The East Carolinian, December 3, 1998






��n

Efc
Thursday
High: 75
Low: 44
Friday
High: 79
Low: 48
Online Survey
Does ECU need a new
football coach?
24 Yes 75 No
www.tec.ecu.edu
In the spirit AIDS Awareness Week, did you
wear a condom the last time you had sex?
Carolinian
.U every Pirate football name the Marching Pirates are
steadfast fan- through tliirlc and thin.
Features, page 7
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3.1998 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 28
Tuesday, December 8 will be TEC's
last etMon for the fall 1998 semester
Demarco wins
unemployment suit
Judge rules informer
professor's favor
P E T K R D A W V O T .
iSISI I NEWS KDI 1 OR
former ECU professor Sal Demarco con-
tinues his fight against ECU, and the
employment judge ruled in his favor.
Judge Tammy Jenkins ruled in favor of
Demarco saying "It is concluded from the
competent evidence in the record that the
"Initially I received an oral warning.
But then two months later I received
the written reprimand. I believe this
is double jeopardy. I am being
disciplined for a previously
resolved incident
Sal DeMarco
Former ECU Professor
evidence fails to show that the claimant
(Demarco) was discharged from the job for
substantial fault or misconduct connected
with the work Monroe said.
This decision allows Demarco to receive
unemployment checks totaling over
$8,000, an amount which Chancellor
Kakin blocked Demarco from receiving.
Demarco believes his victory will help
many who are in situations similar to his.
"This is a very important decision
because the court recognizes that faculty
have employment rights just like other
employees in the state Demarco said. "It
demonstrates Kakin is not above the law.
The constitutional rights as well as federal
and state laws will be upheld for tenure fac-
ulty
I iniversity attorney
Ben Irons says that the
university plans to
appeal the decision.
Irons believes that
Demarco won the case
due to a technicality.
"The university has
witnesses to all of
Demarco's actions.
Regarding his final
incident however, no
one testified to the
incident on behalf of the university, which
is why the employment judge rued in
Demarco's favor Irons said.
Problems between Demarco and the
university began inl994 when Demarco
disrupted a meeting of the Graduate
Faculty Admission Committee by shouting
obscenities. Demarco was given a verbal
warning. Later, he received a written rep-
rimand notifying him that his actions were
unprofessional.
"Initially I received an oral warning. But
then two months later I received the writ-
ten reprimand Demarco said. "I believe
this is double jeopardy. I am being disci-
plined for a previously resolved incident
Later in December 1996, confrontarions
continued as Demarco made negative
remarks toward a colleague. Professor
Richard Shine. Demarco continued to
ridicule Shine with comments which put
SEE DEMARCO. PAGE 2
Delta Sigma Phi house
robbed on Thanksgiving
Fraternity theft,
vandalism
unsolved
Amy S11 kr 11)an
NKWS KDI I OH
The Delta Sigma Phi house,
located on Hast Tenth
Street, was vandalized and
robbed on Thanksgiving
Day.
The president of Delta
Sigma Phi, Paul Kaplan, left
the house on Thursday,
morning and returned on
Friday morning. He
returned on Friday to find
broken windows and doors
which had been forcefully
opened. Apparently, the robbers entered
the fraternity house through the upstairs
deck in the back of the house.
After entering the house, Kaplan found
that the entire house was sprayed with fire
extinguishers and eggs thrown on the
inside and outside of the house. The police
fingerprinted the house; however, that
proved very difficult because of the fire
extinguisher residue all over the house.
"All the doors were kicked in and
someone took the two fire extinguishers
and sprayed all the soot all over the place
said Scott Rose, house manager of Delta
Sigma Phi.
All the vandalism and theft was done to
t
Delta Sigma Phi house was robbed and vandalized on Thanksgiving.
PHOTO BY SARAH CHRISTIE
the specific rooms of the fraternity house
and not the house as a whole. Among the
items stolen from the rooms were a stereo,
rwo guitars, two computers, clothing, and a
credit card wallet.
"The police suggest that it was the work
of another fraternity said Mustafa Rashid,
Delta Sigma Phi secretary.
Rose feels differently.
"I do not think it was the work of anoth-
er fraternity because they would have
stolen fraternity stuff, not personal items
he said.
"We are installing an alarm system to pre-
vent future break-ins and vandalism to our
home and fraternity house Kaplan said.
�V
AIDS Awareness Week raises
community consciousness
PICASO sponsored a
candkligfitwalk
Car a Davis
S.TAFE WKITKR
Pitt County AIDS Service
Organization (PICASO) spon-
sored a candlelight walk to cele-
brate the 11th annual World
AIDS Day.
The vigil was held at 6 p.m. on
Tuesday night. The march began
at Town Commons and ended at
the Percolator on Fifth street
where a reception was held later.
People around the world
observe World AIDS Day to
focus attention and provoke dis-
cussion on current issues involv-
ing AIDS. 'The issues include
transmission, symptoms and gen-
eral information about the drastic
rate of infection occurring around
the world today.
Over 30 million people world-
wide arc infected with AIDS with
90 percent of infections occurring
in underdeveloped or developing
countries. Infection rates arc
occurring at a rate of approximate-
ly 16,000 people per day across
the globe. Last year, transmission rates throughout North eastern North Carolina increased by 50 percent from eight
Carolina alone fell by seven percent, while in just the eastern years previous.
part of the state the occurrence of the disease was increased by "50 percent of all cases of AIDS occur in people less than
seven percent. The majority of the infected pop-
Students show support for AIDS victims by carrying candles on a walk around campus.
PHOTO BV SARAH CHRISTIE
ulation include women and adolescents.
Fastern North Carolina has been hit hardest by
the disease. Pitt county ranks fifth out of the 1(H)
reported counties in the state that have the highest
annual rate of AIDS. It is estimated that by the
year 2000, between 38 and 108 million people will
be infected with IIIY.
Worldwide, two women ate infected with HIV
every minute and one woman dies every rwo min-
utes as a result of the disease. In North Carolina,
Pitt county particularly, males have conrracted
over 75 percent of cases. Of these cases over 80
percent were found in African Americans.
Barry Flmore, outreach coordinator for PICA-
SO, said it appears that eastern North Carolina res-
idents have many misconceptions about AIDS.
"I believe in eastern North Carolina people still
believe it's an urban phenomenon. They feel since
they don't live in a big city they don't have to
worry about it Flmor said. "HIV is not about risk
groups, it's about risk behavior. Basically, if you've
got a blood stream, you can get IIIV
AIDS is affecting the young at an alarming rate.
Cases of reported adolescent transmission rates in
SEE AIDS. PAGE 2
Events going on during
AIDS awareness week
�Candle Light visual and Aids walk
�Students can pick up red ribbons around campus at various locations
�HIV AIDS bulletin boards competition under way throughout
residence halls
�"Safe Sex kits" containing valuable information and condoms were dis-
tributed out side student health Center on Dec. 2
�Anyone interested in creating a panel to submit to the National
AIDS Quilt should stop by Health Service Health Education office to
pick up information about this project and many others.
�Free HIV testing available through the Student health Center call
328-6317 for appointment
For more information on AIDS contact Health
Education at 328-6794
Telemedicine, excellent accomplishment
School of Medicine project
service center
D K V O S W H IT K
ST�FI WR1TBR
The ECU School of Medicine's telemedi-
cine project has been designated the uni-
versity's newest public service center by
the UNC Board of Governors.
"By achieving a center of excellence sta-
tus it focuses the development of any
telemedicine activity in North Carolina;
that is very significant said David Batch,
"This is an excellent accomplishment;
it recognizes a lot of work done so far
for telemedicine. We can now use this
designation to further health care in
North Carolina
Dr. James Hallock
Vice Chancellor lot Health Sciences
director of the 'Telemedicine Center and
Center for Health Services
Communications (CHSC).
Since 1992, the ECU School of
Medicine has been conducting teleme)1-
cinc consultations. To date the program has
completed 3,000 consultations in 34 differ-
ent specialities of medicine through its
REACH-TV network at 12 clinical sites.
The technical team at ECU integrated
advanced telecommunication technologies
into a uniform network which has become
the most flexible telemedicine network in
the country. Any site on any network can
be connected to the four distance learning
rooms spread around campus or the four
custom telemedicine suites.
"Technology is increasing the access as
well as the quality of health care in North
Carolina said Lori Maiolo, training center
coordinator.
The Telemedicine Center also includes
a state-of-the-art training center where
SEE TELEMED PAGE 2






