The East Carolinian, November 17, 1998







Tuesday
High: 73
Low: 54
Wednesday
High: 62
Low: 44
Online Survey
Did you vote in the
November 3 election?
28 Yes 71 No
www.tec.ecu.edu
Did you use the telephone to register for next
semester?
Carolinian
Pirates miss bowl chance.
Sports, page 8
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17 ,1998 VOLUME 74. ISSUE 25
Creator of Sonic Plaza speaks
about four main components
Planning, construction
completed after seven years
S I s i: M 11. k K i;v icm
S I'M�� WHITER
The construction of Sonic Plaza was recent-
ly completed after seven years of planning.
It will be dedicated and turned over to ECU
on Dec. 11, after it undergoes a test period to
make sure that all the components are oper-
ating as planned.
"The plaza will be monitored over the
next couple months to let it settle in the
creator of Sonic Plaza, Christopher Janney,
said.
Sonic Plaza began as an idea in 1991
when YXV decided to renovate Joyner
Library. The building committee held a
national public art competition to determine
who would help to plan and create the plaza.
After interviewing the top five candidates,
the committee selected Christopher Janney.
Janney has art in public spaces at the Boston
Children's Museum, Miami Dade
International Airport, and in New York City
and Paris subway systems.
According to Janney, the project cost
about $110,000, but a lot of funding was
donated by large corporations.
Sonic Plaza consists of four components,
the Sonic Gates, the Percussive Water Wall,
the Media Glckenspiel and the Ground
Cloud Well. The four parts are designed to
be a laboratory for experimentation in the art
program. Students in visual arts, media,
music and performance will be able to create
temporary works for the components under
faculty supervision.
"The plaza will be monitored over the
next couple months to let it settle in
Christopher Janey
Sonic Plaa Creator
The Sonic Gates are classical columns
located at the north entrance of the plaza.
The columns contain computerized electric
cells that produce sound images when peo-
ple pass through. The sound images contin-
uously change in pitch and timbre creating
different sounds.
"By using technology we bring a sense of
performance to architecture Janney said.
The Percussive Water Wall is made up of
64 water jets that play ever-changing pat-
terns of water mist. The series were creat-
ed by Janney but students in the music
department will have the opportunity to
create other patterns that may also be
used. The Media Glckenspiel is a clock
tower that chimes every hour and is
inspired by other international clock tow-
ers. The tower has a ring of television
monitors that run graphics patterns from
sunset to sunrise. The graphics are the
designs of Janney and students in the
School of Arts. The media arts department
will be able to use this for a project so that
students can create their own graphics that
will be temporarily displayed throughout
the year.
Surrounding of the ring of monitors
there is a ring that shows different times of
the year. Twelve letters around the ring
represent the months of the year.
In the center of the circle there is a door
that opens up four times a day to reveal a
sculpture accompanied by a soundtrack.
The Ground Cloud Well is the fourth
component of the project. Mist rises from
underground and is blown by the wind.
"A special characteristic about Sonic
Plaza is that it changes personality
throughout the course of the day Janney
said.
Studepts say cocaine use
Surveys do not reflect perception
of problem amongpeers
I'l MR DAV
! 1ST NEW!
Ill he pas! scars the public V"CV BP'ne nas nccn
decline, bin recently many people in the Greenville area and
( :i siudents have seen a strong increase in the use of the
drug. ,
K 111 officials have found little use of cocaine on campus
and lew people actually admit to using cocaine in recent sur-
scys; however, many students seem to have
essofcocai,
i the Green
en increase in cocaine use.
"People do not sneak around anil use it in
upstairs bedrooms at parties anymore said
one unidentified sophomore "Many times peo-
ple have it lying out on tables in front of every-
body
Cocaine has become a a way of life to some
students. Manv are hooked after the first few
"The first time 1 tried it, I was bored one day
and bought a gram for $70. By the end of the
day I had spent over $200 on coke said an
unidentified freshman "It makes you feel like
a six-year-old in a candy store; all of the sudden
you get a quick burst of energy
Anothet unidentified sophomore living off-
campus agrees that cocaine use becomes a way
of life. "Either you do it or you don't said the
sophomore who will not return to school next
semester because of declining grades, "with
this drug there is no middle of the road
The cases of cocaine use may be increasing
among students, however ECU has been able
to find very few cases of abuse on campus. In a
1997 survey conducted by ECU officials, 92
percent of students surveyed claim they have
never done cocaine. In the eight percent that do use cocaine
however, six percent started between the ages of 18-25.
Marie Antineau, associate dean of students, says that ECU
has had very little problem with cocaine in the dorms or on
campus.
"Less than one percent of students were arrested for
cocaine possessions in the dorms last year and so far there have
been no arrests. Either students are not using the drug, or
becoming smarter at hiding their addiction Antineau said.
Others seem to have a different opinion on dorm drug use.
One junior believes use is very prevalent among students.
effects of �
cocai
increased excitement
alertness
confidence, euphoria, dereased
appitjte, fatigue,
anxiety
toxic psychosis, paranoia
Physical effects: dilated pupils
contricted blood vessels, elevated
heart rate
respiration, increased blood prssure
death, depression,
delirium irregular breathing,
unconciousness, cardiac arrest
"Out of every 100 people in a dorm area probably 15 use
cocaine. I know many people who say coke is more popular
than pot on campus" the junior said.
Associate Dean Of Student Development Kris Smith said
that ECU's penalties for the possession or use of cocaine arc
the most severe of all drug offenses. Students caught with sim-
ple possession are suspended for the semester, but could pos-
sibly return after fulfilling requirements such as successful
completion of a drug treatment program and a passed drug test.
SEE COCAINE PAGE 2
Chris Janney's four component Sonic Plaza set to be dedicated and turned over to ECU on Dec. 11.
PHOTO BY JASON FEATHER
ABC News broadcast
addresses diabetes
Hosted fry correspondent
Nancy Sniderman
C a r a Davis
SI SI I WRITER
The American Diabetes Association in
conjunction with Pitt Memorial Hospital
sponsored a 30-minut.e satellite broadcast
hosted by ABC- News Medical
Correspondent Nancy Sniderman.
The broadcast, which occurred
Thursday night in Edwin Monroe
Conference Center, addressed current
issues such as nutrition, new drugs and dia-
betes symptoms. Following the broadcast,
a panel of experts answered questions
from the audience.
Over 18 million Americans suffer from
diabetes, many of the signs and symptoms
of this disease occur without the sufferer
recognizing them.
Symptoms include being overweight,
frequent urination, constant hunger and
thirst, unhcalable sores, and numbness and
tightening of the feet. Approximately one-
third of the people who suffer from this
disease are not aware qf it and may go
undiagnosed up to four to seven years.
SEE DIABETES PAGE 3
Play unites community
Miss Evers' Boys
presented this weekend
K II I- CaFFREV
s I l 1- w Rl I KR
M& Even- Boys, a play about the Tuskegce
Syphilis Experiment, was presented to the
community this weekend.
This project, funded by the North
Carolina Humanities Council, explored the
40-year study of untreated syphilis in black
males. The play was presented on Saturday
night at Phillipi ("hurch of Christ and again
Sunday afternoon at Mcndenhall
Michael Gauthen, an African American
Studies professor at I'NCG, and Dr. Todd
Savitt, who teaches medical ethics and
medical history at ECU, teamed up to
apply for this grant. When the North
Carolina Humanities Council approved the
project, the grant required that the play
travel to Greenville. According to Dt.
Savitt, Pitt County was a demonstration
site for syphilis testing.
"This could have been the Pitt County
Experiment instead of the Tuskegee
Kxperiment Savitt said.
Actors from I'NCG and North Carolina
A&T presented the play in the form of a
dramatic reading.
"The play was done as a dramatic read-
ing to prompt discussion said Ursula
SEE BOYS PAGE 2
Correct






2 Ttittdty. Novtmbir 17, 1998
news
The East Carolinian
ROTG Pirates on the move this month
Awands ceremony held
for Veteran's Day
Devon White
STAFF WRITER
The army ROTC Pirates have
been on the move in the months of
October and November.
The Pirates have participated in
several events such as the Army 10-
milcr, Ranger Challenger
Competition, Persian Rifle, Fall
FTX, and a Veteran's Day
Ceremony.
"Everything has been very pro-
ductive. These cadets worked hard
to strive for the best Cadet Yvette
Campbell said.
This year marked the second
consecutive year that cadets from
ECU Army ROTC ran in the Army
10-miler. This event is held every
year in Washington, D.C. With
14,000 runners in attendance, this
event continues to be the largest
running event in the U.S. Pirates
Battalions 10-miler team finished
37th among the other ROTC
teams that participated. Individual
times for the team members were:
Latrice Clark at 1:33:36, Todd
Deca at 1:18:41, Jason Dickey at
1:18:41, Jason Gibbs at 1:02:46,
Heather Reilcy at 1:39:28, and
Michael VVorley at 1:28:11.
The ECU Ranger Challenge
Team went to Ft. Jackson, S.C. to
participate in the Annual Carolina
Brigade, Ranger Challenge
Competition. The competition
consisted of 26 teams from all over
North and South Carolina. Each
team competed in a series of events
which included a one-rope bridge,
assembling of M16 & M60,
grenade assault course, land navi-
gation, BRM, 10K ruck run, PT
test and a written land navigation
test.
The ECU Persian Rifle color
guard has also been on the move
this semester. They have partici-
pated in almost every home foot-
ball game, in the opening of Sam's
Club, and the speaking of General
Hugh Shelton, chairman of Joint
Chiefs of Staff. �
On Friday, Nov. 6, 42 ECU
cadets began their journey for the
annual Fall FTX which corre-
sponds with St. Augustine and
NCA & T Universities. This event
SEE ROTC. PAGE 3
3 Tuesday,
Cocaine
continued from page 1
Students caught with possession
and intent to sell or manufacturing
are immediately expelled and not
allowed to return.
"What many students do not
realize is that these rules apply to
all students, not just dorm resi-
dents; it does not matter where you
live Smith said.
The majority of the use is off
campus where people arc away
from school. ECU is apparently not
the only school with an increase in
the numbers of cocaine users.
"When I went home and saw all
my friends, I found out that many
were using coke on a on a regular
basis at their colleges and in my
Boys
continued from page 1
Robinson, director of the play and
the actress who played the leading
role of Miss Evers.
The African American Studies
Program at UNCG worked in con-
junction with the Department of
Medical Humanities and the
Ledonia Wright African-American
Cultural Center at ECU to present
this project to many segments of.
the community.
It's important that everyone in
the community be educated about
the experiment said Taffye
Benson Clayton, director of the
Ledonia Wright center.
hometown the junior said.
"It's sad to see my friends do
this to themselves but we have
lived around it our whole lives. I
started when I was 11. In the area of
Texas that I lived in, it was easier
to get hard drugs than it was to get
cigarettes or beer. I could easily get
a gram of cocaine for around $40
the junior said.
Students all around ECU have
stories of emergency room visits
and friends who have overdosed.
One student we spoke with
needed to be brought to the emer-
gency room by ambulance from a
late-night in one of the student off-
campus living areas.
"She was just convulsing in the
driveway at a party, nobody knew
exactly what was going on or why
said an unidentified Senior. "We
had to follow the ambulance to the
hospital, and wait for hours to find
After the play, a forum was held
to discuss some of the painful
issues surrounding the experi-
ment. This allowed members of
the community to speak out about
whether the Tuskegee
Experiment was right ethically,
morally or legally. Some of the
other issues discussed were who
was to blame for the deaths of
these men and the reason the
experiment was initially approved.
