The East Carolinian, November 24, 1998






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visa USA Inc.
MonFri 8:00
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776). Redemption
& i
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. Valid at all U.S.
online or phone
Heated. Any other
I items or in con
i per transaction.
f valid only when
e paid by bearer,
ice mark of visa
tic.
er, present this
insibility of Tower
fan
Zoffee
Bagels.
heese, and a reg-
ten you use your
3agels" locations.
). Good only for
institutes fraud,
inly one coupon
libited, taxed, or
i your Visa card.
! only in the U.S.
ational Service
�i, present this
ion code 5174.
i Noah's Bagel
College
Iniversity
des.
oks, and career
ithin the United
your Visa card.
ob Search
rvival Guide,
's Internships
IAT, GRE, LSAT,
I. Good only for .
institutes fraud. !
jited, taxed, or I
i your Visa card. I
i only in the U.S.
ational Service
I
or receive a
MonFri 8:30 j
ion is solely the .
I
I
I
haseof
ire.
at Bed Bath &
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i where prohib
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ice Association.
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0 Kmart loca-
ation nearest
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lut

Efc
Tuesday
High: 68
Low: 51
Wednesday
High: 64
Low: 43
Online Survey
Does ECU need a new
football coach?
34 Yes 66 No
www.tec.ecu.edu
Do you agree with the recent tuition hike?
Carolinian
William and Mary heals ECU in the first round of the
QA Volleyball Tournament held at Minges Coliseum.
Sports, page 7
TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 24,1998 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 27
Minority students
receive awards
Academic achievement
honored by university
R W II A I I. II I (i DON
The Minority Student Academic
Leadership and Achievement Award cere-
mony was held to honor African and
Native American students who have
excelled in academics and in leadership.
The ceremony was held Wednesday,
Nov. IK, in Wright Auditorium. Students
who received a cumulative GrA of 3.0 for
the fall of'97 and the spring of'98, a total
of 255, were presented a certificate of
recognition. The leadership award winners
were nominated by faculty and staff and
required a minimum GPA of 2.5. These
fifteen students were recognized leader-
ship awards due ro their outstanding roles
on campus.
The event, sponsored by the African-
American Cultural Center, was established
in 1996.
"The awards help the students gain
confidence by being acknowledged said
Taffye Clayton, Director of the African-
American Cultural Center. "So many times
these students can go through school and
never be recognized
Programs like these also help in minori-
ty recruitment by showing a more positive-
aspect of ECU while assisting in retaining
successful minority students.
"We want them to feel good about
being a student here since acknowledge-
ment and celebration are integral parts of
being a student on this campus Clayton
said. "It also gives the student lasting
memories
Charles Penny, assistant city manager of
Rocky Mount, addressed the crowd on the
topic of "Millennium Torch Bearers:
Continuing the Path of Progress for African
Americans Although the program is orga-
nized for both African and Native
American students alike, the majority of
participants are African-American.
Organizers believe that events like this are
specific ways to make successful graduates
who, in turn, support the cultural center
and serve as positive role models,
"This is an outstanding program said
Brian 1 laynes, with Minority and Student
Affairs. "It is one of the better ones we
have at ECU that honors and recognizes
academic excellence and leadership
What a nice day to be on campus
Students enjoyed unusually warm November days this week. The colorful tree in front of the
General Classroom Building displays its prime fall foliage.
PHOTO BV MIKE JACDBSEN
Increase in tuition applied to all UNC schools
Officials say bill will
save university money
D i: v o n V n i t E
s ! I I W R I I E R
A two percent increase in tuition added to
fall semester bills will end up saving the
university money, said officials of ECU.
More than 155,000 students enrolled at
the 16 North Carolina campuses were
affected by the tuition hike. The increase
i&s approved during the General
Assembly's short session in October, then
approved by the UNC Board of Governors
"The in-state tuition fees are among
the lowest rates in the country
Richard Brown
Vice Chancellor lor Administialion and Finance.
on Friday. ECU decided to add the
increase to the fall tuition, although it had
not yet been formally approved, instead of
sending out supplement bills to 17,000
students later. Brown said that billing now
instead of sending a supplement bill later
saves the university a large amount of time
and money. The hike was recommended
to the legislature as a part of the biannual
budget which was drafted last year, there-
fore ECU officials felt that the increase
was most definite.
UNC Chapel Hill decided to send out
supplement bills to collect the 2 rather
than add it to the fall tuition like ECU.
Both Brown and Joni Worthington,
UNC system spokeswoman, said that "the
two percent increase is a very modest
increase, especially for in-state students
Yearly tuition at ECU is $918 for in-
state students and $8,188 for non-resi-
dents including the increase. The increas-
es for in-state students ranged from $16 to
$28 and $140 to $208 for out-of-state stu-
dents.
"The in-state tuition fees are among
the lowest rates in the country said
Richard Brown, Vice Chancellor for
Administration and Finance.
The increase will be used to cover the
costs of doing business as a university sys-
tem. The two percent increase for the fall
semester will appear on the spring tuition
bill.
"Historically, tuition fees have gone up
by two to three percent per academic
year said Michael P. Balko, University
Cashier.
Phi Beta Sigma; NC Collegiate Chapter of the Year
Historically black service
fraternity awarded
RACHA EL Hi on on
si ir WRITER
Phi Beta Sigma, a historically black service-
oriented fraternity, was recently named the
North Carolina Collegiate Chapter of the
Year.
The award was announced at their
annual state convention the weekend of
Nov. 13-15, this combined with a second
recognition for outstanding work in the
community. This is the chapter's first year
receiving such an honor, and members say
it has been their objective since last year's
convention.
"Our goal from the beginning was to win
this award said Chris Rey, president of
Phi Beta Sigma. "We completely restruc-
tured our organization from the business
aspect
The requirements for winning
Collegiate Chapter of the Year, among the
50 Phi Beta Sigma fraternities in the state of
North Carolina, involve
community service, educational purpos-
es or the cumulative GPA's of the mem-
bers, and bigger and better business, which
is the chapter's ability to take care of docu-
mentation and paperwork.
"This award includes scholarship and
brotherhood said Ion Otterbridge, who
has been the chapter adviser since 1997. "I
feel that their winning is due to a cohesive-
ness with the brothers and their ability to
follow rules, policies and procedures
Phi Beta Sigma has been a part of uni-
versities in North Carolina since 1922, with
the motto "culture for service and service
for humanity The ECU chapter exempli-
fies these words by tutoring at the Right
Step Academy and (IMS Middle School,
and by participating in various projects at
the Little Willie Center.
Phi Beta Sigma now has the opportunity
to represent North Carolina in the running
for National Collegiate Chapter of the Year
this summer at their national convention in
Dallas.
Phi Beta Sigma has 25
members who all try to
"live up to the ideals and
principles" set before them
in the fraternity. An
increase in numbers was
not an factor in motivating
them to win Collegiate
Chapter of the Year.
"We look for quality
within individuals, not
quantity Otterbridge
said.
The difference in this
year than in years past was
their attention to detail.
Letters of appreciation and
pictures documented the
fraternity and their devo-
tion to the community,
which were all presented to
the judging committee.
"We did what we were
supposed to do and then
we went over and
beyond Rey said.
Phi Beta Sigma fraternity awarded Chapter of the Year for NC.
PHOTO BV MIKE JACOBSEH
rthe newest focus issue
�me m the Dee, 3 issue.
University
Symphony
to visit
Prague
Orchestra to perform
in Czech Republic
P B Tr.R Da w y o t
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Next fall F2CU's Symphony orchestra
will perform their first out-of-country
performance in the city of Prague, Czech
Republic.
The festival, which is hosted and
sponsored by the Prague Students
Orchestra, has featured youth orchestras
from numerous countries in Europe.
ECU is the first ensemble from the
United States to be invited to the festi-
val.
"This represents a tremendous honor
of the School of Music at ECU said Dr.
Douglas Morrison, music director. "The
invitation to Prague really underscores
the School of Music's commitment to
excellence. Exciting things are really
happening at ECU
The invitation came about through
violinist Jan Mizera, an exchange stu-
dent form Prague. In the spring of 1998,
Mizera played in the ECU Symphony
Orchestra and upon his return home
urged festivals directors to issue the invi-
tation.
Mizera lived with Morrison and his
family during the stay in the United
States.
"It was sad to see him go said
Morrison. "He had become family
ECU's attendance marks the first
American ensemble to attend the festi-
val. Prior participants in the festival have
included orchestras from France,
Germany, Belgium, Sweden and the
Slovak Republic.
According to Morrison, the timing of
the trip could not be better.
"1999 marks the 175th anniversary of
the birth of one of the greatest Czech
composers, Bcdrich Smetana said
Morrison. " I had already planned a spe-
cial complete performance of his great-
est work, Ma Ylast. Now we will be able
to honor this great composer in the city
in which he lived and composed
The festival, which was inaugurated
in 1994, will be held from Oct. 28
through Nov. 17. These dates will com-
memorate important dates in Czech his-
tory. ECU plans to perform three con-
certs which will focus on American
music for one part of the ensemble and
and the second half to celebrate the
Czech influences.
ECU will perform for three shows in
Prague. Berno, and Vienna, Austria.
ECU freshman Drew Yates is among
one of the music majors hoping to attend
the trip.
"This is an exciting time for the
music department said Yates " I think
this trip will help bring about more
recognition for the music department.
Funding for the trip has now
became one of the major focuses for the
music department. The projected cost
to take the orchestra on the trip is
approximately $150,000, which is
expected to come from charitable dona-
tions to the music department.
"Every7 little bit helps towards our
goal to raise money for the trip
Morrison said. "All donations will
greatly be appreciated





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Efo
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ft
31
Do you ag
Mi
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Acaden,
honom
K.M-I
The Minorit
Leadership and
mony was hcl
Native Amcrii
excelled in aead
The ceremo
Nov. IK, in Wri
who received a
the fall of'97 ar
of 255, were
recognition. Thi
were nominatec
required a mini
fifteen student.1
ship awards due
on campus.
The event, l
American (lultu
in 19.
"The award
confidence by I
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saveui
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fall semester h
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More than 1
the 16 North
affected by the
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Histotm
fraten
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Phi Beta Sigma,
oriented fraternii
North Carolina
Year.
The award
annual state coi
Nov. 13-15, this
recognition for
community. Thi
receiving such ai
it has been their
convention.
"Our goal fror
this award sait
Phi Beta Sigma,
turcd our organ
aspect





'
radio
99 value) when
lent Planner corn-
notepad, Yahoo
for $19,991
Good only for the
es fraud. Not valid
restricted by law.
licable taxes must
wards is a service
Visa USA Inc.
MonFri 8:00
inder color black
776). Redemption
Hnfc
npactDisc,
r Book.
deo, or book reg-
pay with your
. Valid at all U.S.
online or phone
licated. Any other
i items or in con
l per transaction.
�i valid only when
e paid by bearer.
ice mark of Visa
er, present this
ansibility of Tower
Coffee
I Bagels.
heese, and a reg-
len you use your
Bagels locations.
3. Good only for
institutes fraud.
Inly one coupon
libited, taxed, or
1 your Visa card.
� only in the U.S.
lational Service
�r, present this
ion code 5174.
i Noah's Bagel
College
Jniversity
ides,
wks, and career
rithin the United
your Visa card.
ob Search
rvival Guide,
's Internships
IAT, GRE, LSAT,
). Good only for
institutes fraud,
bited, taxed, or
) your Visa card.
only in the U.S.
ational Service
or receive a
MonFri 8:30
tion is solely the
ftaseof
ore.
at Bed Bath &
lot valid for the
fraud. Not valid
d where prohib-
)u pay with your
only in the U.S.
ice Association.
000 1
H
bra
iill-Service
XI Change.
(21.99) when
iter.
Offer applies to
ated. Any other
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ffer. Void where
l when you pay
aid by bearer,
e mark of Visa
Inc.
at the time of
10 Kmart loca-
cation nearest
n is solely the
��
?

