The East Carolinian, December 8, 1998






I!

Tuesday
High: 79
Low: 60
Wednesday
High: 65
Low: 62
pJHT Low: 62 � M j � a
Efpnline Survey O YVV I 1 Yl "I O I'l
Does ECU need a new � fl � � M
lliTyesTsyoNo I J 1i fl �
www.tec.ecu.edu V- V-i- V JL B B XJLVAA A
www.tec.ecu.edu
in the spirit AIDS Awareness Week, did you
wear a condom the last time you had sex?
TUESDAY. DECEMBER 8 ,1998 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 29
Iriuduali' SrhotoTIn mipnrl.i!il fool for ffr
future. Fffl! offers many swvins when considering
Somewhere to gpl a Wasters Degree
I'Mtiii'i's. page 7
Student arrested Group combats drinking problem
in parking scam
Freshman caugkt making
counterfeit residence permits
i: u I) v i s
M i l � II I I IK
Freshman William I lorKicher III was
arrested tor counterfeiting resident parking
permits.
Hortacher received a parking ticket by
ECl Police late Tuesday niiihr for parking
in a staff spot beside Jones Hall. Early
Wednesday morning, when the paperwork
was processed, ii was discovered that the
serial number on I lorlaehcr's resident per-
mit didn't match any numbers that were
issued from T.( :i this year.
"Police began arriving at Aycock around
�xM) p.m said Chris Jencttc. I lorlaehcr's
roommate. "The) staked out his car and
then tame into our room, questioned me
and searched my side of the room
Alter the police finished questioning his
roommate, Horlacher arrived at Aycock
where his side of the room was searched
and he was arrested; v
" The E( M police confiscated all of his
disks. Ins C' . and his car. anything the)
thought contained evidence of the counter-
feiting,1' Jencttc said.
I lorlacher replicated the resident park-
ing permit by using the program Microsoft
Publisher;
"lie completely Freehanded the whole
thing, he punted them out ,m compared
them to the real permits to make sure they
were just right Jencttc said, "lie com-
pleted the first one about two weeks ago
"I don't think anything like this has ever
happened before, it's a first said Matt
Yick, a fellow resident of Aycock Hall.
It was a first incident of this nature,
reported Officer frank Knight of the ECl'
Police Department. "We have never had
anyone recreate a parking permit. In the
"He completely freehanded the whole
thing, he printed them out and com-
pared them to the real permits to
make sure they were just right. He
completed the first one about two
weeks ago
Chris Jenette
Hoilnchei's roommate
past the) have been stolen and then resold
to others
Knight said that the past offenders were
onlv convicted of obtaining property under
false pretenses. They were issued a tine,
given community service and hail their cur-
rent parking permit taken away. I lorlacher
wasn't so lucky, lie is charged with one
felony count of obtaining property under
lalse pretenses, and a misdemeanor count
of computer fraud. The arraignment for his
felony charge was on Thursday, Dec. 3
when a court date was set fot late February.
The arraignment for his misdemeanor
charge is set for later this week.
Inter-Fraternity
Awards Banquet held
New slate of officers
inducted for 1999
Di v.
N W 11 I! I
I UMIIIH
Awards
Council
held at
Intei-l-ratcrnitv
Banquet was
Sweethearts dining room to induct a
new slate of officers and to distribute
various awards to distinguished fraternity
members,
The 1999 I EG Executive Board, led by
its president, Brian 'luck, will govern the
18 ECU fraternities until next December.
The board organizes intermural sports and
educates fraternities on philanthropic
work, among other duties.
"It's just a chance for fraternities to
come together once a week said Joe
Donlevy, current executive vice president.
The board also distributed this year's
awards. The Chancellor's Cup Award was
given to Beta Chi and Delta Chi, the fra-
ternities that received the most points for
playing intermural sports. The Scholarship
Awards, based on GPA, were given to
.Alpha Sigma Phi's pledge class of 1997 and
Sigma Alpha Epsilon's spring 1998. The
individual awards went to Brian Biekctt of
Lambda Chi Alpha for Fall 97 and Aaron
Sheppard of Phi Kappa Psi for Spring 98.
The University Service Award went to Phi
Kappa Psi for work done outside of the fra-
Brian Tuck, president
elect of the Inter-
Fraternity Council.
PHOTO BY STEPHANIE WHITIOCK
ternity. The Most
Outstanding Pledge Class
went to Kappa Sigma for
best representation of
future leaders on campus.
Philanthropist of the Year
went to Delta Sigma Phi fot
having completed the
most amount of service
hours. Current presi-
dent Micah Retzlaff
received the award
from Amanda Garner
for Panhellenic Greek
Leader of the Year for proving to be the
best leader of the Greek System. I EC
(ireek Man of the Year went to Chris Rev
for his many accomplishments. The Most
Outstanding fraternity Award was given to
the fraternity that in all aspects of Greek
life proved to be the best. This award, pre-
sented by Micah Retzlaff, was given to
Sigma Alpha Epsilon.
"Winners stood out clearly amongst the
chapter Dean of Students Ron Speier
said.
As the 'banquet came to a close, new
IbC president Brian Tuck gave thanks to
his predecessor.
" I would like to thank Micah Retzlaff
he said. "I le has left big shoes to fill, and
will be sorely missed. I would also like to
thank the rest of the '98 I EC Board of
Executives. We have an outstanding board
to lead I EC this vear
SEE IFC, PAGE 2
The IMPACT committee works to provide services which may combat a variety of alcohol related problems on campus.
PHOTOS BY MARC CRIPPEN
Help for drinking, drug use
on the way
PBTBR O.vwvoi
ASSISTANT NKWS EDITOR
With the ever-increasing awareness of stu-
dents who are abusing alcohol and other
drugs, the Center for Counseling and
Student Development at ECU has begun
looking into the possibility of hiring spe-
cialized counselors to help curb the prob-
lem.
Due to numbers of underage drinkers at
ECU and other universities in the area.
many faculty members and students have
begun work to start a support group for
people who have been affected by alcohol
and other drus.
The group, in progressive stages will be
sponsored by a committee known as
Interventions to Make Positive Alcohol
Changes Together (IMPACT).
While numbers of drinkers at ECU are
below the national standards, IMPACT
feels it can focus on many other ways to
help combat the drinking problem.
Recently the committee has been focusing
on ways to help not only students with alco-
hol and drug problems, but also work with
students who have had problems with
friends and family who have been affected.
Bob Motphet . head counselor for the
Center for Substance Abuse, helps stu-
dents with drug and alcohol problems
ranging from simple possession to drinking
and driving charges. Statistics have recent-
ly shown that males who drink are eight
times more likely to die accidentally than
non-drinkers, and females who drink are at
an even greater risk of dying of a fatal car
accident than males. Morphet wants the
group to focus on the effects and problems
concerning binge drinking
'The one issue which we are really
focusing on is binge alcohol; drinking not
where people are drinking one drink but
when people, have five or more drinks
Morphet said. "That's where we have the
most problem when involving problems on
campus such as vandalism and people start
to miss class due to drinking
Donna Walsh, director of Health and
Performance celebrates Kwanza
Thespians of Diversity held
play to celebrate holiday
Rvciivki. HlOOON
si Jp WRITES
The ECU Thespians of Diversity held
their fifth performance in Mendenhall to
celebrate the principles of Kwanza, the
African-American spiritual holiday.
Since their establishment in 1993, the
Thespians of Diversity have been devoted
to entertaining and educating the commu-
nity. "We are committed to encourage
minority representation in the theater
said Tory Williams, director of the
Thespians of Diversity. "It is important to
have entertainment for minority people"
SEE KWANZA. PAGE 2
ECU Thespians of Oiversity held performance to celebrate the principles of Kwanza.
PHOTOS BY MARC CRIPPEN






Tmtdiy, Dtcimbir 8, 1998
news
Thi Eitt Carolinian
news
j briefs Tuition hike affects
summer classes
Kwanza
continued from page t
I
$12 billion plan to
compensate
tobacco farmers
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP)
Cigarette manufacturers won't
lagree to a $12 billion plan to com-
pensate farmers worried about an
anticipated drop in demand for
?their crop.
The plan was recommended
jby the National Tobacco Growers
Vssociation as a means of soften-
ing the blow from the $206 billion
settlement signed this month by
the tobacco companies. Farmers
expect the resulting hike in ciga-
Krette prices will depress demand
for tobacco.
(Two dead in accident
in Davidson County
LEXINGTON, N.C. (AP)
IT wo men are dead following a
�head-on collision along N.C. 150
jin Davidson County.
The state Highway Patrol said
JDavid Lewis Wilson, 74, of
inston-Salem and James Dewey
Veaver, 83, of Lexington were
killed Monday in the 12:55 p.m.
accident about 8 miles northwest
of Lexington.
Gulf Islands National Seashore
alans to reopen park
Underad students
hit harder than
graduate students
Gulf Island National
Seashore plan to
reopen park
OCEAN SPRINGS, Miss.
') Rangers at the Gulf Islands
jtional Seashore plan to reopen
park's campgrounds next
bnth.
(The park was damaged by
brricane Georges in September,
cleanup from the storm is
peered to continue for the next
: months on the islands,
i Rangers from the National
Irk Service on Sunday used
leo and aerial photographs to
ow residents the more than $8
Jllion in damage to the islands
ated in the Gulf of Mexico just
the coast.
Caroline Jordan
staff writer
The proposed 1999 summer school
tuition increase might affect the
pocketbooks of some undergradu-
ate students.
"We're mandated from the
General Administration that we
needed to charge by the credit
hour instead of by the block said
Michael Balko of the Cashier's
Office. "The reason for this is that
Professor
killed in
biking
accident
Dr. Peterson taught at
School of Medicine
Amy Sheridan
NEWS EDITOR
Dr. Gary M.
Peterson, asso-
ciate professor
of anatomy and
cell biology at
the ECU
School of
Medicine died
Nov. 22 after a
car hit his bicy-
cleHum
M
Dr. Gary M. Peterson
FILE PHOTO
Georgia National
eneral retires
Suard
t
ATLANTA (AP) Maj. Gen.
illiam P. Bland Jr adjutant gen-
of the Georgia National
Lard, will retire in January.
! Gov. Zell Miller appointed
land in 1990 to guide the com-
ned 12,000 members of the
sorgia Army National Guard,
Georgia Air National Guard
the State Defense Force
Ised in Atlanta.
Australia's slalom
jronze Medal Winner
lecomes famous face
A M M O T H
lOUNTAIN.Calif. (AP) Zali
leggall's summer was hectic,
lammed with media requests
id personal appearances.
She treasured every moment.
"I was definitely Australia's
veetheart for a while Steggall
d after claiming a bronze medal
the slalom in the Winter
Jlympics at Nagano, Japan. It was
Australia's first Olympic Alpine
hedal.
"It was amazingly big, which
fas fun she said. "Australia is
ed to getting a lot of medals in
lie summer Olympics and the
ublic gets quite picky and only
xpects golds.
behind.
At the time
of his death, Peterson was the pres-
ident of the NC Society for
Neuroscience. He was a member of
the Society of Neuroscience, the
Cajal Club, the NC Association for
Biomedical Research, the American
Association of Anatomists, the
American Epilepsy Society, and the
Alexander von Humboldt
Association of America.
In addition to Peterson's epilep-
sy research, he was an artistic pho-
tographer who enjoyed traveling,
hiking, diving, and skiing. He par-
ticipated in bicycle races and car
shows organized to raise money
needed for treatment of different
diseases. He was also recently certi-
fied to instruct handicapped per-
sons in scuba-diving at Pitt County
Memorial Hospital's Aquatic
Center.
"Gary was on the edge of every-
thing he did said Dr. Jack Brinn,
Peterson's department chair. "He
was a very caring person, and I
think if you had an opportunity to
look around, vou would find a num-
ber of people that he had helped
out of a personal crisis
Dr. Peterson is survived by his
wife, two daughters and one grand-
son. Dr. Peterson is a native of San
Jose, Ca. and he completed a
degree in Psychology at Humboldt
State University. He received his
postdoctoral training at the Salk
Institute from 1980-83.
Additionally, he studied at
University of California at Irvine
and U.C. at San Diego. While illus-
trating his passion for other cultures
and travel, he was the recipient of
an Alexander von Humboldt fel-
lowship for research conducted in
Germany. Besides teaching at
ECU, Peterson taught neuro-
science in Guadalajara, Mexico and
Antigua.
summer school is pretty much self
supported, so we have to charge for
what summer school actually costs
in order to pay faculty and so
forth
Balko said that in an academic
year, the in-state student only pays
fot about 19 of what tuition costs
and the taxpayers cover the rest
According to Clayton Sessums,
from the Division of Continuing
Studies, there will be two tuition
changes this year.
"The two changes include the
usual annual increase and now this
year it is proposed that we charge
by the credit hour for summer
school, not by block as we have in
past years Sessums said. "Some
students will pay less, say for
instance, a student taking three
hours
Dan Bishop, ECU comptroller,
says the proposed difference will
be that summer school students
will be billed by the credit hour
instead of by blocks. The blocks
are broken into a quarter basis.
Undergraduate blocks range from
zero to two, three to five, six to
eight, nine to 11 and 12 or more.
Graduate blocks run from zero to
two, three to five, six to eight and
nine or more.
"It will cost undergraduates a
little more and graduates a little
less Bishop said. "Summer
school has nothing to do with the
General Assembly 2 increase
According to Bishop, the 1999
spring rate will be used to figure
out the cost of summer session as
well as future semester rates.
"Summer school tuition is set in
relation to the academic year
tuition and prorated by the amount
of credit hours taken said
Richard Brown, Vice Chancellor of
Administration and Finance.
"This is all strictly an estimate
Balko said. "We will still go back to
the block for next fall and spring
Bishop said the $918 academic
year rate that is recommended by
the General Administration and set
by the Board of Governors will be
the basis to figure out what the
summer school rate is. The same
procedure is followed for out-of-
state rates.
getting better and people are
beginning to recognize that we are
an organization on
campus said Junior William
Best, a member of the ensemble.
Performances have been held
throughout the semester, involv-
ing community members such as
Mayor Nancy Jenkins and local
elementary students. "We are
smaller and can mobilize, do more
in the community Williams said.
"We are also a happy and uplifting
group
Their latest performance was
centered around ��Kwanza, an
African-American holiday which
was created in 1966 by Dr. Ron
Karenga. This holiday is celebrat-
ed from December 26 to January 1
and is it is a cultural and spiritual,
yet non-religious holiday.
The concept was created dur-
ing the civil rights era, when Black
Americans, specifically Dr.
Karenga, realized that there was no
African-American holiday that
related to their "growth, develop-
ment, or essence It was formed
under the theory called Kawaida
which states that social revolution-
ary change can be achieved by
revealing to individuals their cul-
tural heritage. Kwanza is, however,
not only a celebration, it is a way of
life designed to help Black
Americans relate to the past, to
understand the present, and deal
with the future.
During the seven day period,
candles are lit each day for the dif-
ferent principles which are cele-
brated: unity, self-determination,
collective work and responsibility,
cooperative economics, purpose,
creativity, and faith. These seven
tenants allow African-Americans to
practice the principles that helped
their ancestors endure oppression
and slavery. The Thespians of
Diversity had skits prepared to
illustrate these seven principles;
however, due to the low turnout
not all of them were performed.
'This is not solely an African-
American holiday, its principles
are for everyone said Na'im K.
Ackbar, student and minority peer
mentor. "Since I don't celebrate
Christmas, it is a holiday that I can
celebrate without religious conno-
tations and still get in the spirit of
the holiday season Ackbar also
visits area elementary schools and
shares with students the value of
Kwanza to everyone. "We can all
learn from each other said
Ackbar.
HINDUISMworships 300,000
different gods
ISLAM .devoted to one
distant God
BUDDHISMbelieves
no God or gods exist
CHRISTIANITYbelieves and interacts
with one God
NEW AGEbelieves we ourselves
are God
Are they really all the same?
Confused about the differences among the major world religions? For a free and
easy-to-read article describing Hinduism, Islam, Buddhism, Christianity and New
Age .and how to connect with the Divine .call or email us. Just ask for the article,
"Connecting with the Divine
Sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ
1-800-236-9238 � escmail@ccci.org � http:religions.everystudent.com
i
The Pi
NEWYOR
that's sacre
gions, pick
God, and n
around the
offending ar
That wi
before Jeff
founder of
shepherded
"The Prince
the story of 1
reality.
"It is so i
ed, so much
simply m
Katzenberg t
its Dec. 14 is
Katzenbei
and scholar;
Vatican, stu
spoke to pn
divinity schoc
things right
anyone's to
Moses action
tional tie-in v
age containing
and tickets to
Letter bo
in
CANBERRA,
man accused
bomb that ex
mail sorting
charges when
police said Sui
Colin Geor
arrested Frida;
ted to Canbe
slashed wrist a
until his coi
Tuesday.
Australian F
Sergeant Dan
that Dunstan
charges.
Police said a
home had reve;
mentation rel;
whom other ex:
sent.
"It is also
defendant has 1
mailing of 27
devices in the
Territory, Nc
Queensland ar
said.
Dunstan WI
Saturday with c
ing property
device, with int
By a Rot
Several
earth b
VANDENBEI
BASE, Calif. 0
lite that will st
formations wi
Saturday
The satelliti
XL rocket droj
of an L-1011 j
40,000 feet abo'
off the centra
NASA spoki
Drelick said.
The launch
ning of a two-y
sion to learn mc
tion of stars anc
Scientists ws
composition of
and monitor ho
collapse to forr
said Jim Sahli,
Goddard Space
Greenbelt, Md.
the mission.
Pope's Po
be ler
WARSAW, Poh
Paul II has exte
to his native
address parli:
Warsaw, a ne
Saturday.
The pope's
5 and last unti
longer than o
according to th
Zycie. He has ;
his itinerary brii
stops to 19.