"It's important not only to tell
the story, but to explore it said
Cauthen, who led the discussion
along with Dr. Savitt. Dr. Savitt
added that the reason behind the
forum was because, "We want a
frank and honest discussion about
the legacy of the experiment
Need a massage?!
; The E.C.U. Physical Therapy Club is sponsoring a night
of massages. All you have to do is purchase a ticket!
ft HEN: Tuesday, November 17th, 1998 5:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
WHERE: ECU Belk Health Sciences Building on the corner of Charles
Blvd. and Greenville Blvd.
HOW MUCH ARE TICKETS: ONLY $3.00 for JOrrrin. and you can buy up to 30 min
TO PURCHASE TICKETS: Ask any PT student you see! We will also be
selling tickets around campus (in front of bookstore and
at Belk. OR, you can get a ticket AT THE DOOR for
S4.00 for 10 mini!)
So come on, bring your friends and relax with a
Great Massage
CELLAR DOOR PRESENTS
DAVE
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BAND
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Saturday, November 28
Greensboro Coliseum ni
traMffl
out if she was alright
The doctors at the hospital came
to the conclusion that her seizure
was cocaine related. This is not an
isolated incident; numerous cases
such as this occur every year
throughout the city as well as the
nation.
Many have sought help through
local recovery groups such as
Narcotics Anonymous along with
many other groups. These groups
offer advice and many alternatives
to dealing with the addiction simi-
lar to a 12-step program.
"Recovery is a long and hard
process said an unidentified
junior. "Most addicts do not consid-
er themselves victims or addicts.
Usually it takes help from friends
and family in order to get off the
drue
Be a Hero,
Save a Life,
Give
Sponsored by:
Epsilon Sigma Alpha
American Red Cross
Blood Sono�Mld-Atlantlc Region
� �
Mendenhall
Student Center
Tuesday,
November 17,
1998
12:00 - 6:00 PM
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East Carolinian
. 6, 42 ECU
jurncy for the
which corre-
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GE3
3 Tuesday, November 17, 1998
news
The Eait Carolinian
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Computer Tutoring
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Diabetes
continued from page I
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"The more you know, the more
people you can help, whether you
have the disease or not
Sniderman said.
Sniderman believes it is impor-
tant to recognize the two types of
diabetes.Type I Diabetes occurs in
only 10 percent of cases. This type
is very strong and requires insulin
therapy for treatment. Type II
Diabetes is a weaker form, and is
much more difficult to diagnose. It
occurs in 90 percent of the affected
population. With this type, there
are little or no noticeable symptoms
except high blood pressure and
cholesterol. If these symptoms go
undetected they could eventually
lead to heart disease.
There are new developments in
medicine to treat Type II Diabetes
patients. Since 1994, four new
drugs have been approved to be
administered for cases of diabetes.
These include Mezulin, Prandin,
Prelose and Glucophase, which arc
all take orally and suppress produc-
tion of glucose in the blood.
"Education is the key to estab-
lishing a strong grasp on treatments
and cures of this disease
Sniderman said. Doctors recom-
mend to keep accurate records of
normal blood pressure and choles-
terol counts, have frequent check-
ups, especially if something is out
of the ordinary, and most
importantly, stay informed.
ROTC
continued from page 2
began on Saturday, Nov. 7 with
Basic Rifle Marksmanship and
Day and Night Land Navigation.
On Sunday, Nov. 8 the cadets par-
ticipated in an obstacle course,
jump tower and FLRC.
"ROTC prepares you for any
challenge you may have in your
future Cadet Roger Stevenson
said.
An awards ceremony was held
on Wednesday in honor of
Veterans Day and for those who
participated in the events.
Bia TUESDAY
BIG BEERS
LITTLE PRICES
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Would You Like Fries with That? Getting Employment on Campus
The Office of Orientation and the First-Year Experience would like to invite you to attend
this freshman job fair. There will be representatives from Recreational Services, AraMark,
Financial Aid, University Housing Services, Cooperative Education, the Athletic Depart-
ment, and Volunteer Services. So come prepared with information on your previous jobs
and look nice. Call our office with questions or for more information at 328-4173.
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4 Tm.d.v. Novimb.r 17 1998
opinion
ttl Fa" r:�rnlini�n
eastcarolinian
AMY L.ROVSTER Fdilor
HEATHER BURGESS Managing Edilnr
AMV SHERIDAN News td�or
I'EIER UAWVOT Assishhi New: Editor
AMANDA AUSTIN FailuresEdnor
Emily Little Hud Copy Ednot
MARIO SCHERHAUFER Spans Edilai
TRACY HAIRR Assistant Spons Editor
CHRIS KNOTTS Stalf Illustrator
Jason Feather Photo Editor
STEPHANIE WHITLOCK Ad Design Menager
JANET RESPESS AdvertisingManager
DENNIS S. NORTON Wire Editor
BOBBY TUGGLE Webmaster
Seiwg the ECU community sines 1975. the Easl Carolinian punishes " .001 copies ever, tuesdev and tttuisdav the lead editorial in each edition is the
opinion or the fdiroiial Boaid the Ear Carolinian welcomes letieii lo roe editoi. limirad ro 7S0 words, which may be edired tot decarty ot brevity The East
Carolinian reserves the nghi to edn oi leiect tenets lor pubkanon All letters must be snjned leneis should be addiessed to: OpinHM editoi .The East
Camimian. Student Pubaketions Building. ECU. Gieenvitte. ?18b843S'J For mloimation call X2 328.8366.
oumew
Everybody knows that most drugs are a problem. How could anyone not know? There are
advertisements for a "drug-free America" in virtually every aspect of our society. Yes, many
drugs are bad, but not many people know just how bad and what the side-effects of serious
substances, cocaine for example, really are. - �
Cocaine, also known as coke, freeze, snow and rock, is one of the drugs abused at ECU. A
survey was conducted in the spring of 1997 that calculated the number of students who'd
had any experience with the drug. Out of 2,000 students, only around half of them returned
their forms. From that number, 3.7 percent have tried the drug for the first time between the
ages of 18-20.
Curiosity may be a reigning influence since the use of cocaine creates a carefree feeling,
relaxation and a sense of control. But the euphoria doesn't last long.
Cocaine is severely addictive which causes the users to develop a physical and psychological
dependency on the drug sometimes after only one use. Upon snorting the drug, cocaine
causes the brain to secrete dopamine, the chemical responsible for the euphoric feelings
associated with the substance. Eventual effects of repeated use include inability to become
happy without the drug (the brain will lose its ability to produce dopamine on its own after a
while), nasal bleeding and inflammation, seizures, delirium, cardiac arrest and often death.
Aside from all biological facts, the social reasons for avoiding cocaine are just as strong. Once
a person is addicted, his or her friends and family are undoubtedly affected. It may be as
simple as noticing changes in the user's behavior, but soon enough the user is utterly
helpless around others because he or she is no longer capable of caring for themselves. Only
one thing occupies their mind�getting more cocaine.
What about money? An eight-ball (three and a half grams of powder), can cost up to $250.
jt's easy to see how relationships are compromised when cocaine is involved since the user
�,i
jipan only focus on acquiring the drug. These are only a couple of the serious consequences,
�'i
Jbut there is hope for those who have become addicted.
jff you or somebody you know has a problem with cocaine, or any other drug addiction, one
E
.number to call is (818)-780-395. Or call the National Institute of Drug Abuse's free hotline at
�1-800-662-HELP.
� OPINION
Columnist
Marvelle
Sullivan
Republicans forgot the issues
I If they wanted to continue
� their reign in the House, the
Republicans should have
focused and loudly voiced
5 their policy agendas for
V making America and
1 Americans better off instead
of focusing on what Clinton
; lacks by way of character.
E
�The general outcome of this year's
Election proved to create quite an
Jistounding surprise for voters and
�politicians alike. The political
�scene, while always full of scandal
5)nd upheaval�has seen prolific
fthange and turmoil especially
throughout this past year.
With the Republicans' sweep of
She house in 1994, relatively
Javorable polls, and the
Overwhelming Clinton scandals,
.continued Republican dominance
�was seemingly assured for the next
Ifcrm of Congress. Nevertheless,
hc voters' response contradicted
jjiis assumption entirely. The
Republican house seats didn't just
sustain' themselves�the
Democrats actually gained seats
from the Republicans. Then, to
add to the madness, Newt
Gingrich resigned from his high
profile post as Speaker of the
House.
Amid the Lewinsky scandal,
alleged campaign finance
violations, a weakening economy,
and international unrest (not to
mention Clinton's weak foreign
policy concept), how did the
Republicans manage to fall victim
to defeat in this election?
Obviously, there were a few
strategic mistakes. The
Republican party overestimated
the voters' disapproval of Clinton
and its own favorability, which in
turn perpetuated an
underestimation of its lack of
policy and performance in the
areas the voters do care about,
primarily financial well-being.
At the exit polls, 63 percent of
the voters claimed the Clinton
scandal had no prominent effect in
their voting decision. If anything,
the reaction of the politicians
superseded the initial criminal act
of the president and his staff. As
disappointing as it is, voters
conveyed by ballot that
performance in issues that directly
relate to them prevails over
integrity, honor, and character.
Thanks for coming out. If anyone
expects the recent scandals,
events, and outcomes of this past
election to propagate an overall
character reform of politicians,
then major denial is overtaking
common sense.
If they wanted to continue their
reign in the House, the
Republicans should have focused
and loudly voiced their policy
agendas for making America and
Americans better off instead of
focusing on what Clinton lacks by
way of character. Stating
differences between parties may
have a positive internal effect,
creating cohesion within the party
itself, but at the same time it
generates a negative external
perception by the voters. The
Republicans believed the Clinton
scandal and a series of mud-
slinging campaigns would carry
them to victory, but sadly, it carried
them into an election flop.
Gingrich's resignation
encapsulated the Republican
defeat and served to teach a lesson
to both political parties; while
extremism is a necessary facet of a
group, extremists are not
necessarily best fit to lead a group
to its full potential. Instead, they
can best be utilized in bargaining
and in forming initial policies
which can be later guided into
more centrist policies.
While the November election
disappointed Republican
politicians and conservative voters,
the lessons learned will perhaps
gear the party into a positive and
winning direction for the big
election of 2000 knowing what it
faces and what is imperative to
reform.
OPINION
Columnist
Condiments shouldn't be extra
Unless we boycott or
something, they may start to
charge us extra on other
things as well. I'm talking
about napkins, straws, ice,
pay toilets, and oxygen. It
is not fair to us college
students to have to shell out
eleven cents every time we
want to have mustard.
Here's something that really
bothers me. It clearly states in the
United States Constitution, in
section 2, article 13, row 4, scat 45,
that every human being has the
right to as many free condiments as
he or she pleases, but restaurant
profiteers arc denying your rights
every day.
I recently went to a restaurant
with a few friends. To protect the
restaurant's name, let's just call it
"Flojangles My friend MC
Russell ordered some chicken
strips, and then asked for two,
count 'cm, two packets of honey
mustard to dip his food in. The
woman behind the counter then
informed him, with a straight face,
that any more than one packet
would cost him eleven cents extra.
I, as a professional journalist,
had to call Bull-Schmitt on that
one. I have done a little research
(very little, actually) on the
subject, and I have found that
Flojangles isn't the only restaurant
to take this policy. McConnalds, as
well!
What is the world coming to?
. First the Presidential Hummer,
and then this tragedy. Remember
back in the good old days (when
you're parents were young) when
you could go .to someone's house
and open one of the kitchen
drawers, only to find packets upon
packets of ketchup (pronounced
CAT-sup) and mustard from
various fast food restaurants? Well,
apparently those days are gone.