Efc
Tuesday
High: 68
Low: 51
Wednesday
High: 64
Low: 43
Online Survey
Does ECU need a new
football coach?
34 Yes 66 No
www.tec.ecu.edu
Do you agree with the recent tuition hike?
Carolinian
Williain and Mary beats ECU in Uie fast round of the
CA Volleyball Tournament, held at Minges Coliseum.
Sports, pajy � 7
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 24,1998 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 27
Minority students
receive awards
Academic achievement
honored by university
H M 11 A I I. Hid DON
SMI I W HI r K k
The Minority Student Academic
Leadership and Achievement Award cere-
mony was held to honor African and
Native American students who have
excelled in academics and in leadership.
The ceremony was held Wednesday,
Nov. IK, in Wright Auditorium. Students
who received a cumulative GPA of 3.0 for
the fall of '97 and the spring of '98, a total
of 255, were presented a certificate of
recognition. The leadership award winners
were nominated by faculty and staff and
required a minimum CJPA of 2.5. These
fifteen students were recognized leader-
ship awards due to their outstanding roles
on campus.
The event, sponsored by the African-
American Cultural Center, was established
in 1996.
"The awards help the students gain
confidence by being acknowledged said
Taffye Clayton, Director of the African-
American Cultural Center. "So many times
these students can go through school and
never be recognized
Programs like these also help in minori-
ty recruitment by showing a more positive
aspect of ECU while assisting in retaining
successful minority students.
"We want them to feel good about
being a student here since acknowledge-
ment and celebration are integral parts of
being a student on this campus Clayton
said. "It also gives the student lasting
memories
Charles Penny, assistant city manager of
Rocky Mount, addressed the crowd on the
topic of "Millennium Torch Bearers:
Continuing the Path of Progress for African
Americans Although the program is orga-
nized for both African and Native
American students alike, the majority of
participants are African-American.
Organizers believe that events like this are
specific ways to make successful graduates
who, in turn, support the cultural center
and serve as positive role models.
"This is an outstanding program said
Brian I laynes, with Minority and Student
Affairs. "It is one of the better ones ue
have at ECU that honors and recognizes
academic excellence and leadership
What a nice day to be on campus
Students enjoyed unusually warm November days this week. The colorful tree in front of the
General Classroom Building displays its prime fall foliage.
PHOTO BY MIKE JAC0BSEN
Increase in tuition applied to all UNC schools
Officials say bill will
save university money
Devon White
sT AT I- WRITER
A two percent increase in tuition added to
fall semester bills will end up saving the
university money, said officials of ECU.
More than 155,000 students enrolled at
the 16 North Carolina campuses were
affected by the tuition hike. The increase
was approved during the General
Assembly's short session in October, then
approved by the UNC Board of Governors
"The in-state tuition fees are among
the lowest rates in the country
Richard Brown
Vice Chancellor loi Administration and Finance.
on Friday. ECU decided to add the
increase to the fall tuition, although it had
not yet been formally approved, instead of
sending out supplement bills to 17,000
students later. Brown said that billing now
instead of sending a supplement bill later
saves the university a large amount of time
and money. The hike was recommended
to the legislature as a part of the biannual
budget which was drafted last year, there-
fore ECU officials felt that the increase
was most definite.
UNC Chapel Hill decided to send out
supplement bills to collect the 2 rather
than add it to the fall tuition like ECU.
Both Brown and Joni Worthington,
UNC system spokeswoman, said that "the
two percent increase is a very modest
increase, especially for in-state students
Yearly tuition at ECU is $918 for in-
state students and $8,188 for non-resi-
dents including the increase. The increas-
es for in-state students ranged from $16 to
$28 and $140 to $208 for out-of-state stu-
dents.
"The in-state tuition fees are among
the lowest rates in the country said
Richard Brown, Vice Chancellor for
Administration and Finance.
The increase will be used to cover the
costs of doing business as a university sys-
tem. The two percent increase for the fall
semester will appear on the spring tuition
bill.
"Historically, tuition fees have gone up
by two to three percent per academic
year said Michael P. Balko, University
Cashier.
Phi Beta Sigma; NC Collegiate Chapter of the Year
Historically black service
fraternity awarded
Racuaki. Hi(;oon
s I IT WRITER
Phi Beta Sigma, a historically black service-
oriented fraternity, was recently named the
North Carolina Collegiate Chapter of the
Year.
The award was announced at their
annual state convention the weekend of
Nov. 13-15, this combined with a second
recognition for outstanding work in the
community. This is the chapter's first year
receiving such an honor, and members say
it has been their objective since last year's
convention.
"Our goal from the beginning was to win
this award said Chris Rey, president of
Phi Beta Sigma. "We completely restruc-
tured our organization from the business
aspect
The requirements for winning
Collegiate Chapter of the Year, among the
50 Phi Beta Sigma fraternities in the state of
North Carolina, involve
community service, educational purpos-
es or the cumulative GPA's of the mem-
bers, and bigger and better business, which
is the chaptet's ability to take care of docu-
mentation and paperwork.
"This award includes scholarship and
brotherhood said Ion Otterbridge, who
has been the chapter adviser since 1997. "I
feel that their winning is due to a cohesive-
ness with the brothers and their ability to
follow rules, policies and procedures
Phi Beta Sigma has been a part of uni-
versities in North Carolina since 1922, with
the motto "culture for service and service
for humanity The ECU chapter exempli-
fies these words by tutoring at the Right
Step Academy and CMS Middle School,
and by participating in various projects at
the Little Willie Center.
Phi Beta Sigma now has the opportunity
to represent North Carolina in the running
for National Collegiate Chapter of the Year
this summer at their national convention in
Dallas.
Phi Beta Sigma has 25
members who all try to
"live up to the ideals and
principles" set before them
in the fraternity. An
increase in numbers was
not an factor in motivating
them to win Collegiate
Chapter of the Year.
"We look for quality
within individuals, not
quantity Otterbridge
said.
The difference in this
year than in years past was
their attention to detail.
Letters of appreciation and
pictures documented the
fraternity and their devo-
tion to the community,
which were all presented to
the judging committee.
"We did what we were
supposed to do and then
we went over and
beyond Rey said.
Phi Beta Sigma fraternity awarded Chapter of the Year for NC.
PHOTO BY MIKE JACOBSEN
newest ioeus issue
m the Dec. 3 issue.
University
Symphony
to visit
Prague
Orchestra to perform
in Czech Republic
Peter D a w v ot
.sis I s i kws kditor
Next fall ECU's Symphony orchestra
will perform their first out-of-country
performance in the city of Prague, Czech
Republic
The festival, which is hosted and
sponsored by the Prague Students
Orchestra, has featured youth orchestras
from numerous countries in Europe.
ECU is the first ensemble from the
United States to be invited to the festi-
val.
"This represents a tremendous honor
of the School of Music at ECU said Dr.
Douglas Morrison, music director. "The
invitation to Prague really underscores
the School of Music's commitment to
excellence. Exciting things are really
happening at ECU
The invitation came about through
violinist Jan Mizera, an exchange stu-
dent form Prague. In the spring of 1998,
Mizera played in the ECU Symphony
Orchestra and upon his return home
urged festivals directors to issue the invi-
tation.
Mizera lived with Morrison and his
family during the stay in the United
States.
"It was sad to see him go said
Morrison. "He had become family
ECU's attendance marks the first
American ensemble to attend the festi-
val. Prior participants in the festival have
included orchestras from France,
Germany, Belgium, Sweden and the
Slovak Republic.
According to Morrison, the timing of
the trip could not be better.
"1999 marks the 175th anniversary of
the birth of one of the greatest Czech
composers, Bedrich Smetana said
Morrison. " I had already planned a spe-
cial complete performance of his great-
est work. Ma Ylast. Now we will be able
to honor this great composer in the city
in which he lived and composed
The festival, which was inaugurated
in 1994, will be held from Oct. 28
through Nov. 17. These dates will com-
memorate important dates in Czech his-
tory. ECU plans to perform three con-
certs which will focus on American
music for one part of the ensemble and
and the second half to celebrate the
Czech influences.
ECU will perform for three shows in
Prague Berno, and Vienna, Austria.
ECU freshman Drew Yates is among
one of the music majors hoping to attend
the trip.
"This is an exciting time for the
music department said Yates " I think
this trip will help bring about more
recognition for the music department.
Funding for the trip has now
became one of the major focuses for the
music department. The projected cost
to take the orchestra on the trip is
approximately $150,000, which is
expected to come from charitable dona-
tions to the music department.
"Every little bit helps towards our
goal to raise money for the trip
Morrison said. "All donations will
greatly be appreciated





2 Tmidiy, Novimhef 24, 1998
nows
The East Carolinian
November Indian Heritage Month
3 Tiwullliv Mnyj
Events reflect Native
American history
Devon White
STAFF WHITER
The month of November has been
declared Indian Heritage month in
North Carolina by Governor James
B. Hunt.
North Carolina Indians com-
prise the largest American Indian
population of any state east of the
Mississippi River, and the seventh
largest in the nation. According to
the 1990 U.S. Census, North
Carolina's Indian population totals
over 80,000 throughout all 100
counties. Six tribes are recognized
by North Carolina : The Eastern
Band of Cherokee, Coharie,
Haliwa-Saponi, Lumbee, Meherrin
and Waccamaw-Siouan. The
Eastern Band of Cherokee is also
recognized by the federal govern-
ment. Other tribes also exist that
Students admiring Native American display
outside of the Student Book Store.
PHOTO BY S�flAH CHRISTIE
are unofficially recognized such as
the Guilford Native American
Association, Cumberland County
Association for Indian People and
Metrolina Native American
Association.
Archeological evidence indi-
cates that Native Americans
were living in North Carolina
10,000 years ago. Native
Americans of the Virginia and
North Carolina coasts were
hosts to the first English-speak-
ing explorers and settlers.
Natives taught fishing and agri-
cultural techniques to the new-
comers. They introduced the
settlers to new methods of land
clearing, showing them how to
make efficient use of the new
crops such as corn and tobacco.
Many activities were planned to
celebrate the Indian Heritage
month. Events such as the
Lumbee Tribe's Fall Festival &
Pow Wow, Fifth Annual Native
Cultural Festival (for school
children). Native American
Celebration, and Native
American Wild Game Festival
gave an opportunity for children
and adults alike to learn more about
the Native American heritage of
North Carolina, especially at a time
when cultural diversity and educa-
tion has became so important in
keeping the Native American her-
itage alive.
"It is a great time not only to dis-
cuss the contributions of Indian
people, but also the contemporary
histories and lifestyles of the over
80,000 who live in North Carolina
today" said Gregory Richardson,
executive director of the N.C
Commission of Indian Affairs.
Although the turn out wasn't as
good as hoped for, the events still
went well. The contributions of
people around the state helped to
bring about some type of recogni-
tion for Native Americans.
"We had hoped for more support
from the school systems across
North Carolina Richardson said.
As the years continue perhaps
the interest in the awareness of
Native American culture will
improve. Next year look for more
publicity as the state during the
dedicated month. Sometimes pro-
grams have a hard time getting off
to a solid start, but after a little work
these become important events in
the calendar.
Aged Garlic Extract reduces stroke
is Risk factors reduced
for heart disease
Cara Davis
staff writer
A recent study led by Manfred
Steiner, MD, Ph.D researcher at
East Carolina School of Medicine
found that using an aged garlic
extract (AGE) reduced cardiovascu-
lar disease risk factors.
Over 60 million Americans suf-
fer from some form of heart disease
and more than 40 percent of all
deaths each year in the United
States are due to cardiovascular dis-
ease, eventually leading to heart
attacks and strokes. Risk factors for
heart disease include cigarette
smoking, high blood pressure, high
blood cholesterol levels, inactivity,
stress, obesity and diabetes.
When the aged garlic extract is
administered over extended peri-
ods of time the risk factors are
reduced for stroke and heart dis-
ease; aged garlic extract decreased
LDL cholesterol levels by 5 to 7
percent. A reduction of blood pres-
sure in the same 5 to 7 percent
range was also found during the
study. Aged garlic extract is odor-
less and is different in its chemical
make-up than that of fresh garlic.
"The aging process changed
several of the key components and
makes it more easily absorbed in
the stomach and small intestine
Steiner said. He went on to say
that a main cause of heart disease
along with stroke is hardening of
the arteries. This process can be
dramatically slowed with the
antioxidants found within this
extract.
"I'm not saying this will reverse
heart disease or stroke risk factors,
but it may slow down the process
Steiner said.
To have a healthy heart at age 80
or 90 pay attention to major risk fac-
tors. Don't smoke, maintain nor-
mal weight and follow a nutritious
diet schedule. Examine your
behaviors and change any which
contribute to the risk of heart dis-
ease and blood vessel disease.
Originally from Austria, Steiner
is now a professor in the
Department of Medicine, Section
of Hematology-Oncology at the
ECU School of Medicine. He pre-
sented his findings, "Recent
Advances on the Nutritional
Benefits Accompanying the Use
of Garlic as a Supplement at a
recent international conference
in Newport Beach, California.
Six athletes charged in shooting death at State
Lea Delicio
NEWS EDITOR OF N.C. STATE
STUDENT NEWSPAPER "THE
TECHNICIAN-
Neil Davis was shot in his town
home early Sunday morning.
Raleigh Police Department has
Charged six in relation to the crime.
t Three N.C. State football play-
ers, two members of the NCSU
wrestling team and one former
member of the NCSU wrestling
team have been charged in con-
nection with the shooting death of
an NCSU student.
Neil Vernon Davis Jr a lifelong
education student in undergradu-
ate studies, died after a shooting in
his home at 4306 Hunter's Club
Drive at 2:30 a.m. Sunday, accord-
ing to a statement issued by the
Raleigh Police Department
(RPD).
Clyde Williams Blunt, a sopho-
more and a member of the NCSU
wrestling team, is charged with
involuntary manslaughter and mis-
demeanor breaking and entering,
according to the RPD statement.
Also, among those charged,
according to the RPD statement,
are three NCSU football players;
Harold Jackson, a sophomore and a
fullback, is reportedly charged with
accessory to a felony, misdemeanor
breaking and entering and misde-
meanor assault. Willie Wright, a
freshman and wide receiver, is
reportedly charged with larceny of
a firearm, misdemeanor breaking
and entering and misdemeanor
assault. Davis Stringer, a freshman
and a wide receiver, is reportedly
charged with accessory to a felony,
misdemeanor breaking and enter-
ing and misdemeanor assault.
One other NCSU wrestler and
one former wrestler are charged in
relation to Davis' death as well.
The wrestler, Michael Mordarski, a
freshman, is reportedly charged
with misdemeanor breaking and
entering.
According to Captain Mike
Longmire of the RPD, Blunt is
charged with involuntary
manslaughter because he did not
show premeditation or malice
when he allegedly shot Davis.
"We're not saying that Mr.
Blunt went to Mr. Davis' house
with the intent to kill him
Longmire said.
In speculating as to what the
men were doing at Davis' resi-
dence, Longmire said: "We've
charged three other people with
misdemeanor assault, so I guess
you could draw some conclusion
from that
The police do know that Davis
was "killed with a gun that was in
his Davis' possession according
to Longmire. Police have not yet
checked the ownership of that gun.
Police are still investigating the
case. They know there were other
people in the house at the time but
had not been able to positively
identify them as of Sunday night-
Chancellor Marye Anne Fox
said Sunday night that the incident
was a tragedy.
"Our concern is with the stu-
dents and their families she said.
NCSU will release an official
statement on Tuesday morning,
according to Fox.
Under current charges, Blunt
could receive from two to a little
over four years in jail should he be
found guilty of involuntary
manslaughter.
Staff writers Jack Daly and
Phillip Reese contributed to
this story.
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Another I
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ECU dec
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send out su
administrati
j second bill t
i Attending

; students are
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but do not h
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� not includir
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LETTI
This letter is
opinion columt
last Thursday's
Stephen Klei
previous colu
demonstrated i
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in his latest 0
displayed his tr
as a total mon
ignorant and ins
referring to the
Kleinschmit dre





ist Carolinian
PARTY"
OR INFO!
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3 TumHrn- November 24
ML
opinion
.Tin, fut linaliniifl
eastcarolinian
AMY L.ROYSTER Editor
AMANDA G. AUSTIN Managing Editor
AMV SHERIDAN News Editor
Peter Dawyot AssistantNews Editor
NINA DRY Features Editor
EMILY'LITTLE Haad Copy Editor
MARIO SCHERHAUEER Sports Editor
1'RACY IIAIRR Assistant Sports Editor
Chris knotts Stall illustrator
Jason Feather Photo Editor
STEPHANIE WHITLOCK Ad Design Manager
JANET RESPESS Advertising Manager
BRIAN WILLIAMS Layout and Centerpiece Designer
BOBBY TUOOLI Webmester
Serving ibg tCU commomiy smce 19Zr3. the Ent Ceroliniln publishes tl.OOO copies even tuesdey end Ihursdiy The told adilonil in eich edition is the
opinion ot the meiomy of the Editorial 9oerd end is written in turn by Edilotiil Bond memberi The EM Ciiolmnn welcomes letters to the editor, limited to
KO words which miy hi edited lor decency or brevity The test Cuolmiin iiwives the rirjrit to edit or reject letters for puhlicition All litters must be snned
I etuis should be addtessed to Opinion editor .the Eest Cuolmiin Student Pubhcetions Buitdtng. ECU. Greenville. 27BSB4353 for information, call
S2mmw
oumew
Another tuition hike? As if the students of ECU do not pay enough money to go to this
school, the UNC Board of Governors approved a two percent tuition hike for all 16 North
Carolina campuses. More than 155,000 students are affected by this increase.
ECU decided to add the increase to the fall tuition instead of sending supplemental tuition
bills to students after they had already paid. At least our administration had the class not to
send out supplemental bills to collect the two percent tuition hike like UNC-Chapel Hill's
administration opted to do. Imagine paying for the spring semester and then receiving a
second bill demanding another two percent. That is just plain tacky.
Attending a university costs a pretty penny. When tuition is increased every year, more
students are deprived of a higher education, especially students from North Carolina's rural
eastern region. This tuition hike will also hinder students who wish to take a full course load
but do not have the money to be full-time students.
Consider that the average out-of-state student pays $9,000 per year to attend our university,
not including room and board. Out-of-state students will be forced to pay another $180 per
year to attend ECU. That may not seem like a large sum of money if your parents foot your
tuition bill. However, if you pay your own tuition, an extra $180 might make a serious
difference.
The UNC Board of Governors intends to use the increase to cover the costs of doing
business as a university system. While the UNC system is famous for its low tuition costs
relative to other state systems, TEC feels that increases in the wake of especially healthy years
in terms of the state's financial situation are unfortunate.
We as students need to band together to object to the constant rise in tuition every year.
Voice your opinion to the legislature that rules our school. Why are we not told about this in a
letter to each and every student who will be affected by the tuition hike? We as students need
to speak our minds to the legislators who continues to make it more financially difficult for
students to pay for their education.
; OPINION
Columnist
4

