHEM1150,1160?
Anatomy & Physiology, Microbiology
HERTS A SUGGESTION!
FIND OUT ABOUT
CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE
Call or cone to the Department Office for more information
ROOM 308 BELK BUILDING 328-4426
Deadline for application for Fall 1999 is Feb. 1,1999
Circumstantial
evidencefound
Jason Merrill
staff writer
On Feb 8, Dawud Abdullah
Muhammad (formerly David
Junior Brown) will find out
whether he has a chance to avoid
execution for a crime he may not
have committed.
On an August morning in 1980,
Diane Chalfinch and her nine-year-
old daughter were found stabbed to
death in their apartment in
Pinchurst, N.C. A distinctive ring,
quickly identified as the property
of her neighbor, Brown, was found
inside Chalfinch's body. What was
characterized at the time as "Mr.
Brown's bloody hand print" was
also discovered in Chalfinch's
apartment. Drops of blood which
trailed from Chalfinch's apartment
door to Brown's apartment door
were also found at the scene.
Brown worked with Chalfinch at
the hotel where they both lived.
This evidence, along with
Brown's inability to submit an alibi
and a suspiciously deep knife
wound on Brown's hand, con-
vinced a jury beyond reasonable
doubt to sentence Brown to death.
Brown's lawyers, however, con-
tinue to raise questions about the
incriminating evidence. His ring
was one of the key pieces of evi-
dence in the conviction, but Brown
testified that he removed his ring at
a party where he was spinning
records on the night the murders
took place and that he did not sec it
again until it was submitted as evi-
dence in his murder trial.
Investigators could identify nei-
ther the origin nor the age of the
blood trailed between the two
apartments, finding only that it did
not belong to either Brown or the
victims. Experts testified that the
blood could have been there for
many years prior to the incident
and that it could not even be posi-
tively identified as human blood.
Investigators were also unable to
find a single drop of Brown's blood
in the victims' apartment or any of
the victims' blood in his, a fact that
even prosecutors had difficulty
explaining under the circumstances
of such a bloody crime.
In 1994, a former co-worker of
Chalfinch, told police that he saw
her ten miles away from her apart-
ment at 4:45 a.m. on Monday morn-
ing, the exact time when she was
supposedly being stabbed to death
in her apartment According to the
witness himself, however, the pros-
ecution intentionally kept him hid-
den in a hotel under a fake name to
prevent him from testifying. Two
other witnesses, also co-workers,
said they were ignored by police.
They claim to have heard a woman
screaming "Leave her alone in
Chalfinch's apartment a day-and-a-
half after Chalfinch was supposedly
dead. A few minutes later they saw
a man that they could positively
identify as one of Chalfinch's ex-
boyfriends jumping from the bal-
cony of her apartment. They said
that the ex-boyfriend saw them,
said "Oh my God and ran off.
Police took the witnesses' state-
ments, but they never appeared in
court
" can happen to anyone
Muhammad
Defense attorneys say they
knew little about most of this evi-
dence until 1994, because at the
time of the trial the prosecutors
refused to allow them to investigate
the scene or have access to evi-
dence that the prosecution had
gathered.
Earlier this year, due to a feder-
al law passed in 19 allowing
defense attorneys to have access to
the prosecution's evidence in post-
conviction cases where the death
penalty is involved, Muhammad
was granted a stay until Feb. 8,
when a similar case will go before
the Supreme Court If the Supreme
Court decides to allow the defense
attorneys in that case to review the
prosecutors' evidence,
Muhammad's attorneys hope to
have the same opportunity and be
granted an evidential hearing, ten-
tatively scheduled for April 5, to
decide whether or not Muhammad
will be granted a retrial.
Muhammad's attorneys were
unable to comment about the
pending fate of their client but
Muhammad felt that he should
issue a warning to the public.
"It can happen to anyone
Muhammad said. "It can happen to
law-abiding John Q. Public. All it
takes is one incident you not
being in the right place, or someone
dislikes you. It's happened in the
past and it's happening today
Want A
Challenge?
College enrollment,tuition on rise
TRAINING
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Campus enrollment to
surpass 20,000 in
2008
Si'SAW R M II KX K KV I CM
STAFF tt KIT E K
Laboratory and Technology
Building and an addition to the
Rivers Building.
The enrollment increase over
the next decade will be accompa-
nied by an increase, in tuition that
will affect more than 155,000 stu-
dents in the UNC system.
"The two changes (in tuition)
include the usual annual increase
and now this year it is proposed
that we charge by the credit hour
I Kingston Place �
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If you say you saw us in the East Carolinian you will receive a r.
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KINGSTON RENTALS CO. 758-7575 Jg
College enrollment and tuition has
een on the rise throughout past
ears and is expected to continue
o increase as the new millennium
pproaches.
In a report issued in November
f 1998 by the Office of Planning
nd Institutional Research institu-
ional, projections estimated that
ECU'S enrollment could rise from
ts current enrollment of 17,799 to
0,637 by the year 2008. But, the
General Assembly estimated that
nrollment could reach 23,714.
The projected 14 percent and 25
ercent increases, respectively,
will come as ECU completes
uilding projects that would
ncrease the university's capacity.
uch projects include a Science
Summer school is pretty much
self supported so we have to
charge for what summer school
actually costs in order to pay
faculty and so forth
Michael P.Balko
university cashier
for summer school, not by block as
we have in past years Clayton
Sessoms from the Division of
Continuing Studies said in a previ-
ous interview.
A 2 percent increase in tuition
was added to the fall semester bills
at all 16 North Carolina campuses
during the General Assembly's
short session in October of 1998.
This was later approved by the
UNC Board of Governors in
November 1998. The tuition hike
was recommended to the legisla-
ture as a part of the biannual bud-
get that was drafted in 1997 by the
UNC system.
"Historically, tuition fees have
gone up by 2 and 3 percent per aca-
demic year Michael P. Balko,
university cashier, said in a previ-
ous interview.
While UNC-Chapel Hill sent
supplement bills to collect the 2
percent for the 1998 fall semester,
ECU added the increase to the
1999 spring semester bill.
The tuition increases will also
affect summer classes as billing will
now charge students per credit
hour instead of by the block which
is broken into a quarter basis.
"We are mandated from the
General Administration that we
needed to charge by the credit hour
instead of the block Balko said in
a previous interview.
According to Dan Bishop, ECU
"We are mandated from the
General Administration that
we needed to charge by the
credit hour instead of the
block
Michael P.Balko
comptroller, the 1999 spring rate
will be used to figure out the
tuition of the 1999 summer session
as well as future semester rates.
"Summer school is pretty much
self supported so we have to
charge for what summer school
actually costs in order to pay facul-
ty and so forth Balko said.
i�yyj?
��
An evening zuith
The TOLL QospeCCfwir
featuring special guest
charaStnatfzvood
Saturday, January 23,1999
8 pm in bright Auditorium
Advance ticket prices: TuBuc $81 youth $7
�ECU facultyStaff $8 ECU Student $5
M tickets at the door: $12
VISA or Mastercar&accepted.
'for more information call the CentraCIkkft Office at
252J28A788 or 1-800-ECU-XSJS.
fora goodtime cad
The �ECU Student Union Hotline at 252.328�004,
or visit our website at �umw.ecu.edustudentunion
iiPli
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news
Tilt fait Carolinian
CIXLQJJLS
�Or. Elisabeth Heininger and five of her students
head for Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. These stu-
dents have been given a great opportunity to
demonstrate their abilities as recreational program-
mers and facilitators for the Recreation and Leisure
Studies Department. All students invited assisted her
in planning the special events for the 1999 Society
of Partks and Recreation Educators National
Teaching Institute.
-The City of Greenville Public Works Department
wants to remind citizens residing in Controlled
Residential Parking Areas "A" and "B" that parking
permits expire December 31,1998. Residents have
until February 14,1999 to renew them at an annual
cost of $5.00 for each decal requested.
-ASSSE International Student Exchange Programs
is seeking local host families for boys and girls from
Europe, Asia, North and South Africa, 15 to 18 years
of age.Persons interested call 252-569-4647
-In Charlotte, dive deep into the world of sharks in
Discovery Place's newest traveling exhibits that
takes some of myth out of one of the worlds most-
feared creatures. Sharks: Fact and Fantasy opens
February 6, and will be open daily through the spring
at Discovery Place.
-The Bone Marrow Foundation Inc. will be having a
"Valentine Raffle" Beginning January 11,1999. The
drawing will be held February 12,1999. For more
information call 756-7297 or 758-5073
Watch for TECs
latest publication
Arts 6 Entertainment
Magazine ol The Easl Carolinian M 1
WiMmmd
wkfdxmrkfe
Matt Damon
Does hit
thing in
Rounders
3 w
Movie Review
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Be sure and catch the latest
production by James Chapman
("Black Man Rising "Woman
with Wings "Our Young
Black Men are Dying and
No One Seems to Care)
Tuesday, February 2,1999 at 8:00pm
HendrixTheatre-Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University
Sponsored by the Student Union
Cultural Awareness Committee
Mark A.Ward
ATTORNEY AT
� DW1, Traffic, and Felony Defense
� Assistant PubBc Defender 1988-1993
� Private practice since June 1993
� Has RepresentedThousands of Individuals
in District and Superior Criminal Courts
� Member - Pitt. County Criminal Defense Bar
� ECU Class of '84, Campbell Law Class of 87
� 24 hour message service
� Visa and Mastercard welcome
752-7529
LAW
J
You drank.
You danced.
Youhadse
ryiiss"3
Free Pregnancy Tests
Call Carolina Pregnancy Center 757-0003
209-B South Evans Street (downtown near Courthouse)
An emotionally gripping
drama that examines the
difficulty of confronting
issues and love for
self and others.
Advance Ticket Prices:
Public-$3.00
ECU Student - Free
when valid ECU ID is presented
at the Central Ticket Office
in advance of the show.
All Tickets at the Door - $5.00
r


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St Ciroliniin
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WOMEN'S
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news
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I
23E Sigma Phi Epsilon
Supreme Court to consider
advertising ban on casinos
Founded: Richmond. VA. in 1901
Fastest growing of the two largest Fraternities in the world,
oneof the largest on campus.