-� CWtHHn
The Prince of Egypt
NEW YORK (AP) Animate a story
that's sacred to three major reli-
gions, pick a voice to sound like
God, and mass-market the result
around the world all without
offending anybody.
That was the delicate task
before Jeffrey Katzenberg, co-
founder of DreamWorks, as he
shepherded the forthcoming film
"The Prince of Egypt" which tells
the story of Moses from concept to
reality.
"It is so much more complicat-
ed, so much more challenging than
simply making a movie
Katzenberg told Time magazine in
its Dec. 14 issue.
Katzenberg met with 700 clerics
and scholars, journeved to the
Vatican, studied the BibJe and
spoke to professors at Harvard's
divinity school, all in an effort to get
things right without stepping on
anyone's toes. And instead of
Moses action figures, the promo-
tional tie-in will consist of a pack-
age containing a book, compact disc
and tickets to the movie.
Letter bomber appears
in court
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) The
man accused of sending a letter
bomb that exploded at a Canberra
mail sorting center faces more
charges when he appears in court,
police said Sunday.
Colin George Dunstan, 43, was
arrested Friday after he was admit-
ted to Canberra Hospital with a
slashed wrist and was ordered held
until his court .appearance on
Tuesday.
Australian Federal Police Acting
Sergeant Daryl Webb confirmed
that Dunstan will face additional
charges.
Police said a search of Dunstan's
home had revealed items and docu-
mentation relating to people CO
whom other explosive devices were
sent.
"It is also believed that the
defendant has been involved in the
mailing of 27 further explosive
devices in the Australian Capital'
Territory, New South Wales,
Queensland and Victoria police
said.
Dunstan was formally charged
Saturday with one count of damag-
ing property with an explosive
device, with intent to endanger life.
By a Rocket Ferried
Several miles above
earth by a jetliner
VANDENBERG AIR FORCE
BASE, Calif. (AP) A NASA satel-
lite that will study star and planet
formations was put into orbit
Saturday
The satellite was on a Pegasus
XL rocket dropped from the belly
of an L-1011 jetliner flying about
40,000 feet above the Pacific Ocean
off the central California coast,
NASA spokeswoman Donna
Drelick said.
The launch marks the begin-
ning of a two-year $64 million mis-
sion to learn more about the forma-
tion of stars and planets.
Scientists want to determine the
composition of interstellar clouds
and monitor how they cool as they
collapse to form stars and planets,
said Jim Sahli, spokesman for the
Goddard Space Flight Center in
Greenbelt, Md which will manage
the mission.
Pope's Poland visit to
be lengthened
WARSAW, Poland (AP) Pope John
Paul II has extended a planned visit
to his native Poland and may
address parliament while in
Warsaw, a newspaper reported
Saturday.
The pope's trip will begin June
5 and last until June 14, one day
longer than originally planned,
according to the daily newspaper
Zycie. He has added new cities to
his itinerary bringing his number of
stops to 19.
The trip would be John Paul's
eighth to Poland since becoming
pope in 1978. During his stay, he is
expected to beatify more than 100
Poles killed under Nazi occupation.
NC Edwards, Faircloth
Spend More than $17
million, records show
major candidates in the U.S. Senate
race spent more than $17.2 million,
according to federal campaign
records, making it the third most
expensive race in state history.
Federal Election Commission
reports filed last week show U.S.
Sen. Lauch Faircloth spent more
than challenger John Edwards, who
unseated Faircloth in the Nov. 3
election. Faircloth spent $9,270,910
FEC figures show, while Edwards
spent $8,050,297 during the same
period. The race ranks behind the
$26.3 million senatorial race
between U.S. Sen. Jesse Helms
and Gov. Jim Hunt in 1984 and the
$25.5 million battle between
Helms and former Charlotte mayor
Harvey Gantt for Helms' seat in
1990.
lUlr A jWcu






4 TmidtY, Dtcimttf 8. 1998
news
Ths East Carolinian
10-year enrollment plan
Preliminary report
announces projections
SliSANNE MlLENKEVlCH
STAFF WRITF.ll
ECU recently submitted a pre-
liminary report to the North
Carolina General Assembly about
the university's 10 year enrollment
projections and goals.
"The General Assembly will
look at how to meet the projected
capacity with new buildings and
distant education programs and;
decide how to accommodate stu-
dents with laboratories, classrooms
and more faculty said Dr. Robert
Thompson, planning and institu-
tional research director.
According to the Office of
Planning and Institutional
Research's 1998-2008 Long Range
Enrollment Projections, it is esti-
mated that by the year 2008 ECU
will have an enrollment of 20,637
students while it has set a goal for
23,280 students. However, the
UNC General Assembly has pro-
jected that the university will have
the capacity to accommodate
23,714 students.
To develop the estimates, ECU
considered the issues of growth in
the pool of potential students, com-
petition, student qualifications,
financial implications and the uni-
versity itself.
Researchers estimate that with
the completion of projects such as
Joyner Library, the university's
capacity could rise from the current
total of 17,800 to 19,500 by the year
2008.
Other projects in the planning
stages include a science laboratory
and technology building, which is
planned to be completed by 2002
and would increase capacity of stu-
dents by 1,700 students.
By 2003 the university wants to
complete an addition to the Rivers
Building, which would have a posi-
tive impact upon the home eco-
nomics and nursing programs; how-
ever, it would not increase the
capacity of the institution.
Additionally, ECU wants to
begin a project to build new facili-
ties for the School of Medicine,
though this also would not increase
student capacity. Furthermore,
ECU is considering building a new
multipurpose center to meet the
needs of the athletic programs.
Downtown Greenville
Sharkys

10-12 Doors
open at 9:00
Guy's in at
12:00 after
the show
for more info
call 757-3881
Ladies use Sharky's
alleyway entrance
�admJhfa fa, fm you!
liiElllfiAN
HUNKS
WAYS TO
ROLL
Bowline. Alley
at Mendetliall
Student Genten,
AouaI Jo 50$
a (fame 1-6un
Jim nental included
WEDNESDAY & FRIDAY
A GAME!
ikoe netttal included
1-6PM
EVERY 2ND AND 4TH
SATURDAY NIGHT OF
EACH MONTH FROM
8PM-11PM
BOWL UNDER BLACKUGHT
FREE SHOE RENTAL
PIZZA fc DRINKS FROM 8-9PH
ALL-U-CAN EAT
$6.25 PER PERSON FROM 8-11PM
$5.50 PER PERSON AFTER 9PM
CALL 328-4740 FOR DETAILS.
NOWHIRING
Orientation Assistants for 1999-2000
Orientation & the First-Year Experience � 214 Whichard Bldg. � 328-4173
For more information, call the Orientation Office or attend an
Information Session in 208 Whichard Building:
� December 2,1998 (Wednesday)-4:00 p.m.
� January 18,1999 (Monday)-4:00p.m.
Applications are now available in 214 Whichard Building.
Deadline for completed applications is January 22,1999 at 5:00 p.m.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 19,1999 8:00p.m.
pump n wii
Jill km srms
START YOUR SEMESTER
OUT WITH A BANG!
Come see renowned speaker
and enthusiast Dr. Will Keim
speak of leadership and how
it pertains to you
FREE TO ALL
STUDENTS!
Hendrix Theater, Mendenhall
Sponsored by ECU Student
Government Association
SCH00LKIDS
RECORDS I
Putting a new spin
on Christmas!
Merry Christmas
o
rja
-?$&?�

X.
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Tuesday. Pecan
Argh! Tis I
dawn of ser
It seems l
is when we
gift for frier
the stress oi
far away h;
importantly,
cards home
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. freshman: e:
minute to ci
hours. Readi
and don't sp
break after e
during exar
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have been si
makes a goo
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gift to them,
OPINK
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past its time.
get our shop
the beginning
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Christmas be
Can you hear th
Gome to think of
had the Christma
past couple of ye;
to get here so qu:
at the blink of an
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that can make
relationship.
Since I am a f





1
5 Tuesday Decefnh.r 8 139�
opinion
ThrF��"���
1 the 1 � �
eastcarolinian
AMI IROISTER Editor
AMANDA G. AUSTIN Managing Editor
amv Sheridan ndkEdii�
I'KTIiK Dawvot Assislini New Editor
NINA DRV Features Editor
KUI1.I I.ITT1.K Hood Copy Editor
Mario Schf.riiai i-kr SponiEdiiw
Tracy Hairr Ainsiani Spora Editor
CHRIS KNOTTS Slall lllusltatoi
Jason FEATHER Photoiditor
STEPHANIE WlllTl.OCK Ad Design Manager
JANET RESPESS Advertising Manager
BRIAN WILLIAMS layout and Centerpiece Designer
HOBBY TUOOLS Wabmaater
Sarvmtj rhe ECU Mmmunily tinea I9?6. the fait Caroliniin publishes 11.000 rop� every lundrrr arvJ Thursday The lead arMwial ffl each edition is the
mrrnmrr o! rhe maioriry nrl rhe Ednenal Board and is �rmin in run try fdiiorial tad members .The East Cirehniin mtamei rerieri l� rhe edrler Irraned re
W words, trHsrdi may be edited lor decency or brevity The lest Ceioliman reserves rhe nghi id edn or reject leneis for pubricantrn Art liners musr be sejned
tenets should be addiessad to Ornnion ednot .Ihe Fast Carolinian Srudent Pubhcarions Bmtdinrj. ECU, GreenviBe, 7I85843W for inlotmerwn can
�? 3288366
oumew
Argh! 'Tis the season to be stressed! Exam week is upon us once again, as the
dawn of semester's end sets visions of free time dancing in our heads.
It seems that time is totally unavailable at this point in the semester, since this
is when we need it the most. Folks are stressing to find that perfect Christmas
gift for friends and family, and those students who work retail have to deal with
the stress of helping the stressed find what they're looking for. Those who live
far away have to make arrangements to get home for the holidays. Most
importantly, we all have to study for our exams so we can take straight "A" report
cards home to the fclks to hang up on the fridge.
Most of us have been through the exam process, but let this be a lesson to the
freshman: exams are no walk in the park. You cannot rely on waiting until the last
minute to cram a whole semester's worth of knowledge into your brain in a few
hours. Reading day is Thursday; here's a clue: start studying! Space your time out
and don't spend much of this precious time on one subject. Take a 15-20 minute
bireak after each hour of studying, and get a sufficient amount of sleep before and
during exam days. Proper preparation leads to high confidence, and high
qbnfidence leads to low stress and high grades.
: Don't ruin your semester break because you bombed all of your exams. If you
have been slacking, it is time to wake up and smell the coffeeliterally. Coffee
ritiakes a good study mate if you absolutely insist on ignoring this advice not to
cram. Make Mom and Dad happy this Christmas; present a good report card as a
gift to them, and come back for the spring with no worries.
OPINION
Columnist
Ryan
Kennemur
You can't buy her love, can you:
?
Here's an idea that is way
past its time. Fellas, let's
get our shopping done at
the beginning of December.
Hard to imagine?
Christmas bells arc ringing!
Can you hear them? Me neither.
Gome to think of it, I haven't really
had the Christmas Spirit at all the
past couple of years. It just seems
to get here so quickly, only to end
at the blink of an eye. It's sad, but
factually believe I know why it
happens. In a wordshopping
� Some people just love to wait
lintil the last minute to go out and
buy gifts for their loved onesand
wen their "liked ones their
'loathed ones and their
"jolerated-but-if-he-ever-dumps-
rpy-best-friend-I-swear-to-God-
Ke's-a-dcad-man ones This is
especially true with buying gifts
fbr the special someone in your
life, and I'm not talking about
Iyeonardo DiCaprio. No, I am
talking about the shopping trip
that can make or break any
relationship.
j Since I am a guy (it's a fact), I
am going to talk about guy
shopping. There is something we
guys know as the "Day before X-
mas desperation move This is
the time, just minutes before the
stroke of midnight, when guys
rush to the store and try
desperately to find something to
show their love, but seeing as how
every quality product has already
been purchased by other guys
doing the same thing, they usually
end up getting her whatever is left.
This is usually something
inappropriate, such as a broken
Thighmaster (which really sends a
bad message) or an outboard motor
(which isn't as bad, but one must
remember that it has a sharp
propeller and can be used as a
weapon).
Here's an idea that is way past
its time. Fellas, let's get our
shopping done at the beginning of
December. Hard to imagine? Not
if you follow "Ryan-Dogg's Handy
Dandy Shopping Guide (This is
only a few excerpts from the actual
book of the same name, due to hit
the bookshelves in the spring of
2023.)
Rulel: Never go through the
door that opens to the lingerie
section of the department store.
This section was strategically
placed to promote red-faced
embarrassment to the good men of
Americaand maybe Paraguay.
Rule 2: Realize that
sometimes mannequins are
actually sales clerks that are
standing still so they don't have to
deal with you, a little trick they
learned while living on the fifth
circle of Hell.
Rule 3: Always bring credit
cards! The only way you will get
helped by a sales clerk is to let her
smell a credit card. This is one of
the two things that a clerk can
smell, the other being fear.
Rule 4: Use lots of dairy
products, but never Swiss
cheeseno waitthat's from my
other book "Ryan-Dogg's Sex Can
Be Fun and Profitable
Handbook
Rule 5: If she says "Surprise
me don't believe it! If she says
"I'm sure I will love anything you
get me shoot yourself. You'll be
better off! My friend's girlfriend
once said "give me something I
need Imagine her surprise when
he bought her a lifetime supply of
Midol. Imagine his surprise when
she castrated him.
Rule 6: Don't make
something yourself. It may sound
romantic, but we both know that
you have the creativity of a sloth,
and anything you make with wood
could lead to fatalities.
Rule 7: Tell her you love her
and take her somewhere quiet.
Then look into her eyes and say,
"My love, don't get me anything.
Having you near me is like a
million presents, and they keep on
giving the whole year round If
you say this right, she can't
possibly expect a present from
you. You're set for life!
That's about all for this year!
This was all a joke, ladies, so don't
get offended. (guys:wink-wink)
Have a merry Christmas and a
happy new year!
CEEr" 0?
vE 4c