!
ar

I
1
if
a
��

i
Ryan
Kennemur
Ryan's dad speaks out
� I feel that life and death
should occur in the exact
opposite way.
A lot of people who know me well
(all three of you) ask me the same
question. "Hey Ryan-Dogg you
say. "Why don't you take the time
to let us look into your family life?
It seems like your column ideas
come from nowhere, perhaps it
would help if we knew something
about your background
Well, you asked for it! We at
your favorite newspaper are always
interested in giving the people
what they want, so instead of your
usual opinion column we are going
to let my dad give it a shot! Don't
say I didn't warn you. Heeeeeere's
Daddy!
My son Ryan comes home
every once in a while and reads me
the articles he has written for the
East Carolinian. As an alumni of
ECU, I feel that I should have
equal time to expand on what's
been on my mind for some time
now. I feel that life and death
should occur in the exact opposite
way. Let me explain.
When you die you would come
out of the ground, ride home in a
Cadillac and eat all the food your
neighbors brought over, then go
directly into retirement. You can
spend all of your time on the beach
or golf course, living on a monthly
check that the government sends
you. You would have all the
knowledge you ever need to get
you through life.
As time passes, your hearing,
eyesight, etc. will get better to help
you through your adult years. Your
children would be old enough to
look after themselves, as well as
you. You would already have
money in the bank to buy things
with, you could even pay cash for
that new house!
Years later, you would be able to
go out and act crazy and do stupid
things (note: like falling out of a
tree stand and breaking both arms!
I had to say itRyan) and everyone
would understand. Then, at the
very last minute you would be
born, in which case you would
move into this comfy little taco-
shaped condominium. You could
live in this warm little place for
eternity, and never have to be
buried in the cold ground. Sounds
good to me! Thanks for letting me
share that. Ryan's dad. We now
return you to your regularly
scheduled column, already in
progress.
Well, I hope that clears up a few
things. Now you know where I get
it from. Oh, by the way, my dad is
not really that weird. He just has a
lot of time to think since he got out
of the institution. (Sorry Dad, they
had to know.) To his credit, I feel
obligated to tell you that he is
responsible for the inventions of
the external combustion engine
and the artificial appendix.
Well, that about does it for me
this week! By the way, if you have
any questions for me or any topic
ideas, just write to
rtk0623@mail.ecu.edu. I would
appreciate the input. Have a
great Thanksgiving and save me
some turkey.
LETTER
to the Editor
Polish slur not enlightened, appreciated
This letter is in response to an
opinion column that appeared in
last Thursday's paper. The writer,
Stephen Kleinschmit, in his
previous columns has rarely
demonstrated even the slightest
indication of rational thought, and
in his latest opinion column has
displayed his true nature not only
as a total moron but also as an
ignorant and insensitive bigot. I am
referring to the poor analogy Mr.
Kleinschmit drew between himself
and "an intoxicated Polock on
stilts
In case you were unaware, Mr.
Kleinschmit, the word "Polock" is a
derogatory term for a Polish person.
Maybe this hasn't occurred to you
because "dumb Polock" jokes are
so widespread. Had you chosen a
different ethnic group as the target
of your joke, there probably would
have been a huge uproar. However,
the low percentage of people of
Polish descent on this campus does
not in any way justify your use of
derogatory terms when referring to
them. In general, you should be
more careful about who you choose
to insult by lowering them to your
subhuman level of intelligence, and
you should at least consider the
alternative to your narrow-minded
point of view before you put it in
print and have it widely distiibuted.
Jason Merrill
Senior
Philosophy
li avtNer:Wifor
ummsts
OPINION
Columnist
Stephen
Kleinschmit
Language classes hinder many
One of the main problems I
have with the foreign
language requirement is that
they require you to take four
semesters of it.
When I think of the foreign
language requirement at ECU, it
doesn't exactly embrace me as the
most essential or the most
important part of a college
education. I even had to change
my major and degree program
partially because of difficulty with
the foreign language requirement.
I can honestly tell you that the only
thing that I can recall from taking
French last semester is that French
people are snotty, inconsiderate,
are decent at making wine and
suck at fighting wars. Heck, the
day after the final exam, I couldn't
tell you what the professor's name
was, let alone the endearing
(laugh) knowledge that they
bestowed to me.
One of the main problems I
have with the foreign language
requirement is that they require
you to take four semesters of it.
And through high school and
college, I have had three different
teachers, all of which would get
discouraged because nobody gives
a flip about foreign language,
American kids are generally
isolated from foreign cultures and
are uncomfortable talking to
people from other countries,
American kids are apathetic about
world affairs, we have enough
dialects of English that are difficult
to understandYankee, Southern,
Gangsta,South Boston, etc.)
already, or if we study, we'll miss
Springer.
The other thing is that the
professors will speak only in the
foreign language the entire class.
As Busta Rhymes so eloquently
put it , what the dilly yo? I am
making an earnest attempt to learn
about a foreign language, and I am
forced to sit for an hour listening to
someone ramble on more
unintelligibly than a drunken
hyena. I don't believe that this is a
very efficientor reasonableway
to teach. For all those people who
take Math 1065, how would von
feel if the teacher came in each day
and just wrote equations on the
board all day without saying
anything? It's a rather unnerving
way to educate.
Finally, why do we need foreign
language? The only countries that
I want to go to are Canada, Ireland,
Great Britain and AustraliaThey
all speak English there. The only
non-English speaking country that
I would go to would be Germany.
And I am sure that 1 will be a
proficient translator with my three
hours of instruction a week
(sarcasm).
The United States is the only
country in the world that doesn't
use the metric system, and we can
really care less about soccer. We are
used to doing things our way.
When we step up to the plate, the
world cowers in fear. It's the
American way. And that's why if
we don't want to screw up our
GPA's by taking difficult and
unimportant foreign language
courses, then we shouldn't have to.
Maybe we could instead require
courses in idiotic musical landmark
design, and how to finance the
exponentially increasing cost of a
parking sticker.
OPINION
Columnist
Britt
Honeycutt
Well-rounded education the point
Although I hate it, the point
of a foreign language
requirement is abundantly
clear. It broadens your
mind.
I hate it. You hate it. I lell, most of
the professors hate it. The foreign
language requirement will most
likely be the sole cause of my
staying at ECU an extra semester,
and is in general the bane of my
existence. Many of us will may
never leave USA, so why learn to
speak Spanish, French or
German?
Well, why not? To start with,
ECU is just that. A University. It is
not a trade school where we come
to learn a skill and immediately go
apply it in a trade. We are a liberal
arts college, and we are here to be
educated. In the old days (the ones
your grandparents talk about;
when they had to walk 30 miles
through the snow to get to college,
uphill both ways) an education was
not considered complete without a
stint overseas. Now it seems we arc
just here to get our diplomas and
head straight to an office to sit on
our hind parts all day and stare into
the face of a computer. Our only
joy, playing Naked Tetris when the
boss is out.
Although I hate it, the point of
the foreign language requirement
is abundantly clear. It broadens
your mind. So you may never visit
Zimbabwe. But knowing the
language there at least makes it
feasible that you could do so.
Different languages require
different thought patterns. Your
brain has to work differently to
process Spanish than it does to
process English. By introducing
new thought patterns, your mind
expands its capabilities. So the
reasons for keeping the language
requirement thus far are pretty
obvious.
What I don't understand is
why some majors don't have it.
Ones that you would think could
really utilize a language capability
seem to completely neglect it, like
the theater major. You know those
guys could use it as much as
anybody else. Why are they
exempt?
So maybe universities are
becoming less a place to be
educated and more a place to leam
a trade. Maybe the language
requirement is on its way out. But
truly educated people have an
understanding of other cultures
and people, that's why we have
social science requirements.
Learning another culture's,
language is an eye-opening
experience. It gives you insight
into the way they think and relate
to each other, and that insight
contributes to your understanding
of the way that the world works. It
makes you a more complete
individual.
Even though I feel that the
foreign language requirement
screwed me in several ways, I'm
glad it's there. I'll appreciate
knowing how speak Spanish one
day. Maybe not today. Maybe not
tomorrow, or the next day, or the
next, but someday. Hasta luego,
mis amigos.
Correction
In the Nov. 19 edition oTEC we neglected to include the name of the author of a letter to the
editor entitled "Artists ask due credit for work The mistake was especially ironic considering the
context of the letter. We sincerely apologize to Mr. Lee Howard and consider this a learning
opportunity for our staff.
(





ACROSS
1 In fawx i J
-1 Parasitic
arachnid
8 Afford
opponunity
14 Atmosphere
15 Gumbo
ingrodlonl
16 iroqums taagua
tribe
i7 aiaiinclive fabric
patterns
19 Eurasian plum
20 Coral isle
21 At the ready
23 Ecconlrlc piece
24 Hawaiian Island
25 Uttle piggy
28 Follow closely
?9 Or a ol Giants
31 Much removed
33 Leg joint
34 Nova
37 Looee tat
39 Lemon drink
40 Dangling
ornaments
42 Makeshift ,
44 Business abbr
46 Compute' input
47 Arrive on Hinge
48 Vox
50 Avoided defeat
51 Use elbow
grease
52 1990-92 French
Open winner
S4 Sltange
56 Lathers
80 Floral neckwear
61exceienca
62 Anwar ol Egypt
63 Beaver or
dog, at ttmos
DOWN
1 Ol the Valicon
2 I ar 1st
3 Halted hunter ol
me sky
4 Soothed
5 Eljwnhowar lo
cronies
6 Secret meeting
7 Oecreoso
8 Escape vehicle
9 Make a law
10 Commont
11 Hun poorly
t? Manwgo vow
13 Khaki shade
18 Biases
?? Slug ducks
27 , of Lebanon
28 Holds on to
30 S. Dey TV
series
32 EslimaiO'
34 Mixes up
35 Waiercraft
36 Swing to and frc
38 Free Turn
41 Biownatone
enlranco
43 J.F.Kannedy's
vessel
46 Allogretlo-
adagio
separator
49 Margin for orror
53 Blockade
55 Not look
forward lo
5 Mexican
sayonara
58 Ctly watt of
Venice
59 Sovere
63 Sticky
substance
64 Essence
65 Crimson or
senrtnt. e.g.
67 Chopping loot
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5 Tuesday, Novemb
Many sit
digs no
Dan i
COSTR
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ofcheanthropol
programs that i
log
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r P
days
seme
school digs hav
will alternate bi
ology, which is i
Charles Ewen, a
gy, which is con
Daniel. At pres
ty graduate stud
"We hope t
"The classes arc
During the
1W8, students
school conducte
John Byrd in
Forest. Under
students workin
the opportunity
which, on this
historic and pre!
The first site
toric shell midc
Americans. As!
an ancient trash
shells are the 1
ncnt of such a n
are often many
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occasionally plar
are very revealir
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sites situated alo
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Another site
EC
help
Mentoringi
consists of3i
Nina M.
Ik 1 TUBES
The Fmerald city i
for ECU and the Pi
people do not realii
munity that consist
the area. One univi
tion does recognize
cs out to give back
East Carolina F
brother big sister
gram that pairs chi
area (known as "littl
an ECU student (k
friend").
The organizatii
lished about 13 ye
Linda Mooney, a i
sociology departmei
"A student came
of my classes and
were any child men
in the area Mooni
weren't any so I pi
and it has turned ou





