The East Carolinian, November 19, 1998







Thursday
High: 66
Low: 45
Friday
High: 72
Low: 55
Online Survey
Did you vote in the
November 3 election?
28 Yes 71 No
www.tec.ecu.edu
Did you use the telephone to register for next
semester?
Bascon
speaks on
Eritrea
Professorgivespresentation
on new African country
Car a Davis
STAFF Rl TF.R
Johnathan Bascon gave presentation in Brewster.
PHOTO BY CARA DAVIS
In recognition of National Geographic
Awareness Week, Professor Johnathan
Bascom, associate professor of geography
at ECU, gave a presentation on the newly
independent country of Eritrea.
The presentation was held on Monday
night in the Brewster Building and was'co-
sponsored by the ECU Department of
Geography and the North Carolina
Geographic Alliance.
Eritrea is the newest country in Africa.
It is located in the northeastern corner of
the continent and is bordered by the Red
Sea, Ethiopia, Djibouti and Sudan. Eritrea
was a province of Ethiopia until its 30 year
war of independence ended in May of
1991. Two years later, after an internation-
ally-sanctioned referendum, Eritrea
became officially independent. It is the
182nd country to join the United Nations
and the 52nd Country in Africa. During
the war nearly 700,000 people were dis-
placed to Sudan, but only 370,000 of those,
people have returned to Eritrea.
Dr. Bascom returned this summer from
Eritrea. Last year, he taught four different
geography classes to Eritrean students at
the only university in the country, the
University of Asmara.
"Funding for my trip originated from a
US AID grant between UNO Chapel Hill
and the University of Asmara Bascom
said.
Many local high schools along with the
National Geographic Alliance are teaming
up to get the word out on the importance
of geography.
"From the 10's through the 1980's
most academics in the United States con-
sidered geography a marginal discipline,
although it remained a core subject in
most other countries said Alexander
Murphy, a vice-president of the American
Geographical Society.
In 1988 a Gallup Survey of people in
the 18-24 year age bracket was conducted.
America's youth ranked lowest out of ten
surveyed countries; only one-fourth of
those tested were able to identify the
Soviet Union or Pacific Ocean on a world
map.
I The theme of Geography Awareness
Week is "People, Places, and Patterns:
Geography Puts the Pieces Together
The geography department organized the
first annual poster contest for the event.
he posters will be displayed in the B-
wing hallway on the second floor of the
Brewster Building in the weeks to come.
Carolinian
ECU'S Pure Gold Dance Team shows its low; for tlio same
without, setting the it-cognition thai they deserw;
Sports. i��i' 10
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19 ,1998 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 26
Great American Smoke Out
challenges students to kick butts
Effort to increase
awareness of tobacco use
R A CM A El. 11 I 0 1) ON
STAFF WRITER
A M V S II E R I I) A N
NEWS EDITOR
The American Cancer Society's 22nd
Great American Smokeout will be held
throughout campus on Thursday as a part
of an national effort to increase awareness
on the detrimental effects of tobacco.
The Great American Smokeout pro-
motion is the American Cancer Society's
annual, nationally recognized day when
smokers are asked to put down his or her
cigarettes, cigars or any tobacco product
because they all have the potential to
cause cancer. The smokeout will help mil-
lions of smokers kick the habit and help
youth understand the importance of never
starting to smoke.
Tables will be set up Nov. 19 at
Mendenhall, Todd, the Student
Recreation Center, the Wright Place and
the Student Health Center. These tables
will provide information on how to quit
smoking or chewing tobacco and other
related topics. Each booth will have a dif-
ferent game at which students will have
the opportunity to win prizes such as key
chains, sweatshirts and coffee mugs. The
Student Recreation Center will be pro-
SEE TOBACCO. PAGE 2
Senior Anthony Watkins smokes a cigarette outside the General Classroom building.
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
Evans Street Mall
nearing completion
Remodeling almost finished
after three years of planning
Devon White
staff writer
After many months of anticipation the
remodeling of the Evans street mall is near-
ing completion.
"We are hoping for a great project and
everyone will be happy with the results
said Jim Jacto, Greenville city engineer
responsible for the Evans Street Project.
In 1995, the nonprofit, tax-exempt orga-
nization Uptown Greenville was estab-
lished to develop plans and implement
actions necessary to revitalize and recover
economic stability to the downtown busi-
ness district. To complete an urban design
plan for the four blocks surrounding the
Evans Street Mall, Uptown Greenville
engaged the services of ECU's Regional
Development Institute.
The once commercial center of the city
suffered a drastic decline in business when
centers and malls opened up along major
thoroughfares. Although downtown
Greenville is unlikely to have the type of
trade it once had, it has great potential to
develop as a cultural, financial, entertain-
ment, governmental office and housing
center. Overall, the city is hoping to restore
the historic character,
create a closer link with
the university, encour-
age new office and ser-
vice uses and promote
residential development
in downtown Greenville.
The first step that
they are taking is to revi-
talize Evans Street Mall.
A "main street" will replace the former
mall. The renewed Evans Street will have
an abundant amount of lighting, front store
parking and attractive landscaping. Uptown
Greenville is hoping for a historic look by
"Once this project is completed we
all hope that Greenville will be
pleased with the changes
Andy Harris
Director ol Planning and Community Developmem.
making the lamps, clocks and even the
bricks look as they once did. The owners of
The Courtside Cafe, Bob Merrifield and
Jane Lester, have purchased the buildings
surrounding their restaurant on Evans
Street. They are also hoping to renovate
these buildings and restore them back to
the original architecture, which dates back
to 1913.
r a jr � jr � :
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Evans Street Mall soon to be remodeled into Main Street.
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
Scholarship
awarded to
Mary Davis
Golden Key Honor Society
rewards marketing major
The delay for this renovation of Evans
Street has been due to the wait for bids that
match the amount of money needed to
complete the project. One way Uptown
Greenville attempted to raise money for
the repairs was through fund raising. For
example, they have a "Buy-A-Brick cam-
paign where people can contribute $100 for
an oversized personalized brick with their
name or the name of a loved one, friend,
organization, or business written on it. All of
the bricks will literally be a part of the foun-
dation of the new Evans Street. People are
also asked to contribute by dedicating clas-
sically-styled lampposts, attractive planters
and landscaped seating areas to loved ones
or businesses.
"Once this project is completed we all
hope that Greenville will be pleased with
the changes said Andy Harris, Director of
Planning and Community Development.
The street should be completed by late
Spring, with the landscaping and minor
details following. With all of the wonderful
plans, downtown Greenville should be "the
place to be .
Caroline Jori w
vnirimni
The annual Golden Key National Honor
Society Undergraduate Scholarship of
$200 was awarded to junior Mary Ruth
Davis.
"I'm thrilled and honored Davis said.
"It was such a surprise
Davis is a marketing major with a 4.0
GPA. She is a member of several honor
societies, Vice President of Programs for
American Marketing Association, and
Chapter Betterment Coordinator of
Gamma Sigma Sigma National Service
Sorority.
"I'm interested in marketing research
and hope to stay in Eastern North
Carolina upon graduation Davis said.
According to Beth Ann Pritty, director
of Orientation and the First-Year
Experience and Golden Key advisor, the
data for every Golden Key member was
submitted to the national Golden Key
SEE SCHOLARSHIP PAGE 2





2 Thariity, NovmibV 19, 1998
news
Thl Eilt Carolinian
news
briefs
RUSSIAN PRIME
MINISTER YEVGENY
PRIMAKOV TOLD U.S.
VICE PRESIDENT AL
MOSCOW (AP) Russian Prime
Minister Yevgeny Primakov told
U.S. Vice President AJ Gore on
Tuesday that more loans are vital
to help Moscow deal with the
country's economic crisis, accord-
ing to Russian news reports.
Primakov said Russia wants the
International Monetary Fund to
release the next installment of a
frozen dlrs 22 billion aid package to
enable Moscow to refinance exist-
ing debts to the IMF and the
World Bank.
U S WEST. REGULATORS
AGREE TO $53 MILLION
REFUND FOR UTAH
CUSTOMERS
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) U S
West and state utility regulators
have agreed to a $53 million
ratepayer refund to settle a 10-
year-old case over the phone com-
pany's excess profits.
The case had been to the Utah
Supreme Court once and a January
court hearing was pending when a
mediator negotiated the compro-
mise this week.
BOYS ROUNDED UP IN
PLOT TO ATTACK
SCHOOL HAD ACCESS
TO GUNS
BURLINGTON. Wisconsin (AP)
Three boys were charged
Wednesday with conspiring to
murder students and educators at
their high school in a plot police
say was crafted with chilling detail.
The boys, all 15 or 16, each
were charged in juvenile court with
three counts of conspiracy to com-
mit first-degree intentional homi-
cide. The judge made no decision
on a prosecutor's request to charge
the boys as adults and for psycho-
logical evaluations.
12 KILLED 3 INJURED
AFTER ELEVATOR
PLUNGES 20 FLOORS
IN LEBANON
BEIRUT, Lebanon (AP) An ele-
vator plunged 20 floors after its
cables snapped, killing 12 workers
and injuring three others at a build-
ing site in Lebanon on Tuesday,
police said.
Ten Syrian and two Lebanese
laborers were killed instantly after
the elevator fell. Two Syrians and
an Egyptian were hospitalized with
serious injuries.
Summit to improve race relations
3 Thundiy,
"If
SHAW UNIVERSITY TO
AWARD DON KING
HONORARY DOCTORATE
RALEIGH (AP) Boxing promot-
er Don King will soon join the
ranks of writer Maya Angelou,
. singer Dionne Warwick and world
heavyweight boxing champion
I Evander Holyfield.
King will be awarded an hon-
orary doctorate degree from Shaw
University for his "humanitarian
contributions to the poor and
underprivileged King's promo-
tion agency announced Tuesday.
CHARLOTTE MAN
WINS LAWSUIT OVER
FALLING MERCHANDISE
CHARLOTTE (AP) A truck dri-
.� ver and his wife were awarded $2.2
million by a Mecklenburg County
- jury for injuries suffered when
�, 1,000 pounds of Sam's Club mer-
,u,chandise fell on him nearly eight
.�. years ago.