Location: 505 E. Fifth Street, two blocb from downtown across the
street from campus. We have two houses and a party room
for band parties.
Academics: Balanced man scholarship.
Athletics: Chancellor's cup. which we are currently leading. 8 out of past
10 years.
WASHINGTON (AP) The
Supreme Court will decide whether
a disputed federal law violates free-
speech rights or effectively protects
compulsive gamblers from the lure
of casinos.
The court said Jan. 15 it will
judge the validity of a ban on televi-
sion and radio ads that promote casi-
nos not
owned by Indian tribes.
The ban is only in effect in some
pans of the nation because some
federal appeals courts have ruled it
unconstitutional while others
have upheld it.
For example, the 9th U.S.
Circuit Court of Appeals struck
down the ban last year, blocking its
enforcement in nine Western states
Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii,
Idaho, Montana.Nevada, Oregon
and Washington.
The Supreme Court refused last
February to review that But
Congress in the past 20 years has
amended the
anti-broadcast law to allow airing
ads for casinos on Indian reserva-
tions, state-run lotteries or any gam-
bling sponsored by nonprofit pro-
moters working for charitable pur-
poses.
Today, 37 sates and the District
of Columbia sponsor and aggres-
sively advertise lotteries, and
more than
two-thirds of the states are home
to Indian-owned casinos. Non-
Indian casinos are legal in 22 states,
and the
appeal acted on Jan. 18 focuses
on how the federal ban affects
advertising for those establish-
ments. The New Orleans-based 5th
U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals
upheld the ban. Justice
Department lawyers say the New
Orleans court was right
They point to studies detailing
economic and social problems, such
as compulsive gambling and orga-
nized crime, associated with casi-
no gambling and other gaming
activities.
In seeking to have the 5th
Circuit court's ruling overturned,
the Greater New Orleans
Broadcasting Association and indi-
vidual radio and television stations
contend that the government's stat-
ed concern for compulsive gamblers
is hard to swallow.
"Broadcasters are encouraged to
air advertisements that feature
gaming conducted on Indian reser-
vations and
are permitted o broadcast adver-
tisements that feature pari-mutuel
betting and other sports betting
they noted. Recent Supreme Court
rulings appeared to cut against such
an advertising ban. The court ruled
in a Rhode Island case last year that
states may not ban all advertising
that refers to liquor prices in efforts
to promote sobriety. '
RUSH
Jan. 25-29
For more information
call 561-7618
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
souuuewlhere to
Write a Utter
to the Editor
and let your
view be heard!
eastcarolinian
Bring all letters to
our office which
is located on the 2nd Floor of
The Student Publications Building
MMMMMMMM
"ScnoocMl
v Vv
Monday, February 8, 1999 at 8:OOpm
Hendrix Theatre - Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University
Sponsored by ECU Student Union
Lecture Committee
Artof
Kissing
vVv
Featuring over 25 different
styles of kisses, like
- the lip-o-suctlon kiss
- the upside-down kiss
- the Trobrtsn Islands kiss
- and the vacuum kiss.
�fV�
Advance Ticket Prices:
Public - $3.oo
ECU Student - Free
when valid ECU ID is presented
at the Central Ticket Office
In advance of the show.
All Tickets at the Door - $5.oo
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� It astonishes us that anyone feels it a fitting tribute to divide a street in half (a division which
happens to fall on racial lines) and give only a portion of it in honor of a man who gave his life
for racial equality and desegregation.
Dr. Martin Luther King, JR. was murdered because he promoted racial equality through
non-violent means. He was murdered because an intolerant racist assassin wanted to quiet his
words of peace. He was murdered because he attracted an international following of thousands
who took comfort in his words and turned to him for leadership.
King was not a black hero. He was a hero for everyone. He was a hero for the black
population, who were segregated and given second-class rights, as well as a hero for whites who
Wanted segregation and racism eliminated. His words set a precedence for peaceful yet
persistent change for other groups of people in this country and around the world. Today, in
Greenville, King should be a hero for people on both the "black end" of Fifth Street and the
"white end
The very fact that Fifth Street itself is so polarized is a testament that the societal issues
which King addressed more than 30 years ago still persist. The government may not support
segregation anymore, but people still make conscious decisions about where to live and who
to associate with on the basis of race.
Fifth Street, like many other streets and residential areas of cities across the country, is
divided. Perhaps this is why other cities have named large boulevards and thoroughfares after
King. It seems unfitting somehow to divide a street or to select a portion of a street which is
associated, however unfortunately, with any specific population.
At a city council meeting in April 1998, in which the vote was taken on the name change,
a mother stood up to say she had tried to explain to her young daughter what King stood for
and why he was an important man, worthy of the honor of having a street named after him.
After the mother explained to her daughter about King's life and the civil rights movement,
the daughter turned and asked her why he only got half a street. As the daughter grows older
and hears racist remarks about areas like West Fifth Street and learns that many people still
keep very close social circles, she will know why the street was divided.
College students don't often think past graduation and career, but the day is coming when
we, too, will have a child who is bom into this world pure, without any knowledge of racist
attitudes or traditions. Citizens of Greenville, including ECU students, have a responsibility
not to carry further the racist divisions that exist today.
We believe King would have wanted a street like Fifth Street named for him. Because it
runs past homes filled with white people, homes filled with black people, government
buildings, a public university, a private Catholic school, black-owned businesses and white-
owned businesses.
If we can't agree to give all of Fifth Street to King, we need to find a street we can give. King
does not deserve a street named in his honor simply because every other city already has one
or because it is an easy political decision to make.
Driving down old West Fifth Street and seeing the sign labeled Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Memorial Drive will never remind us of the tremendous contributions of a grea't leader or of
how the civil rights movement affects us today. Instead, it will always remind us of how divided
our own town is and of how far we still have to go.
. ��.
Two great Southerners not forgotten
This past Monday we were able
to commemorate the life and death
of a great man, Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr. There were parades,
festivals, TV shows and dedications
made all around the country. There
was even a new street named after
him here in Greenville. This was a
wonderful and an important day for
all of us here for a plethora of
reasons; one of them being that he,
like so many of us here, was a proud
ton of the South, and he made us all
so proud by representing our
geographical location so well.
But lost in all this celebrating
was the celebration of two other
proud sons of the South that did so
much for all of us. Monday was also
Lee-Jackson Day, commemorating
the lives of two of this country's
finest gentlemen, Civil War
generals Robert E. Lee and
Stonewall Jackson. For those of you
who don't know, this has been a day
celebrated long before MLK day
here in the southern states. It is a
day that honors two great men who
wanted to do nothing more than
make life better for all the citizens
of the South. They fought to keep
states' rights, which kept the
national government from
controlling and regulating
everything we do in our respective
states, principles that still stand
today.
Before anyone jumps to accuse
Lee and Jackson of being flaming
racist bigots that despise the
American way as we've all come to
know it, here are the facts. As soon
as war was imminent, they released
their slaves and ensured their safe
passage out of the soon-to-be
battle-trodden state of Virginia.
Both men attended the United
States Military Academy and were
at the top of their respective classes,
and they were heros during the
Mexican-American War. In fact,
General Lee was Lincoln's first
choice as head Union general.
I did not write to take away from
MLK day, not by any means. I'm
just asking you to help honor the
memories of two great men. These
men loved their country; they just
fought for what they believed in, as
many American heros before and
after them have done. When it is all
said and done, like King, they were
good men - men who stood up for
what they believed in. They had
the highest moral standards,
integrity and honor, and that's the
stuff real heros are made of.
Bryce R. Wagoner III .
Junior
Exercise Science
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OPINION
Marvelle
Sullivan
.�
Columnist ,

Dishonesty taken hold on us
The general and constant lack
of honesty has taken a
noticeable toll on society.
Honesty. What a novel concept.
Telling the truth and expecting to
be told the truth are indeed
laughable and random events these
days. Honesty is now considered a
mysterious virtue which can only
be attained by astute discipline and
rigorous soul-searching. Can
anyone imagine that not too long
ago it was deemed almost the
barest minimum of common
decency not to lie or variate the
truth? Was it because people in
general possessed a higher standard
of morals and religious conviction?
Or, was there just less temptation
and therefore less of a reason to lie?
To be sure, those aren't exactly
questions wrenching the heart of
most college students and
spawning them into a hopeless
intellectual crisis, but they are valid
questions nonetheless.
The general and constant lack of
honesty has taken a noticeable toll
on society. The most obvious
example (of course) is the
ClintonLewinsky fiasco. Basically,
the whole chain of perplexing
events boils down to the simple fact
that a total disrespect and disregard
for anything resembling honesty
and truth has occurred and is
continuing to take place at this very
moment. What is really
disheartening is that this scandal is
evidence that politics imitate life
(rather than life imitating politics).
The president's actions are a mirror
image of society, and the public
wanting to excuse the president for
lying is an attempt to justify what
Americans do whenever they can.
Politicians aren't the only
dishonest people here. A recently
conducted poll revealed that 30
percent of American married men
believed that cheating on their
wives was a natural and inevitable
part of marriage. At first that
statistic may seem humorous, but
the realization of it shatters people's
homes and lives, all for something
deemed acceptable. The high
percentage also conveys how far
the fundamental facets of character
and integrity have left society.
This column isn't meant to be
some diatribe or propaganda for the
folks at the Religious Right or a
self-righteous proclamation.
Integrity and fairness should be
sacred to everyone since the lack
thereof facilitated the founding of
this country and initiated some of
the policies that have made thii
country a pretty great place to live
What has caused this shifting
away from honesty? The primary
source would be a concept of
philosophy known as rclativismj
which is the contention thai
ultimate truth is hard, if not
impossible to define. Therefore;
what is right depends on tha
person, time and situation (Clinton"
completely subscribes to this
reasoning). Simply put, relativism
amounts to justifying and
rationalizing every action an
individual takes so that they can
have some sense of inner peace.
No one is ever held completely
accountable because everyone has
the opportunity to explain why
what they did was "right at thej
time Relativism is definitely noq
all bad and thus has a lot of validity
but it carries with it the fatal flaw of)
most idealistic thought: human!
nature.
Admittedly, being honest is
difficult, especially when everyone
is fudging on everything from their,
homework to the reason for thej
hole in their apartment wall. The;
problem is, the benefits of honesty
(like a clear conscience and good
karma) just don't seem to outweigh!
the benefits of being less than!
honest, and we all know what those
benefits are. It's just one more of!
life's perplexing ironies.
OPINION
Columnist
Ryan
Kennemur
Predictions for judgement year
Ryan Dogg mil win a
Pulitzer for his dead-on,
Nostradamus-ish
predictions.
Happy gnu yerr! As you can
see, I did not git a spelle checkr
fore x-mas. I did, however, get a
nice guitar and amplifier. And
perhaps the best present of all, the
George Foreman Fat Reducing
Grilling Machine! It's so choice.
If you nave the means, I definitely
recommend picking one up.
But enough about me! Let's
talk about something else for a
change.
By the time you read this, it
will be 1999. Kind of hard to
imagine, isn't it? Here we are, only
a year away from what many
people (religious people mostly)
believe to be the judgment day,
and yet we still have not found a
way to coexist peacefully! "But
who should we blame for this?"
you may be asking yourself.
Well, Bubba, as far as I can tell,
nobody. Some might say Neil
Diamond. Others say the smart
money is on Stephen Kleinschmitt
(I get bragging rights for first put-
down of the year). The fact of the
matter is, that as long, as we
continue to live this way (the
bombings, the killing of the
innocent, etc.) we will never be
able to achieve this great paradise.
On that extent, let me make some
predictions for this year of our lord,
Nineteen Hundred and Ninety-
Nine.
l.The WB network will take
note from the success of
"Dawson's Creek" and drop its
other shows, such as "Unhappily
Ever After 'The Jamie Foxx
Show and the cable ace award
winning "Homeboys in Space
The shows will be revamped into
shows entitled "Dawson Ever
After 'The Jamie Foxx Show
featuring Pacey and "Homeboys
in the Creek
2. Elizabeth Dole will be
starting her run for the presidency,
and this columnist thinks it's about
time we had someone decent in
the White House. The sad part is
that the guy who should be
president right now may have to
settle for the First Lady position.
3. Alf Returns!
4.A new album by legendary
'80s pop-punkers Blondie will
come and go, and the Matchbox
20 album will continue its reign on
the charts for the next 18 years.
5.Plucky Rap-person Sean
"Puffy" Combs will start to run
short of '80s songs to sample and
will branch out into the bluegrass
scene. His first single to be titled
"Hillbilly got da Uzi" will feature
a duet with Allison Krauss and the
once-dead Notorious BIG.
6. Ryan-Dogg action figures
will hit the toy rack and become
the staple toy of the holiday
season. Noting the lucrative sales
figures, other Ryan-Dogg related
toys shall be available, such as
Tickle-Me Ryan-Dogg, Ryan-
Dogg: Weak Bladder Edition
and Ryan Dogg with Kung-Fu
Grip, for those lonely nights.
7.Sadam Hussand, er,
Husseion, uh, that guy that is in
Iraq will go on television and tell
the world that he likes to dress in
women's clothing, upon which
time he rips off his fatigues to
reveal that he has been wearing a
tight albeit sexy teddy throughout
his entire political career. His
popularity with the nation triples.
H.Macintosh computers will
begin their new line of
commercials for the Imac,
featuring both people that bought
one last year.
9.Jason, the hockey-masked
killer from the Friday the 13th
films, will finallv die for good, or
WILL HE?
10. Ryan Dogg will win a
Pulitzer for his dead-on,
Nostradamus-ish predictions. He
will later sell it to buy something
frivolous, such as Hawaii
Well, that's about all this time.
If I'm wrong, nevermind. If I'm
right, you owe me half yout yearly
wages. Sounds fair, I think. At any
case, we'll just have to wait and
see, provided we don't get nuked
first by that guy over there in the
desert. Just remember these
words, duck and cover. Learn 'cm,
live by 'em.
I
7 Thurtdsy. Jinu
Four Seats
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Four Seats Left
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Hid Office

