The East Carolinian, January 19, 1999







Tuesday
High: 60
Low: 38
Wednesday
High: 62
Low: 48
Online Survey
Does ECU need a new
football coach?
34 Yes 65 No
www.tec.ecu.edu
Do you think the Y2K problem
will affect your life?
Carolinian
Arrrrgh!
Welcome Back!
TUESDAY. JANUARY 19.1999 VOLUME 74. ISSUE 30
'Annual campus wrap-up
Devon White
staff whiter
This year on campus Pepsi
became the choice of our
administration, the rapes of sev-
eral women scared us, and a pro-
fessor's controversial dismissal
occupied headlines proving
1998's campus news as interest- I
ing as national headlines.
� February 3
' North Carolina poet laureate,
Fred Chappell, will give the
89th commencement address at the spring
ceremony on May 16th. "Fred is an
absolutely fascinating poet and a charming
individual said Dr. Patrick Bizzaro of the
uplCU English department.
�February 10
A student and resident of Gotten resi-
dence hall reported that she was raped in
her first floor room. This incident occurred
just as the university began its week to pro-
mote Sexual Assault Awareness.
�February 26
Students around the Messick Theater
Arts and Dance Building fell prey to the
thieving of John Stanley Cobb, who stole
backpacks from in and around the building,
took out whatever was valuable and threw
the bags in the bushes. Cobb faced numer-
ous charges for which he was held in jail
and banned from the campus. TEC even
featured Cobb in a regular chart warning
students of his last strike.
�March 3
A female student was assaulted on the
-ECU campus by an unknown assailant, fol-
lowing the rape in Cotten Hall by three
weeks. Police were concerned by the close
timing of the two incidents.
�March 5
ECU has had the highest number of
drug violations in seven years out of a nine-
year period. Dr. Al Matthews, vice chan-
cellor for student life, relates the high inci-
dence to the fact that ECU enforces the
.rules and regulations to a greater extent
j than other institutions.
�March 10
A student and resident of Tyler Hall,
Kristen Olson, was arrested for Filing a false
assault report. Olson was charged with fil-
, ing a false report, a misdemeanor that could
call for a maximum fine of $1,000 and up to
30 days in jail. She was released from jail on
jin unsecured bond of $500.
�March 12
' Sal DeMarco, speech'
pathology professor, was dis-
missed by Chancellor Eakin
Ifbr inappropriate behavior.
.The case went on for many
months until DeMarco finally
won his fight for unemploy-
"ment benefits. DeMarco is
Currently appealing the uni-
versity's decision.
I 'March 26
s� The Board of Trustees
'approved a parking increase of
"$24 a year for faculty, staff,
,Commuters, residence and freshman regis-
tered vehicles. The new fee is $120 yearly.
Limited decafs were also increased from
,$42 to $60 annually, and private decal's
increased from $288 to $360. The increase
I will be in effect as of July 1,1999.
jli
"�'April 21
. Greenville Police were still waiting on
National News
Emily Little
STAFF WHITER
Students began to drink Pepsi on campus this year because of the new Pepsi contract made with ECU.
PHOTO BY MIKE JACOBSEN
results from a rape kit that was sent off to
the State Bureau of Investigation (SBI) for
the alleged sexual assault that occurred in
the Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity house last
January. The results were inconclusive and
consequently charges were dropped.
�April 23
ECU ranked 25th in the nation as one of
America's "Most Wired" colleges, accord-
ing to Yahoo! Internet Life Magazines list-
ings. ECU moved from 93rd in 1997 to 25th
in 1998, outranking Duke and Wake
Forest- the only other North Carolina uni-
versities included in the list.
�June 3
ECU faced a $1.2 million cutback at the
beginning of the fiscal year. Of the UNC
system, ECU's financial losses were second
to UNC-Chapel Hill's $1.4 million cut.
Due to the cutbacks, a total of 34 campus
vehicles, approaching their 10-year mark,
could not be replaced.
�June 24
Housekeepers found posters portraying
slaves and slave ships in Jenkins Art
Building during the month of January.
Because the housekeepers were disap-
pointed with the university's response to
the incident, a meeting was held to further
discuss the issues of racial slander. Later in
the year Assistant University Attorney Toi
Carter completed a report for Chancellor
Eakin which concluded that the posters
were distasteful yet not intended to
offend.
�July 1
The ECU Playhouse manager was
arrested by the SBI's Financial Crimes
Unit for embezzling money from the pri-
vate Theater Arts Foundation. Gary
Faircloth, manager and treasurer of the pri-
vate theater, was initially suspected with
embezzling approximately $15,000. That
amount doubled from the time he was sus-
i
pended in May to July.
�July 15
The Student Health Center began free
HIVAIDS screenings in the fall. The
process is completely confidential, and
post-test counseling regarding the results is
offered. It is estimated
that one in 500 stu-
dents have the virus.
�July 22
ECU reduced its
soft drink choice to
Pepsi after signing an
exclusive deal with
the company. ECU's
Board of Trustees
took Pepsi's $7.1 mil-
lion bid over Coke's
$3.93 million proposal.
Pepsi will monopolize the university's
vending machines, dining halls, and con-
cession stands for the next 10 years. Forty
percent of the 7 million went toward acad-
emics, and the remaining sixty percent was
spent on athletics. An additional $100,000
was invested by Pepsi for new concession
stands at Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium.
�August 27
ECU survived Hurricane Bonnie with
SEE CAMPUS PAGE Z ?
The year 1998 provided the
American public with enough
scandal, tragedy and intrigue to
last at least until the millennium.
The most important story, of
course, was the impeachment of
President Clinton. Linda Tripp
began this year's debacle by
informing the world on Jan. 12 of
Monica Lewinsky's affair with
the President, providing Paula
Jones with a possible witness to
the sexual harassment suit she
filed against Clinton in May of
1994.
Despite Lewinsky's denial of
a sexual relationship and the President's
statement that he "did not have sexual
relations with that woman independent
counsel Kenneth Starr, originally appoint-
ed to investigate the Whitewater land
deal, launched a full investigation.
On April Fool's Day, a VS. district
judge dismissed Paula Jones' lawsuit, too
late to save the President's reputation.
The day after Lewinsky testified
under immunity before the grand jury on
Aug. 6, the President confessed, "I did
have a relationship with Ms. Lewinsky
that was not appropriateIt constituted a
critical lapse in judgment and a personal
failure on my part for which I am solely
and completely responsible
President Clinton's constant apologies
and hedgy grand jury testimony failed to
deter Congress from voting on Dec. 19 to
make him only rhe second president in
American history to be impeached.
From the day the Mouse began to
debate the articles of impeachment until
the day the vote was taken, the President
launched a new set of air strikes against
Iraq, called Operation Desert Fox.
ij'The action resulted from a build-up of
aggravation at Saddam Hussein's policies,
including blatant challenge of American
planes over the "no-fly" zones and refusal
to comply with UN policies.
The air strikes destroyed barracks for
many of Hussein's elite guard, as well as a
few missile sites.
The majority of the Iraqi public was
angered by the U.S. military action, and
Hussein began to increase his defense of
the "no-fly" zones and to make accusa-
tions of treachery against Arab leaden
that supported the U.S.
Two deaths occurred in 1998 that
awoke the government and the nation to
the issue of "hate crimes a term used to
describe a crime
committed
because of prej-
udice of a spe-
cific characteris-
tic of the victim.
In June,
James Byrd Jr a
handicapped
black man, was
chained by
three white men
to a pickup and
dragged for
miles across Jasper, Texas. He was muti-
lated and decapitated.
'His murder revitalized the effort to
increase the power behind hate crime leg-
islation, most of which only protects vic-
tims participating in federally protected
activities, such as voting. Sen. Edward
Kennedy, D Mass led the fight for a new
bill in the Senate.
"Due to limitations in current law, fed-
eral prosecutors are fighting bigotry with ,
SEE MUM. PAGE 7






2 Tauaav, Jmmry II. iMt
llv TTN?
Tht Eitt Carolinian
Campus
contiMMd from pagi 1
little damage. Many students were
pleased with the cancellation of
classes. Emanuel Amaro, director
I of Housing Services, said, "A hurri-
I cane seems to be an occasion for a
party
�September 3
Jarvis Hall, the oldest residence
hall and building on campus, is in
the process of being renovated.
Estimates for the building over-
haul have reached over $4 million.
Opening of the refurbished resi-
dence hall is scheduled for January
2000.
�September 8
Tipper Gore, wife of Vice
President Al Gore, visited the
ECU campus to observe the Child
Development Lab and was present
at the round table discussion held
that day. The discussion focused
on child care and child develop-
ment in the United Sates today.
U.S. Representative Eva Clayton
(D-NC) accompanied Gore on her
visit to ECU.
�September 10
Charges of sexual assault painsr
member of Sigma Phi Epsilon
were dropped due to lack of evi-
dence in the case. Joe Donlevy,
acting president of Sigma Phi
Epsilon, said the suspect in the
case was looking into pressing
charges of libel against the woman.
"Based on what I know from the
Greenville Police Department, she
was not untruthful in her state-
ment to the police said Assistant
District Attorney Lee Allen.
�September 15
GPAs (Grade Point Averages)
are on the rise at ECU. Over the
past five years the average GPA of
undergraduate students has risen
steadily each semester. In 1993,
the average GPA was a 2.56. The
latest figures from the Department
of Institutional Research and
Planning shows that 1997's GPA
average was 2.7.
�September 17
Steven Cerutti, an ECU foreign
language professor, was charged for
obtaining a controlled substance by
fraud. The arrest report said
Cerutti used a forged prescription
to obtain Hydrocodone at the CVS
on Memorial Drive.
�September 22
A 19-year-old freshman report-
ed being raped in Garret Hall in
the room of an acquaintance. The
rape allegedly occurred between
6 JO and 7 p.m but was not report-
ed to the ECU Police Department
until the morning. No charges have
yet been made against anyone in
the case.
�September 29
The north side and the new
upper deck of Dowdy-Ficklen sta-
dium was filled for the first night of
Festival '98. There was a perfor-
mance by Ricky Skaggs and a
speech from Franklin Graham.
The evening ended when Graham
called for "everyone who is unsure
of their place in heaven" to come
onto the field.
�October 22
Following the murder of gay
University of Wyoming student
Matthew Sheppard, ECU added
sanctions to prejudiced lawbreak-
ers. "If a student at ECU commits
a hate crime, this is very serious,
and as such, we do more than other
schools said Ronald Speier, Dean
of Students.
�November 10
Internationally recognized
human rights activist and 19
Nobel Peace Prize winner Jose
Ramos-Horta delivered Phi Kappa
Phi's 1998 lecture. The lecture
entitled "Peacemaking: The
Power of Nonviolence was free
and open to the public
Millennium bug soon to affect us
Entiretuition prepares
for the Y2K problem
Amy Sheridan
niws EDITOR
Many people do not fear the
Millennium Bug, that glitch in
computer programming that
threatens to shut down civilization
at the stroke of midnight Dec. 31,
1999.
However, there are many peo-
ple who do fear that the dreaded
Y2K will appear at the brink of the
millennium.
"All Americans owe it to them-
selves and their families to consid-
er the implication of the year 2000
computer problem says Adam
Kalplan, editor of Westergaard
Year 2000, an organization that has
been studying Y2K since 1995.
"We tend to dismiss things we're
uncomfortable with, but in this
case, there's no time to waste
Some experts call the problem
the "physics of unintended conse-
quences The problem referred
to is this: at the mm of the third
millennium, millions of micro-
processors running the world's
technological infrastructure (all
programmed with year dates con-
sisting of just two digits) may inter-
pret Jan. 1, 2000 as Jan. 1, 1900.
This will confuse computer sys-
tems and begin sweeping inaccu-
rate data, or, simply quit
Our computers will run perfect-
ly this way until the '00 mark when
SEE Y2K PAGE 3
Recommended questions students
should ask their financial institutions
CciWycHjexp�ntomeinaneasy-to-ui
your company b doing to address Its year 2000 compfance issues?
�What isyour timetable for tbdng any r�nsrripBart systems?
WIB you be informing me of or Y2K test results?
�How wHI your efforts of the Year 2000 issue affect me and my
account?
And i
professioi
Bbtems,
aaVHaVaH
Technology expanded to meet needs of students
Campus prepares for
the new millennium
Craig D. Ramey
STAFF WRITER
As the millennium approaches, the
ECU campus is expanding to meet
the changing needs of students in
an age of technology.
Projects worth a total of $180
million are in the works. These will
hopefully make ECU more appeal-
ing to future students.
"The most challenging thing for
us was to design the new Science
and Technology Building said
Bruce Flyc, director of Facilities,
Planning and Construction.
This building covering 259,000
square feet, contains three class-
rooms and cost $58 million.
Interdepartmental research will be
conducted there, and chemistry
and biology classes will meet there.
The building should be completed
in five years.
The building, which is at the
end of the design phase, is project-
ed to be the largest and most
expensive building on the main
campus. Known as Science and
Grads
staying
inNC
Increase in new jobs
keeps alumni in area
Jason Merrill
staff writer
ECU's southeastern location may
contribute more than just favor-
able weather and Southern charm
to graduates planning to remain in
this region after graduation.
According to Dr. James
Westmoreland, director of Career
Services at ECU, graduates can
expect a bright future in the job
market of tomorrow.
Westmoreland cited studies that
indicated a 19.3 percent increase
in jobs for new graduates in the
southeast, and he contrasted this
with a 21.8 percent decrease in
job opportunities for new gradu-
ates on the West Coast These are
very pleasing statistics for gradu-
ates who plan to enter the job
market in this area.
As far as ECU graduates are
concerned, only seven percent of
the class of 1997 and five percent
of the class of 1996 were unem-
ployed and stilt seeking employ-
ment within six months of gradu-
ation. Westmoreland stated chat
there are more and more opportu-
nities for ECU graduates in many
fields including electronics, com-
puters, education, physical then-
Technology Building, it will house
the Chemistry Department along
with the School of Industry and
Technology.
State legislators will get an
overview of the project as they tour
the site to decide about the funding
that may be provided toward the
construction of the facility. ECU
hopes to receive some of the $52
million from the General Assembly
near the end of the August session.
Already the school has received
$6.2 million for sight preparation
and planning, but is still in need of
much more in order to start con-
struction.
"Lab space is limited
Chancellor Eakin said. 'To serve
students well we need more lab
space. The Science and
Technology Building should do the
trick. It will be one and a half times
the size of the Rec Center
Improvements will also be
made on the Speight Building. In
some classrooms, professors will be
able to use laptops to project com-
puter information onto overhead
screens, providing a more efficient
teaching tool than transparencies or
chalkboards.
Plans are in motion for the new
dining hall on West Campus which
will feature a more relaxed market-
place type setting where students
will enjoy food that is prepared
before their eyes. Developers are
currently planning the dining hall
which will be two stories hign and
eventually take the place of
Mendenhall dining area.
Efforts have also been focused
toward the traffic problems near
campus. New parking lots are pro-
posed for the north end of Ficklen
Stadium. This will provide 600 new
parking spaces. Existing gravel
parking lots will be paved and have
emergency phones and lights
added.
Finally, renovations on Jarvis
and Jones are planned. Jarvis will
receive new air conditioning and
more modem bathrooms. Jones will
get a new sprinkler system and
have air conditioning added. Belk
will be destroyed so that College
Drive can be extended to meet
14th Street.
(25J
www.c
Tolerance
is not enough.
Dr. Martin Luther King Jrs
dream was that one day blacks
and whites would not merely
tolerate each other, but live
together in mutual love and
respect.
He admitted the challenges of
this dream, "It is pretty difficult to
like some people. Like is senti-
mental and it is pretty difficult to
like someone bombing your home;
it is pretty difficult to like some-
body threatening your children; it
is difficult to like congressmen
who spend all of their time trying
to defeat civil rights. But Jesus
says love them, and love is
greater than like
What motivated him were these
words from Jesus: "Love your
enemies, do good to those who
hate you, bless those who curse
you, pray for those who abuse
you. If you love those who love
you, what credit is that to you?
But love your enemies, and do
good and your reward will be
great, and you will be sons of the
Most High; for he is kind to the
ungrateful and selfish
With a commitment to love
even his enemies, Dr. King led an
historic civil rights movement
without any violence
or vengeance.
As he said, We must be
concerned aboutthe sacred-
ness of all human life. Every man
is somebody because he is a
child of God
Why Is tolerance not enough?
You can tolerate people without
loving them. But loving them is
what will defeat racism.
This year in honor of Dr. King's
birthday and Black History Month
we're offering the article "Qlve
the Dream New Life For your
free copy call 1-800-236-9238.
For your free article call
1-800-236-9238
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Timdiy, J.nmrv 18 1999
news
Tkt East Caratiiiaa
;nts
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tissues?
stems?
�and my
nobteros.
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of Ficklen
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ing gravel
d and have
md lights
on Jarvis
Jams will
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38
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IFC Spring 1999 Fraternity