OPINION
Columnist
Stephen
Kleinschmit
Kleinschmit clears the ugly air
Sometimes I feel that people
art Just arguing for the sake
of argument.
It seems that this semester that
I have been the instigator of many
letters to the editor. I have enjoyed
reading most of these, but I have
wanted to respond to some that I
feel result from misunderstanding.
Sometimes I feel that people are
just arguing for the, sake of
argument.
Recently, I received a letter
from a reader who called me a
"Republican from the North who
doesn't want other than rich
people to attend college" in
relation to my article on requiring
people to have computers at ECU.
Well look here buddy, you stated
that your parents help pay for your
school.
I receive absolutely nothing
from my parents. I can afford to go
here only because of my veteran
benefits and loans. I paid for my
truck, a new computer, utilities
and rent, food, gas, and my
fraternity dues because I know
how to manage my finances and
work for what I want and need. I'm
sure that since you stated that you
don't have a job, you probably just
expect the magic computer fairy to
put one under your pillow. I may
be a "Republican from the North
but it is far from the truth that I
think that only rich kids should get
the privilege of a college
education.
I also read letters from many of
you who view Mark McGwire as a
hero. Good for you; that's fine. I
don't view sports stars as heroes. I
think the NBA players are cowards
for ruining the season. Sports are
fun to watch, and I enjoy a good
football or basketball game now
and then, but I won't lose any
sleep over Carolina getting beaten
by College of Charleston on
Saturday. I guess I just have
different priorities. I prefer to live
my life instead of watching it on
TV.
Then there was the notorious
NorthSouth thing. I got a lot of
hate mail from this one, but the
whole purpose of the article was to
poke fun at the rude Southern
elitist attitude towards
Northerners. Hell, we're all
Americans. I had no idea that so
many normal people considered
themselves toothless idiots. I guess
that people either misunderstood
the meaning of the article or have a
really bad opinion of themselves.
OPINION
Columnist
Chris
Coppedge
Procrastiriators get goin' now, now I
Procrastination is a
problem, not always serious,
but it seems to be catching.
There arc only two weeks left in
this semester, a concept that
should leave many students and
faculty happy. It is definitely time
for an extended holiday break so
we can recover and regroup for the
next dose of learning in the spring.
Of course, with only two weeks
left, that means all final papers and
projects are due. Time to stress
out.
If you are like me, you have
decided to leave all of your papers
and projects to the last possible
moment. Yes, I am a procrastinator,
a very good one in fact. I cannot
tell if I procrastinate just because I
am lazy, because I am too busy
with other work, or because my
best work is done when I am under
the pressure of a deadline. I love it
when I receive an "A" on a
research paper that was supposed
to take weeks to write, but I did it
in an hour or so the night before I
turn it in. This isn't always on
purpose, nor do I always get an
"A but I usually get a decent
grade minus the sleep.
The only problem with
procrastinating is the schedules at
the library and computer labs.
Often times, I am only able to do
my research late at night. Joyncr
Library closes at 1 a.m. through the
week and at 6 p.m. on the
weekends. It also opens early,
around six in the morning, but
some of us prefer sleep to research.
This semester I have had a very
tight and hectic schedule, so I
cannot work on the same schedule
as the library. Plus, I have always
done better work at night, so
where do I go? Millions of dollars
were spent to build our new
library; maybe they could have
considered hiring more people to
work late nights. I know people
need money and want jobs, and if
it fit into their schedules, this
would be a great opportunity for
all. If the university would like to
spend some money to help the
students, they could also consider
putting a copy machine in each of
the dorms. Sometimes when I
work late on my various
assignments, I need to make
copies, but every place I know that
has a copier is closed. I know a
couple of friends who have had the
same problems dealing with the
copiers.
Procrastination is a problem, not
always serious, but it seems to be
catching. I should go do my work, i
Good luck to all the procrastinators
out there during the final weeks,
especially in finding an open
computer at night.
Write a, Letter
to tk& Editor
Got something to say? Need somewhere to
say it? Bring your letter to the easftarolinian
located on the 2nd floor of The Student
Publications Building





I
8 TaiitdiY, Oecimber 8, 1998
comics
The East Ciroliniin
Four Seats Left
Jason Latour
Raymond Sanders
I

Life's Meanings
x i n i n a :
'CW r-rixchs in
trV�ts section
are r�ot die
opinion of" cVic
GasV Ccvr-oLinicvn.
I Cheyre COine ! ! !
ol miNenm
So you ctxrt
elCnet- CtxUe -wncvr
I'm disnin for- rVic
I enCir-e nianr, or- we
cxn f"iar�C A.nd you
know IVL kick
Kevin Jordan
rc
what images come to your mind, when I say.
TERRORIST
Webster delines terrorist as the
"systematic use of terror, espe-
cially as a means of coercion
No where in that definition, did
it say that all pelple with mid-
dle eastern blood in their veins
are terrorist. Yet it also didn't
say that a person from Ireland
is a terrorist. Also, don't think
that all African Americans carry
guns, or have anything to with
drugs.
Ask yourself, how many African
Americans own boats, or planes
to bring drugs into the country.
Just because a couple of bad
apples have surfaced in the
world, don't think that the
whole tree is rotton.
And another thing. Don't fall for the
sterotypes displayed by the media. Don't go
see " the Siege " starring Bruce Willis, and
Denzel Washington, and leave thinking that
all people of Arab desent have a bomb
strapped on their backs, waiting to blow up
the school.
Sterotypes created by the media is the
leading reason so many americans can' get
along.
Can't We All Just Get Along !?!?!
Decem6ei
TOe made a, Cut o� cuKenittet
t&at (f&u, tAould cAcck tuUce.
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9 Tueid�y.
continual) from page 7
"ECU has 60 masters and 10
PHd programs said Gail
Pinkham, manager of Graduate
admissions. "Not many schools
offer such a variety of programs
.According to Pinkham, when
applying for grad school, the most
important things you can do is read
all of the directions on your appli-
cation, make all of the deadlines,
and get in touch with graduate
director in one's program.
t "Depending on the program,
some have earlier deadlines than
others Pinkham said. That's why
it is very important to know when
they arc in order to get your appli-
cation in on time
According to Pinkham,
important to talk to the graduate
director in order for one's name to
be more familiar to them.
"I always encourage students to
get in touch with their graduate
director and let them know who
they are, that they arc applying for
their department, and that they are
quite interested Pinkham said.
"This way the director will have
an idea of who you are if your
name comes up again
Then of course there are the
graduate school exams that are
similar to high school SATs called
GREs. There are different forms
of this test MATs, which is a 100
word analogies test, GMAT which
is the exam taken by business stu-
dents, and the TOEFL exam,
which is for international students.
"It is for students coming from
foreign countries who were not
taught in English Pinkham said.
The GREs can be taken here at
ECU. And if you're looking for a
little more assistance before you
take the GRE, there arc prep
courses offered at the Student Life
Research Assessment and Testing
office.
Once all of the information is
received at the office of graduate
admissions, Pinkham said it is
keyed into the computer so that
the graduate department has
immediate access to a student's
file.
itt
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Recyling
continued from page 7
week. Materials such as aluminum,
paper, glass and plastic are recy-
clable and can be placed in these
bins. For information on special
recycling pickups, call 328-60.
"We have bins all over the
place said Roy Briley, a member
of the three-man team that collects
the materials from the bins.
"Everyone should be able to use
them Briley said.
Joyner Library, Mendenhall
Student Center and the Student
Recreation Center also offer ways
to recycle. They take part in the
recycling program by displaying
collection bins and by recycling
their own waste products.
One of the reasons for the
implementation of the recycling
program is that the North Carolina
legislature has made it mandatory
for all state employees and agencies
to recycle materials with a goal of
40 percent total waste reduction by
the year 2000.
Only specific materials are
accepted for recycling. Items are
separated into various categories. In
the white collection trailer, 1 and
2 plastics, aluminum cans, glass
(clear, brown and green) and paper
(office, computer, newspaper) are
accepted. A three man team goes
around collecting these materials
which account for 27 percent of
ECU's waste. The teams are made
up of staff, though work study stu-
dents are also employed for the
program.
Cardboard and scrap metal
should be placed beside the nearest
dumpsters. There is now a fine for
putting large amounts of cardboard
into the landfills, so it saves the uni-
versity unnecessary money if card-
board is recycled.
The money that is gained from
the recycled materials goes back
into the program.
"We use the money to maintain
our equipment like our trailer and
metal containers said Tom
Pohlman, who is in charge of the
recycling program.
The advantages of recycling
include saving natural resources,
energy and landfill space.
Recycling also helps reduce costs of
trash disposal and raw products.
Pollution is also decreased as a
result.
"Recycling is just the right thing
to do Pohlman said.
The Office of Environmental
Health and Safety is not the only
group recycling. Many offices at
recycling, if there really is one, is
that it requires a sense of commit-
ment Pohlman said.
The Recycling Program has also
taken its message online. Their
web site located on the
Environmental Health and Safety
Web page. Their internet address
is http:www.ecu.eduoehs. This
site offers information about the
program and recycling in general.
One can access tips on recycling,
reducing, and reusing. There is also
Locations of Recycling bins:
Austin Building
- Biology Building
� Brcwster Building
� Flanagan Building
� Fletcher Musk Center
General Classroom Building
ECU recycle the material they use.
Facility Services recycled 15,000
pounds of white goods last year.
White goods include such things as
broken air conditioners, scrap metal
and various other materials. Facility
Services also managed to divert
52,000 pounds of tires, batteries, oil
filters and motor oil from the land-
fill last year.
Materials Management was able
to recycle over 2,000 pounds of
printer cartridges and other office
waste. The Grounds Department
recycled and composted 724,000
pounds of yard waste, most of
which was the result of hurricane
damage. Dining Services managed
to recycle 63,000 pounds of cooking
oil.
Announcements are usually cir-
culated to the faculty and staff to
encourage them to practice recy-
cling methods. But students are the
key to on-campus recycling. Even
everyday activities like using e-
mail can help the environment. By
using e-mail and other electronic
data transfers, 250,000 pounds of
paper were saved last year.
"One of the disadvantages to
� Rawl Building
� Rivers Building
- Spllman Building
- Unrveristy Central
Processing and Graphics
Whkhard Building
helpful information about recycling
in residence halls and in academic
and administrative areas. One
interesting aspect of the web site is
a link that offers ways of stopping
junk mail from being delivered to
you. For those who are still con-
fused about what materials are
recyclable and ones which are not,
this site will inform you.
The '9798 fiscal year has been
one of the best years for the recy-
cling program. The list of materials
that were recycled from various
departments grew. Items include
magazines, aluminum scrap metal,
lead, fax paper, plastic drink con-
tainers, corrugated and regular
cardboard.
If you wish to volunteer your
services to the recycling program
you may contact Tom Pohlman at
328-4234 or stop by the Office of
Environmental Health and Safety.
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East Carolinian
m Units
1 bath
and Sewer
Heat & Air
)ishwasher
ratorStove
r Hook Ups
Vlini-Blinds
ibolt Locks
or Balcony
ith Pet Fee
������
jst 5 Blocks
;U Campus
J Bus route
Emergency
nee Service
9 Tueiday. Oacambir 8. 1988
Yoga
continued from page 7
features
Th East Carolinian
planted at your feet while stepping
into a push-up position, slowly
lower your knees, then your chest,
and finally your chin to the floor.
Inhale deeply, moving your body
forward and upward. Keep your
shoulders relaxed. Try not to sag in
the middle and keep your arms
straight.
Despite this exercise that tar-
gets females, Yoga is not just for
women anymore.
"Although the classes tend to
have more females, we do have a
mix of males and females in our
classes Brown said.
Yoga classes will be offered next
semester at the Rcc Center. From
Jan. 27 through March 3 there will
be an introductory course offered
every Wednesday at 4 p.m. If
Wednesdays aren't good times,
another introductory course will be
held from Jan. 28 through March 4
with courses every Thursday at
5:30 p.m.
For those who have already
completed an intro course, there is
an advanced beginners class
offered every Tuesday starting
from Jan. 26 through March 2 at
5:30 p.m.
"Each class can accommodate
28 studentsBrown said. 'To reg-
ister, students need their ECU
one card. It is $15 for students and
members
To register, go to the main office
at the Rec Center during office
hours (Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 6
p.m.) and sign up. Classes tend to
fill up quickly.
"It's phenomenal how quickly
they fill up Niswander said.
1
Convicted murderer I
not allowed to teach
PHOENIX (AP) -Complaints
raised when a convicted murderer
was hired to teach criminal jus-
tice at Arizona State University
convinced school officials to
c
01
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niversity-BookTExcHaiige
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Plug into the source
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reverse themselves Thursday.
James Hamm, who shot and
killed someone when he was � n
teen-ager, will not teach classes
this spring semester as planned;5"
officials said Thursday, the same
day The Arizona Republic had"1
reported Hamm's hiring.
"The debate surrounding Mr1
Hamm's employment in the"
classroom at ASU would be too
disruptive to the educational32
environment, as evidenced by the"
reaction to his hiring said Milton
Glick, ASU provost and senior
vice president.
Some members of the legal
community had been critical of
the idea.
"This has got to be a cruel
joke Phoenix attorney Dan
Cracchiolo saidIt's like�-
Hannibal Lecter inviting Jodie
Foster to a tea party
Hamm said he was disappoint�
ed with the school's decision but!5
not entirely surprised. '3
"I would prefer to teach, bur'
that's just not in the cards and51
that's not the way it's going to
happen Hamm told The.H
Associated Press. Earlier, he tokf "
the paper "I never had any prob11
lems with the students or faculty "
in law school It was just a probJ
lem with the politicians and news
� r o
papers. 0
Hamm pleaded guilty in 1974
to shooting Willard J. Morely Jr
during a drugdeal in Tucson. He331-
was sentenced to 25 years to lifej'm
in prison and served 17 yeaivrt1
before he was paroled in 1992.
Since then he earned his cola11
lege degree, then a law degree0
from ASU. Despite his gains, the
state's clemency board refused K"
earlier this year to release him" n
from parole. ! "
Dennis Palumbo, the justice1
studies professor who interviewed'
Hamm for the job, said Hamm-
deserves a second chance. -�
"He did something real stupid-1
when he was 17. Why the hell 4
should we condemn him for rfce
rest of his life?" Palumbo said. f.�
Hamm was supposed to teach?-
one pre-law course on substantive
criminal law and another on duerf"r
process and the Bill of Rights aP3
the School of Justice Studies. �"
Hamm still has a contract withob
the school, Glick said. Hamm said11
he is negotiating with the univer'
sity on his new position, whicrprte
could tesearch. ASU will also
change hiring procedures for part3
time instructors. Hiring had been
left to department chairmen, butw�
a dean will now review their deci-1!
sions, Glick said.
Graphic
irrnfiTTn
Advertising Designer
and Layout Designer
needed at the
East Carolinian.
Apply at the TEC
office on the second
floor of the Student
Publications Building.
Open to CA Major?
Musi hi
l�
o