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5 Tuesday, November 24, 1
998
f pa r i i rps
The Eait Carolinian
Digging iip the past
yl?y summer semester
digs now established
Daniki. Kktcii I l
CONTRIBUTING WRITER
The archaeology program at ECU is part
of the anthropology department's triad of
programs that include archaeology, bio-
� logical anthropology and
H cultural anthropology.
JM The anthropology
' department's archaeology
H program is flourishing these
days as a pattern of summer
semester archaeology field-
school digs have been established that
will alternate between historical archae-
ology, which is under the direction of Dr.
Charles Ewen, and prehistoric archaeolo-
gy, which is conducted by Dr. Randolph
Daniel. At present, there are over twen-
ty graduate students in the program.
"We hope to expand Ewen said.
"The classes are packed
During the first summer session of
1W8, students participated in a field
school conducted by Dr. Daniel and Dr.
John Byrd in the Croatan National
Forest. Undergraduates and graduate
students working on his or her thesis had
the opportunity to work at several sites
which, on this occasion, included both
historic and prehistoric remains.
The first site excavated was a prehis-
toric shell midden left by local Native
Americans. A shell midden is essentially
an ancient trash heap. While, obviously,
shells are the largest compo-
nent of such a midden, there
are often many other things .
to find such as projectile
points, pottery shards and
occasionally plant and bone remains, that
are very revealing about the lifestyles of
the first inhabitants of North Carolina.
One of the reasons that this dig was
conducted was the concern expressed by
the Forest Service that some suspected
sites situated alongside rivers might have
been damaged by the hurricanes we have
experienced in recent years, which can
erode the shoreline and thus might dis-
turb or even destroy remains.
Another site examined by the stu-
� �
Many interesting artifacts are discovered in the surrounding areas by ECU's Archaeology Dept.
All PHOTOS 8T MAKC CMWfH
dents was a suspected civil war
blockhouse which was held alter-
nately iff the Confederacy and then
by the Union, and was thought to
have been built to guard a section of
railway line. This site serves to point
out that archaeology is not just "fortune
and glory" but rather a hard, sweaty pro-
fession that demands a great deal physi-
cally and mentally from its practitioners.
Here, before any surface collecting or
digging could even begin, the land had to
be cleared of both large and small trees,
underbrush and vines. After an
incident with a chainsaw, it was
decided that the trees would have
to be cleared the old fashioned
way: with axes. Even when this
was accomplished, there remained
the even more difficult task of cutting
though the endless tree roots filling any
spot where digging was thought best.
Several other sites were also exam-
ined to greater or lesser degrees, depend-
ing on what a preliminary survey
revealed (and on available man-power
and time).
As one might imagine, one of the
results of this yearly frenzy of activity is
a sizable collection of artifacts gathered
from many different sites.
All of this material is presently to be
found stored in the Archaeology Lab,
which is located in the same building
housing Financial Aid, just beyond the
inner courtyard and up the stairs.
While Ewen says that students and
other groups are permitted to visit the
lab and see the artifacts "on an appoint-
ment basis"(interested parties should
contact Ewen if they wish to do this)
there has been some discussion
of the possibility of creating
. a museum to display sonic
fe of the materials the lab con-
l& tains.
A proposal to that effect
was drafted last year, but it has not yet
been acted on.
"It's just a matter of space and fund-
ing Ewen said. "I don't think anyone
is really opposed to it
Aside from the North Carolina his-
toric and prehistoric sites contain-
ing "some very interesting things
Ewen points out that the lab also
has artifacts from the
Mediterranean, including some of
Greek and Roman origin. There
are also pieces from Mesoamerica
as well as masks from Mexico.
In addition, members of other
departments are also interested in
the idea of a museum. In
L i letter, Dr. Runyan,
Director of the pro-
wf gram in Maritime
History and Nautical
Archaeology, expressed his sup-
port of the idea. He pointed out
during an interview that in March of
1999 an exhibit of some of the arti-
facts recovered from the ship suspected
of being Blackbeard's Queen Ann's
Revenge will be on display in the North
Carolina Collection of the Joyner
Library.
In the future, if a museum is created,
such displays can take place there. Thfe
library has a collection of materials in rJB�,
University Archives that could be placer
in a museum, including many items from
the early years of ECU.
Ewen mentioned funding is perhaps
the primary obstacle to building a muse-
um on campus since it will need, aniong
other things, a core full time staff. The
solution, Dr. Runyan suggests, is the cre-
ation of a Board of Trustees who will
be responsible for raising the
necessary funds.
ECU Friends reach out to Volunteer work makes impact
help children in community on future job prospects
Mentoring program
consists of 35 members
Nina M. Dry
f'e ifiJRts tin run
The Emerald city is widely known
for ECU and the Pirates, but many
people do not realize the vast com-
munity that consists of children in
the area. One university organiza-
tion does recognize this and reach-
es out to give back to the kids.
East Carolina Friends is a big
brother big sister mentoring pro-
gram that pairs children from the
area (known as "little friends") with
an ECU student (known as a "big
friend").
The organization was estab-
lished about 13 years ago by Dr.
Linda Mooney, a professor in the
sociology department.
"A student came up to mc in one
of my classes and asked if there
were any child mentoring programs
in the area Mooney said. "There
weren't any so I put one together
and it has turned out to be very suc-
Student helpers always
in high demand
V. K 1C A S1 K ES
S f I- WRI'I-fiH
Area children are often helped by members of ECU Friends as big sisters and brothers.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU FRIENDS
cessful
According to Jamie Ellis, presi-
dent of East Carolina Friends, there
are currently about 35 members
involved in the organization who
are a friend to children between the
ages of six and 12 who need a little
bit more attention in their lives.
"We send applications to local
elementary schools and the coun-
selors, parents, or the child fills it
out Ellis said. "Once they are
returned to us, we match the chil-
dren up with the ability of the
friend and the need of the child
As a whole, East Carolina
Friends plan many activities for all
the "little friends" involved in the
organization such as Christmas par-
ties, end of the year parties, and,
just recently, their Halloween
party.
"The Halloween party
rockedsaid Mike Caston, an ECU
big friend. "All of the kids were a
lot of fun and they filled mc with a
lot of love. I just wanted to give
each one of them a big hug
Besides these activities, the big
SEE FRIENDS. PAGE I
It seems that students are constant-
ly encouraged to participate in vari-
ous campus activities. Everywhere
you go, there are fliers and adver-
tisements for internships, jobs, vol-
unteer activities and other benefi-
cial programs for students. Look at
any bulletin board and you will sec
the constant demand for student
volunteers and workers.
Everyone tries to plan ahead
while in college and those who are
successful at this are more likely to
succeed later on in life. Getting
involved allows the student to grow
socially and achieve a sense of inde-
pendence, self-confidence and
responsibility.
When seniors walk across the
stage and into the work force,
employers are impressed with
someone who has shown some
SEE VOLUNTEER PAGE 6
How will getting a job while in school andor
participating in different service activities
benefit students in the future?
�"Perhaps the main, pragmatic reason students take
jobs is to strengthen their vitas, but one hidden
advantage is that it allows students to keep a foot in the
'real world"
-Johnathan Bascom-Associate Professor in
Geography
� "It will help you develop good time management
skills that will be beneficial in the workforce
-Lindy Hemming-Resident advisor, Tyler Hall
�"It helps build responsibility and secure financial
standings"
-Crystal Hardison-student
� I believe that it shows that you can be responsible
and it gives you experience with public relations to
use in the future
-anonymous student
�"It will benefit me by getting work experience while
in college and I can make money to help myself through
college
-anonymous student
� "It will show that you are responsible and thai
can hold a job down and excel in school at
t ime

.1
;ra





6 Tuesday, Novtmtw 24. 1998
features
The East Carolinian
I
Volunteer
continued from page 5
level of responsibility. Being
involved shows that you are respon-
sible enough to handle the daily
stresses of college life and are more
than qualified to handle a full time
job. Having this positive level of
responsibility allows the student to
build an attractive resume. Some
things that are attractive on a
resume are leadership positions and
involvement in non-profit organiza-
tions.
When a student can be selfless
iftd give his or her time and talents
rjbey are admired by most adults
4tho have lost faith in the younger
generations.
Bobby Burns of The Daily
Reflector feels as an employer that
someone who has internships and
experience is more likely to get
hired than someone with little
experience.
"Drive and enthusiasm gets the
job Burns said.
According to Dr. Jim
Westmoreland, Director of Career
Services, in any interview the per-
son who has service experience has
actual examples of how they devel-
op his or her communication skills.
Employers look for people who can
talk about examples of things that
they have done. Someone who has
been an intern at a hospital while in
college will be more likely to be
hired than someone with no hands-
on experience.
Getting involved will strengthen
resumes, communities and your
own individuality. So, if you're not
involved with at least one extra-cur-
ricular activity, get involved with
something! The world needs more
responsible, selfless human beings.
Friends
continued from page 5
friends and little friends do things
on their own.
"The relationship between the
big friend and hisher little friend in
a one on one thing Ellis said.
"With the consent of the child's
parent, they can do whatever they
want.
"Being apart of the East
Carolina Friends is definitely a
rewarding experience said Stacey
Pinney, an ECU freshman. "You're
not only a role model to your 'little
friend but you're also a friend to
them, someone they can have a lot
of fun with
To join the East Carolina
Friends one must meet a few crite-
ria. There is an application , three
reference forms, and a contract and
pledge that needs to be filled out.
"The contract states that the
applicant will stay with the organi-
zation for at least a year, will spend
at least two hours a week with
hisher little friend, and attend all of
the parties
Also applicants must have a 2.0
GPA, pay a five dollar due for the
whole year and, if you are planning
to use your car as a mode of trans-
portation for you and your little
friend, a copy of your driving record
and insurance information is need-
ed.
"We will be accepting applica-
tions again in January for those
interested in becoming an East
Carolina friend Ellis said.
All students are welcome to join
this organization, but as a first
semester freshmen, you can not
receive a little friend until your sec-
ond semester.
"First semester freshmen do not
receive a child right away Ellis
said. "They participate in the activ-
ity set up and make sure everything
is running smoothly at the events
"Everyone's making a differ-1
ence in these children's lives
Pinney said. "That's what we're all
in it for. Making a difference is
what it is all about
If you have any questions or are I
interested in joining the East
Carolina Friends organization,
call Linda Mooney at 328-61371
or Jamie Ellis at 328-7797 for
more information.
"Yea, Buffy, I totally can't
believe they really printed
my letter to the editor
"Like, I heard they want to
publish yours too
All letters to the Editor must be
typed, 250 words or less. Must
nclude your name, major, year, an
phone . Send to.
East Carolina University
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East Carolinian
hey want to
irs too
ditor must be
or less. Musi
najor, year, and
end to.
SERVE
IET0PS.
ILLE
Ml &
SES
ieed
to help
criteria
sts.
iking Ages 18-40 I2I7-S:30am
es
king Ages 18-50
ing
'stmas
Chorale
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Choirs
Tuesday, November 24, 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
Football team wins
season finale, 34-31
Humanitarian Bowl
bid still possible
Travis B rk.i.ei
SENIOR v H I l l li
For the second week in a row,
records fell during ECU's football
game, but while Louisville's Chris
Redmond did most of the record
breaking last week, this time it was
Pirate freshman David Garrard.
Garrard completed 33 of 44
passes for a school record of 414
yards as ECU rallied to beat
Memphis 34-31. With the win,
ECU finishes the fourth winning
campaign in the last five years with
a 6-5 overall record.
Carrard's passing total broke
Marcus Crandell's mark of 392
yards, set againsi Syracuse iii 1995.
Garrard threw three touchdowns
without an interception and fin-
ished with the highest single sea-
Ison accuracy total in K( :l' history
fat 61.9 percent.
Despite Garrard's impressive
play this season, head coach Steve
Logan said Garrard has played
more than he planned.
"Quite honestly, he's played
more than 1 wanted him to and
he's shouldered more than I want-
ed him to Logan said. "It's a
long, long season for a freshman
and we see it happen every year to
them. Around the 7th, 8th and 9th
games, we see freshmen all the
time that just swoon on you.
"David has been good along
those lines. I Ic hasn't had much of
that. I think Hobby Weaver early
in the season prevented him from
having to take all of it
The team's leading receiver,
Troy Smith, did not play because
of a knee sprain suffered againsr
Louisville. Injuries also hampered
junior flanker LaNlonr Chappell,
who played sparingly because of a
sore hamstring. Nine different
Pirates caught passes on Saturday,
led by seniors J.J. McQueen and

�alB? bh aM'aH aM.ikTrj
ECUMEMPHIS
Score3431
First Downs2815
Rushes-Yards46-14439-189
Passing Yards414226
Sacks-Yards7-380-0
Fumbles-lost2-21-1
Penalties4-494-36
Time of Possession35:2724:33
Source: ECU Sports Information Department
Buck Collins. Two of McQueen's
six receptions went for touch-
downs while Collins added five
catches for 94 yards and a score.
Saturday's victory kept ECU's
slim bowl hopes alive. If Southern
"I'vegot to go to the Senior
Bowl and the EastWest game
to show that I can match up
with everybody else in the
country. Whatever
happens after that, happens.
I'm waiting for it
Rod Coleman
Senior Linebacker
Miss is invited to the Music City
Bowl, it would open Conference
USA's spot in the Humanitarian
Bowl for the Pirates.
An ECU bowl bid seemed
highly unlikely in the first half on
Saturday as Memphis jumped out
to a 24-7 lead. ECU battled back,
cutting the deficit to three on
Jamie Wilson's one yard touch-
down run before halftime.
After a scoreless third quarter
that saw both teams turn the ball
twice, ECU finally took the lead
28-24 on McQueen's second
touchdown catch of the day.
Memphis then regained the lead
31-28. ECU appeared to retake
the lead on its next drive as
Garrard found Chappell in the end
zone on third and goal from the
one. The referees ruled that
Chappell bobbled the ball, forcing
ECU to tie the game with an 18
yard field goal. Television replays
showed that the ball never hit the
ground and that the play should
have been ruled as a touchdown.
The Pirate defense stiffened on
Memphis' final drive, forcing the
Tigers to punt. Garrard led ECU
on a 73 yard final drive, which cul-
minated in Andrew Bayes' game-
winning, 41 yard field goal. Only
seven seconds remained in the
game.
Although he didn't get a sack
on Saturday, senior linebacker Rod
Coleman finished his career as
ECU's all-time sack leader with 39.
Coleman says he hopes to extend
his playing career to the NFL.
"I've got to go to the Senior
Bowl and the EastWest game to
show that I can match up with
everybody else in the country
Coleman said. "Whatever
happens after that, happens. I'm
waiting for it
Pirates lose to William & Mary
Volleyballers end season
with first-round defeat
Stephen S c h r a m m
SENIOR WRITER
The ECU women's volleyball team
finished the season with a loss of 0-
3 to William & Mary in the first
round of the CAA Tournament on
Friday night in Minges Coliseum.
After taking a slight lead in the
fitst game, the Pirates lost the game
15-11. The Tribe took the second
gamel5-13. In the third, the Pirates
bolted to an early 4-0 lead but were
steadily overtaken by the Tribe
who went on to complete the three
game sweep by a score of 15-13
Michelle Clayton
ot tne oest uirowcrs in tne country,
h Charles Justice said. "She is a hard
1 all the tlr oar kids to
Sophomore Alphons van lerland of the men's
basketball team was chosen as one of golf coach
ith a
said. "I think he will
c influence on the team this year
a forward on the women's soccer team , Kim
Sandhoff holds the ECU single season sc
record and is second in career points and
Sandhoff was nominated for I md leadcr-
uhin ninliti,
Justin En junior on the me
country7 team and holds the ECU home course
nd has been successful
it Men's cross-country
Len Klepack feels that England is a good
example for other students.
"He has an attitude and willingness to promote
the team and good academic standards Klepack
1 Ic has the hard working qualities every ath-
Still adding to the list, Troy Smith is a wide
receiver for the Pirate football team and a senior at
Smith is the all-time leading receiver at
md originally from the Greenville area. He
was nominated for his individual performance and
positive attitude.
"He is the best wide receiver 1 have ever
coached head football coach Steve lxgan said.
"Troy is the best spirited petson everyday he
comes to pra
Justin England
Alphons Van Ireland
Smith
other ECU teams
coach Dee
on the field. ,
"I think
potential Gibson
the team all
�������H� ; �
I Aig-on and place your vote for
one of the five athletes above at:
www.studentmedia.ecu.edupoIl
Votes accepted until Dec. 5
"We played better in our
defense to offense transition head
coach Kim Walker said. "We out
dug one of the best defensive-
teams in the conference, but just
came up short. It's a disappointing
loss
Inexpctience is a problem the
Pirates have dealt with all season.
Five of the six Pirate statters on
Friday night wete freshmen or
sophomores.
"It was a learning, maturing
experience for us tonight Walker
said. "We stepped on the floor this
year and looked like a bunch of
freshmen and sophomores playing.
Tonight we looked like a bunch of
experienced freshmen and sopho-
mores playing. At one point I had
three freshmen on the floot
The loss gives valuable knowl-
Captain Shannon Kaess on a block in the first-round defeat against W 6 M Friday night.
PHOTO BY MARIO SCHERHAUFER
Volleyball Stats
Mayer
:Wls
Shannon Kaess
jgnta.aafD
-Staci Pieasant
LuCtnda Mason
bets
i
2
13
Digs
6
5
10
:vsmmmti
39
Liz Hall
Whitney Brawner
Sarah Kary
Christie Walter
Cartssa Sbmtdt
10
0
o
0
edge and inspiration to the young
Pirate squad that they can take with
them into the next season.
"I'm proud of the way we
played sophomore Cinta Claro
said. "It's unfortunate how we fin-
ished, but I think that today wc
learned a lot and that will hopefully
transfer into next season
The Pirates finished their sea-
son with a record of 10-18.
According to Walker, the record was
not reflective of the Pirates' effort
this season.
"The only thing I'm truly disap-
pointed with this season is our
record Walker said. "That's how
we're measured. That's our society,
and we're measured by our wins
and losses
Despite their losing record, the
Pirates do not view the entire sea-
son as a disappointment.
"I enjoyed the season as
being a freshman and coming
in and play Staci Pleasant
said. "It was fun, and I hope it
gets better
Next season, all of the cur-
rent team members will return
to the Pirates. With the experi-
ence gained this season, the
team should improve in 1999.
"We need to focus on get-
ting strong in the weight room,
going into spring season, get-
ting bettct individually, and
getting better as a team
Walker said. "I told them
tonight that there will be no
more seasons of 'OK, we have
next year This is the last year
we are going to say that here
Basketball;
gets first
win of yeafi
Pirates facing SW
Louisiana tonight
Source; ECU Sports Information Department
Jonathan Russell
s 1 I I � R I I E R
The Pirates won for the first time
this season on Saturday at
Campbell University. Evaldas
Joeys scored 15 points and reserve
Steven Branch grabbed KJ
rebounds. ECU also shot 68 per
cent from the floor in the second
half to pull away from Campbell
7749.
"We came out and played really
hard tonight head coach Joe
Dooley said. "I'm pleased with the
effort that we got and it feels good
to get our first win of the season
The Pirates (1-1) led 32-25 at;
intermission and outscored
Campbell 24-5 over the first 9:17 of
the second half to put the game
away. ECU starters Neil Punt,
Alphons van lerland and Garrett
Blackwelder all scored 10 pointes
each.
SEE BASKETBALL PAGE S