2 Thundiy, Dictmbtr 3, 1998
news
Tha East Carolinian
not presently
further possible action that
e taken. As 1 have stated
lie incident to
mate, and while
ntioncd, the
I'd as abhor-
us, including
the United States. The pe
North Carolina have deci
fund higher education with
w uvl"
to find Are you sat
report? Is Acre fur-
te action which the
I have complete confidence irt
Tot Carter and the report she sub-
you satisfied with this year's
Pirate football season? What
changes would you make if you
were Coach Eakin instead of
Chancellor Eakin?
I believe the Pirates, including
players and coaches, performed
admirably this season. While a
bowf appearance doesn't seem
likely, I thought the season was
encouraging for this year and for
the future. Two games come to
mind as having particularly unhap-
py outcomes. One is the Alabama
game, in which we played well and
could have won. The other is the
Houston game in which Murphy's
law seemingly applied on every
occasion.
So if you were Coach Eakin,
how would you have changed the
outcome?
ECU is very fortunate that nei-
ther 1 nor many other fans are
coaches.
The majority of our editorial
board felt the Sonic Plaza was not
the best use erf money and wonder
why it was a priority. Are you
pleased with the outcome and con-
fident with the choice of this as a
priority?
What your editorial board may
not understand is that thb came
about because of a law passed by
the general assembly which
required a certain amount of
money to be spent on ait for public
buildings. That law is no longer in.
place. The North Carolina Arts
Council helped select the artist,
Chris Janney. We decided to pick
him because his public art is art
that involves people. They can
interact with it. I think he has
delivered a wonderful piece of art
for ECU. Pve had the pleasure on
many occasions of watching people
interact and be playful and mysti-
fied. I think it has added a wonder-
ful dimension to our campus. I
wish the general assembly would
restore the public art component
At TEC we have heard a lot of
grumbling from students who feel
they do not have a voice They
complain to us about the Pepsi
contract, about their ATM
provider changing, and about fee
increases. What is
is that they complain
not feeling like arryon
consult them and find
opinions. What do you say
dents who feel this way? W
be done to imprc
ship with the uni
I think the way for students to
express views is through The East
Carolinian, which is obviously a
student operared publkarjon that
values student point of views. If
chey have a concern they should
make their view known to the
Student Government Association
SGA) which is charged with the
responsibility of representing the
student's point of views. The pres-
ident of SGA sits as a member of
the Board of Trustees.
Thursday,
See stow
far
details
Telemed
continued from page I
health care providers learn how to
establish a remote health care
delivery system in their communi-
ty. Since access to this care is uni-
versal, health care providers from
throughout the world come to the
Center to leam how to implement a
system covering hundreds of miles.
The attendees learn everything
from how a physician conducts a
telemedicine consultation to how
to fill out the patient chart and file
for insurance reimbursement.
"This is an excellent accom-
plishment, it recognizes a lot of
work done so far for telemedicine.
We can now use this designation to
further health care in North
Carolina said Dr. James Hallock,
vice chancellor for health sciences
and dean of the medical school.
Demarco
continued from page I
his teaching abilities into question.
After the meeting, Demarco
allegedly shoved Shine into a wall
when Shine accidentally brushed
against him.
These events, along with others,
were among the charges which
ECU and Chancellor Eakin used as
cause for the decision to dismiss
Demarco. Demarco continues to
fight the charges brought against
him after he was discharged in April
1998. Demarco recently filed a suit
against ECU for disability discrimi-
nation. He believes that his multi-
ple sclerosis condition is causing
the problems which have surfaced
in the past few years.
ECU still plans to stand behind
the decision to appeal the employ-
ment judges decision. "Demarco
was voted down by the Board of
Trustees Irons said He commit-
ted setious acts of misconduct,
which led to his discharge
However, Demarco is still fight-
ing to get his job back and plans on
staying in the area. His attorney, Al
McSurely, believes that Demarco
could start his own private practice.
"His reputation in this field is so
good. It is ironic that the university
calls him a nut case. He is a pretty
famous children's' clinician who
helps diagnose children with
Attention Deficit Disorder and
many other brain disorders. "
McSurely has utmost confi-
dence that justice will be given to
Demarco
"We will eventually win, no
question, it is certain " McSurely
said. It is a real tragedy that this
process has continued on so long to
get to this point
AIDS
continued from page I
25 years of age said David
Satcher, U.S. surgeon general.
Satcher, who recently spoke at a
conference in Geneva, estimated
that 40,000 to 80,000 people in the
U.S. become infected each year.
World AIDS Day (WAD) origi-
nated in the United Kingdom by
the WAD Project at the Health
Education Authority and the
National AIDS Trust. WAD is
funded by the Department of
Health, a supporter of World AIDS
Day across the world.
The purpose of World AIDS
bay is to raise funds for HIVAIDS
projects and to support national
and international efforts to combat
the disease. It raises awareness
about HIVAIDS with the general
public and is used to carry mes-
sages of prevention into communi-
ties across the nation and to
improve care for those who are
infected with HIV.
World AIDS Day was set up to
help people remember the more
than 400,000 Americans who have
died as a result of AIDS and the 1
million Americans and 30 million
people around the world who are
currently infected with the disease.
ECU has been working in con-
junction with PICASO and the
Health Department in ways to
help spread the word that these
statistics can be ptevented. The
University Health Center has pro-
moted poster competitions dealing
with AIDS along with administer-
ing free HIV screening tests.
Ribbons and safe sex kits have
been offered around campus.
"Some students have been
embarrassed by the distribution of
condoms and others have not taken
them saying that they have chosen
abstinence said Beth Credle,
graduate assistant. "At least stu-
dents are being honest about their
relationships
Credle is among the many who
have worked to advertise the sig-
nificance of the week's festivities.
Other events include participat-
ing in helping ECU create a panel
for the AIDS Quilt, a symbol of the
world's recognition of the disease.
Credle feels that young people
in general still have much to learn
about the disease.
"Many college students partici-
pate in sexual behaviors which put
them at high risk for HIV transmis-
sion. It is important for students
who feel invincible or immune to
getting HIV to realize that the
virus does not discriminate said
Credle. "HIV could happen to any-
one who does not take precautions
to protect themselves from running
the risk of transmission
Watch for TECs
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SGA discusses increase in tuition
Members fanlight
campus benifits
SlISANNE MlLENKEVICH
STAFF WHITER
The Student Government
Association (SGA) met Monday to
discuss the proposed increase to
student tuition that would con-
tribute to the improvement of the
Student Union, Student Health
Center, Mendenhall, technology
and Transit.
Student Union President
Christine Edwards asked for an
extra $5.50 per student to provide
ECU with more entertainment, but
only received a $4.50 increase.
Edwards said the Student Union
wants to provide better and more
diverse entertainment for students,
but entertainment cost is continu-
ously increasing.
Jim Stern discussed the need for
more leadership programs and lec-
tures.
The money will be divided so
that Student Union receives $1.50,
Leadership Development will
receive $2, and Minority Student
Affairs will receive $1.
Director of the Student Health
Center, Kay Wilkerson, asked for
an $8 increase for personnel, operat-
ing needs and for a sports medicine
clinic for non-varsity athletes. The
health program was only awarded
$7 so it will be unable to begin the
new sports medicine clinic.
"I am disappointed that the new
program will be cut Wilkerson
said.
Director of University Unions,
Bill Clutter, asked for and received
$7 for Mendenhall, which is the
same amount of money that was
given to the facility last year.
The money will be used to
update the bowling center with
automatic scoring, to improve the
lounge and to provide social events
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The money will be used for
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well as more software for the com-
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ECU is the 25th "best wired"
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Huskampset a goal to make it bet-
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President of SGA Eric
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"Six dollars per student is an
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4 Thursday, December 3, 1998
news
The East Carolinian
news
briefs
PEARL JAM CREDITS
MENTION POLICE IN
NC. CONNECTICUT
Pearl Jam's just-released live
album, "Live on Two Legs con-
cludes its sleeve credits with the
following postscript: "And a P.S. to
the Raleigh, NC and Hartford, CT
police departments. Get a life.
"Leave those kids alone
Pearl Jam was moved to single
out Raleigh after the group's Aug.
31 show at Walnut Creek
Amphitheatre, during which
bassist Jeff Ament reportedly wit-
nessed a scuffle between police
Jicl eoncertgocrs.
5J The Raleigh police department
doesn't appear to be losing much
sleep over the matter. When asked
to comment, police Chief Mitch
Brown responded, "Pearl Jam
who?"
' Actually, that wasn't the only-
law enforcement moment of Pearl
Jam's visit in August. Onstage at
the Walnut ('reek concert, singer
Kiddie V'edder told a story about
how he had bought beer for two
kids the night before at Chapel
f-jill's Cat's Cradle nightclub,
apparently without realizing they
weren't old enough to drink legal-
ly That got the kids thrown out of
rrfe club.
; TEEN DIES FROM
ALCOHOL POISONING
RALL1GH (AP) Police are investi-
sjiting the weekend alcohol poi-
soning death of a teen-ager after he
iltank heavily at a family celebra-
tion.
The death of Crisanto Salas
Ramos, 17, is considered acciden-
tal, Lt. D.S. Overman of the
Raleigh Police Department said
Monday. Witnesses saw Ramos
Jfmk tequila and beer during a
JSthering of friends and family
members that started Friday night.
Overman said.
Ramos passed out, and family
members helped him to bed.
"They thought he was going to
sl;cp it off Overman said. "But
apparently he consumed so much
alcohol, it shut down his respirato-
ry svstcm
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FREE TO ALL
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Sponsored by ECU Student
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5 Thursday. December 3
opinion
The Eiil Cirnliniin
I the 1 � �
eastcarolinian
AMV IROYSTF.lt Editor
AMANDA Q, AUSTIN Managing Editor
amv Sheridan News Editor
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Seirmtj lire CU comrmjrwt since 19ft. ihe last Carolinian uubiishes 11 000 copies ewi� tuesdey ana Ihuisday the lead editorial in each edition �the
ODimon of ihe maiorily ol Ihe f rtilonal Roard and is mrilien in nun by editorial Boorrt members The test Caiohnien welcomes letters lo the editor, limned id
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rollers should be addressed te: Opinion editor .The last Carolinian. Stodent Publications tJoUdmu ECU. Greenville. 2BoM3b3 rot inloimaiion. call
mount
It seems as if everywhere we go, we're accosted by AIDS awareness propaganda. "Wear a
condom "Practice safe sex "Abstinence is the answer and "Know your partner" are the
catch-phrases of our college experience.
But how often do we stop to consider just how risky our behavior continues to be? Yes, we
all know that AIDS is deadly and incurable. But how many of us actually take the time to keep
ourselves from getting infected?
It's easy to pretend that AIDS is a disease that only promiscuous people get, or that "just
this once" we can engage in risky behavior and not contract the disease.
But AIDS is present now, on our campus.
Ladies, that guy you were scoping at the Elbow? He may have AIDS, and he may not even
know it. He can look harmless enough, and he may be a nice guy, .but inside his body the AIDS
virus is slowly taking over.
Guys, your new girlfriend may not be all she seems. Don't be embarrassed to ask her abot t
her sexual history. If she refuses to discuss it, she may have her own doubts about infection.
But it's not enough to discuss sexual history with your partner. If you have any doubt about
your partner's honesty, get the facts, and get them in writing.
Abstinence is becoming extremely popular way to avoid STDs altogether. Not surprisingly,
it's 100 percent effective. Don't feel like you have to engage in sex to have a real relationship.
If you use drugs intravenously, please remember that sterile needles are very important.
AIDS microbes can live in the smallest amounts of blood. Just because you don't shoot up
heroin does not mean that you can use someone else's needle, even for insulin, without great
risk.
Keep your eyes open. Protect your safety at all costs. Be aggressive when defending your
right to know about your partner's sexual history. Stand by your decision to be abstinent, if
you've made one. Only you can be responsible for your own well-being.
It may be embarrassing to talk about sex or to end an encounter because you're in doubt of
your partner, but it beats being dead.
OPINION
Columnist
Marvelle
Sullivan
Relationships make college hard
Relationships are just one of
the few truly perplexing and
continual avenues of life.
Dating, relationships and all of the
mysteries that the opposite sex
perpetuates are a prominent facet
of the average college student's
life. This facet is usually
extremely time consuming and
takes an unusual precedent over
the other more important and long
term aspects of life such as tests,
classes, jobs, bills, families, etc. For
some reason, guys, girls and their
respective dating patterns can
create more undue stress and
trauma than any 10-page paper
assignment could ever aspire to
cause. Relationships are just one
of the few truly perplexing and
continual avenues of life.
The college dating scene
produces four basic categories of
relationships. These categories are
not mutually exclusive, which
further adds to the complexity and
perhaps deluded enjoyment of the
whole grand scheme.
The first category belongs to
the "psycho" relationship. This
type is plagued by a series of
confusing and self-perpetuating
events. It most often occurs when
one or both parties involved are
two nickels short of a dime. They
maliciously fight and scheme to
"get the other one back All the
while, friends and family watch in
utter amazement at the ridiculous
episodes that transpire on a
weekly, sometimes daily, basis.
The scary thing about this type of
relationship is that, in the
beginning, everything and
everyone is normal. Then, one
day, someone realizes that they
aren't dating the girl-or-guy-next-
door, but rather a jealous,
temperamental and unreasonable
head case. Sadly enough, once this
is realized and encapsulated in one
or more unexplainably psychotic
events, the point of no return has
been reached and they're both
hopelessly "in love" and
imprisoned in a twisted, manic-
depressive and never-ending
situation.
The second category is a very
common one. This is the
unbalanced relationship and is
characterized by one person giving
entirely more (on many levels)
than the other one. This can
happen for a variety of reasons and
is never any one person's fault
because you can't be a co-
dependent by yourself.
Essentially, the giver is either blind
or in total denial that the other
person is obviously not the perfect
and unassuming creature that is
reciprocating all of his or her
feelings and actions. At best, it's
just a misunderstanding of
intentions. At worst, it is a
situation where one is being taken
advantage of entirely. But again,
no one can blame the taker in the
relationship because he or she
can't unapologetically take what
isn't being readily doled out to
them.
The third category is the
"dreaded ex syndrome This is
where one simple universal has to
be established: no partner of six
months or less can ever hope to
compete with a previous partner of
two or more years. This former
"love of his or her life" will always
be put on a pedestal even if the
relationship was as volatile as a bull
in a china cabinet. How can you
compete with that? It's virtually
impossible and the other person
will probably come back to haunt
the relationship time and time
again reeking utter havoc. It's just
one of those things.
The fourth type is the good and
healthy relationship. This occurs
when two well-adjusted people
meet, connect and love every
minute of it. The new found loved
one can make bad days good; the
world just doesn't seem so bad
after all. Although it doesn't
happen very frequently, when it
does it is a very fulfilling
experience indeed. Everything is
normal, methodical, happybut
what fun is that?
Since it is so difficult to put
things in proper perspective and
hence take relationships and what
they entail in stride, it is
imperative to only be involved in
what makes you completely happy.
If one has to constantly strive and
worry to maintain something that
is essentially dysfunctional, then
maybe that should be some sort of
hint. In college, individuals change
at rapid rates. The person you
know one month may hot be the
same person the next. That is why
evaluations are a necessity. No one
should have to settle. If you do,
inevitably you'll end up unhappy
and resentful of the person who
held you back. Nice thought, huh?
College should be an enjoyable
time of exploration on many levels.
Relationships , can either
perpetuate or impede this process.
Wasting time on someone who is
just a distraction hurts both parties
in the end. It boils down to making
a commanding decision about your
life and its direction. So, live life
and do what it takes to make
yourself content and fulfilled
because at the end of the dav-esaW
is what counts the most.
OPINION
Columnist
Stephen
Kleinschmit
Macy's Parade fake, cheesy
We shouldn' hide behind
televised parades and movie
marathons during the holiday
season; we should be spending
some time with our relatives.
The most foul, detestable and
cheesiest part of American culture
the annual N.acv's Thanksgiving
Day P-ra; h N'�� Yk City. V
ycj w:e uiforjnar .nough co
itnc , thi f. nrc s ispla' 'jt
crap, you probably have a good
idea of what goes on. It's as fake a.
Tammy Fay: Baker. Let's rake a
look at thi Y�yV !yw poin ��
As usu? , thr.e re abejt at rjt
lOOmillio Hg .�nool ai lo'egt:
marching bands who spend
countless dollars to travel to New
York and have their three seconds
on national TV before Willard
Scott starts going off on some
tangent about himself or old
women. 1 guess while the audience
is oohing and aahing over the
bands, the pickpockets make a
good dishonest living. Ain't it a
special time of year?
The worst part of the whole
show is the really cheesy staged
music performances. Ooh child,
there is nothing I like more than to
watch Kenny Loggins and Monica
lip sync a childish 3rd grade
thanksgiving song in the pouring
rain. Then they have these really
tasteless dance routines that are so
big, thev rival the Supsr Brwl half
time sh w. Thr . ar nr � nrH� -r,
describ; my d �rjsr ,t see ng 5 r j
j yea' olds t wia; in. I orar s K
the bitter, wet cold to booty music.
Thank goodness that therr was no
Monica Lewir �'��; float (y u know,
the one v ,iere �l. - s � 1
h �iTier).
Fially, There a' rt c
ridiculously huge balloons. I am
surprised that our society isn't
quite as immoral as I thought. I
almost expected to see a huge
inflated Durex condom floating
down the street to help promote
World Aids Day. But, as usual there
were the huge renditions of Big
Bird, turkeys and Snoopy. And
sometimes I even believe that
Ryan Kennemur could be a float
with all of his hot air Just kidding,
of course Ryan-Dogg.
So what is the point of all this?
We, as Americans, will Watch the
stupidest meaningless crap as long
as it makes a spectacle. It's sad
that American families cannot
entertain themselves by doing
family things during the holidays.
We shouldn't hide behind
te' :vised parades and movie
Marathons during the holiday
season; we should be spending
some time with our relatives.
Here's my final thought. Just
the way pure statistics work out,
tr -e .re probably going to be
� orri �� you good people reading
b'a t .tide today who will lose
someone you love in the next year.
How would you like it if your last
memories of your loved one were
that you were ignoring them so you
could watch TV? I encourage you
to make every moment last;
unplug the tube this holiday
season.
OPINION
Columnist
Bntt
Honeycutt
People are slobs in public places
The bottom line here is that if
you're gonna be gross, do it
in your own house.
Have you ever been to the movies
for a nine o'clock show, right after
everyone has left from the seven
o'clock show, and waded through
the crunchy abyss of spilled
popcorn, dropped drink cups and
scattered Goobers? Have you
taken your seat only to realize,
twenty minutes later when you
need to go potty, that you've put
your hiney in a wad of grape
Bubbalicious? Have you cursed
the very mothers of these fiends
who don't have enough respect for
humanity to clean up after
themselves?
I have.
Do you ride down a scenic
North Carolina back road, admire
the foliage as it changes colors, and
find yourself trying desperately to
overlook the MacDonald's bags,
Mello Yello bottles and dirty
diapers lining the roads? Do you
wonder what portion of the brain is
missing in the people who have
the audacity to assume that it is
their right to spread their filth
wherever they go?
So why do people do this crap?
They go into restaurants (usually
around closing time) and pour
ketchup on the tables. They slosh
food onto the floor. They do
hideous things in the bathrooms.
And then they leave, feeling as if
they have "conquered" the place.
I hate them.
It is not difficult to be a clean
human being in public places. If
your house is disgusting, nobody
really cares. You are the only one
living in your nastincss. But when
you spread it around, we all have to
live in it. So stop it.
It's so easy to flush a toilet, even
in a bar or club- I know this is a
totally new concept for some of
you, but these places do have
working toilets. You don't need a
degree in engineering to figure out
the the handle goes down and
poof! All gone. It's really easy to
put your trash in the trash can. It
goes right through the little slot at
the top.
You can really see the evil dirty
people coming. They have a
certain look in their eyes. It says
"Yes, I'm evil and dirty. And I'm
gonna leave all of my evil dirt here
for you to sit in. Ha ha ha ha
maniacal laughter
I think that I'm going to start
my own personal crusade against
these monsters. Whenever I see
them leaving piles of filth in movie
theaters, in restaurants, on the side
of the road, in a bar, or anywhere, I
will follow them home and urinate
on their carpet. That would make
us just about even, don't you
think? I mean, if they feel they
have the right to invade my space
and make it nasty, then don't I
have the right to do the same?
The bottom line here is that if
you're gonna be gross, do it in your
own house. Otherwise I'll be
forced to release the fury of my
bladder upon your rug, and nobody
wants that. Trust me.
Wri�e a. Letter
to ike. Editor
Got something to say? Need somewhere to
say it? Bring your letter to the easixarolinian
located on the 2nd floor of The Student
Publications Building