I
AKE5I
The first and largest coed Professional
Business Fraternity in the world!
Come join over 175,000 members from over 260N:ollege and
universities nationwide! Alpha Kappa Psi is re-colonizing here
at ECU! Be a part of history by becoming a Founding Member.
If you've ever thought of owning your own business, gain
valuable skills by forming your own student organization.
�All other organizations welcome
�Can't make it? email Michael Anthony
at theant2@aol.com
�Membership limited to the first 100
applicants. Don't be left out!
�Eta Omnicron: est. 1966
Freshmen
MBA
AKPsi.com
Eligible members
All Business Majors, Communication,
Fxon, Poli Sci and many others
Informational Meetings
Tuesday Dec 8 @ 5:00 PM GCB 1005
Wednesday Dec 9 @ 5:00 PM GCB 1005
InductionOfficer Elections
Thursday Dec 10 @ 5:00 PM GCB 1005
Chapters started this semester: Cornell,
U of Louisville, UK, Western Kentucky, Case
Western, George Mason, Towson University

Alpha Kappa Psi
1904
Tuesday
E
Ar
X
Steven Branch
I
Jocysgnab,
: victory
J ON AT I;
STA
Despite bcin
ninth, the Pirai
ference victor
place in the
standings. C
young squad i
throughout the
mg out strong i
- Recovering
ing and close
State last Mon
1 64-58 victc
Saturday afte
Coliseum.
The Pirate;
g, 1-0 in CA
ad to hold of
Jccond h
(jharge by t
pagles. Americ
3-4, 0-1) car
back from a 36-
Jeficit at ha
time to get
lose as 59-
Jwth 34 sccon
Jfcft to play wit!
$1-7 run. But, tl
Pirates made fi
$f seven fin
frirows in tl
fcnal 34 secon
jo ice the game
' The Pirat
iiiade a first hi
switch from ma
to-man to a zo'i
fefense. Th
Caught Americi
was a major co
i
ihe win.
c
i "We did eve
V
lo come up wn
�lay' possible
Dooley said i
ECU Spor
Department. "V
o mix and man
I Evaldas Joey:
double figures
fix games, score
the first half. Ad
four of five tht
fcontest and ah
team-best eight
"I just wer
blayed my best
levision n�
Everyone pa
ist happy that i
Hie win I
� The Eagles 4
Second half by
Thompson, whi
after intermissic





Tuesday, December 8.
7
1998
sports
The East Carolinian
ECU defeats
American 6448
? Steven Branch hits all field goal attempts to ensure the win over American on Saturday.
PHOTO BY JACOB GARMON
returning to his home town having
played high school basketball at
D.H. Conley.
ECU hit only 27.6 percent of its
field goals in the second half. The
Pirates out-rebounded the Eagles
by 41-36 extending, EC! Cs perfect
string to six games of out-rebound-
ing the opposition.
Junior forward Neil Punt was
ECU's other double figure scorer
with 11 points.
Ilalftime entcrtainmenr was
provided by the Charlotte-
Honeybees dance team. They
were a real crowd pleaser. They are
managed by Pirate Alumni and for-
mer ECU Pure (iold Dancer Alto
Gary.
The Pirates will be on the road
for their next game as they take on
Green Bay Wisconsin Tuesday at
8:00 p.m.
victory far Pirates
Jonathan Res ski. i.
STAFF WRITER
Despite being picked to finish
ninth, the Pirates got their first con-
ference victory to put them in first
place in the current conference
standings. Coach Joe Dooley's
young squad is surprising coaches
throughout the conference by start-
ing out strong early in the season.
- Recovering from a disappoint-
ing and close loss to Appalachian
�tate last Monday, ECU captured
jl 64-58 victory over American
Saturday afternoon at Minges
fcoliscum.
� The Pirates (4-
I, 1-0 in CAA)
Pirates sink Blue Devils
Men win, women
lose a close one
Stkimikv Sciiramm
S I N I (i R W R I T B R
Ameri
MtifJs
B&tk&tbtdl
had to hold off a
jeeond half
jjhargt by the
pagles. American
�5-4, 0-1) came
back from a 36-21
(Jeficit at half-
time to get as
Hose as 59-56
fyith 34 seconds
jMt to play with a
J1-7 run. But, the
Pirates made five
Of seven free
(hrows in the
fcnal 34 seconds
to ice the game.
i The Pirates
Biade a first half
switch from man-
to-man to a zone
jefense. This
taught American by surprise and
was a major contributing factor to
the win.

t "We did everything imaginable
to come up with every late game
Elay' possible head coach Joe
looley said in an interview to
ECU Sports Information
Department. "We have been trying
to mix and match our defense
k Evaldas Joeys, who has scored in
louble figures each of the Pirates'
ix games, scored 15 of his points in
the first half. Additionally, Joeys hit
tour of five three pointers in the
kontest and also pulled down a
team-best eight rebounds,
i "I just went out there and
blayed my best Joeys said in a
tilevision news conference.
Everyone played hard and I'm
ist happy that we came away with
Hie win ,
; The Eagles were boosted in the
Second half by freshman Bobby
Thompson, who scored 12 points
after intermission. Thompson was
ECU men's basketball team willhave its next game at
Greenville on Saturday, Dec. 12. at 7 p.m. vs. EvaiuviUe.
Matt Jabs
st Carolina
TOT-FG
FG FGA
TP
REBOUNDS
OF DE TOT
The ECU
men's and
women s swim-
ming and div-
ing teams
spent
Saturday in
Minges
Aquatic
Center bat- file photo
tling the Blue
Devils of
Duke. The men's team handily
defeated Duke 142-90, while the
women lost in a close meet 122-
119. The meets are the teams' last
before their annual winter training
trip to Florida.
The Pirates 400 medley relay
team of Andy Byrnes, Josh
LePree, Richard Chen and Matt
Jabs won event with a time of
3:30.38, which started the defeat
of the devils. Pirates Adam Gaffey
and Mike Julian won the 1000
freestyle and 200 freestyle,
respectively. Claes Lindgrcn took
the top spot in the 200 IM, while-
Chen won the 200 fly. Diver Willy
Hayes won the 1-m diving competi-
tion and the rout was on.
On a day when Pirate swimmers
and divers preformed so brilliantly
and won every event except the 200
backstroke, one ECU athlete had a
particularly good day. Junior Matt
Jabs won the 50 freestyle and later
won the 100 freestyle. The Pirates
capped the day with victories by-
William Hudgins in the 500
freestyle, Ryan Baldwin in the 3-m
board diving competition and Josh
LePree in the 200 breast-
stroke.
"We swam very, very fast
This is the fastest we've
swam all year said Rick
Kobe, ECU's head swimming
coach. "On the guys side,
they all swam well. It wasn't
just one individual because
they all swam fast. They were
on fire. It was a good team
meet
The Pirate women didn't
SEE SWIMMING. PAGE 12
Richard Chen wins the 200 fly contest over Duke.
PHOTO BV JACOB GARMON
Pirate Swimmers at Meet vs. Duke 12598
Men
I&J9
400 Medley, 3:30.38
Adam Gaffey 1000 Freestyle, 9:38.89
Mike Julian 200 freestyle, 1:44.69
Matt Jabs 50 Freestyle, 21.39
Claes Lindgren 200 Individual Medley 1:56.62
Willy Hayes 1-m diving competition, 235 points
Richard Chen 200 Butterfly, 1:56.00
Matt Jabs 100 fteestyle, 47.82
William Hudgins 500 freestyle, 4:46.30
Ryan Baldwin 3-m board (diving) 249 points
Josh LePree 200 breaststroke, 2:21.09
Women
Hollie Butler 200 freestyle, 1:55.41
Courtney Foster 50 free, 24.93
Heather Hagedorn 200 backstroke, 2:07.01
Dana Fuller 500 freestyle, 5:07.29
400 Medley Relay, 4:00.49
Source: ECU Sports Information Department
ECU's swim teams will have their next meet
Greenville (Minges Aquatic Center) on Saturday. Jan. 16, at 2 p.m. vs. the College of
ECU wins one, loses one in Davidson Invitational
Veney named CAA
player of the week
Eric Couch
SENIOR WRITER
The ECU women's basketball
team took an undefeated record to
the Davidson Roundball
Invitational this weekend, and
returned home with their first loss
of the season.
With a spectacular defensive
effort against Elon, the Pirates
rolled to a 56-37 victory. The
Pirates held Elon to shooting 5-26
in field goals and 12 points in the
first half. Even though ECU was
playing without team leader
Waynetta Veney
W a y n e t t a
Veney, several
other players
stepped up and
took charge.
Veney sprained
her ankle in
last week's
tournament in
the Warner
Classic.
"The good file photo
news about this
game was that we won without our
leader head coach Dee Gibson
said. "We wanted to be very cau-
tious about her (Veney's) ankle so
we sat her out for a game
One of the players that led the
Pirates in the first game versus Elon
was Danielle Melvin, who pro-
duced a double-double by scoring
14 points and grabbing 121
rebounds. Cecilia Shinn also
scored 10 points and brought
down five rebounds while
Beth Jaynes chipped in nine
points and six rebounds.
The victory moved ECU I
to a record of 5-0 and to a
chance to play host Davidson j
in the championship game.
That game would prove to
bring a much tougher oppo-
nent for the Pirates, even
with their team leader return-
ing. ECU lost in a frustrating j
battle by a score of 82-62.
It was a frustrating loss
because Davidson was a much
more physical team. This j
physical play by the
SEE BASKETBALL CAGE 12
avidson
East Carolina
TOT-FG
FG FGA
REBOUNDS
Danielle Melvin
kki Brown
Beth Jaynes
Joana Fogaca
Waynetta Veney
Misty Home
Cecilia Shinn
Teana McKivet
Millette Green
Jennifer Moretj
l;U women's basketball mam wiH h�ve ia t
: on Wednetctay, Dec. 9, � J p.m. v�. V.