8 Tytriiy, Novtmbir 24, 1998
I
sports
Th� Eiit Ciroliniin
Lady Pirates
face busy break
Frenchman shocks field to win men's slalom
Women's basketball
hopes to continue wins
Jason Latoir
senior writer
The ECU women's basketball
team's season hits full stride over
Thanksgiving break as the Lady
Pirates are scheduled to play three
games in the span of the week.
They are hoping to continue the
strong play which led them to a 64-
43 road win over Campbell last
Monday.
The team travels to Charlotte
early this week to take on in-state
foe UNC Charlotte on Monday,
Nov. 24, at 7 p.m. The game will
be a home-coming for ECU head
coach Dee Gibson, who played at
UNCC from 199193 under cur-
rent 49ers head coach Ed Baldwin.
The Lady Pirates are hoping to
continue to receive production
from key players, including junior
transfer Waynetta Veney, who
helped ECU with 19 points against
Campbell, and freshman Teana
McKiver, who lead the team with 5
blocks. UNCC is lead by returning
guard senior Nikki Richardson,
who averaged 13 points per game
last season, and junior Shemika
Turner.
The Lady Pirates will then trav-
el to Fairfield, CT to participate in
the Fairfield University Warner
Classic. ECU will face the tourna-
ment host Fairfield Stags in the
first game of the tournament on
Friday, Nov. 27th, at 5 p.m. Based
upon the results of the first game,
the Lady Pirates will either face
the winner of the tournaments'
other game, Wake Forest vs.
Fairleigh Dickinson, in the cham-
pionship or will play the loser in
the consolation game. Both the
championship and consolation
game will be held on Nov. 28th.
The tournament presents ECU
with it's first-ever match up with
Fairfeld, while the Lady Pirates
hold a 4-1 series lead over Fairleigh
Dickinson and a 4-2 series lead
over Wake Forest.
The possible match-up with
Wake Forest could pit ECU assis-
tant coach Jennifer Mitchell up
against her alma mater. Mitchell
was an outstanding member of
Wake Forests' womens basketball
team before graduating in 1991.
PARK CITY, Utah (AP) Pierrick
Bourgeat will probably wake up
with a sore dialing finger. But it's
not every day you get to call home
to France and share a first World
Cup victory with family and
friends.
The 22-ycar-oId Bourgeat didn't
figure to be spending so much time
chatting on the phone after
Saturday's first run of a men's
slalom. Blinded by a snowstorm
and stunned when he hit himself in
the chin with a ski pole, he stag-
gered to a 14th-place finish.
Visibility returned for the after-
noon run and, despite huge ruts at
some of the gates, Bourgeat took
full advantage.
"It's the perfect kind of condi-
tions for me, when I have to fight
' Bourgeat said. "In conditions like
these, I have to ski my best
Bourgeat, whose best previous
performance was a second last year,
made up over two seconds on the
field in the afternoon run, thanks in
large part to his skill at maneuver-
ing through ruts that tossed his
competition like rag dolls.
"I don't like these conditions,
but I still skied very hard said
Bourgeat, who was so overcome by
his victory he kept forgetting words
in English, a language he speaks
well. "On my second run, I decid-
ed I must rake chances.
"It's great, it's wonderful, it's
magnificentl"
It was the first French slalom
victory since a 19 triumph by
Sebastian Amiez, who settled for
sixth on Sunday. Bourgeat had a
second run of 51.19 seconds.
Basketball
continued from page 7
Jaimie Simmons led the fight-
ing Camels (0-3) with 13 points,
making nine of 10 shots from the
foul line. Campbell shot only 31
percent (14 of 35) for the game.
The Pirates are back in action at
home on Tuesday, Nov. 24, against
Southwestern Louisiana (0-1),
where they will try for their first
home victory of the season.
Southwestern lost their to
Southern Mississippi 57-51 in their
last game and is also hoping to win.
The teams have met twice in the
past two seasons, and the Pirates
won both times. USL will be led
by guard David Patrick and for-
ward Reginald Poole, who both
average 12 points and four
rebounds per game.
"Southwestern Louisiana will
bring in a good team Tuesday
Dooley said. "We'll need to come
out ready to play and hopefully
we'll get the win Tip-off is set for
7 p.m. in Williams Arena at Minges
Coliseum.
"I was really motivated for the
second run. I didn't think I could
win; I was aiming at a top-8 result
Bourgeat said.
Bourgeat completed two runs in
1 minute, 43.34 seconds, a healthy
.44 seconds faster than Norway's
Olympic champion, Hans-Petter
Buraas, who led the Frenchman by
1.67 seconds after a morning ses-
sion run during a snowstorm.
Although blue skies reappeared
for the second run, an army of
course workers was unable to
sweep away the snow cover, and
the racers soon built that loose
snow into huge ruts, particularly on
the gates midway down the steep
portion of the Clementine layout.
Austria's Christian Mayer, who
would claim third in 1:44.02, said
he didn't ski his best.
"But this is a very tough course
under these conditions Mayer
said. "I'm very excited about this
weekend because I'm skiing very
well
Mayer, second in Friday's giant
slalom, parlayed his two-podium
weekend into the lead in the World
Cup overall standings. He has 190
points to 180 for teammate Stefan
Eberharter, who doesn't ski slalom.
Mayer had just finished when
the five heavy hitters from the first
run, four Norwegians and a
Slovenian, lined up to try their
luck.
Each charged from the gate,
each handled the top gates well,
but each was jostled from gate to
gate midway down the steeps.
Slovenia's Jure Kosir, second in the
morning, almost came to a halt
after crashing into one of the ruts, a
collision that helped drop him to
12th.
Buraas came closest to master-
ing the mid-steep minefield,
although he couldn't approach
Burgcat's time. Kjetil Andre
Aamodt, a close fifth in the morn-
ing, dropped to a tie for ninth and
teammate Ole Kristian Furuseth
went from fourth to 16th.
50 YEAR ANNIVERSARY

Southern Miss to Humanitarian Bowl
RENO, Nev. (AP) Playing on a
blue football field in Idaho appears
to be in Southern Mississippi's
future. Lee Roberts passed for 344
yards and three touchdowns
Saturday, breaking Favre's season
yardage record and tying his record
of 52 career touchdown passes, in a
55-28 win over Nevada that may
have clinched a berth to the
Humanitarian Bowl.
Southern Miss (7-4, 5-1 in
Conference USA), apparently has
wrapped up a bid to the bowl game
at Boise, Idaho, but the Golden
Eagles are hoping for a better invi-
tation after winning six of its last
seven.
"We'll be happy to go to the
Humanitarian Bowl if that's what
happens said Southern Miss ath-
letic director Bill McLellan. "But it
would be nice to go to somewhere
closer so more of our fans could go
to the game
But after breaking one of Brett
Favre's records, Roberts says he
will be happy to have the chance to
lead the Golden Eagles to any bowl
game after a 1-3 start.
"It's really good to be mentioned
in the same sentence with Brett
Favre. He did great things at
Southern Miss and has made a
name for himself in the NFL
Roberts said.
"Next season, somebody could
tome along and break it. What peo-
ple are going to look back on and
remember about meis that he led
his team to a 7-4 record and to a
bowl game
Freshman Derrick Nix ran for
219 yards and two touchdowns and
Todd Pinkston caught 12 passes for
203 yards, including a 14-yard TD
pass from Roberts.
Roberts completed 22-of-37
attempts, leading Southern Miss to
a 27-0 lead before Nevada's Chris
Lemon ran 5 yards for a touchdown
just before the half.
In the second half, Roberts
threw touchdowns of 10 yards to
Sherrod Gideon and 9 to Eddie
Shaw to tie Favre's career TD pass-
ing mark. His 344 passing yards
Saturday gave him 2,780 for the
season, surpassing the mark of
2,588 Favre set in 1989.
"I've never seen Lee sharper
said USM coach Jeff Bower. "He
was really on target and making
good throws. We were really play-
ing well offensively and moving the
ball
Linebacker Brian Bell recovered
a fumble in the end zone and
DeQuincy Scott got a school-record
46th career sack for the Golden
Eagles defense that shut down the
nation's fifth-ranked offense most
of the game.
David Ncill, who set an NCAA
freshman record with 611 yards
passing in a single game for Nevada
this year, passed for 280 yards,
including touchdown passes in the
second half to Trevor Insiey of 13,
20 and 31 yards.
But Southern Miss' pass rush
kept him off balance much of the
game and he ended up scrambling
to become Nevada's leading rusher
on the day with 122 yards.
McLellan said he hopes
Saturday's win can give Southern
Miss more bowl options. At-large
berths to the Music City Bowl in
Nashville, the Jeep Aloha Bowl in
Honolulu and the Las Vegas Bowl
still remain.
Seafood &
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� Hamburger Steak Plate $3.95
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� Shrimp & Deviled Crab $4.95
� Shrimp & Crab Cake $4.95
All of above served with choice of
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Slaw, String Beans or Applesauce.
Peck of Steamed Oysters
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Each Unit Has a Patio or Balcony
Pets Allowed with Pet Fee
All Apartments Just 5 Blocks
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1 Block from ECU Bus route
24hr Emergency
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Wesley Commons South
OneTwo Bedroom Units
1 bath
Free Water and Sewer
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Wall AC Unit in 1 Bdrms
RefrigeratorStove
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On Site Laundry Facilities
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tance to EC
5005.





hi Ent Ciroliniin
ilom
his two-podium
lead in the World
mgs. He has 190
eammate Stefan
oesn't ski slalom,
t finished when
ers from the first
egians and a
up to try their
from the gate,
top gates well,
led from gate to
wn the steeps,
sir, second in the
came to a halt
one of the ruts, a
cd drop him to
losest to mastcr-
eep minefield,
uldn't approach
Kjetil Andre
ifth in the morn-
tie for ninth and
Tistian Furuseth
to 16th.
Y Specials
(3.95
4.95
.95
4.95
5
toice of
Tench Fries,
esauce.
ysters
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shrimp
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om Units
1 bath
r and Sewer
! Heat & Air
Dishwasher
eratorStove
er Hook Ups
Mini-Blinds
sdbolt Locks
) or Balcony
with Pet Fee
lust 5 Blocks
:CU Campus
:U Bus route
r Emergency
ance Service