6 Thundiy, OicimbT 3, 1998
comics
7 Thursday, Deci
The East Cirpliniin �,
Four Seats Left
Jason Latour
Raymond Sanders
Ants Marching
Victoria Kidd
Life's Meanings
Kevin Jordan
THIS Toosl IS
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To ALU Lev
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Finding A Pifict.
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of theuniversi
school pride.
While most
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Banner" is typ
show.
"Pregame p
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During th
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time they play
the band's full
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rendition of "1
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Halloween. Tl
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taken from fan:
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Internships
4
www.livewireonline.com
�Webster defines
�dent or recent
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'intern has defiri
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Jvonder what kirn
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guarantees a futi
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I





The Eait Ciroliniin
md Sanders
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"PA. f&�.
.t-
Ji��X-
vin Jordan
iary Nightclub,
I at ECU and
ollege Bart in
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October 1997
e DRAFT
: DRAFT
DRAFT
E
7 Thursday, December 3, 1988
features
The East Carolinian
Marching Pirates lead crowd spirit
Create atmosphere
forgames
Phillip Gilfus
STAFF WRITER
At every Pirate football game, amidst all
the touchdowns and crowd cheering,
are the steadfast ECU Marching Pirates.
Although sometimes overlooked, the
ECU Marching Pirates who perform at
all football games are an important part
of the university and contribute much to
school pride.
While most fans just go to the home
! football games, the almost two hundred
I person band has to travel around with
the team to support them at their away
games. At every game held at Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium, the band performs a
pregame show. "The Star-Spangled
Banner" is typically part of the pregame
show.
"Pregame performances is when we
try to play something that fires up the
crowd said Katie Blizzard, who plays
the piccolo for the band.
During the half-time show, the
Marching Pirates take to the field. This
time they play a piece that will show off
the band's full talent. Some performances
from the past season have included selec-
tions from Earth, Wind, and Fire, and a
rendition of "The Time Warp" from The
Rocky Horror Picture Show for
Halloween. These selections are usually
chosen by the Christopher Knighten, the
band director, though suggestions are
taken from fans.
The band then plays a number until
the crowd is fully excited.
The practice schedule for the band is
rigorous. They practice every Monday,
Wednesday, and Friday under the direc-
tion of their sixth year band director. Most
practices last from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
At these practices, the Marching Pirates
go over all aspects of their performances,
from playing their instruments to walking
in formation.
"We usually start off with 'fundamen-
tals one percussion member said. "This
is when we practice the basics, including
breaking into sections and our block for-
mations
Percussion warms up on the field.
FILE PHOTO
After fifteen minutes of stretching and
drill practice, the actual playing takes
place. First the band breaks off into sec-
tions, which include winds, brass and per-
cussion. The section leaders then take
over.
The squad and section leaders are stu-
dents who excel in their particular instru-
mental section.They have the responsibil-
ities of being in charge of spot placement
and knowing where everyone should be
marching. The only difference between
the two is that the squad leaders have
more people under their direction.
"There has been really good
student leadership this "year said
Christopher Knighten, the band
director.
This semester the Marching
Pirates had the chance to go to
Charlotte where they played in a
nationally televised Carolina
Panthers game.
"We play many exhibition
shows at high school each year
Knighten said. "This is a chance
for the band to provide outreach
and recruitment for the universi-
ty"
Students who want to join the
band must arrive at school early in
the year. During the summer,
members come to campus early to
practice.
"It is a chance to meet people
and to work early Blizzard said.
Students who spend their time
in band only receive one semester
hour of credit. Students who miss
three practices or a performance
have the potential to be asked to
leave the band.
Anyone who is interested in
marching in the band, but does
not want to play an instrument
should contact a band member.
When a member is not able to
play, someone is still needed to
march in formations. The band
member will show you how to
march, where you are supposed to
walk, and how to pretend to play
their instrument.
Local bands perform for Pirate fans.
FILE PHOTO
Go-op assists students
in finding internships
Internships prepare students for
future
Erica Sikks
staff writer
�Webster defines an intern as "an advanced stu-
�dent or recent graduate gaining supervised,
'practical experience The real meaning of
tjntern has definitely been obscured by the
' jnedia lately. With all of the recent hype about
jhe former intern in the White House, you may
'Jvonder what kind of experience she was trying
:f get.
�i' Working in an internship position almost
guarantees a future in the area of your choice.
Research studies done by the Cooperative
Education Department shows that 80 percent of
interns are invited by the company to work full
Sime at the completion of the internship. Only
5K) percent actually accept since the experience
Hiey attain allows them to open themselves up
3� bigger and better jobs. Bobby Burns of The
a)aily Reflector stated that interns in the jour-
nalism industry usually go on to work at the
j-papcr where they intern. Burns also stated that
)fhe more internships you participate in, the bet-
ter chance you have of getting hired by the
Employer of your choice. Internships add to
our experience level. Someone who can share
Experiences in their field of study will more
Qhan likely be hired before someone with no
Experience.
1 Employers always look for someone with
J
SEE COOP PAGE I
Newman Center's Second
Annual Sock Hop
Proceeds go to Catholic
Social Services
Junior math major Holly Gurganus organizes files at her internship.
PHOTO BY JACOB GARMON
Nina M. Dry
FEATURES EDITOR
Trying to break free from that
turkey coma? How about a break
from all of the studying you are
doing for the exams coming up?
Well clear your calendar and call all
of your friends, because there's a
party going on that'll pull you out
of that end of the year funk.
On Friday, December 3 at 8
p.m the Catholic Newman Center
will be sponsoring their second
annual Sock I lop.
"The Sock Hop is an event that
is open to all campus ministries
said Aaron Spivey, president of the
Newman Center. "The only admis-
sion we ask for is one non-perish-
able canned food item
The donation will get you a
night of great club music (don't let
the title Sock 1 lop fool you) food,
drinks, and a lot of fun. All of the
proceeds will go to the Catholic
Social Services.
"We've been working on this
since September said Candice
Matclski, secretary of the Newman
Center and the head of the social
activities ministry. "Many people
have been putting a lot of work into
it. It gives us a breather right before
exams and lets us have a good time
Students make their requests.
Flit PHOTO
Couple cuts a rug at Newman.
FILE PHOTO
during the holiday season
Last year the Sock Hop was a
great success with students from all
over campus and around the area.
"It was a good way to get other
Newman Centers together and get
to know other people from differ-
ent colleges said Jason Spivey, co
vice president of the Newman
Center.
"It was great said junior
Danielle Custis. "I had a fabulous
time and met many people. It was a
great event that built many new
friendships
"I never would have expected a
church to have a party like that
SEE NEWMAN. PAGE I