Rush
Jan. 25-29, 1999 7-10pm
bids extended after 9pm Friday, Jan. 29
AIO Alpha Sigma Phi - Delta Zeta House
AIO Delta Sigma Phi-510 E. 10th St.
AX Delta Chi - AAFI House
0X Theta Chi - 312 E. 11th St.
KA Kappa Alpha - 500 E. 11th St.
KX Kappa Sigma - 700 E. 10th St.
AXA Lambda Chi Alpha - 500 Elizabeth
nKA Pi Kappa Alpha- Sigma Sigma Sigma House
EIKO Pi Kappa Phi- 803 Hooker Rd.
nAO Pi Lambda Phi- 410 Elizabeth St.
IAE Sigma Alpha Epsilon - Zeta Tau Alpha House
IOE Sigma Phi Epsilon - 505 E. 5th St.
IN Sigma Nu - 501 E. 11th St.
Zn Sigma Pi - 506 E. 10th St.
TKE Tau Kappa Epsilon - 951 E. 10th St.
OBI Phi Beta Sigma - 800 W. 5th St.
OKT Phi Kappa Tau- 409 Elizabeth St.
OKF Phi Kappa Psi- Alpha Phi
Friendships are
common,
but Brotherhood
lasts a lifetime.
Go Greek i
iB lkJ ii!
Graduate school an
important tool for future
Sixty masters degree
programs offered
Nina M. Dry
FEATURES EDITOR
Higher education plays an impor-
tant role in a person's path to his or
her ideal career. But in this day and
age, it seems as if a four year
degree no longer cuts it.
Many students realize that grad-
uate school is almost necessary so
they may stay in the running for
competitive occupations.
According to Randy Gilland, an
ECU grad student studying coun-
selor education, grad school can
prepare students for their future.
"Graduate school is the best
way to gain that extra education
and experience Gilland said.
Since he graduated from ECU
with an undergrad in Psychology,
Gilland contemplates the differ-
ences between both schools.
"Maturity plays a definite fac-
tor Gilland said. "I'm more seri-
ous and put more time into my
work. As a grad student, we do all
we can instead of just trying to get
by
One of the major differences
between graduate and undergrad is
the course work load. Gilland said
that in grad school it is more
involved.
"The classes are more focused
and demanding Gilland said.
"That's probably why students
don't need so many hours
According to Gilland, the cours-
es aren't so much reading from text
books and listening to the profes-
sors lecture, but more research
based.
"The courses are more
focused Gilland said. "We (cam
from other students as well.
Professors are also more relaxed,
but they expect graduate work
Besides taking centralized
courses, some grad students get the
opportunity to obtain hands on
experience in their field. As a
counselor education major, Gilland
applied for assistanccships to
obtain more experience in his field
and was hired by undergraduate
studies to teach a reading course.
He was also hired by Dr. Brian
Haynes to work in minority affairs.
"I act as a liaison between Dr.
Haynes' office and the Native
American organizations around
campus Gilland said.
With both his courses and his
Sfl GRAD. PAGE 4
Y2K
continued from page 2
serious electronic confusion starts
and the machines, programmed to
assume the number "19" before
every two-digit date, will start
repeating the century. Basically,
none of us will have been born yet.
Meaning that on a small scale, cred-
it cards will have expired and no
one will be able to collect Social
Security. Though on the up side,
the IRS will not be able to levy
taxes because they didn't exist in
1900.
Scared yet? The government is
definitely concerned and so are any
number of other industries ranging
from computing to banking to trav-
el. An entirely new industry has
sprung up to worry about the Y2K
problem and work on a cure.
There is a team here at ECU
working on the Millennium Bug
for all of the computers on the
ECU network.
"ECU has been working dili-
gently on resolving the issues about
the Y2K problem. We have not
only been working on financial sys-
tems, but on personal computers
within campus also said Leon
Gipson, applications analysis pro-
grammer.
Vice Chancellor Richard Brown
has made sure that a large amount
of money has been put forth into
making sure that the Personal
Computers (PC's) in the labs have
been cured of the Millennium Bug.
"We have been working on this
for years and the student data sys-
tem was all done in 1995 said
Don Dunlap, Director of Software
Development Services. "Some of
our financial systems we are still
working on an will be done in
March
"We feel very comfortable that
we will resolve this issue before the
given time period said Gipson.
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4 Twtfay. JwHiwy 11.1889
news
ThlEsit Carolinian
Grad
cominuid from pigi 3
apprenticeships, Gilliand's free
time is quite limited.
"I didn't expect it to take up as
much of my time, but it is worth
it Gilland said. "I am definitely
more prepared by just the experi-
ence I have gotten from teaching
Besides its undergrad programs,
ECU's graduate school programs
offer a variety to students who wish
to continue their education after
four years at a university.
"ECU has 60 masters programs
and 10 PH.D programs said Gail
Pinkham, manager of graduate
admissions. "Not many schools
offer such a variety of programs
According to Pinkham, when
applying for grad school the most
important things applicants can do
are: read all of the directions on the
application, make all of the dead-
lines and get in touch with the
graduate director of the program
desired.
"Depending on the program,
some have earlier deadlines than
others Pinkham said. "That's
why it is very important to know
when they are in order to get your
application in on time
Pinkham believes it is important
to talk to the graduate director so a
students name can become more
familiar to the graduate director.
"I always encourage students to
get in touch with their graduate
director and let them know who
you are, that you arc applying for
their department and that you are
quite interested Pinkham said.
"This way they will have an idea of
who you are if your name comes up
again
Applicants also must go through
numerous requirements before
being accepted into the program,
graduate school exams known as ,
GREs, which are similar to high
school SATs are among the differ-
ent requirements.
There are different forms of this
test for the numerous programs:
MAT, which is a test that consists
of 100 analogies; GMAT, which is
the exam taken by business stu-
dents; are some of the challenging
requirements graduate hopefuls
must first pass before admittance.
Others such as the TOEFL
exam, are given to international
students wishing to enroll in ECU
programs.
"It is for) students coming
from foreign countries who were
not taught in English Pinkham said.
The GREs can be taken here at
ECU. If you're looking for a little
more assistance before you take
the GRE, there are prep courses
offered at the Student Life
Research Assessment and Testing
office.
Once all of the information is
received at the office of graduate
admissions, Pinkham said it is
keyed into the computer so that
the graduate department
has immediate access to a
student's file.
Q
SS
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B

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53
College of Arts and Sciences
Anthropology
Biology
Biology: MolecularBiotechnology
Chemistry
Computer Science
Economics
English
Geography
Geology
History
History: Maritime History and Nautical
Archaeology
Mathematics
Physics
Psychology: General
Psychology: Clinical
Psychology: School
Public Administration
Sociology
School of Allied Health Sciences
Communication Sciences and
Disorders
Environmental Health
Occupational Therapy
Physical Therapy
Rehabilitation Studies
School of Art
Art
School of Business
Accounting
Business Administration
School of Education
Adult Education
Counselor Education
Educational Leadership
Elementary and Middle Grades
Education
Instructional Technology Specialist�
Computers
Library Science
Reading Education
Science Education
Special Education
Vocational Education
School of Health and Human
Performances
Health Education .
Exercise and Sport Science
Recreation and Leisure Services
Administration
School of Human Environmental Science
Child Development and Family
Relations
Marriage and Family Therapy
Nutrition and Dietetics
School of Industry and Technology
Industrial Technology
School of Music
�Concentrations in Accompanying,
Church Music, ComposmonAThcory, Music
Education, Music Technology, Music
Therapy, Performance, and Pedagogy
School of Nursing
Nursing
School of Social Work and Criminal
Justice
Social Work
Criminal Justice
5 Tmttfty, Ji
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HOME OF THE "BIG DISCOUNT"
Muniinfwear
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�Etoruc
root Joy
The Biology Graduate student
Association is collecting clean
winter coatsclothes to donate
to the Greenville Homeless
Shelter. Coats can be placed in
the drop-box in the Howell
Science Complex lobby.
Help the homeless
donate a coat
BGSA
Coat Drive
January 18-22, 1999
SPRING BREAK '99 � PANAMA CITY BEACH, FLORIDA
It 8 all good!
rv��9 Illustrated �pmt
And this Spring Break,
its all here
Coll us toll free
1-800-224-GULF
Located next door to
Spinnaker & La Vela, the
Boardwalk Beach Resort Is
Spring Break Headquarters
for Panama City Beach,
Florida And as host to Si's
Beach Club '99, you'll be
immersed in the center of all
the non stop party action!
So party with thousands,
but sleep with the best!
INCLUDES:
Gulf front
accommodation!
Martin Luther King
Candlelight Vigil March
Monday Jan.18
6 pm @ Belk Residence Hall
ECU Gospel Choir Presents:
"An Evening With the ECU
Gospil Choir & special guest
Richard Smallwood"
Saturday Jan.23
8 pm @ Wright Auditorium.
Spades Tournament
Mon & Tuesday
Jan.25&26
6 pm @ MSC Multi-
purpose Room
$2 registration fee on site
Hendrix Films:
BuhHiv
Thurs Sunday
Jan.21-24
8pm@ MSC-
Hendrix Theatre
Sundance Cinema:
Sivwgtrs
Wednesday
Jan.27
8 pm @ msc Hendrix
Theartre
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Host to Sports
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Wev
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.252.32a.e0O4,
e RlWtM.�
Mooooooove on over to greener pastures at
Eastbrook & Village Green!
The cows have come home, so why don't you?
NOW LEASING FOR SUMMERFALL 1999!
Call or visit us today!
Eastbrook 4 Village Green Apartments
204 Eastbrook Drive
Greenville, NC 27858
752-5100






5 Tuesday, January 19. 1989
news
The East Carolinian
: Cerellaian
:r so that
partmcnt
s to a
Science
Family
ts
anying,
Music
Music
riminal
Get PiorCO
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eyebrow
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Tuesday ThuRsday: 19 p.m FridAy: 1 10 p.m Saturday: 12-10pjn.
CALL US! 756-0600
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
TATTOOING BY AWARD WINNING ARTISTS!
From downtown, go straight down Dickinson Avenue
Extension, located at 4685 US Hwy. 13, Greenville.
Who said you couldn't find
a meal for a $1 anymore?
Beginning Wednesday, January 20th,
at the First Pentecostal Holiness Church In Greenville, you can join
us for a time of food, fun and fellowship. Every Wednesday at
5:45P we will be serving a meal - and it's only a BUCK! All college
students are welcome. After the meal we will have Cutting Edge
Youth Church to feed your soul. So come and bring a friendll We're
located off Evans Street on 100 Plaza Drive - behind Overton's
Sports Center or call 766-3315.
Don't have a buck, COME ANYWAYI We'll aea you therel
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Call Carolina Pregnancy Center 757-0003
209-B South Evans Street (downtown near Courthouse)
4
f
it
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Seafood &
OysterBai
BEER & WINE
PERMITS
BROWN BAGGING
All of above served with choice of
two sides: Baked Potato, French Fries,
Slaw, String Beans or Applesauce.
Peck of Steamed Oysters
with free crab leg cluster
or 14 lb. steamed shrimp
Fried Frog Legs $3.95
East Carolina University
School of Business
cAitouNA �ff'ce �f Professional Programs
wnwrrO 252-328-6377
Hurry, classes begin February 9
Future
continued from pegs 2
py and conttruction engineering.
He also said that these additional
opportunities, in conjunction with
the reputation of ECU students as
employees with a strong sense of
work ethics, are responsible for
the good placement of ECU
graduates in an increasingly
competitive job market.
As career opportunities
become increasingly special-
ized, many ECU graduates
continue their education in
graduate school. Fourteen
percent of ECU graduates
from the class of 1997 became
full-time graduate students,
and an additional six percent
went on to graduate school on
a part-time basis.
Westmoreland stated that
despite the common miscon-
ception that ECU is primarily
a party school, ECU's alumni
place very well in graduate
school; some graduates have
even gone on to graduate
schools as prestigious as
Harvard and Stanford.
Overall, Westmoreland
emphasized that maintaining a
good GPA is more important than
the major course of study. He
feels that employers look at col-
lege degrees as an indication that
an applicant is capable of learning
to perform the complicated tasks
that are required in today's job
market He also urged students to
come to Career Services as soon as
possible in order to speak with a
counselor. They have thousands
of job listings arranged by both
major and employer, as well as
information about the degrees
offered at various graduate
schools.
Increasing numbers of students are staying
in Eastern North Carolina after graduation.
PHOTO BY MICHAEL SMITH
guidance on the career and gradu-
ate school choosing processes.H
Their building is located at the,
corner of Fifth and Jarvis streets
across from the art building. More
information can be found on thel
web at http:www.ecu.educareer.
Cubbie's Downtown
STUDENT SPECIALS
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321-1714 ,