It's about greed, pure and
simple. The fast food industry
must be losing money, what with
those itty bitty sponsors like
Disney and the NBA. (note: The
preceding line fully utilized the
age-old journalism tactic known as
"sarcasm I learned it in a class
right here at ECU, thus proving
the existence of education on
campus.) The restaurants are
charging us for condiments, and
someone has to put a stop to it!
That's why it is up to you and
me, Jasper and Francine American,
to take this whole ordeal to the
highest authorities, and seeing
how Frank Sinatra is now dead, we
should probably go to Bill Cosby.
We should tell him, with a bribe of
pudding in hand, that he needs to
make a public service
announcement about this matter,
and if that doesn't work then we
will just have to deal with it. If
"the Coz" can't do it, no one can!
Sorry about that. I am still
-wired from the 4,000 pixi-sticks I
bought at Sam's last week. But
seriously, there is something really
wrong when people are getting
charged for mustard. Unless we
boycott or something, they may
start to charge us extra on other
things as well. I'm talking about
napkins, straws, ice, pay toilets,
and oxygen. It is not fair to us
college students to have to shell
out eleven cents every time we
want to have mustard.
Think about it. Eleven cents
can really add up. If you cat at
Flojangles every day for two
months, getting two extra mustard
packets every time, you will have
spent roughly $13 extra. That's
enough for a couple to go to the
movies, dinner at Red Lobster, or
even a dime bag for the drug set.
I hope this has opened your
eyes to some extent. Think about
how much you love your free
condiments, and then express to
the local restaurant managers your
disgust. If nothing else, you may
get one of those cards for a free
small soda, so it won't be wasting
your time. In the meantime, Til be
at Flojangles eating my
condiment-free chicken biscuiti I
don't use condiments, anyway.
LETTER
to the Editor
Housekeepers; university report a cover-up
The university's just-concluded
investigation into the racially
offensive posters found by
housekeepers in the Jenkins Art
Building is a cover-up. There was
no evidence presented that a
student or students were
responsible. The university's
attempt to scapegoat students is
offensive in itself.
The idea that the act
represented a well-meaning but ill-
conceived attempt at artistic
expression is simply not credible.
The posters were not hung in any
gallery, but in hallways cleaned by
black housekeepers. The only area
of Jenkins cleaned by a white
housekeeper had no racist posters
hung up. The posters were hung
anonymously and were not part of
any formal exhibit. When students
display artwork, they most likely
obtain prior approval.
Approximately 170 of the 186
ECU housekeepers are African
American, and their association,
formed almost three years ago,
organized into the NC Public
Service Workers Union, UE Local
150. There has been harassment by
Marriott and ECU supervisors, and
a noose was found hanging from a
file cabinet drawer in a faculty
member's office. This is all in
context of two black church
burnings in Pitt County.
UE Local 150 - ECU
Housekeepers Association is
asking for a real investigation by
the Justice Department and US
attorney Janet Cole.
Harold Willoughby and
Erma Roberson
UE Local 150
ECU Housekeepers Association
�L.ETTER
to the Editor
Sceptics obsessed with Ventura's old job
I was appalled at columnist
Stephen Kleinschmit's article about
the election of Minnesota Governor
Jesse Ventura, especially with the
fact that he seems obsessed with
the man's former job. That's
correct, former job. Mr.
Kleinschmit doesn't seem to realize
that most politicians are always a
former something; it just wasn't
until now that we had a former
wrestler elected to public office. He
seems to think that this former job
will somehow affect Mr. Ventura's
ability to hold office, but I find this
an incorrect statement since it is
obvious that Mr. Ventura can
separate fantasy from reality.
Perhaps it is Me. Kleinschmit who
is having trouble with that.
Mr. Kleinschmit goes on to call
the election of Ventura a desperate
craving for "entertainment" by the
people of Minnesota. Basically, this
is ludicrous. Yes, Ventura was once
an entertainer, but Mr. Kleinschmit
conveniently neglects the fact that
the new governor is also a former
Navy Seal and mayor, which adds
, more validity to his holding office.
As for the people of Minnesota,
they had the entire campaign to
make up their minds about
Ventura's platform; evidently they
wanted a change from the old
establishment.
Perhaps Mr. Kleinschmit should
widen his view concerning Ventura,
and sustain his initial impulses to
bash the man just for doing a job
that some find ridiculous, as it is
just that, a job. And a job does not
define a man, just as Mr.
Kleinschmit's does not make him a
credible columnist.
Michael Godwin
Junior
Graphic Design
-Bv-





Fnl Camliniin
:V�cXS
extra
i Bill Cosby,
th a bribe of
he needs to
j service
this matter,
)rk then we
with it. If
10 one can!
I am still
pixi-sticks I
week. But
:thing really
are getting
Unless we
they may
;ra on other
liking about
pay toilets,
it fair to us
ive to shell
ry time we
leven cents
' you cat at
y for two
;tra mustard
pu will have
tra. That's
o go to the
Lobster, or
e drug set.
pened your
Phink about
your free
express to
.nagers your
ie, you may
s for a free
be wasting
itime,TH be
ting my
n biscuiti I
anyway.
er-up
iging from a
n a faculty
is is all in
ck church
f-
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ciation is
itigation by
nt and US
iby and
Association
om the old
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doing a job
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job does not
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make him a
5 Tuesday, Novnmber 17, 1998
comics
The Em COTlinitn
Four Seats Left
Jason Latour Ants Marching
Victoria Kidd
r"� loooufr Foe a
srAen movie Got
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OF fteSSASCM X ?fc�SfcNT
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Life's Meanings
The opinions in this
happy, little box are
MINE 1111111111! 11
flit MINE
and if you don't like
what is spewing out
of my Keyboard, then
111 lust have to lay the
smack down on your
candy buttocks
Do You Smell
What The Kev
IsCookin'
Kevin Jordan
what comes
to mind, when
I say
PRIDE I
Pride is defined by websters, as
�having a reasonable,or a jusrifaible self I
Irespect.The problem with pride, is thatl
Isometimes.it keeps us from doing what!
�needs to be done. How many times
lhave you, or your friends and faimly
lhave said Man, I wouldn't be caught I
�dead doing that
Don't look down on those who fix
land serve your food, or the bag boy, or I
�the people who clean the school's
�buildings and grounds. They have
�pride, they just don't let it interfere
Iwith them making a living for their
families.
Remember, pride is a good thing. It I
Igives you a feeling of self worth, but
�pride doesn't put food on the table.
�Pride doesn't pay the bills. Lastly, pride I
�doesn't keep a roof on your head, or
Iheat inside.
The next time that you �ee
someone working, Just say
" Thank You "
FREE FOOD AND GREAT PRIZES
We're Celebrating YOU at
Student
Appreciation nay
When: Thursday,
November 19th, 1998
Where: At ECU Student
Health Service
Time: 10:00AM - 3:00PM
Fill Your tummies while you fill out a survey
letting us know how you feel about our services!
GREAT GIVEAWAYS
ECU STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES
ACROSS
1 F.ag down
3 Approaches
10 Morally smug
parson
14 Woodwind
instrument
15 University ot
Maine location
16 First-class
17 Sampras of
tennis
18 Durable fabric
19 Discourteous
20 Get the ball
rolling
22 Modifiers
24 Thailand, once
27 Singer Kazan
28 Silent assent
31 Shamrocks, e.g.
34 Exploit
35 Phobias
36 Georgia city
40 Soutn American
plain
42 Republicans
43 Nonsensical
44 Hermit
45 Beige shades
47 'Norma"
48 Most blatant
50 Conclusion
51 Dental coating
54 Tall tale
56 Infidelity
59 Signs ot
boredom
63 Singer Tennille
64 Ruth's
mother-in-law
67 Bloke
68 Actor Estrada
69 Enrage
70 Beatles'
metermald
71 Actor
Auberjonois
72 Roller blade
73 Self images
DOWN
1 Beer ingredient
2 Help on a heist
3 Very small
amount
4 Ogles
G Massachusetts
cape
6 Smeiterv pile
7 Lisa"
8 Author Bagnold
9 Language of
Mogadishu
10 Guerrilla
11 Port on the
Seine
12 Madagascar
primate
13 V-formation
flyers
21 Retaliation
Answers in Wednesday's Fountainhead
23 Fortune telling
25 "We the
World"
26 Paltry
28 Amounting to
nothing
29 Norway's capiti
30 College bigwig
32 Dress
33 Florida raptor
37 Caution
38 Son of Judah
39 Require
41 Cozy
46 New World nat.
49 Sports venues
51 Spud
52 Venerate
53 Encounter
55 Mother-of-pearl
57 Relative position
58 Hindu discipline
60 Earlv American
political party
61 Western
alliance, briefly
62 Rejuvenation
resorts � .
65 Ran into
66 Furv
I1s1�11"41W
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HHM0
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IV
C' 1996 Tribune wk1b Servic�. inc
Al ngnts reserved
Is This You ?
Good People Skills
Intersted in Succeess
Goal Oriented
Hard-Working
Confident
Intersted in Business
Interested in Technology
Persistent
Join the one of the
Fastest growingMajors
on Campus
Industrial Distribution
Visit our table on the mall in front of the Wright
Place Tuesday and Thursdays.
Talk with some of our majors!
or
Contact:
r
Dr. Jim Toppen
Department of Industrial Technology
133 Flanagan Hall
East Carolina University
328-2323
i ra
EXCELLENCE
I






i
6 Tuesdav. November 17. 1998
features
The East Carolinian
Campus food drives aim to help
underprivileged families during holidays
Collection boxes located
throughout campus
Phillip 'Gil.fus'
STAFF WRITER
As the holidays approach, people
are once again getting into the char-
itable spirit. Here at ECU, the
�ourth Annual ECU Holiday Drive
�as commenced and it is hoped that
jpany community organizations and
families will benefit from donations
given by faculty and students.
Business Services, in conjunc-
tion with the Pitt County
Department of Social Services, has
�et up fifty collection boxes
throughout the campus and
Greenville.
"We felt that the university
Deeded a program that could give
something back to the communi-
ty said Julie Wolfe of
Administration and Finance of
Business Services.
� The programmed kicked off this
year on November 3 and is expect-
ed to end on December 9. Social
Services has identified several fam-
ilies in need and has provided wish
lists for several children and elderly
shut-ins. Social Services usually
compiles a list of families to be
sponsored that contain ECU stu-
dents or employees that are in
need, but this year there are none.
Last year twenty three children
were provided for by the holiday
drive, this year that number has
increased to forty one.
"The drive grows tremendously
each year said Leslie Craigle,
Director of Marketing for Business
Service. "We hope to help more
and more families each year
Items that are being asked for
donation include toys, clothing,
baby items, school supplies, non-
perishable food, and household
items. While children are the
emphasis of this holiday drive,
many other charitable organizations
will be helped by donations. The
Greenville Community Shelter,
Operation Sunshine, the Flynn
Christian Home for Men, the F'irst
Born Community Shelter, and the
Salvation Army are among the
groups that will benefit from ECU
charity.
In partnership with Business
Services, WZMB (91.3 FM), the
campus radio station, has helped
make this year's Holiday Drive spe-
cial. During their "Family Values
Food Drive a person is entered
into a drawing for free concert tick-
ets for every two cans of non-per-
ishable food items that are donated
in their collection boxes. Two stu-
dents have already been awarded
tickets for Korn and Marilyn
Manson. But tickets for Phish and
Dave Matthews are still up for
grabs.