I
8 Thursday. December 3, IS
features
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Senior Julia Womble benifits from Co-op
PHOTO 8V JACOB GABMON
experience. Then comes the most
commonly asked question, "How
do I get a job without experience
and how do I get experience with-
out a job?" The answer is Co-op,
internships and work study.
"The Cooperative Education
Program here at ECU is a program
similar to the internship program
said Dr. Mary Cauley, director of
the Cooperative Education
Program. "Students choose a field
of work study directly related to
their major. Students with a mini-
mum CJPA of 2.0 are eligible for
Co-op
Cooperative Education was �
formed in 1906 by the university
to better educate its students. It is
a cooperation between the stu-
dent, the employer, and the uni-
versity. Co-op students, on aver-
age, earn about $3,331 per year,
which defrays the cost of college
expenses while the student earns
credit hours toward their major.
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There are three types of Co-op
education. One is alternating,
where the students work full time
during alternating semesters.
Another is parallel, where students
work while they attend school and
the third is a
summer
position,
where the
students
work during
the summer
months with
no obligation
to return for
a second
work period.
Students
interested in
Co-op
should
attend an
information-
al seminar to
learn more
about it,
complete an
I application,
prepare a resume and make an
appointment with the Co-op coor-
dinator assigned to their major.
Students should also search the
Co-op internet site for jobs that
interest them at:
ww.ecu.educoophome.htm.
covering the
offbeat

Newman
continued from page 7
said Lissa Griffin, an ECU junior.
The Newman Center hopes
that this year's Sock Hop meets
and possibly exceeds the expecta-
tions of last year's bash.
"I hope this party will accom-
plish what it intends to Matelski
said. "I hope that when people
leave they feel as if they had a
good time and are ready to face
finals
Unhappy Man Bring
Dead Deer to Dealer
STAMFORD, Conn. (AP) �
Edward Aragi caused quite a stir
when he deposited a buck at his
local bank.
Aragi, 70, plopped the carcass
of a deer in a customer servicerep-
rcsentative's office Tuesday and
refused to remove it until the
bankersettled a clerical mistake
with his checking account, police
said.
"He said he wasn't satisfied
with the service he received so he
brought thedeer into the bank to
get their attention and refused to
move it until hegot satisfaction
Police Lt. Joseph Falzetti said.
"He did end up gettingattention
Aragi, who had legally hunted
and killed the buck the day
before, removedthe deer when
asked police said.
The bank, in turn, promised to
look into his complaint and notify
him bymail of their findings.
Arthur Murphy, branch manag-
er and assistant vice president of
the bank, said the incident caused
a distraction, but did not disrupt
business.
Aragi, of Pound Ridge, N.Y
was charged with misdemeanor
breach of peace, police said. He
was released at the scene on his
own recognizance and scheduled
to appear in state Superior Court
in Stamford Dec. 4.
He faces up to six months in
jail and a $1,000 fine if convicted.
Woman Sentenced for
Penis Burning
HANOI, Vietnam (AP) � A
woman has been sentenced to two
years in jail for burning her hus-
band's penis because she suspect-
ed him of having a mistress, a local
court official said Monday.
Nguyen Thi Thu Lan, 40, was
convicted during a one-day trial
Nov. 12.
The incident took place in April
in the central coastal province of
Binh
Thuan. Lan, using cotton
soaked with gasoline, burned her
husband after he came home
drunk, the official said.
Her husband suffered 56 per-
cent burns on his privates and has
paid some 20 million dong (dlrs
1,500) for medical treatment, a
huge amount in a country where
the annual per capita income is
only about dlrs 340.
Swamp Sleepwaker
PALM HARBOR, Florida (AP) - A
77-year-old man with a habit of
sleepwalking awoke in a muddy
pond and had to use his cane to fend
off alligators.
James Currens wandered behind
his home early Monday and woke
up in several feet of water, his legs
stuck in the mud.
He said several alligators, some
longer than three feet (one meter),
came around. Currens said he poked
rs5o
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Items & Prices Good Through December 5,1998 In
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reserve the right to limit quantities. None sold to
dealers.






East Carolinian
I) fhuisday. Dicambti 3, 1998
I
oatures
The East Carolinian
itencedfor
irning
(AP) � A
mtenced to two
irning her hus-
ise she suspect-
mistress, a local
londay.
m Lan, 40, was
a one-day trial
)k place in April
ital province of
using cotton
ne, burned her
: came home
aid.
jffered 56 per-
rivates and has
lion dong (dlrs
I treatment, a
country where
pita income is
epwaker
� lorida (AP) - A
ith a habit of
; in a muddy
his cane to fend
mdered behind
iday and woke
' water, his legs
illigators, some
et (one meter),
is said he poked
)
JDING
.F)
IE
5
Official
Supermarket
Of The Pirates.
Winn-Dixie
Marketplace
Club
Pepsi, Diet Pepsi,
Or Mt. Dew
2 liter btls.
Holiday Cakes
Carrot Cake, German
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Prices good Wednesday, Nov. 18
thru Thursday Nov. 26, 1998.
Effective In Our N.C. Locations
ViSA
�Copyright 1098. Winn-Dixie Raleigh, Inc. Quantity Rights Reserved, www.winndixie.com
Funeral homes drawing DNA samples
VERMILION, Ohio (AP) �
There has been cremation jewelry
and designer caskets with themes
that included even golf � a
"Fairway to Heaven" motif.
Now funeral homes are begin-
ning to collect DNA samples from
the dead � for a fee � to preserve
a genetic record that could provide
medical information.
While experts are divided on
the usefulness of the data, some
think theservice will be a strong
seller for the 21,000 funeral homes
in the UnitedStates.
"I imagine every funeral home
will have this service in the
future saidTerry Travis, funeral
director of Riddle Funeral Home
in Vermilion, about 30 miles (50
kilometers) west of Cleveland.
Travis signed up earlier this
month for the service offered by
Cincinnati-based DNA Analysis
Inc. For dlrs 350, he will snip a bit
of hair, draw some blood and run a
swab inside a deceased person's
mouth to get a DNA sample.
The samples are packaged in
sterile kits and sent to a lab where
molecular biologist Paul Harding
extracts the DNA He then sends
the family a confidential genetic
fingerprint of the deceased.
The company stores the DNA
samples for 25 years at minds 80
degrees Fahrenheit, in case there is
a need for analysis. Only next-of-
kin can have the samples tested,
for an extra fee. GeneLink Inc. has
been offering a similar service since
19 through hundreds of funeral
homes and cemeteries in 20 states,
said John DePhillipo, president of
the company based in Margate,
New Jersey.
"If you trust your loved one to a
funeral home and have been work-
ing with them for generations, then
this might be the right profession
to be offering this type of service
said Stephen Gehlcrt, executive
director of the Ohio Funeral
Directors Association. "The jury is
going to be the consumer
With cremation jewelry, the
question was whether to store
remains of a loved one in a locket
or pendant. DNA storage is a much
more profound issue, full of ethical
questions.
At the urging of her seven chil-
dren, Kathleen Hanrahan, 79, of
suburban Cincinnati had DNA
samples taken of her husband,
Bert, when he died in October.
Bcrnie Naegele, who owns a funer-
al home in Cincinnati and is co-
founder of DNA Analysis, per-
formed the procedure.
"We talked about it in the fami-
ly and it sounded like the wave of
the future Mrs. Hanrahan said.
"My children thought it would be
very useful for their children or
grandchildren
Are You Mo
v i n g 7
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of Pitt County
WANTS YOUR STUFF
Anything you don't want to haul with you
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2 and 3 Bedroom Townhouses � V2 Baths
Water, Sewer, and Cable Included
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5 BLOCKS FROM ECU WITH
BUS SERVICE AVAILABLE