Twrtty. Jutwy 19. I9M
news
The East Carolinian
Internet becomes daily
routine for most students
i
Distance learning now
available on campus
SUSANNE MlLENKBVICH
STAFF WRITE
Throughout the past decade, the
Internet has become a way of life
for many people as it offers a world
of information that is readily avail-
able.
As the millennium approaches,
the Internet will continue to be a
part of the dairy routine and will
become even more prevalent in the
lives of the students, faculty, and
staff at ECU.
ECU's web site offers the com-
munity much information about
the university as well as access to
records. Registration may be com-
pleted over the Internet, and
recently courses were made avail-
able to be taken over the Internet
for college credit at a small price.
ECU signed a three-year con-
tract in 1998 with Real Education,
Inc. for $30,000 to expand the
online courses already offered by
the university, and a Distant
Education and Extension advisory
board was established to advise the
university on decisions concerning
the online courses.
The distant learning program
allows people worldwide to take
ECU courses and receive credit for
completed courses through the
Internet.
Five new courses have already
been made available through the
Internet for off-campus students.
The courses include ELEC 4505,
Internet Tools, ASIP 3220,
Business Communications, EDUC
3200, Introduction to American
Education, RCLS 2000
Introduction to Leisure Services,
and ITEC 3292 Industrial Safety.
The courses were chosen from a
list of 10 and based on the potential
audience, the availability to off
campus and on campus students,
and because of the amount of time
the faculty had to prepare the
courses.
The five new courses may only
be accessed on the Real Education,
Inc. home page where anyone
interested in taking a course can
choose from a number of courses
offered by universities throughout
the nation.
ECU has also begun creation of
Internet courses that to be available
on the university home page.
Dr. Richard Ringeisen, vice
chancellor of Academic Affairs,
appointed a task force of faculty
and administration members to
work on developing those online
courses.
The content of all courses to be
offered on the Real Education, Inc.
and ECU web sites will be provid-
ed by ECU faculty, who will super-
vise the academic and curriculum
matters.
"Several faculty members are
working this spring and summer to
develop more online courses
Ringeisen said,
By creating the online courses
ECU has joined other schools such
as UNC-Chapci Hill and NC State
in the age of technology with much
success as we approach the new
millennium.
"Online courses really arc work-
ing for ECU Ringeisen said, "We
will be seeing a large increase in
online courses in the future
For more information about the
distant learning courses, you can
visit Real Education's web site at
http:www.RealEd.com.
GROUP THERAPY1�
4 PEOPLE
4 SHOTS
1 PITCHER
1 LOW PRICE
SPORTS PAD
FORM!
EVERY TUESDAY NIGHT
8 & 8-BALL POOL
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STARTS AT 10:30pm
CASH POT
We are currently accepting applications for seasonal employment
Catalog sales positions include taking customer calls, placing orders for
merchandise and catalogs, and assisting customers with general product information.
Successful candidates will have basic keyboarding skills, demonstrate an outgoing per-
sonality, positive attitude, and previous telephone andor customer service
experience. Flexible scheduling, including evenings and Saturdays. No Sunday work. Paid
two week training period conducted each weekdayevening from 5:00 P.M9:O0 p.m.
work a part time schedule now. (15-20 hours per week), hAI time schedule in the summer
Priority given to students not enrolled in summer school.
Screening for Distribution Center positions starts 3-1-99.
Employment applications accepted daily at our Corporate Center Office. 111 Red Banks Road. FOE
Feel the energy1.
PWSE
�Stamori Square
752-5239
call today!
T
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
LOCATION: 953 E. 10TH ST. (BOTTOM OF COLLEGE HILL AT EAST END OF CAMPUS)
WELCOME,
�prin4 Semester 9tudent$H
FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL US 757-1991
MASS SCHEDULE;
Sun:11:30am and 8:30pm
Wed: 5:30pm
ALL MASSES ARE AT THE CENTER
Fr. Paul Vaeth Chaplain A Campus Minister - Fa more inhumation oioul llw� ond othef pfOjroms, at m vrs� doily belwwn 8:30nm and 11pm.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
1998-99 PINNACLE HONORARY INDUCTEES
The Pinnacle is a non-traditional student honorary which recognizes seniors over 25 years old who
have earned over a 3.000 grade point average. Honorees must also be actively involved iii at least
three extracurricular activities outside of the classroom including, volunteer service or involvement
with a student, community or church organization. The 1998-99 ECU Chapter Inductees were:
Allison Meredith DeBerry Allen
Betty W. Burnette
Marion Cooper-Jones
Margaret H. Dean-Harmon
Vonda Robinson Godette
Judith Grace Harrison
Michelle Hussey Hill
Samantha Home
Amanda Johnson-Eckles
Linda S. Klund
Warren Carlos Moore
Mark Allan Snyder
Patricia Ann Warner
Todd F. Wiggs
Tracy A. Britto
Edward M. Clifton
Debbie C. Crosby
Robin E. Fogerty
Sharon S. Hardison
Michelle LeBlanc Hayes
Jennifer Gwynn Hobbs
Katherine W. James
Laura Kay Jones
Tondrea Davis Leach
Sally L. MorinitI
Wendy K. Sturgill
Barbara D. Whitehead
Natalie Johnson Wilson
Sammy B. Brooks
Larry M. Collins
William Herman Dams
Jeffrey T. Fuller
Bobby Hardy ,
Vickie Rogers Herring, .
James Thomas Scott Hopkins
Margo Faye Johnson
Marjorie Anne Kinney
Debrah Diane Marshburn
Victoria Marie Rudd
Luke Van Eyk Jr.
Vivian Whitfield-Daniels
Margaret Linda Zealy
f
East Carolina Paintball
s5 mask rental
$5 gun rental
s8 field fee
�2C0Bfee
$6 for 100 paintballs
Take Hwy 33 West from Greenville, 8 miles
past the airport. Turn Right at the Belvoir
Cornerstop, on to Porter Rd. Go 2.5 miles
.and turn left at the yellow signs. Park
in front of our Army tent.
10 Student Discount Call
OPEN EVERY SATB. SUN. 11:00AM TILL 5:30PM 9 C
OR MAKE RESERVATIONS DURING THE WEEK W "T
Checkyour phone book for coupons
WWW.ECPB.COtVI
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DON'T MAKE THE MISTAKE
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NEAR CAMPUS
UNIf PLAN
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-440-5378
As technolc
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L
ft
� helpofcomf
E Programs si






7 Twjiy, Jmuiry 18. 1889
news
Tht Ent Carolinian
"IP
University keeps Up Minority student groups grow
with technology
Groups flourished in
pastjkxyears
School benefits from
computer advancement
Peter Dawyot
assistant news editor
As technology continues to propel
to new and unforeseen places,
ECU continues, like many other
schools in the system, to try to stay
on top of the ever-changing
advancements in ways that may
prove beneficial to the school.
Lisred as one of the top 25 most
wired schools in the nation last
year, ECU continues to build pro-
grams that encourage advance-
ments in television, computer, dig-
ital, and even sound techniques
that have made it even easier to
gain access to some of the top new
technological toys on the market.
New gadgets range from light-
weight computers, cellular phones
no bigger than a index card, along
with VCR type machines which
play video's on a CD format known
as DVD player are among the
many new inventions which have
recently became the next wave of
the future of technology.
ECU also has found themselves
in the middle of the technology
frenzy.incorporating new teaching
techniques with new advance-
ments from the digital communi-
cations world. Many classes now
rely heavily on the aspects and
help of computers and the internet.
Programs such as ones from the
Students working diligently in an on-campus computer lab.
PHOTO BY MICHAEL SMITH
medical program have been initiat-
ed to help others from far away
towns relieve medical attention.
The telemedical program allows
doctors to view patients who live in
other cities through the help of the
internet and the new computer
technology initiated here at ECU.
"Technology is increasing the
access, as well as the quality of
health care in North Carolina said
Lori Maiolo, training center coordi-
nator.
To date, the program has com-
pleted 3,000 consultations in 34
different specialties of medicine
through its REACH-TV network
at 12 clinical sites. The technical
team at ECU integrated advanced
telecommunications technologies
into a uniform network, creating
the most flexible telemedical net-
work in the country.
Students have also found them-
selves interacting with the new
advancements, bringing more per-
sonal computers and laptops to
school every semester. Western
Carolina University already
requires students to bring comput-
ers to school, a condition that many
other colleges in the state plan to
adopt within the next few years.
ECU also plans to begin con-
struction soon on a new building, to
be finished by fall of 2002, to house
the Chemistry Department and
other technology-related depart-
ments. Plans for the finish of the
building could come possibly as
soon as the fall semester of 2002.
The construction comes on the
heels of a University of North
Carolina System consultant's
choice of Flanagan as one of the
two worst academic facilities in the
system.
Many have found themselves
wondering what will be next for
the upcoming years of the technol-
ogy wave. Experts predict faster,
better quality, more lightweight
computers with price tags that may
soon rival those of today's personal
computers.
Rachael Higdon
staff writer
Minority Student Organizations
have shown increasing growth and
will continue to support diversity
on campus through the year 2000.
In the past five years such
groups as the NAACP, the Black
Student Union, the Native
Amcricam fraternity Epsilon Chi
Nu, and the Native American
sorority Sigma Omicron Epsilon
have been formed and have flour-
ished, gaining members and sup-
port every year.
Campus leaders, such as the
Director of Minority Student
Affairs Brian Haynes, believe that
the need for specific culturally
based groups is growing at univer-
sities across the United State at
the enrollment includes a broader
ethnic base. These types of groups
will multiply in the coming yean.
Haynes also thinks that America
will continue to shift from a society
based on one culture to one that
embraces all cultures. When
groups are formed to identify a spe-
cific segment of the student popu-
lation, that segment is able to join
the mainstream and use its voice.
According to Haynes, in order to
live and work in a diverse society,
students need to become more
aware of their own personal preju-
dices and take responsibility for
addressing bias and discrimination
that they encounter. To be suc-
cessful in overcoming stereotypes,
we need to be able to understand
and avoid common misconcep-
tions.
Along with becoming more
dominant in the university system,
persons of color will also be the
majority population by the year
2025. The face of the US is chang-
ing and so will the workplace and
the educational environment.
This will increase the need to gain
respect for all genders and races.
The growth and success of minori-
ty student organizations at ECU
gives the campus a positive out-
look toward the year 2000.
"We all need to work to gain a
better understanding of diversity
Haynes said.
The International Student
Program is looking toward its goal
for the future: growth. Although
fluctuating over the past five years,
growth has been slow and steady,
and the hope is that the new mil-
lennium will bring more interna-
tional students and an increase in
the exchange program. To achieve
this goal, they are making more
directed efforts at recruiting and
following up more consistently.
Nation
continued from page 1
one hand tied behind their backs
he said.
Some conservative Republicans
have attacked hate-crime legisla-
tion because of their inclusion of
gays and lesbians as protected vic-
tims. That stance was challenged
in October when Wyoming college
student Matthew Shcpard was tied
to a fence with severe head trauma
in nearly-freezing temperatures.
He lay in a coma on full life-sup-
port until his body gave out on
Oct. 12.
Though the two men and two
women charged with the crime
claim robbery as a motive, gay
rights advocates say otherwise, cry-
ing for attention to the matter,
holding candle-light vigils and
demanding inclusion of gays and
lesbians into hate crime laws.
With the sharp-looking I-Macs
selling like hotcakes and AOL's
acquisition of Netscape, not to
mention the impending Y2K bug
moving to the forefront of techno-
logical concern, 1998 saw a great
deal of activity on the computer
front.
The most publicized event was
the Microsoft trial. Several soft-
ware companies backed the Justice
Department in accusing Bill Gates,
of running a monopoly on comput-
er software, pointing to Microsoft's
80 to 90 percent command of oper-
ating systems as evidence that the
company has used nasty tactics to
get ahead.
Microsoft, however, has
responded by remarking the
Netscape-AOL deal and Sun
Microsystems' Java technology as a
new wave of competition in an
ever-changing market.
While Minnesota elected for-
mer mayor, Navy Seal and profes-
sional wrestler, libertarian Jesse,
"The Body" Ventura as governor
Mark Maguire beat out Sammy!
Sosa for the new home run record!
and the NBA strike raged on
America lost Frank Sonatra, Phil!
Hartman, Lloyd Bridges and!
Sonny Bono.
As 1999 commences, the econo
my is up and the government is!
stalled and Y2K is on its way.
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VTtiitfty. January 18. 1999
features
The East Carolinian
Rising Star
Ttmrrm
19951996 season
Destry Rides Again
� Tartuffe
19961997 season
� Big River
�JB.
� Lysistrata
19971998 season
�� The Mystery of
Edwin Drood
� Landscape of the
Body
� Mother Hicks
Aspiring actor and dedicated student, Jim Bray, gives an outstanding performance in the Theatre Arts production of "Landscape of the Body
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU PLAYHOUSE WEBSITE
I im Bray may possibly
j Tin list of elite alumni
Nina M. Dry
FEATURES EDITOR
er the years, ECU has seen its
fair share of celebrity alumni. MTV
jJVicc President Mark Kemp, actress
! Sandra Bullock and
screenwriter Kevin
Williamson are among
tthem. This year, ECU
Ipenior Jim Bray will go
Jim with the hope of join-
ing their ranks.
Bray is known for his
comedic ventures and
'the
lability to steal the show
iwith song and dance.
� Upon his arrival at ECU Jim Bray
'in the fall of 1995, he
j Wasted no time in get-
icing involved with the ECU
! Playhouse.
Bray's first role came to him in
production "Destry Rides
Again" as a member of the chorus
jinscmble. His talent was recog-
jhized even at this early point in his
career because he was at first called
back for one of the lead roles. Bray
'said that even though he was disap-
Einted in not getting the lead, he
ilizes now that he was not ready
such a part at the time,
j! Other productions Bray has per-
Jformed in include "Tartuffe "Big
jjtiver "I.B�" "Lysistrata "The
Mystery of Edwin Drood
f Landscape of the Body "Mother
licks "Cabaret "Mother
urage and a workshop entitled
Personals He has also participat-
I in many directing projects.
"In directing projects, one must
I Che people for the productions,
build the sets, do the lights, etc
Bray said. "It's a great opportunity
to gain experience
Out of all the productions Bray
has currently performed in,
"Cabaret" has to be his favorite.
According to Bray, the part of the
MC was quite challenging.
"I think I was ready for a role
like that Bray said. "I feel that I
was mature enough to handle a role
like that
Bray said he realized that if he
had taken on a role like
this his freshman year, it
would just have been
"Jim Bray making funny
faces, trying to steal the
show instead of being the
person
Bray said he wants to
be in roles that challenge
him, proving that he can
do other things instead of
being type-cast in the
loud mouth, outgoing
roles. He is looking for-
ward to auditioning for the upcom-
ing Playhouse productions, "Our
Town Hot I Baltimore" and
whatever workshops come up.
As a child Bray always had a love
of acting. While growing up in
Winston-Salem, NC, he was what
many people would consider a
"ham
"When you're young, TV is in
your face all of the time Bray said.
"I had dreams of being on TV
shows like 'Family Ties' and hav-
ing my picture all over teen maga-
zines. There was always something
about it that definitely intrigued
me when I was little
Although Bray took acting class-
es at a community theater through-
out his grade school years, he was-
n't really into it when he first began
high school. According to Bray, he
thought the people in theater at
Mt. Tabor High School were
"weird
Upon the persuasion of a friend,
Bray decided to take a theater class,
where he met many interesting
characters his freshman year. This
still did not increase his appeal to
join theater, as he joined the
track team in the spring.
During this time Mt. Tabor
was presenting the musical
"Grease Bray's drama teacher
offered him the part of Eugene,
but he declined.
"I was running track, and it
was more important to me at the
time Bray said. "1 now regret
that 1 didn't do it
He did continue to take the-
ater classes, however.
During his sophomore year,
Bray joined the cross country
team, but he did not enjoy him-
self. As soon as cross country sea-
son was over, he went back to
what had been his calling all
along, and never ran for his
school again.
From that moment on, Bray
spent all of his time in the the-
ater department. While acting,
he also did a lot of the pre-pro-
duction work such as building
sets, working the lights, and
became the stage manager for
one of the plays.
"Doing all of the behind the
scenes work taught us the
responsibility behind what we
wanted to do Bray said.
It was during his senior year
that all of the hard work paid off
as he received his first lead role in
the musical production "Damn
Yankees where he played Mr.
Applegate.
According to Bray, his drama
teacher suggested he take up musi-
cal theater as a major once he came
to college. At first Bray thought it
w uld be better to do just straight
acting instead of musical theater.
"Musical theater isn't in your
face all the time like TV and films
are Bray said. "You can't see a
Broadway show in your living
room
He finally decided to heed the
schools at the audition Bray said.
"I got called back by eight, but
ECU wasn't one of them
Bray spoke with the ECU repre-
sentative who told him to come
visit the school.
Jim Bray steals the show as he performs as the MC in "Cabaret
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU PLAYHOUSE WEBSITE
suggestion of his teacher, and major
in musical theater and minor in
communications "to have some-
thing to fall back on" if the acting
thing didn't happen.
After looking at eight different
schools, Bray started going to schol-
arship auditions, one of which was
held in New Bern, NC.
"There were 10 different
Upon his arrival, Bray spoke
with chairperson, John Shearin, and
the musical teacher at the time who
told him to audition for the produc-
tion he would be putting on in the
fall and to make sure he was seen
around the department.
After graduating from high
school in 1995, he chose to attend
ECU. According to Bray, ECU is
one of the best theater schools in
the state among the state support-
ed schools.
Bray recognizes that a lot of his
success came from the support of
the faculty and his friends.
"Dr. Don Bichn has
been the biggest impact on
me Bray said. "He was a
great teacher who support-
ed me and taught me to
trust myself.
"Friends are really
important. They have been
one of the best things for
me. They've helped me
through many times. I
don't know what I would
have done if it weren't for
my friends in the theater
department
After graduation Bray
plans to do some summer
stock theater and in either
August or September move
to New York.
"I want to go up there
and excel Bray said. "I
want to affect people the
way I am affected when I
see a movie. I want to
enable them to have some
sort of connection with
what I am doing
For those who are inter-
ested in theater, Bray
leaves these final words of
wisdom:
"Audition for every
show. Don't let one show
pass you by that you don't
audition for Bray said. "Also
make sure what you are doing here
is because you love it, not just
because you think it is some sort of
cool thing
A
j