"Our main objective is to feed
the hungry said Lisa Ramsey,
WZMB promotional director. "The
concert tickets are simply an incen-
tive to get people to donate more
food
The radio station is accepting
food items at their station, local gro-
cery stores, and local remotes. The
final drawing for tickets will take
place November 24 when WZMB
broadcast live from the Onix.
The Student Volunteer Program
will help to distribute the collected
items during the beginning of
December. Any students interest-
ed in helping should contact
Student Volunteer Services or stop
by their office in Christenbury.
Several donation boxes are located across campus for donating non-perishable items.
PHOTO BY AMANDA AUSTIN
Heavily populated campus
calls for safety measures
GRIME STATISTICS FOR THE AREA
SURROUNDING THE UNIVERSITY
199519961997
Aggravated Assault Arson Burglary Larceny , Motor Vehicle Theft Murder Sex Offenses Forcible Nonforcible Robbery 67 1 141 499 37 0 6 0 2466 2 187 519 41 1 4 0 13
Not available
A larger campus population calls for students, faculty and staff to take more safety measures while on campus.
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
All should be aware of
i, their environment
Nina M. Dry
SENIOR WRITER
Although ECU's student popula-
tion is approximately 17,8(K), it has
managed to stay close knit and rel-
atively safe. To keep things the
way they are, we must continue
implementing safety procedures.
Here are some tips of keeping safe
on and around campus grounds.
5,500 find their home away from
home in one of the fourteen resi-
dence halls around campus. Even
though some might consider the
people on their hall family, there's
always the possibility that not
everyone is what they seem.
"It is unfortunate that people
will walk into someone's room and
steal things said Tom Younce,
assistant director of the ECU
police. "That's why you should
always keep your door locked, even
if you're just going down the hall
Younce explained a procedure of
keeping belongings safe called
Operation I.D. the ECU police will
come and mark one's property such
as stereos, televisions, and refriger-
ators with the person's social secu-
rity number or their drivers license
number. This way if the items were
to become stolen, they would be
identifiable.
To keep residence halls safe as a
whole, residents must be aware of
their environment. If someone
looks suspicious, report it immedi-
ately to the coordinator or an RA.
"Make sure to never let some-
one in the residence hall you do
not know Younce said. "Also
never prop open doors. This gives
access for anyone to just walk right
on in
At one time or another most stu-
dents will have to take a night class.
Students should take precautionary
measures when walking back to
their rooms or their cars.
"People should always walk in
pairs. This applies to both men and
women Younce said. "Assaults on
men happen more frequently than
on women
If there isn't anyone to walk
back with, students can use the
escort service provided by the ECU
police department or they can use
the Pirate Ride.
"Pirate Ride picks up at the Rec
Center and goes throughout cam-
pus Younce said. "It runs about
every 10-15 minutes. It's a great
form of transportation
If you are walking around cam-
pus and feel your personal safety
being threatened, there are devices
that can be to your advantage. The
blue light telephones are strategi-
cally placed throughout campus
that are connected to the ECU
police.
"There are about 75 blue light
phones on ECU grounds Younce
said, "The best thing about them is
if you pick one up, we know exact-
ly where you are�you do not need
to say anything
Younce said the ECU police
check the lights once a week and
review their locations. If you come
across one that seems out of order,
report it to the ECU police.
Some students can not park
their cars near their residence halls
and must park in the gravel lot by
5th street. Even though the car isn't
close by doesn't mean it can not be
safe.
"The lots are patrolled often and
officers are placed in street clothes
around the area to catch people in
the act of vandalizing and stealing
Younce said.
According to Younce, the best
way to keep one's car safe is to
make sure all personal, valuable
items are out of sight.
For any other safety concerns
the ECU police department is here
for the students. It is a full service
police organization located on tenth
street next to Umstead Hall.
For more information on the
ECU police visit their site on the
web, www.ecu.edupolice
Students must take special care when entering doors. Always shut doors behind you.
Campus blood drive
On Nov. 17 the Red Cross blood
drive will be held at the student
center from noon until 6 p.m.
Sea grant proposals
On Nov. 17 a workshop to help
researchers prepare proposals for
the North Carolina Fishery
Resource Grants will be held at the
Willis Building from 7 p.m. to 9
p.m. The grants are provided
through the N.C. General
Assembly for research to improve
fishery resources.
Travel-Adventure Film
Series presents Spain
The Travel-Adventure Film
Series will show a film about
"Spain: Land of Contrast" on Nov.
18 at 4 p.m. and again at 7:30 p.m.
in Hendrix Theatre. The film will
be narrated by its producer, Clint
Denn. Tickets are $5 and an
optional dinner is available for $16.
For information call the central
ticket office.
Visiting journalist to
discuss "The Crisis of the
Presidency"
A journalist who covers the White
House will address a Program at
ECU on Thursday, Nov. 19, on
"The Crisis of the Presidency
Alexis Simendinger, White
1 louse correspondent for the
National Journal, will give the talk
at 4 p.m. in Mendenhall 244. The
public is invited
Simendinger is a native of
Washington D.C. at has been writ-
ing for the capital for the last 12
vears.
Playhouse presents
Mother Courage and Her
Children
Mother Courage and Her Children
opens Nov. 19 at 8 p.m. in
McGinnis Theatre. The plays cen-
ters on a woman who owns a rolling
canteen wagon and follows troops
during the 17th century Thirty
Years War.
1
Correction: The art pho-
tos featured in the Nov.
12 edition of TEC were
taken in the Greenville
Museum of Art, not the
vans Street Art Gallery
CRIME STATISTICS FOR THE UNIVERSITY
Aggravated Assault
Arson
Burglary
Drug Possession
Drug Sale
Driving While impaired
Larceny
Liquor Law Violations
Motor Vehicle Theft
Murder
Physical Assault w
Sexual Motives
Robbery
Sex Offenses
Forcible
Nonforcible
Simple Assaults
feapon Violations
199519961997
9(7)18(7)10(4)
0(0)1(1)1(0)
36(2)14(0)36(9)
28(12)36 (36)22 (15)
0(0)0(0)0(0)
51 (51)42 (42)37 (37)
339(19)354 (28)408(31)
5(2)2(2)104(104)
2(0)4(1)3(1)
0(0)0(0)0(0)
1(1)0(0)3(1)
5(0)5(3)1(0)
2(0)4(2)1(0)
0(0)0(0)0(0)
34(16)56(2)53(19)
27(17)23(5)
i





Fhe East Carolinian
mug
ST5
ood drive
ted Cross blood
I at the student
jntil 6 p.m.
proposals
jrkshop to help
re proposals for
rolina Fishery
ill be held at the
im 7 p.m. to 9
i are provided
IM.C. General
arch to improve
nture Film
nts Spain
venture Film
a film about
Mitrast" on Nov.
;ain at 7:30 p.m.
e. The film will
producer, Clint
ire $5 and an
ivailable for $16.
call the central
rnalist to
Crisis of the
mcy"
overs the White
is a Program at
y, Nov. 19, on
Presidency
dinger, White
ident for the
nil give the talk
L-nhall 244. The
s a native of
,t has been writ-
for the last 12
presents
igeand Her
ren
md Her Children
at 8 p.m. in
The plays cen-
io owns a rolling
1 follows troops
century Thirty
ie art pho-
n the Nov.
TEC were
Greenville
krt, not the
Art Gall
ery
7 Tuesday, November 17, 1998
features
The East Carolinian
"Persistence of Memory" - Dali
Stri-sstul day in .l.iss? Relax Come home to .i more peaceful setting
surround youraell with beautiful and intriguing artwork fromi.irk Gallery!
With mn' ol the Ijik�i selections of art In the area you're sure to find
something to make that day loss stressful! Visit us today!
Arlington Village
M-f 9:30-6:00
Sat. 9:30-5:00
CLARK
One of the must
complete galleries ot
jrt and .Training
Ha picture
IMAGINE
YOU ON THE
FRONT PAGE
Where the ocean ends, business begins
UNCW
CAMERON
so oot. or-business
LOOKING FOR A GRADUATE DEGREE?
Prepare yourself for a
career in business,
even if you're not a
business major
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ACCOUNTANCY
CAMERON SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT WILMINGTON
Prepares you for opportunities in:
�Public accounting �Management consulting
�Information systems -General business
It has small classes, can be completed between ID to 13 months
and is AACSB accredited.
Classes begin:
May 2(1. 1999 for non-accounting undergraduates
August 18, 1999 for accounting undergraduates
For an application or more information, please contact:
Laura Egi'ln
910.962.3903
.9in.962.3815 (fax)
egelnl'uncwiLedu
Message left in bottle 28
years ago turns up on coast
PHOTOGMfflEJIS arm � m TEC OFHCf
MOBILE, Ala. (AP) � A little girl
who got bored on a fishing trip
scribbled a note, stuck it in a bottle
and threw it in the water. It turned
up 28 years later a mere 40 miles
from where it began its journey.
Kathy Briley stumbled across
the time capsule last Sunday on a
beach at Perdido Bay.
Mrs. Briley was only two months
old in 1970 when Betty Elaine
Harris of Loxley wrote the message
oit the back of a sample ballot for
the 1970 election. She also drew a
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Then she sealed the ballot in a
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River, while flows through south-
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"I can vaguely remember doing
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Mrs. Ory said she was 8 at the
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Mrs. Ory's mother, Janie Harris,
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Tommy McGaster, were looking
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I thought it was pretty neat she
said.
When Mrs. Ory was asked if she
plans any more messages in bottles,
she laughed and said, "I'm going to
let my kids try it. I'm not going to
do it this time
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snorts
s- fr V- JKr The East Carolinian
Louisville severely spoils Pirates' senior daf
Tundiy, Nov
8 Tuetdiy. November 17. 1998
Football team misses
chance for bowl game
Travis Bark ley
senior writer
Saturday's game against the
University of Louisville turned
out to be a record setting affair.
Unfortunately for ECU, it was
Cardinal quarterback Chris
Redmond who did most of the
record breaking.
The junior quarterback com-
pleted 44 of 56 passes for a stag-
gering 592 yards and six touch-
downs as Louisville spoiled senior
day for ECU and won 63-45. In
total, ten ECU records were bro-
ken or tied in the game.
"We didn't score enough points
in the first half to keep pace with
them head coach Steve Logan
said. "They've got an NFL quar-
terback and a fine compliment of
receivers. They did to us what
they've done to a lot of folks
Logan said ECU threw a vari-
ety of different defenses at
Louisville, but none of them
proved effective against the
nation's top-ranked offense.
"We tried everything in the
world to stop them and couldn't
come up with any answers Logan
said. "You name it, we tried it. We
tried man coverage, zone coverage,
blitz coverage, we dropped eight,
we had combination coverages
Junior cornerback Forrest Foster
had the unenviable task of covering
the Cardinal receivers. He said
Louisville got most of their yardage
Records Set In LouiswilleECU Football Gamo
Pirate linebacker Carlos Ochoa runs the ball to score the team's first touchdown on a blocked punt against the Cardinals on Saturday.
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMBER
on runs after the catch.
"We mixed it up, but they came
out there and executed well
Foster said. "Their tight end, No.
10 wideout Arnold Jackson some-
times came underneath the line-
backers. I think that's where they
got most of their yardage from:
slants ovet the middle and runs
after the catch. That's a big factor
The Cardinals tallied 769 yards
of total offense, improving to 6-4 on
the season. With the loss ECU fell
to 5-5 and was probably eliminated
from any possible bowl berth. The
winner of the game was said by
Motor City Bowl officials to have
the inside track on that bowl's at-
large berth.