immi
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UVW0M0M

9 Tuesday, November 24, 19S8
FOR RENT
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$285month. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apts 125 Avery St. in Green-
ville - 5 blocks from campus. 758-
6596.
CANNON COURT Two bedroom, 1
12 bath townhouse. Includes stove,
refrigerator, dishwasher, washerdry-
er hook-up, on ECU bus route. Call
Wainright Property Management
ILC, 756-6209-
2 BEDROOM, 1 bath. WD includ-
ed. No pets allowed. Walking dis-
tance to ECU campus. Call 758-
5005.
TWIN OAKS end unit, 3 bedrooms.
2 12 baths, gas logs. Available Jan.
1. $650 month. Call 756-5177. De-
posit required.
FURNISHED 2 bedroom apt. Quiet
area close to ECU. Call for more de-
tails, 758:5p05,
2 BR. Apt. available above Percola-
tor Jan. 1st. $500 a month. 2-2 BR.
apts. available above Catalog Con-
nection, Jan. 1st-$475 & $550 a
month. 3 BR. apt. available January
1st above BW 3's. $850 a month.
Please call 758-2616, ask for Yvonne.
NEEDED: TWO people to take over
lease $510month, 2 bdrm 2 bath,
washerdryer, dishwasher, 1 12
blocks from ECU. JanMay (Avail-
able Dec. 19 free). 757-3913
GLADIOLUS GARDENS One, two,
and three bedroom apartments. Free
cable. Located on 10th Street. Call
Wainright Property Management
LLC 756-6209.
$395 A month Two bedroom du-
plex. Quiet neighborhood. Wash-
erdryer hook-up. Call day, 551-7810;
night 321-2329.
WANTED: MALE or female room-
mate to share 2 bedroom apt walk-
ing distance from campus, upper-
classman, non-smoker preferred.
$225 a month plus 12 utilities. No
pets. Call John 757-0610.
2 BEDROOM. 1 bath. Spacious. 2
blocks from ECU campus. No pets
allowed. For more info, call Dog-
wood Holfow Apts. @ 752-8900.
FOR SALE
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom, 1 bath apartment
off 1st Street, from JanMay. Perfect
for students not attending summer
school! Dishwasher, air, WD con-
nections. $187.50 plus 12 electric.
12 phone. Free water, sewer, basic
cable. Smokers OK. Call Sallie, 329-
7235.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to sublease
room in duplex. Walking distance
from ECU and on bus route. Security
deposit is paid for! No pets! Call JC
or Kelly at 551-3424.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
sublease a two bedroom apt. in Tar
River. Please call 561-8385.
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE
needed to share 3 bedroom duplex
in Wyndham Cir. Call ASAP. 830-
2003.
ONE ROOM available for sublease
$240 per month plus 14 utilities.
No deposit. 757-3647
FOR SALE
SUPER ENTERTAINMENT System
(Sony digital Dolby Prologic system
receiver, 26 cartridges Pioneer CD
player. Sony 5-disk CD changer, dual
cassette tape player, Bose 301
speakers (4), JBL rear speakers, sub-
woffer; Sony 27" Surround Sound
TV); 3 Hi Fi VCRs; Furniture - couch
& chair, bookshelves, dining table,
queen & full size bed (new), many
other items. 321-3242, leave mes-
sage if no answer.
SLEEPER SOFA for sale. Asking
$40. Good condition. Need to sell by
December 15th. Call 353-2936.
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1991 MITSUBISHI Galant, good
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LEARN TO
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The East Carolinian
SERVICES
FACULTYSTAFFPARENTS: Tutor-
ing Today for a successful tomor-
row. 13-year veteran school teacher
specializing in Reading, Math, and
Study Skills. Contact Robin � 754-
8020.
I WILL type your paper for you.
$2.50 per page double spaced;
$3.50 single spaced. Pick up and de-
livery avail. 24 hour service. Call
Becky at 830-5559.
HELP WANTED
$7.00 PER hour plus $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina (Nags Head). Call
Dona for application and housing
info, 800-662-2122.
BABYSITTER WANTED to watch
small child. Must be mature, reliable,
and have previous experience with
small children. CPR certified pre-
ferred. Must be available most wee-
kend evenings. Please leave mes-
sage. 353-8840
EARN WHILE YOU learn, up to
$1,000.00 wk. Day and night
shift. Clean, secure working at-
mosphere. Playmates Adult En-
tertainment. 252-747-7686 for in-
terview.
BEAUTIFUL LINGERIE sales people
needed. Must have retail experience.
No calls. Lori's Intimate Apparel.
FUN, ENERGETIC babysitter need-
ed for 4-year old and 9-year old
boys. Beginning January, must be
available Monday 8a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
and Thursday 12Noon to 4:30p.m.
, Please call 353-7446.
NEEDED-ABLE bodied, dependable,
trainable individuals for historic res-
toration. Full time till Christmas $7-
$12hour. Call 8304829.
1999 INTERNSHIPS! Attention un-
dergraduate business students. Now
interviewing on campus for manag-
ers across Virginia, North and South
Carolina for summer of 1999. Aver-
age earnings last summer $7,000.
Call Tuition Painters at (800) 393-
4521 or e-mail at tuipaint@bell-
south.net
HELP WANTED
TEMPORARY PART-TIME (20
hrs.week) positions available begin-
ning December 1, 1998-February 26,
1999 (tentative). Need: 28 Library
Moving Assistants, $6hour; 4 Li-
brary Moving Assistant Team Leader
$8hour; 4 DriverLoaders $7hour.
Apply MonFri. 9 a.m3 p.m room
2400. 2nd Floor, Joyner Library.
Must be a current ECU student en-
rolled 6 hours or more, bring social
security card, drivers license, and
class schedule.
FULL AND part-time cooks wanted.
Lupton's Seafood Restaurant.
BASIL'S RESTAURANT & Pizzeria
now hiring all positions. Apply in
person, 1675 East Firetower Road in
front of Carmike Cinemas
PERSONALS
KITTENS FREE to a good home.
Call 353-2932 ASAP!
HOUSE-SITTER Available. Matured,
experienced, reliable, trustworthy na-
tive of Greenville available for house-
sitting Christmas and possibly
Thanksgiving holidays. Call Kathy at
202-667-6216.
GREEK PERSONALS
PI KAPPA Phi would like to thank
Alpha Phi for a great social on Thurs-
day night. We had a great time.
Hope to do it again real soon.
PI KAPPA Alpha would like to thank
the sisters of Delta Zeta for the won-
derful time at our "Superfly" social
this weekend. Let's do it again real
soon.
DELTA CHI would like to thank Al-
pha Delta Pi for a splendid social last
week. We look forward to doing it
again soon. Love, the brothers of
Delta Chi
GREEK PERSONALS
EPSILON SIGMA Alpha "Under The
Stars" was a blast. Great job on the
pictures and thanks to all of you who
helped in cleaning the street.
CONGRATULATIONS SIGMA Sig-
ma Sigma on your successful season
in soccer, you guys did a great job!
(DELTA CHI) - thank you so much
for the social Friday night! We had a
lot of fun! Love, the sisters and new
members of Sigma Sigma Sigma
TO THE brothers of Delta Sigma
Phi. thank you for the social last
Thursday. Everyone had a wonderful
time. Let's get together again soon!
Love, the sisters of Delta Zeta
TO OUR sister sorority, Zeta, we
hope you have a safe and fun
Thanksgiving. Love, the sisters of Al-
pha Phi
CONGRATULATIONS CHI Omega
soccer team on your win against Sig-
ma. Good luck next week in the
semi-finals. Love, Chi Omega
CONGRATULATIONS KELLY
Worsley on your senior recital. You
did awesome! We love you. Love, Chi
Omega
PI KAPPA Alpha would like to thank
everyone who took part in Satur-
day's quad at "The Cellar It was a
great time as usual.
SIGMA SIGMA Sigma would like to
thank B.J Matt, and J.T. for repre-
senting us in Greek God. You guys
were awesome!
DJ. FOR HIRE
NYC D.J. READY TO
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For all functions & campus
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Did you see news happen? Did you make news happen? Do you belong between our covers?
we want to cover you
Give us your story and appear in our next ad. Call eastcarolinian at 328-6366
I





PERFECTIONISM
VERSUS EXCELLENCE
"Life is not a gymnastics meet writes Dr. Kevin Leman in Growing Up.
Firstborn. "There are not five judges sitting out there waiting to hold up score
cards after everything you do. You do not have to run through life racking up a
perfect "10" in everything
Striving for perfection is a quality shared by many over achievers. Constantly
pushing oneself to make all "As to win every sport or to look "perfect" can be
exhausting. Some perfectionists may even give up trying if they feel the end
result will be less than perfect.
Dr. Leman encourages others to strive for excellence instead of perfection.
Pursuing excellence, which is within reach, leads to a healthier more balanced life
than chasing after perfection, which is definitely out of reach. Listed below are
some differences between pursuing excellence and chasing after perfection.
As campus life runs along each day, photographers wB be out and
about to capture us, the students, at our best if you can identify
yourself to any of our pictures, present yourself to MSC109 (Student
Leadership) and point "you" out to the staff there. Rewards wiB be
on hand for your efforts, so keep a close eye on these pictures!
PERFECTIONEXCELLENCE
Reaches for impossible goalsMeets high standards that are within reach
Personal esteem is based on accomplishmentsPersonal esteem is based on liking self
Crushed by disappointment, may give upFeels hurt but keeps moving towards a goal
Lets failure devastate himherSees failure as an opportunity to learn from mistakes
Wants to be 1 in everythingHappy knowing she did the best she could
Hates and avoids criticismDoesn't always enjoy criticism, but listens and tries to learn from it
Believes winning is crucial for a healthy self-esteemCan finish second and maintain a healthy self-esteem
Very critical of selfAble to forgive self
Want to have a successful
year here at ECU?
Think about these Alcohol Facts:
College students who are alcohol abusers and binge drinkers are:
11 Times more likely to fall behind in school.
10 Times more likely to drive after drinking.
7 Times more likely to have unprotected sex.
Approximately 240,000 to 360,000 of the nation's 12 million
current undergraduates will ultimately die from alcohol-related
causes - more than the number that will get MA's or PhD's combined.
College students who reported D and F grade point averages consumed
an average of 10 alcoholic drinks per week, while those who earned
mostly A's consumed slightly more than 3 drinks per week.
Alcohol-related auto accidents are the 1 killer among young people ages 16-24.
RESULTS FROM ECU'S CORE ALCOHOL SURVEY
95 of ECU students don't drink from Sunday to Thursday
84 of ECU students drink once a week or less
66 of ECU students said no to an offer to use alcohol or other drugs
69 of ECU students didn't use marijuana in the past year
Myth: 74 of our students believe their peers drink 3 times a week
Fact: only 17 report drinking this often
Results of the Core Survey, Spring 1997
To Consume or Not to Consume
Joe and Joanne Student begin their holiday ride home.
JOE: Thanks for driving me home this Thanksgiving, Joanne. I'm so glad that the
beginning of the holidays is here. I can't wait to eat some home cooked food.
JOANNE: Yeah, the food will be good, but I'm going to be very careful about what
I eat. Did you know that Americans average a 6-8 pound weight gain during the
holidays?
JOE: No I didn't, but I don't really care. I'm going to fill up on cookies, stuffing,
pudding, pie, candies and turkey. I'm going to eat so much turkey. And, football
snacks with chili and chips. OH YEAH! I can't wait.
JOANNE: Well, I think you're being pretty stupid. I plan to be very selective this
holiday season. I will only take a sample of my favorite goodies rather than pigging out.
JOE: Are you crazy? Why would you get just a taste and then have to wait until
next year to get more? I'm going to get as much as I can, while I can.
JOANNE: You're going to be sorry when you don't fit into your old clothes. I'm
going to plan out the next day's eating before I go to bed at night and I'm definitely
going to stick to my plan. Then I'm going to wake up early and exercise every day.
JOE: Well, while your planning your meals, I'll be out drinking beers with my
friends. I'm not going to waste my holidays at home worrying about my diet. You
can do what you like in the morning but my holidays are for my rest and relaxation.
Don't plan to see me before noon, and don't plan to see me off the couch.
JOANNE: You can do what you want, but I warn you that eating, drinking and
sleeping add up to serious weight gain. If you skip meals then you'll overeat later
and if you don't exercise, then the holiday foods will really get to your waist size.
JOE: I don't believe that you're serious about this. What do you think
a New Year's resolution is for? I'll have a great holiday
season with no worries. I'll start my good habits
January 1st and be back to normal by January
15th.
JOANNE: We'll see Joe, we'll see. But I
can tell you that January is too late. You will
probably carry 6-8 holiday pounds with
you to Florida for Spring Break and after
the partying you do down there you may
not fit in the car on the way back.
� � in.� '





� i I m
CD
Arts & Entertainment Magazine of The East
East Carolinian m m
vwiMmmd.
Wednesday, December 2,1998
Nina M. Dry
Staff Writer
gm H The Christmas holiday is fast approach-
ing which means another year of pushing
m�. trough malls, fighting over merchandise
and stressing over what to get the person
who has everything (or wants nothing). Well this dilem-
ma can easily be resolved at this year's Holiday
Exhibition and Sale sponsored by the School of Art.
From December 3-5, the Gray Art Gallery will exhib-
it art work from the different student art guilds, graduate
students and some faculty members.
"The School of Art has been sponsoring the exhibi-
tion and sale for the last 12 years said Gil Leebrick,
director of the Gray Gallery. "It's a very big deal.
Approximately 5000 square feet will be filled with a vari-
ety of pieces, all of which are for sale
"This is the second year 1 have been involved in the
Christmas sale said Amanda Proctor, an ECU art major.
"It is a good chance to have the experience of selling
your pieces and having your work on display"
The pieces on display will range from jewelry and
scarves to wood carvings and ceramics. The best part is
that all of the art work is one-of-a-kind, so you never
have to worry about you and a friend buying the same
thing.
"People will see a little bit of everything Leebrick
See Exhibit, continued on page 7
reativdv
Support art guilds and find unique gifts at the School of Art Holiday Sale S
The V-Roys do
their own thang
CD Review
Where your
mama waits to
wash your
mouth out with
soap
Movie Review
I'm dreaming
of some
Christmas
movies
Video Review
If this is "In nifly
you don't even B
want to see
fountainhead � 2nd Floor Student Publications Building Greenville. NC 27858 � Phone 328-6366� Fax 328-6558 � Advertising328-2000.www.fountainhead.ecu.edu