9 Tueidiy, January 19. 1999
features
Thl Elit CaroliniM
Yoga becomes popular
new exercise trend
Many prepare for career world1
Classes offered at
Recreation Center
Nina M. Dry
FEATURES EDITOR
Erica Sixes
staff writer
Yoga is a system of exercises for
attaining bodily or mental control
and well-being. It's more than just
a bunch of pretzel positions that
supposedly help you lose weight; it
is a great stress relieving technique
and is a growing trend leading into
the millennium. The recreational
center at ECU offers Yoga to inter-
ested students.
"Yoga courses were introduced
to the Rec Center in the Spring of
'97, right when the facility opened
up said Kari Brown, director of fit-
ness at the Rec Center. "With Yoga
being on an up trend, (he demand
has been going up. This had been
our strongest year
Aside from being rated one of
the best fitness programs you can
do without bouncing around and
working up a sweat, it offers a
plethora of other health benefits.
Yoga improves your flexibility,
helping you feel more relaxed
(which is especially good around
exam time) and also reduces the
likelihood of muscle strain and
sports related injuries. Another
benefit of the program is that it
reduces stress by promoting deep
relaxation, increasing blood circula-
tion and improving coordination.
"The mind and body classes are
quite popular among the students
Brown said.
"I incorporate the breath and
relaxation into my classes said
Dcbi Niswander, yoga instructor at
the Rec Center. "I focus on relax-
ation and the removal of stress out
of the body, mind and emotions
Yoga also conditions your mus-
cles without the use of weights and
barbells. This is obtained through
resistance exercises that use your
own body weight.
Yoga can also (listen up ladies)
relieve those once a month killer
pains. This exercise opens up your
chest cavity and stretches the mus-
cles in your lower back alleviating
killer cramps. Keeping your hands
planted at your feet while stepping
into a push-up position, slowly
lower your knees, then your chest,
and finally your chin to the floor.
Inhale deeply, moving your body
forward and upward. Keep your
shoulders relaxed. Try not to sag in
the middle and keep your arms
straight.
Despite this exercise that targets
'females. Yoga is not just for women
anymore.
"Although the classes tend to
have more females, we do have a
mix of males and females in our
classes Brown said.
Yoga classes will be offered this
semester at the Rec Center. From
Jan. 27 through March 3 there will
be an introductory course offered
every Wednesday at 4 p.m. If
Wednesdays aren't good times,
another introductory course will be
held from Jan. 28 through March 4
with courses every Thursday at 5:30
p.m.
For those who have already com-
pleted an intro course, there is an
advanced beginners class offered
every Tuesday starting from Jan. 26
through March 2 at 5:30 p.m.
"Each class can accommodate 28
students Brown said. "To register,
students need their ECU one
card. It is $15 for students and
members
To register, go. to the main office
at the Rec Center during office
hours (Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 6
p.m.) and sign up. Classes tend to
fill-up quickly.
"It's phenomenal how quickly
they fill up Niswander said.
Departments offer
assistance to students
Phillip Gilfus
STAFF WRITER
As a new semester starts, many
students may find themselves
stressing about the future. Not to
worry: ECU has many services
that make it easy for students to
choose their majors and careers.
"There shouldn't be any pan-
icking going on if a student is still
undecided said Lynn Roeder,
director of the Center for Student
Counseling and Development.
"We just want students to have an
idea of what their focus is by their
junior year
A student can use a personal
assessment of his or her interests,
strengths and weaknesses to fill
out the college major selection
form, available at the office of
Undergraduate Studies. This
helps to narrow the field of choic-
es of majors.
"When students come to me
for help, I think one of the most
important steps is showing them
the requirements for certain
majors said Don Joyner, assis-
tant dean of Undergraduate
Studies. "A science or foreign lan-
guage requirement may make the
difference between
whether or not a
major is suitable for
a student
Students may
worry chat once
they choose a major
there is no chance
for change, but that
is not true.
"People think
majors are for life
Joyner said. "What
students need to
remember is that
people change careers
all their lives
Students who have
just decided on a major may think
that it is too early to start consider-
ing a career path, but if a they gets
jobs in their fields while in school
so that they can gain some experi-
Dr. Jim Westmoreland helps I student look through
material during � reference search at Career Services.
PHOTO IT MICHAEL SMITH
ence. Students may also "shadow"
people in their field, which will
give them insight into their poten-
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18 Tvtriiy. Jaatiary II, I9S8
features
Till Eiit Carolinian
WifchforTECs
latest publication.
Career
continued from page 9
rioperty I c
lonocgment
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tial careers.
"Students should be meeting
people in their field as early as
possible said James
Westmoreland, director of Career
Services. "They should try to
contact people in their hometown
areas during vacation and speak
to them about finding out more
information on their career choic-
es
At ECU, students are encour-
aged to follow the Three C's of
Careers: Center for Counseling
and Student Development, Co-
op, and Career Services.
"Most students aren't aware of
what they want to do after col-
lege Roeder said. "Here at the
Center for Counseling and
Student Development, we try to
be their first step in the career
process
They offer a workshop once a
week called "Choosing a Major
and a Career This program tries
to stimulate students into thinking
about their interests and values. A
profile is made for the student
using the Personal Academic and
Career Survey. This workshop is
held in 316 Wright Building, and
more sessions are offered during
registration.
When looking at careers, it
might be wise not to dismiss cer-
tain options immediately.
"There are some careers that
i
11 Taaiday, Jam
amaBBBBn n
- communication skills
- communication s
- motivation �
- motivation
- work experience ?
- work experience
- teamwork JL f
- feamvvork
- leadership "
- leadership
- academic background l i
- aaioemie back�
- technical skills 1 1 1 O
-Technical skills
- interpersonal skills � � I
" Mf�&0crsonal skill
- analytical skill � i 1 1 1
inaTvtical skills
JlIC" �
-ethics I -
th.es
Source: National Association of Colleges and Employees
will fit in with a person, but they
might reject certain choices
because they don't know a lot
about a particular area
Westmoreland said. "For instance,
sales might not appeal to a person
right away, but a specific area like
public relations or writing might
Career Services holds a work-
shop entitled "Exploring Careers"
Wednesdays at 4 p.m. in the office
at 701 East Fifth Street. This
workshop looks at a variety of
careers and helps students with
their career skills. Students are
shown how to gather information
about careers that appeal to them,
and they are given tips about the
interviewing process.
SIGI Plus, a computer program
available at the Center for Student
Counseling and Development and
Career Services, helps to create a
personalized list of career choices.
Another way of getting more
information on possible careers is
attending career days held on cam-
pus. The last career day drew 80
businesses that were available for
students to ask questions. An edu-
cation career day is being planned
for Feb. 26.
eastcarolinian
Amy L.Royster Hum
Amanda G. Austin Managing Editor
Amy Sheridan N�ws Editor
PETER Dawyot Assistant New Editor
Nina Dry FeatutuEditor
Emily Little Hud Copy Editor
Mario Scherhaufer SportsEditor
Tracy Hairr Assistant Sports Editor
Chris Knotts Staff IHustritor
JONATHAN OREENPtloto Editor
Stephanie Whitlock Ad Datign Managar
Janet Respess AirmailingManager
Brian Williams liyoutandCantiipiaciDisignar
Bobby Tuggle Wabmasiar
Sarong tki ECU common lira 828. rtnHI Carotaim ptfaka n.OOOoim iwrUMrr ind rrnln n�lMj �tooi m �dirt� 11 w ot�v
ion ol thi mifomvol Itw Ed'torral Board and nminanin ruinbvEdctonal Bruntmarrta. tha Earl torrlmn mkornu laRn lo tha adrn biaaM
wdi, irtdi m� bi adittd for tir or triviri. tr� E�t Cwolinitn iiiarm r
linn should be addrasrad to Ooinion �diior .Th Erst Cnrtniin. Siudtni Pubkaoom Bwldinp, ECU. Gramiat. 27854353 For mfonnatjon. cat
susum
MMMMMMMM
�aSmoocWr
vVv
Monday, February 8, 1999 at S.OOpm
Hendrix Theatre - Menderthall Student Canter
East Carolina University
Sponsored by ECU Student Union
Lecture Committee
klSSING
"���
Featuring over 25 different
styles of kisses, like
- the llp-o-suctlon kiss
- the upside-down kiss
- the Trobrien islands kiss
- and the vacuum kiss.
��
Advance Ticket Pricea:
Public - $3.00
ECU student - Free
when valid ECU ID Is presented
at the Central Ticket Offlce
In advance of the show.
ah Tickets at the Door - $5.00
Plannec
amphitk
Phili
ITA
'o many who
place ofter
ning Servici
th the probl
iction, ten
tart in early 2
ail.
Mendenhal
but the new
about 600-650
,Flannagan-Sy
that currently I
next to downtt
,n "The new
, convenient am
, the five resic
West Camp
.Sa'amon, Di
I Services. The
.services
Though the
�,in the prelimi
this dining ha
? new features t
from the rest.
A -
4
H





Tlit Eitt Ciroiiniin win
appeal to chem,
n tips about the
:ss.
imputer program
:nter for Student
'cvelopment and
iclps to create a
F career choices.
)f getting more
issible careers is
lysheldon earn-
er day drew 80
:re available for
estions. An edu-
s being planned
"it
11 Tundiy, Jinuiry 19, 1818
features
Thi Eit Cinlinitn
ew dining hall
for year 2001
Planned to replace
amphitheater on hill
It seemed like a good idea
Phillip Gilfus
itaff whiter
'� JTo many who eat at Mendenhall,
; the place often seems too crowded.
ining Services has a plan to deal
th the problem through the con-
iction, tentatively planned to
in early 2000, of a new dining
ail.
Mendenhall seats 355 students,
but the new dining hall will seat
about 600-650. It will replace the
,Flannagan-Sylvan Amphitheater
that currently lies buried in the hill
i , next to downtown.
ir, "The new dining hall will be
.convenient and more friendly with
, the five residence halls on the
West Campus said Frank
.Sa'amon, Director of Dining
I Services. "There will be many new
services
i
Though the exact layout is still
, in the preliminary design stages,
, this dining hall already possesses
new features that will set it apart
from the rest.
"We will be using an 'All-You-
Care-to-Eat' concept Salamon
said. "There will be less cafeteria
food and more of a marketplace
feeling
Dining Services intends to
stress freshness in the food by
preparing it right in front of the
customer. Aramark will extend its
service to the new dining hall.
Since the amphitheater area
will provide the site of the new
dining area, the building will have
a unique layout. The interior din-
ing area will include terraces and
many levels because of its place-
ment on the hill.
Food sales to Dining Services
will supply the finances for con-
struction. Gantt and Huberman,
architects from Charlotte, will
build the new dining hall.
After its completion, tentatively
set for fall of 2001, Mendenhall
will be getting a new look.
The Spot will expand into the
area that now serves as the dining
hall. That space will become the
Student Union Food Court and
Entertainment area. Many kiosks
will be placed to serve food.
According to Dining Services, it
will be reminiscent of the Plaza
Mall food court.
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Attention
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Start the New year
with a clean slate
NeW life Christian FeilOWSlliP meets Thursdays in Gcb 1010 at 7pr
i. m
4
Be sure and catch the latest
production by James Chapman
("Black Man Rising "Woman
with Wings "Our Young
Black Men are Dying and
No One Seems to Care)
Tuesday, February 2,1999 at 8:00pm
Hendrix Theatre-Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University
Sponsored by the Student Union
Cultural Awareness Committee
$�tto
An emotionally gripping
drama that examines the
difficulty of confronting
issues and love for
self and others.
Advance Ticket Prices:
Public-$3.00
ECU Student - Free
when valid ECU ID is presented
at the Central Ticket Office
in advance of the show.
All Tickets at the Door - $5.00
:�





12 Tttiiey. Jwairy 19. 1989
sports
Ttu Eatt Caroliniw
Pirate football faces tough 1999 schedule
Duke, Miami, NC
State to come to ECU
Mario Scherhaufek
spouts editor
The Pirates will have the opportu-
nity to kick Wolfpack butt on home
turf for the first time ever in an
exciting season packed full of tough
matches against Miami, Duke,
West Virginia (at Charlotte),
Southern Miss, Cincinnati, and the
1998 Liberty Bowl winner Tulane.
According to Dr. Henry
VanSant, EClI's associate athletics
director, the official schedule will
"Then is always a lot of
enthusiasm involved in the
Pirate-Wolfpack rivalry. This
rivalry means a lot to students
and fans as well. I think
that this year it will be a
great game again
Dennis Young
Executive director of the AthleiicsPirate Club
not be available until the end of this
month, but it is already being called
the best home game schedule ever
in Pirate football history. South
Carolina will be ECU's first away
opponent with Army, UAB and
Houston rounding out the schedule
on the road.
"We played a lot of good teams
Greenville before, but this is the
first time Duke and NC State are
coming to town VanSant said.
"Our footbal' program is growing
and getting stronger and our players
deserve big-name institutions
which present a bigger challenge
and additional motivation to them
According to VanSant there are
several reasons why ECU didn't
have a similar attractive schedule
before, with the completion of the
upper-deck extension at Dowdy
Ficklen Stadium as the most obvi-
ous one.
"Due partly to the new 43,000
capacity of the stadium and to some
political pressure, NC State
became more receptive to play at
Greenville VanSant said.
Additionally, there is a policy of
scheduling home-and-home with
some schools, which means that
both teams agree to play at each
others stadium the following year,
VantSant said.
Money, of course, can attract
good teams as well, but according
to VanSant, there is usually the
same amount of money exchanged
between two schools. "If they pay
us $100,000, for example, to come
to their school, we would pay them
$100,000 to come to our school the
following year VantSant said.
Looking at the impressive
names of teams, there is no ques-
tion that Greenville will be the
media focus a couple of times
in the 1999 football season.
Now it's up to the coaching
staff and the team to use this
opportunity of media exposure
and get ready for the challeng-
ing season.
"The upside of this sched-
ule is that if you win those
games you'll get the people's
attention, but you have to win
those games first said Steve
Logan, ECU football head
coach. "It's our job now to take
this group of kids and try to
maximize their abilities
The Pirate defense line will
be the biggest question mark
in the 1999 team after ECU
lost four defensive starters
including Roderick Coleman,
who is the Pirate career sacks
leader, as well as Travis
Darden.
"We're going to redo our
defense with putting the
emphasis on speed and quick-
ness. ;tWe won't be strong but
we will be a lot faster Logan
said.
Another big loss for the
team will be the loss of Troy
Smith, who Logan calls the
best wild receiver in his 25-
year-career as football coach.
"You don't replace guys like
that You have to find a way to
do things differently Logan
said.
According to Logan, quar-
terback Bobby Weaver, who is
currently recovering from his
knee injury will not be avail-
able for spring practice but is
expected to return to action for
the fall season. "He is drop-
ping back and throwing balls.
We can't count on him for
spring but for fall Logan said.
David Garrard, last year's
red-shirt freshman quarter-
back, was considered one of
1998's major positive surprises
by Logan and the Pirate fans.
"I think that we really got
everything out of the kids last
year considering that we had a
red-shirt freshman quarterback
and considering the injury fac-
tor Logan said.
Such a big home schedule
also means less travel and orga-
nization stress for everybody
involved, according to Logan.
"It simply is a win-win situ-
ation for everybody said
Dennis Young, executive
director of the AthleticsPirate
Club. "This schedule is great
for our athletic program, for the
Pirate Club, and for the entire uni-
versity. And don't forget the kids
who will be out on the field in front
of a sold-out Dowdy Ficklen
Stadium facing a top-ranked team
from Miami. It will be a lot of
excitement for everybody
involved
According to Young, this sched-
ule, which he calls the best home
schedule ever in ECU football his-
tory, will be a tremendous boost for
the Pirate Club as well.
'This (home schedule) promis-
es a definite growth in membership
numbers and season tickets
Young said. "And for the fans and
students, there will be a number of
great football Saturdays coming up
this fall in Greenville
Young calls Miami the toughest
opponent, but he also said that NC
State will bring a lot of emotions
into town.
"There is always a lot of enthu-
siasm involved in the Pirate-
Wolfpack rivalry Young
said.Young still remembers the day
when Pirate fans stormed the field
and tore the goal post down in 1987
after the Wolfpack was defeated 32-
ECU Football Opponents
for 1999 am
WEST VIRGINIA (at Charlotte)
DUKE
South Carolina
MIAMI
Army
SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI
TULANE
Houston
University of Alabama Birmingham
jamfn.A CINCINNATI
fflMUfoWSk NC STATE
(HOME)
Source: ECU football head coach Steve Logan
ffls
JlLAtE
14 in the season-opening game.
"This rivalry means a lot to stu-
dents and fans as well. 1 think that
this year it will be a great game
again Young said.
Nevertheless, Young does think
that this rivalry means that addi-
tional security will be necessary for
the game against NC State.
"We will have a full house that
day, and our entire crew will have
an exhausting day, but I don't think
that we will have an security prob-
lem just because of the team we're
playing said Norm Reilly, assis-
tant athletics director for Sports
SEE FOOTBALL. PAGE 13
ECU Games Against
Duke
1977W17-16
1979L14-28
1980W35-10
1981L14-24
1992L14-45
1994L10-13
Source: Sports Information Department
football ht
Games Against NC State
1970L6-231981L10-31
1971W31-151982L26-33
1972L16-381983W22-16
1973L8-571984L22-31
1974L20-241985w33-14
1975L3-261986L10-38
1976W23-141987W32-14
1977W28-231991W37-34
1978L13-291996W50-29
1979 1980L L20-34 14-361997L24-37

CAA coaches p
ish last in thei
losing most of
But, the Pirate
surprised everyl
selves by starti
well.
Thanks to t
coaches and th
players, the EC
team headed i
holidays with a 5
place ranking in
These numl
the break after t
nately got hit b
players. Junior
Joeys is out inde
tured left foot
ECU Sports Infl
been the ur
through the first
He is averaging 1
rebounds per gai
starting in place
van Ierland, wh






13 Tundiy, January 18, 1099
Tha Ent Carolinian
sports
Tha Eatt Carolinian
Basketball team plagued by injuries
: Pirates to play CAA
'teams after good start
Jonathan Russell
staff write
Bl.AIN F. DENIUS
STAFF WRITER
CAA coaches picked ECU to fin-
ish last in their conference after
losing most of last year's starters.
But, the Pirate basketball players
surprised everybody except them-
selves by starting the season off
well.
Thanks to the good work of
coaches and the versatility of the
players, the ECU men's basketball
team headed into the Christmas
holidays with a 5-3 record and a first
place ranking in the conference.
These numbers changed over
the break after the Pirates unfortu-
nately got hit by a series of injured
players. Junior forward Evaldas
Joeys is out indefinitely with a frac-
tured left foot according to the
ECU Sports Information. Joeys has
been the unexpected leader
through the first part of the season.
He is averaging 14.75 points and 6.6
rebounds per game. Joeys had been
starting in place of injured Alphons
van lerland, who suffered a stress
123
130
21
23
210
213
215
217
220
22528
at UNC-Wilmington
William & Mary
at Old Dominion
James Madison
at Virginia Commonwealth
at American
at George Mason
Richmond
UNC-Wilmington
Richmond, Va.
(CAA Tournament)
4:30 p.m.
7:00 p.m. X 7:35 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
jalth 7:30 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
TBA
Garratt Blackwaldar (left) cannot pravant tha Pirates 54-51 lost in Wadnaaday night's basketball game against the Monarchs of ODU.
fracture in his left leg. Van Icrland
is off the injured list, but at this
point is only seeing limited action.
ECU (8-7, 2-3), which played its
sixth straight game without leading
scorer Joeys lost another starter in
their close loss against Old
Dominion last week. Sophomore
forward Steven Branch suffered
what looked to be a serious knee
injury midway in the first half of
the 54-51 loss against the
Monarchs.
"I have never seen our kids play
as hard as they did tonight said
PHOTO IV MARC CHIPPEN
ECU head coach Joe Dooley after
the loss according to Sports
Information Department "It was
really their best effort. I give them
an A
Despite the close loss and the
injured list full of important play-
ers, Dooley can depend on his
bench for stepping up and filling
the places of the injured players.
"I'm pleased with the way that
we arc playing. We've had some
players step up and play some
SEE BASKETBALL. PACE M
Football
continued from page 12
I Information.
Reilly, too, thinks of Miami as
the toughest name on ECU's
(schedule.
"They finished really strong last
year winning against NC State in
their Micron PC Bowl game
Reilly said.
Both Miami and NC State have
a long ball-game history with ECU
and the Pirates will try to add two
wins on their negative records with
those two schools.
The Wolfpack leads the all-time
series 17-8, and they also won the
last confrontation on Nov. 22, 1997,
in front of 52,000, with a score of
37-24. Duke also leads the scries
with four victories compared to two
Pirate wins with the last dating
back to 1980.
This time it will be the first time
that NC State and Duke will have
to travel to Greenville.
"It will be a rock and roll affair
Logan said. "There won't be many
seats left out there
It's TOURNAMENT TIME!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
BILLIARDS BOWLING CHESS
TABLE TENNIS SPADES RACQUETBALL
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent
ECU at regional competitions to be held at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va
February 19-21,1999. All expenses paid by Mendenhall Student Center.

ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out!
Spades
Bowling
Mon Jan. 25 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
Multi-Purpose Room

,&
BilHardS (Nine Ball)
TueFeb. 2 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center
(Men's and Women's Divisions)
Chess
Wed Feb. 3 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
Multi-Purpose Room
Mon Feb. 1 6:00 p.m.
The Outer Limitz
Mendenhall Bowling Center
(Men's and Women's Divisions)
Table Tennis
Thur Jan. 28 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Multi-Purpose Room
(Men's & Women's SinglesTeam Divisions)
Racquetball
�Registration Deadline - Wed Jan. 27
� Student Recreation Center
(Mixed Doubles and Men's & Women's SinglesTeam Divisions)
here is a $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the
fendenhall Information Desk, the Billiards Center, and THE OUTER LIMITZ Bowling Center
located on the ground floor of Mendenhall Student Center, as well as at the Main Desk of the
StudeAt Recreation Center. Call the Student Activities Office, 757-4711, for more Information.
J
1 M �
114Court Authority (Exh.)82-66W
119Next Level All- Stars (Exh.)101-82W
1114at Jacksonville State53-61L
1121Campbell (at Fayettville)77-49W
1124Southwestern Louisiana75-69W
1128at Liberty 8056w
1130Appalachian State67-68L
125American64-58W
128at Wisconsin-Green Bay3663L
1212Evansville82-79W
1219at South Carolina5634W
1222at Georgia6532L
1228Francis Marion7S65W
12at Richmond6083L
16Virginia Commonwealth71-66W
19. at James Madison57-73L
113Old Dominion51,54L
116at William &, Mary7:00 p.m.
118George Mason 7:00 p.m.
Source: Sports Information Department
Thursday �acUe& 6y6t
ladles free Admission � $1.00 Bud a Bud it. Bottles � Penny Draft
fRIDAY I DOUflR HIGIIT J
HlfBig Ass Bonies Night
Ladies free Admission & $2.00 22oz. Bottles
IT fill goes Down
111 THE CEIMR





14 Tiwatiy, Janwry 1�. �M9
sports
Tfii Ett Carolinian
Tough upcoming spring for women's hoops
Lady Pirates start out
strong to face CAA foes
Eric Couch
SENIOR WRITER
The first half of the inaugural sea-
son of head coach Dee Gibson has
been a success, and the women's
basketball team hopes to continue
that success in the second half of
the season.
The Pirates jumped out of-the
chute fast this season with an early
record of 5-0. Over the
Thanksgiving holiday they picked
up the Warner Classic Championship
tide and then competed in the
championship game of the
Chescbrough-Ponds Invitational
and were handed their first loss of
the season against Davidson.
"In our losses, mainly our
defense didn't attack like we
should said Beth Jaynes, senior
center.
That defense is one of the
things that Dee Gibson will try to
Basketball
continued from page 13
important roles Dooley said.
"We need to keep our focus and
concentrate on building momen-
tum as we continue conference
play
Nine more games and the CAA
tournament remain on the Pirates
schedule.
"The bulk of our conference
games are ahead of us and every-
one is ready to get them started to
see how we really stand up
Dooley said.
The Pirates boasted an 8-6
record going into last Wednesday's
match up against Old Dominion
where ECU's Neil Punt had tied
the game at 51-51 with a lay up at
the :22 mark. Nevertheless, ODU
ran the clock down inside 10 sec-
onds before Mike Byers hit a run-
ning jumper to help lift the
Monarchs to the close victory over
the Pirates.
These close games though, will
decide how the Pirates fare in the
conference which they were
expected to finish last in.
Several key players have been
making the good start happen for
the Pirates this season. Alico
Dunk has been supplying a rela-
tively young team with much
needed senior leadership.
"Alico has been a great leader
on and off the court Dooley said.
"He has played his role in every
game and he does whatever it
takes to get the win
Freshman Brandon Hawkins
has been impressive since the
start. He is the team's second lead-
ing scorer and leads the team in
assists. Hawkins averaged 10.8
points per game in his first five
starts at the guard position. He
shows great promise and gives
Pirate basketball a bright future.
The Pirates starting lineup has
changed several times this season
and the team is starting to really
play together.
"We have many interchange-
able players this year Dooley
said. 'The team is very versatile
ECU students have always
been supportive of Pirate basket-
ball and its players, and coaches
hope the student body will contin-
ue to attend games and show their
enthusiasm.
"Winning isn't everything to
me ECU senior Christy Pratt
said. "I just like going to the
games and giving the team my
support. The games are exciting
and the pep band really makes
things fun
Nevertheless, the arena still
has not been close to being sold
out
ECU and UNCW have one of
the most heated rivalries in the
CAA. The two teams will battle
on Jan. 23 in Wilmington. The
Pirates will be bock for action in
Greenville against William &
Mary on Saturday, Jan. 30, at 7
�r
motivate. All year the Pirates have
seemed to jump out in the second
half and take control of the game in
most of the Pirates' wins. This
proved true on Jan. 10 when the
Pirates downed JMU, 70-61, after a
sluggish start. �
"We're a second half team said
Waynetta Veney, point guard and
team leader.
The Pirates plan to get more
outstanding play from Veney.
Veney has earned tournament
MVP honors and been named CAA
SEE WOMEN'S MSKETMU PAGE li
Women's Basketball
Upcoming Games:
Jan. 19 RICHMOND
Jan. 22 at George Mason
Jan. 24 at American
Jan. 29 at James Madison
Feb. 2 UNC-WILMINGTON
(game will be televised by Home Team Sports)
Feb.5 at William & Mary
Feb. 7 at Old Dominion
Feb. 12 GEORGE MASON
Feb. 14 AMERICAN
Feb. 19 at Richmond
Feb.24 at Virginia Commonwealth
March 3-6 CAA Tournament at Richmond, VA.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
2 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
2 p.m.
7 p.m.
2 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
"sasftketball So Far
Nov. 16 CAMPBELL W64-43AWM
Nov. 24atUNCC W85-814v
At Fairfield University Warner Classic Nov. 27atFairfield W Nov. 28 vs.Wake Forest W At Davidson Roundbalf Invitational82-6 78-70s
Dec. 5 vs. Eton W56-37
Dec. 6 at Davidson L82-62
Dec. 9 VIRGINIA TECH L77-45
Dec. 19APPALACHIAN STATE W85-70
Dec. 21 at North Carolina State L94-68
Dec. 30NORFOLK STATE W97-76
Jan. 3 VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH L85-70�
Jan. 8 WILLIAM & MARY W71-59
Jan. 10 JAMES MADISON W70-61
Jan. 15 OLD DOMINION L81-52
Jan. 17 at UNC-WHmington 2 p.m.