Logan said he didn't mention
any bowl possibilities to his team
because he is somewhat skeptical
about such situations.
"Those things; I have to see
them to believe them first because
of the experience I've had here
ECU fans' voice about the '98 team
Football fans differ
in their opinions
Blaine Denius
staff writer
Pirate fans hold a variety of opin-
ions about the performance of this
year's football team, which owns a
record of 5-5.
. "As far as wins and losses go, I
hope for a better season next year
' ECU junior Craig Morrisette said.
"It's really difficult when your
leadet on the field is new to the
scheme, but I feel that Garrard has
done an excellent job this year
ECU alumna Jodie Britton says
she is satisfied with the team's per-
formance so far and does not think
they deserve much of the criticism
that has come.
"I have heard all of the criticism
of Coach Logan and I just don't
agree with it Britton said.
The performance of the special
teams players has brought the con-
cern of several Pirate fans.
"The team had some close
i games that could have gone either
i way sophomore Matt
j McLawhorn said. "I wish the kick-
i ing game was stronger. I think that
j would have helped
J According to sophomore Lee
i Hiner, ECU's special teams have
been really slack. "Offensively we
are struggling and just can't seem to
i put the points on the board
I Hiner said.
Although the time is near, few
: teams are certain of their position in
( the variety of bowl games yet to be
played this season. Even if the
i Pirates do not receive a bowl bid,
! fans are showing their continuing
i support.
I "I think for a young team they
i have done really well this year.
They have lived up to my expecta-
tions ECU senior Lonnie Farmer
said.
Long time Pirate fan and now
ECU sophomore Morgan Clayton
I agrees. Clayton is happy with the
team this season and looks forward
to next year.
before with an 8-3 team Logan
said. "We've got a game next week
that we have to focus on, that's all
that matters now
The play of ECU's special
teams have been overlooked in the
loss. The Pirates scored their first
touchdown on a blocked punt
return by linebacker Carlos Ochoa
and suffered no breakdowns in
their own kicking game. Andrew
Bayes converted six of six extra
points and nailed his single field
goal attempt. Ochoa said they
planned to go after Louisville's
first punt instead of setting up a
return.
"We surprised them with the
first call to block it, and it worked
Ochoa said.
Also overlooked in the loss is
Most Total First Downs by an opponent 39
Old record: 36 by Florida State in 1980
Most Pass Completions by an opponent: 46
Old record: 39 by South Carolina In 1994
Most Passing Yards by an opponent: 615
Old record: 456 by Florida State in 1982
Most Total Yards by an opponent: 769
Old record: 706 by Florida State in 1982
Most Passing Yards by an opponent: 592
Old Record: 451 by Steve Taneyhill, South Carolina 1994
Most Touchdown Passes: 6
QTB Shares record with Gus Frerotte.Tulsa 1993
Chris Redmond:
Most Completions by an opponent: 44
Old record: 39 by Steve Taneyhill, South Carolina 1994
ECO:
Total Combined Points: 108
Old record: 100 in 1996 Ohio 45, ECU 55
Kevin Monroe:
Longest Interception Return: 100 yards (TD)
Old record: 98 yards by Reggie Pinkney vs. Richmond 1976 (noTD)
and by Dwight Henry vs. Louisville 1997 (TD)
Source: ECU Sports Information Department
the continued development of
freshman quarterback David
Garrard, who played his best game
to date, finishing 28 of 38 for 316
yards. He threw three touchdowns
against only one interception.
"I really felt like tonight was a
night where we could let him loose
a little bit Logan said. "We
expanded our passing game menu
and I was just thrilled with the way
he handled it. We had our passing
game working well, but not well
enough to keep pace with them
Senior offensive lineman
Mondell Corbett said the team
knew going into the game that they
would have to outscore Louisville
"We knew on offense that je
hail to go out and put some points
on the board, just to try and keep jt
as close as we could Corbett saij)
"The first half, we started out repl
slow. We could have done a lot of
things better. It's just a bad situa-
tion
ECU will try to close out their
season with a win at Memphis this
Saturday. A victory would give the
Pirates their first winning season
since 19, when they finished 8-3.�
Pirates' season nuns out
Cross country runners
finish 14th at NCAA
Stephen Schramm
senior writer
Despite some key injuries, the
ECU men's cross country team
capped its season with a strong
showing at the NCAA District
Three Regionals in Greenville,
S.C. The Pirates finished with an
impressive 14th place and set the
stage for next year's stacked squad.
"I think, considering the cir-
cumstances, we ran very well said
Leonard Klepack, head men's cross
country coach.
The Pirates set two school
course records on the muddy track.
One of those was accomplished by
Junior Justin England, who fin-
ished 25th overall with a time of
31:03 and was named to the All-
District Team. Sophomore Stuart
ECU Cross Country NCAA
Regionals Times
25. Justin England, 31:03
43. Stuart Will, 31:28
87, Brian Beil, 32:26
115, Craig Littlefield, 33:07
146, Justin Poretri, 34:38
Will also set a school course record
en route placing 43rd at 31:23. The
former record was hold by Jamie
Mance with a time of 31:35.
"Will and England have consis-
tently been one, two all year
Klepack said.
The Pirates were without two of
their more consistent contributors.
Freshman Jason Trant, was unable
to participate all week due to a flu
and did not make the trip.
Sophomore Steve Arnold did not
run either after he was hindered by
a severe cramp. According to
Klepack, Arnold's Joss was
extremely unfortunate for the team
because he had otherwise been one-
of the successful runners.
Luckily for the Pirates, jnruor;
Brian Beil and freshmen Craig;
Littlefield and Justin Poretti ranj
well in the absence of Trant and!
Arnold. Beil finished 87th at 32:26
Littlefield placed 115th and Poretti!
placed 146th with times of 33:07!
and 34:38 respectively.
SEE CROSS COUNTRY. PAGE 9
Men's team loses game and Wiberg;
Head soccer coach
resigns his position
"I think they have played well
for having such a young quarter-
back Clayton said. "I love ECU
and have gone to every game since
elementary school
Overall, Pirate fans arc showing
s
their approval of this year's team.
The young players have impressed
many fans with their performance
and others look forward to next
year's season.
Tracv Hairr
assistant sports editor
The men's soccer team concluded
its season last Tuesday with a 0-4
shutout by American University
during the CAA Championships in
addition to losing head coach Will
Wiberg, who resigned his position.
ECU's best opportunity to score
in their final game of the season
came when Brian Denoo made a
shot, right outside the net, at 18:40.
This was one of five shots attempt-
ed by the Pirates.
For senior Wyatt Panos, this was
his last game for the Pirates.
"We had a very bad year and
thought we had a chance at win-
ning Panos said. "I wish we could
have finished the season different-
ly
The CAA began the soccer tour-
nament in 1990, but ECU has cap-
tured a victory only once. This
occurred when the Pirates defeated
UNC-Wilmington in 1995.
"Every time there's a tourna-
ment, if feels like you're getting a
second chance assistant coach Jeff
Oberg said. "We had hoped to do
better and didn't expect to lose so
quickly
Due to Wiberg's resignation,
however, the program will hopeful-
ly invite changes to allow for anoth
er tournament win in the future.
"Coach Wiberg made ai
extremely good effort to work withr
his team, was very loyal to them
and cared about them academically
as well said Henry VanSant
Associate Athletics Director. "To;
his credit, he did a really good job
but he felt it was in the program's;
best interest to resign I
Last year, the men had seven!
wins compared to the three victo-I
ries brought home by the 1998�
team.
"We thought last year
maybe there had been improve-
ment since we were doing so well
VanSant said. "But now we think"
SEE SOCCER. PAGE 9
that-





n
East Carolinian
ball Game
ent: 39
980
lent: 46
1994
t: 615
982
769
982
t:592
irolina 1994
"ulsa 1993
t:44
rolina 1994
JSS
js (TD)
ind 1976 (no TD)
(TD)
to the game that they
outseorc Louisville,
on offense that ie
and put some points
just to try and kcepit
could Corbett sai)
f, wc started out rejl
d have done a lot fit
It's just a bad situa-
:ry to close out their
win at Memphis this
etory would give the
first winning season
icn they finished 8-3
)Ut j
;NCAA
nes
up. According to
nold's Joss was
rtunate for the team
otherwise been one-
tl runners.
the Pirates, jnnjqr.
d freshmen Craig
Justin Poretti ranj
sence of Trant andl
ished 87th at 32:26
;d 115th and Poretti"
kith times of 33:07
ctivcly.
COUNTRY PAGE 9
Viberg:
;s to allow for anoth-
win in the future,
iberg made at
I effort to work withr
very loyal to them
t them academically
d Henry VanSant
:tics Director. "ToJ
id a really good job
'as in the program's;
resign I
he men had seven!
to the three victo-I
iome by the 1998
it,
ht last year thatt
lad been improve-?
vere doing so well
But now we think"
:CER. PAGE 9
Tutidty, Novamber 17, 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
Cross Country
continued from page 8
WILSON ACRES APARTMENTS
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The Pirates finished the season
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"Our team had a good season
and they should be proud. They
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still in it. They never gave up.
They had quality of character
Klepack said.
Soccer
continued from page 8
finding someone with more coach-
ing experience at the division 1
level will make a difference
Many of the players have been
on the team for three or four years
and so far have not had a winning
season.
"I really hope a coach comes
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success Oberg said. "It would be
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positive results
Members of the athletic depart-
ment are currently seeking a new
coach to fulfill this position.
"We are preparing to advertise
and hopefully find the best coach to
lead the program VanSant said.
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1 0 Tuesday, November 17, 1998
FOR RENT
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2 BR. Apt available above Percola-
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Please call 758-2616, ask for Yvonne.
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on campus. Just call 1-800-932-
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TEMPORARY PART-TIME (20
hrs.week) positions available begin-
ning December 1, 1998-February 26,
1999 (tentative). Need: 28 Library
Moving Assistants, $6hour; 4 Li-
brary Moving Assistant Team Leader
$8hour: 4 DriverLoaders $7hour.
Apply MonFri. 9 a.m3 p.m room
2400. 2nd Floor, Joyner Library.
Must be a current ECU student en-
rolled 6 hours or more, bring social
security card, drivers license, and
class schedule.
7ASTHMA ALLERGIES? Needed:
97 who desire immediate relief to try
and evaluate a new compact, state-
of- the -art home air purification sys-
tem. No cost or obligation. 252-355-
9248.
SALES AND marketing internship.
Northwestern Mutual Life. Gain valu-
able sales experience and earn good
money. Looks great on resume. Call
Jeff, 355-7700.
BARTENDER NEEDED: must be
over 21, must have great personality.
Experience preferred. Flexible hours.
Please call 948-4788 after 6 p.m. or
946-8194 before 6 p.m.
INTERNSHIP AVAILABLE in public
relations. Gain valuable experience
in public speaking and human re-
sources. Call Gerri at 355-7897.
FULL-TIME and Part-time teaching
positions available. Great experience
for CDFR and ELEM majors. Call
Greenhouse Preschool at 355-2404
EARN WHILE YOU learn, up to
$1,000.00 wk. Day and night
shifts. Clean, secure working at-
mosphere. Playmates Adult En-
tertainment. 252-747-7686 for in-
terview.
Make Money at Home
Easy Work, Excellent Pay, Free Details!
Send a long sell addressed stamped envelope to:
ACE Financial Publication
Post Office Box 507
Robersonville, NC 2787I
1999 INTERNSHIPS) Attention un-
dergraduate business students. Now
interviewing on campus for manag-
ers across Virginia, North and South
Carolina for summer of 1999. Aver-
age earnings last summer $7,000.