12 Ti�iiiy, Dtcumtir �. 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
Chalk one up for the old guys
SUN CITY, South Africa (AP)
Nick Price, 41, edged 22-year-old
Tiger Woods in a dramatic five-hole
playoff to win the big check at the
Million Dollar Challenge and his
third tide at Sun City.
It was a victory of experience
over pure talent, of one of golfs
most amiable players over its most
brilliant.
"Obviously to have beaten
someone like Tiger, it makes it a
little special. He's a phenomenon
said Price, who has been a profes-
sional for as long as Woods has been
alive. "I've got a great future
behind me. He's going to win plen-
ty
"If he continues to refine his
game as he's doing, he's going to be
formidable Price said of Woods.
"I'm glad I'll be hitting the senior
tour then
Price's win was in keeping with
the season of Mark O'Meara,
another 41-year-old, who won two
majors and was named PGA golfer
of the year. O'Meara was part of the
elite field of 12 of golfs best play-
ers, but finished fifth.
Woods and Price both started
the final round at the 7,597-yard
Gary Player Country Club course
four strokes behind another young
sensation, Lee Westwood. But
Westwood quickly faded,Josing
two shots on the first four holes. He
never recovered and ended up
fourth.
Meanwhile, Woods and Price
playing as a twosome began trading
birdies. By the 16th round, it was
clear one of them would come our
on top. By then, Price had scored
six consecutive birdies on holes 9
through 14.
Then, Woods staged a late-
round charge, starting with a birdie
on the 17th.
It came down to the 462-yard
18th hole. Price was leading the
field at 15-under, a stroke ahead on
Woods.
SEL60IJ, PAGU3i
N3!
Basketball
continued from page 11
Elon
East Carolina
Wildcats led ECU to commit
23 turnovers and also going a
disappointing 3-23 from the
free-throw line.
"It was terrible Gibson
said. "We had four players
miss practice last week due to
injuries and sometimes that
can throw off someone's tim-
ing
At the half the two teams
were separated by only a
point. Then, in the second
half, ECU lost control, and
eventually lost the game.
The Wildcats scored 54
points in the second half and the
Pirates continued their free-throw
woes.
The leading ECU scorers were
Teana McKiver with 14 points and
13 rebounds, and Vcney returned to
the Pirate roster by scoring 14
points in the second half.
On a brighter note, Veney was
named the CAA player of the
Danielle IvWvirf'
Srfkki Brown
BetHJaynes
Joana Fogaca
Misty Home
Teana McKiver
Charette Guthrie
Cecilia Shinn
Millette Green
Jennifer Moretz
TOTFG
FG FGA
5 10
1 4
3 10
3 8
1 4
1 3
0 1
3 12
1 4
3 13
3-PT
FG FGA
TP
REBOUNDS
OF OE TOT
Mountain Dew, Pepsi One,
Diet Pepsi or
Pepsi Cola
2$-Q
Limit two V
PLEASE
Source: ECU Sports Information Department
week. The transfer from the
College of Charleston has been the
team's leader this season as the
point guard. With her spectacular
play and gutsy leadership, Veney
was named the MVP of the Warner
Classic Tournament and she cur-
rently leads the Pirates in scoring
and assists.
Next up for the Pirates it only
gets tougher with Virginia Tech
coming to town to face them in
Minges Coliseum on Wednesday at
7 p.m.
"VT is a very good team, well
coached and very physical Gibson
said. "I expect them to be ranked
this week. This physical game
against Davidson will help
tremendously
Swimming
continued from page II
fare quite as well. The Lady Pirates
. were paced by Hollie Butler who
won the 200 freestyle in 1:51.41, her
best rime of the season. Courtney
Foster took the 50 freestyle while
teammate Heather Hagedom won
the 200 back. Pirate Dana Fuller
took the top spot in the 500 free and
the Lady Pirate 400 medley relay
team of Amy Hcndrick, Niki Kreel,
Cammy Carson and Foster took
first with a time of 4:00.49.
"The girls also did great. It was
the same deal: they all swam well
Kobe said.
The Pirates next meet won't
take place until next semester. The
ECU swimmers will head down to
South Carolina to take on the
College of Charleston. The Pirates
are not looking forward to a lengthy
layoff over the break though.
On December 29th the Pirates
begin their annual pilgrimage to
Florida for a week and a half of
intense training.
"Basically we will train for five
hours a day to get into the best
shape we can for the last few weeks
of the season. Swimming is a sport
where you can't take time off. Our
swimmers will be home for a week
and a half. At home they will train
with their USS teams, their old
teams and their old teammates. Its
not training at the same level they
get here. When we go down to
Florida, we will hit it hard and get
back into shape
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I (EXCLUDING
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wfca
Super Size
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WED THUR
9 I 10
i Items & Prices Good Through December 12,1998 In
Greenville. Copyright 1998 Kroger Mid-Atlantic. We
J reserve the right to limit quantities. None sold to
dealers.
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The East Carolinian
EAN
SHT
The Eait Carolinian
49ers upset Panthers
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) The
San Francisco 49ers showed signs
of missing Bryant Young on
Sunday, and he let them know
about it.
Six days after losing their defen-
sive leader for the season with a
broken leg, the 49ers blew a 21-
point lead in the final 16 minutes
of regulation, then defeated
Carolina 31-28 in overtime.
As bad as the 49ers' defensrve peP"
" forrnance was, coach Steve
Mariucci quickly discovered that
there was more embarrassment
still to come. When the 49ers got
back in their locker room, Mariucci
telephoned Young to let the player
know his teammates were thinking
about him.
"He told us we gave him a lot of
pain today, squirming around in his
&ed Mariuoci said.
Carolina, the NFL's worst rushing
team, ran for 203 yards against San
Francisco - 131 more than the
Panthers' average and 66 more
than their previous best this sea-
"No question, we missed B.Y
said Gabe Wilkins, who started at
left tackle in place of Young. "But
he's still with us. He's in our spirit,
he's in our
minds, he's in our hearts. He's
everywhere
A Carolina fumble set up Wade
Richey's 23-yard field goal on San
Francisco's first possession of the
extrarjetioclrSeeuring arVictbry that
assures the 49ers (10-3) of at least a
wild-card berth in the playoffs.
"We're excited about it quarter-
back Steve Young said. "We're
going to get the best of everybody,
so we should be proud of being 10-
3. Now it's time to get that much
more gritty about our perfor-
mances and about toughness
The 49ers finished with 236 yards
rushing, the most allowed by
jQarolina in its nearly foi
tory.
Young threw for 213 yards and two
touchdowns and Garrison Hearst
rushed for 139 yards and a score as
the 49ers extended their NFL
record of consecutivelO-victory
Golf
continued from page 12
He two-putted the hole for par,
but Woods, his ball about 20 feet
away on the fringe, used a sand
wedge to sink an uphill 18-footer.
He pumped his trademark upper-
cut into the air and went into the
sudden-death playoff.
"I had no choice. I had to make
that shot Woods said. "I knew 1
hit it on the line. I wasn't sure I
had the pace or not. As it kept
rolling, kept rolling, about 3 feet
from the hole, it looked like it had
a really good chance, and then it
went right in center Woods said.
After playing each of the first
four playoff holes in par, Price
birdied the 409-yard par-4 17th to
win it.
Both, shot a 6-under 66 to finish
at 273. Woods added $250,000 to
his lifetime winnings of $4.7 mil-
lion, already about half Price's
total in one-10th the time.
Justin Leonard, who finished
third with a 3-under 69 for 274,
took home $200,000.
It was the first appearance by
Woods in the tournament, and in
Africa, for that matter. He was
treated as a hero by South Africa's
majority black population and
greeted by a huge gallery at each
hole.
Price said his knowledge of the
course and maturity gave him the
edge.
"I was so focused today he
said. "I knew I couldn't afford to
make a mistake
He didn't.
seasons to 16. The 49crs' Terry
Kirby added 68 yards rushing and a
halfback option pass for another
score.
While the 49ers are headed to the
postseason for the seventh consec-
utive year, Carolina (2-11) has
already locked up the worst record
in its four-year history. �
JThc-Pafltherrtiave been plagued
all year with injuries and poor exe-
cution, and Sunday's loss featured
more of the same.
"We gave up big plays for touch-
downs. We turned the ball over in
critical situations coach Dom
Capers said. "You can't have that
kind of execution and beat a team
like San Francisco
The Panthers' biggest blunder
came on their third play from
scrimmage in overtime, when
aierlein. couldn't handle�
the snap from Frank Garcia and
San Francisco's Chris Ooleman
pounced on the ball at the Carolina
30.
The 49ers ran five plays, including
a 17-yard bootleg by Young, to set
up Richey's winning kick with
10:44 left.
"The victory was there for the tak-
ing, and we didn't take it
Panthers cornerback Eric Davis
said. "We didn't, they did. End of
story. Good teams find a way to
win
Earlier miscues by Carolina
appeared to point the 49ers safely
toward their fourth consecutive
victory over the Panthers. Carolina
turned the ball over twice on the
San Francisco 1-yard line, once on
William Floyd's fumble and once
on Beuerlein's interception, help-
ing the 49ers build a 28-7 lead late
in the third quarter.
San Francisco ended up with 474
yards, but just 57 of those came in
the fourth quarter.
"The whole game was going exact-
ly as scripted Steve Young said.
SEE 49ERS PAGE 14

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14 Tutidiy, Diombtr 8. 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
Georges-biggest hurricane
in UCLA upset?
MIAMI (AP) Edgerrin James
ran for a school-record 299 yards
and three touchdowns. Scott
JCovington threw three TD passes
and wasn't intercepted.
Edward Reed forced a fumble
with 3:24 left, keeping UCLA from
sealing the outcome.
There were plenty of
Hurricanes to talk about following
Miami's 49-45 upset of the previ-
ously unbeaten Bruins on Saturday.
But perhaps the most important
one had a single name and last was
seen somewhere over the
Mississippi delta.
Georges.
Timing is everything. And when
Hurricane Georges forced post-
ponement- from tha gameVorigmal
Sept. 26 date, it gave Miami's inex-
perienced players time to mature.
"This is great for the program
said sophomore linebacker Dan
Morgan, who made 17 tackles. "We
are young and it shows all the great
things yet to come
In September, coach Butch
Davis had 14 starting freshmen and
sophomores still adjusting to their
roles. By Saturday, the Hurricanes
themselves had been one game
away from a Bowl Championship
Series berth by finishing second in
the Big East.
"They were better than they
were when we were originally
scheduled to play them UCLA
coach Bob Toledo acknowledged.
"Butch did a great job with this
team
Saturday may well have been a
defining moment for a Miami pro-
gram trying to emerge from the
shambles of NCAA-imposed penal-
ties and return among college foot-
ball's elite.
Last year's 5-6 record was its first
losing season since 1979, before
Miami's run of four national titles in
nine years. The Hurricanes still
have only 77 scholarship players,
eight under the maximum, because
of cuts imposed as punishment for
an illegal-benefits scandal.
Davis called the win a huge trib-
ute to "our integrity and character.
UCLA (10-1) dropped three
places to No. 6 in the final regular-
season poll, dropping out of con-
tention to play for the national
championship in the Fiesta Bowl.
Instead, the Bruins were placed
in the odd position of settling for
the Rose Bowl as a consolation
prize.
Before the BCS was created, the
Pac-10 champion was locked into
spending New Year's in Pasadena,
Calif. Under the new system, the
Bruins would have been released to
play for the national title.
"We had a great year, but not
great enough said wide receiver
Brad Melsby, whose questionable
fumble on Reed's hit opened the
-We-mvesced U-rnonthsJA-fJuVteain�rionr for rhc HnriicaneSL-
to win a game like this. It took our
entire team's every ounce of heart
and soul to win this game
The season had its share of
angst. The Hurricanes lost at home
to Virginia Tech in overtime and
struggled in the first half of a win
over Rutgers. A 34-31 win at West
Virginia was a breakthrough, but
things fell apart last week when
they were routed by Syracuse 66-
13, Miami's worst loss since 1944.
"After last week, this was a big
win said James, whose 1,416 yards
rushing this season also is a school
record. "We had nothing to lose and
a bunch to gain. We went out and
we did it
Miami (8-3) was propelled back
into the ratings at No. 24. And as
thousands of fans stormed the
Orange Bowl field after time
expired, the Hurricanes left the
impression of great things to come.
"In my whole career, I never
played in a game where the fans
rush the field at the end defen-
sive tackle Michael Lawson said.
"I'd seen it on television, but I'd
never experienced it. It's indescrib-
able. This is what I played for
Alabama to play
Virginia Tech
in Music City
MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP)
Alabama will face a team it has
never lost to in the inaugural Music
City Bowl in Nashville, Tenn.
The Crimson Tide (7-4) faces
Virginia Tech (8-3) on Dec. 29, the
first meeting between the two
teams since 1979. Alabama has won
all 10 games in the series.
The Hokies, an at-large selec-
tion, finished third in the Big East
while Alabama was a selection from
the Southeastern Conference.
"This is a big step said Tide
coach Mike DuBose, whose team
.went 4-7 and sat out the postseason
in 1997. "The circle's not complete-
ly closed yet, but
obviously there's not as much of
a gap as there was at the first of the
season. We're headed in the right
direction
Alabama is the all-time leader in
bowl appearances (48) and victories
(28). But after DuBosc's nightmar-
ish debut season, the Tide was
happy just to get back into postsea-
son play of any sort
"Sometimes when you're at a
university like Alabama, with our
rich tradition, you take that for
granted DuBose said. "I think
we're much more appreciative of
this opportunity (after last season)
49ers
continued from page 13
"Offensively we seemed to kind of
idle it down and try to see if we
could get out of there, and that's
way too early. We got caught. We
got burned, and it's tough to
reignite us.
Beucrlein, who threw for 235 yards
and three touchdowns, started the
comeback with a screen pass that
Anthony Johnson turned into a 38-
yard score with 52 seconds left in
the third quarter.
After Carolina forced a San
Francisco punt, Raghib Ismail got
behind the 49ers' secondary for a
40-yard touchdown pass.
Another punt by the 49crs set up a
36-yard reverse by Ismail, who was
yanked down by his facemask by
Ken Norton, putting the ball at the
San FranciscolO. Tshimanga
Biakabutuka scored on a burst
through the right side of the 49ers'
line on the next play. John Kasay's
kick tied it with 6:20 remaining.
The Panthers got back into scoring
range once more in regulation, but
Kasay was wide right on a 47-yard
field-goal try with 22 seconds left.
San Francisco couldn't get into
field-goal range before time
expired.
The Tide is coming off a 31-17
win over Auburn, storming back
from a 17-point deficit to keep its
bowl hopes intact.
Virginia Tech, making its sixth
straight bowl appearance, had a.
topsy-turvy regular season. The
Hokies started off 5-0 and rose to a
No. 14 ranking before blowing a 17-
0 lead in a loss to Temple, which
hadn't beaten a ranked team in 11
years.
Then, the Hokies gave up a
touchdown pass to Syracuse on the
last play of the game and blew a 29-
7 halftime lead against Virginiala-
the season finale.
Virginia Tech wound up losing
that game 36-32.
"Virginia Tech is one play away
from being in the (Bowl
Championship Series) DuBose
said. "They gave up a fourth-down
touchdown to lose a game at
Syracuse. If they win that game,
they win the big East Conference
and are playing in the BCS
The Hokies lost 42-3 to North
Carolina in last year's Gator Bowl.
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16 Tuesday, December 8, 1998
focus
The East Carolinian
QN6QHME
City of Greenville takes
a bite out of crime
KKl. 1. KV PAYNTER
BTAFi WRITER
The Greenville Police Department is tak-
ing steps to make Greenville a much safer
ity for its residents. According to Captain
John Ennis, Commander of Patrol with
Greenville Police Department, since the
crime rate is increasing rapidly the Police
Department has come up with a few pre-
cautionary programs.
Project l.D. is one that helps victims
repossess valuable property if they are
robbed. This service includes engraving an
l.D. number in valuable property such as
computers, stereos and TVs.
"When the property is reported stolen,
we check pawn shop records and reposses-
sion for the l.D. number and usually can
locate it Ennjs said.
Crime Stoppers is a campaign that has
been around for years. People can call w ith-
out leaving their name and report informa-
tion about a crime. If the information leads
to an arrest, the person could be rewarded
up to $2500.
The new but popular program, 830-
EVES, is similar to the famous Crime
Stoppers. Residents can call this number to
report any suspicious activity or potential
crime and it will be investigated. It is not a
substitute for 411! It should not be used for
emergencies.
According to the 1998 FBI Uniform
Crime Reports, about one third of all vic-
A popular program, 830-EYES allows residents to report suspicious
activity in areas where they do not feel safe.
FILE PHOTO
tinis of violent crimes are between ages 19
and 25. Students are a target for burglaries
especially since they leave for breaksholi-
days and own expensive bikes, computers
and other things of that nature. During hol-
idays, police officers patrol more frequent-
ly, but it does not always help.
"Wc cannot do it by ourselves; crime
prevention is just as much an individual
responsibility as it is the police depart-
ment's Knnis said.
When choosing a place to live, look for a
quality neighborhood that appears to be
safe. Look for one with sufficient lighting.
"Nowhere can you be absolutely guar-
anteed, you can just decrease your odds
said Knnis.
Another type of repeated crime among
students occurs when students leave from
downtown. "Most of the time when they
walk home from downtown, they have had
a few drinks and think nothing could hap-
pen to them said Knnis.
People who leave the downtown area on
foot and alone are at great risk for being
attacked. Law enforcement officers recom-
mend that students wall in groups and be
extremely alert of their surroundings.
"There is nothing new, no new crime
theories. Just be aware of w hat is going on j
said Captain Knnis.
The most important tool in crime pre-
vention is your mind, according to a recent,
crime control survey. Residents can be pro-
tected from crime by using common sense
and a few standard security devices. For
example, install more than one lock on win-
dows and doors and drive a nail through the
window jamb so it cannot be raised.
I lowever, remember even the best security
devices will not keep you safe if you do not :
use them.
The ECU Police work to patrol campus and keep students safe.
FILE PHOTO
SAFETY TIPS
Here are some tips from the North Carolina Department of
Crime and Public Safety to reduce your risk of being victimized:
-Never tell a caller that, you are alone.
-Look through the peephole to see who is at your door.
-If you think a forced entry has been made, do not go inside.
Security cameras to help prevent crime Half of crime
statistics declining
CHjnsTi s i ii n
S-TAl I H HIT KR
Video surveillance cameras are
in the I diversity's future plans,
according to Tom Younce,
assistant director at ECU's
Police Department. Although
Younce isn't sure exactly when
the cameras will be installed,
he does know where.
Two years ago, ECU asked
Lockwood Cireene, Inc a
security company from
Spartenburg S.C to decide
where the cameras would be
most beneficial to faculty, staff
and students. The goal was to
place cameras in parking lots
on campus property.
"Our problem is funding
Younce said. The police
department doesn't have a
budget large enough to incor-
porate the cameras' installation,
thus will have to rely on other
means of funding for the project.
However, the police department
j has Jejen granted money through
tWe Governor's Highway Safety
i Program to put video cameras in
i two patrol cars.
The department will also install
j computers in the patrol cars. This
will help in identifying people and
unning national license plate
-�hecks.
"One of the department's
biggest problems is non-students
on and around campus Younce
said. He hopes that these cameras
md computers will correct the vari-
ous problems incurred by these
people.
Abrial Hayes speaks to an ECU Police officer
in a parking area that may benefit from a security camera
FILE PHOTO
ECU Police Department is the
second largest in the state, behind
NCSU.
"We hope to put a stamp of
approval on what we are doing
here Younce said.
Within the coming year, the
ECU Police Department will be
seeking national accreditation by
having to meet about 600 standards.
"This will only be helpful to our
police department Younce said. If
the accreditation was not finalized,
they would know where the police
department stood and could make
the necessary changes. The police
department is increasing efforts to
maintain a safe carhpus by continu-
ing patrols and Installing more
emergency blue-light phones.
According to Sgt. LaFrance Davis
of the ECU Police Department
Crime Prevention
Division, there arc approximate-
ly 80 phones on campus. "The goal
is to install five phones per year
over the next five years Davis
said.
According to Younce, when new
campus buildings are being
planned, their layout must include
an emergency phone.
In addition to adding new emer-
gency phones to campus, the police
department is working with Facility
Services to make the phones more
handicapped accessible.
Handicapped accessible phones
will be located on
taller brown poles
instead of the current
orange ones.
Another change
includes the
redesigning of the
first floor of the
Blount I louse, where
the F.CU Police-
Department is locat-
ed. This will increase
the effectiveness of
the telecommunica-
tions center.
Currently, the center
handles all emer-
gency and non-emer-
gency calls, which
include 911 and
TDD
(hearingspeech
impaired). The
equipment is
designed to monitor
campus burglary and
fire alarms and secu-
rity telephones in
addition to regular, daily functions.
When the remodeling and instal-
lation of new equipment is com-
plete, the telecommunications cen-
ter will be able to monitor the video
surveillance cameras and have an
enhanced caller tracking system.
Construction began the week of
Oct. 12, 1998 and the anticipated
completion is 120 days later.
The ECU Police Department
wants to make other changes, but
funding is limited.
"The university has always been
good to us as far as funding
Younce said. He pointed out that
needs must be met before wants
fan be pursued.
Elena Thioo
staff R 1 I KH
If you have ever reported anything
stolen at ECU, then you arc a part
of the statistics kept at the ECU
Police Department.
"Most of the calls that we receive
are reports of stolen bookbags or
bikes reports Sgt. LaF'rance
Davis, crime prevention officer.
Arson, drug sales and murder
are just a few of the other areas in
which statistics are kept.
According to the ECU web
page, more than half of the record-
ed crimes have declined over the
past five years. Crime rates have
gone down in many areas. In 1993
there were 45 counts of burglary,
and 36 in 1997. Drug possession
counts went down from 37 counts
in 1993 to 22 in 1997. DWI went
down form 57 counts in 1993 to 37
in 1997. Liquor-law violations went
down from 8 counts in 1993 to 3 in
�1997. And finally weapons viola-
tions went down from 27 counts in
1993 to 14 in 1997.
According to statistics, other
areas have gone up in the last five
years. Larceny went up from 351
counts in 1993 to 408 in 1997.
Simple assault went from 43 counts
in 1993 to 53 in 1997.
"You will find that our statistics
may be higher than other schools
in some areas because we report all
of our statistics Pavis said. "We
don't hide anything under the
rug University of North Carolina
at Chapel I lill's rates are
higher than EC! i in the areas of
burglary and larceny. The number
of burglaries at UNC-Chapel Hill
during 1995 to 1996 was 56 counts.
At ECU during the
1995 to 1996 period there were
50 accounts. During the 1995 to
1996 period at UNC-Chapel Hill
there were 758 accounts of larceny.
There were only 692 accounts at
ECU. Crime rates'at UNC were
lower in the categories of rape and
robbery during that two-year peri-
od. The one category that was
vastly lower at UNC was DWI.
During that two-year span of 1995
to 1996, there were only 34 cita-
tions. At ECU there were 93.
According to the ECU web
page, one of the eight core values
of the ECU Police
Department is to continuously
seek improvement.
"The major area that is under
improvement is larceny Davis
"said. "Bookbags form the student
store and bikes are the main things
stolen.
"Because of the more awareness
of crime on campus, there are more
females taking self defense to pre-
vent assault on themselves Davis
said.
One suggestion that Davis
makes for self protection is to use
the "buddy system
"If you have to go across cam-
pus it is good to take someone witlj
you Davis said.
17 Tuasday, I
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"The sex i
about sex shi
came out to m
was fine, but a
I was getting i
a different st
"They fed int
homosexual n
they want to
down inside, h
what people i
than how I fee
Neither Cn
families came
which was he
Universalist C
seven close fri
them at the alt
"I was more
did not come
else in my fain
"I didn't
because they
am a lesbian
would have w
there, if I ci
courage to tell
Aside from
approval of l
Jayneen' sees
media. She bel
people are bee
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because of TV
unrealistic.
"Chasing A
which actress J
portrays an e
bian, has Adar
sexual orientat
character playt
"The movie i
see what hor
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feel once you'i
always a lesbia
to change
Crystal and
homosexual r
nothing to do
one plays the
plays the worn;
"Gay men ;
boyant, and les
butch Crysi
stereotypes are
the ignorant
know any bettc
She believe
change people
sexual relation:
shows of neg
and that a nc
often shown on
trayal of gay ir
wealthy. But "F
that showed a
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person. Crystal
that the only
change the vk
relationships is
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clouded by thi
dices.
"People nee
at us as people i
ing wht we arc
room Jayneen