. !An evening with
The TCU gospelChoir
featuring special guest
'RichardSmathvood
Saturday, January 23,1999
Spm in Wright Auditorium
Advance ticket prices: 'PuSRc $8 youth $7
'ECU 'acuityStaff $8 ECU Student $5
Mtickets at the door: $12
VISA, or Mastercard accepted.
�Jot more information catlthe Central Ticket Office at
252 J2S.4788 or 1 �800-ECU-A!TS.
for a good time calf
The �ECU Student Union Hotline at 252.328.6004,
or visit our website at www.ecu.edustudent union
STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT WANTED
WPIaiPHSipippP!
I
East Carolina University's Student Union Board of Directors
is taking applications for Student Union President
for the 1999-2000 term.
Any full-time student with a minimum G.P.A of 2.5 can apply.
Applications are available at the Student Union Office
Room 236 Mendenhall Student Center.
Deadline to apply: January 20,1999
IThis is a paid position
IS Tmiiy,
E(
Athk
Ste
With every
are promin
into the EC
This ye
bolstered
familiar pla
of success,
few athlci
promise an
season one
The EC
team is off
decade. T
Waynetta
guard in he
the squad,
the College
transferring
Hampton,
year und
Donovan. 1
adjust to a
role as a teai
"Our tea
said Dee C
basketball e
When she
great opport
Women
player of the w
the team in
despite sittin
because of an;
On Jan. 8, I
another win
Mary, defcatini
Consider! ne





� Etlt Carolinian
15 Tutijiy, Jtnwry IS, 1991
a

porfc
ECU's teams full of rising stars
Tht Eiit CartHaiM
Athletes look to take
overin '99
Stephen Schramm
seniok whiter
With every new season, new faces
are prominent and new stars shoot
into the ECU sports galaxy.
This year most teams will be
bolstered with new talent and
familiar players who hit new levels
of success. We have already seen a
few athletes who have shown
promise and intend to make this
season one of their own.
The ECU women's basketball
team is off to its best start of the
decade. This is due largely to
Waynctta Veney, a 5'10" point
guard in her first year playing on
the squad. She spent two years at
the College of Charleston before
transferring to ECU last year. The
Hampton, Va. product sat out last
year under ex-coach Anne
Donovan. This year she has had to
adjust to a new coach and a new
role as a team leader.
"Our team goes as she goes
said Dee Gibson, women's head
basketball coach. "She's our leader.
When she plays well, we have a
great opportunity to win. She is an
integral part of our team
Veney is currently
leading the league in
assists and scoring, aver-
aging an impressive 17.3
points per game. She
plays an important role
in ECU's fast-paced
game.
"Our style is well suit-
ed for her style. She's not
really a walk-the-ball-
up-the-floor type of
point guard Gibson
said.
The men's team has a rising star
of their own. Evaldas Joeys, a
native of Lithuania, comes to ECU
from Western Nebraska
Community College.
While at Western
Nebraska, the 6'9" for-
ward was named JUCO
All-America. Joeys has
led the Pirates in scoring
so far this season, averag-
ing over 14 points per
game. The junior also
picked up the CAA
Player of the Week for
strong performances fil
against Liberty and the
Ragin' Cajuns of USL.
"He's got to provide leader-
ship said Joe Dooley, men's head
basketball coach. "He's got lots of
skills. As he gets more comfortable
Waynetta Veney
FILE PHOTO
he will be able to exhibit more of
those skills
Equally as com-
pelling as the journey of
Joeys and Veney is the
story of the track team's
Terry Speller. The
Williamston, N.C.
native walked onto last
year's team but was
injured while playing
basketball before he
could race. Thus,
Speller did not compete
on last season's loaded squad. This
year the sophomore has returned to
the track team and has done noth-
ing but impress in practice.
"He's back this year and he's
coming along nicely
said Bill Carson, men's
head track coach. "Terry
likes to talk a lot, but I
think this year he can
back it up. He's per-
forming very well in
practice but he's still got
a lot to learn
Speller is a nice addi-
Evaldas Joeys tion to a team that is full
rut photo of rising stars. In addi-
tion to the long list of
conference champions that return,
the team welcomes back an Ail-
American, James Alexander, and
two one-time track stars who went
to try their luck with football.
Women's Basketball
continued from page 14
player of the week. She has also led
the team in scoring and assists
despite sitting out some games
because of an ankle sprain.
On Jan. 8, the women captured
another win against William &
Mary, defeating the Tribe 71-59.
Considering such success, the
second half of the season does
promise to be tough for ECU.
Long-time menace Old Dominion
heads the list with ECU trying to
get revenge at this nationally
ranked team which handed the
Pirates three losses last season.
"We always know Old
Dominion will be tough, but our
goal is always the tournament
CAA and making it to the NCAA
tournament Jaynes said.
Jaynes scepticism proved to be
ri?ht when the Pirates fell to the
No. 11 Lady Monarchs 81-52 in
CAA action on Friday night. "I feel
that we struggled offensively
Gibson said. "After the first half we
stopped attacking
The losses this year for ECU
have been to very good teams.
Davidson and Virginia Tech were
teams the Pirates knew they would
have to play well against, and it just
was not enough. With four Pirates
who have been injured at one time,
one main goal of ECU will be to
stjv hcalthv tor the rest of the sous. n.
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Damon Davis will return to the
track team after a season on the
gridiron. The Pirates also welcome
Aaron Harris.
"We helped recruit him
Carson said. "He played football
but tore up his knee. He's looking
very very good in practice. He's
like a freshman to us. We look for
him to run for the next three
years
The women's track team is also
full of rising stars. Sophomore
Margaret Clayton looks to take
over the top spot among throwers
in the conference, a spot currently
held by her older sister Michelle.
Sprinters Rasheca Barrow and
SEE STARS. PAGE IS
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NOWHIRING
dentation Assistants for 1999-2000
Orientation & the First-Year Experience � 214 Whichard Bldg. � 3284173
For more information, call the Orientation Office or attend an
Information Session in 208 Whichard Building:
� December 2,1998 (Wednesday)-4:00 p.m.
� January 18,1999 (Monday)-4:00 p.m.
Applications are now available in 214 Whichard Building.
Deadline for completed applications is January 22,1999 at 5:00 p.m.
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Water, Sewer, and Cable Included
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5 BLOCKS FROM ECU WITH
BUS SERVICE AVAILABLE





16 luttat. Jmiry H. HM
sports
17 Tmtiiy, Ji
Tkt Etit Carolinian
QUICK
'FfwitcnS, INC.
521 S. Cotanche St Greenville, NC 27858
(Next to Chico's)
252.758.1616
Sixth man helps basketball teams
ECU pep band adds
extra energy to games
. A Cut Above
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� Walk-ins Welcome
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Bring in this ad
for a free visit
One per Customer
Blaine Denius
staff writer
Screaming, dancing and playing
that funky music is what the ECU
pep band does best.
The unofficial name of the ECU
pep band as The Sixth Man Band
describes how the group works to
establish themselves as that next
presence on the court The pep
band uses upbeat music, cheers
and a positive attitude to energize
ECU fans and support Pirate bas-
ketball.
"We make sure the crowd stays
involved and we support the
team said Donny Allen, pep band
director. "The band also dpes
cheers as part of the pregame and
tries to create a sense of school
pride
Another aspect of the ECU pep
band is the effect it has on opposing
teams. Band members use loud
music and taunting cheers to break
the concentration of visiting players
on free-throws.
"We like to get rowdy and get
into the head of the opposing
team Allen said. "We try to irritate
and really annoy them
The pep band stands the entire
game as a method of showing sup-
port for Pirate basketball. Band
members also have ritual cheers
and tactics they want the crowd to
help them participate in. With the
crowd contributing their voices as
well, the band hopes Pirate players
will benefit while opposing teams
will struggle.
"We are as rowdy as possible and
try to energize the crowd said
David Holt, an ECU pep band
member. "We scream, holler and
have lots of fun
The pep band, however, docs
not forget its musical duties and
music lovers will be
very impressed with
The Sixth Man
Band's performance.
Musical numbers
include 70's funk,
80's rock and current
radio hits. The fight
song and other
crowd favorites
played by the
Marching Pirates are
also covered by the
pep band. Talented
musicians with lots
of energy and a love
of playing music
make The Sixth Man Band impres-
sive and exciting to watch.
"The musicianship is high and
the atmosphere is professional
Holt said. "We are by far the best
band in the CAA
Director Donny Allen is proud
of the band and recognizes: their
skill and the contribution they
make to the games.
"My job is easy. I just point
ECU's pap bind gets loud during Wednesday night's game.
PHOYO BY MARC MIFtEN
them in the right direction and let
them go Allen said. "I am really3
proud of them.
The Sixth Man Band's 36 mem-
bers will be performing at all men's ,
and women's home basketball
games. Band members invite
everyone to attend games and join
with them in creating Pirate fan tra-
ditions and supporting ECU sports ,
teams.
mm,
ARE YOU:
? RICH
? FUNNY
? SMART
? GOOD LOOKING
? NONE OF THE ABOVE
WHATEVER YOU ANSWERED, YOU CAN BE A PART
OF THE ECU STUDENT UNION SPECIAL EVENTS
COMMITTEE - THE PLACE WERE YOUR OPINION
COUNTS WHEN IT COMES TO CAMPUS
ENTERTAINMENT.
For mote informaiion, contact Tom Forbes at 328-4715.
APPLICATION DEADLINE - Tues Ian. 26.
Applications available from 236 Mendenhall.
Stars
continued from page 16
Nicky (ioins look to improve on
last year's, season, a season that saw
them win an ECAC and CAA
championship as members of the
4x100 meter relay team. The
Pirates also welcome some talent-
ed freshmen onto an already tal-
ented team: Toshima Dabbs, from
Eden, N.C. and Gastonia's Toni
Kilgore.
"The upper class has already
won things like All-East and
Conference Champs and the
freshmen are looking as good as
anyone in practice. I think they
will do the same thing said
Charles "Choo" Justice, women's
head track coach.
Softball team has high expectations
Piratesfadng
promising season
Blaine Denh;s
staff writer
With a more aggressive attitude
on the field, the '99 Pirate softball
team will show no fear or mercy
toward their opponents on the road
to a championship season.
Much of last season's dangerous
and powerful offense has returned
this year, along with some talented
new players. Softball team mem-
bers hold high expectations for sue-
New Playcrs
NameYr.PositionHometown
17 Beth BridgeFt.utilityHemdon,VA
10 Addie ChlebnilcowFtOOFKeswick.VA
9 Sarah ColeaSr.OFOwing, MD
11 Eva HerronFr.SSulilityRaleigh, NC
16 Angela ManzoFr.PuulityHicksville, NY
12 Ameka McDougaldJr.OFAitilityCameron, NC
cess this season and have worked
hard to develop a stronger mental
game as well.
"The team attitude is more
aggressive and we have a better
image of ourselves said Isonette
Polonius, a senior on the Pirate
softball team. "We want to be bet-
ter and quicken to look good and
play good. We're not scared of any-
one, but I think they are scared of
us
SEE SOFTBALL PAGE 17

i.
ARE YOU A SUPPORTER OF PIRATE BASEBALL?
If attending Pirate Baseball games just is not enough and you want to become
part of the team, then ECU's Diamond Girls is for you!
What is the Diamond Girls?
The Diamond Girls is a new student support group for East Carolina Pirate Baseball. This organization will primarily serve as
marketing assistants and official hostesses for Pirate Baseball. Duties of the Diamond Girls will include the following: attendance of
designated home games, take part in promotional events and assist the baseball coachesteam during recruiting visits.
Who can be a Diamond Girl?
Any ECU student demonstrating the qualities of dedication and hard work can become a Diamond Girl. Membership into the East
Carolina University Diamond Girls is open to all persons otherwise qualified, without regard to race, sex, religion, creed or
handicap.
How do you become a Diamond Girl?
Call ECU Sports Narketing at 328-4530 to receive an application or additional information as soon as possible. Completed
applications are due by Friday, February 5 th at 5:00 p.m. Review of applications will begin on Monday, February 8th and will
be completed on Friday, February 12 Qualified candidates will be contacted by the Sports Marketing Department.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CAUL ECU SPORTS MARKETING AT 328-4530
9tm
sc
ECURet
intramw
Davii
assistant dire
sports at e
SI
Among many i
that will be o
recreational cei
facilities, bask
spring's highiif
to start soon.
The C
Recreational S
soring a 5-on-J
which will be c
faculty and star'
Leagues w
men's, women's
Information i
rules, participat
guidelines and
will be covcre
meeting tods
Mendenhall, re
Sof
continued
Sophomore
Shepperson, w
base, agrees thi
will help the tei
petitive. Playe
have worked to
harder and inert
"We are goin
cnt attitude
"We're not scan:
to beat anyone
Head coach 1
that the new pi
will make an i
according to Kec
tion and defensi
be the keys to si
team.
"We have in
sive power and
positions said
players have ad
Mar
Lacrosse st
tofulfilU
Jim I
SENIOf
If you are gettir
i.ifrisbee with yc
-1Recreational Sen
ibcr of club teams
h:talent
Club sports ar
nizarions that ar
get financial si
Services to comj
��university teams.
. "For example
� :club will compe
12Chapel Hill, N.
Indi
Golfers shoi
fornaAonai
Tracy
ASSISTANT SPi
By the end of 19
team had closed i
laid a solid found
season full of an
and success.
It was by far
since I've t
Kevin Wiliams, h





17 Tyaaiav, January IB, 1999
Eltt Carolinian
ims
sports
ay night's game.
rection and let;
i. "I am really3
and's36mem
ng at all men's ,
ic basketball
mbers invite ,
;ames and join .
; Pirate fan tra-
ig ECU sports
ions
stown
Jon.VA
'idr.VA
g�,MD
igh, NC
sville,NY
;ron, NC
mt to be bet-
x)k good and
scared of any-
are scared of
WSE17
Of
;t
t�
t
5-on-5 basketball
season set to begin
ECU Rec Center offers
intramural basketball
David Gaskins
assistant director of intramural
sports at ecu recreational.
SIRVIC1S
Among many intramural programs
that will be offered at the ECU
recreational center and its outdoor
facilities, basketball will be this
spring's highlight and is expected
to start soon.
The Department of
Recreational Services will be spon-
soring a 5-on-5 Basketball league
which will be open to all students,
faculty and staff at ECU.
Leagues will be offered for
men's, women's and Co-Rec teams.
Information regarding playing
rules, participation policies, league
guidelines and entry procedures
will be covered during the first
meeting today, Jan. 19 in
Mendenhall, room 244 at 5 p.m.
Registration for league play will be
held tomorrow, Jan. 20 at the
Student Rec Center, room 128
between 10 a.m. and 3 Jo p.m.
Unaffiliated players who are
interested in playing are encour-
aged to attend for placement on a
team. Teams will play a round-
robin format which will be fol-
lowed by a single elimination tour-
nament to determine All-Campus
champions. Gold (advanced skill),
Purple (intermediate), and Blue
(recreational) leagues will be avail-
able provided that there is suffi-
cient interest.
Leagues will also be offered to
accommodate varying segments of
the university population and will
include Men's Independent,
Fraternity, Residence Hall,
Sorority, Women's Independent
and Co-Rec. A variety of playing
days and times are available for
convenience and assorted schedul-
ing needs.
The regular season will begin
on the week of Jan. 25; games will
be played in the evenings at
Christenbury Gym and the
Student Recreation Center.
Prior to the opening of the regu-
lar season a limited number of
teams will be able to participate in
the Basketball Preview. This is a
preliminary jamboree-type event
which provides league teams the
chance to play several opponents in
shortened games in preparation for
the season. Registration for the
Preview will be on a first-come,
first-serve basis while openings last
and will be conducted along with
the regular season sign-up tomor-
row at the Rec Center.
There is no cost for students
and Student Recreation Center
member facultystaff. Non-SRC
member facultystaff will have the
option either to purchase a daily
guest pass for entry into the facility
or may purchase a 'Limited Pass'
for $10.00 which will cover facility
usage costs for the entire
Basketball season. For further
information on the 5-on-S
Basketball league or the Intramural
Sports program, contact Allison
Kemp, David Gaskins, or Patrick
Daniel at 328-6387.
Softballi
continued from page 17Schedule Feb. 26-28 Pirate Classic TournamentGreenville, NC