Call Tuition Painters at (800) 393-
4521 or e-mail at tuipaint@bell-
south.net
MODELS FOR Portfolio. Reputable
amateur photographer seeking slim
young women for portfolio photos.
Send note, photo (if available), ad-
dress, and phone for immediate rep-
ly. Paul Hronjak, 3015-A Wynfall
Lane. Wilson, NC 27893-9677
CYPRESS LANDING. Now hiring
marketing assistants MonThur. 4
p.m9 p.m 20-22 hours weekly.
Great hourly wage plus bonus. Must
have strong communication skills,
like talking to people, customer serv-
ice oriented & team player. Main
function will be telephoning custom-
ers. Call Craig Wheeler MonFri. to
schedule interviews, 975-8100.
I
MMWm
cancun'JaMiarCd-Bdhdwias
sw $�fi S
CAMPUS REPS SIGN UP ONLINE !
18002347007
www.endlesssuminertours.com
GREEK PERSONALS
BRYANT AND Josh, thanks for all
your help last Tuesday. We really ap-
preciate it. Love, Chi Omega
ALPHA XI Delta would like to con-
gratulate Karen Kushner on her
scholarship for having highest soror-
ity GPA and Tiffany Hoffman for her
scholarship from Belk Department
Store. We are so proud!
CHI OMEGA would like to thank all
formal dates for making our White
Carnation Weekend so special. We
all had so much fun!
ALPHA XI Delta presents Greek
God on Tuesday. November 17 at the
Attic at 9 p.m. Come see the Greek
males strut their stuff.
SISTERS OF The Week: Alpha Del-
ta Pi-Katie Williams, Katy MacNeil;
Alpha Phi-All new sisters; Alpha Omi-
cron Pi-Tracy McLendon. Tanya Fowl-
er: Alpha Xi Delta-Catherine San-
ders, Shelley Bissette; Chi Omega-
New Exec; Delta Zeta-Tiffany How-
ard, Roxane Paraschos, Jessica Dob-
bins; Sigma Sigma Sigma-Valerie
Springle, Ann Jennings; Zeta Tau Al-
pha-Kristin Mayer, Carrie Rogers; Pi
Delta-Carrie Barrett, Anne Lucas;
Panhellenic Member of the Week -
Lexi Hasapis. Congrats!
ALPHA XI Delta soccer team, you
did a great job this week. We are re-
ally proud of you guys.
SIGMA SIGMA Sigma hopes every-
one who came to our Bring-a-Date
had a great time!
TO ALL Members of Order of Ome-
ga: We have a meeting tonight at
6:00. Don't forget to bring baked
goods the bake sale! Also bring
your dues!
DELTA CHI, thank you for the Pre-
downtown last Thursday! Hope we
can get together again soon! Love.
Alpha Delta Pi
Register to win Dave
Matthews and Phish tickets!
For every two items of can food you bring
into WZMB, your name will be registered
once for our drawing. Register as many
limes as you like and help feed the hungry!
NEED A PART TIME JOB?
RPSINC.
Is looking for mxMt iiandmtc to load vans and
unload trailen for the am shift hours 3:00am to 8am.
$7.00hour; tuition assistance available after 30 days.
Future career opportunities in operations and manago
ment possible. Applications can be flBed out at 2401
United Drive (near the aquatics center) (ireeiiviUe
Sprtny mm Trwvw �� 1 otli
U MM to ten
Bahamas Pity
Cruise $279
9MycMeaiankFiwPainlncUMTu�i
Cancun $399
T Nlgm � Mr � HMI � Fiw Food � � Hn � Mrta
Jamaica $439
w 7 MOM � Mrmm � bo SIM m Food Mnha
Florida $119
�MM Cm Doyion. Sou MM a Coooa �won
Seriat Break TrwtM)r 12th Year!
1-800-678-6386
LAMBDA CHI Alpha, we definitely
had a great time with you tailgating
before the game, we'll have to get
together again soon! Thanks for eve-
rything! Love, the sisters and new
members of Sigma Sigma Sigma
CHI OMEGA would like to congratu-
late their new exec. President: Jen-
nifer MdKagan; Vice President: Karen
Johnson; Secretary: Erin Adams;
Treasurer: Dana Gajowski; Pledge
Trainer: Celeste Lassiter; Personnel:
Rebekah Johnson; Rush Chair: Va-
nessa Montuoro; and Panhellenic:
Jen Little Congrats girls, we know
you'll do great. Love, Chi Omega
SIGMA PI, as always we had a blast
with you guys Thursday night Can't
wait till next time! Love, the sisters
and new members of Sigma Sigma
Sigma
PI KAPPA Alpha would like to thank
the sisters of Alpha Delta Pi for a
great time at our theme social on
Saturday. Let's do it again soon.
LAMBDA CHI, thanks for the Pro-
downtown on Tuesday. We had a
blast Love, the sisters and new
members of Alpha Xi Delta
OTHER
TO THE brothers of Pi Kappa Alpha:
You're the best looking pimps we've
ever seen, taking your look to the ex-
treme. To beat our social, don't even
try, because when we get together
we're so superfly! Thanks for the
wonderful time, as usual! Love, the
sisters of Delta Zeta.
SPRING BREAK 99! Cancun' Nas-
sau " Jamaica 'Mazatlan ' Acapulco
' Bahamas Cruise ' Florida' Florida '
South Padre. Travel Free and make
lots of Cash! Top reps are offered
full-time staff jobs. Lowest price
Guaranteed. Call now for details!
www.classtravel.com 800838-6411
SPRING BREAK 99 Best price
Guaranteed CancunJamaica from
$399! Bahamas from $459! Florida
from $129! Travel for Free Campus
Reps Wanted! Call USA Spring Break
at 1-800-799-8445 or 1-888-777-
4642. Space is limited, so call today!
GAMMA BETA Phi fundraiser on
111898. in Wright Plaza Only $1.
Win great prizes!
SPRINGBREAK FLORIDA, Texas.
Cancun, Mexico, Jamaica. Bahamas,
etc. All popular spots. Browse
www.jcpt.com and call 800-327-
6013. Best hotels, prices and parties.
Reps, organizations, and promoters
wanted. Inter-Campus Programs.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
CRUISE SHIP Employment - work-
ers earn up to$2.000month
(wtips & benefits). Word Travel!
Land-Tour jobs up to$5,000-
$7,000summer. Ask us how! 517-
336-4235 ext. C 53622
THE EAST Carolina Native Ameri-
can Organization will be holding an
interest meeting on Nov. 19th in GCB
1031 at 9p.m. Any students are wel-
come to attend.
HAVE YOU experienced the ride?
The Dept. of Recreational Services
new RPM bike classes are in high
gear, and classes are filling fast! $10
pass gets 5 full sessions. Contact
the SRC Main Office at 328-6387 for
registration information.
WZMB 91.3
Bring in two cans of
food and register for your
chance to win Marifyn
Manson, Korn,
or Dave Matthews ticket
F@st
8289
'DAYIWHTS pAoi
UFTIflDGWG 9 -
itravel.com
1-800 999 SHI9
ENHANCE YOUR climbing skills
There will be a day trip to the pinna-
cle of Pilot Mountain, December 5th.
This trip is great for beginners and
those wanting to test their limits. Be
sure to hurry, registration deadline is
November 27th. Member cost is
$25. Any questions? Call Adventure
ProgrammingDept. of Recreational
Services @ 328-6387.
THE THETA Alpha Chapter of Alpha
Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. presents,
"Fast Food Diet: How to Survive a
College Student Diet A one-hour in-
teractive seminar designed to in-
crease students awareness of the
various food selections and diet
choices for an on-the-go lifestyle of a
college student on November 23.
1998, 7:30-8:30 p.m. at Mendenhall
Student Center.
GET IT together.togetherl! Few peo-
ple like to do things alone, including
working out and dieting. Find a mo-
tivated friend to join you, and con-
tact the SRC Main Office (328-6387)
for details on how the two of you, to-
gether, can purchase a Partner Train-
ing package to get you both on the
right track for a healthy lifestyle.
GAMMA BETA Phi will hold their
next meeting 5 p.m. Thursday in
Mendenhall rooms 2 & 3.
ADVANCED CLIMBING Sessions!
The Adventure Program will be host-
ing climbing sessions every Tuesday
from 7-8 p.m. thru Dec. 8th. Join us
each week for some one-on-one
time with our top climbing instruc-
tors. Set your ow pace and choose
what you want to learn! Registration
deadline is one week prior to each
session. Member cost is $15. For fur-
ther information, contact Adventure
ProgrammingDept. of Recreational
Services @ 328-6387.
ALL PSI Chi members please come
join the officers of Psi Chi at Chico's
for dinner on Wednesday, Nov. 18 at
6 p.m. Let's get to know each other!
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: Thursday 3:30-5PM. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop on November 19th. If
you are interested in this workshop,
please contact the Center at 328-
6661.
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION Work-
shop: Thursday 1:30-2:30. The Cen-
ter for Counseling and Student De-
velopment is offering the following
workshop on November 19th. If you
are interested in this workshop,
please contact the Center at 328-
6661.
BECOMING A Successful Student
Time Management: Thursday 3:30-
4:30. The Center for Counseling ahd-
Student Development is offering theT
following workshop on November;
19th. If you are interested in this-
workshop, contact the Center aj"
328-6661. �:
� t �
AEROBICS SCHEDULE HotHljij
Need to know when the next stress
relieving, heart-rate raising, flab.
burning, blood-pressure reducing
aerobics class is? Dial 328-6443; ex�
2 for a listing of current class sch'erj
ules
NORTH CAROLINA Zoo Expedition
Join us December 6th, as we ex
plore one of the East's best habitat-
zoos. You'll see an array of animals
from North America as well as Afri-
ca. Sign up! Spaces are limited. Reg I
istration deadline is Nov. 27th. Mer6
ber cost is $15. Call Adventure PnjI
grammingDept. of RecreatiodaC
Services @ 328-6387
TUES NOV. 17- FACULTY RECh"AC;
John Kramar, baritone. John;B
O'Brien, piano, Willis Building Audi
torium. 8:00 P.M. WED NOV 18-
PERCUSSI0N PLAYERS. Mark Ford,
Director, Room 101, A. J. Fletcher
Music Center, 8:00 P.M. THURS
NOV. 19- SYMPHONIC WIND EN-
SEMBLE AND SYMPHONIC BAND
Scott Carter and Christopher Knighj-I
en. Conductors, Wright Auditorium I
8:00 P.M. FRI NOV. 20- JAZZ EN
SEMBLE A. Carroll V Dashiell Jr Dl
rector with Bob Mintzer, Robert-C
Jones Distinguished Professor qfi
Music, Wright Auditorium, 8:00 PJvT
SAT NOV. 21- SENIOR RECITAC
Kim Barclift. clarinet, JUNIOR RECI-
TAL, Audrey L. Murphy, clarinet, Oak-
mont Baptist Church, 1100 Red
Banks Road. Greenville, 7:00 P.M.
SUN NOV. 22- SUNDAY AT THE:
GALLERY CONCERT: GUITAR Ej4:
SEMBLE. Elliot Frank, Director,
Greenville Museum of Art, 862-1
South Evans Street, Greenville. 2:0�I
P.M. SUN NOV. 22- SENIOR Fl�j:
TAL, Michael Dwayne Artis, percpi; I
sion, Willis Building Auditorforil
5:00 P.M. SUN NOV. 22-JUNIOR
RECITAL, Kelly Worsley, voice, Willis'
Building Auditorium, 9:00 P.M.