It's TOURNAMENT TIME!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in

BILLIARDS BOWLING
CHESS
TABLE TENNIS IPflDCI RACQUETBALL
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent
ECU at regional competitions to be held at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va
February 19-21, 1999. All expenses paid by Mendenhall Student Center.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out!
Spades
Bowling
Mon Jan. 25 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
Multi-Purpose Room

BHliardS (Nine Ball)
Tue Feb. 2 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center
(Men's and Women's Divisions)
Chess
Wed Feb. 3 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
Multi-Purpose Room
Mon Feb. 1 6:00 p.m.
The Outer Limitz
Mendenhall Bowling Center
(Men's and Women's Divisions)
Table Tennis
ThurJan. 28 6:00 pin
Mendenhall Multi-Purpose Room
(Men's & Women's SinglesTeam Divisions)

Racquetball
Registration Deadline - Wed Jan. 27
Student Recreation Center
(Mixed Doubles and Men's & Women's SinglesTeam Divisions)
There is a $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the
Mendenhall Information Desk, the Billiards Center, and THE OUTER LJMJTZ Bowling Center
located on the ground floor of Mendenhall Student Center, as well as at the Main Desk of the
Student Recreation Center. Call the Student Activities Office, 757-4711, for more Information.
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Life on Tuesday
Chris Knotts
IFC Spring 1999 Fraternity
Rush
Jan. 25-29, 1999 7-10pm
bids extended after 9pm Friday, Jan. 29
AIO Alpha Sigma Phi - Delta Zeta House
AIO Delta Sigma Phi - 510 E. 10th St.
AX Delta Chi - AAFI House
0X Theta Chi - 312 E. 11th St.
KA Kappa Alpha - 500 E. 11th St.
KI Kappa Sigma - 700 E. 10th St.
AXA Lambda Chi Alpha - 500 Elizabeth
I1KA Pi Kappa Alpha- Sigma Sigma Sigma House
nKO Pi Kappa Phi-803 Hooker Rd.
I1AO Pi Lambda Phi-410 Elizabeth St.
IAE Sigma Alpha Epsilon - Zeta Tau Alpha House
IOE Sigma Phi EpsUon - 505 E. 5th St.
IN Sigma Nu - 501 E. 11th St.
in Sigma Pi - 506 E. 10th St.
TKE Tau Kappa Epsilon-951 E. 10th St.
OBI Phi Beta Sigma - 800 W. 5th St.
OKT Phi Kappa Tau- 409 Elizabeth St.
OKF Phi Kappa Psi-Alpha Phi
Friendships are
common,
but Brotherhood
lasts a lifetime.
x-5
Go Greek
II






iTfewtaty. Jwwiry 21. 1889
features
9 Thundiy.
Th� East Carolinian.
aaaaaaV
2 J
Students Studying Abroad
PG Shelton
Senior
BiologyPre-
Med
Australia
Kendra
Robinson
Junior
English
Belize
Ashley
Rankin
Junior
International
Business
Germany
Britt
Honeycutt
Junior
English
England
mtmm
masmmmmmmMsmmm
Travis
Herbert
Sophomore
Construction
management
Australia
Peter
Cloutier
Grad School
Business
Australia
Rob
Fannon
Junior
Physiology
England
R
i
Wells
Tyson
Sophomore
Business
Australa
R
.
Recycling program benefits campus
Students encouraged to
take part in process
Phillip G ilk is
STAFF WHITER
Many ECU students pass by a
white can on their way to class
without giving it one thought. What
they may not realize about that
white trailer is that it saves the uni-
versity over one million pounds in
waste.
According to the ECU recycling
web site, "The goal of the ECU
Recycling Program is to reduce
waste and minimize the universi-
ty's impact on local landfills
' The ECU Recycling Program,
sponsored by the Office of
Environmental Health and Safety,
has been around since 1991. The
program has taken many forms on
campus. There are many recycling
bins in every classroom building,
including The School of Medicine.
The trailer that serves as a collec-
tion bin moves every two days from
College Hill to Greene Hall and to
the campus mall every week.
Materials such as aluminum, paper,
glass and plastic are recyclable and
can be placed in these bins. For
information on special recycling
pickups, call 328-60.
"We have bins all over the
place said Roy Briley, a member
of the three-man team that collects
the materials from the bins.
"Everyone should be able to use
them
Joyner Library, Mendenhall
Student Center and the Student
Recreation Center also offer ways
to recycle. They take part in the
recycling program by displaying
collection bins and by recycling
their own waste products.
One of the reasons for the
implementation of the recycling
program is that the North Carolina
legislature has made it mandatory
for all state employees and agen-
cies to recycle materials with a
goal of 40 percent total waste
reduction by the year 2000.
Only specific materials are
accepted for recycling. Items are
separated into various categories.
In the white collection trailer, 1
and 2 plastics, aluminum cans,
glass (clear, brown and green) and
paper (office, computer, newspa-
per) are accepted. A three man
team goes around collecting these
materials which account for 27 per-
cent of ECU's waste. The teams
are made up of staff, though work
study students are also employed
for the program.
Cardboard and scrap metal
should be placed beside the nearest
dumpsters. There is now a fine for
putting large amounts of cardboard
into the landfills, so it saves the uni-
versity unnecessary money if card-
board is recycled.
include saving natural resources,
energy and landfill space.
Recycling also helps reduce the
cost of trash disposal and raw prod-
ucts. Pollution is also decreased as a
A student throws her plastic trash into one of the many recycling bins on campus.
FILE PHOTO
The money that is gained from
the recycled materials goes back
into the program.
"We use the money to maintain
our equipment like our trailer and
metal containers said Tom
Pohlman, who is in charge of the
recycling program.
The advantages of recycling
result,
"Recycling is just the right thing
to do Pohlman said.
The Office of Environmental
Health and Safety is not the only
group recycling. Many offices at
ECU recycle the material they use.
Facility Services recycled 15,000
pounds of white goods last year,
including such things as broken air
conditioners, scrap metal and vari-
ous other materials. Facility
Services also managed to divert
52,000 pounds of tires, batteries, oil
filters and motor oil from the land-
fill last year.
Materiels Management was able
to recycle over 2,000 pounds of
printer cartridges and other office
waste. The Grounds Department
recycled and composted 724,000
pounds of yard waste, most of
which was the result of hurricane
damage. Dining Services managed
to recycle 63,000 pounds of cooking
oil.
Announcements are usually cir-
culated to the faculty and staff to
encourage them to practice recy-
cling methods, but students are the
key to on-campus recycling. Even
everyday activities like using e-mail
can help the environment. By using
e-mail and other electronic data
transfers, 250,000 pounds of paper
were saved last year.
"One of the disadvantages to
recycling, if there really is one, is
that it requires a sense of commit-
ment Pohlman said.
The Recycling Program has also
taken its message online. Their
web site located on the
Environmental Health and Safety
Web page. Their internet address is
http:www.ecu.eduoehs.
Locations of
Recycling Bins:
- Austin Building
- Biology Building
- Brewster Building
- Flanagan Building
- Fletcher Music Center
- General Classroom
Building
- Rawl Building
- Rivers Building
- Spilman Building
- Univeristy Central
Processing and
Graphics
- Whichard Building
I
4
New club started by health-conscious students
Members decide path
organization takes
Phillip Gilfis
STAFF WRITER
A new organization is beginning at ECU that will
address students' views of wellness on campus. This
club promises to be totally run by student members;
all students are encouraged to join.
A set of tiny footprints, or "a path of wellness will
be visible in Mendenhall. This will lead to the meet-
ing where refreshments will be served afterwards.
This student wellness organization, which will soon
be given a name by its members, will be coordinated
by students from different health-related majors and
non-majors. Some students have already been select-
ed for this organization, but it is open to everyone. The
sponsors for this club are Kari Brown, Laura Hartung
and Heather Zophy, who all come from different well-
ness related areas on campus.
"It'll be exciting to see what direction the stu-
dents take said Kari Brown, assistant director of fit-
ness at Recreation Services.
One purpose of this organization is for students to
learn from one another about the different areas that
wellness encompasses, including nutrition, fitness,
exercise and disease.
Another reason for the formation of this group is to
replace the Peer Health Educators, who provided a
student-oriented perspective for the campus on health
issues.
At the first meeting, leaders will be chosen and sur-
veys will be filled out by the prospective members.
The surveys will cover many issues and areas that stu-
dents may want to learn about and promote on cam-
pus. The purpose is to figure out what direction the
club will take.
"We'll be brainstorming about different issues
across the campus including student dining, recre-
ation, health, and many other areas Brown said.
"We want to know student opinions about how to
promote a healthy lifestyle and how to reach out to the
campus said Laura Hartung, director of nutrition at
Dining Services.
The amount of wellness issues that concern college j�
students are numerous. Fitness, nutrition and stress mi
reduction are just some of the issues that this new 'ti
group will be tackling.
"There's been a variety of different strategies of lb
health and wellness on campus said Heather Zophy, �
director of health education at Health services. "We s5
want students to help students
The first meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, Jan. n
27 at the Mendenhall Student Center Social Room at u
4 p.m. The agenda involves discussing where and t
when students would like to meet regularly.
"We want to bring enthusiasm and excitement iet
about wellness to the campus Hartung said.
I
s
�Co
4





Thi Em Carolinian
9 Thundiy. Jinuiry 21, 1889
features
Tin Ettl Cirslinisit
ReSister To Win A 199
Red Convertible Ford Mustan f!
See Store
Winn-Dixie
BMf
Coke, Diet
Coke or
Sprite
6 pk.20 oz. btls.
$188
� non-returnable.
bottles
Limit 4 with additional orderl
IS
I
kins:
ing
ding
ilding
jilding
sic Center
issroom
ig
ing
Iding
lentral
and
building
Ghek Drinks
Reg. Or Diet
6 pack 12 oz. cans
C
Hunt's
Manwich
15.5 oz. can
99c
Hamburger
Helper
& oz. size
98c
to
�s.
&�mtiS
its
t concern college3?.
rition and stressu;
:s that this neww
ent strategies oftt�
Heather Zophy,�
Ji services. "We�xh
Wednesday, Jan.a
r Social Room atit
sing where andto
jularly.
and excitementton
ing said.