Reps from minority
communities attend
community forum
Rachael Higdon
staff whiter
The Summit to Improve Race
Relations (STIRR) was held
Friday, Nov. 13, and Saturday,
Nov. 14, at the Next Generation
Church in Winterville.
The STIRR mission statement
outlines the purpose of the event,
which is "to encourage productive,
meaningful debate and promote
solutions and policy initiatives on
race relations
"When we have a diverse repre-
sentation we will be on the road to
success said Keith Cooper, orga-
nizer and director of STIRR.
The meeting began with five
goals which were given to the
attendees: to promote racial healing
and harmony, to encourage com-
munity dialogue about divisive race
issues, to explore social, psycholog-
ical, and socioeconomic forces that
may cause criminal behavior
between blacks and whites, to rec-
ognize and discourage forces that
perpetuate racial stereotypes and
myths, and to impress upon the
community the benefits of promot-
ing racial justice and reconciliation
through policies and personal
behavior.
The summit was held in a ques-
tion and answer format, with a
panel of successful representatives
of the minority community to
respond and expand on the prob-
lems presented by Cooper and
other audience members. The
panel varied from Friday to
Saturday, but each night was devot-
ed to exploring ways to better the
black community in Pitt County,
North Carolina and the country as a
whole.
"Once we have a thorough
understanding of each other we will
have harmony said Robert
Muhammed, panel member.
The topics of discussion ranged
from Affirmative Action to interra-
cial adoptions.
One of the most important ques-
tions that ran as a theme was how to
combat racial tensions in our area.
The responses from panel mem-
bers included education, goals and
problem identification.
"We need to begin to look at
diversity, it is all about minorities
pulling together to make a better
SEE SUMMIT PAGE 3
Scholarship
continued from page I
headquarters in Atlanta. From
there, the top 25 juniors and seniors
were selected based on there GPA.
"All of the students selected had
a 4.0 GPA, so selection came com-
pletely down to what they had done
and what they had been involved
in Pritty said.
In order to be invited to join
Golden Key, a student must be a
junior or senior in the top 15 per-
Tobacco
continued from page I
viding Pepsi One as an incentive
for visitors to the booths and stu-
dent volunteers and members of
Students Against Destructive
Decisions (SADD) will be answer-
ing questions and manning the
tables.
"The majority of students at
ECU do not smoke, bur, that does-
n't mean that they can't learn
more about smoking said Donna
Walsh, ECU Health Promotions.
The latest campus surveys
show that 24 percent of students
use tobacco more than three times
a week, whereas 61 percent of stu-
dents indicated that they had used
tobacco during their lifetime.
' Pledge cards with the slogan
"the way to be is tobacco free" will
be available for those who wish to
participate to promise to quit
smoking for the day or for as long
as they wish. Nonsmokers can get
involved by "adopting" smokers
and helping them quit or by
becoming advocates for smoke
free air by encouraging his or her
work site or favorite restaurants to
establish smoke free policies.
Campus dining services and
residence halls will also be partici-
pating with special programs and
information. The objective of The
Great American Smokeout, how-
ever, is not aimed at smokers
alone. It is also an opportunity for
non-smokers to learn information
to educate themselves and their
loved ones on the harmful effects
of tobacco.
Also, workshops focusing on
smoking cessation are being spon-
sored by the Student Health
Center. To sign up, contact Bob
Morphet at 328-6661. WZMB will
participate in the smokeout by
running public service announce-
ments during the week about the
effects of smoking.
"We had a student last year
who took the information given to
him and presented it to his father,
who was a smoker Walsh said.
"His Christmas present that year
was the fact that his father had
quit smoking, so there is a ripple
effect to awareness activities like
these j
Along with the information
sites students who wish to stop
smoking may call the Counseling
and Student Development
Center for individual sessions or to
find out the times that workshops
are scheduled.
"Our goal is to continue to to
create awareness activities that
encourage people to lead a health-
ier lifestyle Walsh said.
cent of the class.
'That means this year students
had to have a 3.5 Pritty said.
Golden Key National Honor
Society awards two scholarships
annually to each of its 270 college
and university chapters across the
United States, Puerto Rico, the
Virgin Islands, Australia, Canada
and Malaysia. The scholarship is
awarded to the outstanding junior
and senior initiate of the chapter
based on overall scholastic perfor-
mance, honors and awards, leader-
ship, campus and community activ-
ity and work commitments. Over $2
million has been given nationally in
scholarships.
"I didn't even know there was a
scholarship Davis said. "I was
even more honored and excited by
this complete surprise
Golden Key National Honor
Society is a non-profit, international
academic honors organization that
provides academic recognition,
scholarships, leadership opportuni-
ties, community service and career
networking. The ECU chapter
began in 1991 and now has 200
members.
"There are a lot of outstanding
excellent scholars at ECU Pritty
said.
Monday, Nov. 16 Meeting of Legislation Room 221 Mendenhall
�A new Physician's Assistants Honor Society was introduced
�At the African American Leadership Conference Mr. Na'im
Akbar will be presenting a seminar and will take members
from the legislature with him
�Eric Rivenbark announced that there will be a meeting on
Nov. 30th about fees and how they are spent. The purpose is
to keep students informed and to keep student fees lower
�The East Carolina Honors Organization was revisited and
passed unanimously
No students were absent from the meeting.
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I East Carolinian
IS
mportant ques-
:me was how to
ns in our area,
n panel mem-
ition, goals and
on.
:gin to look at
lout minorities
make a better
PAGE 3
3 Thursday, Novamber t8, 1998
news
Th Ent CaraliaiM
I Mendenholl
itroduced
Ar. Na'im
lembers
eting on
: purpose is
:s lower
ted and
r
Must have excellent grammar & editing skills
Ifyaican'tnotwrtgMd, :BE�5LET
I ?i.L, � Apply at the second floor ol Student
fflptyVTtnin , Publications Building or call 328-6366
Copy Editors Needed
easti
ISA to start newsletter
Articles profiling
officers, events, activities
NOW HIRING
Orientation Assistants for 1999-2000
Orientation & the First-Year Experience � 214 Whichard Bldg. � 328-4173
For more information, call the Orientation Office or attend an
Information Session in 208 Whichard Building:
� December 2,1998 (Wednesday)-4:00 p.m.
� January 18,1999 (Monday)-4:00p.m.
Applications are now available in 214 Whichard Building.
Deadline for completed applications is January 22,1999 at 5:00 p.m.
Rachael Higdon
staff writer
The International Student
Association (ISA) is beginning to
rebuild its numbers and will send
out its first newsletter this semes-
ter. .
The monthly newsletter will be
a presentation of the ISA itself,
with articles profiling the officers,
write ups of previous events, and
information concerning future
activities.
The group has between 30 and
40 members, but ISA officers hope
the letter will increase interest and
membership in the association.
"Our purpose is to make it easi-
er for international students to
adjust to American culture and to
make friends said Senior Paula
Ketula, secretary of the ISA and
exchange student from Finland.
The ISA holds general meetings
once a month and is located at the
International House, behind the
Student Recreation Center. All stu-
dents and faculty are encouraged to
join and mingle with those of
another culture.
"These students know a differ-
ent country, different culture, dif-
ferent people, so we are here to
help support them and also to come
together to exchange ideas said
senior Markus Doell, president of
the ISA.
The planning committee, which
meets once a week, has scheduled
different events throughout the
year, such as a tour of North
Carolina.
"We want to show the interna-
tional students where they live
Ketula said. "Often times they
have no means of transportation,
since it is not economical to buy a
car for one or two semesters, so we
want to give them the opportunity
to see more than Greenville
The newsletter will be instru-
mental in increasing attendance
and keeping the campus updated,
since "e-mail was not working
well" according to Doell.
"We will start out small Ketula
said, "but once we have more
resources and more participation it
will eventually increase
The ISA is a fledgling organiza-
tion this year due to inactivity in
the past, however the enthusiastic
executive board members see great
potential for the future.
"We are dedicated to make the
ISA work and be active again
Ketula said.
Summit
continued from page 2
MSA
MUSLIM STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
community panel member
George Perry, said.
The general consensus was that
the stage of social revolution has
Smay NotoijjW 21,1S9S
In Oenend Qftwoom
BulMingCGCB)
Room frl 032
3Tlie lecture wHI itart �rt
240 on !a�f until &20
Everyone i welcome to
�HendtiifcIedtire
�.
presents
JESUS: A PROPHET IN ISLAM
HDo the Muslims believe in the Bible?
Do the Muslims believe in Jesus?
These Questions and More will be
answered in a lecture given by:
IMAM: MAHMMOD AL-KSABANY
(THE IMAM OF THE MOSQUE IN ROCKY MOUNT)
Refreshments will be served. For more information, please tail the Islamic Center of Greenville 252.756.4411
now given way to that of an eco-
nomic one, the enemy as "the bot-
tom line Members discussed the
legacy of Martin Luther King Jr.
and the decline of the black youth
of today.
The turnout was not as success-
ful as Cooper had hoped. "A 99 per-
cent black audience is not the way
to fight racism Cooper said.
Members of minority organiza-
tions, such as the NAACP, were
attending; however, community
members contributed their
thoughts as well.
"There is a lot of talk about
things that can be better between
whites and blacks, but it is all about
how you feel about yourself. If you
hold your head down, you will feel
down said Yvonne Lindscy,
Winterville resident.
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4 Thundiy, Novimbtr 19, 1998
news
The Ent Ciraliniin
U.S. sailors regret not getting
go-ahead to hit Saddam's arsenal
ABOARD THE USS EISEN-
HOWER (AP) Navy pilot Lt. Matt
Bartell was getting dressed for his
first combat mission Saturday
when the announcement came
over the public address system:
Stand down. The United States
had scrapped a planned attack on
Iraq.
"We were mentally geared up.
It was pretty frustrating said
Bartell, 26, an FA-18 pilot from
Harrington, R.I.
From the cacophonous flight
deck to the muted assembly room
deep in the belly of this aircraft car-
rier, servicemen said Tuesday they
felt let down they had lost a chance
to bomb Saddam Hussein's hide-
out.
But the disappointment was giv-
ing way to the heady anticipation of
celebrating Christmas peacefully
with their families. There was also
relief that American troops and
Iraqi civilians were spared a possi-
ble war.
"There will be a little bit of that.
"Boy! We were almost there said
Eisenhower's skipper, Capt.