MON NOV. 23- GUITAR ENSEM-
BLE, Elliot Frank, Director. Willis
Building Auditorium, 8:00 P.M.
STRESS MANAGEMENT Work-
shop: Wednesday 3:30-4:30. The;
Center for Counseling and Studenl-
Development is offering the folfovj
ing workshop on November 18ttuff!
you are interested in this workshd,
please contact the center at 32fJ
6661. X
Advertise in
The East Carolinian
classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE$4.00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional words 50 each
STUDENT LINE AD RATE $2.00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional words 50 each '�
Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to refuse this rate for any ad deemed to be
non-student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE . . .$1.00
add to above rate for BOLD or ALL CAPS type.
All classified ads placed by individuals or campus groups
must be prepaid. Classified ads placed by a business
must be prepaid unless credit has been established.
Cancelled ads can be removed from the paper if notifica-
tion is made before the deadline, but no cash refunds
are given. No proofs or tearsheets are available. The : -
Personals section of the classifieds is intended for non -
commercial communication placed by individuals or �
campus groups. Business ads will not be placed in this ,
section. All Personals are subject to editing for indecent T;
or inflammatory language as determined by the editors.
CLASSIFIED DEADLINE . . .4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue
We reserve the right to change a deadline for holidays
or as necessitated by other considerations. :
PHOTOGRAPHER
INTEREST MEETING
ANYONE INTERESTED IN BEING A PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE
EAST CAROLINIAN NEEDS TO ATTEND THIS MEETING. :
PREVIOUS APPLICANTS ARE WELCOME
4PM TUESDAY, NOV. 171998 - AT THE EAST CAROUNIAfji;
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BUILDING 2ND FLOOR
BRING ANY WORK YOU THINK WOULD BE BENEFICIAL





The East CacolNft ;
lUNCEMENTS
I A Successful Student
jement: Thursday 3:30
jnter for Counseling and
elopment is offering the!
orkshop on November;
i are interested in this-
sontact the Center aj-
�T
SCHEDULE Hotlirje
w when the next stress
eart-rate raising, ftalJ-�
ood-pressure reducing'
is is? Dial 328-6443 ext.
3 of current class sch'ed
IOLINA Zoo Expedition.
:ember 6th, as we ex-
the East's best habitat
see an array of animals
America as well as Afrt-
Spaces are limited. Reg I
dline is Nov. 27th. Meni-�
515. Call Adventure Pfd
Sept. of Recreational
128-6387
17- FACULTY RECITAC
ar, baritone, John B
io, Willis Building Audi-
P.M. WED NOV. 18-
M PLAYERS. Mark Ford,
am 101, A. J. Fletcher
it. 8:00 P.M. THURS
SYMPHONIC WIND EN-
ID SYMPHONIC BAND
and Christopher KnighJ1
ors, Wright Auditorium.11
Rl NOV. 20- JAZZ Eli:
;arroll V Dashiell Jr p-� I
Bob Mintzer, Robert-C
nguished Professor "oC
it Auditorium, 8:00 Pji.l
21- SENIOR RECITAC
clarinet. JUNIOR REC1
L. Murphy, clarinet, Oak-
st Church. 1100 Red
. Greenville, 7:00 PJVf.
22- SUNDAY AT THE!
DNCERT: GUITAR EJf;
llliot Frank, Directpi
Museum of Art, 802-
Street, Greenville, 2:001
MOV. 22- SENIOR R�T:
I Dwayne Artis, percps
Building Auditoriuffl,
UN NOV. 22-JUNIOR:
ly Worsley, voice, Willis'
jditorium, 9:00 P.M.
23- GUITAR ENSEM-
Frank, Director, Willis
itorium, 8:00 P.M.
ANAGEMENT Work
lesday 3:30-4:30. The;
lounseling and Studen)'
: is offering the foltowJ-
3 on November 18thrtfC
ested in this workshd
ict the center at 328
e East Carolinian
ad deemed to be
3d.
CAPS type.
campus groups
by a business
n established.
paper if notifica-
0 cash refunds
available. The �
tended for non
individuals or
e placed in this
ing for indecent
1 by the editors
o.m. FRIDAY
n. MONDAY
f'S issue
e for holidays
iderations.
Comin
(December 7t
khe 1999
Spring Pocket
Calender.
Containing all
Recreational
Services
activities fori
the Spring
Semester.
Exam Jam
December 3rd
BFeaturin
m 1 1 m 1 IFinishiTiTI
u
Its About Energy
s
FITNESS
Holidays in Motion
128 5:30-7:00pm
Free Aerobics
128-18 See Schedule
SRC Sports Forum
SRC 239, 240
It's About Challenge
ADVENTURES
Climbing Pilot Mountian - 4x
125 Day Trip Adventure Center
Kayaking Roll Clinic - 2x
127 Clinic SRC Pool
It's About Fun
INTRAMURALS
Pirate ChaseTurkey Trot entry deadlin e
1117 5:00 pm SRC 128
Pirate ChaseTurkey Trot Run
1121 11:00 am SRC Rotunda
Exam Jammathon
123 8:00 pm SRC
14 �
mil �� llllllilUllllimW
I
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
vRiii rA � ,





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Arts & Entertainment Magazine of The East
last Carolinian m m
vwiMnhmd.
Wednesday, November 18,1998
4fe Miccah Smith
fl Fountainhead Editor
L Starting tomorrow, November 19th,The
V East Carolina Playhouse will present
'tKftW Mother Courage as its second and last
production this semester.
Bertok Brecht's drama is set in Europe during the Thirty
Years War, with action that spans over several of those
years.
The set is simple: a woven brown canvas stretches across
the back wall of the stage and rustic fortress gates made
of wooden planks conceal the wings.
With only her four children and a wagon filled with sup-
plies to peddle to desperate soldiers, Mother Courage
carves herself a life and a business out of the necessities
and privations of war, following the soldiers of either
side from country to ravaged country.
Over the course of years, Mother Courage loses her chil-
dren, one by one, through brutality or her own selfish-
ness. But her humanity has instilled in her the strength
of will to grimly plunge ahead, no matter the cost
Through it all, Mother Courage stands upright, face
turned broadly to scenes of carnage and rage, dispens-
ing earthy wisdom even when her heart is broken.
"I don't know why I listen to you slurs a drunken young
soldier once.
Her response is steady and true: "You listen to me
because I'm not saying anything new
Director John Shearin has drawn upon his own memo-
See Mother, continued on page 4
New spin on a classic
� Mother Courage will please audiences willing to think
He's a winner,
baby, so why
don't you
buy it?
CD Review
They're funky! They're skinny! But 1 thought there were only two of them Band!leview
Video Review
Madrigal Dinner
gets a well-
deserved break
and careful
makeover
WWtjPHfick
fountainhead � 2nd Floor Student Publications Building Greenville, NC 27858 � Phone 328-6366 � Fax 328-6558 � Advertising 328-2000 �www.fountainhead.ecu.edu





I
CD Review
Beck
Mutations
8 out of 10
Let me start out by saying this:
This is not everyone's Beck album.
For those of you still trying to
figure out where it's at, let me tell
you, it ain't here. Mutations finds a
Dust Brothers-less Beck stripping
away the spotlight glitter of Odeky,
and instead exploring a more
organic, eclectic mix of songs. This
is the age of pluralism and Beck is
a master of the trade. Whether it be
blues, folk, country, or even the
surprising Indian influence,
Mutations showcases a maturity in
songwriting that, although not
surprising coming from Beck, can't
be ignored.
From the opening psychedelicfolk
of "Cold Brains" to the final hidden
track, which could easily be
mistaken for c Beastie Boys
number, Beck pulls out all the
stops and rarely falters.
The clear stand-out on the
album isn't easy to distinguish, and
the fact that the two top contenders
are so stylistically different makes
it no less harder. "Bottle of Blues
with its subtly wailing harmonica
and blues-tinged guitar is
definitely a highlight. Lyrically,
Beck knows when to be abstract,
when to be funny, and when to be
down right simple, as demonstrated
here with lines like "Ain't it hard to
want somebody who doesn't want
you And leave it to Beck to find a
way to successfully put a wah wah
guitar in a blues song.
In the other corner,
"Tropicalia which sounds Ijke it
came off the same Carnival Cruise
Line ship as the recent single
"Deadweight"(from the life less
Ordinary soundtrack), has, I'm
sure, all but guaranteed Beck a spot
in Vegas as a future resident lounge
singer. With its flamenco style
guitar, Latin percussion, and sound
effects that remind me of the noise
your straw makes when you move
it up and down in your milkshake,
this song is so strangely unusual
that you can't help but love it0
Maria" takes us back to the wild
west, with its saloon-style piano
and drunken vocals, only to
transport us down to New Orleans
with the introduction of a trom-
bone. Listening to the song, 1 can't
figure out whether I'm supposed to
take that special someone into my
arms and head for the dance floor
or to just sit down and have
another.
"Nobody's Fault But My Own"
finds a contemplative Beck singing
over a sitar-laced raga, and at
times, even finds his usually nasal
vocals in such perfect form that
they all but melt into the mix. I
See Beck, continued on page 3
fcll b inlartMMWM Utfvin, of rh. Uu CgMxifl
WwMnkem
L
Amy LRoyster Editor in Chief
Heather Burgess Managing Editor
Miccah Smith Editor
Caleb Rose Assistant Editor
Stephanie Whitloclc Drjagtw
Brian Williams Uvout
(and Rcspess AoVerlismy Manager
Bobby TuggleWebmaflw
Sei.ing the !UJ community since OS. the last CmoJumh pubkihet
11.000 topiei e.ery luesday ant) IhurMfay .Q00 copies ol the
rouftiamheW. out ne am and en le ft unman i magazine, ate pub
iisrutd neiy Wednesday the lead editorial hi e�h edition ol iha East
Carounnn ts he opinnn ol ihe fditonal ftoairl the fast Carolinian
wtlmmts ieners in the eilnoi limited to 2S0 nxdi. ttftich may bg
edited lot decency w brevity The East Carolinian ittwi.es the right id
adit oi retect tenets lut outliuimn All lesims must be signed letters
should be addressed id Opinion ediiur .The I asi Carolinian. Student
Pubhraimns Building fCU, Greenville. 2B68-43&3 fonrifoimaiion.
cut 919 3?B 6366
2 Wednesday, November 18,1998
Band Review
2 Skinnee fs in da house!
Caleb Rose
Assistant Editor
It is amazing that the
floor of The Attic did
not cave in last
Thursday night due
to the sold out crowd that gath-
ered together for an evening of
tunage from Nameless? Dial-7 and
headlining act 2 Skinnee J's.
People started to pour in when
the doors opened at 9 p.m. Once the
tickets at the door were gobbled up,
The Attic was sold out for the
evening. House of Pain guru Everlast
was originally slated to open for the
Skinnee ones but he canceled and
the slot was filled by California's Dial
7.
Serious busting of moves just occurred here
Greenville natives Nameless?
opened the evening delivering their
own mix of rock and funk. Being no
strangers to The Attic, they put on a
good opening to a soon-to-be great
concert.