10 Thuisdiy, December 3. 1998
sports
The East Caroliniw
I
I Thursdai
Ri
Winning streak ends with loss to Appalachian
Mountaineers win
Mondays nail biter, 68-67
Mario Scherhauff.r
SPORTS EDITOR
Each mountain usually follows a valley, and
the Pirates took one step downhill after
dropping a nail biter Monday night to end
their short winning streak.
ECU recorded two victories during the
Thanksgiving holidays to bring their record
to 3-1 before they came up short in a 68-67
loss to Appalachian State on Monday.
The Pirates' first victory during the hol-
idays came on Nov. 24, when forward
Evaidas Joeys had 17 points and 11
rebounds to lead the Pirates to a 75-69 win
over the Ragin' Cajuns of Southwestern
Louisiana. His performance entitled Joeys
CAA Player-of-thelkVeek after he proved to
be the team's leading scorer and rebounder.
ECU shot 58 percent and dominated on
defense in the second half to overcome a
nine point haiftime deficit.
The Pirates didn't have too much time
for their Thanksgiving turkey when they
had to travel to Lvnchburg, Va. to defeat
Liberty on Nov. 28. Quincy Hall had 18
points, five of them in a crucial run in the
second half, as ECU scored 52 second half
points Saturday night to seal the victory
over Liberty 80-56, respectively. Hall was
8-of-10 from the field and also grabbed 10
rebounds to lead the Pirates, who shot 55


1 Punt, Neil0 082
Hfcys, Evaidas1 3.110
HaCTuincy3 70 0625 7 a
Dunk, Alico2 51 2504 4 u
Blackwelder, Garrett4 112 51301 1
Taylor, David2 30 0520 2'
Branch, Steven4 60 01256 11
1 Sharpe, Vinstfnitefl o0 0000 0
Morrisey, tfircw J00 10 .0000 0
1 Hawkins, Brandon2 7Source: ECU Sports Inforroetioa Department
percent in the second half. Evaidas Joeys
also had 18 points for the Pirates, including
12 points in 3-pointers.
The Pirates saw their three-game win-
ning streak come to an end Monday night
in the buzzer beater to Appalachian State.
"We did a lot of good things even though
we got a loss junior guard Garrett
Blackwelder said. "We played hard against
a good team and now we need to focus on
our conference opener Saturday against
American
Blackwelder led the Pirates with 13
points in the close loss.
"This was a tough loss, but one game
won't make or break our season head
coach Joe Dooley said. "We need to learn
from this game and be prepared for our first
conference game against American this
weekend
The Pirates are hoping to avenge last
seasons' 76-63 loss to American by trying to
contain senior guard Matt Brown and senior
forward Dave Small.
"If wc can control Brown and Small and
penetrate their defense we should be just
fine Dooley said.
Additionally, the Pirates had to forfeit
their 7 foot tall center Alphons van lerland
for their last two games due to an injury.
According to ECU'S Sports Information
Department, van lerland is suffering from a
stress fracture on his left foot which was
bothering him before but really got worse
SEE BASKETBALL PAGE 11
CO men's basketball team will have its next game at Greenville on Saturday, Dec. 5, at 2 p.m. vs. CAA opponent American.
Women's hoops remain
unbeaten in holiday action
Sophomore forward Steven Branch's 12 points couldn't prevent the close loss Monday.
PHOTO BY SARAH CHRISTIE
Pirates come away on
4-0 winning streak
Eric Couch
senior w�ITER
The ECU Women's basketball
team picked up three straight wins
against UNC Charlotte, Fairfield
and Wake Forest over the holiday
break to start out the season with a
record of 4-0.
The streak started on Nov. 24
when head coach Dee Gibson led
the Pirates to her alma mater and
defeated UNCC by a score of 85-
81. Jen Mortez scored a team-high
24 points and connected for five
three-pointers. Additionally, junior
point guard Waynetta V'eney
chipped in her own 22 points.
Next on the list for the Pirates
was to play Fairfield in the Warner
Classic Tournament in Fairfield,
Conn. The Fairfield Stags had not
lost in the first round of their own
tournament in 12 years so the
Pirates knew they would have
their hands full. In front of a record
home crowd of 2,089 the Pirates
Top Pirate Scorers
Player Points Avg. Assists Rebound Avg.
Waynetta Veney 2,1.5 22 3.0
TeanaMcXiver 14.0 I 4.6
Jennifer Moretz
13.5 9 5.6
Source: ECU Sports Information Department
Elon College, with whom ECU
holds a 5-2 lead over in the all-time
scries. However, it has been 21
years since the Lady Pirates and
Fightin' Christians last met when
ECU won 79-64.
As for Davidson and Bucknell,
ECU defeated Davidson 61-59 on
Dec. 20 last year in the sole meet-
ing between the two teams. The
Lady Pirates have never faced
Bucknell.
handled the task well and downed
the host of the tournament 82-76.
"Fairfield would definitely be a
task at home Veney said.
Veney led ECU in offense with
19 points and added nine assists.
Also, freshman Teana McKiver
added 15 points in the paint while
Danielle Melvin, scoring 14 points,
ended all hope for Fairfield by
sinking two free throws with four
seconds left on the clock.
With this win, the Pirates would
advance to face the Demon
Deacons of Wake Forest for the
championship game. In this game
Veney led ECU past Wake Forest
78-70 by scoring 26 points and
being awarded the tournament
MVP.
"It was an honor Veney said.
Veney turned her ankle in the
first minute of the WFTJ game and
sat out only four minutes.
"It was a bad sprain Veney
said.
Despite being injured, Veney
toughed it out and continued to go
on strong. The Pirates took a half-
time lead of 37-26 into the locker
room and never trailed after that.
Jen Mortez and Teana McKiver
were named to the All-
Tournament Team to join Veney's
honors.
Up next for ECU's women will
be another tournament. The
Pirates will travel to Davidson to
participate in the Chesebrough-
Ponds Roundball Invitational from
Dec. 5-6. Other teams in this
Invitational are Elon, Davidson
and Bucknell.
Up first for the Lady Pirates is
Streak of Success
Date Opponent
1116 CAMPBELL
1124 at UNCC
1127 at Fairfield
1128 vs Wake Forest
Source: ECU SivirtN Information Department
ClubL
spn
S T K I' I
SKI
Few teams a
cess and wir
Rugby Club.
1975, the clu
ing season. 1
sive streak al
paign this fal
"We had ;
despite all tr
said Rugby
Palmer. "Wc
graduated ci,
from last seas
day until 7 f
expecting to
more games.
on .Sunday ai
elimination c
the '98 I'
Champion,
for a first p
respect of fel
The Iran
team, and tl
women's teai
pete. Both te
tations to im
crowd and si
ment.
"Although
team, we hav
year said
women's tean
ZV women's basketball team will have its next game at the Davidson Roundball Invitational on Saturday, De�.5, at 2 p.m. vs. Elon.
Swim teams finish 11th at Nike Cup
Ultimate frisbee to
host tournament
Pirates to host Duke
this weekend
todi) tai.lmadok
senior writer
The Pirate swimmers gained
national rankings after outstanding
lerformances in their most recent
jompetition.
Jl'he ECU nien's & women's
�wm teams finished 11th at the
Nike Cup hosted by UNC-Chapel
Hi Nov. 19-21. The meet was
highlighted with Adam Gaffey
breaking three ECU swimming
records.
On Thursday, Gaffey broke the
" was extremely pleased with
my performance. I went into
the meet to do my best and was
happy with where I placed
Dana Fuller
ECU Swimmer
500 yard freestyle with a time of
4:30.31. The old mark was set in
1978 by Ted Nieman at 4:32.23. On
Saturday, Gaffey destroyed the
1,650 yard freestyle record of
15:48.07 with a time of 15:39.35.
The old record was set by Chema
Larranaga in 1984. Gaffey also
broke the 1,000 yard freestyle
record by three seconds with a time
of 9:28.42. The old mark was also
held by Larranaga in 1984.
Gaffey, who is originally from
Orlando, Fl. and a JUCO transfer
from Broward (Fl.) Community
College, is his first year swimming
for the Pirates.
The ECU men's 800 yard relay
team (Gaffey, Claes Lindgren,
Mike Julian and Matt Jabs) placed
sixth with a time of 6:52.61.
With these times, the men are
now ranked nationally. Stu Corliss,
who writes for the Taper and Shave
Magazine, has Gaffey ranked 17th
in the 500 yard freestyle and 18th in
the 1,650 yard freestyle. The 800
yard relay team is ranked 21st.
On the women's side, the 200
yard freestyle relay team (Amy
Hendrick, Kathy Knorr, Lindsay
Gardiner and Courtney Foster, all
freshmen) finished 18th with a time
of 1:40.95. The 400 yard medley
team (Hendrick, Niki Kreel,
Cammy Crossen and Foster) came
in 14th with a time of 3:59.11.
These times were two seconds
SEE SWIMMING. PAGE 10
Teams from across the
country come to ECU
Blaine Demi's
staff writer
As a high-paced mixture between
soccer and basketball, played on
grass fields, ultimate frisbee is
gaining popularity on ECU's cam-
pus and beyond.
� The 28th Ultimax Ultimate
Frisbee Tournament will be held
this weekend at the Blunt recre-
ational fields and teams from
across the United State's are set to
Play-
All teams will register in a pool
on Saturday and play begins at 10
a.m. Pool play lasts throughout the
err rnifnrr n�rv �fi
DOI
OF
Wll
NE
3
37 frisbee teams to compete on weekend.
FOR A
ttm
MMI
mm