Denby Starling. "When you don't
go out to do it, there is a little bit of
letdown.
"But am I disappointed that we
did not launch aviators off the ship
and send them in harm's way?
No, absolutely not
The crew feel like a "basketball
team that always practices but
never plays a game. And that was to
have been our game. It was a heart-
breaker said Aviation Ordinance
Man Dirk Palmer of Fort Monroe,
Va.
By Tuesday, sailors had disman-
tled most of the bombs that had
been assembled and loaded on
strike aircraft. After being on a war
footing last week, the 4,700-crew
ship the size of the Empire State
Building in length is settling back
into routine.
"You should have been here a
couple of days ago. The place was
steaming Lt. Mick Rankin told a
group of visiting reporters in the
combat direction center, a dimly lit
room where officers keep track of
every ship and aircraft in the
Persian Gulf region on color video
screens.
But even routine is hard work.
And impressive.
On the flight deck, a flat spread
of steel layered with black non-skid
paint, jets and other aircraft took
off and landed regularly with ship-
shaking shudders and earsplitting
roars. Using only 319 feet of run-
way, steel catapults hurled aircraft
from 0 to 170 mph in 2 12 seconds.
And every 45 seconds, pilots
touched down in a narrow rectan-
gle to ensure a hook protruding
from the plane's rear was ensnared
by a thick steel rope strung across
the deck.
Eisenhower's complement of 46
F-14 and FA-18 jet fighters fly 100
sorties a day. They keep a vigil
around the carrier's battle group
that comprises 14 other ships
destroyers, cruisers, a submarine
and smaller ships.
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FREE FOOD AND CREAT PRIZES
We're Celebrating YOU at
Student
Appreciation Day
When: Thursday,
November 19th, 1998
Where: At ECU Student
Health Service
Time: 10:00AM - 3:00PM
Fill Your tummies while you fill out a survey
letting us know how you feel about our services'
GREAT GIVEAWAYS
ECD STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES
;5 ThufidaY Hot
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; 5 Thursday Nov.mhar 13 13SH
opinion
, The Enl
eastcarolinian
AMV L.ROYSTErUtfilnr
HEATHER BURGESS Managing Ednor
AMV SHERIDAN News Editor
PETER Dawvot Assistant News Ednoi
AMANDA AUSTIN FeaiuiesEdiior
EMILY UTTI.E Head Copy Ediloi
Mario Scherhaufer SponsEdinx
TRACY HAIRR Assisiam Sports EdilDf
CHRIS KNOTTS Stall Mtniuior
Jason Feather PhotnEditor
STEPHANIE WHITI.OCK AH Oesign Manager
JANET RESPESS Advertising Manager
Dennis S. Norton w�bEditor
BOBBY Tugki.E Webmaster
Seivmn ttie CU commufiiiy since t9ft the fas! Cainimun publishes tt.QOTJ copies eveiy Tuesday and Thursday Tee lead edeonal In each edition a the
opinion of Hie f diurnal Board The last Camlmian welcomes leueis 10 Ihe ednoi tunned to 7S0 words which met be edited lot decency or enemy The East
Cai oilman leseives the nqhi m edit m lajeci tellers Iw publication AH letters must be sejned I cue's should ha addressed to Opinion ednoi .The East
Catoiimen. Student Publications Building. ECU. Gieemite. ?i0&843u3 roi mlmmelton ceil ft? 3ZB.6366
ouwiew
Would you like to have a picnic on the grounds of a toxic landfill? Stupid question, right?
Do you smoke?
Every time you light up a cigarette you breathe in, as do the people around you, chemical
compounds like tar, carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide, formaldehyde, benzene, and
nicotine. The list goes on and on. There are over 4,000 chemical compounds that have been
identified in tobacco products and tobacco smoke.
Nicotine is classified as a Class A Carcinogen. This category is used for only the most
dangerous cancer-causing agents to humans and is more dangerous than exposure to asbestos.
The tobacco industry spends about $13 million every day on advertising, much of which
targets adolescents. As a result, 26.5 billion packs of cigarettes are sold in this country every
year, which means that 840 packs are sold every second. How many of them are yours?
Despite the image the tobacco industry wants to give you that everybody smokes, and the
habit is as normal as drinking milk with breakfast, 75 percent of American adults do NOT
smoke.
And people don't die from drinking milk, anyway.
About 434,000 Americans die every year due to their nicotine addictions. Tobacco products
are responsible for more deaths than cocaine, heroin, alcohol, fire, automobile accidents,
homicides, suicides and AIDS combined. Smoking is the number one preventable cause of
death in the nation. Nevertheless, 3,000 children start smoking every day, and 1,000 of them
will die a premature death as a result of their habits.
"But I like smoking you say. That's fine, as long as the pleasure you get from a cigarette
is worth bad breath, yellow teeth, shortness of breath, fuzz on your tongue, smelly clothes, loss
of taste and smell, having to stand outside in the cold every time you want a cigarette,
endangering the health of those around you through second-hand smoke, never having any
money, and the most important of all side effects: Death.
"It's too hard you say. Maybe it is, but it won't seem so difficult when you're lying on a
hospital bed, bald and weighing 100 pounds.
Today is the Great American Smokeout. Can you go through one day without a cigarette?
There are plenty of opportunities to get help with all the activities on campus.
We highly encourage you to participate and inform yourself and your loved ones about the
deadliest of our diseases. Use this opportunity, no matter whether you smoke or not, to find
out how you can quit or how you can help someone else to quit smoking.
OPINION
Columnist
Stephen
Kleinschmit
Campus travel gets weird
Kudos to all of you who stick
with the mountain bikes, the
atple of all of us who are too
poor to buy parking stickers.
I continue to be amazed at the
lengths people go to transport
themselves around the ECU
campus. I am sure a lot of you have
seen some of these things around
campus, so take some time to
reflect with me on how some of our
students here at ECU move
themselves in unusual ways.
Consider the people with low
rider bicycles. They look weird,
yet cool. Usually the people riding
look as if they were going into
childbirth by the position the seat
puts them in. Kudos to all of you
who stick with the mountain bikes,
the staple of all of us who are too
poor (er financially
disadvantaged) to buy parking
stickers.
Then there are the skateboards.
I always thought it would be fun to
be able to ride one of those things.
It's rather unfortunate that I have
the coordination of an intoxicated
Polock on stilts. When I was a kid
my first (and only) skateboard was
a Nash, which any 'boarder will tell
you is the 73 Pinto of skateboards.
I also had a pair of the Fisher
Price safety skatesyou remember
the onesthey were totally plastic
and you could probably crawl
across broken glass faster than you
could skate with those things.
Finally, I know most you have
seen it. I see almost everyone at
the Wright Place chuckle when it
makes its grand entrance: the
motorized scooter. It's like Huffy
and Weed Whacker had a bastard
child. I compare the motor scooter
to a mechanical bull at a country
bar. It looks fun to ride, but I
wouldn't want to be seen on one in
public.
These are rather
unconventional methods of travel,
but nonetheless entertaining to the
spectators. I am pretty sure that I
will have to keep on using my
good old feet, though. Or maybe I
can even whip out those stilts
LETTER
to the Editor
Artists ask due credit for work
Imagine you are a musician who
is beginning to receive airplay and a
DJ neglects to mention your name
when he or she spins your song.
Fathom the idea of being chosen to
sit on the Homecoming Court and
not receiving name recognition at
; the Homecoming game. This type
'�� of neglect occurred in the Nov. 12
: issue of The East Carolinian.
If you feel as I do, then you
believe it's important to be
recognized for your
I accomplishments. In "Local Artists
�displayed at new Evans Street Art
Gallery the Evans Street Art
Gallery was misrepresented, two
"local artists were not acknowledge,
and their copyrights were infringed
upon. The two photographs that
accompanied the article did not
mention the artists, Hannah Jubran
and Michael Waller, and permission
to photograph their work had not
been granted. Additionally, the
represented artwork is actually
displayed at the Greenville
Museum of Art (GMA), not the
Evans Street Gallery.
My purpose is to set the record
straight because I feel it is
important to give credit where
credit is due. The photograph of
the semicircular shape is
"Horizons" by Waller, which is on
display at the GMA. The other
photograph depicts and exhibition
called Secrets of Nature on temporary
display at GMA by Jubran, a
professor of art at ECU.
�I spoke with the assigned
photographer, Marc Crippen, who
did ironically receive credit for the
photographs, and he said he was
told to go to the art museum on
Evans Street. It's apparent that
what ensued was an honest
mistake, which happens often
enough.
I spoke with the owner of the
Evans Street Gallery, Billie Morris.
Morris felt the mix-up was
unfortunate, but the article was
wonderful and definitely
appreciated. In fact, Morris said, "I
have plenty of artwork to be
photographed, and The East
Carolinian is welcome any t
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OPINION
Columnist
Ryan
Kennemur
Macintosh computdrs evil
Why, and I am talking to
the Mac users here, do you
like these fascist machines?
Let's just get it out in the open. I
despise Macintosh computers.
There, 1 said it. Now, I realize that
there are a lot of you out there that
love your Macs more than
anything in the whole wide world.
It is not uncommon to see people
carrying their little powerbooks
with them on airplanes, subways,
horses, or other types of public
transportation. In heaven, the Mac
users have their own little cloud
where they can discuss all kinds of
Mac-related topics, such as
wondering when all the cool PC
programs are going to come out for
them.
Why, and I am talking to the
Mac users here, do you like these
fascist machines? I have been
thinking really hard about it the
past few minutes, and I can come
up with is one thing. You must
really like that little "quack" noise
that you hear when you do
something wrong in the program
that you are using. Hmm. Yep,
that's the only redeeming quality I
can think of.
Come to think of it, I can think
of a thousand good uses for the
"quack" noise. Can you imagine
it? It could work in so many
situations in our everyday lives.
For example, let's say (you don't
really have to "say" it) that you are
having an argument with your
girlfriend. It turns really nasty.
She's screaming about the fact that
you never take her anywhere, and
you are screaming about the fact
that she shouldn't be screaming.
Finally, she insults your family.
"Your family sucks she says.
Well, this puts you ever the edge.
You immediately think of
everything she has ever done or
said that really bothered you, and
then you pull out the most terrible
thing you can think of.