Match 1Eastern Michigan UniversityGreenville, NC
Sophomore KeishaMarch 6-7PurmanMiddle TN StateGreenville, SC
Shepperson, who plays secondMarch9UNC-GreensboroGreensboro, NC
base, agrees that a new attitudeMarch 13-17Rebel GamesOrlando, FL
will help the team be more com-March 19-21Winthrop TournamentRock Hill, SC
petitive. Players and coachesMarch 24Akron UniversityGreenville, NC
have worked to push each other
harder and increase motivation.
in rnot
SLIDEINTRODUC
Two ofSRCs most popular �
obics classes are back! Learn
insouts & upsdowns of ev
one's favorites! FREE introduc
ry class on each tonight at SRC.
AB-SOLUTIONS:
Learn new tricks for targetiri
your abs�tonight at SRC
free to membersstudents!
239 mm p.m. Call 328-1
register.
HEALTHY LIVING
Start the new year right by
learning long-term, healthy habits
for weight control. Meets weekly
throughout the semester, open to
all. Call 328-6387 for price and reg-
istration information.
A CRASH COURSE IN FIT
NESS:
Today is the last day to register.
Hour long class at SRC
Wednesday, Jan. 20 � 5:30. Call
328-6387 to register.
TRACK ATTACK returns to
SRC on Jan. 25. Call 328-6387 for
registration information.
Source Department of Recreation!
Services
"We are going out with a differ-
i ent attitude said Shepperson.
. "We're not scared and wc are ready
to beat anyone
Head coach Traccy Kee believes
that the new players on the team
will make an immediate impact,
according to Kce, offensive produc-
tion and defensive consistency will
be the keys to success for this year's
team.
"We have increased our offen-
sive power and added depth in all
positions said Kee. "Our new
players have added some serious
pop in the lineup
Softball team members have
been working hard off the field as
well. Extra hours in the gym and
being dedicated to constantly
improving as a team has created a
stronger squad both physically and
mentally.
"We have been more focused
during the off season and worked
harder on weight training and prop-
er technique said Mamie Oursler,
shortstop for the team and a junior
at ECU. "We want to constantly
improve every game and every
week
A Big South Tournament
Championship and the chance to
play in the NCAA tournament are
two major goals team members are
shooting for this year. Pirate Softball
players will have to face and defeat
tough competition from conference
rivals Coastal Carolina and Liberty
in order to meet the high expecta-
tions that they have set for them-
selves.
"The only thing I want at the
end of May, when it's all over, is for
ECU to finally get to play in some
NCAA games said Polonius. "If
we don't do it this year, I don't get
the chance to try again .
Polonius, who was picked first to
the recent professional women
Softball draft, hopes that Pirate fans
will come support the team and
watch these gifted athletes play.
"I want people to be aware of
ECU softball and that we are one of
the most successful sports on cam-
pus Polonius said. "I want people
to come out and cheer
The softball team's first home
appearance will be Feb. 26-28 as
they host the Pirate Classic
Tournament.
Many club sport teams offered in spring
Lacrosse still recruiting
to fulfill expectations
Jim Phelps
senior writer
If you are getting tired of playing
frisbee with your dog, Student
Recreational Services offers a num-
ber of club teams that will use your
talent.
Club sports are extramural orga-
nizations that are student-run and
get financial support from Rec
Services to compete against other
university teams.
"For example, the Rugby men's
club will compete against UNC-
Chapcl Hill, N.C. State and all
kinds of different club teams from
different universities said Todd
King, marketing director for
Student Rec Center. "The other
clubs, like the kayaking club, are
just a bunch of people that enjoy
the sport and go on trips together
The clubs are always recruiting
new members throughout the
semester.
"The best way to get involved in
a club is to come to Recreational
Services and speak with Gray
Hodges and he'll be able to give
you the information you need and
who to contact to get involved in
the club King said.
The club teams at ECU tend to
compete really well.
"Our ultimate frisbee team is
always ranked nationally in the top
five and the rugby team does really
well in the inter-
collegiate
leagues, and
lacrosse does
very well also
King said.
Every team
wants to be suc-
cessful in their
competitions.
The lacrosse
team has high
hopes for the
upcoming sea-
son that begins
in about three to four weeks when
they will also begin their practicing.
They will continue to recruit for the
next three to four weeks.
"We've always done really
good said Ben Kley, president of
the team. "Last year was the first

teams:
Men and Women's Ultimate Frisbee
Men and Women's Lacrosse
Rugby "
Men and Women's Volleyball
Men's Soccer
Swimming
Raquetball
Martial Arts
Source: ECU Recreational Services
year that we didn't go to the play-
offs. We hope to win North Carolina
and go to the playoffs this year
Anyone who is interested in par-
ticipating in these club sports can
contact Student Recreational
Services at 328-6387.
Individual accomplishment to form strong team
Golfers show ambitions
for national recognition
Tracy Hairr
assistant sports editor
By the end of 1998, the ECU golf
team had closed its fall season and
laid a solid foundation for a spring
season full of anticipated change
and success.
"It was by far the best fall I've
�een since I've been here said
Kevin Williams, head coach. "Our
stroke average was
extremely low and
our national ranking
was the highest it's
ever been
This national
scale is based on scor-
ing averages and cur-
rently the Pirates are
ranked 19th in the
district
There is a light at
the end of the tunnel,
however Williams
said. "Around the
end of February a
committee is sched-
Marc Miller to lead the 1999 team.
PHOTO COURTESY BY SID
uled to vote on
whether or not
con fere nee
champions can
receive automat-
ic admission into
the NCAA tour-
nament"
If this follows
through, the
Pirates' scores
will be consid-
ered on a much
broader scale
that includes the
nation's best
teams, among
whom ECU certainly seems com-
patible after considering the
accomplishments of key players.
Freshmen Frank Adams and M.
Chad Webb proved their excep-
tional skills despite being new to
the team last year. They each
played 23 total tournaments, nine
of which were 71 or below.
"This was really good Williams
said. "In effect they were shooting
under par nine times, and they
came out strong for us
Other top players with the
team's lowest averages were senior
Scott Campbell and junior Marc
MHJpr whose scores were 73.2 and
Tennis teams
bring new talents
Kalajo, Morgan to
lead'through season
Todd Tallmadce
senior writer
While the women's tennis team
will have to rely on one senior and
a lot of new talent for the upcom-
ing season, the men's team hopes
to take its good fall tournament
results and hard practice into a
challenging 1999 tennis season.
The men's team is led by
seniors Roope Kalajo and Kenny
Kirby. Kalajo is coming off of a
good showing at the 1998 ITA
Region II Indoor Championships.
He advanced to the second round
of the tournament before being
eliminated. Kirby and sophomore
Michael Huez will carry their
impressive fall play into the spring
matches.
"We had some great practices in
the fall said junior Stephen
Siebenbrunner. "The team ran
more this season and this helped
us as the fall season went on. It
should help us in the spring season
too
The women's team lost its
number one player, Anne Svae,
due to graduation.
After several big wins this fall,
the team will look to the lone
senior Catherine Morgan to
assume the leadership role.
"Catherine stepped up and
played at a level higher than she
ever had before said Brian
Jackson, assistant coach.
Freshmen Meredith Spears,
Andrea Tcrrill and Mary Elaine
Knox had a strong showing this
past fall, and will hopefully add to
their list of wins while they also
will need to share their experi-
ences with some new arrivals.
Hrushida Kamhre, Stacey Sasser
and Maria Carolina Torres will
begin playing this season, intro-
ducing their talents and encourag-
ing change throughout the team;
head coach Tom Morris is opti-
mistic.
"We as a team ended well in
the fall and are looking forward to
the spring Morris said. "We
made the improvements we need-
ed to have a great showing in the
CAA this season
The men's and women's teams
will start practice Jan. 18. The first
match will be on Feb. 9 when the
Pirates host UNC-Ashcville. The
start time is set for 2 p.m.
Lady PiraIHus
February
Tues9 UNC-Asheville
Wed 10 Barton College
Sat 20 Mt Olive
Sat 20 Campbell University
Sat 27 Coastal Carolina University
Greenville, NC 2 PM
Greenville, NC 2 PM
Greenville, NC 9 AM
Greenville, NC 1PM
Myrtle Beach, SCU AM
March
Sat 6 NCA&T Greenville, NC 1PM
Mon 8 UNC-Greensboro Greensboro, NC 2 JO PM
Sat 13 South Carolina State Greenville, NC HAM
Mon 15 Charleston Southern UnivcrsityCharleston, SC 2 PM
Tuesl6 College of Charleston Charleston, SC 1PM
Wed 17 Francis Marion University Florence, SC 2:30 AM
Fri26 UNC-Wilmingtion Greenville, NC 2 PM
Sat 27 UNC-Charlottc Greenville, NC 1PM
April
Thu 1 Elon College
Mon 5 NC State University
Thu 8 Georgetown
Fri 9 James Madison University
Sat 10 George Mason University
Fri-Sun
16-18 Colonial Athletic Association Championships TBA
Elon College, NC 2:30 PM
Raleigh, NC 2 PM
Washington, DC TBA
Washington, DC 3 PM
Washington, DC TBA
ineirsPinflis
r ebruary
Tues9 UNC-Asheville Greenville, NC 2 PM
Wed 17 Barton College � Greenville, NC 2:30 PM
Sat 20 Mt Olive Greenville, NC 9 AM
Sat 20 Campbell University Greenville, NC 1 PM
Tues23 Davidson College Davidson, NC 2 PM
Sat 27 Coastal Carolina University
MyrdeBeach.SC 11AM
March
Tucs2
Wed 3
Sat 6
Sat 13
Mon 15
Tues 16
Wed 17
Fri 26
Mon 29
April
Thul
Thu 8
Fri 9
Fri 9
Fri-Sun
Richmond University
High Point College
NC Sate University
South Carolina State
College of Charleston
Charleston Southern University
Francis Marion University
UNC-Wilmingtion
West Virginia University
Greenville, NC
High Point NC
Raleigh, NC
Greenville, NC
Charleston, SC
Charleston, SC
Florence, SC
Greenville, NC
Greenville NC
2:30 PM
2:30 PM
2 PM
HAM
2 PM
2 PM
10 AM
2 PM
1PM
Elon College
George Mason University
American University
James Madison University
Elon College, NC 2:30 PM
Washington, DC 2:30 PM
Washington, DC 9:30 AM
Washington, DC 3 PM
16-18 Colonial Athletic Association Championships
Source: Sports Information Department
TBA
73 respectively.
With such talent at stake,
Williams is excited about the
upcoming spring.
"I really think we have a good
shot at winning the tournament"
Williams said. There are seven
events planned right now. and six of
these courses we player! on last
year.
The one unfamiliar ground will
be at UNC-Greensboro, but hope-
fully when the new season begins
on March 4 the golfers will
continue with their winning
achievements.