I Thunday, December 3, 1998
snorts
Thi East Carolinian
IV
Rugby team to continue
winning ways
Four Pirates in All-Conference
Club prepares for
spring season
S T K P H F. N S C II R A l l
SKN IUK U I IK H
Few teams at ECU have the suc-
cess and winning tradition of the
Rugby Club. Since its inception in
1975, the club has never had a los- -
ing season. They kept that impres-
sive streak alive with an 8-5-1 cam-
paign this fall.
"We had an outstanding season
despite all the problems we had
said Rugby Club president Brad
E'almer. "We had a new coach, we
graduated eight of our 15 starters
from last season and wc had a lot of
injuries. It was a cardiac year for
us
The season's highlight was the
trip to the State Championship in
early November. The Pirates have
made it to the finals in every State
Championship Tournament in
which they have competed, so
when ECU faced a team from
UNC-Chapel Hill in the finals of
this year's tournament, it was noth-
ing new. The Pirates eventually
lost to Chapel Hill by seven points.
The Pirates' goal for next
semester is to improve on their fall
record as the stakes get higher in
the spring.
"We are preparing for the Spring
now. We will play in the
Southeastern . Collegiate
Conference this spring. We will
play for a birth in the National
Rugby Tournament run by USA
Rugby Palmer said.
The Pirates will field a squad
this spring that bares little resem-
blance to the team that finished
second in the state in the fall. The
Pirates will be without many of
their more experienced contribu-
tors.
"We look good. We are losing
the other seven starters from last
year, but we're returning two
starters from this year. Our rookies
played a lot this year too. But only
time will tell how good we are
because our only problem is a lack
of experience Palmer said.
The Pirates begin their spring
campaign with practices that will
start when classes resume. The
team will face their first test when
the take on N.C. State in
Greenville on Jan. 30.
Frisbee
continued from page 10
day until 7 p.m. with some teams
expecting to compete in three or
more games. The action continues
on Sunday at 11 a.m. when single
elimination contests will determine
the 'l)H I'ltimax Tournament
Champion. Teams are competing
for a first place trophy and the
respect of fellow clubs.
The Irates, the ECU men's
team, and the Helios, the ECU
women's team, are ready to com-
pete. Both teams have high expec-
tations to impress the hometown
crowd and succeed in the tourna-
ment.
"Although wc have a young
team, we have been playing well all
year said Candace Voight, the
women's team president. "We won
a big tournament in Athens, Ga.
which has made us want to practice
and work hard
The ECU men's team is also
having a successful year and has
participated in three tournaments
already this fall. The Irates defeat-
ed rivals UNC, N.C. State, and
UNC-Wilmington to become the
number one ranked frisbee team in
the state last season.
"We finished number one in the
state, but were unable to go to
nationals said ECU senior Jeff
Wilhelm, the men's team presi-
dent. "We are looking to be nation-
al competitors again this season as
well
Ultimate teams from Raleigh,
Philadelphia, Washington, D.C
and as far as Canada are participat-
ing in this year's Ultimax tourna-
ment. In total, 37 teams will be rep-
resented; 25 on the men's side and
12 on the women's. This tourna-
ment will also include non-colle-
giate club teams, college teams,
and alumni clubs all competing
against one another in high-flying
athletic contests.
"This tournament will be show
casing the best talent in ultimate
frisbee from around the country
Wilhelm said. "These athletes are
very talented and in excellent
shape
New ultimate frisbee fields
located at the Blunt recreational
facility are ready for action, and
players are hoping for good weather
and a large crowd. Admission to the
tournament is free and seating is
available for the championship
rounds on Sunday.
"Ultimate frisbee is an up and
coming sport that is exciting and
fast paced said Britt Thomas, an
Irate team member and ECU grad-
uate student. "I think everyone
should come out and watch the
tournament
e
Sports .Downtown Greenville
Pad J Eveiy Thm-sdgy
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NEAR CAMPUS
UNIT PLAN
GREENVILLE, N.C. (AP) Four
East Carolina players made the All-
Conference USA first team,
announced Tuesday.
The team was selected by the
league's eight head coaches.
Pirate center Danny Moore
made the team for the second
straight season and was the lone
ECU offensive lineman chosen.
Defensive linemen Rod
Coleman and Travis Darden also
made the team. Coleman made the
second team last season.
Linebacker Jeff Kerr, who
missed three games due to injury
but still led the team in tackles
(115), also made the first team.
Tight end Buck Collins, safety
Kelvin Suggs and punter Andrew
Bayes were selected to the C-USA's
second team.
Quarterback David Garrard and
linebacker Pernell Griffin made the
league's All-Freshman team.
Garrard passed for school freshman
records
2,091 yards and 14 touchdowns.
Griffin started all 11 games this sea-
son and led all conference fresh-
men with 99 tackles.
Tyson's charges end dubiously
ROCKVILLE, Md. (AP) Mike
Tyson pleaded no contest Tuesday
to misdemeanor assault, a decision
that could return the former heavy-
weight champion to prison.
Although the plea to the two
counts is not an admission of guilt,
Tyson faces up to 20 years in prison
- 10 years on each count - when he
is sentenced early next year by a
Maryland judge. He also could be
fined up to $2,500 on each count.
The charges stem from an Aug.
31 traffic accident in Montgomery
County, Md involving Tyson's
wife, Monica. Tyson was accused of
kicking and punching two motorists
after the accident.
"You understand that this plea
could affect your parole Judge
Steven Johnson told Tyson before
accepting his plea.
"I'm truly aware of that said
Tyson, who was released from
prison in 1995 after serving three
years of six-year sentence for a 1992
rape conviction in Indiana.
Tyson, who is scheduled to fight
Francois Botha on Jan. 16, would
not discuss his case outside court.
Following the August accident,
Abmielec Saucedo and Richard
Hardick said Tyson attacked them.
They have reached a settlement
with Tyson to avoid a civil suit.
Kemp said Saucedo and Hardick
are prepared to testify at sentencing
that they support Tyson's no-con-
test plea.
"He does not admit to intention-
ally striking anyone when this inci-
dent occurred Kemp said.
Kemp told the judge that Tyson '
became angry when neither
Hardick nor Saucedo expressed
concern for his wife, who was dri-
ving when the accident occurred.
Kemp admitted that Hardick was
struck with a glancing blow and
Saucedo was inadvertently kicked :
as the boxer was restrained by his !
wife and bodyguard.
Tyson is undergoing psychiatric
treatment, one of the conditions
that led to reinstatement of his box-
ing license by the Nevada Athletic
Commission in October. The
license was revoked after he bit
champion Evander Holyfield's ears
during a June 1997 title bout.
Basketball
continued from page 10
during practice- prior to the SW
Louisiana game. He is expected to
stay out of the game between three
to six weeks.
The Charlotte Honeybees, pro-
fessional dance team of the NBA's
Charlotte Hornets, will be making
a special appearance at Minges
Coliseum on Saturday, Dec. 5, at
the ECUAmerican men's basket-
ball game. Besides performing dur-
ing halftime and timeouts, the
Honeybees will sign autographs
and will be available for pho-
tographs following the perfor-
mance. Alto Gary, a former captain, !
coach and choreographer of the
Pirates' Pure Gold Dance Team
(1991-95), is now directing the '
Honeybees and made their appear-
ance possible.
Game time for the
PiratesEagles Colonial Athletic
Association tilt in Williams arena is j
2 p.m.
Swimming
continued from page 10
below former ECU records.
Dana Fuller, another freshmen,
placed 10th in the 1,650 yard
freestyle with a time of 17:25.78.
That mark puts her third all-time at
ECU.
"I was extremely pleased with
my performance Fuller said. "I
went into the meet to do my best
and was happy with where I
placed
The Pirates will host their first
home meet of the season against
Duke University. The men's swim
team holds a 16-9 series advantage
over the Blue Devils, including a
139-103 win last season.
"The men's team Duke has an
excellent team said Rich Kobe,
ECU head swim coachThis
should be a good match up for both
teams.
The women's swim team has a
13-7 advantage in the series after
winning last years meet 143-92.
"The girls squad for Duke is
probably the best team they have
ever had Kobe said. "We will have
to swim extremely well to compete
with them
The meet will start at 2 p.m. on
Saturday, Dec. 5, at Minges Aquatic
Center.
NOWHIRING
Orientation Assistants for 1999-2000
Orientation & the First-Year Experience � 214 Whichard Bldg. � 328-4173
For more information, call the Orientation Office or attend an
Information Session in 208 Whichard Building:
� December 2,1998 (Wednesday)-4:00 p.m.
� January 18,1999 (Monday)-4:00p.m.
Applications are now available in 214 Whichard Building.
Deadline for completed applications is January 22,1999 at 5:00 p.m.
The only place in Greenville
to get the honest surf ware,
skateware, & accessories.
CHECK US OUT AT THE PLAZA MALL (NEAR THE FOOD COURT) 321-4884.
Surt Skmim,
i weekend.
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-440-5378
NEWWINTER INVENTORY
WITHMAMt BHANDPANTS.HOQOIES. T-SHIRTS. DRtSStS.
WAICHfS.SUNGLASSES.SSHOtSSUCHAS:
LOST �GIRLSTAR�VANS ?FUEL
HiCEMERICA�BILLABONGES
SMP RUSTYMCD ?ETNiES
OSIRIS E2EKIEL
�PLUS THE LARGEST SELECTION Of BODY JEWELRY
ILOTHINI
?
GREENVILLE'S PREMIERE SKATE
SHOP.WHEREYE DON'T STOP
TEAM FUSION
Kevin Roberts, Robbie Morris.
Jarrette Moore. Brandon Shaw.
Chad Rodger, Brandon Faiicette
OVER 50 DECKS
IN STOCK