"Remember when you got your
hair colored pink you say, "and I
kept telling you how much I loved
it? Well, I hated it! It made you
look like a flamingo, and everyone
else thought so, too
This is a perfect time to instill
the use of the "quack" noise. This
guy is about to have the wrath of
the plague beset upon him, all
because he lost his temper. The
"quack" noise would be helpful by
showing us that we shouldn't go
any further with the sentence, or at
least change the overall theme of
it. It would sound more like,
"Remember when you got your
hair colored pink and, (QUACK!),
urn, that was really cool. I love
you
It could work in virtually every
possibly devastating situation. It
could keep you from getting fired,
being forced to resign, or even told
that you can't work anymore. It
could even keep you from making
the mistake of writing an opinion
column that says that "women
voters shouldn't count" or
"southerners watch Nascar and
beat their wives It could also
keep you from making those kids
work in your sweatshop to make
your Wal-Mart clothes. It could
even
Sorry about that tangent. I'm
down to my last pixie stick. What
was the point of this column again?
Oh yes, now I remember.
Macintosh bad.
OPINION
Columnist
Britt
Honeycutt
Flowers are nice once in a while
know it's archaic and
outdated, but once in a
while, I like to be courted. I
like the flowers. I like the
dinner. And you, oh you
sneaky, sneaky men, you
know this about
womankind.
I've played the game. We all have.
I am female- I know there are
those of you who have trouble
discerning that from the photo
above, but I am, and being such,
I've piayed the game.
You all know the game. Some
guy asks you out, and you go for
the free stuff. Because they'll do it
unquestioningly, and even though
they usually have ulterior motives,
you're in control of those as well.
So you get the dinner, movies, trips
to amusement parks, concerts,
monster truck rallies and mud
wrastlin. You know, all kinds of
wooing events, and you get to
participate at absolutely no cost.
Ain't it wonderful to be a girl
sometimes?
But eventually it eats at your
soul. I know this from experience.
I begin to question why this poor
individual is spending his hard
earned dollars on my happiness
when I am returning none of these
favors. Why are men programmed
to feel that they should be the
wooers? I know that I personally
am more than capable of paying
my own way into the movies, and
his too. I have a job (hell, 1 have
three) and I have the means to
support myself. I am an
independent person, and I don't
need to be "taken care of by
anyone. So why do I continuously
succumb to the free meals, or the
opening of doors, or the "ladies
first" policy?
Because it feels so damned
good.
1 know it's archaic and outdated,
but once in a while, I like to be
courted. I like the flowers. I like
the dinner. And you, oh you
sneaky, sneaky men, you know this
about womankind. So you take
advantage of it, and hence we are
wooed.
However, If it continues for
long enough, I feel that I am taking
advantage of the poor guy who's
going so broke feeding me that he
can no longer send the money
home to his 17 brothers and sisters
and save for Little Peggy's
operation. And then I start to feel
like a whore.
I think that this situation is
reversed quite a bit as well. You
know the guys who never have any
cash? They'll always "get it next
time?" Weil, they should feel like
whores too.
I have a theory about dating.
Whoever asks for the date and
makes the plans should fork over
the loot when the bill comes,
regardless of whether that person
has a penis or not. I think my
message is this: It's cool to eat for
free, watch free movies and all that
jazz. But take your man (or
woman) out to dinner once in a
while. And don't be a whore.
LETTER
to the Editor
Smog, a problem that can't be ignored
North Carolina has the second
highest number of unhealthy
"smog days" (68) and violations of
the new federal health standard for
ozone pollution (517) between
April and early September. Smog
has been shown to trigger asthma
attacks and other acute respiratory
illnesses in tens of millions of
Americans. Certainly we who live
in this humid environment in
eastern North Carolina are affected.
It's time to tighten up on emission
controls.
��"
But don't we have enough
emission controls, and wouldn't
such controls cause our cars and
trucks to cost mote?
The most recent EPA report has
determined that cleanup of cars
and trucks can be achieved in a
cost-effective manner. Two specific
suggestions for reducing emission
levels would be stipulating that
mini vans and sport utility vehicles
meet the same emission standards
as cars, and reducing the sulfur
content in gas. Hiajh-sulfur gas
erodes emission control equipment
and leads to much higher tailpipe
emissions.
A quick postcard or e-mail to
Margo Oge at the EPA might go a
long way toward cleaning up our
local air. She can be reached at
EPA 401 M St, SW, Mail Code
7645; Washington DC 20460 or by
e-mail at oge.rnan?o�eparnail.epa.gov
Mike Hamer
English Department faculty





6 Thnr�d�y, Nov�mbir 19, 1998
comics
Tin Etitttrolinitt
Four Seats Left
Jason Latour
Mike Litwin
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Raymond Sanders
Life on Tuesday
Chris Knotts
REASONSTO
HAVE LUNCH
ATDARRYFS
10. li will enhance your image.
9. Vour stomach grouted all through biology.
8. There are no quizzes after the meal.
7. They have an incredibly attractive wail-staff.
6. You won! gel onion breath.
5. They have a special lower-priced lunch menu
4. They are convenient!) located across
from the campus.
3. The General Manager will personally
wash your car.
2. They need money to pay for this ad.
1. Refer to the above photo!
Mill I R E D BRILL
800 East 10th Street � 752-1907
Then is no guarantee of enhanced
Image, but II sounds nice.
� Except Fred
Unless you eat onions
Forget it! He won't even
wash his own car.
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7 Thursday. November 19. 1998
features
The East Carolinian
SQUIRRELIN AROUND
Often believed to wreak
havoc on campus
�mm. ,
Brent W. Anderson
CONTRUUTING WRITER
Some students attend East
Carolina for free. That's right,
absolutely free. These students can be
found running around campus without
backpacks. Instead of studying for
classes, they go climb a tree.
This unusual group includes some of
the most famous students on campus�
they are the squirrels of East Carolina
University.
Sciurus carolinensis, better known as
the Eastern Gray Squirrel have been run-
ning around the East Carolina campus for
years. Nobody has an exact count of the
number of gray squirrels on campus but
one person has a good guess.
"I believe there are about 200-300
squirrels on this campus said Hal J.
Daniel, ECU Biology Professor.
Daniel should have a pretty good guess
because for the past 20 years he's been
using the squirrels for his animal behavior
class. He requires students to observe the
squirrels and record their sounds for a class
project.
Not only do students enjoy observing
the squirrels, the squirrels seem to enjoy
observing the students. And they enjoy
the nuts from
oak
trees that
surround the campus. Gray squirrels feed
in the early morning and then again in
mid-afternoon.
"A main source of food for squirrels are
nuts said
Dr. Linda Kuhn, Veterinarian at the East
Carolina Vet Service.
The campus also provides a safe home
for the squirrels.
'The campus provides a nice ecological
setting with plenty of food and very few
predators Daniel said.
One myth about squirrels is that they
cause extensive damage throughout the
campus. People blame them for digging
up flowers, creating messes and many
other things. But one of the problems that
the squirrels ever caused happened a few
years ago. The squirrels were cutting off
the branches of the junipers and cedar
trees next to the Rawl Building searching
for water because of the drought. The
branches ended up on the ground and
it hurt the appearance of the trees.
"The only thing that I don't like
about the squirrels is when they mis-
judge their jump from tree to tree and
splatter on the ground or when they
get hit by a car or bike said Doug
Caldwell, Superintendent of
Facilities Services. "When we dis-
cover a dead squirrel we bury them
next to where we found them
The squirrels seem to do more
good for the campus than bad. First
and foremost, they provide entertain-
ment for the students and staff of
East Carolina.
While walking down the mall, you can
always see students or staff admiring the
squirrels.
"I love the squirrels because they
remind me of Chip and Dale said Aaron
Phelps, East Carolina junior.
"It's nice to see the squirrels run-
ning around when you're having a bad
day because you know
somebody is having a
good time said Christy
Stallings, East Carolina
junior.
According to
Caldwell, another good
thing that the squirrels
do is they help irrigate
the grass when they dig
to hide their food.
Squirrels are interest-
ing creatures with many spe-
cial qualities, according to biologist
Daniel. The first quality is that squir-
rels use a "female choice" mating system.
When you see two squirrels chasing
each other, it is the male squirrel chasing
the female. The female does this to judge
the male's agility and speed in order for
her young to have the same quality genes.
There are usually 4-6 squirrels in a litter.
"The only thing that I don't Hie
about the squirrels is when they mis-
judge their jump from tree to tree
and splatter on the ground, or when
they get hit by a car or bike. When
we discover a dead squirrel we bury
them next to where we found them
Doug Caldwell
Superintendent oi Facilities Services
"Squirrels usually breed twice a year.
Usually around January and June. But
often only the most fit females breed
twice if the population is low and food
resources are available Daniel said.
Another quality of the gray squirrels is
that they release different oral responses
to different types of predators. These
responses are known by all the surround-
ing squirrels and it helps them increase
their usual life span of one to four years.
Around campus, there are only a few
predators for the squirrels to
contest with. Some of these
predators include hawks, owls,
dogs, and humans.
"When it is not squirrel hunting
season, you can see a lot of hawks
hovering over the campus just wait-
ing to feast on the squirrels
Caldwell said.
Caldwell remembers when one
predator feasted on the squirrels.
A few years ago there was a
red-tailed hawk who would
perch on top of the Brewster
building. When the hawk
saw a squirrel, he would
attack the squirrel and
feast on it right there.
"This event made
some of the passing stu-
dents sick to their stom-
achs Caldwell said.
One important thing
for students and staff to
remember about the
squirrels is never to feed
the squirrels, according to
animal experts. Some
food such as egg yolk,
dog food and sun-
flower seeds can hurt
or even kill squir
rels.
"Squirrels are
very unpre-
dictable and
you must always
remember that
they are wild ani
mals and might
bite you if you
get too close
Kuhn said.
Squirrels also
carry a few diseases
such as "Walking Dandruff a condition
in which small mites feed on the superfi-
cial debris present on the skin surface.
Squirrels are known carriers of rabies but
very few humans are affected, according to
Kuhn.
Over the past few years, the squirrels
have become part of the Pirate family and
it wouldn't be the same without them
roaming around the campus.
"The squirrels were here long before
we were here so we should not be con-
cerned Daniel said.