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I
Stolen identity turns nightmarish
ALBUQUERQUE (AP) �
There's something about Meriyha
she would like you to know. She is
Meriyha McAfee, upstanding citi-
zen, mother of two, hardworking
employee, non-smoker and non-
drinker.
She is not Meriyha McAfee,
crack addict, twice-accused felon,
friend to a fugitive and perpetrator
of an extensive array of traffic vio-
lations.
And she isn't the Meriyha
McAfee whose arrest in a string of
car-stereo thefts was in the news
last month.
But this is no split personality,
no evil twin story.
Meriyha McAfee says her iden-
tity was stolen.
Worse, she says, it was pilfered
by a woman she once called her
best friend.
Now McAfee, like the growing
number of people who discover
that someone else is committing
crimes in their name, helplessly
watches as this case of mistaken
identity steals her precious time
and money and could eventually-
rob her of her reputation, her job,
her children and her freedom.
"I can't go anywhere without
worrying that she's done some-
thing wrong but I get caught
instead the 23-year-old
Albuquerque woman said. "It's
scary.
I feel mad. I feel everything.
I don't know what to do
Officials of the Albuquerque
police, Metro Court and district
attorney's office say it's a problem
that has increased substantially in
the last two years. And it's one
that's hard to fix.
"Lots of criminals are doing it
because it's so easy to do and so
easy to get away with said Byron
Samora, police detective. "There
is no punishment
Officials say McAfee's night-
mare won't totally be resolved
until her friend is arrested and
identified under the correct name.
There's no telling when that may
happen.
"Maybe the next time she
might kill somebody said Irene
McAfee of her daughter's sinister
shadow. "Maybe my daughter will
get the blame
Readers first learned of
Meriyha McAfee in a Nov. 17 story
detailing her purported role as get-
away driver for suspected car-
stereo scofflaws who traded their
booty for crack cocaine.
Among McAfee's companions
was a man identified as one of
New Mexico's most wanted fugi-
tives.
The real McAfee said she
knows the impostor.
"She's been doing this to me for
a long time McAfee said.
Her criminal counterpart, she
said, is a childhood friend who lost
her way when she found crack
cocaine.
"I was going to lose my job
because of all this McAfee said.
"I had to explain everything
The women were born two
weeks apart in the same month,
the same year. They had been
' neighbors as children.
"We were best friends, friends
since we were 5 McAfee said.
"She sometimes lived with my
family when we were growing up
and she was having trouble at
home. We were like sisters
The two also shared a place
together as young adults and raised
children together, she said.
The relationship began to
crumble as the friend became
increasingly imprisoned by drug
addiction, McAfee said.
"But we were still friends even
though she was doing this to me
without me knowingMcAfec
said.
McAfee said she didn't discover
it until Sept. 8, 1997, when
McAfee herself was cited for a
minor traffic violation.
"I called downtown to find out
my court date and they tell me I
have all these warrants McAfee
said.
Metro Court records indicate
that a Meriyha McAfee was cited
for 14 traffic violations � careless
driving, no registration, no insur-
ance, no driver's license, speeding
and driving with an open contain-
er, and others � on four occasions
beginning in March 1997.
Five of those violations became
failure-to-appear citations when
court dates went unheeded.
"I had to go to each individual
judge to get the charges all
dropped she said. "It took me
forever
But she would again sec what
her friend would do with her
name, her record and her life. And
this time it would be far more seri-
ous than a traffic ticket.
Bernalillo County sheriffs
deputies arrested a woman June 18
on charges of auto theft and con-
spiracy in connection with a stolen
blue Chevy pickup.
The woman gave her name as
Meriyha McAfee. She was booked,
fingerprinted and catalogued
under McAfee's name into a
national database known as the
Automated Fingerprint
Identification System, or AFIS.
Those fingerprints forever
entangled McAfee in the criminal-
justice system.
"When she was fingerprinted,
she gave an alias that will remain a
part of her life, regardless of what
her real name is said Barbara
Dominguez of the district attor-
ney's office.
McAfee said she learned of the
auto theft from her friend's former
husband.
rl
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II Tkurilty, January 21. 188S
Mother confronts principal
CAMBRIDGE, Wis. (AP) An
angry mother thrust a bag of pen-
nies at a principal after hearing her
14-year-old daughter could be
penalized foowing 72 cents to a
school library.
"She was very upset and yelling
at me quite loudly principal Bob
Rosen saidShc pulled out a bag-
gie full of pennies and just threw
them at me and they went all over
the floor and she left
Denise Davenport of rural
Oakland says her daughter was told
she risked being unable to take a
final examination because of the
unpaid fine.
The girl walked for a mile
through snow Wednesday before a
friend gave her a ride the final three
miles home.
Rosen said there was a miscom-
municarjon. The girl could have
taken the examination had she spo-
ken to him rather than leave the
building, he said.
"It scared me that she started
walking home in that weather her
mother said. "That really scared
me
Davenport said she was "real-
ly fric" by the thought that a child's
schooling depended on a fee.
"Public education is not free
anymore she said. "You are
always going to have to pay enroll-
ment fees and in certain classes you
have to buy things .
A letter sent to parents Jan. 8
says obligations like library fines,
unreturned athletic equipment and
unserved detention must be
resolved prior to final examinations.
Students can reschedule an
examination they were unable to
take, the letter says, but failure to
comply within the time allowed
"may result in a failing grade
The policy instills responsibil-
ity in teen-agers, Rosen said.
Lawyers for the state
Department of Public Instruction
said they knew of no law that dis-
cusses denying access to examina-
tions for unpaid fees.
The legality on that is some-
thing courts would have to decide
department spokeswoman Debra
Bougie said.
The Wisconsin Supreme Court
said in 1974 that public schools can
charge book fees and make stu-
dents pay for school items like
paper, gymnasium towels andband
instruments.
The ruling involved a father of
six who called textbook fees a
denial of free public education.
Davenport said her daughter
learned of the 72-cent fine when
paying an overdue $10 registration
fee Wednesday. A school secretary
told the child about the fine,
Rosen said.
"If she had known it was
$10.72, she would have told
me Davenport said.
Case against squirrels won
SHREWSBURY, England (AP)
A vacationing couple whose house
was trashed by a rampaging squirrel
have won their battle to have their
insurance company cover the more
than $8,250 in damages.
Saga Insurance originally told
Desmond and Veronica Green that
the squirrel, which was thought to
have entered the house via the
chimney, was classified as "ver-
min" and thus not covered under
their policy.
But the company reconsidered
after newspaper stories about the
case, issuing a statement Thursday
explaining that "Saga has never
before encountered a claim involv-
ing a rogue squirrel
While the Greens were away
from their home in Shropshire,
west central
England, in September, the
squirrel broke a number of objects,
damaged their
carpets and gnawed at five win-
dow frames that now must be
replaced.
It eventually was chased out of
the house by a neighbor after it set
off a burglar alarm.
After builders complete the
repairs to the house, Desmond
Green, 71, said he would assign
them one last task: squirrel-proof-
ing.
"I will get something put across
the chimney to block it off he
said.
"I would do it myself tomorrow,
but I'm too old
For more info visit our website at,
WWW.netmar.comuserselbo
The Elbo is available for private parties
Call 758-4591 or 752-4715
for available dates and times
plus price packages
The Elbo has been newly renovated
Come sit down with your friends in our
new Pub Room, Dance on the Raised
Dance Floor, Experience the new light �
and sound all for your Party Pleasure
21 and over
Qm�&fe4foin and t
1.
features
Thi Ent Carolinian
11 Thuraday. Janii
INDOOR
YARD
Cool Gear for
Hot Workouts!
More Than a Dancewear Shop
i�sftfBtf�tmt-
9t9fMptft�tmnc
onnection
Available at
AXt
BARRE
Arlington Village � Greenville � 756-6670
UJW.
illi St. 758-8612
t
East Carolina Paintball
iTSA
6
Take Hwy 33 West from Greenville, 8 miles
past the airport. Turn right at the Belvoir
Cornerstop, on to Porter Rd. Go 2.5 miles
.and turn left at the yellow signs. Park
in front of our Army tent.
10 Student Discount Call
OPEN EVERY SAtW SUN, 11:00AM TILL 5:30PM C
OR MAKE RESERVATIONS DURING THE WEEK J"T
Checkyour phone book for
www. I
85 mask rental
s5 gun rental
SB field fee
2C0B fee
for 100 paintballs
!
coupons
.COM
FEBRUARY 12, 1999 9 PM-2 AM
GMHA
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
Fun Flicks Video Karaoke
Salsa and Merengue Dance
vDJ Dance w 3. Arthur
Loo-Zee-Anna Laser Tag
Bourbon Street Bingo
Lady Luck Casino
King Cake
Glow Bowling
CajunBul
md Queei
Students may attend fbtAerby using their valid ECU One Card. One adult guest will be admitted with a guest pass. Student
and guest must ekeftogether. Guest passes will be available beginning Monday, February 8 through Friday, February 12,
1999, at the Central Ticket Office from 8:30am to 6pm and Todd Dining Hall Meal Plan Office from 9am to 5pm. On February
12, guest passes will be available at the Student Recreation Center from Spm to 10pm.
IX
Who said
a meal fo
Beginning We
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Edge Youth C
We're located
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H Carolinian ,
11 Thundty. January 21, 1999
features
Tt� faat CaraNiliM
or
uts!
ear Shop
0.
56-6670 M
"ental
rental
Sid fee
DBfee
itballs
ms
DM
M

iass. Student
February 12,
On February
Who said you couldn't find
a meal for a SI anymore?
Beginning Wednesday, January 20th,
at the First Pentecostal Holiness Church In Greenville, you can
oin us for a time of food, fun and fellowship. Every Wednesday at
5:45PM we will be serving a meal - and It's only a BUCKI All
:ollege students are welcome. After the meal we will have Cutting
Edge Youth Church to feed your soul. So come and bring a friendll
We're located off Evans Street on 100 Plaza Drive - behind
Dverton's Sports Center or call 756-3316.
Don't have a buck, COME ANYWAY! We'll see you therel
Man told not to father more children
Got Pierced;
eye'
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oarcar
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Large selectionof imported
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Tuesday ThuHsday: 1-9p.m Fridy:M0pjTM Saturday: 12-10p-m.
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Feeling
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Office of Professional Programs
university 252-328-6377
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MANITOWOC, Wis. (AP) A man �nnot
father any more children, unless he shows he
can support seven children he has already
fathered, a judge said in a ruling criticized by
the American Civil Liberties Union Saturday.
David Oakley, 32, has children ranging in
age from one to 13. Over the years Oakley has
failed to pay all or parts of court-ordered child
support for their maintenance, authorities said.
Oakley has a total of nine children, is
divorced and also fathered children out of wed-
lock, according to court documents. A sentence
handed down against Oakley last week
involved seven children fathered through four
women, Manitowoc County Circuit Court
Judge Fred Hazlewood said Saturday.
Oakley pleaded no contest to three felony
counts of failing to pay support as a repeat crim-
inal offender. Four other counts were dismissed
and read into the court record.
Hazlewood last week ordered Oakley to
spend up to three years in prison, consecutive
to a three-year term he is serving from
Sheboygan County for intimidating a witness.
In addition, Hazlewood placed Oakley on pro-
bation for five years.
As a condition of probation, Hazlewood
ordered Oakley to have no more children
unless he can demonstrate he is meeting finan-
cial obligations for his existing offspring.
When , told of the probation condition
Saturday, Chris Ahmuty, executive director of
the American Civil Liberties Union of
Wisconsin, said it was "entirely inappropriate,
because the right to make decisions about
whether to have children is a fundamental
right"
"What's to say that the defendant in this
case won't turn his life around and be able to
support his children in the future Ahmuty
said. "He shouldn't have to prove that to the
judge before exercising a fundamental right"
Oakley also must maintain a full-time job
and comply with child-support orders, and
spend an additional 90 days in jail.
Hazlewood said Saturday he could not com-
ment on the case because Oakley could file an
appeal.
"He could appeal the sentence. He could
appeal conditions of probation Hazlewood
said. "He can appeal almost everything
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I