17 Tmsday, Decembur 8. 1998
Th� East Cirolinim
Gay
couples
love like
everyone
Nicoi.f. Underwood
S I F V W HI T K R
It was love at each tap of the key
for Crystal Watson and Jayneen
Thomas, who met in a chat room
two years ago.
"First we started e-mailing one
another, and before I could send a
photo of myself I had Jayneen on
a bus Crystal said.
"My plans were just to stay
until June, but I didn't go back. I
decided to move down here
Jayneen said.
Crystal and Jayneen have been
married for a year now and face
the same challenges of many mar-
ried college students. Yet when
they kiss each other in public,
thi-y receive disapproving looks
and rude comments.
Crystal and Jayneen are a les-
bian couple. "We are just like het-
erosexuals. We fall in love. We
fight. We make up Crystal said.
She feels that many heterosexuals
mistakenly think that homosexual
relationships are just about sex.
"The sex is good, but it's not
about sex she said. "When I first
tame out to my family everything
was fine, but after I told them that
I was getting married it turned to
a different story Crystal said.
"They fed into the stereotype of
homosexual relationships. I feel
they want to accept me deep
clown inside, but they are afraid of
what people might think, rather
than how I feel as a person
Neither Crystal's nor Jayneen's
families came to the wedding,
which was held at the Unitarian
Universalist Church. So they had
seven close friends stand up with
them at the altar on May 1,1997.
"I was more hurt that my sister
did not come more than any one
else in my family Crystal said.
"I didn't invite my family
because they don't know that I
am a lesbian Jayneen said. "I
would have wanted them to be
there, if I could just get the
courage to tell them
Aside from their families' dis-
approval of their relationship,
Jayneen sees prejudice in the
media. She believes that although
people are becoming more aware
about homosexual relationships
because of TV, the characters are
unrealistic.
"Chasing Amy a 1997 film in
Which actress Joey Lauren Adams
portrays an experimenting les-
bian, has Adams questioning her
sexual orientation after meeting a
character played by Ben Affleck.
"The movie didn't help others
see what homosexual relation-
ships are about said Crystal. "I
feel once you're a lesbian, you're
always a lesbian; you're not going
to change
Crystal and Jayneen both say
homosexual relationships have
nothing to do with role-play. No
one plays the man and no one
plays the woman.
"Gay men aren't always flam-
boyant, and lesbians aren't always
butch Crystal said. "These
stereotypes are just helping feed
the ignorant people who don't
know any better
She believes that one way to
change people's views on homo-
sexual relationships is to rid TV
shows of negative stereotypes,
and that a negative stereotype
often shown on sitcoms is the por-
trayal of gay men as feminine-or
wealthy. But "Ellen" was a sitcom
that showed a realistic view of a
lesbian by revealing Ellen as a
person. Crystal and Jayneen feel
that the only way society will
change the view of homosexual
relationships is by-reaching out to
the kids before their minds are
clouded by their parental preju-
dices.
"People need to start looking
at us as people and not be imagin-
ing whdt we are doing in our bed-
room Jayneen said.
College relationships can be complicated, but ohhhhh so rewarding
Ryan Kennemur
staff writer
It's 9:30 on a Friday night, and a
freshman girl sits alone in her
dorm room waiting for the phone
to ring. Her roommate has gone
home for the weekend, and so
have her suite mates. In a dorm
room on the other side of the
building sits a freshman boy
playing video games with the
lights off. Sound like you or any-
one you know? If so, then open
your eyes to the "Wonderful
World of Meeting People at
ECU
Everyone knows about the
clubs downtown, but not many
know what to do when they get
there. Some go out to the dance
floor and try to bump into a com-
patible companion, while others
opt for the less effective
approach of sitting at the bar and
hoping to strike up a conversa-
tion. Both are acceptable, but
some people find other
ways.
"I like to go downtown and
dance with the guys junior
Susan Taylor said. "It's pretty
fun, but I'd say the best place to
meet date material would be at
work,
especially in an elevator. I've
met plenty of nice guys at work
in the elevator. All you
have to do to start a con-
versation is ask what
floor they are going
to
Other students
agree with her on
the idea of meeting
in the workplace.
"Many people
that meet in the
workplace have a '
chance to develop a
friendship before they
try the actual dating
thing sophomore
Brent Best said. "My
fiancee and I met at the
pizza place I work at
Meeting in the workplace
and downtown isn't for every-
one. In fact, some students aren't
quite old enough to get in the
downtown night spots. These
people must resort to more
uneconomical ways of meeting
people.
"When I was a freshman, I
always met people in my classes,
especially the first day of class
junior Chris Mizelle said. "I
could always get in a conversa-
tion with someone. I mean, since
you're in the same class together,
you already have something in
common
Another place that underage
students can meet is at church or
one of the many church-oriented
groups on campus such as the
Baptist
Student
Union or
New Life.
"I've met lots
of people through
Church and youth group activi-
ties said junior Kelsey Dixon, a
junior Business major, who for
the last three years has dated a
boy she
met at a retreat. "Church is
the place where you meet the
nicer guys. Most of the guys
down-
town are
jerks, anyway
This brings us to
the next and newest way
to meet people: the
Internet. Many students stay
online for hours at a time meet-
ing people in electronic chat
rooms.
"I have two or three friends
that met others through chat
rooms junior Caleb Rose said.
"I even know one guy who is
getting married to a
girl from Portland,
Oregon that he
met - on
America
Online. It's that
addictive. They
exchanged pic-
tures through
their e-mail
accounts and a
few months
later, they
were flying
back and forth to
visit each other
Dr. Phyllis
Monroe, a sociology pro-
fessor, says that the statis-
tics look a little different
than one might expect them
"On the average, about 50
percent of all students meet
prospective relationship material
in the classroom. About 20 per-
cent meet in the dance clubs,
and the rest is divided between
such places as the workplace and
church-related places.
Only a small percentage of
the student body actually meet
on the Internet she said. So the
next time you are at a restaurant,
or even a gas station, look
around. You might see someone
you would like to see more of.
Married students face unique dilemmas
Many wouldn't have
it any other way
Teri Ho well
staff writer
Melissa Bender is not waiting for
Mr. Right to come and sweep her
off of her feet like many of her col-
lege-age female peers may be.
Instead, she looks forward to see-
ing the familiar face of her hus-
band appear in the doorway as he
returns home from class or running
an errand.
Melissa and Berry Bender do
not lead the typical college life. On
Aug. 1, 1998, they vowed to spend
the rest of their lives together as
husband and wife. They were
married in their hometown of New
Bern, NC, and now they face the
challenge of maintaining a mar-
riage and balancing the task of
being college students.
There are about 17,800 stu-
dents who are enrolled at ECU,
according to the Office of Planning
and Institutional Research. Of
those students, only 740 are cur-
rently married.
As one might imagine, being
married has changed the lifestyle
that Berry and Melissa once
livedYou have to focus on each
other Berry said. "The relation-
ship is taken to a whole different
level. It's not just love. I don't even
know how to explain it. It's your
whole life and that love is a lot
deeper than something you say to
a girlfriend. Sometimes it scares
you, but sometimes it's good too
Along with any relationship,
there arc certain pressures that
exist. The fact that they have
made a lifetime commitment to
each other is something on which
they remain continually focused.
"You have to talk about every-
thing and think before you say
things Melissa said. "It's not just
any roommate that you're talking
to
For this newlywed couple,
remembering that they must
always consider the feelings of the
other person has been one of the
added pressures to face. Berry wor-
ries about doing his best to be
kind. There are times when he
may be aggravated, which causes
him to get short with his wife.
"It's a pressure to know when
you are frustrated because you
have to pull back Berry said.
Another responsibility that
comes with marriage is deciding
who will do which household
chores in the apartment close to
campus where they live. Melissa is
responsible for keeping the entire
apartment clean, while Berry does
all of the cooking and grocery
shopping.
"Cleaning is like torture to me.
I know it's not fair because Melissa
does more work Berry said.
However, these rules are not set
in stone. "If there is something
that needs to be done, it's okay to
ask the other person for help
Melissa said.
Since both Melissa and Berry-
are students, they spend much of
their free time studying. They
study together much of the time.
Berry is a business major, and
Melissa's major is exercise physiol-
ogy. Berry has found that being
married has given him a new focus
on school. Since their engagement,
his GPA has increased.
"I need to be able to get a good
job because I have a family to sup-
port he said. "I want to be able to
support Melissa so that she can
stay home with our kids one day, if
that's what she decides she
wants
Other people have been very
supportive of the marriage. Even
the fact that Berry is 19 and
Melissa is 20 has not caused peo-
ple to look at them negatively.
"People see you as one. They
respect you more Melissa said.
They do admit that some peo-
ple initially react strangely, sur-
prised to see a couple that made
such a commitment. That hap-
pened on one occasion when
Melissa missed a class that she has
with Berry, so he offered to grab
her quiz and take it home to her.
He had to explain to the professor
in front of the class that Melissa is
his wife. The students in the class
seemed surprised, and a little
whispering took place, but other
than that it was no big deal.
"As soon as you say i do' you
learn a lot about real life Berry
said.
eastcarolinian
Amy L.Roystkr Editor
Amanda G. Ai'sitn Managing Editor
The Focus section is a combined effort between
Shearlean Duke's basic reporting class and TEC.
Students contribute articles for the section and for class
credit. The purpose of the Focus section is to bring an
in-depth analysis of issues relevant to the ECU
community.
cartoonists
cartoonists
CARTOONISTS!
BE A CARTOONIST
GET YOUR STRIP PUBLISHED
GET A PAYCHECK
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR SUMMER CARTOONISTS.
APPLY IN PERSON AT THE OFFICES OF
eastcarolinian
in the Student Pubs Building