ARISE program gives Committee proposes
lisabled opportunity to workout camPus computer use
new
policy
I Local participation
encouraged
Phillip Gilfus
staff writer
i
! here is a program at ECU that lets
:oplc in wheelchairs climb walls,
lard to believe? Not to the people
ho run the Adapted Recreation
itermural Sport Enrichment
,RISE) program. People with dis-
tilities are being taught to look at
teir handicaps in a different way,
that they can get a chance to
lay and workout like everyone
te.
Thanks to the ARISE program,
:ople who go to the Student
ecreational Center should not be
irprised if they see people in
heclchairs playing basketball or
icquetball. This program, which
been at ECU for many years, is
p mteed through the Department
Recreational Services. However,
le ARISE program did not reach
many people as it wanted to until
ie Rec Center was built. Before its
I impletion, the only alternative
) lace to work-out and exercise was
Christenbury Gym, which offered
very little access for disabled per-
sons.
"Things can be adapted in so
many sports that one can do just
about anything that's out there
said Terri Edwards of the ARISE
program.
On October 17, the ARISE pro-
"Our goal for that day was
primarily to give people an
opportunity to come to the Rec
Center and use its services
Edwards said. "We also
wanted to show people how to
do things they thought they
couldn 't and to give them a
chance to meet other people
and learn
Terri Edwards
ARISE
gram sponsored its Second Annual
Adapted Sports Day. This event
consisted of a series of free work-
shops that were opened to every-
one from ECU and the community.
It was a day of conferences and
workshops that taught people how
to adapt their behaivor in order to
participate in sports and other activ-
ities. This day also encouraged
able-bodied people to come and
learn more about participating in
adapted sports.
"Our goal for that day was pri-
marily to give people an opportuni-
ty to come to the Rec Center and
use its services Edwards said.
"We also wanted to show people
how to do things they thought they
couldn't and to give them a chance
to meet other people and learn
Experienced instructors
explained how various types of
sports could be played. Many had
an opportunity to play wheelchair
basketball and use the climbing
wall. Special handbikes were used
that let participants "run" around
the track. In the pool area, begin-
ning scuba diving and kayaking
were taught. The workshops them-
selves were either taught or co-
taught by a person who was dis-
abled. This helped to show the par-
ticipants how easy it was to learn to
adapt, having an example that
could meet and speak with them.
The ARISE Program offers a
variety of activities each month.
During the month of November,
courses were taught on using the
' SEE ARISE, PAGE 10
Student input wanted
for final version
Nina M. Dry
SENIOR WRITER
For the last two years Yahoo!
Internet Life magazine has listed
ECU as one of the "most wired"
on-line campuses in the United
States. It is the only public univer-
sity in North Carolina to receive
such distinction.
The survey was based on four
categories: general services, acade-
mics, social life and computer sta-
tistics. ECU moved up a whopping
69 places from number 93 in 1997
"East Carolina University is
one of the few schools to
offer distance-learning, a
program that includes
Internet-only classes
A magazine representative
to number 25 this past May
All who use campus computers will soon have to abide by policy
FILE PHOTO
Campus touch-screen kiosksS)lasses.
allow students at East Carolina
University to access grades, web
sites and syllabi. Connected stu-
dents can also register for classes.
drop and add courses, check tran-
scripts, and read the student news-
paper without ever leaving their
dorm room a magazine represen-
tative said. "East Carolina
University is one of the few sch(xls
to offer distance-learning, a pro-
gram that includes Internet-only
With all of this hi-tech technolo-
gy, it has been suggested that a pol-
icy should be formatted for on-cam-
pus computer use.
"A nine people committee com-
posed of students, staff and faculty
was created to put together a draft
of a computer use policysaid
Ronald Speicr, Dean of students.
"There are laws governing the mis-
use of I 'niversity property, but no
specific laws like this policy
SEE COMPUTER PAGE I





8 Thursday, Novtmbir 19, 1998
features
The Eatt Carolinian
Computer
cantinuad ftom page 7
The policy draft is entitled
University Student and Employee
Computer Use Policy. It lists all of
the regulations students, staff, and
faculty must abide by while using
'computers, whether it is in one of
the academic labs or in the comfort
.of one's residence hall.
"The draft has not been adopt-
ed by the university as a policy
yet said Toi Carter, assistant uni-
versity attorney. "It is still up for
review and we are looking for stu-
dent input
The Computer Use Policy draft
was given to the Student
Leadership Development
Programs office to be printed in
their student leadership newsletter,
Kaleidoscope. According to Jim
Sturm, director of student leader-
ship development programs, the
draft was printed in the newsletter
and then distributed to the presi-
dents and advisors of all the organi-
zations on campus and to all of the
RAs. In total, 700 newsletters were
given, out.
To check out the proposal, go to
The East Carolinian web site.
Input is wanted, so students who
have questions or concerns about
the draft should contact the office
of the Dean of Students, Student
Life.
9 Thursday,
covering the
offbeat
Bank robber caugit
after stopping for beer
STAFFORD TOWNSHIP, N.J.
' (AP) � A bank robber was caught
. .after stopping off for a cold beer fol-
' lowing the heist, police said.
Andrew Vada, 37, of Waretown
.used a mask and a plastic handgun
xo rob $4,760 in cash from a First
Union Bank branch in a shopping
plaza Thursday, said police Lt.
Thomas Conroy.
Witnesses told police the robber
drove away in a 19 Nissan Sentra,
which had been stolen Wednesday.
According to police, Vada aban-
doned the car in the rear of an
i apartment complex and changed
�his clothes before walking away
carrying a blue-and-white cooler
with the cash inside.
He sat down at the Cranberry
Bog Restaurant's bar, conversing
with the
bartender about John Glenn's
return to space and other matters.
He drank two large beers and
repeatedly asked what time it was
before paying with a $50 bill and
then leaving $2 and change for a
tip.
He was caught when he walked
out of the bar to a nearby bus stop,
where two police officers in sepa-
rate cars spotted him and arrested
him, police said.
Witnesses had seen him change
clothes and told police what he was
wearing, police said.
Environmentalists hit
global trade with pies
GENEVA (AP) � About 20
environmentalists threw cream
pies Friday at the chief of the
World Trade Organization.
WFO Director-General Renato
Ruggiero had just given a speech at
the Royal Institute of International
Affairs in London when the pies
flew. More than one hit Ruggiero,
said WTO spokesman Keith
Rockwell.
"When they have no more ratio-
nal arguments, the fringe elements
have to use cake Ruggiero said in
a one-sentence statement from his
Geneva headquarters. In his
speech, he had been defending a
WTO decision to overturn U.S.
attempts to protect endangered sea
turtles from shrimp fishermen.
A group calling itself the Biotic
Baking Brigade later issued a state-
ment saying its pie throwers sent
"a sticky message" to Ruggiero
and the global elite: To those who
wish to dominate the world, the
world replies, "Let them eat hum-
ble pie
Someone from the group
approached Ruggiero with what
appeared to be a present, Rockwell
said, "but I told him to get out of
the way
"Then one guy shoved the pie
SEE PIES. PAGE 9
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9 Thurtday. November rS. 1998
features
Tilt Eait Carolinian
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Pies
continued from page 8
hard into his face and another
brought a second down on top of
his head, accusing him of being a
'turtle-killer Rockwell said.
Rockwell, who was by
Ruggiero's side, expressed concern
about the "very threatening and
hostile" attack on the 69-year-old
Ruggiero.
The WTO drew the ire of envi-
ronmental groups two weeks ago by
ruling that the United States cannot
force shrimp-exporting countries to
fit their fleets with $75 devices that
protect turtles.
Rockwell said Ruggiero, who
received heavy bodyguard protec-
tion when he was Italy's trade min-
ister in the 1980s, was "extraordi-
narily calm
"The first thing he said was:
'This is not a bad cake Rockwell
told The Associated Press. The fla-
vor of the pie wasn't known, he
said.
No police or guards were pre-
sent. Ruggiero wasn't hurt in the
attack and police weren't called,
said George Joffe, acting director of
the institute.
A person claiming to be a mem-
ber of the Biotic Baking Brigade
slapped Nobel Prize-winning econ-
omist Milton Friedman in the face
with a coconut cream pie in San
Francisco on Oct. 9. That pic-
thrower was arrested for misde-
meanor battery and released.
In February, pranksters in
Brussels, Belgium, hit Microsoft
Corp. chairman Bill Gates with
three pies. Procter & Gamble chair-
man John Pepper was pied less
than two weeks later in Columbus,
Ohio, by animal rights activists.
Last November, designer Oscar
de la Renta was hit with a tofu
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continued from page 7
climbing wall, playing wheelchair
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other programs are being planned
in the future. If you wish to partic-
ipate or learn more about the
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Rec Center (328-6387) for more
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10 Thursday, November 19, 1998
sports
11 Th
undi
The East Carolinian
PureUola
Dance team shows love for the game
J A S O N L A T O L: R
SENIOR WRITER
When thinking of the term 'stu-
dent athlete general perceptions
come to mind. Many of us think of
the 250-pound linebacker or the
wiry 6-foot-6 shooting guard.
What most of us don't realize,
however, is that we may be sitting
next to a different kind of student
athlete in class everyday.
These athletes commit their
life to just as much practice, give
just as much effort, and have just
as much love for their sport as any
All-American power forward.
Ladies and gentlemen we are
speaking of none other than your
ECU Pure Gold dance team.
Along with the usual stress of
college life, these girls commit an
average of 15 hours a week to prac-
tice, not to mention a few hours of
weight lifting. Furthermore, they
sacrifice many weekend evenings
to perform at basketball games.
All of this is done for the pure love
of performing for your enjoyment.
No scholarships, free books or free
meals are provided as incentives
for these hard-working athletes.
"Sure, it takes up a lot of my
free time freshman Jessica
Mauch said. "But I couldn't imag-
ine it not being a part of my life, it
is very much worth the effort
In order to make the team, the
girls must try out. One tryout is
held during the fall and one in
spring. They are judged heavily
on the criteria of basic dance tech-
niques in jazz, funk, and cheer
dance. They are
additionallyjudged on their atti-
tudes.
"Few people realize the effort
and ability that goes into being a
dancer coach Amy Graham said.