sports
f IV J. JKS The Eest CaroHntow.
I 12 Thundty Jmuiiy 21. 1989mm������
Ball players have bright future
New ligfits, players bring
ligfitto baseball game
Chad Tracy
Jason Mandryk
Blaine Denius
staff writer
Eric Bakich
Lee Delfino
'��
1,1 K
Nick Schnabel
February Schedule
Winn-Dixie Shootout hosted by The Citadel
Let there be light.
A newly installed state-of-the-art
lighting system and some talented
additions to the Pirate roster give the
'99 baseball season an exciting out-
look.
The tradition of eating
Crackerjacks, joining in the seventh
inning stretch and cheering on
America's favorite pastime is strong in
Greenville. Players and coaches are
hoping the new lights and upcoming
I night games at Harrington Field will
, continue this tradition and bring even
more fans out to support Pirate base-
ball.
"I think the new lights are excuing
for the community as well as the team
and we expect a lot of support said
head coach Keith LeClair. "What bet-
' ter place to get together with friends
and watch a great game
than out in left field?"
ECU players arc also
excited with the lighting
system and hope more
fans will come out and
enjoy the games while
supporting a strong Pirate
team.
"I am very excited
about the new lights and
want to thank the program
for getting them senior
outfielder Steve Salargo
said. "Night games really
pull in the crowd
The lights are not the
only things making the '99
season look so bright. The
Pirates have added depth
and talent in all positions
this season with a recruiting
class ranked 34th in the
13 Tharsdi
Pirate baseball players won't have to play with the sun in their faces anymore because of the new lights.
FILE PHOTO
nation.
"We brought in a great number of
talented players LeClair said. "We
really fulfilled some needs from last
season
Both experienced transfer stu-
dents and young-blooded freshmen
players have come in this year to fill
some very big shoes. They have been
helped by the leadership qualities of
some of the more seasoned Pirate
team members.
"The junior college guys really
know how to play and will fill some
key positions for us Salargo said.
"The young guys are going to help
out offensively and defensively
The team's defense is like a brick
wall and will be difficult for any team
to go through or hit over. This defen-
sive strength will be one of the
Pirate's most dangerous weapons this
season.
SEE BASEBALL, PAGE 13
We are
c
merchan
Successfi
son
experieno
two wee
work a
Employmen
12 Friday
13 Saturday
14 Sunday
20 Saturday
21 Sunday
24 Wednesday
27 Saturday
28 Sunday
vs.
vs.
vs.
vs.
vs.
vs.
vs.
vs.
North Carolina
Virginia
NC State
Radford (DH)
Radford
Wake Forrest
Ohio (DH)
Ohio
Charleston, SC
Charleston, SC
Charleston, SC
Greenville, NC
Greenville, NC
Winston Salem, NC
Greenville, NC
Greenville, NC
Jason Mandryk25PitcherFresh.
Adam Reikowski27 PitcherTrans.XSr
Jeff Massey28PitcherFresh.
Curtis Moncus33PitcherFresh.
Mike Barker37PitcherFresh.
Drew Poul38PitcherFresh.
Jake Fonvielle19CatcherFresh.
Kevin O'SuHivan2InfieldFresh.
Nick Schnabel6InfieldTrans.XJr.
Eric Bakich9InfieldTrans.XJr.
Chad Tracy18InfieldFresh.
Lee Delfino21InfieldFresh.
James Molinari4OutfieldTrans.Mr.
Chris Brock40OutfieldFresh.
Ben Sanderson41OutfieldFresh.
SOURCE ECU SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
Women get caught in Spider's net
after winning UNCW rivalry
. . sixth double-double of the season
7 'l PirateS fiaVe tWO lOSSeS, and produced her eleventh game of
one win in five days
Senior Writer
ERIC cot CH
scoring in double figures. Melvin
led the Pirates on Tuesday in scor-
ing and rebounding with 18 points
and grabbing 15 rebounds.
"Danielle continues to do an
excellent job on the boards head
coach Dee Gibson said.
Also contributing for the Pirates
3U.il
ry
The web spun by the
Richmond Spiders was
just too tight for the Lady
Pirates to escape in their
third game within five
days.
The women's basket-
ball team seems to contin-
ue its up-and-down roller
coaster ride with a 85-67
loss on Tuesday night
against Richmond after it
lost a tough match on
Friday to No. 11 ranked
Old Dominion and then
bounced back to a 63-57
win over the rival
Scahawks of UNC-
Wilmington on Sunday.
As for the Richmond
game, the Pirates could
not shut down the three-
point arsenal set up by
Heather Aleshire and
Travece Turner who each
nailed three bombs from
the three-point line. The
Spiders combined to hit
11-18 from the three-point
line. Five of Richmond's
players finished the game in
double figures
Throughout the ups and
downs for ECU there has been one
consistency, and that is Danielle
Melvin. The Junior out of
Roscboro has been on fire as of late
and once again contributed her
As for the Richmond scoring,
CAA player of the week Mandy
Hester led the Spiders with 17
points and Freshman point guard
Michelle Koclanes had her own
double-double by scoring 15 points
and adding 12 assists.
Up next for the Pirates is a road
game at George Mason. GMU will
bring on a 6-8 record (3-2) against
the Pirate
women.
One woman
to watch for
GMU is Jen
Surlas who aver-
ages 13.6 points
per game and
more important-
ly 19.4 against
conference
opponents. 'Irish
Halpin also
promises to give
ECU a rebound-
ing challenge
when she brings
on her average of
eight rebounds
per game against
the Pirates down
low.
This will be
yet another chal-
lenge for
Danielle Melvin
to overcome and
a chance to
show-off more of
her rebounding
Danielle Melvin wafts for a rebound surrounded by Spiders Tuesday night, dominance.
PHOTO BY SARAH CHRISTIE
was Cecilia Shinn and Joana
Fogaca with 10 points each. Shinn
also pulled down five rebounds and
Fogaca was able to grab four.
"My goal for
her is to lead the
CAA in rebound-
ing, and she is well on her way
coach Gibson said.
ECU will travel to GMU on
Friday, Jan. 22 and tip-off is sched-
uled for 7 p.m.
SOURCE: ECU SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
Men's injured list grows, but
team is back on winning streak
NEW
Pirates lose Steven
Brand for the season
Jonathan Russell
staff writer
The Pirates started with the ninth
different lineup and used only
seven different players in a single
basketball game.
This set a personal coaching
record for men's head coach Joe
Dooley, but additionally sealed the
second loss for the George Mason
Patriots.
After a heartbreaking loss last
week to Old Dominion, the
Pirates bounced back to defeat
the Patriots 60-58, who arrived
at Minges Coliseum with the
Colonial Athletics Association
lead but left with their second
straight loss in three nights. The
victory put ECU back over .500
for the season.
ECU (9-8,3-4) relied on their
bench to step up and replace
several key players on the
injured list.
Leading the way for the
Pirates was David Taylor with
18 points and eight rebounds.
"I think people are stepping
up and playing more to their
capabilities Taylor said. "I
guess knowing how to lose has
helped us to learn how to win
The Pirate bench outscored
George Mason's bench 22-9.
Quincy Hall completed a 3-
point play with 34 seconds left
to regain a lead that the Pirates
would not relinquish.
"I had never been in a position
to hit the game winning shot
before Hall said. "I'm just glad
that I made it and that I could help
the team get the win
Hall was the second leading
scorer for the Pirates with 15
points in only 28 minutes of play.
ECU was 10 for 14 from the chari-
ty stripe with several clutch foul
shots towards the end to seal the
victory. The Pirates also had a suc-
cessful defense with 19 turnovers
that held George Mason scoreless
for the final two minutes of the
game.
The Pirates unfortunately
learned before the game that
Steven Branch is out for the year
with a severe knee injury. On a
brighter side, Alphons Van Ierland
returned from the injured list to
see limited action.
"I was impressed with the way
Alphons (van Ierland) came head
coach Joe Dooley said. "He'll have
to work his way back slowly
ECU faces one of their biggest
rivalries Jan. 23 in Wilmington.
"UNCW has a great team and
it's a hard place to play Dooley
said. "We'll have to play hard to
come away with the win Tickets
for the Saturday's CAA rivalry,
scheduled for 4:30 p.m. in the
Seahawks' Trask Coliseum, are
expected to sell out before game
day.
Next home game is Jan. 30
against WMU at 7 pm in Minges.
2p
MAS
Sun:
Wed
ALL
Fr. Paul Vaetl
Alphons van Ierland shoots two free throws early in the first half against GMU Monday.
PHOTO BY MICHAEL SMITH
� X