University
December 9
of regular S? sale
priced merchants
with Student
or Faculfc
DOES NOT INCLUDE:
Cosmetics. Fragrances. Designer Watches. Estate Jewelry. Hair Salon. Polo. Chaps. Ralph Lauren. No Fear. Quiksilver. Mossimo. Nautica. Tommy Hilfiger. Hanes. Easy Spirit.
Liz Oaiborne. Jones. New York. Ena Picone. Rene Rowan. JNCO. Etienne Aigner. Calvin Klein underwear. Cairn Studio Collectables. Department 56 collectables. Waterford.
All Clad Cookware. Value Edge Items. Fine Jewelry Best Buys. Belkie Bear. Doorbusters. Lay-Aways. Special Orders. Gift Certificates and previously purchased merchandise.
OFFER VALID ONLY AT BELKS IN CAROLINA EAST MALL AND THE PLAZA MALL
I
Tuesday, D
CANNON C(
12 bath tow
refrigerator, d
er hook-up, c
Wainright P
LLC. 756-620
ROOMMATE
13 utilities. I
Available no
campus on Ei
PLAYERS C
lease JanJul
needed! Call
BEECH STRI
room, two bal
campus, with
refrigerator, i
Wainright Pi
LLC 756-6209
GLADIOLUS
and three bed
cable. Locatei
Wainright Pi
LLC 756-6209
$395 A mor
plex. Quiet i
erdryer hook
night 321-232
TIRED OF ;i
Young profess
share 2400 i
ous student
rooms with r.
Access to all
use of cable
phone line ava
eluded neight
minutes of mi
versity. Referei
icai students a
must; very affc
son @ 756
mentmore inl
1 BLOCK froi
needed. Must
14 utilities. C
WALK TO E
$285month.
wood Apts 1!
ville - 5 block:
6596.
SUBLEASE I
front Wildwoc
utilities avails
(919)759-2475
feet for gradue
PINEBROOK
BRs available,
eluded Reduc
ber, Deceml
tenance. mar
line. 9-12 mon
758-4015
1 BEDROOM
neighborhood
off-street parki
758-5559.
2 BR. apt. av
tor, Jan. 1st
apts. available
nection. Jan.
month. 3 BR. i
above BW 3
Please call 55
Smiley
SUBLEASE A
January 1st. T
cious two be
bath, basic cal
ed. half pf
$525mo. 551-
2 BEDROOM
month include
rooms and wa
ice to campus,
mat. Call 329
DECEMBER R
1 or 2 peopli
townhouse in
posit needed
nished. Call 3
Derek.
RINGGO
Now Taki
1 bedroorr
Efficiency
CALL
ROOMMATE
lease a duple:
Cheap rent. !
12 utilities.
quired. Call A
FEMALE ROC
share 2 bedrc
apartment loce
cle. Price inclu
dromat, clubho
ble. Move in .
6344 for more





I
f
1

Tuesday, December 8, 1998
FOR RENT
CANNON COURT Two bedroom. 1
12 bath townhouse. Includes stove,
refrigerator, dishwasher, washerdry-
er hook-up, on ECU bus route. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC, 756-6209.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. Rent $205,
13 utilities. Call 758-9433 anytime.
Available now. Few blocks from
campus on Eastern Street.
PLAYERS CLUB apartment for
lease Jan-July. Can rent by room if
needed! Call 321-6215.
BEECH STREET Villas - Three bed-
room, two bath apartments, close to
campus, with laundry room, stove,
refrigerator, and dishwasher. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC 756-6209.
f
GLADIOLUS GARDENS One, two.
and three bedroom apartments. Free
cable. Located on 10th Street. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC 756-6209.
U
$395 A month Two bedroom du-
plex. Quiet neighborhood. Wash-
erdryer hook-up. Call day, 551-7810;
night 321-2329.
TIRED OF apartmentdorm room?
Young professional couple wishes to
share 2400 sq. ft. house with seri-
ous student. Spacious, upstairs
rooms with private bath available.
Access to all areas of house. Free
use of cable and laundry, private
phone line available. Located in a se-
cluded neighborhood within 10-15
minutes of medical school and uni-
versity. References from former med-
ical students available. Non-smoker a
must; very affordable. Please call Ja-
son @ 756-2636 for appoint-
mentmore information.
1 BLOCK from campus, roommate
needed. Must like dogs. $135 rent
14 utilities. Call 757-1467.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$285month. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apts 125 Avery St. in Green-
ville - 5 blocks from campus. 758-
6596.
SUBLEASE BEECH St. Villas in
front Wildwood $207 month 13
utilities available now. Call Vinny
(919)759-2475 leae is until May per-
fect for graduation
PINEBROOK APARTMENTS, 1-2
BRs available, water, sewer, cable in-
cluded Reduced Deposits Novem-
ber. December. On-site main-
tenance, management. ECU bus
line. 9-12 month lease, pets allowed.
758-4015
1 BEDROOM house for rent. Quite
neighborhood near campus. Private
off-street parking. $325month. Call
758-5559.
2 BR. apt available above Percola-
tor, Jan. 1st $500 a month. 2-2 BR.
apts. available above Catalog Con-
nection. Jan. 1st. $475 & $550 a
month. 3 BR. aptavailable Jan. 1st,
above BW 3s;$850 a month!
Please call 551-9040. ask for Rick
Smiley
SUBLEASE APARTMENT, opened
January 1st. Tar River Estates. Spa-
cious two bedroom, one and half
bath, basic cable and water includ-
ed, half phone and utilities.
$525mo. 551-9196.
2 BEDROOM apartment. $395 per
month includes cable water, large
rooms and walk-i�ycloset, bus serv-
ice to campus, ha;s pool and laundro-
mat. Call 329-1433.
DECEMBER RENT Free! Looking for
1 or 2 people to sublease 4 BR
townhouse in Players Club. No de-
posit needed. Washerdryer fur-
nished. Call 355-4318 and ask for
Derek.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom 6V
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
ROOMMATE NEEDED to sub-
lease a duplex close to campus.
Cheap rent. $200 per month
12 utilities. $200 deposit re-
quired. Call ASAP, 757-9348.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom, fully furnished
apartment located in Kingston Cir-
cle. Price includes rent. pool, laun-
dromat, clubhouse, water, sewer, ca-
ble. Move in January 1. Call 758-
6344 for more details.
ROOMMATE WANTED
FEMALE REPLACEMENT room-
mate needed to share 2 bedroom
apartment. Rent $185month, de-
posit $185, 12 utilities, 12 cable,
plus phone. Available DecJan. Call
756-3654
ROOMMATE WANTED for nice 3
BR duplex close to campus and
downtown. Central heatair, dish-
washer, WD, fenced in yard and
more. No deposit! Call Doug or Steve
� 830-6921.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to sublease
room in duplex. Walking distance
from ECU and on bus route.
December rent is paid for! No pets!
Call JC at 551-3424.
FOR SALE
PANAMA CITY Spring Break Spe-
cials! Plan Now 8- Save! Boardwalk
Beach Resort. Holiday Inn Sunspree!
7 nights, parties, free drinks from
$119-$ 199! springbreaktravel.com 1-
800-678-6386
"LIKE NEW" Moving sale. Contents:
living room set, kitchen set, bar set,
twin bed, and futon. Must See!
Leave message; 561-7550. Best rea-
sonable offer!
3-PIECE Computer table must be
sold. Brand new table looking for
best offer. Call 830-0903.
AAAA! EARLY Specials! Cancun
& Jamaica! 7 nights air and hotel
from $399! Includes free food,
drinks, parties! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
K2 FREERIDE 161 Snow Board with
bindings, excellent condition, fast
and great for freestyle courses. Used
only twice. $250 OBO 752-6689.
COMPUTER PARTS for sale! Com-
puter case. Ram, VideoCard, CD-
ROM. Zip Drive. 3.2Gig Harddrive. A-
Drive, and Monster 3dfx Graphics
Accelerator. All for Very Cheap! Ask
for Ron, 329-7203.
COMPLETE SUPER entertainment
system (150w receiver, tape deck, 2
CD players. 8-speaker system-Bose,
2 VCRs. cabinet); 3-piece center
table; 2 dressers; queen Er full size
beds; 2 book shelves; dining table;
etc. Call 321-3242.
AAAA EARLY Specials! Panama
City! Room with kitchen $129! In-
cludes 7 free parties! Daytona $149!
New Hotspot-South Beach129! Co-
coa Beach $149! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
AAAA! EARLY Spring Break Spe-
cials! Bahamas Party Cruise! 6 days
$279! Includes most meals! Awe-
some beaches, nightlife! Departs
from Florida! springbreaktravel.com
1-800-678-6386
1991 MITSUBISHI Galant, good
condition, $2,800. 752-4628.
AAAAI SPRING Break Travel was
1 of 6 small businesses in the US
recognized by the Council of Better
Business Bureaus for outstanding
ethics in the marketplace! spring-
breaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386
SERVICES
I WILL type your paper for you.
$2.50 per page double spaced;
$3.50 single spaced. Pick up and de-
livery avail. 24 hour service. Call
Becky at 830-5559
FACULTYSTAFFPARENTS: Tutor-
ing Today for a successful tomor-
row. 13-year veteran school teacher
specializing in Reading, Math, and
Study Skills. Contact Robin @ 754-
8020.
LEARN TO
SKYOIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(919)496-2224
classifieds
1
The East Carolinian
HELP WANTED
WANTED: PART-time warehouse
and delivery. License required. Apply
in person at Larry's Carpetland, 3010
E. 10th Street. Greenville, NC
EDUCATION MAJOR needed for
tutoringsitting services for fourth
grader. Every other week beginning
1499 from 2:30-5;30, $60week.
758-8400.
BASIL'S RESTAURANT a Pizzeria
now hiring all positions Apply in
person, 1675 East Firetower Road in
front of Carmike Cinemas.
$7.00 PER hour plus $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina (Nags Head). Call
Dona for application and housing
info, 800-662-2122.
1999 INTERNSHIPS! Attention un-
dergraduate business students Now
interviewing on campus for manag-
ers across Virginia. North and South
Carolina for summer of 1999. Aver-
age earnings last summer $7,000
Call Tuition Painters at (800) 393-
4521 or e-mail at tuipaint@bell-
south.net
AFTERNOON CARE for three (ages
10.7,5) 3:20 until 4:30 or 5:30 M-Th
(some Fridays). Safe auto, exc. driv-
ing record, exp. with children, out-
standing references, take home or to
activities, assist with homework, etc.
Leave message, Janet, 353-3998
HELP WANTED: Parents are seek-
ing a student to take 7-year old boy
and 12-year old girl home from
school and watch until parents get
home from work (approximately
5:30 p.m.). Transportation to speech
class once a week and assistance
with homework will be needed De-
pendable transportation required
Salary is $75week. Call 758-3111 af-
ter 5:30 p.m.
BARTENDERS ARE in Demand
Earn $15-$30hr Have fun and
make great $$$! Call for information
about our $99 Holiday Tuition Spe-
cial Offer ends soon! Call Raleigh's
Bartending School today Call toll
free at 1-888-676-0774.
BEAUTIFUL LINGERIE sales people
needed Must have retail experience
No calls. Lori's Intimate Apparel.
STUDENTS WANTED, all positions
(bartenders, doormen, DJ's and
managers) Apply in person at The
Sports Pad or call for more info, 757-
3881 or 757-3658.
BABYSITTER NEEDED all day on
Wednesdays to care for two child-
ren. Please do not call if you have
morning classes. No smokers,
please. Call 355-7875.
CARPENTERS WANTED. Full or
part-time One year experience re-
quired. Call 758-9904. Clipper Con-
struction Co, Inc leave phone num-
ber and time you can be reached.
EARN WHILE YOU learn, up to
$1,000.00 wk. Day and night
shifts. Clean, secure working at-
mosphere. Playmates Adult En-
tertainment. 2S2-747-7686 for in-
terview.
NEEDED-ABLE bodied, dependable,
trainable individuals for historic res-
toration. Full time till Christmas. $7-
$12hour. Call 830-4829.
SUPERVISOR NEEDED with ECU
campus dining in Recreational Cen-
ter Hours are 6:45a.m2 p.m. Can-
didate should be energetic, custom-
er service oriented, and have previ-
ous supervisory experience. If you
enjoy a healthy lifestyle and like be-
ing around others who do, this could
be the job for you! Apply at the Ara-
mark office in Mendenhall Student
Ctr. No phone calls. EEO
HOUSE-SITTER Available Matured,
experienced, reliable, trustworthy na-
tive of Greenville available for house-
sitting Christmas and possibly
Thanksgiving holidays. Kathy, 202-
667-6216 hkathryn.hotmail.com
FULL TIME
FINANCIAL SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVE
RWr.lr .
NBC Bank has an opening in the Triangle area, for a Financial ServiceSales Representative.
Successful candidate will possess si rang customer service skills and sales orientation with career
interest in banking. Join a growing operation that was ranked one of the top live banks in the coun-
try by U.S. Banker Magazine.
NBC Bank offers:
�Competitive salary plus incentive program
�Exciting professional environment with
potential opportunities for career growth.
Also accepting resumes for Part-time work
Please send resumes to NBC Bank Administration Office � 4515 Falls ol Neuse Rd Ste 200
Raleigh. NC 27609 Fax 919-850-3382 or email us at nbcidu etjellsouth.net
� An equal opportunityAffirmative Action Employer; MFHV
GREEK PERSONALS GREEK PERSONALS ANNOUNCEMENTS
CONGRATULATIONS ANDI David-
son and Valerie Springle on your up-
coming graduation. We wish you the
best of luck but will miss you! Love,
Your Sigma Sigma Sigma sisters
LIZ-CONGRATULATIONS! We are
so proud of you. We're gonna miss
you! Love, your sisters
CONGRATULATIONS TO the Grad-
uating Brothers of Tau Chapter Phi
Sigma Pi: Julie Brandenburg, Patti
Dean, Jason Deans, Angela Leak,
and Michelle Snead
SIGMA SIGMA Sigma would like to
congratulate our new officers Presi-
dent: Carrie Brewer; Vice President:
Allison Knotts; Secretary: Lynsey
Durshin; Treasurer: Kim Kelly; Rush
Chair: Taryn Sikkema; Assistant Rush
A Chair: Melissa Hamlett. We know
you'll do great. Love, Sigma Sigma
Sigma
SIGMA SIGMA Sigma would like to
wish everyone good luck on exams,
and hopes everyone has a fun & safe
Christmas break!
CHI OMEGA Seniors - Your sisters
just want you to know how much we
will miss you! Good luck with every-
thing you do. We love you all!
CONGRATULATIONS CARMEN
Land and Jason Harris on your en-
gagement We love you both! Love,
the sisters of Alpha Phi
SIGMA SIGMA Sigma would like to
congratulate our newest initiated
members: Susan Chesson, Page
Clark, Nicole Cobb, Cammie Cole,
Amanda Crumpton, Emily DeHart,
Molly Earnhardt, Courtney Evans.
Lindsay Gainey, April Herring, Ashley
Holbrook. Liz Joseph, Nina Kragnes,
Mindy Murray. Michelle Page. Katie
Rutter, Amy Short, Sarah Stone,
Christy Taylor. Wendi Ward, Nan Wi
nters. Erica Wyatt We love you!
Love, your sisters
HEY BOYS! Did you enjoy the Won-
derland? We sure did Thanks for
coming out for our Crush Party! Eve-
ryone had a great time Love, Zeta
Tau Alpha
PHI KAPPA Psi, we had a great
time at the social Thursday night.
Thanks for everything! Love, Sigma
Sigma Sigma
CONGRATULATIONS JACKIE
Wright on begin elected Panhelle-
nic's new Vice President We know
you will do a great job! Love, your Al-
pha Delta Pi sisters
TRACY AND Kate - Happy 22nd
Birthdays! Hope they were great!
Love, your Zeta sisters
ALPHA PHI would like to congratu-
late Kathryn Dengler, Amy Frank,
Carmen Land and Monica Lopez on
their graduation. Much love and
good luck. Love, the sisters of Alpha
Phi
ALPHA PHI, good luck on exams
and have a wonderful break! Love,
your sister sorority, Zeta Tau Alpha
GAMMA SIGMA Sigma sisters,
good luck on your exams, have a
great break, be safe!
EPSILON SIGMA Alpha sisters,
thanks to those who helped at the
Ronald McDonald House - Great Job!
PS. Don't forget to bring your orna-
ment and covered dish Wed.
SISTERS OF The Week: Alpha Del-
ta Pi-Kristen Trull, Katie Williams; Al-
pha Phi-Andrea Gillispie, Ginny Stan-
ley; Alpha Omicron Pi-Sarah Gar-
riques, Lindsay Arndt; Alpha Xi Del-
ta-Sarah Evans, Kerri Augustino; Chi
Omega-FriendshipSocial Commit-
tee; Delta Zeta-Marvelle Sullivan,
Heather Cline; Sigma Signra Sigma-
Carolina McClaugherty, Katie Mc-
Cabe; Zeta Tau Alpha-Sara Leahy,
Sarah McConnell; Pi Delta-Shelly
McCutcheon, Leslie Garris; Panhelle-
nic Member of the Week - Carmen
Land for her job offers and her re-
cent engagement! Congratulations!
LINDSAY PEELER, Kelly Lundin,
Christina Alexander, and Tracy
Jones, thanks for working so hard
on our Senior Banquet. Everything
was perfect! Love, your Alpha Delta
Pi sisters
KAPPA ALPHA, thank you for the
social last Thursday. The All Good in
the Hood theme was a great idea. .
Hope we can get together again real
soon! Love, Alpha Delta Pi
PI KAPPA Alpha- Thanks for show-
ing us a great time Wednesday
night! Love Chi Omega
HAPPY ANNIVERSARY Sigma Phi
- 19 years at ECU (12-8-79).
Established 153 years ago (12-6-45).
Causa Latet Vis Est Notissima.
SIGMA ALPHA Epsilon, thanks for
a great social on Thursday. We had a
blast. Love, the sisters of Alpha Phi
KAPPA ALPHA, thank you for the
social last Thursday. The All Good in
the Hood theme was a great idea.
Hope we can get together again real
soon! Love, Alpha Delta Pi
CONGRATULATIONS AND wel-
come to the New Brothers of Tau
Chapter Phi Sigma Pi: Dana Autry,
Cheryl Baker. Shawna Borsz, Kim
Bouldin. Jacque Brady, Kristi Gibson,
Kelly Grace, Charlene Hagen, Katie
Hanna, Mary Ann Helms, Nicolle
Johnson, Wendy Johnston, Jennifer
Medlin, Angie Mitchell, Natalie Poin-
dexter, Jamie Sellers, Emily Shields,
Amber Stallings, Tracee Thigpen,
and Krista Wilhelm.
OTHER
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ANNOUNCEMENTS
STRESS MANAGEMENT Work-
shop: Wednesday 3:30-4:30. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop on December 9th. If
you are interested in this workshop,
please contact the center at 328-
6661.
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10th Street. Greenville. NC opening
soon, 9-6 MonSat. Accepting dona-
tions (tax deductible) of household
items, books, etc. (sorry, no clothes)
Proceeds go towards building homes
for our community's families in
need. For more info call 758-2947.
Habitat for Humanity of Pitt Co Inc
TUES DEC. 8- GRADUATE RECI-
TAL, Michael Weaver. iolin, Willis
Building Auditorium, 9:00 P.M.
HOLIDAY CONTRA Dance! Willis
Bldg 1st and Reade Sts 7 p.m.
Sat. Dec. 19. Free beginners lessons
at 7; dance 7:30-11. Live old-time
music with band and caller. Bring a
snack to share! ECU Folk and Coun-
try Dancers. 328-0237 or 830-5403.
Students $3.00; public $5 or $6. A
smoke and alcohol-free alternative to
downtown.
THE EXERCISE and Sport Science
Motor and Physical Fitness Compet-
ency Test - is scheduled as follows:
Minges Coliseum (Williams Arena),
Thursday, December 10 at 8 a.m. A
passing score on this test is required
of all students prior to declaring Ex-
ercise and Sport Science as a major.
Any student with a medical condi-
tion that would contraindicate partic-
ipation in the testing should contact
Mike McCammon or Michelle Brun-
son at 328-4688. A detailed sum-
mary of the test components is avail-
able in the Human Performance Lab-
oratory (Room 371, Sports Medicine
Bldg.) "Students must bring ECU
student ID.
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FEATURING THE NEW SONG: "HANDS
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WE ARE IN IT"
PLOTINUS