"Most of these girls have been
dancing for years. They all have
some prior background in dance or
cheer teams
ECU'S Pure Gold dance team supports the Pirates in their basketball home games in an elegant style for the crowd's enjoyment.
PHOTO BV KIM MCCUMBER
Once selected to the team, the
girls then begin to prepare for the
National Cheer Association sum-
mer camp. A good performance at
the camp is a key factor because it
is one of the two ways to qualify for
the National Cheer Association
championship held every April.
Hoping to improve from a disap-
pointing 13th place at last year's
championship, the team has
already qualified by finishing with
an impressive second place at the
camp this year.
"We are pretty pleased with the
showing at the camp Graham
said. "We are right now shooting to
make a top 10 finish at the national
finals
A top 10 national finish could
possibly could make some of these
girls just as recognizable to you or
me as that 250-pound linebacker,
but maybe just a little bit easier to
Women's basketball beats Campbell
Strong defense and shooting gjves
Lady Pirates win over Camels
Jonathan Russell
staff writer
Defense and hot shooting led the ECU women's bas-
ketball team to a 64-43 win over Campbell in their
home opener Monday night at Williams Arena, aveng-
ing a 67-62 loss from last year at Buies Creek.
Junior transfer guard, Waynetta Veney, led with 19
points on seven of 14 shooting from the floor while the
Lady Pirates' (1-0) defense held Campbell to 24 per-
cent shooting in the second half. Freshman center
Teana McKiver came off the bench to score 15 points
and five rebounds. She also had five blocked shots in
her 21 minutes of play. The Pirates' offense struggled
in the first half but caught on fire in the second with 52
percent shooting and Waynetta Veney's 16 points.
"I was overly excited at the beginning about my
first game here Veney said. "I think that we came
together great tonight as a team and I'm glad that we
got the win
The Lady Pirates tight defense forced 30 turnovers
and recorded 12 steals, most of which came in the sec-
ond half. This allowed the Pirates to secure an early
second half lead that they wouldn't relinquish.
"Defense was the key to win head coach Dee
Gibson said. "We have a goal of forcing 20 turnovers a
night and I think we did a good job of doing that. The
kids came out and played really hard tonight which
made my first win a lot of fun The win was Gibson's
first ever collegiate win as head coach.
With the loss, the Lady Camels fell to 1-1 for the
season and will face Richmond on Saturday.
The Lady Pirates begin a long road trip starting
next Tuesday, Nov. 24 where they take on the 49ers of
UNC-C. i
The Lady Pirates start theirseason Monday night with an impressive 64-43 home win against Campbell.
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMBER
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�M : .
Pirates head to
season finale
To face Memphis
in Liberty Bowl
Travis It mm
SENIOR WRITER
ECU's football team will try to sal-
vage a winning season on Saturday
when it travels to Memphis to take
on the Tigers in the Liberty Bowl.
The Pirates faced a similar situ-
ation last year when at 5-5
the team played their final
game against N.C. State in
Raleigh. While ECU came
up short in that game, the
players are confident this
year that they end the sea-
son on a positive note.
"We went 5-6 last yar
and that was a real low
point said Rod Coleman,
senior linebacker. "Last
year it was tough. I felt bad
for the seniors just going
out 5-6.
"It hurt me knowing
that they have to live with
that for the rest of their
lives. It would hurt me just
knowing that I would have
to go out like that too
Sophomore running
back Jamie Wilson says the
underclassmen want to send
Coleman and the rest of the
seniors off on a good note.
"We can't end up like last
year Wilson said. "For
most of them it's going to be
their last football game ever.
We want to give them a good
feeling of going out with a
winning season
Head coach Steve Logan
says the tough losses against
Alabama and Houston have
haunted this team but a win-
ning campaign would help
erase those memories.
"A winning season means
a lot Logan said. "Those
two games put us with our
backs against the wall. We
just need to go win this foot-
ball game right here so we
can put another winning season
under our belts. That is a big deal
Logan says in order to achieve
that winning season, they must
throw early and often against the
Tigers. Freshman quarterback
David Garrard has been brought
along slowly by Logan but had
more of the offense available to
him against Louisville. Garrard
responded by having the best
game of his young career.
"I'm going to push the enve-
SEE FOOTBALL. PAGE 12
fcV
LaMont Chappell runs the ball in the Pirates' last
home game Saturday against Louisville.
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMBER
CONFERENCE
USA
UPDATE
ThU Week's Qtwtes
Army at Louisville
Cincinnati at Arkansas State
ECU at Memphis
Houston at Tulane
Southern Miss at Nevada
Uut Week's Keadts
Louisville 63, ECU 45
Tulane 49,Army 35
Cincinnati 44, Houston 43
Southern Miss 45, Memphis 3
Source: ECU Sports Information Department
All Games W-L Pts Opp
CONFERENCE CSIJPDATE
� � W-L Pts Opp
Tulane 5-0 191 129 Southern Miss 5-1 207 80 Louisville 3-2 203 180 ECU 2-3 137 184 Houston 2-3 155 148 Army 2-3 148 164 Memphis 1-4 121 179 Cincinnati 1-5 161 2599-0 6-4 6-4 5-5 3-7 2-7 2-8 1-9388 294 409 240 234 200 195 208218 168 304 266 269 260 306 449
Source: ECU Sports Information Department
Volleyball to host
CAA Championships
William & Mary first
opponent on Friday
Todd Tallmadoe
senior writer
ECU's volleyball team will host the
1998 CAA volleyball champi-
onships this weekend at Minges
Coliseum.
The team, coming in as the
number six seed, will open against
number three seed William &
Mary. The Lady Pirates split the
series this year with W & M by
winning the first match back on
Oct. 3 at Williamsburg, Va� 3-1.
The win stopped a 22-match losing
streak against W & M, dating back
to 1982. The women, however,
were not able to come back with
another win the second time at
home by dropping three straight
games against W & M on Oct. 23.
The Pirates go into the tourna-
ment without a lot of experience.
The team has only one senior and
six new players to the team.
Despite its inexperience, the team
feels optimistic about going into
the tournament.
"We feel confident as a team
said Cinta Claro, sophomore. "We
are more competitive and more
SEE VOLLEYBALL PAGE 11
I

Bostc
A





�rolinian
Jto
ale
winning season
hat is a big deal
order to achieve
ison, they must
ften against the
in quarterback
is been brought
Logan but had
nse available to
lisville. Garrard
aving the best
; career,
push the enve-
ILL. PAGE 12
I in the Pirates' last
linst Louisville.
JMBEfl
DATE
State
ida
r
i 43
nphis 3
:ion Department
Games
PtsOpp
388218
294168
409304
240266
234269
200260
195306
208449
DSt
hips
isburg, Va 3-1.
22-match losing
: M, dating back
imen, however,
:ome back with
second time at
three straight
: M on Oct. 23.
into the tourna-
t of experience.
' one senior and
to the team,
ience, the team
out going into
ent as a team
ophomore. "We
itive and more
Ll. PAGE 11
IThursdty, November 19,
1998
s
The East Carolinian
50 YE4R ANNIVERSARY
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Swim teams head into
NIKE Cup on winning note
I
Pirates earn confidence
with last victories
Checker
Burger
Checkers
Eric Couch
SENIOR WRITES
Both the men's and women's swim
teams captured impressive accom-
plishments with wins against
Davidson and Georgia Southern
this weekend, when the Lady
Pirates improved to an undefeated
record of 6-0 and the men's team
achieved its first two victories of
the year to move to 2-4.
For the women's team, it was a
dominating win on Saturday, Nov.
14, with scores of 154-84 over GSU
and 131-101 over Davidson. Once
again, Courtney Foster helped lead
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the way for the Pirates. Foster has
won nearly every event she has
entered this year. She won the 50
yard freestyle and 100 yard
freestyle. But Foster was not the
only freshman standing out for the
Pirates. Freshman Dana Fuller was
a double winner on Saturday by
winning the 1000 yard freestyle
and the 500 yard freestyle.
Nevertheless, the Lady Pirates
were not the only Pirate winners on
Saturday. The men's team pulled
off two wins for themselves.
"The guys really stepped up
and had by far their best day of the
year said Rick Kobe, head coach.
Adam Gaffey contributed two
wins for ECU with victories in the
1000 yard freestyle and the 500
yard freestyle. Matt Jabs tacked on
two wins in the 50 and the 100 yard
freestyle. Hopefully, the Pirates
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Looking for a Church Away from Home?
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Come join the friendship, fellowship, food and fun!
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will keep up the strong swimming
in Chapel Hill this weekend for the
NIKE Cup.
"The NIKE Cup is one of the
top two or three invitational tourna-
ments Kobe said.
In this invitational, the Pirates
will be taking their talents against
some of the top 20 teams in the
nation, including UNC, Clemson,
UCONN, Kansas, Kentucky, LSU, .
N.C. State and Syracuse.
According to Kobe, the Pirate
swimmers are very excited about
being invited to such a tournament.
"Everybody's really pumped
Kobe said.
Twelve Lady Pirates and nine
men will make the trip to Chapel
Hill to compete this weekend.
Their coach says their attitudes are
very positive right now.
Volleyball
continued from page ID
prepared for this tournament this
year
The Lady Pirates had a disap-
pointing 3-0 loss to James Madison
in last years' CAA tournament.
The volleyball team ended up 4-8
in the conference this year and in a
three way tie for fourth.
"You cannot look at our record
said Lucinda Mason, sophomore.
"We were in a lot of our games and
just could not get a break. The
teams were fairly even - talent-
wise - in the conference
With the loss against JMU at last
years' tournament, the players feel
less pressure this year.
"Last year I was scared going
into the CAA Mason said. "This
year I do not have the butterflies
like I did back then
"We are more experienced this
time said Shannon Kaess, junior
captain. "We are more talented this
year and our attitude is better with
better preparation for it
Claro, too, feels that there is less
pressure on the team this year than
last year.
"We basically have a nothing-to-
lose mentality Claro said. "We
had really good practices this week
and feel ready to play
ECU will start the tournament
against William & Mary at 7 pm on
Friday. Their will be a banquet
tonight for the announcement of
the all-conference-selections with
the competition starting on Friday
at 2 p.m.
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TICKETS General Public S9andS8 � Children S6 and S5
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November 19. 20 21. ?3 iintl 24 8 00 (i m � NovemhtM 71 7 00 p m
lb





12 Thursday, November IS. 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
Football
continued from page 10
lope again with the young man
Logan said. "We are going to have
to throw the ball on these people.