M Eait Carolinian
'e
13 Thundiy, Jinmry 21, 1999
sports
Tht Ettt Cart
Sports
Writers
Needed
Must have excellent grammar & editing
Apply at the second floor of Student
Publications Building or call 328-6366
linan
is like a brick
t for any team
t. This defen-
: one of the
i weapons this
We are currently accepting applications for seasonal employment
Catalog sales positions include taking customer calls, placing orders for
merchandise and catalogs, and assisting customers with general product information.
Successful candidates will have basic keyboarding skills, demonstrate an outgoing per-
sonality, positive attitude, and previous telephone andor customer service
experience. Flexible scheduling, including evenings and Saturdays. No Sunday work. Paid
two week training period conducted each weekday evening from 5:00 P.M9:O0 P.M.
Work a part time schedule now. (15-20 hours per week), full time schedule in the summer
Priority given to students not enrolled in summer school.
Screening for Distribution Center positions starts 3-1-99.
Employment applications accepted daily at our Corporate Center Office, 111 Red Banks Road. FOE
'� �;�
: .
Sports
Pad
.Downtown Greenville
Tonightn
'�������:�-��� i
Every Thursday
Ladies Free All Wight
Block Party
Ladies Night
Free Admission w ECU ID
(For guy's until 12:30)
Karaoke in Splash
Dance in Sharky's
$1.00 Bud & Natural
$1.25 Mixed Drinks
$1.50 32 OZ. Southpaw Draft
jured list to
vith the way
came head
. "He'll have
ilowly
their biggest
mington.
�at team and
lay Dooley
play hard to
rin Tickets
ZSA rivalry,
p.m. in the
iliseum, are
before game
: is Jan. 30
i in Minges.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
LOCATION: 953 E. 10TH ST. (BOTTOM OF COLLEGE HILL AT EAST END OF CAMPUS)
WELCOME,
FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL US 757-1991
.
MASS SCHEDULE;
Sun:1 1:30am and 8:30pm
Wed: 5:30pm
ALL MASSES ARE AT THE CENTER
Fr. Paul Vaeth Chaplain ft Campus Minister - famorc Infatuationobcut jjg ond otlw progromi, rail or visit doily batwen 8:30an and 11pm.
st GMU Monday.
CHtCK US OUT AT THE PLAZAMALL (NEAR THE FOOD COURT) 321-4884
all winter inventory must goto
make room for nlv spring lines
IARGESISELECT1PN OF S KfeTE SHOES I
AMES.
OVER 50 DECKS IN STOCK!
2b-50
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31IliiiiiiiiiitiLUtiiiii3
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Pirate runners ready for '99
ECU track teams
remain stacked despite
some losses
Stephen Schramm
senior white
Nobody is perfect and only a few
teams can say they had a perfect
season, but most teams hope to
improve their achievements from
the year before.
1998 saw ECU men's and
women's track teams reach new
heights in conference and national
competition. Last year's men's
team dominated the CAA's sprint
events, while the women were
among the conference's most con-
sistent teams. This season most of
each team's talent is back and both
teams are ready to improve on last
year's successes and reach new,
maybe higher heights again.
The ECU men's track team had
. � � i full oi good newsuuu
bad news. Starting with the bad
news, defending CAA 100-meter
champ, Titus Haygood has left the
team.
"He withdrew from school for
academic reasons. He was still eli-
gible, but he felt he just needed a
break said Bill Carson, head
men's track coach. 'That hurt our
4x100
The track team also lost Chris
Justice, who left ECU for Wake
Forest and Tyrone Dozier, who
headed to N.C. State to pursue '
engineering.
For the good news, Damon
Davis, an Ail-American sprinter for
the Pirates in the Spring of 1997,
also played tailback on the football
team. In the tall of 1997 Davis
decided to quit track and devote
his time to football. Two years
later, Davis has returned to the
track. Also back with the track
team are former sprint standout
James Alexander and Lyn Stewart,
who has been hampered by
injuries but is now healthy. The
team looks to Davis, Alexander
and Stewart to fill the void left by
the departures of Haygood, Justice
and Dozier.
"The additions of Damon
Davis, a healthy Lyn Stewart and
James Alexander returning to
school gives us three people we
didn't have. We also have some
walk-ons who can give significant
contributions, so we will be pretty
deep Carson said.
Despite the slight losses the
team is still stacked with talent.
Two-time defending Conference
200 and 400 Champion Darrick
Ingram looks to team with Davis to
make a dangerous one-two punch
in the 400. Along with Ingram, the
nuclei of the champion relay teams
remain intact. Returning contribu-
i. � include Koi Ibrahim, au,
Monroe, Christia Rey and the
Fuquay's Britt Cox.
The team looks to improve on
last year's third place finish in the
conference and their sixth place
finish in the IC4A.
The women's team brings back
most of the talent from last year's
squad. The wealth of experienced
talent on the team has head coach
"Choo" Justice thinking big.
"I think it's the best team we've
ever had. We have as much if not
more talent than we've ever had.
We've got excellent leadership
Justice said. "We've got several
individuals who could break some
school records
The squad retains most of its
CAA and ECAC Champion 4x100-
meter relay team as well as the
incomparable throwing tandem of
Margaret Clayton and her older sis-
ter Michelle. After being red-shirt-
ed last year, Michelle Clayton
returns as one of the country's best
throwers.
"Michelle is head and shoulders
above everybody else and should
have a big impact Justice said.
Also returning are sprinters
Rasheca Barrow, Kai Eason, Nicky
Coins and Kiona Kirkpatrick. The
Pirates also return hurdler Marshari
Williams and the versatile Saundra
Teel. Justice has big plans for this
year's squad.
"We hope to put it all together
in March and have a shot at the
conference and by May have a shot
at being one of the five or ten top
teams on the East Coast Justice
said.
He won't have to wait too long
to see how his team stacks up
against the best. This weekend the
women's team and part of the
men's team travel to Blacksburg,
VA to the Virginia Tech Invitational
; i compete against some or the l- p
teams in the country.
"We are going to get stiff com-
petition in the events we excel at
from schools like South Carolina,
Georgia Tech, Georgetown and
Ohio State Carson said.
"This is a brutal meet It's the
twenty best teams east of the
Mississippi. It will be a real test
We could go there and have an
awesome performance and not
place as high. It will be a measuring
stick for us Justice said.
1999 Woman's Track Remaining Schedule
Jon.22-23Virginia Tech Invitational
Jan.30Delaware Invitational
Feb.12-13Virginia Tech Invitational
Feb.20GMU Collegiate Invitational
Feb.27-28ECAC Indoor Championships
March54NCAA Indoor Championships
March20Weems Baskins Invitational
March26-27NCSU Raleigh Relays
April2-3Duke Invitational
Texas Relays
April16-17CAA Championships
April22-24Penn Relays
May1USATF Series
May15James Madison Invitational
May21-23ECAC Outdoor Championships
June2-5NCAA Outdoor Championships
1999 Men's Track Schedule
Jan.22-23Virginia Tech Invitational
Jan.29-30ETSU Invitational
Feb.54Butler Invitational
Husker invitational
Feb12-13Virginia Tech Invitational
Feb.20George Mason Invitational
Feb.26-27USAFT&F Championship
March54NCAA Indoor Championships
March6-7IC4A Indoor Championships
March19-20,Weems Baskins Invitational
March26-27Raleigh Relays
April2-3Texas Relays
April910Sun Ray Relays or
College Series
April16-17CAA Championships
Apr23-24Penn Relays
May1USATC Quadrangular Meet
May15Clemson Invitational
May22-23IC4A Championships
June2-5NCAA outdoor championships
June24-26USAFT&F Championships
ILVEJ,
"A Touch OfClass' Q
TUESDAY:
��ge(e JfigJit
ULLEE
'ouchOfClass"( iMw1'0
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THURSDAY:
Coastal 6
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Located 5 miles west of
Greenville on 264 Alt
(Behind Aladdin Services & Limo)
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� Stage Time: 9:00 pm
Baseball
continued from page 12
"Our defense is really solid said
Pirate pitcher Brooks Jcrnigan. "We
have good players in both the infield
and the outfield
Coach LeClair agrees that defense
is the key and that the team must
work together in order to be success-
ful.
"Our strong point is our defensive
strength and offensively we are going
to be a team that can score some
runs LeClair said. "We must play
well as a team; it's not going to come
from any one individual
This year's Pirate baseball team
has worked hard to form a family
atmosphere and all players seem to
be focused on the goal of reaching the
big game. That game is the NCAA
Championship game in Omaha.
"The team unity is really strong
and everyone gets along really well
Salargo said. "Everyone stays focused
on the goal at hand to reach Omaha.
There is a real positive atmosphere
and I can't wait to start the season
The schedule is much more dan-
gerous this year. The Pirates will bat-
de strong conference opponents like
Old Dominion and Richmond. The
team also has games against ACC
rivals UNC-Chapel Hill and N.C.
State which promise to be heated and
exciting.
The team's season opener will be
on Feb. 12 in Charleston, S.C. at the
Winn-Dixie Shootout. The new
lights will be blazing all season as the
Pirates have their first home game on
Feb. 20 against Radford.
Phil's out of the picture.
so qet Phil out of the piitu
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14 Ttitrtm Jiiiwy a, MM
sporEs
Thi East Carolinian
Swim teams continue winning ways
mmii
Mm and women 7-0
against Colieg? of Charleston
Tood Tallmadge
seniok wkitek
Greenville waters seem to have
become a nightmare for the swim-
mers of the College of Charleston.
They were handed another
tough loss by the Pirates to travel
back to Charleston with an all-time
record of 0-7 for both the men's
and women's teams.
The men's team won its fourth
straight meet 142-93, without
nationally ranked swimmer Adam
Gaffcy. The women continued to
roll this season with a 158-88 victo-
ry, who won without having seven
swimmers.
The men won every event of
the day except the 400-yard
freestyle relay, which they swam as
an exhibition. Leading the way for
the Pirates (4-4, 0-4) were juniors
Matt Jabs, Mike Julian and sopho-
more Claes Lindgren, winning two
events a piece. Leading the way for
the men was Julian, swimming the
second-fastest time of the year in
the 1,000-yard freestyle (9:57.38)
before going on to win the 500-yard
freestyle. Jabs picked up wins in
the 50-yard freestyle and the 100-
yard freestyle. Lindgren finally
won two events in the same meet
for the first time in his short ECU
career. He picked up victories in
the 200-yard individual medley
(1:58.06) and the 200-yard back-
stroke (1:57.53).
"We as a team were really tired
coming off our training in Florida
Julian said. "Coach pushed us a lot
harder this year to get us ready for
conference
After losing the the first four
meets of the year, the men seem to
be having momentum going into
the CAA Championship.
"The team was really down on
itself early in the year Lindgren
said. "After winnipg at the
Davidson meet, we started getting
our confidence back. That win let
us know we could win and has car-
ried us to where we are now
Richmond will be coming to
town this weekend. The men hold
a 22-0 all-time record over the
Spiders.
"Adam Gaffcy will be back
this weekend said Rick Kobe,
ECU swim coach. "He sat out this
past weekend to rest a sore shoul-
der. With him back, we should
dominant this meet"
The Lady Pirate swimmers
improved to 7-1 (4-0 in CAA) with-
out seven swimmers, including
three CAA finalists from last year's
team. Three freshmen led the way
SEE SWIMMING, PAGE 15
If you stand for
Equality, Justice, and Truth
ECU wants you to serve
on a Student Judicial Board
This is your opportunity to serve your fellow students
and gain valuable experience making solid,
well thought out decisions.
Requirements include:
�Minimum 2.0 GPA overall
�Must be in good standing with the University
�Must have good decision making skills
�Commitment to a fair and just judicial process
Information can be picked up at 201 Whichard or
Student Government Offices, 2nd floor MSC.
Applications are available beginning Thursday,
Jan. 21 and will be due by 5pm.
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onogement
Aportrwto 4 Rental Houses
K Boa 673 �nimnkjoOHwSulaA
Gaarnfc. No fcwfrio 27835-0873
(252) 758-192) � FAX (262) 767-7722
Langston Park Apartments
Two Bernnm IJnjtff
SATO
moaw
ASK ABOUT
SECURITY
DESPOSIT
SPECIALS
Hook Up.
UVSMI
DOOM MBA
1 bath
Free Water and Sewer
Central Heat & Air
Dishwasher
RefrigeratorStove
WasherDryer Hook Ups
Mini-Blinds
Oeadbolt Locks
Each Unit Has a Patio or Balcony
Pets Allowed with Pet Fee
All Apartments Just 5 Blocks
from ECU Campus
1 Block from ECU Bus route
24hr Emergency
Maintenance Service
We've Got
the Best
Comic
Books in
Town!
NOSTALGIA NEWSSTAND
919 Dickinson Avenue
Greenville, NC 27834
1-252-758-6909
Wesley Commons South
OneTwo Bedroom UnifS
1 bath
Free Water and Sewer
Central Heat & Air in 2 Bdrms
Wall AC Unit in 1 Bdrms
RefrigeratorStove
WasherDryer Hook Ups
Mini-Blinds
Deadbolt Locks and Hall Closets
1st Floor Patio with Fence
2nd Floor Front or Back patio
Pets Allowed with Pet Fee
"
Swimming
cominuad from pig I
with two victories a piece and with
the team getting eight wins overall
Courtney Foster won the 50-yard
freestyle and the 100-yard
freestyle. Dana Fuller got wins in
the 500-yard freestyle and 1,000-
yard freestyle , with Heather
Hagcdorn adding victories in the
200-yard freestyle and the 200-yard
backstroke.
"I personally swam my worst
rimes of the year Foster said. "It
makes me feel good though know-
ing I can still win without swim-
ming my best
The women's team holds a 12-4
edge over the Spiders of
Richmond.
"At this point of the season
these freshmen girls are no longer
freshmen Kobe said. "We expect;
the new freshmen that come in
every year to help carry the team. I
"The girls did a great job this
weekend and will have two, possi- �
bly three girls back to help this;
weekend. The meet will be tight:
the whole way though
All Apartments Just 5 Blocks
from ECU Campus
On Site Laundry Facilities
On ECU Bus route
Apply at TEC office on
the second floor of the
Student Publications Building
tCoke
bora only.
ARE YOU A SUPP0RT1R OF PIRATE BASEBALL?
If attending Pirate Baseball games just is not enough and you want to become
part of the team, then ECU's Diamond Girls is for you!
What is the Diamond Girls?
The Diamond Girls is a new student support group for East Carolina Pirate Baseball. This organization will primarily serve as
marketing assistants and official hostesses for Pirate Baseball. Duties of the Diamond Girls will include the following: attendance of
designated home games, take part in promotional events and assist the baseball coachesteam during recruiting visits.
Who can be a Diamond Girl?
Any ECU student demonstrating the qualities of dedication and hard work can become a Diamond Girl. Membership into the East
Carolina University Diamond Girts is open to all persons otherwise qualified, without regard to race, sex, religion, creed or
handicap.
How do you become a Diamond Girl?
Call ECU Sports Marketing at 328-4530 to receive an application or additional information as soon as possible. Completed
applications are due by Friday, February 5 th at 5:00 p.m. Review of applications will begin on Monday, February 8 and will
be completed on Friday, February 12. Qualified candidates will be contacted by the Sports Marketing Department.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL ECU SPORTS MARKETING AT 328-4530