12 Thursday. Oicimber 3, 1998
Webber denies striking
officer, using marijuana
UPPER MARLBORO, Maryland
(AP) Occasionally defiant but
under control, Chris Webber took
the stand Tuesday and denied
striking a police officer and using
marijuana before he was arrested
on his way to a Washington
Wizards practice in January.
"I had to go to work. It's not the
time or place Webber said when
he asked if he had used drugs that
day. "Not that any time is the time
or place
Webber is charged with second-
degree assault, resisting arrest, dis-
obeying an officer,rraanjaafiapos-
session and several traffic-related
offenses stemming from a Jan. 20
traffic stop for speeding near the
Washington Beltway. The arrest
was one of several off-the-court
matters that prompted the Wizards
to trade Webber to the Sacramento
Kings in May.
With testimony concluded, clos-
ing arguments arc set for
Wednesday morning. Prosecutors
have said they will ask for jail time
if Webber is convicted of the more
serious charges.
Webber raised his voice twice in
his defense, once to say "Yes, he
was" when asked if arresting
Officer Raymond Kane had lied
when testifying for the prosecu-
tion, and again when describing
the moment he was hit by pepper
spray while sitting in the driver's
seat of his sports utility vehicle.
The arrest was one of two mari-
juanarjelatcd dealings with the law
this year for Webber, the National
Basketball Association player who
paid a fine after admitting posses-
sion of marijuana found in his
carry-on bag at an airport in Puerto
Rico in August.
Later that month, Fila, the
sneaker maker, canceled its multi-
million-dollar endorsement con-
tract with Webber, saying he had
violated a good-conduct clause.
STYpre
THE STUDIO OFFERS THE SAFEST PIERCINGS IN A CLEAN & FRIENDLY ENVIRONMENT, SO
YOU 00NT HAVE TO GO OUT OF YOUR WAY TO GET PERFORATED!
NAVEL, EYEBROW,
TONGUS, LABRET, NIPPLE EAR CARTILAGE'
WITH STAINLESS STEEL
JEWELRY INCLUDED!
LAR6EST SELECTION OF
BODY JEWELRY
CHECK US OUT IN DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE BESIDE BW-3S.
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY! FOR MORE INFO CALL 758-8874
Excalibur.
TO&fUTE
KUNNBN
RmTtiBik'
Armour
mrrsutHtan
CUutland
America's Favorite
Golf Store For Over
30 Years
JUST ARRIVED
Great Holiday Gifts for Every Golfer
uge Selection of gift items under $25.00
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Buy 2 Adams Tight Lies and get a
FREE golf bag. Value of $150.00
� Great Deal Armour 855 Irons
3-PVV, plus sand wedge
and lob wedge only $399.99
�Gift Certificates Now Available
�Many More Great Deals
�With the lowest prices
and largest selection,
why would you buy anywhere else?
353-0111
1909 E. Fire Tower Rd. Greenville NC
Maxfli
O ooYwmmv
.0 T R K,x
PING
Dexter.
U)l��on
:
UMIWNIMin
Line-up
�Eton
rod Joy
0 $100 OFF
Security Depo
eposit
with presentation of this coupon, offer expires
121198 not valid with any other coupon
-wesley commons south : 1or 2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
range, refrigerator, free watersewer, washerdryer
hookups, laundry facilities, 5 blocks from campus,
ECU bus services.
-LANGSTON PARK: 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, range, refrig-
erator, dishwasher, free watersewer, approx. 900
sq. ft washerdryer hookups, central heatair, 6
blocks from campus.
Other Apartments Also Available
-All Properties have 24 hr. emergency maintenance-
rroperty I
onogement
Apotments S Rertd houses
108-A Brownlea Drive
758-1921
sports
The Eut Carolinian
Well, Phil's Gone
i
why did ! ever get this tattoo?
LASER REMOVAL
OF TATTOOS
$99
Per Session
Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, RA.
752-1406
www.hdawkins.com
Howard G. Dawkins, Jr. M.D F.A.C.S.
Board Certified Plastic Surgeon
Have your cosmetic surgery performed by a surgeon
certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery.
Mark A.Ward
ATTORNEY AT
� DWI, Traffic, and Felony Defense
� Assistant Public Defender 1988-1993
� Private practice since June 1993
� Has Represented Thousands of Individuals
in District and Superior Criminal Courts
� Member - Pitt County Criminal Defense Bar
� ECU Class of '84, Campbell Law Class of '87
� 24 hour message service
� Visa and Mastercard welcome
752-7529 e
long Week of Classes?
Time to get Out and Jam!
osters Poste
osters Post"
osters Post,
osters Posti
osters Postr
osters Posti
osters Posti
osters Posti
JpP7p'
Posters Po:
Posters Po
Posters Po
Posters Po
Posters Po
Posters Po
Posters Po;
Posters Pol
Where students are always welcome!
E. Arlington Blvd.
Arlington Village
M-F 9:30-6:00
Sat. 9:30-5:00
CLARK
One of the most
complete galleries of
art and framing
After Finals
The Cramming Begins!
Having trouble getting your stuff home from college? Let Mail Boxes Etc' pack
and ship it for you.
From computers and stereos to boxes of books and furniture. Mail Boxes Etc.
handles your shipments with are. MBE can pack and ship just about anything.
MAIL BOXES ETC
It's Not What We Do. It's How We Do It
740 SE Greenville Blvd (Next to Factory Mattress and Bedrooms)
3 2 1.6021
SELLING DC COMICS
AREAT:
THE FASTEST
NOSTALGIA NEWSSTAND
919 Dickinson Avenue
Greenville, NC 27834
1-252-758-6909 -
� TM DC Comics Inc. C1991
VV Men's Hair Styling Shoppe
MA7 Barber S Style
2800 E 10th St.
Eastgaw Shopping-Center
Across From Highway Patrol
Behind Stain Glass
Mon Frl. 9-6
walk-ins Anytime
752-3310
Say Pirates
& Get Hair
Cut for $7
Every time.
Pirate Special
$7.00
Haircut
You drank.
You danced.
You had se
fyissinj
Sor�e-frJ �
P
Free Pregnancy Tests
Call Carolina Pregnancy Center 757-0003
209-B South Evans Street (downtown near Courthouse)
J FLORIDA!
� $PRINCBREAK
FROM $149 PER WEEK
NIJi.UM
SSS!iXi.iJ:l3Xiii-i
FREE DRAFT BEER ALL WEEK LONG
2 OUTDOOR HEATED POOLS � 1 INDOOR HEATED POOL
HUGE BEACH FRONT HOT TUB
LAZY RIVER RIDE � SUITES UP TO 10 PERSONS
SAILBOATS � TIKI BEACH BAR � JET SKIS � PARASAILS
HOME OF THE WORLDS LONGEST KEG PARTY"
CALL FOR INFO: 1-SOO-874-8828
www.sandpijx'rbeacon.coni ('rates per person)
17403 FRONT BEACH ROAD � PANAMA CITY BEACH. FL 32413
Presented In
Rampant W wQjjrf
Theatrical CompanyV � ; V
JO
Compam
December 3.4,5,cx7
Evenings 7:30 p.m.
December 6
Matinee 2:00 p.m.
$6.00 per person
For more information call
321-6277
Performed at J.H. Rose Performing Arts Center
A play In two acts by James Y. Rodgers
Based upon the film by Frank Capri
and the story by Philip Van Doren Siren
SPONSORED IN
Family Medical Care, Inc.
Regional Cardiology Consultants. PA
Trade Oil Company
Bojangles
Ernest L. Conner. Jr. Attorney at Law
PAINTBALL

OLD SPARTA SHOOTING PRESERVE
Hwy 42�5 MILES EAST OF PINET0PS.
20 MINUTES FROM GREENVILLE
GUN RENTALS $20 PER DAY
(INCLUDES 200 PAINTBALLS. C02.
MASKS. & FIELD RENTAL)
EXTRA PAINTBALLS $4 PER 100
100 ACRES WITH SPEEDBALL &
WOODED COMBAT COURSES
open 7 days a week
call for reservations
iinw00d e0m0nds0n
call nights 919.827.4794
'��
13 Thursday,
BEECH STRI
room, two ba
campus, with
refrigerator,
Wainright P
LLC 756-620S
SUBLEASE
BR duplex tw
jiff street parl
hookup close
permo. plus
for info.
WANTED: tV
mate to share
ing distance
classman, rv
$225 a montl
pets. Call Joh
WALK TO E
$285month.
wood Apts 1
ville - 5 block
6596.
TIRED OF a
Young profess
share 2400
ous student,
rooms with r.
Access to all
use of cable
phone line ave
eluded neighl
minutes of m
versify. Refere
ical students a
must: very affi
son @ 756
mentmore in
GLADIOLUS
and three bedi
cable. Locate!
Wainright Pr
LLC 756-6209
2 BR. apt. a
tor, Jan. 1st 3
apts. available
nection, Jan.
month. 3 BR. i
above BW 3
Please call 5E
Smiley
2 BEDROOM
month include
rooms and we
ice to campus,
mat. Call 329-
$395 A mom
plex. Quiet r
erdryer hook-1
night 321-232E
2 BR. 2 bath
Jan. 1 12 bio
info. 830-5115
2 BR Apt. iiv,
Connection Je
rooms &
$550month. I
Rick Smiley.
SUBLEASE A
January 1st, T
cious two be
bath, basic ca
ed, half pf
$525mo. 551-
CANNON CO
12 bath town
refrigerator, dis
er hook-up, or
Wainright Pn
LLC, 756-6209
RINGGO
Now Tak
1 bedroon
Efficienc
CALL
1EJ
SKY
CMOUN
(9191
FOR USE
TOMM'
NAUTK
POLO
.AN!
SHIRTS,
GOL
� Stereos, (Sy:
(DRP
ONE