They arc very strong against the
run, I don't care what their num-
bers say
Memphis (2-8, 1-4 C-USA) has
played well in recent weeks, scor-
ing over 30 points in four consecu-
tive games before being obliterated
by Southern Miss last week 45-3.
Logan said Southern Miss was able
to throw the ball early and run it
late against the Tigers' talented
front seven.
"Their front seven is very
good Logan said. "They're a 4-3
type defense. They've got four
good down people. They're very
strong.
"They Southern Miss threw
the ball early and ran it late when
things got a little bit out of hand.
That's what we need to do
ECU may be without leading
receiver Troy Smith. Smith twisted
his knee in the loss to Louisville
and whether or not he will play for
the last college game of his career is
uncertain. Smith says he
will try to play if at all possi-
ble.
"I hope I can get out
there for a couple of snaps
Smith said. "It would be
difficult not to play
Noseguard Travis
Darden is another senior
who may miss his final col-
legiate game. Logan said
Darden suffered a severe
bruise when he took a hel-
met to the shoulder during
a kickoff return against the
Cardinals.
"He is questionable at
best Logan said. "I don't
know if he will travel
The loss of the run-
stuffing Darden could be
the key, as Memphis has
become primarily a run-oriented
team in recent weeks.
"The last three or four weeks
they've committed themselves to
the running game Logan said.
"They've eliminated turnovers and
found a couple of good backs
Tailbacks Gerald Arnold and
Teofilo Riley provide the Tigers
with their main rushing threat. The
smaller Arnold starts most games,
running for 899 yards while averag-
ing five yards per carry. Riley sports
Sextet
History
ECU vs. Memphis
(ECU leads, 6-2)
1990-
1991-
1992-
1993-
1994-
1995-
1996-
1997-
ECU 24-17 at Memphis
ECU 20-13 at Greenville
UM 42-7 at Memphis
UM 34-7 at Greenville
ECU 30-6 at Memphis
ECU 31-17 at Greenville
ECU 20-10 at Memphis
ECU 32-10 at Greenville
Source: ECU Sports Information Department
a 6.4 yards per carry average, com-
ing off the bench to gain 462 yards
on the season.
After playing several quarter-
backs earlier in the year, Memphis
will go with redshirt freshman Neil
Suber against ECU. Suber has
completed 53 of 103 passes for 704
yards this season, with three touch-
downs and two interceptions.
The game will be broadcast
throughout eastern North Carolina
by WITN. Kickoff is set for 2 p.m.
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General Admission: $11.00 Individual $13.00 at the Door $9.00 Groups of 10 or more
Ticket Outlets: Baptist Student Union 252-752-4646
A Taste ol Heaven Christian Bookstore 252-321 -2021
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Oakmont Baptist Church 252-756-1245
For More Information, Call: 252-355-6392
Sponsored by Baptist Student Union and CGB. Inc. COMPASSION
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1 3 Thursday,
2 BR. Apt. a'
tor Jan. 1st. 3
apts. availabl
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Please call 75;
$395 A mor
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night 321-232
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758-4015
WANTED: M
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$225 a month
pets. Call Johr
TWIN OAKS
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SEEKING 2
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WANTED TO
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sewer Free. ;
Pool and laund
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LAID-BACK
placement roc
bedroom towi
cember or Jan
12 bills. 439-
NEED TWO re
12 bath town
from Wal-Mart
or mid-Decem
bills. Call Jeani
FEMALE ROC
share 5 bedroc
house located
on 5th Street.
town. Includes
heat, WD, d
and more- mu
plus 14 utilit
leave message.
FEMALE ROC
sublease a two
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rilla state only,
od Stamps,
1 3 Thursday, November IS, 1998
FOR RENT
2 BR. Apt. available above Percola-
tor Jan. 1st. $500 a month. 2-2 BR.
apts. available above Catalog Con-
nection, Jan. 1st-$475 & $550 a
month. 3 BR. apt. available January
1st above BW 3's. $850 a month.
Please call 758-2616, ask for Yvonne.
$395 A month Two bedroom du-
plex. Quiet neighborhood. Wash-
erdryer hook-up. Call day, 551-7810;
night 321-2329.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
ONE OR Two roommates.
$240mo. $240 dep. Great loca-
tion. Call 353-1065 or 353-8945.
PINEBROOK APARTMENTS, 1-2
BRs available, water, sewer, cable in-
cluded. Reduced Deposits Novem-
ber, December. On-site main-
tenance, management, ECU bus
line. 9-12 month lease, pets allowed.
758-4015
WANTED: MALE or female room-
mate to share 2 bedroom apt walk-
ing distance from campus, upper-
classman, non-smoker preferred.
$225 a month plus 12 utilities. No
pets. Call John 757-0610.
TWIN OAKS end unit, 3 bedrooms,
2 12 baths, gas logs. Available Jan.
1. $650 month. Call 756-5177. De-
posit required.
SEEKING 2 females or males to
sublease 2 bedroom, 1 12 bath
townhouse, $410month. No depos-
it. Basic cable included. For more
info, call 353-4734.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$285month. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apts 125 Avery St. in Green-
ville - 5 blocks from campus 758-
6596.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom, 1 bath apartment
off 1st Street, from Jan-May. Perfect
for students not attending summer
school! Dishwasher, air, WD con-
nections. $187.50 plus 12 electric.
12 phone. Free water, sewer, basic
cable. Smokers OK. Call Sallie, 329-
7235.
WANTED TO share 2 bedroom
apartment; on bus line, cable, water,
sewer Free. Available December
Pool and laundry on site. Call Renee
at 754-2719.
LAID-BACK Musician seeks re-
placement roommate to share 2
bedroom townhouse starting De-
cember or January. $205month
12 bills. 439-0310
NEED TWO roommates for 3 BR, 2
12 bath townhouse located across
from Wal-Mart. Can move in ASAP
or mid-December. Pay 13 of all
bills. Call Jeanine 355-2913.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 5 bedroom2 bath, furnished
house located across from campus
on 5th Street, one block from down-
town. Includes cable, central air, gas
heat, WD, dishwasher, backyard
and more- must see! Rent $231.25
plus 14 utilities. Call 830-2069,
leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
sublease a two bedroom apt. in Tar
River. Please call 561-8385.
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE
�needed to share 3 bedroom duplex
m Wyndham Cir. Call ASAP, 830-
�"2003.
FOR SALE
CANON STARWRITER Jet word
processor monitor, printer clip
art, spread sheet, address book
label program and games. Not
even a year old $450 or best off-
er. Call Davina at 355-5450 or
353-2505.
TWO DORM size refrigerators for
sale. $60 OBO, great condition. Call
752-7097.
MONGOOSE HILLTOPPER one
year old, like new, comes with seat
lock, water bottle cage and U-lock,
$325 OBO. 329-0786 ask for Benji or
leave message.
AAAA EARLY Specials! Panama
City! Room with kitchen $129! In-
cludes 7 free parties! Daytona $149!
New Hotspot-South Beach129! Co-
coa Beach $149! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
'86 FORD Bronco II. auto, 138K
miles, new exhaust, starter, battery,
plugs, runs looks good, red, white,
red int. $2100, must sell, OBO. 329-
1250.
AAAA! EARLY Specials! Cancun
& Jamaica! 7 nights air and hotel
from $399! Includes free food,
drinks, parties! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
MOVING - Must sell: kitchen table
and chairs, double bedframe, mi-
crowave, washer and dryer, mirrors
and more. Cheap Prices. Call 752-
7224 after 2 p.m.
AAAA! SPRING Break Travel was
1 of 6 small businesses in the US
recognized by the Council of Better
Business Bureaus for outstanding
ethics in the marketplace! spring-
breaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386
FURNITURE MANUF. by 'This End
Up sofa, chair, 3 tables. Excellent
condition. Must sell. 321-1402.
AAAA! EARLY Spring Break Spe-
cials! Bahamas Party Cruise! 6 days
$279! Includes most meals! Awe-
some beaches, nightlife! Departs
from Florida! springbreaktravel.com
1-800-678-6386
FOR SALE: one extra long sofa, two
wing-back chairs, and one ottoman
for $100. Call Becky at 758-1317.
SUPER ENTERTAINMENT System
(Sony digital Dolby Prologic system
receiver, 26 cartridges Pioneer CD
player, Sony 5-disk CD changer, dual
cassette tape player, Bose 301
speakers (4), JBL rear speakers, sub-
woffer; Sony 27" Surround Sound
TV); 3 Hi Fi VCRs; Furniture - couch
& chair, bookshelves, dining table,
queen & full size bed (new), many
other items. 321-3242, leave mes-
sage if no answer.
SERVICES
FACULTYSTAFFPARENTS: Tutor-
ing Today for a successful tomor-
row. 13-year veteran school teacher
specializing in Reading, Math, and
Study Skills. Contact Robin @ 754-
8020.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(919)496-2224
WZMB 91.3
Bring in two cans of
food and register for your
chance to win Marilyn
Manson, Korn,
or Dave Matthews ticket
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
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FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
We Need TimberUnd boots
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POLO EDDIE BAUER
AND OTHER NAME BRAND MEN'S CLOTHING
SHIRTS, PANTS, JEANS, SWEATS, JACKETS, SHOES, ETC.
WE ALSO BUY AND SELL:
GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
QUICK, EASY, HELPFUL
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
414 S. EVANS (UP THE STREET FROM CUBBIES)
752-3866
TUESDAY - SATURDAY, 9:00 - 5:00
(DRIVE TO THE BACK DOOR BEHIND PARK THEATRE)
ONE OF THE FAVORITE STUDENT STORES FOR YEARS
(IF YOU ARE SELLING, ID IS REQUIRED)
classifieds
HELP WANTED
TEMPORARY PART-TIME (20
hrs.week) positions available begin-
ning December 1, 1998-February 26,
1999 (tentative). Need: 28 Library
Moving Assistants, $6hour; 4 Li-
brary Moving Assistant Team Leader
$8hour; 4 DriverLoaders $7hour.
Apply MonFri. 9 a.m3 p.m room
2400. 2nd Floor, Joyner Library
Must be a current ECU student en-
rolled 6 hours or more, bring social
security card, drivers license, and
class schedule.