CD Review
TheV-Roys
All About Town
9 out of lORyans
The V-Roys (formerly the Viceroys,
but some reggae band already had
that name) are back, and with a
vengeance. Their last effort lust Add
Ice was one of the best albums of
1996, and they continue their high
quality brand of bittersweet country-
tinged rock with their new release All
About Town.
These four guys from
Knoxvillc have come up with a batch
of songs that want to enter through
your ears and bounce around for a
few weeks. Scott Miller and Mic
Harrison share the songwriting and
singing responsibilities, an idea that
has gotten lost with the rock bands of
late. With the "Twangtrusl" (Steve
Early and Ray Kennedy) producing
this album, there is really nothing left
to stop this band from making it to
the big time.
The disk starts off with
"the window song which isn't the
strongest song on the album, but def-
initely holds its own. Next comes the
acoustic, almost bluegrass stylings of
"Mary This one is about as catchy
as a song gets.
The third track, "Amy 88
is a flat out rocker about a girl that
they only know from her license
plate It comes complete with blaring
guitars, a catchy HP chorus, and saxo-
phones!
This brings us to one of
the best songs on the disk, "Ariane"
This tale of lost love is so reminiscent
of the Beatles, I can't help but love it.
Scott Miller sings in his best tenor
voicethere's a place where I can
gowhere her memory still flowsit
cuts a deeper pathwith every season
past
"Strange the fifth track,
is possibly the weakest of the disk.
It's really nothing more than a bunch
of two-word sentences thrown
together to make a song. Pretty
lame. Then there's the cool little
acoustic ditty "Hold on to me" and
the Amy 88-ish "Miss Operator Both
of these songs are good, but they
don't exactly stand out. They just add
to the solidity of this album.
The last five songs are all
standouts. "Testify" begins with just
a bass line (sounds like a Phil Collins
song) and then jumps into a foot-
stomping sing along. "Sorry Sue" is a
very relaxed tune about unrequited
lovc.a real teary-eyed soliloquy of a
song.
"Over the Mountain" is
what you might call a "rollicking Irish
drinkin' song It has that beat that
you can swing your beer steins back
and forth to. Then comes the combi-
nation of "Virginia WayShenandoah
breakdown It starts out as a slow
acoustic song song, but ends up in a
full-blown bluegrass pickin' session,
compliments of the Del McCoury
Band.
The V-Roys must believe
in saving the best for last. "Fade
Away" is about Scott Miller's suicidal
sister. The lyrics speak for them-
selves. "Your eyes are mineYour fin-
gers fit my hands.It makes me
cryTo think I will not hold them
again The chorus is equally haunt-
ing. "If I could see you one more
dayIt would be the one before you
changedSee you later to say good-
bye
All About Town is a gen-
uinely great disk. It does more than
just sharpen the skills first shown on
their debut album; it marks the tran-
sition for a good band into a poten-
tially great one.
fcu b EnttrtuMTMM Miginnt illh� Em
' ' ' f
vwiMwmd
Amy L.Royster Editor in Chief
Heather Burgess Managing Editor
Miccah Smith Editor
Caleb Rose Assistant Editor
Stephanie Wnitkxk Dasirjnw
Brian Williams Layout
land Rfspcss Wwrtiiing Manager
Bobby Tu&ic Webmaster
Serving ihe ECU communny since Bft. the fast Cnolinnn publishes
II ,000 copies every hiesdey end Ihuisday 000 copies of ihe
Foumambesfl. out new ails and entertainment megame, tit pub
hshed every Wednesday Ihe lead editorial in each edition of ihe ��l
Carolinian is Ihe opinion ol the E Mortal Board The test Carolinian
welcomes tellers to ihe edilor, limned to ?M worth, which may be
edited lot decency ot bievriy The East Caiohoian reserves the right to
edil or reieci tellers lor publication An letters must be signed letters
should be addressed to: Opinion editor .Ihe East Carohmtn, Studeru
PubkatTonj Budding. ECU. GreenwBe. Z78584353. for iniormaiKW.
can 9r9.3?8.636fi
2 Wednesday, December 2,1998

Band Review
Mghthawks swoop for a kill
Caleb Rose
Assistant Editor
� -Jk Who says downtown is for
: H college kids only? November
21 seemed to start out as a
dead night in downtown Greenville,
but The Attic had something up their
sleeve.
Washing D.C. blues men, The
Nighthawks, continued their 25-year
legacy when they delivered two sets of
music to a somewhat older-than-
usual-crowd that gathered at The
Attic
It was interesting to watch the
crowd mingling together as if they
were at a class reunion. There were
many hugs, handshakes, and how the
hell are you? conversations wafting
through the smoky air. Once reac-
quainted with their old mates, the
crowd was ready to get wild.
The Nighthawks took the stage
and opened with a hey, hey, hey chant
which kindled into a blues groove and
caused a dance eruption in the crowd.
One fan seemed to be doing
rounds as has waltzed all around The
Attic finding women and encouraging
them to dance along with him to the
music. It was an endless endeavor that
seemed to pay offat least it did for
him.
The Nighthawks had an arsenal of
blues numbers from all regional
types. Vocalist Mark Wenner shined
on Texas Blues numbers because his
gravelly voice is reminiscent of the
late Stevie Ray Vaughn. The slow
boom-chicka-boom rhythm that the
band perfected was an obvious nod to
the Chicago blues scene that attracted
such famous acts as B.B. King.
The Nighthawks also paid homage
to the Rolling Stones by covering
"Honest I Do which is currently on
the Hope Floats soundtrack.
Above and beyond, The
Nighthawks did something to
Greenville that is overlooked: they
brought some real, different music to
town. For all those who have com-
plained about the Greenville music
scene recently, this would have been a
great opportunity to hear some vari-
ety.
The Attic was transformed into a
madhouse bar on this Saturday night.
Everyone was having a good time
singing and dancing along.
Everyone gets the blues at some
point in time, and for all of those who
had them Saturday night, The
Nighthawks were the perfect
prescription.
Its Your Place
To Catch a Free Filch
DECEMBER 3-5 AT 8 P.M. AT HENDRIX THEATRE
SUNDAY MATINEE AT 3 P.M.
Where in Greenville can you see a FREE blockbuster
movie AND bring a guest? Right here in Mendenhall
Student Center, of coursel This week's show:
Can't Hardly Wait PQ-M).
For a Place to Study
MSC'S EXAM PLAN EXTENDED HOURS ARE IN
EFFECT DECEMBER 11-17 - WEEKDAY HOURS
ARE 8 A.M. TO 2 A.M.WEEKEND HOURS ARE
12 P.M. TO 2 A.M.
Mendenhall Student Center is here for you as the
semester winds down.
Take advantage of our extended exam hours. Cram
for those big tests in our quiet, designated study
areas. Group-study rooms can be reserved in
advance- call the Reservations Office from 9 a.m. -
4 p.m. at 3284731.
Mendenhall is supplying your fix of coffee and
refreshments.
To Catch a Ride
Need to catch a ride for weekends or holidays?
Check out the RideRider Board at the foot of the
stairs in the lower level of Mendenhall Student
Canter.
For Extra Time In The
Computer Lab
MSC'S COMPUTER LAB EXTENDED HOURS ARE
IN EFFECT DECEMBER 6-17 - WEEKDAY HOURS
ARE 8 A.M. TO 2 A.M.WEEKEND HOURS ARE
12 P.M. TO 2 A.M.
With a state-of-the-art facility at your fingertips,
including Pentium-based computers. Power Macs.
and color and laser printers, finishing those last
minute papers will be a breeze.
After midnight, enter the lab from the staircase
nearest the ATM machines. The lab is located in the
Lower Level of MSC.
To Knock Em Down
Boost your Monday from 1 - 6 p.m. with 50-cent
bowling at Outer Limitz (shoe rental included.) Make
Wednesday and Friday discount days by rolling 10
frames for just $1 (shoe rental included) between 1
- 6 p.m. Call 3284740 for Outer Limitz hours.
EXAM PLAN HOURS
The computer lab will be open
until 2 a.m. from Dec. 6-17.
The entire building will be open
until 2 a.m. from Dec. 11-17.
MSC Hours: MonThun, 8 i.mll p.m Fri 8 a.mMidnight; Set, Noon-Midnight; Sun 1-11 p.i





Jk
3 12 out of 4
MovieReview
Pleasantvilk is weird but cool
Ryan Kcnncmur
Movie Reviewer
There is a place out there, where
there's no crime, no fires, and
nobody gets hurtat least not so
had that it doesn't heal in a half an
hour.
This place is called
"Pleasantville and it is very real, or
at least it was. In the movie of the
same namePleasantville"is a
Donna Reed-ish television show
that comes on every evening in
David and Jennifer's house.
David (Tobey McGuire) is your
typical school nerd who does noth-
ing but read and watch episodes of
"Pleasantville Jennifer (Reese
Witherspoon) is his twin sister who
couldn't care less about school.
Indeed, she is more involved with
other extracurricular activities, such
as shopping, dating and sex. At the
start of the movie, she has just
made a date to watch a televised
concert with her newest conquest.
What she neglects to realize, howev-
er, is that the marathon of
"Pleasantville" is coming on at the
same time as the concert. Madness
ensues.
The twins fight over the remote
control, breaking it in the process.
Enter the TV Repairman, played by
Barney Fife (Don Knotts). He gives
them a new remote, which inciden-
tally looks like something off of
"Lost in Space They press the big
red button, and are suddenly
zapped into the screen, becoming
the two siblings from the Parker
family in the TV show. At first, I
thought this may be just another
movie where the people get sucked
into the TV (Stay Tuned) and go
Welcome to
i
Welcome. Please wipe your feet and leave your vices at the door
from channel to channel trying to
find a way out.
I was wrong. This movie has a
message, and though it isn't exactly
screaming at you, it is definitely
there. The basic overall theme is
&&cotre a member.
Launch your
organization
into cyberspace.
WWW.
clubhouse.
ecu.edu
how the powers that be want every-
thing to stay the same in the set
outline, with themselves in total
control. In a wordsocialism
When the kids arrive in their
new black and white surroundings,
they have two different points of
view. David plans to act out the part
that he has been given until he can
figure out a way to get home.
Jennifer, in contrast, is intent on
teaching the local boys about some
of the more pleasurable facts of
lifenamelysex.
Every married couple in
"Pleasantville" has the typical setup.
They sleep in separate beds, but in
the same room. They occasionally
kiss, but it is just a goodbye peck.
They have heard the word "sex but
they aren't too sure what it
is. Apparenth the stork is
not just an dd wives tale.
Jennifer makes out with a
boy on lovers lane, and then
introduces him to the s-
word by saying "Don't
worry. It's supposed to do
that
Things start to happen.
In the middle of the black
g and white abyss, a red rose
appears on a bush, then
I another rose and then a per-
I son. The Parker's tree catch-
es on fire and people start to
wonder what's going on, and
so they go to David, who
informs everyone of the
wonder and delight that exists out-
side of "Pleasantville
The real standout is the visuals.
At one point, David and his new
love interest are driving a convert-
ible to Lover's Lane, and they drive
on a tree-bordered path.
Everything is in black and white
except for the colored leaves falling
down. This scene best summarizes
the movie by showing that, even
though there may be chaos, there is
still beauty hidden in every situa-
tion.
I won't give away the ending, but
I'm pretty sure you can figure it out.
This movie is highly entertaining,
and the performances are possibly
Oscar material.
answers to Tuesday's East Carolinian Crossword
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LANAiT0ETRACK
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0BEYEDEDEN5AN
Wednesday, December 2,1998 3





No
Shewing
Carmike Cinemas
Am (PG)
Daily: 2:15,4:30,7:00,9:15
I Still Know What You Did last
Summer (R)
Daily: 1:45,4:20,7:00,9:30
HI Be Home For Christmas (PG)
Daily: 2:10,4:25,75,9:25
Living Out Loud (R)
Daily: 1:5ft 4:25,70,930
MeetJoeBlack (PG-13)
Daily: 12:30,4:15,80
PleamntvUle (PG-13)
Daily: 10,3:45,70,9:40
Practical Magic (PG-13)
Daily: 20,4:20,70,9:20
Rush Hour (PG-13)
Daily. 1:50,4:25,7:00,9:30
IVieSttge (R)
Daily: 1:00,3:40,7:05,9:45
IfceJWiterBoy (PG-13)
Daily: 2:10,4:25,75,9:20
The Wizard Of Oz (G)
Daily: 1:30,4:15,7:00,9:40
Vampires (R)
Daily: 1:45,4:20,7:00,9:30
Carolina East 4
Betty (R)
Daily: 7:15,9:20
Sat-Sun: 10,35,5:10,7:15,9:20
JMomi (R)
Daily: 80
Sat-Sun: 1:00,4:30,80
Bride Of Chucky (R)
Daily: 7:15,9:20
Sat-Sun: J:00,35,5:10,7:15,
9:20
Urban Legend (R)
Daily: 7:00,9:45
Sat-Sun: 1:30,4:15,70,9:45
Buccaneer
Halloween H20 (R)
Daily: 7:00,90
Sat-Sun: 10,30,50
Simon Birch (PG)
Daily: 7:00
Sat-Sun: 1:10
OneTrueThing (R)
Daily: 9:30
Sat-Sun: 40
MaskofZorro (PG-13)
Daity: 70,9:50
Sat-Sun: 10,40
Video Review
Watch Wrafe Christmastfs good for ya!
Miccah Smith
Fountainhead
Editor
You're just like me. About now
you're feeling the familiar tug of the
old couch, the urge to plop down
with your folks and watch one of
those raggedy old Christmas
movies. Maybe even a Charlie
BrownGarfield double feature.
1 don't know you, but I feel your
pain. This Thanksgiving break I
myself was corralled into watching
a huge chunk of musical master
Irving Berlin's optimistic postwar
classic White Christmas.
Fortunately for yours truly, it's
always been a favorite of mine,
since I seem to have inherited my
mom's yen for funny, limber red-
heads like the legendary Danny
Kaye.
He stars alongside the heavy-eyed
Bing Crosby in this musical extrav-
aganza about two old Army chums
who scheme to help a retired Army
general out of financial difficulties,
since he sank all his life savings
into remodeling a Vermont ski
lodge with no snow in sight.
Yes, some of the numbers are
cheesy, but most are chock full of
the graceful Robert Alton choreog-
raphy that was just hitting full
stride back when our grandparents
were having kids. Rosemary
Clooney and Vera-Ellen play the
Haynes sisters, slim blonde side-
kicks to the two gentlemen, who
have turned to showbiz after being
discharged from the Army.
Together they bring a successful
New York vaudeville act to the ski
lodge in hopes of attracting cus-
tomers.
Guess what? The harebrained
scheme to help out the old general
works, and the actors frolic happily
in a bank of snow on Christmas
Eve. Aw gee whiz (I'm not quite sure
how they managed to get the snow,
though)!
White Christmas is one of those
movies that never goes out of style,
and like How the Grinch Stole
Christmas and It's a Wonderful Life,
it has a sure grip on prime time
television from Thanksgiving
throughout the rest of the season.
So you might as well bite the bullet
and watch it again, just for old
time's sake-
Pretend for a couple of hours that
you're not a jaded and cynical stu-
dent, and gape with wonder at the
fast-flyin' feet, wasp-waisted
women and general mind-melting
musical mayhem that is White
Christmas. And save some room on
the couch for your folks.
Surprise! Watching old movies with your folks ain't that bad!
TEC has teamed up
with Barnes and Noble
to bring book reviews to
Wednesday's fountainhead
in our new program
Carolinian
for
Ronald
We are looking for fellow book lovers to
read and review best sellers for a good
cause. Each Semester we will donate these
best sellers to the Ronald McDonald House
where they will be available for the family
members of terminally ill children to read.
If you would like to write a review
please call Miccah at 328-6366
4 Wednesday, December 2,