East Carolinian
rM DC Comics Inc P1991
0
ippe
ate Special
7.00
iircut
,m

?
i7-0003
use)
ATED POOL
?4 �
r
5
s Center
SERVE
IETOPS
ILLE
ALL &
SES
1 3 Thursday, December 3. 1998
FOR RENT
BEECH STREET Villas - Three bed-
room, two bath apartments, close to
Campus, with laundry room, stove,
refrigerator, and dishwasher. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC 756-6209.
SUBLEASE AVAILABLE Jan 1st. 1
BR duplex two blocks from campus
of�stteatpaiking Jront poreh; WD
hookup close to downtown. $250
permo. plus deposit. Call 752-2955
for info.
WANTED: MALE or female room-
mate to share 2 bedroom apt walk-
ing distance from campus, upper-
classman, non-smoker preferred.
$225 a month plus 12 utilities. No
pets. Call John 757-0610.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$285month. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apts 125 Avery St. in Green-
ville - 5 blocks from campus. 758-
6596. .
TIRED OF apartmentdorm room?
Young professional couple wishes to
share 2400 sq. ft. house with seri-
ous student. Spacious, upstairs
rooms with private bath available.
Access to all areas of house. Free
use of cable and laundry; private
phone line available. Located in a se-
cluded neighborhood within 10-15
minutes of medical school and uni-
versity. References from former med-
ical students available. Non-smoker a
must; very affordable. Please call Ja-
son @ 756-2636 for appoint-
mentmore information.
GLADIOLUS GARDENS One, two,
and three bedroom apartments. Free
cable. Located on 10th Street. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC 756-6209.
2 BR. apt. available above Percola-
tor, Jan. 1st $500 a month. 2-2 BR.
apts. available above Catalog Con-
nection, Jan. 1st. $475 8 $550 a
month. 3 BR. apt. available Jan. 1st.
above BW 3's. $850 a month!
Please call 551-9040. ask for Rick
Smiley
2 BEDROOM apartment. $395 per
month includes cable, water, large
rooms and walk-in closet, bus serv-
ice to campus, has pool and laundro-
mat. Call 329-1433.
$395 A month Two bedroom du-
plex. Quiet neighborhood. Wash-
erdryer hook-up. Call day. 551-7810;
night 321-2329.
2 BR, 2 bath for lease, take over in
Jan. 1 12 blocks from campus. For
info, 830-5115. $485month.
2 BR Apt. available above Catalog
Connection January 1. Large bed-
rooms 8 lots of windows,
$550month. Call 551-9040, ask for
Rick Smiley.
SUBLEASE APARTMENT, opened
January 1st, Tar River Estates. Spa-
cious two bedroom, one and half
bath, basic cable and water includ-
ed, half phone and utilities.
$525mo. 551-9196.
CANNON COURT Two bedroom. 1
12 bath townhouse. Includes stove,
refrigerator, dishwasher, washerdry-
er hook-up, on ECU bus route. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC. 756-6209.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(9191496-2224
FOR RENT
PLAYERS CLUB apartment for
lease JanJuly. Can rent by room if
needed! Call 321-6215.
ROOMMATE WANTED
FEMALE REPLACEMENT room-
mate needecTTc sTia7e2bedr6ofn
apartment. Rent $185month. de-
posit $185, 12 utilities, 12 cable,
plus phone. Available DecJan. Call
756-3654.
ONE PERSON needed at Players
Club. Sublease with no deposit.
$200 per month plus 14 utilities.
757-3647
ROOMMATE NEEDED to sublease
room in duplex. Walking distance
from ECU and on bus route. Security
deposit is paid for! No pets! Call JC
or Kelly at 551-3424.
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE
needed to share 3 bedroom duplex
in Wyndham Cir. Call A.S.A.P. 830-
2003.
FOR SALE
COMPUTER PARTS for sale! Com-
puter case. Ram, VideoCard. CD-
ROM. Zip Drive. 3.2Gig Harddrive. A-
Drive, and Monster 3dfx Graphics
Accelerator. All for Very Cheap! Ask
for Ron. 329-7203.
AAAA! EARLY Spring Break Spe-
cials! Bahamas Party Cruise! 6 days
$279! Includes most meals! Awe-
some beaches, nightlife! Departs
from Florida! springbreaktravel.com
1-800-678-6386
PANAMA CITY Spring Break Spe-
cials! Plan Now 8 Save! Boardwalk
Beach Resort. Holiday Inn Sunspree!
7 nights, parties, free drinks from
$119-$ 199! springbreaktravel.com 1-
800-678-6386
AAAA EARLY Specials! Panama
City! Room with kitchen $129! In-
cludes 7 free parties! Daytona149!
New Hotspot-South Beach $129! Co-
coa Beach149! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
DESK AND dresser for sale. Each
one year old, perfect cbndition.
Dresser is $50.00 and desk is
$90.00. Need to sell by December
11. 752-0276, leave message.
AAAA! SPRING Break Travel was
1 of 6 small businesses in the US
recognized by the Council of Better
Business Bureaus for outstanding
ethics in the marketplace! spring-
breaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386
1991 MITSUBISHI Galant. good
condition, $2,800. 752-4628
"LIKE NEW" Moving sale. Contents:
living room set, kitchen set, bar set,
twin bed, and futon. Must See!
Leave message: 561-7550. Best rea-
sonable offer!
K2 FREERIDE 161 Snow Board with
bindings, excellent condition, fast
and great for freestyle courses. Used
only twice. $250 OBO. 752-6689.
AAAA! EARLY Specials! Cancun
8 Jamaica! 7 nights air and hotel
from $399! Includes free food,
drinks, parties! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
SERVICES
FACULTYSTAFFPARENTS: Tutor-
ing Today for a successful tomor-
row. 13-year veteran school teacher
specializing in Reading, Math, and
Study Skills. Contact Robin @ 754-
8020.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$y�, � r- T T ti We Need timberUnd boots
CASH? �nd.hoetlGoodJe.m.
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER TIMBERLAND
NAUTICA ABERCROMBIE
POLO EDDIE BAUER
AND OTHER NAME BRAND MEN'S CLOTHING
SHIRTS, PANTS, JEANS, SWEATS, JACKETS, SHOES, ETC.
WE ALSO BUY AND SELL:
GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
QUICK, EASY, HELPFUL
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
414 S. EVANS (UP THE STREET FROM CUBBIES)
752-3866
TUESDAY - SATURDAY, 9:00 - 5:00
(DRIVE TO THE BACK DOOR BEHIND PARK THEATRE)
ONE OF THE FAVORITE STUDENT STORES FOR YEARS
(IF YOU ARE SELLING, ID IS REQUIRED)
classifieds
SERVICES
I WILL type your paper for you.
$2.50 per page double spaced;
$3.50 single spaced. Pick up and de-
livery avail. 24 hour service. Call
Becky at 830-5559.
HELP WANTED
STUDENTS WANTED, all positions
(bartenders, doormen. DJ's and
managers). Apply in person at The
Sports Pad or call for more info, 757-
3881 or 757-3658.
EDUCATION MAJOR needed for
tutoringsitting services for fourth
grader. Every other week beginning
1499 from 2:30-5:30, $60week.
758-8400.
BIOLOGISTS-December Graduates:
Enter a challenging field where job
opportunity is always superb! IMS
Inc. of Silver Spring, Maryland is
training science majors in Biomedi-
cal Information Technology. No ex-
perience required. Start your career
at $27K. Most people earn $33K in
one year. Free. 4 week intensive pro-
gramming course, starting 11199.
Jobs start 21099. In our last 4
classes. 19 out of 22 students re-
ceived and accepted offers to work
in our firm. Must have BS with 2.9
GPA. Call (888) 680-9778 if interest-
ed"
1999 INTERNSHIPS! Attention un-
dergraduate business students. Now
interviewing on campus for manag-
ers across Virginia. North and South
Carolina for summer of 1999. Aver-
age earnings last summer $7,000.
Call Tuition Painters at (800) 393-
4521 or e-mail at tuipaint@bell-
south.net
EARN WHILE YOU learn, up4o
$1,000.00 wk. Day and night
shifts. Claan, secure working at-
mosphere. Playmates Adult En-
tertainment. 252-747-7686 for in-
terview.
BARTENDERS ARE in Demand
Earn $15-$30hr. Have fun and
make great $$$! Call for information
about our $99 Holiday Tuition Spe-
cial Offer ends soon! Call Raleigh's
Bartending School today Call toll
free at 1-888-676-0774.
NEEDED-ABLE bodied, dependable,
trainable individuals for historic res-
toration. Full time till Christmas. $7-
$12hourCal 830-4829.
BEAUTIFUL MODEL for lingerie
fashion show. Apply in person only.
No calls. Lori's Intimate Apparel
BEAUTIFUL LINGERIE sales people
needed. Must have retail experience.
No calls. Lori's Intimate Apparel.
$7.00 PER hour plus $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina (Nags Head). Call
Dona for application and housing
info, 800-662-2122.
FUN, ENERGETIC babysitter need-
ed for 4-year old and 9-year old
boys. Beginning January, must be
available Monday 8a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
and Thursday 12Noon to 4:30p.m.
Please call 353-7446.
BASIL'S RESTAURANT 6 Pizzeria
now hiring all positions. Apply in
person, 1675 East Firetower Road in
front of Carmike Cinemas.
BABYSITTER WANTED to watch
small child. Must be mature, reliable,
and have previous experience with
small children. CPR certified pre-
ferred. Must be available most wee-
kend evenings. Please leave mes-
sage, 353-8840
CARPENTERS WANTED. Full or
part-time. One year experience re-
quired. Call 758-9904, Clipper Con-
struction Co. Inc leave phone num-
ber and time you can be reached.
HOUSE-SITTER Available. Matured,
experienced, reliable, trustworthy na-
tive of Greenville available for house-
sitting Christmas and possibly
Thanksgiving holidays. Call Kathy at
202-667-6216.
PERSONALS
SRANDI-THIS one makes four in a
row! Let's make this Christmas the
best yet! I Love You! Ryan K.
KITTENS FREE to a good home.
Call 353-2932 ASAP!
GREEK PERSONALS
TO THE Lil' Sisters of Delta Zeta.
thanks so much for our beautiful
paddles. We had a great time. We
love you guys. Love, your Big Sisters
DELTA SIGMA, thanks for having
us for New Year's in November. You
guys always show us a good time!
Love, Chi Omega
LEIGH ANN- Your smiles and hard
work are definitely appreciated! Con-
grats on your Best New Member
Award! Love, your Zeta Tau Alpha
sisters
GREAT JOB Alpha Omicron Pi on
making it to the intramural soccer
playoffs! Good luck the rest of the
way!
LAMBDA CHI Alpha, we had a
great time at the social last Saturday.
Thanks for everything. Love, Alpha
Delta Pi
THE BIG sisters of Alpha Omicron Pi
would like to tell Carmin Pollard and
Amanda Swing that tonight is the
night. We'll be waiting for you. Love,
your big sisters
CARRIE- Congrats on receiving the
Crown Sister Award at Formal! We
love you and appreciate all your hard
work. Love, your sister
CONGRATS TO the new executive
council of Zeta Tau Alpha- President
- Taryn Cavaco. VPI - Wendy Melton,
VPII -Meredith Brown, Secretary -
Stephanie Shifler. Treasurer -Jen
Moore. Membership Alison Gurga-
nus. Ritual - Sara Arnesen, Historian
- Casey Rushton, Panhellenic - Sarah
McConnell. Love, your sisters
THE SISTERS of Gamma Sigma
Sigma would like to welcome our
new members! We are so proud of
you!
THE BROTHERS of Delta Chi would
like to thank Sigma for a great social
last Friday. We look forward to doing
it again soon. Love, the brothers of
Delta Chi
TO THE brothers of Kappa Sigma,
thanks for sharing our Big Sis party
with us. Everyone had a wonderful
time. Love, the sisters of Delta Zeta
TO THE soccer team and lacrosse
team: thanks for making our social
last week so much fun! Everyone
had a blast and we are ready to do it
again! Love, Chi Omega
ALPHA OMICRON Pi would like to
thank everyone who attended last
weeks' Christmas Cocktail! It was a
wonderful night!
THE SISTERS of Chi Omega would
like to thank our pledges for decorat-
ing the house for Christmas! The
house looks wonderful and we love
you!
THANKS TO all our good-looking
dates who came out for our Crown
Ball! We had a wonderful time and
we hope you did too! Love, Zeta Tau
Alpha
TO THE lovely sisters of Chi Omega,
we had a blast watching the clock
hit 12:00 at our New Year's in No-
vember Social Friday. Hope to see
you girls again soon! The brothers of
Delta Sigma Phi
TO THE sisters of Delta Zeta, we
had a great time at the social on
Thursday. Hope to do it again soon.
The brothers of Delta Sigma Phi
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The East Carolinian
OTHER
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lots of Cash! Top reps are offered
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FOR SUBLEASING: two bedroom,
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Great location. $470. For more infor-
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CRUISE SHIP Employment - work-
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ANNOUNCEMENTS
CHRISTMAS LIGHTING Ceremony,
Community Christian Church,
Sunday December 6 at 5:30p.m.
Sunday evening service will begin at
6p.m. Everyone is invited to attend
1104 N. Memorial Drive, Greenville.
752-5683
CHOOSING A Major or a Career:
Workshop: Thursday 3:30-5PM. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop on December 3rd. If
you are interested in this workshop,
please contact the Center at 328-
6661.
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION Work-
shop: Tuesday 11:00-12:00. The Cen-
ter for Counseling and Student De-
velopment is offering the following
workshop on December 8th. If you
are interested in this workshop,
please contact the Center at 328-
6661.
THERE'S ONLY 1 ISSUE
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ANNOUNCEMENTS
THE BEGINNING of an Orthodox
Christian Church in Greenville, on.
Sat. Dec. 5. Orthos Service 9 a.m
Diving Liturgy 10 a.m. Services be
ing held at St. Paul's Episcopal
church in Greenville. Everyone is wel-
come! �s
BECOMING A Successful Student
Test Preparation Workshop: Tuesday"
11:00-12:00 The Center for Coun-
seling and Student Development is
offering the following workshop on,
December 3rd. If you are interested,
in this workshop, contact the Center
at 328-6661.
HABITAT RE-SALE Store. 2727.
10th Street. Greenville. NC opening,
soon, 9-6 MonSat. Accepting dona-
tions (tax deductible) of household
items, books, etc. (sorry, no clothes).
Proceeds go towards building homes
for our community's families in"
need. For more info call 758-2947,
Habitat for Humanity of Pitt Co Inc
TUES DEC. 8� GRADUATE RECI-
TAL, Michael Weaver, violin, Willis
Building Auditorium. 9:00 P.M.
ALCOHOL Substance Intervention
Program (A-SIP): Thursday 3:30-5�
PM. The Center for Counseling and
Student Development is offering a
workshop to assist you in exploring?
more about substance use on De-�
cember 3rd An open, non-judgmen-J
tal approach is used to encouragej
healthy decision-making and to an-T
swer questions regarding substance
use. If you are interested in this pro
gram, contact the Center at 328y
6661.
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Did you sec news happen;
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(La .tMrarolinian at ,H-nf6.





at the Student Recreation Center
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Time to see
V�:what you learne
this semester!
Free Food
Prizes
Featuring: Games
�Spit Ball Shooting
�All Campus Dodgeball
�Scooter Races
�Sports Trivia
�CardsBoard Games
8pmto11pm
Take a Study Break
hnfl RECREATIONAL
U U SERVICES
EAST
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UNIVERSITY
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Title
The East Carolinian, December 3, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 03, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1309
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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