i





M Thundny. January 21. 1999
classifieds
Th� East Carolinian
FOR RENT
ECU AREA big 3 bedroom house.
Washer and dryer included. Living
room, dining room, front porch and
screened back porch. Pets OK. Call
830-9602.
STANCILL DRIVE, 2 bedroom. 1
bathroom, brick duplex, central
heatair. near ECU. $425 month.
pets extra with fee. Call 3B3-27T7.
TIRED OF apartmentjjjoffa room?
Young professional couple wishes to
share 2400 sq. ft. house with seri-
ous student. Spacioup. upstairs
rooms with private bath available.
Access to all areas of house. Free
use of cable and laundry: private
phone line available. Located in a se-
cluded neighborhood within 10-15
minutes of medical school and uni-
versity. References from former med-
ical students available. Non-smoker a
must very affordable. Please call Ja-
son � 756-2636 for appoint-
mentmore information.
FOR RENT: six bedroom. 3 12
bath, fenced-in yard, pets OK, corner
of 4th and Oak St. Contact Betsy O
329-6658.
CONDO FOR Rent: 2000 sq.ft. con-
do. newly renovated, 4 bedrooms. 2
12 baths, washerdryer hook-up.
Available immediately. 752-1899
daytime. 561-2203 pager nights.
2 BR. APARTMENT with wash-
erdryer hook-ups. $325month.
Available February. Call 321-7956
FOR RENT: Unfurnished 2 BR. 1
bath with living area & kitchen-local
phone, cable & parking provided.
$375 per month with deposit. Fe-
male students only. Non-smokers-no
pets. Call 919-497-0809. leave mes-
sage
CANNON COURT Two bedroom. 1
12 bath townhouse. Includes stove,
refrigerator, dishwasher, washerdry-
er hook-up, on ECU bus route. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC. 766-6209.
BEECH STREET Villas - Three bed-
room, two bath apartments, close to
campus, with laundry room, stove,
refrigerator, and dishwasher. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC 756-6209.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$285month. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apts 125 Avery St. in Green-
. ville - 5 blocks from campus. 758-
6596.
PINEBROOK APARTMENTS. 1-2
BRs available, water, sewer, cable in-
cluded. Reduced Deposits Novem-
ber. December. On-site main-
tenance, management, ECU bus
line. 9-12 month lease, pets allowed.
758-4015
NAGS HEAD, NC-Get your group to-
gether early. Relatively new house in
excellent condition; fully furnished;
washer & dryer; dishwasher: central
AC; available May 1 through Au-
gust 31: sleeps 8-$ 2200 00 per
month. 757-850-1532
APARTMENT FOR rent on 10th
Street, two bedroom, no deposit,
$400 a month. Pets okay, free cable
and water. Call 752-7097.
FREE 1ST month rent. Players Club.
Sublease 4 bedroom townhouse
with washerdryer and own person-
al bathroom for only $240 plus 14
utilities. Pool, basketball, volleyball,
tennis courts and gym. Call Derek
for more details at 355-4370
GLADIOLUS GARDENS One. two.
and three bedroom apartments. Free
cable. Located on 10th Street. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC 756-6209.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
ROOMMATE NEEDED to sub-
lease � duplex close to campus.
Cheap rant. $200 par month
12 utilities. $200 deposit re-
qulrad. Call ASAP. 787-9348.
MF ROOMMATE needed to share
large 3 BR house 1 block from cam-
pus. Rent 13 bills per month. Call
ChrisLisa at 754-8094.
LOOKING FOR mf roommate
ASAP to move into Dockside. Rent
$275month 13 bills. Sublease
until August. Must be able to toler-
ate smoke and dogs. Call Stacy or
Adrienne at 758-3364. No security
deposit required.
ROOMMATE WANTED
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE
Needed to share apt. close to cam-
pus, student preferred. Must be re-
sponsible & clean 8- like pets. Total
expenses per month will not exceed
$270. 762-0009.
NEED ROOMMATE ASAP! Tar Riv-
er. $265month. Free water, cable,
walk to class, no deposit or lease.
Call Nick. 754-2277.
FOR SALE
JUST IN time for Valentine's) En-
gagement ring, never used. 1.1 car-
at marquis cut. Have appraisal. Seri-
ous inquiries only please. 758-2887.
ask for Todd.
CUSTOM PRINTED T-shirts. Profes-
sion printers since 1981. Competitive
rates. Free shipping. Full art depart-
ment. We accept digital files in most
formats. 800-272-2066 culture-
works.com
AMCJEEP GRAND Wagoneer
1983 powerful V8. Power windows,
locks, seats, etc. This truck is huge,
fun. Perfect college vehicle. Will last
forever. Call Chris. 762-9038.
FUTON FOR sale. Large, wood
frame, wmattress & cover. Like
new. $100. 328-6247.
AAAI .Spring Break Panama City
$1291. Boardwalk room with kitchen
near clubsl 7 parties-free drinksl
Daytona $1491 South Beach $1291
Cocoa Beach $1491 springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
USED L-SHAPED sleeper-sofa and
recliner. 321-7956. $200.
PRE-PAID Phone cards. 106 min-
utes for $10. 216 minutes for $20.
For more information or to purchase,
call Kristy at 328-8426.
DORM SIZE FRIDGE for sale, bare-
ly used. Call 752-7097'
FOR SALE: brown sectional sofa
bed. blue recliner and two end ta-
bles. $250 or best offer (will sell
separately). Call 756-5617 for more
info.
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
(black), 2 dressers, full size bed. 2
VCRs, 3-piece center table, complete
stereo set, etc. 321-3242
SERVICES
AAAI SPRING Break Bahamas Par-
ty Cruisel 5 nights $279! Includes
meals 8- parties! Awesome beaches,
nightlife! Departs from Florida! Can-
cun & Jamaica $399! springbreak-
travel.com 1-800-678-6386
ABRACADABRA NAILS now open!
$25 full set. $15 fills. $10 mani-
cures. Call 329-7235. or visit our
website http:www.ange
fire.comncAbracadabraNails.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CMOUM SKY SHUTS
(919)496-2224
DJ. FOR HIRE
NYC D.J. READY TO
HYPE UP YOUR PARTY
For all functions & campus
organizations
Call XArthur @ 252-412-0971
ITS PARTY TIME!
Semaj Entertainment specializing in
Mix tapes. Music production and mobile
Wing with the latest Hip-Hop, Top 40,
R&B, Techno, and Reggae.
All functions & campus organizations!
Call J.Arthur @ 252-412-0971
HELP WANTED
BABYSITTER NEEDED all day on
Wednesdays to care for two child-
ren. Please do not call if you have
morning classes. No smokers.
please. Call 355-7875.
IN-LINE Hockey Coaches. The
Greenville Recreation & Parks De-
partment is recruiting individuals
with some background knowledge
with in-line hockey or ice hockey. Ap-
plicants will be responsible for
coaching youth in-line hockey
leagues at the Jaycee Park. Some
weekend work required.Salary rates
range from $5.15 to 6.50 per hour.
Starting date is February 1999. For
more information, please call Ben
James. Michael Daly, or Judd Crum-
pler at 329-4650 after 2PM.
PART-TIME JOBS AVAILABLE.
Joan's Fashions, a local Women's
Clothing Store, is now hiring. Em-
ployees are needed for Saturdays
and weekdays between 10AM and
6PM. with a particular need for em-
ployees on Tuesdays and Thursdays
(mornings and early afternoons). The
positions are for between 7 and 20
hours per week, depending on your
schedule and on business needs.
The jobs are within walking distance
of the university and the hours are
flexible. PaV is commensurate with
your experience and job perfor-
mance and is supplemented by an
employee discount. Apply in person
to Store Manager. Joan's Fashions.
423 S. Evans Street. Greenville (on
the Downtown Mall).
LOCAL LAW firm has a part-time
filer position available.Responsibili-
ties include: opening, closing, main-
taining and storing files. Must be
computer literate. M-F. 12-5:30.
Please send resume to: Legal Admin-
istrator. 1698 E. Arlington Blvd
Greenville, NC 27858
SEEKING RESPONSIBLE, reliable
student to pick up my child from his
school and keep in my home from
2:30 to 6:00, Monday through Fri-
day. Please call Donna Walker at
758-9240 after 6:00 p.m.
FULL OR PART-TIME cooks wanted
at Luptons Seafood. Call Bruce Lup-
ton at 752-4174.
ECU DINING Services has great op-
portunities in catering for smiling
faces! We offer great pay, flexible
schedules, and benefits! We also
have supervisory positions available
to experienced servers. Attend our
hiring session on Tuesday, January
26. 1999 at 5 PM in Sweethearts of
Todd Dining Hall to get more infor-
mation. Refreshments will be served.
Come prepared to interview and
learn about our opportunities or call
328-4339 for information.
1-2 PART-TIME tennis instruc-
torattendants needed at River Birch
Tennis Center immediately. Pays
$5.15hr� 10-20 hr.wk weekday
afternoons, some weekends. Call
328-4559.
CDFRELEMENTARY ED. majors
Energetic afterschool teacher need-
ed for Farmville Daycare. Approx. 25
hrsweek. Call 753-4866.
S & M Construction looking for part-
time clerical help 15-20 hours per
week. Computer skills required. Call
321-1991 or 355-2404 for interview.
Ask for Gwynne.
1999 INTERNSHIPSI Don't get a
summer job Run a summer busi-
ness. www.tuitionpainters.com. tui-
paint�bellsouth.net or 800-393-
4521.
NEED A PART TIME JOB?
RPS INC.
Is looking for khu i im i j js to load vans and
unload trailers for the am shift hours 3:00am to Sam.
J 7.50lxxir; tuition assistance available after 30 days.
Future career opportunities In operations and manage-
ment possible. Applications can be filled out at 2410
United Drive (near the aquatics center) Greenville
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS. SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
We Need Timberland boots
and shoes! Good Jeans.
JPMMY HILFIGER
NAUTICA
POLO
TIMBERLAND
ABERCROMBIE
EDDIE BAUER
AND OTHER NAME BRAND MEN'S CLOTHING
SHIRTS, PANTS, JEANS, SWEATS, JACKETS, SHOES, ETC.
WE ALSO BUY AND SELL:
GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TVs, VCRs, CD Players � Home, Portable
QUICK, EASY, HELPFUL
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
414 S. EVANS (UP THE STREET FROM CUBBIES)
752-3866
TUESDAY - SATURDAY, 9:00 - 5:00
(DRIVE TO THE BACK DOOR BEHIND PARK THEATRE)
ONE OF THE FAVORITE STUDENT STORES FOR YEARS
(IF YOU ARE SELLING, ID IS REQUIRED)