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CONGRATULATIONS
FALL 1998
GRADUATES!
FROM THE
STUDENTS OF THE
ECU STUDENT MEDIA
Sc
CINDY AUTRY
What a wonderful
day in your life,
another step closer
to your dreams.
Love you.
Dad, Mom, Lisa, Roger,
Darren, Jenny, Ashley, Tiffany,
Grandma, Aunt Irene
ERIC JASON MAGGIO
It's wonderful how far
you've come and how
far you'll go.
We are proud of you
and we love you!
Mom, Dad
& Grandma
MATTHEW BRIAN LEVINE
Dear Mattie:
Congratulations on
your wonderful
achievement!
All our love,
Mom, Dad and Chuck
TRACY L. MASON
Tracy,
Your hard work and
dedication has paid off.
You have made us so
proud of you and your
accomplishment.
We love you very much.
Mama, Daddy & Adam





JENNIFER DAWN GOOCH
CONGRATULATIONS
SWEETHEART!
YOU DID IT!
WE'RE SO PROUD OF
YOU, AND WE LOVE YOU
VERY MUCH.
MOM, DAD & DUSTY
MICHELLE KALAN BAGBY
Congratulations
Michelle Kalan
to the beginning of a
wonderful future. You've
made us so very proud.
We love you.
Mom, Dad & Karol
SONIA LANDWEHR
Sonia's $taduatln$. ou fcnaltif made it.
TQe'te very
proud otf fou
and we love
ifou!
Horn Jl �ap
CHRIS SCHODERBEK
May your life be full of
joy and may all your
dreams come true.
We'll love you forever,
Mom, Dad, Brandon,
Stacy, Nona, Paw-Paw
JENNIFER GRAY
Sti�"Jennifer,
Your family and I are
y Ivery proud of you!
m 1Congratulations and Bon Voyage!
v JL MLove, Mom

KATRIN HENNING
Q0e proiSlu present:
oKatrin s cfradiiat'ma!
Q0e can $o it -
sAa ?wu have Bone it!
(Sxcellent Moo) luck
jjor the fyrime.
�ove, sMama a?iB �Papa
MEREDITH CELESTE WILSON
As always, we are
j$proud and feel very privileged to have
been a part of your journey! Love, Mom & Dad
ADRIANNE SUZANNE WOOD
Susie Q is graduating You are AWESOME fcU ARE THE APPLE OF OUR EYE! Love. Mom. Dad. Nannie. Pa Pa. Aunt Resa. Hunter, PB and Camilla. Bubea and Buddy






I
BARRY GORDON POWELL JR.
Barry,
We are so proud of
you. May God bless
you and Sue in the
months and years
to come.
Love,
Your family
m wm-m.
CAMILLE ELIZABETH BATES
Hey Millie!
You did it! There was no
doubt! The pride of Wake
County, Pitt County &
WNCT! Stay real!
Love. Mom, Dad, Tyler,
Muff & Sally
DWAYNE EDWIN DAVIS
jjslfH,(3 onyi&tuLoxions
1 A'TOe ate vetif ptoud
1 Ariiikt.oj) you.
YOe love you.
i �'ZSad, faom, (Zasandta,
l�.dwazd and (Zod
Z AN ETTA D. MCCALLUM
Congratulations "ZA
May God continue to
bless you as you enter
into the real world.
Good luck.
Love,
Mom & Dad
THOMAS SHANE RENN
Qood jo( Stone.
We're proud
of you
Love,
Daddy, Apr ie �
Kyde
JULIE MAE BATEMAN
Your daddy's dreams
for his baby girl have
been fulfilled.
He lives on through you
Colt and I are proud of
you.
Love,
Mom & Colt
TYLON LAMAR GUINE
Tylon's graduating!
All that hard work
paid off. You made it.
We're so happy for you.
"Congratulations"
Mom & Dad
CHRISTINE NAIKELIS
"Many daughters kave
cLone-welL, butyou,excel
them, all"
Proverbs 31:29
We, Love,you, so muxM
Your family





Dr. Richard Marks
Award-winning ECU professor
to deliver graduation address
Dr. Richard Marks, an East Carolina Univer-
sity professor who was honored last spring with a
top teaching award, will deliver the address at the
University's fall commencement on Dec. 12.
About 2,000 degree candidates will be recog-
nized at two ceremonies in Williams Arena at
Minges Coliseum. The public is invited.
The first ceremony, at 8:30 a.m will recog-
nize all doctoral degree candidates and the master's
and bachelors degree students in the Schools of
Allied Health Sciences, Business, Health and Hu-
man Performance, Industry and Technology, Nurs-
ing and Social Work.
The second program, beginning at 11:30 a.m
will honor the advanced study and educational spe-
cialists degree candidates along with the under-
graduate and graduate students from the College
of Arts and Sciences and the Schools of Art, Edu-
cation, Human Environmental Sciences and Mu-
sic.
Marks, a professor biochemistry in the School
of Medicine, has been a member of the ECU fac-
ulty since 1976. In May he was honored as the ECU
winner of the University of North Carolina Board
of Governors Award for Excellence in Teaching, the
highest teaching award in the UNC system. He won
an ECU teaching award in 1995.
Multiple ceremonies honor grads in all areas
East Carolina University's 1998 fall commencement will be held on Saturday, Dec. 12, in
Williams Arena at Minges Coliseum.
There will be two ceremonies. The first commencement program will begin at 8:30 a.m. and
will be preceded by a' band concert at 8 a.m. The second commencement is at 11.30 a.m. with a
band concert at 11 a.m.
The procession of degree candidates and faculty will form at 8:15 a.m. and at 11:15 a.m.
Dr. Richard Marks, an ECU professor who was honored last spring with a top teaching
award, will deliver the address.
The two-commencements will be organized as follows:
8:30 A.M. COMMENCEMENT
The first commencement will recognize all doctoral degree candidates and the master's and
baccalaureate degree students in the Schools of Allied Health Sciences, Business, Health and
Human Performance, Industry and Technology, Nursing and Social Work.
11:30 A.M. COMMENCEMENT
The second program will the honor the advanced study and educational specialists degree
candidates along with the undergraduate and graduate students from the College of Arts and
Sciences and the Schools of Art, Education, Human Environmental Sciences and Music.
Schools and departments will hold graduate recognition ceremonies Friday and Saturday. The
following is the schedule for the unit recognition ceremonies:
THURSDAY DEC. 10
Honors Program in the Gray Gallery at 5 p.m. N
FRIDAY DEC. 11
School of Art in Speight Auditorium at 4 p.m.
School of Business in Wright Auditorium at 3 p.m.
Department of Chemistry in 244 Mendenhall Student Center at 4 p.m.
School of Education in Williams Arena at 2 p.m.
Department of English in the Willis Building at 6 p.m.
Health & Human Performance in Williams Arena and Minges at 7:30 p.m.
School of Human Environmental Sciences in Hendrix Theater at 4 p.m.
School of Nursing in Wright Auditorium at 10 a.m.
Department of Psychology in the Brody Building Auditorium at 6 p.m.
School of Social Work in Wright Auditorium at 8 p.m.
Department of Sociology in Brewster Building room D-313 at 8 p.m.
Department of Theater and Dance in McGinnis Theater at 7 p.m.
SATURDAY DEC. 12
Department of History inTodd Dining Hall (Senior Breakfast) at 8:30 a.m.
School of Industry and Technology in Hendrix Theater at 11:15a.m.
MSC STUDENT WORKERS
Congratulations to these Mendenhall Student
Center workers who are graduating this Fall:
Jim Matheson James Joyner
Justin Beaver Lisa Klein
From the staff of Mendenhall Student Center
VICTOR LAWRENCE BANFIELD
Vic's Special Day
"Graduating" Hoorah
We are all very proud of you,
Vic. You've accomplished
your goal. We love you!
Mom, Steve, Jen, Erlka,
Eric, J.J. & Benji






Want to stay in touch with what's
happening at ECU after you
graduate?
ecu.edu
Now you know how!





LINDSAY KATHRYN PERRY
fyeu aye stiU cuy ?yeau
cente true anb we
couCbn't be mete yyeub!
tfeeb Luck at graduate
school.
Aooe,
lien A 7W2y
MELISSA MAY FALCO
JASON EARL HOPKINS
Congratulations Jason!
You are our joy, our love
and our inspiration
We're very proud of you,
Words can't express
For all that you do,
Our lives are so blessed.
Love, Dad, Mom & Shannon
iVI o n d a v
Monday Night Football
on the big screen
50 Draft
$3.00 Pitchers
lues d a y
Margarita Special
$2.00 Glass
$7.95 Pitchers
After 5pm
buy 1 get 1 free
appetizers
Sunday
live Music at 7pm
?2.00 Mimosas
Bloody Mary's and
Screwdrivers
check out the
Grooveriders on
December 13th
Melissa,
We are so very proud
of you. You're great!
Congratulations.
We love you lots!
Mom, Dad & L.J.
KATHRYN DENGLER
Kathryw,
Our wonderful little girl
has grown up and is
graduating.
We are so proud of you!
Love,
Mont Pad, fob � Brie
6i
If you can't not
wight good,
apply within
Copy Editors Needed
Must have excellent grammar & editing skills
English majors preferred
Apply at the second floor of Student
Publications Building or call 328-6366
oast .
Carolinian





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Title
The East Carolinian, December 8, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 08, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1310
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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