1999 INTERNSHIPS! Attention un-
dergraduate business students. Now
interviewing on campus for manag-
ers across Virginia, North and South
Carolina for summer of 1999. Aver-
age earnings last summer $7,000.
Call Tuition Painters at (800) 393-
4521. or e-mail at tuipaint@bell-
south.net
EARN WHILE YOU learn, up to
$1,000.00 wk. Day and night
shifts. Clean, secure working at-
mosphere. Playmates Adult En-
tertainment. 252-747-7686 for in-
terview.
BEAUTIFUL MODEL for lingerie
fashion show. Apply in person only.
No calls. Lori's Intimate Apparel
CYPRESS LANDING. Now hiring
marketing assistants MonThur. 4
p.m9 p.m 20-22 hours weekly.
Great hourly wage plus bonus. Must
have strong communication skills,
like talking to people, customer serv-
ice oriented & team player. Main
function will be telephoning custom-
ers. Call Craig Wheeler MonFri. to
schedule interviews, 975-8100.
FULL-TIME and Part-time teaching
positions available Great experience
for CDFR and ELEM majors. Call
Greenhouse Preschool at 355-2404.
NEED A PART TIME JOB?
RPSINC.
b looking fcin'Ai km ;t iuniujki to load vans and
unload trailed fur the am hift noun 3Xtani to 8am.
S7.G0houn tuition assistance available after 30 days.
Future career opportunities in operations and manage
ment possible. Applications can be filled out at 2401
United llrive (near the aquatics center) Greenville
BEAUTIFUL LINGERIE sales people
needed Must have retail experience.
No calls. Lori's Intimate Apparel.
FREE CD Holders, T-shirts, Prepaid
Phone Cards. Earn $1000 part-time
on campus. Just call 1-800-932-
0528 x 64.
BARTENDERS ARE in Demand
Earn $15-$30hr. Have fun and
make great $$$! Call for information
about our $99 Holiday Tuition Spe-
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Bartending School today Call toll
free at 1-888-676-0774.
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CAMPUS REPS SIGN UP ONLINE I
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GREEK PERSONALS
PI KAPPA Alpha. Sigma Phi Epsilon.
and Delta Zeta. we had a great time
at the Quad on Saturday Hope we
can all get together again soon!
Love, Alpha Delta Pi
ALPHA DELTA Pi would like to con-
gratulate our new sisters Gena An-
derson, Adrianne Gietz. Caryn Hines,
Jennifer Jackson, Sandy Jenkins,
Heather Keck, Kelly Lundin. Katy
MacNeill, Melissa Madson, Sarah
Mansfield, Kelley McMurray, Kara
Medlin, Lesley Miller, Shanna Moore,
Amy Patton, Nicole Porter, Margaret
Roberts, Candyce Rumley, Liz Swirs-
ky, and Becky Williams. We are very
proud of all of you and love you very
much!
PI DELTA wishes to thank all of
those who either participated in or
attended our 2nd Annual Wild "N
Crazy Towel Contest. Without you it
would not have been a success!
EPSILON SIGMA Alpha would like
to thank everyone who came out to
support our blood drive. Thanks, sis-
ters, for all of your hard work! See
you Friday nightl
GREEK PERSONALS
ALPHA DELTA Pi would like to
thank everyone who came to our
Bring-A-Date last Thursday. Hope
everyone had a great time!
DELTA SIGMA Phi, thanks for a
great social on Thursday. You always
show our sisters a great time. Love,
the sisters of Alpha Phi
THANKS SIGMA Nu for a great so-
cial on Thursday Love, the sisters of
Alpha Phi
SIGMA PHI Epsilon, Pi Kappa Al-
pha. Alpha Delta Pi, thanks for the
great quad last Saturday! Let's get
together again soon! Love, the sis-
ters of Delta Zeta
PI DELTA would like to extend a
very special thank-you to the Rugby
Team for a great social. We had an
awesome time spending our "bucks"
on you! Love, the sisters and new
members.
TO ALL of our little sisters, we had
a wonderful time at sisters party.
You girls did a great job. Love, your
big sisters in Alpha Phi
PI KAPPA Alpha, thanks for the tail-
gate, too bad it rained. Let's get to-
gether again soon. Love, the sisters
and new members of Alpha Xi Delta
OTHER
CRUISE SHIP Employment - work-
ers earn up to$2,000month
(wtips & benefits). Word Travel!
Land-Tour jobs up to$5,000-
$7,000summer. Ask us how! 517-
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SPRING BREAK 99 Best price
Guaranteed CancunJamaica from
$399! Bahamas from $459! Florida
from $129! Travel for Free Campus
Reps Wanted! Call USA Spring Break
at 1-800-799-8445 or 1-888-777-
4642. Space is limited, so call today!
D. J. FOR HIRE
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HYPE UP YOUR PARTY
For alt functions & campus
organizations
Call J.Arthur @ 252-412-0971
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Send a long self addressed stamped envelope to:
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Post Office Box 507
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The East Carolinian
OTHER
"�ACT NOWI Reserve your spot for
Spring Break 19991 Packages to
South Padre(free meals), Cancun, Ja-
maica. KeyWest. Panama City. Group
Discounts for 6. 800-838-8203
www.leisuretours.com
SPRINGBREAK FLORIDA, Texas.
Cancun, Mexico, Jamaica, Bahamas,
etc. All popular spots. Browse
www.icpt.com and call 800-327-
6013. Best hotels, prices and parties.
Reps, organizations, and promoters
wanted. Inter-Campus Programs.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
THE EAST Carolina Native Ameri-
can Organization will be holding an
interest meeting on Nov. 19th in GCB
1031 at 9p.m. Any students are wel-
come to attend.
SPRING BREAK 99! Cancun' Nas-
sau Jamaica 'Mazatlan Acapulco
' Bahamas Cruise ' Florida" Florida '
South Padre. Travel Free and make
lots of Cash! Top reps are offered
full-time staff jobs. Lowest price
Guaranteed Call now for details!
www.classtravel.com 800838-6411
HAVE YOU experienced the ride?
The Dept. of Recreational Services
new RPM bike classes are in high
gear, and classes are filling fast! $10
pass gets 5 full sessions. Contact
the SRC Main Office at 328-6387 for
registration information.
CHOOSING A Major or a Career:
Thursday 3:30-5PM. The Center for
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering the following work-
shop on November 19th. If you are
interested in this workshop, please
contact the Center at 328-6661.
THE THETA Alpha Chapter of Alpha
Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. presents,
"Fast Food Diet: How to Survive a
College Student Diet A one-hour in-
teractive seminar designed to in-
crease students awareness of the
various food selections and diet
choices for an on-the-go lifestyle of a
college student on November 23,
1998, 7:30-8:30 p.m. at Mendenhall
Student Center.
BECOMING A Successful Student-
Test Preparation Workshop: Monday
3:30-4:30 The Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development is of-
fering the following workshop on
Monday the 23rd. If you are interest-
ed in this workshop, contact the
Center at 328-6661.
GAMMA BETA Phi will hold their
next meeting 5 p.m. Thursday in
Mendenhall Student Center rooms 2
&3.
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION Work-
shop: Monday 11:00-12:00. The Cen-
ter for Counseling and Student De-
velopment is offering the following
workshop on Monday the 23rd. If
you are interested in this workshop,
please contact the Center at 328-
6661.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
NORTH CAROUNA Zoo Expedi-
tion. Join us December 6th, as we
explore one of the East's best habi-
tat zoos. You'll see an array of ani-
mals from North America as well as
Africa. Sign up! Spaces are limited.
Registration deadline is Nov. 27th.
Member cost is $15. Call Adventure
ProgrammingDept. of Recreational
Services @ 328-6387.
AEROBICS SCHEDULE Hotline:
Need to know when the next stress-
relieving, heart-rate raising, flab-
burning, blood-pressure reducing
aerobics class is? Dial 328-6443 ext.
2 for a listing of current class sched-
ules.
ADVERTISE IN THE
CLASSIFIEDS
328-6009
IT WORKS!
ADVANCED CLIMBING Sessions!
The Adventure Program will be host-
ing climbing sessions every Tuesday
from 7-8 p.m. thru Dec. 8th. Join us
each week for some one-on-one
time with our top climbing instruc-
tors. Set your ow pace and choose
what you want to learn! Registration
deadline is one week prior to each
session. Member cost is $15. For fur-
ther information, contact Adventure
ProgrammingDept. of Recreational
Service's @ 328-6387.
GET IT together .together Few peo-
ple like to do things alone, including
working out and dieting. Find a mo-
tivated friend to join you, and con-
tact the SRC Main Office (328-6387)
for details on how the two of you. to-
gether, can purchase a Partner Train-
ing package to get you both on the
right track for a healthy lifestyle.
BECOMING A Successful Student-
Time Management: Thursday 3:30-
4:30. The Center for Counseling and
Student Development is offering the
following workshop on November
19th. If you are interested in this
workshop, contact the Center at
328-6661.
ENHANCE YOUR climbing skills
There will be a day trip to the pinna-
cle of Pilot Mountain, December 5th.
This trip is great for beginners and
those wanting to test their limits. Be
sure to hurry, registration deadline is
November 27th. Member cost is
$25. Any questions? Call Adventure
ProgrammingDept. of Recreational
Services � 328-6387.
Your ad could be here
for as little as $2.
Advertise in
The East Carolinian
classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE $4.00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional words 5� each
STUDENT LINE AD RATE$2.00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional words 5C each
Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to refuse fhis rate for any ad deemed to be
non-student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE$1.00
add to above line rate for either BOLD or ALL CAPS type.
All classified ads placed by individuals or campus groups must
be prepaid. Classified ads placed by a business must be pre-
paid unless credit has been established. Cancelled ads can be
removed from the paper if notification is made before the
deadline, but no cash refunds are given. No proofs are avail-
able The Personals section of the classifieds is intended for
non-commercial communication placed by individuals or cam-
pus groups. Business ads will not be placed in this section. All
Personals are subject to editing for indecent or inflammatory
language as determined by the editors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADUNE 4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue
I
We reserve the right to change a deadline for holidays
or as necessitated by other considerations.

I





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Title
The East Carolinian, November 19, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 19, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1307
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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