II Tyeiday. January 19, 1999
classifieds
� i
The East Carolinian
FOR RENT
FOR SALE
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
BEECH STREET Villas - Three bed-
room, two bath apartments, close to
campus, with laundry room, stove,
refrigerator, and dishwasher. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC 766-6209.
FOR RENT: Unfurnished 2 BR. 1
bath with living area & kitchen-local
phone, cable & parking provided.
$375 per month with deposit. Fe-
male students only. Non-smokers-no
pets. Call 919-497-0809. leave mes-
sage.
GLADIOLUS GARDENS One. two.
and three bedroom apartments. Free
cable. Located on 10th Street. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC 766-6209.
FOR RENT: six bedroom. 3 12
bath, fenced-in yard, pets OK, comer
of 4th and Oak St. Contact Betsy �
329-8668.
FREE 1ST month rent. Players Club.
Sublease 4 bedroom townhouse
with washerdryer and own person-
al bathroom for only $240 plus 14
utilities. Pool, basketball, volleyball,
tennis courts and gym. Call Derek
for more details at 355-4370
CANNON COURT Two bedroom. 1
12 bath townhouse. Includes stove,
refrigerator, dishwasher, washerdry-
er hook-up. on ECU bus route. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC. 756-6209.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$285month. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apts 125 Avery St. in Green-
ville - 5 blocks from campus. 758-
6596.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
STANCILL DRIVE, 2 bedroom. 1
bathroom, brick duplex, central
heatair. near ECU. $426 month,
pets extra with fee. Call 353-2717.
2 BR. APARTMENT with wash-
erdryer hook-ups. $325month.
Available February. Call 321-7956.
ECU AREA big 3 bedroom house.
Washer and dryer included. Living
room, dining room, front porch and
screened back porch. Pets OK. Call
830-9502.
APARTMENT FOR rent on 10th
Street, two bedroom, no deposit.
$400 a month. Pets okay, free cable
and water. Call 752-7097.
TIRED OF apartmentdorm room?
Young professional couple wishes to
share 2400 sq. ft. house with seri-
ous student. Spacious, upstairs
rooms with private bath available.
Access to all areas of house. Free
use of cable and laundry: private
phone line available. Located in a se-
cluded neighborhood within 10-15
minutes of medical school and uni-
versity. References from former med-
ical students available. Non-smoker a
must very affordable. Please call Ja-
son � 756-2636 for appoint-
mentmore information.
ROOMMATE WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED, 3 bed-
room located close to campus.
$135mo 13 utilities. 12 phone.
Call Jimmy at 752-9376 for more in-
formation.
FEMALE REPLACEMENT room-
mate needed to share 2 bedroom
apartment. Rent $185month. de-
posit $185. 12 utilities. 12 cable,
plus phone. Available DecJan. Call
756-3654.
LOOKING FOR mf roommate
ASAP to move into Dockside. Rent
$275month 13 bills. Sublease
until August. Must be able to toler-
ate smoke and dogs. Call Stacy or
Adrienne at 758-3364. No security
deposit required.
NEED ROOMMATE ASAPI Tar Riv-
er. $265month. Free water, cable,
walk to class, no deposit or lease.
Call Nick. 764-2277.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
small mansion. Must be friendly,
honest, responsible and not mind
smokers or cats. Hardwood floors,
fireplaces, spacious room. bar. wash-
erdryer, fountains, and 2 acre es-
tate. Deposit required. $200 per
month and 14 utilities. Call Chris
830-8828.
FOR SALE: brown sectional sofa
bed. blue recliner and two end ta-
bles. $250 or best offer (will sell
separately). Call 756-5617 for more
info.
SONY COMPACT disk player, holds
51 CD's, remote, well maintained,
less than one year old. $100. Call
Mark at 328-4190.
1991 MITSUBISHI Galant. good
condition. S2.B00. 762-4628.
PRE-PAID Phone cards. 106 min-
utes for $10. 216 minutes for $20.
For more information or to purchase.
call Kristy at 328-8426.
USED L-SHAPED sleeper-sofa and
recliner. 321-7956. $200.
20" RCA television. $135 OBO.
Dorm-size fridge. $50 OBO. Call
830-3605.
CUSTOM PRINTED T-shirts. Profes-
sion printers since 1981. Competitive
rates. Free shipping. Full art depart-
ment. We accept digital files in most
formats. 800-272-2066 culture-
works .com
NICE FUTON couch for sale, black,
asking $75 or best offer. Call Amy.
353-4715.
FUTON FOR sale. Large, wood
frame, wmattress �r cover. Like
new. $100. 328-6247.
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
(black). 2 dressers, full size bed. 2
VCRs. 3-piece center table, complete
stereo set. etc. 321-3242
AAAI Spring Break Panama City
$129! Boardwalk room with kitchen
near clubs! 7 parties-free drinks!
Daytona $149! South Beach $129!
Cocoa Beach $149! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
DORM SIZE FRIDGE for sale, bare-
ly used. Call 752-7097.
MOVING! 30 gallon aquarium. 10"
table saw, RC planes and boat. Mon-
goose mountain bike, tuxedo, sew-
ing machine. All in excellent condi-
tion! Low prices! Call 353-7473.
AAA! SPRING Break Bahamas Par-
ty Cruise! 5 nights $279! Includes
meals & parties! Awesome beaches,
nightlife! Departs from Florida! Can-
cun & Jamaica $399! springbreak-
travel.com 1-800-678-6386
SERVICES
ABRACADABRA NAILS now open!
$25 full set. $15 fills. $10 mani-
cures. Call 329-7235. or visit our
website http:www.ange
fire.comncAbracadabraNails.
HELP WANTED
LOCAL LAW firm has a part-time
filer position available.Responsibili-
ties include: opening, closing, main-
taining and storing files. Must be
computer literate. M-F. 12-5:30.
Please send resume to: Legal Admin-
istrator. 1698 E. Arlington Blvd
Greenville. NC 27858
EARN WHILE YOU learn, up to
$1,000.00 wk. Day and njprtt
shifts. Clean, secure working at-
mosphere. Playmates Adult En-
tertainment. 252-747-7686 for in-
terview.
LOSE WEIGHT now! Up to 30 lbs.
100 natural, doctor developed. Call
931-7022.
1-2 PART-TIME tennis instruc-
torattendants needed at River Birch
Tennis Center immediately. Pays
$5.15hr 10-20 hr.wk weekday
afternoons, some weekends. Call
328-4569.
1999 INTERNSHIPS! Don't get a
summer job Run a summer busi-
ness. www.tuitionpainters.com. tui-
paintGbellsouth.net or 800-393-
4521.
I)IS( () l It (l)
SPRING
MSS
SKYDIWE!
MMUai aVf BMaTTI
mom-nu
Serin, M DM Mai if ISM UauaKN ISm IMIaU
ncafHtkaiaaaNtolfCwclillwrlMmiknM!
Bahama Party
Cruise $279
9 tm � a �� � fm Fm � ikmm ikn
Panama $119
Clty-imi�i,iiili���i ,ium
Jamaica $439
Cancun $399
7 Ht� ��MM � FM FM 30 � OMa
Spring Break Traivi-Our 12th Year!
1-800-678-6386
SPRING YOUTH indoor soccer
coaches. The Greenville Recreation
8- Parks Department is recruiting for
12 to 16 part-time youth soccer
coaches for the spring youth indoor
soccer program. Applicants must
possess some knowledge of the soc-
cer skills and have the ability and pa-
tience to work with youth. Applic-
ants must be able to coach young
people ages 5-18, in soccer funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3 p.m. until
7 p.m. with some night and wee-
kend coaching. Flexible with hours
according to class schedules. This
program will run from Mid March to
April. Salary rates start at $5.15 per
hour. For more information, please
call Ben James. Michael Daly, or
Judd Crumpler at 329-4550 after
2p.m.
TAKING APPLICATIONS for substi-
tutes and full-time teaching posi-
tions. For more information call Har-
mony Child Care at 756-6229. Li-
cense 7456138
FULL OR PART-TIME cooks wanted
at Lupton's Seafood. Call Bruce Lup-
ton at 752-4174.
WANTED: PART-time warehouse
and delivery. License required. Apply
in person at Larry's Carpetland. 3010
E. 10th Street. Greenville. NC
ECU DINING Services has great op-
portunities in catering for smiling
faces! We offer great'pay. flexible
schedules, and benefits! We also
have supervisory positions available
to experienced servers. Attend our
hiring session on Tuesday. January
26, 1999 at 5 PM in Sweethearts of
Todd Dining Hall to get more infor-
mation. Refreshments will be served.
Come prepared to interview and
learn about our opportunities or call
328-4339 for information.
LOOKING FOR A PART-TIME job?
The ECU Telefund is hiring students
to contact alumni for the ECU An-
nual Fund Drive. $5.50 per hour.
Make your own schedule. If interest-
ed, call 328-4212. M-TH between the
hours of 3-6PM
PT CLERICAL worker wanted.
Some accounting it typing pre-
ferred. Flexible hours Monday
through Friday. Call 756-0496.
JOIN THE BBC. - The Buffalo Brew
Crew. BW-3 now hiring part-time po-
sitions for kitchen and delivery staff.
BW-3. 114 East 5th Street. Apply
within.
WANTED: PAYING $6.50 an hour
plus bonuses for qualified telemar-
keters. No Friday or Saturday work.
Hours: 5:30-9 p.m. Monday-Thurs-
day; 4:30-8 p.m. Sunday. Apply in
person 5-9 p.m. Energy Savers
Windows & Siding. Inc Wintergreen
Commercial Park, Suite O. Firetower
Road, Greenville.
BABYSITTER NEEDED all day on
Wednesdays to care for two child-
ren. Please do not call if you have
morning classes. No smokers,
please. Call 355-7875.
BABYSITTER WANTED. Must be
experienced, referenced and have
own car. Must be available on Tues-
day and Thursday mornings; other
hours are variable, including some
weekends. Call 321-0580 until 8
p.m.
IN-LINE Hockey Coaches. The
Greenville Recreation & Parks De-
partment is recruiting individuals
with some background knowledge
with in-fine hockey or ice-hockey. Ap-
plicants will be responsible for
coaching youth in-line hockey
leagues at the Jaycee Park. Some
weekend work required.Salary rates
range from $5.15 to 6.50 per hour.
Starting date is February 1999. For
more information, please call Ben
James. Michael Daly, or Judd Crum-
pler at 329-4550 after 2PM.
GREENHOUSE PRESCHOOL is
looking for substitute teachers.
Great experience for CDFR and Elem
majors. Call 355-2404 for inter-
views.
SEEKING RESPONSIBLE, reliable
student to pick up my child from his
school and keep in my home from
2:30 to 6:00, Monday through Fri-
day. Please call Donna Walker at
758-9240 after 6:00 p.m.
'86 GREENVILLE Stars needs soc-
cer coach. 2-3 practices a week.
Games Saturdays, some away. Sal-
ary based on experience. Call 355-
1697
S 8- M Construction looking for part-
time clerical help 15-20 hours per
week. Computer skills required. Call
321-1991 or 355-2404 for interview.
Ask for Gwynne.
BABYSITTER NEEDED immediate-
ly for Tuesday and Thursday 11:00
thru 5:00 or 6:00. Call 355-1621 for
information and have references.
CHILD CARE 2:30-6:15 1-2 days
per week for 3 and 6-year old. Good
driving record and references neces-
sary. 355-7598 (Near PCC)
GREEK PERSONALS
CONGRATULATIONS TO Christina
Yarborough on being elected Panhel-
lenic Rush Director. Love, your Delta
sisters
WELCOME BACK Gamma Sigma
Sigma girls! Get ready for a fun, ex-
citing, and service filled semester.
CONGRATULATIONS TO The new
executive officers of Delta Zeta: Pres-
ident- Marvelle Sullivan, Vice-Presi-
dent of Rush- Heather Cline. Vice-
President of New Membership- Erin
McCracken. vice President of Pro-
gramming- Heather Schultheis.
Treasurer- Michelle Bartlett. Secre-
tary- Sara Boyd, House Manager-
Jenny Simmons. Panhellenic Repre-
sentative- Jessica Smith. We know
yuu win cfo a great job. Love, your
sisters
HAPPY FOUNDER'S Day Gamma
Sigma Sigma! Congratulations on 25
years of service in the community.
OTHER
SPRING BREAK 99! Cancun' Nas-
sau ' Jamaica 'Mazatlan Acapulco
' Bahamas Cruise Florida Florida '
South Padre. Travel Free and make
lots of Cash! Top reps are offered
full-time staff jobs. Lowest price
Guaranteed. Call now for details!
www.classtravel.com 800838-6411
CRUISE SHIP Employment - work-
ers earn up to$2.000month
(wtips & benefits). Word Travel!
Land-Tour jobs up to$5.000-
$7.000summer. Ask us how! 517-
336-4235 ext. C53622
EARN $500 per week. Stuff envel-
opes, make earrings, record videos,
etc. Free info. Send SASE: New Life
Mail. P.O Box 562602. Miami. FL
33156.
THE DEPARTMENT OF Communi-
cation Sciences and Disorders will
be providing the speech, language
and hearing screening for students
who are fulfilling requirements for
admission to Upper Division on the
following dates: Screenings for stud-
ents in the School of Education will
be held January 25 or January 27,
1999 from 5:00-6:00 p.m. Screen-
ings for students in the College of
Arts and Sciences. General College,
and the Schools of Art. Health and
Human Performance. Human Envi-
ronmental Sciences and Music will
be held February 1 or 3. 1999.These
are the only screening dates during
the Spring Semester. The screening
will be conducted in the Belk Annex
(ECU Speech and Hearing Clinic) lo-
cated next to the Belk Building
(School of Allied Health Sciences),
near the intersection of Charles
Street and the 264 By-pass. No ap-
pointment is needed-Please do not
call their office for a appointment.
Waiting is outside the clinic waiting
room. Sign in begins at 4:50PM.
Screenings are conducted on a first
come, first serve basis.
COMMUNICATIONS &
CRIM. JUSTICE MJRS:

WE NEED your experience! Your
achievements in everyday situations
can be useful to others, the REAL
Crisis Center is recruiting volunteer
crisis counselors to help our com-
munity. We will be offering a training
class beginning Jan. 25, 1999. For
more information, call 758-4357.
TIME MANAGEMENT: Monday
3:30-4:30. The Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development is of-
fering the following workshop on
January 25th. If you are interested
in this workshop, contact the center
at 328-6661.
HEY STUDENTS, The Greenville-
Pitt County Special Olympics is cur-
rently recruiting volunteers for the
following sports: Bowling, swim-
ming, volleyball recreation camp,
track and field, and Special Olympics
Spring Games. For more informa-
tion, contact Kelvin Yarrell or Dean
Foy at 329-4844 or 329-4541.
TIME MANAGEMENT: Tuesday
11:00-12:00. The Center for Courr;
seling and Student Development is, -
offering the following workshop onw
January 19th. If you are interesteS
in this workshop, contact the center
at 328-6661.gi
SNOW GOOSE Contra Dance Re-
treat! Lake Mattamuskeet Lodge.
Feb. 5-7. Dancing, nature walks, -
good food! Students: $14-17, others I
$26 and up, lodging extra. Co-spon-
sor: ECU Folk 8- Country Dancers. -1
328-0237 for more information. i�f
ADVERTISE
IN THE
CLASSSIFIEDS.
IT WORKS!
NEED A PART TIME JOB?
RPSINC.
btotong fee mcxMxtwcxiK to load vans and
unload Miss for the am shift how Maun vo Sun.
$7.5Qnoun tuition assistance available after 30days.
Rjturc aim opportunity In oprraiJcra and m�nif�v
mem possible. Appacaoora can be Med outat 2410
Unked Drive (near the aquatics center) GmnvHt

SI'UIM, 1(1(1 h
Advertise in
The East
Carolinian
classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE$4.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 5t each
STUDENT LINE AD RATE$2.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 5t each
Must present a valid ECU I.O. to qualify. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to refuse
fhis rate for any ad deemed to be non-student or business
related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE. . . $1.00
add to above line rate for either
BOLD or ALL CAPS type.
. All classified ads placed by individuals or campus
groups must be
prepaid. Classified ads placed by a business must
be prepaid unless
credit has been established.
. . Cancelled ads can be removed from the paper if
notification is
made before the deadline, but no cash refunds are
given. No proofs or tearsheets are available.
The Personals section of the classifieds is intended
for
non-commercial communication placed by individu-
als or campus groups. Business ads will not be
placed in this section.
All Personals are subject to editing for indecent or
inflammatory
language as determined by the editors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE
4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue
We reserve the right to change a deadline
for holidays or as necessitated

ri
become a member.
Launch your organization
into cyberspace.
www.
clubhouse
ecu.edu
;�





!MENT: Tuesdij
Center for Courf�j"
it Development 1st
ring workshop jn;
you are interested'
contact the eantv3
Contra Dance R�
amuskeet Lodge,
g. nature walks, ��'
its: $14-17, others:
ig extra. Co-spon- '�
Country Dancers
information. .
t Carolinian
r business
r campus
ess must .
I
Recreational Services In f f
SPRINGQ9
A New Year! A New You!
Adventure
1
fc
Skiing-Wintergreen Friday Trip 1
3x Jan. 22Reg. 120
Winter Backpacking
4x Jan. 22-24Reg. 118
Climbing-Pilot Mountain Trip 1
4x Jan. 23Reg. 115
Kayak-Roll Clinics SESSION 1
2x Jan. 25Reg. 121
Advanced Climbing Sessions Session 1:
3x Jan 26-Mar 9 Tues. 's Reg. 1 25
Snorkel-Crystal River Manatee Experience
4x Jan 29-31
Reg. 119
Arise
Wheelchair Basketball Practice
Jan.23 11:00 AM- noon SRC Forum
Free
WheelPower Dance Troupe Practice
Jan.24 3:00-5:00 PM SRC Free
Wheelchair Softball
Jan.29 7:00- 9:00 PM
SRC Forum Free
WheelPower Dance Troupe Practice
Jan.31 3:00-5:00 PM SRC Free
Intramurals
BasketballBB Preview (m,vkcu im captain's
ceitf. dlntc Tues. 19 Reg, mtg. 5:00 pm MSC 244
Bowling Registration meeting
Tues. 26 5:00 pm MSC 244
Racquetball Tourney entry deadline
Weds. 27 5:00 pm SRC 128
Fitness

Exercise Wisely for Faculty & Staff I
Jan.11-Mar.5 MWF 12:10-12:50PM
SRC 240 $25 (nonmembers) Starts Jan. 11
Introduction to Slide
Jan. 19 5:30 PM
SRC 239
Ab-Solutions
Jan. 19 5:30 PM
SRC 240
6:30 PM
Healthy Living
Jan. 19-May 4 Tues. 12:10-12:50PM
SRC Class $70 mem.$85 non-mem. Jan.4
. . vV ' � I � w
"
�15
laiChi
Jan.19-Feb. 11 SRC 238 ThTh 12:10-
12:50 PM $15 mem.$25 non-mem. Jan. 4 -
15
A Crash Course in Fitness
Jan.20 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM SRC Classroom
$3.00 mem.$8 non-mem. Jan. 11-19
Introduction to Step
Jan.20 5:30 PM
Noon Track Attack
Jan.25 - Feb. 26 SRC Track MWF 12:10
12:50 $5 mem.$25 non-mem. Jan. 4 - 22
Adult Swim Lessons - beg. & inter.
Jan.26 - Feb. 11 SRC Pool TTh 7:00 - 8:00 PM
$25 mem.$35 nonmem. Jan. 4-21
Learn to Play Squash
Jan.26 and 28 TTh 5:30 - 6:30 PM
SRC Courts 7&8

Advanced Beginner Yoga
Jan.26 - Mar.2 SRC 238 Tues. 5:30 - 6:45 PM
$15 mem.$25 non-mem. Jan. 11 - 25
Introductory Yoga
Jan.27-Mar.3 SRC 238 Wat 3:00 or
Th at 5:30 $15 mem.$25 non-mem. Jan. 11
25

��





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Watch your mailbox for more information
about Return to Campus Living Sign-Up,
scheduled for February 15-19, and
the 1999-2000 REACH FOR THE STARS
( Campus Living Sweepstakes. s '
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 19, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 19, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1311
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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