HELP WANTED
SPRING YOUTH indoor soccer
coaches. The Greenville Recreation
6 Parks Department is recruiting for
12 to 16 part-time youth soccer
coaches for the spring youth indoor
soccer program. Applicants must
possess some knowledge of the soc-
cer skills and have the ability and pa-
tience to work with youth. Applic-
ants must be able to coach young
people ages 5-18, in soccer funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3 p.m. until
7 p.m. with some night and wee-
kend coaching. Flexible with hours
according to class schedules. This
program will run from Mid March to
April. Salary rates start at $5.15 per
hour. For more information, please
call Ben James, Michael Daly, or
Judd Crumpler at 329-4550 after
2p.m.
COMMUNICATIONS &
CRIM. JUSTICE MJRS:
Build " � � i
expem : loniti ring
urity
. Mil
moi ;ty
alan I
call ci n lude
handhi and
Hi' paid l
Cu: I itions are
also available I xcellenl communi-
cation skills clean i riminal n con
& dm ; quired. Fax
EARN WHILE VOU learn, up to
$1,000.00 wk. Day and night
shifts. Clean, secure working at-
mosphere. Playmates Adult En-
tertainment. 262-747-7686 for in-
terview.
GREENHOUSE PRESCHOOL is
looking for substitute teachers.
Great experience for CDFR and Elem
majors. Call 355-2404 for inter-
views.
LOSE WEIGHT now! Up to 30 lbs.
100 natural, doctor developed. Call
931-7022.
JOIN THE BBC- The Buffalo Brew
Crew. BW-3 now hiring part-time po-
sitions for kitchen and delivery staff.
BW-3. 114 East 5th Street. Apply
within.
BECOME A CERTIFIED
AEROBIC INSTRUCTOR
OR
PERSONAL TRAINER!
Classes art forming now for thou Interested
In becoming part of the fitness Industry.
Certification is provided by
P
ITS
IXIIJ� rWT�UCTO� TRAINING SCWXH.1
Space is l.miied
Call (252) B27-1791 tor registration information
STUDENTS WANTED, all positions
(bartenders, doormen. JD's. and
managers). Apply in person after
5p.m. at The Sports Pad or call 757-
3881 or 757-3658 for more info.
BABYSITTER WANTED. Must be
experienced, referenced and have
own car. Must be available on Tues-
day and Thursday mornings; other
hours are variable, including some
weekends. Call 321-0580 until 8
p.m.
TUTORS NEEDED: Do you have a
3.0 or better GPA? Are you interest-
ed in becoming a tutor for the Office
of Student Development-Athletics?
We need individuals capable of tu-
toring any 8- all levels (0001-5999) in
all subject areas especially the fol-
lowing: ACCT. ASIP. BIOL CHEM.
CSCI. DESN. ECON. EMST. GEOG.
JUST. MATH. MGMT. MKTG. PHIL.
PHYS. 8- SOCI. Undergraduate stud-
ents are paid six dollars an hour ($6)
and graduate students are paid sev-
en dollars an hour ($7). If this
sounds like the job for you, join us
for an orientation meeting on Tues-
day January 26th. room 236-B
WSMB. If you have any questions,
please contact Isha Williams at 328-
4691 for further information.
SPRING BREAK 99! Cancun Nas-
sau " Jamaica. Travel free and make
lots of Cash) Top reps are offered on-
site staff jobs. All-inclusive deals. 32
hours Free Drinks. Special Discounts
up to$100 per person. Lowest price
guaranteed. Call now for details!
www.cla8Stravel.com 800-838-6411
'86 GREENVILLE Stars needs soc-
cer coach. 2-3 practices a week.
Games Saturdays, some away. Sal-
ary based on experience. Call 355-
1697
HELP WANTED
LOOKING FOR A PART-TIME job?
The ECU Telefund is hiring students
to contact alumni for the ECU An-
nual Fund Drive. $6.50 per hour.
Make your own schedule. If interest-
ed, call 328-4212, M-TH between the
hours of 3-6PM
HAVE LITERARY Talent? Help Ex-
pressions Magazine produce its Fe-
bruary double-issue. Submit ideas
on or related to minority love andor
history to: xpressyoself4hotmail.com
Today
LOOKING FOR a part-time job?
Help wanted at Szechual Express, in
the Food Court at the Plaza Mall.
Day hours from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m
night hours from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Apply in person. No phone calls,
please
LEASING AGENT -Large property
mgmt. co. specializing in luxury col-
lege student housing is seeking self-
motivated, outgoing leasing consult-
ants. Part or full-time. Training pro-
vided. Fax cover letter and resume
to 352-472-1819. attention Rebecca.
BABYSITTER NEEDED immediate-
ly for Tuesday and Thursday 11:00
thru 5:00 or 6:00. Call 355-1621 for
information and have references.
WANTED: PAYING $6.50 an hour
plus bonuses for qualified telemar-
keters. No Friday or Saturday work.
Hours: 5:30-9 p.m. Monday-Thurs-
day: 4:30-8 p.m. Sunday. Apply in
person 5-9 p.m. Energy Savers
Windows & Siding. Inc Wintergreen
Commercial Park. Suite 0. Firetower
Road, Greenville.
TAKING APPLICATIONS for substi-
tutes and full-time teaching posi-
tions. For more information call Har-
mony Child Care at 756-6229. U-
cense 7455138
GRAPHICSMARKETING ASSIS-
TANT. Detail oriented person need-
ed to assist ECU dining marketing
manager. Successful candidate will
assist with special events, graphic
design. & distribution of signs. Ad-
vanced skills in Adobe Pagemaker
andor FreehandIllustrator desired.
Must be able to work 25 hours per
week. Please apply at the Aramark
office in Mendenhall Student Center
SPRING BREAK Panama City
Beach. 'Summit � Luxury condos.
Next to Spinnaker. Owner discount
rates. 404-355-9637.
GREEK PERSONALS
CONGRATULATIONS HEATHER
on your lavalier from Justin. We are
so happy for you! Love, your Sigma
sisters
THANKS SIGMA Alpha Epsilon for
the great social last Friday. It was a
blast and we hope todo it again
soon. Love. Sigma Sigma Sigma
OTHER
CRUISE SHIP Employment - work-
ers earn up to$2.000montl)
(wtips ft benefits). Word Travel!
Land-Tour jobs up to$5,000-
$7,000summer. Ask us how! 517-
336-4235 ext. C53622
!t
l SPRINGBREAK
HOOKS & IIOlTKSO1 HI 1 DRINKS!
Earn 2 FREE Trips & $$$$$!
( isnoin. Jamaica, FloridaIl.llll.lliov H.lll.llll.lK
I rrncsl IVhtBm Meal I'l.m
I.80O-426-771A���.�insiliislilmis.voiti
SPRING BREAK 991 Cancun Nas-
sau Jamaica 'Mazatlan Acapulco
' Bahamas Cruise Florida' Florida
South Padre. Travel Free and make
lots of Cash! Top reps are offered
full-time staff jobs. Lowest price
Guaranteed. Call now for details!
www.classtravel.com 800838-6411
Sonno M TrM m I of S SM hlMMS � �� US in IMS tot�
rocoomied tor outstjrvsng. etfwcj fJr Counc ol Belter Busmen BurMut'
Bahamas Party
Cruise $279
5 dm � Mo MMh � f 'W P-rttet � rnctudei Tun
Panama $119
City Boirtwo. Hofcley n Summ Mom
Jamaica $439
Cancun $399
7 Htm � tkHow � fm Food I� Hti tf OrMa
Spring Break Traml-Our 12th Ycaii
1-800-678-6386
OTHER
EARN $800 per week. Stuff envel-
opes, make earrings, record videos,
etc. Free info. Send SASE: New Life
Mail. P:0 Box 562602. Miami. FL
33156.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
FREE FOOD! Join the East Carolina
Communications Organization on
Tues. 126 at BW3's. Build your re-
sume. Learn valuable skills. And of
course have funl Stop by BW3's bet-
ween 4-7 p.m. to learn more about
this new growing organization. Don't
forget. Free Food!
BECOMING A Successful Student-
Note-Taking: Tuesday 11-12:00. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop on Tuesday the 26th. If
you are interested in this workshop.
contact the center at 328-6661.
THE DEPARTMENT OF Communi-
cation Sciences and Disorders will
be providing the speech, language
and hearing screening for students
who are fulfilling requirements for
admission to Upper Division on the
following dates: Screenings for stud-
ents in the School of Education will
be held January 25 or January 27.
1999 from 5:00-6:00 p.m. Screen-
ings for students in the College of
Arts and Sciences. General College,
and the Schools of Art. Health and
Human Performance, Human Envi-
ronmental Sciences and Music will
be held February 1 or 3. 1999.These
are the only screening dates during
the Spring Semester. The screening
will be conducted in the Belk Annex
(ECU Speech and Hearing Clinic) lo-
cated next to the Belk Building
(School of Allied Health Sciences),
near the intersection of Charles
Street and the 264 By-pass. No ap-
pointment is needed-Please do not
call their office for a appointment
Waiting is outside the clinic waiting
room. Sign in begins at 4:50PM.
Screenings are conducted on a first
come, first serve basis.
WE NEED your experience! Your
achievements in everyday situations
can be useful to others, the REAL
Crisis Center is recruiting volunteer
crisis counselors to help our com-
munity. We will be offering a training
class beginning Jan. 26, 1999. For
more information, call 758-4357.
BOWUNG REGISTRATION meet-
ing: anyone interested in participat-
ing in intramural bowling must at-
tend the registration meeting on
Tues. Jan. 46 at 5 p.m. in MSC room
244. RegiRration will be held Wed-
nesday. Jan. 27 at the Student Re-
creation Center.
JOIN PRESBYTERIAN Campus
Ministry on Tuesday nights from 6
p.m. until 8 p.m. at First Presbyterian
Church (at the corner of Elm and
14th Street) for a free home-cooked
meal, good company, and a pro-
gram. If you need a ride or if you
have questions, call Ellen at 758-
1901.
SNOW GOOSE Contra Dance Re-
treat! Lake Mattamuskeet Lodge.
Feb. 5-7. Dancing, nature walks,
good food! Students: $14-17. others:
$25 and up. lodging extra. Co-spon-
sor: ECU Folk 8- Country Dancers.
328-0237 for more information.
GAMMA BETA Phi will meet Thurs-
day, Jan. 21st in the social room at
Mendenhall. 5 p.m.
HAVE LITERARY Talent? Help Ex-
pressions Magazine produce its Fe-
bruary double-issue. Submit ideas
on or related to minority love andor
history to: xpressyoself9hotmail.com
Today!
RACOJUETBALL TOURNEY: anyone
interested in playing in the racquet-
ball tourney must enter by Wed. Jan.
27 at 5 p.m. in the Student Recrea-
tion Center main office.
TIME MANAGEMENT: Monday
3:30-4:30. The Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development is of-
fering the following workshop on
January 25th. If you are interested
in this workshop, contact the center
at 328-6661.
ORDER OF Omega meeting will be
held on Monday, Jan. 25 at 6 p.m. It
will be in Mendenhall room 14. All
members must attend.

DCitc�en Uable
7or an appointment
call(232)746-3726
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The Elit Carolinian
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week. Stuff envel-
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62602. Miami. FL
1 the East Carolina
Organization on
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able skills. And of
stop by BW3's bet-
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uccessful Student-
day 11-12:00. The
leling and Student
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ruesday the 26th. If
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INT OF Communi-
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speech, language
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ter Division on the
icreenings for stud-
il of Education will
25 or January 27,
6:00 p.m. Screen-
in the College of
s. General College,
of Art. Health and
nee. Human Envi-
es and Music will
1 or 3, 1999,These
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ster. The screening
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the Belk Building
Health Sciences),
iction of Charles
14 By-pass. No ap-
ded-Please do not
or a appointment
i the clinic waiting
egins at 4:50PM.
inducted on a first
basis.
experiencel Your
sveryday situations
others, the REAL
ecruiting volunteer
to help our com-
) offering a training
Ian. 25. 1999. For
call 758-4357.
STRATION meet-
ssted in participat-
bowling must at-
ation meeting on
p.m. in MSC room
will be held Wed-
at the Student Re-
ERIAN Campus
day nights from 6
it First Presbyterian
:orner of Elm and
free home-cooked
pany, and a pro-
d a ride or if you
call Ellen at 758-
Contra Dance Re-
tamuskeet Lodge,
ig, nature walks,
nts: $14-17. others:
ing extra. Co-spon-
Country Dancers.
e information.
'hi will meet Thurs-
the social room at
n.
t Talent? Help Ex-
ne produce its Fe-
;ue. Submit ideas
linority love andor
oselfdhotmail.com
TOURNEY: anyone
ing in the racquet-
enter by Wed. Jan.
le Student Recrea-
office.
EMENT: Monday
Center for Counsel-
Development is of-
fing workshop on
you are interested
contact the center
ga meeting will be
Jan. 25 at 6 p.m. It
nhall room 14. All
tend.
jSen Uable
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iff(232)746-6726

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Title
The East Carolinian, January 21, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 21, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1312
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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