tf?
&
horoscopes
ARIES:
(March 21-April 20)
You may have a tough time with
changes on a personal level. Since
these changes are going to take
place without your say-so learn to
accept them. Pay attention to your
home life, your family needs your
input - expressing positive feelings
will do wonders.
TAURUS:
(April21-May21)
New ideas need to be shared, and
the feedback of others may improve
the concepts. It's time to make way
for a new approach. Time out may
be a welcome change in your love
life - although there is love, the day
to day routine may have become
boring and tedious.
GEMINI:
(May 22-June 21)
Your need for solitude and quiet
may be hard to achieve. Make the
necessary compromises, meeting all
responsibilities, but keep your input
at a minimum. Try not to be so gen-
erous with money, or you may come
up short yourself. Expect defiance
from those not wanting change.
CANCER:
(June 22-July 23)
Use all available resources in the
most economic and efficient way
possible in order to reach your goal.
You might have to do some juggling,
but the extra effort will be worth it.
Others will end up amazed at how
much you were able to.do, with so
few resources.
LEO:
(July 24-August 23)
Perfection is not required, and will
no doubt be impossible to achieve.
Assuming any type of superior
stance will aggravate those around
you, try to leave well enough alone.
You have a great deal to think about,
especially concerning personal mat-
ters, take time to do so.
VIRGO:
(August 24 - September 23)
Resist any suggestion or manipula-
tion that tries to get you to give
more than you've got in terms of
time, money and energy. Standing
up for yourself will give you a great
feeling of success, boosting your
confidence tenfold. Don't budge on
what you believe.
LIBRA:
(September 24 - October 23)
Show your appreciation to your
friends and family. You have lots to
give those you love, and revealing
those feelings more often will bring
you joy and peace. Financial success
will be tied to a raise or promotion -
and if not now, advancement is in
the very near future.
SCORPIO:
(October 24 - November 22)
Learning something new will give
you a feeling of joy and confidence
which you can share with friends
and loved ones. You are currently
riding on a crest of continued suc-
cess either at work or on the home-
front, so be prepared for any unex-
pected difficulties.
SAGITTARIUS:
(November 23 - December 21)
What has previously seemed like a
potential disaster, probably concern-
ing a relationship, may instead turn
out positive and provide you with
new opportunities to create a more
stable and loving closeness. If you
find yourself in a rut, do something
about it now.
CAPRICORN:
(December 22 - January 20)
Any investments, especially in the
area of real estate or stocks, can pro-
vide you with excellent returns.
Communicate clearly with experts
in these fields before you make your
move. Try to let a troublesome prob-
lem take care of itself. Enjoy time
with your mate.
AQUARIUS:
(January 21 - February 19)
If you feel pressured about making a
choice, insist on more time to gather
the information and think about
what you really want from all this.
It's best to delay any decision,
instead of trying to undo what you
never should have done in the first
place. Practice moderation.
PISCES:
(February 20-March 20)
If you are finding yourself constant-
ly letdown, it may be time to re-
examine your expectations - unreal-
istic expectations of others will only
cause you grief. Compromise is a
key word for the week. Certain mat-
ters are not worth worrying about,
since you cannot change them.
Birthday This Week:
You may be having the nagging feel-
ing that there's something you
should be doing, but you can't
remember just what it is. This may
just be a sign that you are moving
forward toward a new future which
hasn't become apparent to you yet.
Horoscope by Miss Anna
Things to
Downtown
2 Wednesday
Hipbone Clambake at Peasant's
Comedy Zone at the Attic: Al Earns
and Bernard Mark
3 Thursday
The Breakfast Club at the Attic
Carol Dashiell and Company at Staccato's
4 Friday
Rathskeller Social at The Attic
Keller Williams at Peasant's Cafe
Benefit for EZLN at Backdoor(Dec 4th
and 5th: 400 YearsRah BransInflicted
SpoonHovelRegurgistateOchlocracy
Attentat
Self Explanitoryfr more
5 Saturday
Chairmen of the Board at The Attic
Dayroom at Peasant's Cafe
Poetry Slam at the Percolator �
Open Mic before Slam featuring DJ
Rhetoric
6 Sunday
Open Mic night at Peasant's Cafe
The Groove Riders at The Courtyard
Tavern
8 Tuesday
Studio 54 night at the Attic
Fischer at Boli's
Wednesday, Oeostte 2.1998 5





Bumping into an ex-member of the once
glorious Greenville rock bandStormz)"
while Christmas shopping
In.
and
Out
Hearing selections from this
abhorrent Christmas album in
every department store
all month
Holiday Concert
Miccah Smith
Fbuntainhead Editor
k
fPV The Madrigal Dinner
�W isn't the only ECU hol-
iday tradition. The annual Holiday
Concert, which features the
Symphonic Wind Ensemble, has
provided a healthy dose of Yuletide
cheer for students, staff and children
alike since the 1970s.
Conductor Scott Carter remembers
playing in the concert years ago. Now
his ensemble will please the Sunday,
Dec. 6 audience with what he calls
Vtypical holiday fare
or junior Angie Bess, a music edu-
cation major who plays both piccolo
and flute, this will be her first
Holiday Concert.
"There's a lot of kids that come, and
they really enjoythe concert, and
we also enjoy putting it on for them
says Bess.
Things have changed this year with
the addition ofECU's 3 choral
groups. Dr. Rhonda Fleming, con-
ductor of the Chamber Choir, is
pleased that choir involvement,
which started the year before last
with the Chamber Singers, has come
this far.
"This year we've expanded the for-
mat to include all the choirs she
says.
"Carter has been very gracious to
want to include choirs in the pro-
gram
The 30-member Chamber Singers
and Concert Choir and the 75-mem-
ber University Chorale will add an
eye catching element to the festivi-
ties.
"We have several outstanding gradu-
ate students who are majoring in
choral conducting says Fleming,
who is giving five of the students
opportunities to conduct the
University Chorale during the con-
cert. Janna Brendell will conduct the
Concert Choir.
Faculty members Sharon Munden
and John Kramar will be the fea-
tured soloists of the evening, lending
their voices to Silent Night and the
Glouchester Wassail song respective-
iy-
Of course this is all well and good to
those fidgeting younger members of
the audience, who will be anxious to
see whether or not a certain jolly old
elf waltzes onstage at the last minute
to distribute candy. According to
Carter and Fleming, odds are that he
will.
Good music, candy and a
Christmasy glow that lasts all day are
in store for anyone who attends this
free concert on Sunday, Dec. 6 at 3
p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
For a good time call
the ECU Student Union Hotline at 252.328.6004,
or visit our website at www.ecu.edustudentunion.
O: C
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HOUSE OF YES
WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 2
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THURSDAY, DEC. 3 through SATURDAY, DEC. 6 AT 8 PM
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, MATMEE AT 3 PM
All ftfm. tfirt .t 8:00 pmunlmoewwlw noted HKlir. FREE to Md.fTt�,fKUlt�i ��!�( one gut

6 Wednesday, December 2,1998
The Student Union la now accepting application for the 1999 � 2O00 Stuo Union Pieekt ieltlon
All bitereated should contact 328.4715, or come by the Stwiwit Union Offk at 234 Memlenhall Stwiert
J





ODDITIES
INTERNET SWEETHEARTS
THANKFUL FOR SUPPORT
PHILADELPHIA (AP When Ian
Fleming, an Englishman, celebrated
his first Thanksgiving this year, he
had a lot to be thankful for.
He was thankful that his new wife,
Teresa, was still in good health after
receiving a kidney transplant. He
was thankful that he met her, in an
America Online chat room in early
fall 1997. He was thankful that he
was a suitable match, so he could
donate the kidney keeping his new
wife alive.
And he was thankful for the prayers
and cards from hundreds of people
enraptured by this improbable love
story.
"There must be at least 100 cards
around from people we don't even
know said Fleming. "We are really
thankful for everybody's prayers
Although both are doing fine, Mrs.
Fleming will return Monday to the
hospital in Philadelphia for routine
blood tests to make sure her body
isn't rejecting the kidney.
"Every time she has a cold she has to
go back to the hospital to make sure
there isn't any kind of infection
Fleming said.
In addition to the many cards and
letters they've received, Fleming said
his mother Sylvia still gets stopped
on the street- back home in
Manchester, England by people
askingIs your son OK? Is your
daughter-in-law OK?"
"You step back and thinkWhy?'
Fleming saidIt astounds you,
really?
But the fact that so many were swept
up in the couple's story shouldn't be
all that surprising. It has all the
improbable plot twists of a good
soap opera.
Fleming met his wife in an America
Online chat room in early fall 1997.
They began exchanging e-mail, then
trans-Atlantic phone calls. Fleming
proposed on New Year's Eve and
moved to York from Manchester this
summer.
When Fleming found out his wife
needed a kidney, he volunteered
immediately and turned out to be a
match. The newlyweds each under-
went about four hours of surgery on
Nov. 10, when Fleming's right kidney
was transplanted into his new wife.
As he prepares to celebrate his first
Christmas with his new wife,
Fleming is asking Santa for just one
small favor.
"A nice, quiet Christmas Fleming
said. "No trips to the hospital
WARPED TOY LIST
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) The Rev.
Christopher L. Rose's 1998 warped
toy list and some of the reasons for
his choices:
1. Bashin' Brawler's "Macho Man
I
Randy Savage" (Toy Biz): Wrestler
doll issues taunts when it is punched
or twisted.
2. Toonsylvania's Xrush Me Phil
and Taunt Me Igor" (DreamWorks,
by PagneaToy Island): Dolls scream
and vibrate when pummeled.
3Silly Slammers.beanbags with an
attitude (Gibson Greetings Co.):
Toys shriek when thrown to the
floor.
4. Toonsylvania's "Dr. Vic's Electron
Chair" (DreamWorks, by PagneaToy
Island): Includes a figure that can be
zapped in an electric chair.
5. Capcom's Resident Evil toys:
"Maggot Zombie with tear-away
limbs, and "Forest Speyer" with
undead attack (ToyBizCapcom).
6. Todd MacFarlane's Monsters "Dr.
Frankenstein" play set (McFarlane
Toys): Comes with a blood-spattered
doctor.
7. Toonsylvania toys and action fig-
ures, including Psycho-Screamer
Collection: "Bad Gas Baby Human
"Gastro Intestinal IgorSpinal Tap
PhilRabid Ravin Melissa
(DreamWorks,by PagneaToy
Island).
8. Gywnn Exotic Dancer, Mercy
Cyber Angel, Typhoid Mary, Skull
Queen, Letha-Sisters of Darkness
(Various manufacturers): Female
action figures that treat women as
sex objects.
9. Todd McFarlane's "The Graveyard"
play set (McFarlane Toys): Comes
with crypt and corpse.
10. Rock 'n' Barf Musical
Instruments: "Snot a Lotter
"Horror Harmonica "Slime
Whistle
(Source: The Rev. Christopher L
Rose)
exhibit, continued tram page 1
saidIt's like the Macy's of fine arts
without the high prices
According to Leebrick, all of the
proceeds of this three-day event will
go to back to the artists in some
form.
"A percentage will go back to the
artist and the rest will go towards the
guilds to bring speakers and visiting
artists to ECU and to send students
to important exhibitions Leebrick
said.
Patrons should plan on stopping
in on all three days because, unlike
Ceramics, jewelry, woodwork end other arts
will be available at the sale.
the stores in the malls, there will be
something new to see every time.
"There are pieces set aside for
each day so that there are new things
on display' Leebrick said.
The sale begins on December 3
through the 5. Hours of operation are
as follow: December 3 from 900
a.m. to 8:00 p.m December 4 from
9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m and
December 5 from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00
p.m.
"Everyone should come out and
enjoy themselves Leebrick said.
"The Christmas spirit will definitely
be present
Free Time
December
2 Wednesday
-Chew on This noon lecture in the
MSC Underground
-Sundance Cinema: The House of Yes
at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
-School of Anything Goes Anime at
8 p.m. in 221 MSC
-The Pirate Underground at 7 p.m.
in the MSC Social Room
-Hypnotic Clambake at The Cave in
Chapel Hill
-The Woggles at Local 506 in Chapel
Hill
3 Thursday
-Can't Hardly Wait at 8 p.m. in
Hendrix
-School of Art Holiday Exhibition
and Sale in Gray Gallery
-TubaEuphonium Ensemble with
Jeffery W. Jarvis, conductor, at 8 p.m.
in Rm. 101, A.J. Music Center
-Sharkquest at The Cave in Chapel Hill
-Drive By Truckers, The Illbilly Boys
at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
-BMI showcase with Collapsis at
Cat's Cradle in Carrboro
4 Friday
-Can't Hardly Wait at 8 p.m. in
Hendrix
-Sock hop at the Newman Catholic
Student Center
-Acoustic Syndicate at The Cave in
Chapel Hill
-The Pristeens, Trash Mavericks,
Easy Living at Local 506 in Chapel
Hill
-Archers of Loaf, Jennyanykind,
William Christ Supercarr, Capsize 7
and Starpoint USA at Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro
5 Saturday
-Can't Hardly Wait at 8 p.m. in
Hendrix
-Poetry slam 8c open mic at 8 p.m. at
The Percolator
-The Crow Fifes, Memphis at The
Cave in Chapel Hill
-Billy Joe Winghead, Leadfoot, The
Peasants at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
-Archers of Loaf, Jennyanykind,
William Christ Supercarr, Capsize 7
and Starpoint USA at Cafs Cradle in
Carrboro
6 Sunday
-Holiday Concert, featuring the
Symphonic Wind Ensemble,
Chamber Singers, Concert Choir and
University Chorale, with Scott
Carter, Rhonda Fleming and Janna
Brendell, conductors
-Can't Hardly Wait at 3 p.m. in
Hendrix
-Carbon Leaf at The Cave in Chapel
Hill
7 Monday
-Michael Neal Patrick at The Cave in
Chapel HOI
8 Tuesday
-Jennings Durand at The Cave in
Chapel Hill
-Madball, Patriot at Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro
MIB
weekly top hits
15. Frank Black &
the Catholics
"All my Ghosts"
14. 112
"The Sweetest
Thing"
13. The Offspring
"Pretty Fly for a
White Guy"
12. Zebrahead
"The Real Me"
11. Kid Rock
"Cowboy"
10. Jewel
"Hands"
9. Hipbone
"Radius"
8. The Cardigans
"My Favorite Game"
7. Marilyn Manson
"The Dope Show"
6. Cowboy Mouth
"Whatcha Gonna Do"
5. Fighting Gravity
"Bend the Light"
4. Dial 7
"All I WanT
3. Jump Little
Children
"Come Out Clean"
2. REM
"Lotus"
1. Soul Coughing
"Circles"
Wednesday, December 2,1998 7






pet ite The.East Carol
ampins caleedr'
Go to our wefcRjte at www.tec.ecu.eduaiai�gfff i on the calendai ik.
w
9fr6r
Just below ttaaayyeek's listir "to the event submission form.
Or if you want a ortcuJlffJirwww.tec.ecu.e into your browser.
Then just enter your event onto our campus calendar.
ft's just that easy. And it's one more free service of The East Carolinian.


Title
The East Carolinian, November 24, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 24, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1308
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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