Dial 7 set up shortly thereafter
and soon took the stage. The five-
piece consisted of the core guitar,
bass, and drums and fueled
by a ball of energy disguised
as two singers. To picture
Dial-7's singers, imagine if
Chuck D and Flava Flav of
Public Enemy joined
Fishbone
Dial-7 delivered tunes
promoting their latest record
Never Enough Time. Most
all of the songs from their
set were upbeat and tight. The
dual singingrapping force put on a
show of their own by dancing errati-
cally about in costumes and encour-
aging crowd participation. "All I
Want" displayed the band's harmony
talents as they sang the melody "All I
wantis just another chance to do it
again Other memorable tunes
See Skinnee, continued on page 7
asset jfflst hhv HHtveai wbbb&
Ul fF I
Wmimma
enter
Its Your Place
To Catch a Free Fitch
NOVEMBER 19-21 AT 8 P.M. AT HENDRIX
THEATRE SUNDAY MATINEE AT 3 P.M.
Where in Greenville can you see a FREE blockbuster
movie AND bring a guest? Right here in Mendenhall
Student Center, of course! This week's show:
Armageddon (PG-13) starring Bruce Willis and Billy
Bob Thornton.
To Get Some Worh Done
OPEN MONDAY-THURSDAY 8 A.M10:45 P.M
FRIDAY 8 A.M. - 11:45 P.M SATURDAY 1 P.M.
- 11:45 P.M SUNDAY 1 P.M10:45 P.M.
Work doesn't have to tie. well work.
Not when you have a state-of-the-art facility at your
fingertips. Located on the ground floor, the comput-
er lab at Mendenhall features Pentium-based com-
puters, Power Macs, and color and laser printers.
And there's always an assistant ready to help you.
To Catch a Ride
Need to catch a ride for weekends or holidays?
Check out the RideRider Board at the foot of the
stairs in the lower level of Mendenhall Student
Center.
To Knoch Em Down
Boost your Monday from 1 - 6 p.m. with 50-cent
bowling at Outer Limitz (shoe rental included.) Make
Wednesday and Friday discount days by rolling 10
frames for just SI (shoe rental included) between 1
- 6 p.m. Call 328-4740 for Outer Limitz hours.
To Rack fm Up
Find your inner pool shark at the Mendenhall
Student Center billiards center It only costs S2 to
play for an hour. Call 3284740 for hours.
THANKSGIVING WEEK HOURS
Mon. 8 a.m11 p.m Tues. 8 a.m5 p.iuiWeds. 8 a.m5 p.m
Thursday-Sunday closed;
MSC Hours: MonThurs, 8 a.mll p.m Fri 8 a.mMidnight; Sat Noon-Midnight; Sun 1-11 p.i





Movie Review
Ryan Kennemur
Movie Reviewer
3 out of 4 Ryans
Apt Pupil gives evil a new face
Apt Pupil, the newest movie from
director Bryan Singer, begins with a
kickstart.
"I want to know everything.
Everything that they won't tell us in
school That's what Todd Bowden
(frighteningly portrayed by Brad
Rcnfro), a sixteen-year-old high
school student, tells Arthur Denker
(menacing Ian McKellan), the fugi-
tive Nazi war criminal.
What Todd wants to know
everything about is the Holocaust.
Not only does he want to know
about it; he wants to know every
graphic detail and to hear all about
Denkcr's involvement in the
massacre.
Why should Denker tell him any-
thing? Well, Todd has assembled
pictures and fingerprints, and is giv-
ing him no choice If he doesn't (ell
his stories, Todd will go to the police
with his evidence. So Denker agrees
and tells Todd his stories. Every day
after school, Todd goes to Denkcr's
house, absorbing more and more of
the truly awful stories that Denker
has to offer. Because of his fascina-
tion.Todd begins to falter in school
and soon the tides turn, leading the
Nazi gentleman to take control.
By posing as Todd's grandfather,
Denker is able to thwart the school
guidance counselor (a pretty decent
David Schwimmcr) into letting
Todd take the final exams and use
those grades as the ones that are to
show up on hisjreport card. Todd
studies and studies and makes all
As.
Even after this
act of kindness,
Todd is not willing
to let go of the
wtiole ex-Nazi
thing. He pur-
chases a Nazi
General costume
and makes
Denker put it on,
and then instructs
him to march.
Denker, by orders,
begins to march
in place. This is
one of the most pow-
erful scenes I have seen in any
recent movie. When you realize that
Denker is (in his own mind) no
longer in his kitchen, but back in
WWII Germany, you begin to won-
der exactly what went on back then.
The basic plot of the story deals
with Todd's undying thirst for
I Renfra and Ian McKellan dredge up a dark past in Apl Pupil
knowledge on the subject of Nazi-
era Germany. He can't seem to be
satisfied with the age-old saying
"learn from your mistakesor better
yetlearn from others'mistakes
Todd doesn't learn about what went
on as much as he learns how to pro-
tect his interests by using the Nazi
techniques.
I won't give away the end-
ing, but I'll tell you that
Denker makes a profound
indention on Todd's life
Whatever goodness and
morality Todd has at the
beginning of the film, we are
to assume that he has lost
these qualities by the end.
Bryan Singer's style fits
the overall mood of the
story quite well. He adopted
most of the cinematography
from his last film and one of
the best movies ever, The
UsualSuspects.You don't get as
much out of this film as you do with
SuspectSybul it is indeed well worth
lull admission. Just always remem-
ber this: If you don't believe in the
existence of true evil, then you have
a lot to learn.
Become a member.
Launch your
organization
into cyberspace.
Beck, continued from page 2
personally never imagined hearing
a Beck song that you could
meditate to, but again, Mutations
isn't exactly your typical Beck
album. "Static the album's closing
song (minus the mysterious hidden
track) is one of Beck's most
accessible song to date, one that I
could see being covered by any
number of artists, many of whom
would probably never touch a Beck
song otherwise. Laced with trippy
guitar and vocals that are, at times,
reminiscent of the Velvet
Underground, and surprisingly
warm lyrics like "It's a perfect day
to lock yourself inside you can't
help but walk away from the song
feeling a certain degree of comfort.
And all this from a man who, only a
few years ago, was calling himself a
loser. If only all mutations could
be this good.
answers to Tuesdays East Carolinian Crossword
WWW.
clubhouse
ecu.edu
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WedneaiaY,nlovBniber18,1998 3





r5
Mm
Mm Mint�
Carmike Cinemas
Ana (PG)
Daily: 2:15,4:30,7:00,9:15
Still Know What You Did Last
Summer (R)
Daily: 1:45,4:20,7:00,9:30
niBe Home For Christmas (PG)
Daily: 2:10,4:25,7:05,9:25
Living Out Loud (R)
Daily: 1:50,4:25,7:00,9:30
MeetJoeBlaek (PG-13)
Daily: 12:30,4:15,8:00
Pleasantville (PG-13)
Daily: 1:00,3:45,7:00,9:40
Practical Magic (PG-13)
Daily: 2:00,4:20,7:00,9:20
Rush Hour (PG-13)
Daily: 1:50,4:25,7:00,9:30
The Siege (R)
Daily: 1:00,3:40,7:05,9:45
The Water Boy (PG-13)
Daily: 2:10,4:25,7:05,9:20
The Wizard Of Oz (G)
Daily: 1:30,4:15,7:00,9:40
Vampires (R)
Daily: 1:45,4:20,7:00,9:30
Carolina East 4
BeOy (R)
Daily: 7:15,9:20
Sat-Sun: 1:00,3:05,5:10,7:15,9:20
Mnvd (R)
Daily: 8:00
Sat-Sun: 1:00,4:30,8:00
Bride Of Chucky (R)
Daily: 7:15,9:20
Sat-Sun: 1:00,3:05,5:10,7:15,
9:20
Urban Legend (R)
Daily: 7:00,9:45
Sat-Sun: 1:30,4:15,7:00,9:45
Buccaneer
Halloween H20 (R)
Daily: 7:00,9:00
Sat-Sun: 1:00,3:00,5:00
Simon Kirch (PG)
Daay:7:00
Sat-Sun: 1:10
One True Thing (R)
Daily: 9:30
Sat-Sun: 4:00
MaskofZorro (PG-13)
Dairy: 7:00,9:50
Sat-Sun: 1:00,4:00
Madrigal Dinner plans

Nina M.
Dry
Senior
Writer
Each year ECU
has celebrated
the Christmas
holiday with the
traditional
Madrigal
Dinner, an
E 1 i a b e t h a n
tvpc feast with the-
atrical song and dance activities, what we come up with. Gray sa.d
A 20-year tradition gets revamped
These dinners were presented
for four nights in December at
Mcndenhall Student Center
and featured musical perfor-
mances by students of the
School of Music. School of
Theatre and Dance students
created different characters such
as the Lord and Lady of the
Manor, the court jester and court
singers. Dining Services always
served a delectable feast.
This 20-year ECU tradition was
headed by School of Music faculty
member Dr. Brett Watson.
Dr. Watson's retirement last year
from ECU caused him to step down
from the position of the Madrigal
Dinner director. His subsequent death
this summer was a shock to many
people. This year, it has been decided
to change the holiday tradition a little
bit.
"After the retirement and unfortu-
nate death of Dr. Watson, the
(Madrigal Dinner program will be
suspended for this yean said Carol
Woodruff, marketing director of the
University Unions.
This year will be taken to review
the Madrigal Dinner of years past.
Director of Student Activities Stephen
Gray is currently the committee chair-
person in charge of looking at what
can be improved in the program.
"We were using the same format
every year Gray said. "The program
needed to be revisited, make it more
authentic
Gray, along with School of Music
faculty member Rhonda Fleming and
Theatre and Dance faculty member
Marcus Olsen (also known for direct-
ing the hit production of Cabaret),
plan to brainstorm in the hopes of cre-
ating a new and improved Madrigal
Dinner.
"We're going to travel to other uni-
versities to look at other scripts to see
Gray plans to sec what type of pro-
ductions other Universities used this
season and compare it to what will
work here.
"We have every intention of rein-
stating the program in December'99
Woodruff said.
As to what we will see the next
Dinner, continued on page 7
Mother, continued from page 1
ries and his impressions of suffering
and war to make the characters as
real as they can be. He wants
audience members to see what he
sees in the story.
"1 hope they'll take from it he same
thing that inspired me to do it
perhaps a better understanding of
what helps people to survive in the
face of seemingly insurmountable
odds and horrors
Music director Mort Stinc has helped
Shcarin produce what he hopes will
be a fresh and attention-grabbing
interpretation.
"1 think one of the things that you
will see in this is the use of music that
is atypical of Brecht says Shearin 1
created a set of characters called the
Four Zanies (pictured on Page 1)
The Zanies play and sing music com-
posed by Mort Stine for voice, trom-
bone, tambourine, slide whistle and
kazoo.
"They carry the burden of the show
says ShearinThey're the narrative
thread in a highly episodic play"
A great admirer of Brecht, Shearin
thinks it is important for ECU
students "to gain exposure to one of
the great modern playwrights
He calls Brecht "one of the giants of
drama
Shearin just hopes the audiences are
ready to do some heavy thinking.
"You've got to have an attention span
to dig this stuff. This isn't a sitcomhe
warns.
Evening performances are on the
19th, 20th, 21st, 23rd and 24th at 8
p.m. A Sunday matinee will be
presented on the 22nd at 2 p.m.
"There are tremendous challenges for
actors in this playl'says Shcarinl
think we have risen to the
challenge
TEC has teamed up
with Barnes and Noble
to bring book reviews to
Wednesdays Fountainbead
in our new program
Carolinian
for
Ronald
We are looking for fellow book lovers to
read and review best sellers lor a good
cause. Each Semester we will donate these
best sellers to the Ronald McDonald House
where they will be available for the family
members of terminally ill children to read.
If you would like to write a review
please call Miccah at 328-6366
4 Wednesday, November 18,1998






ARIES:
(March 21-April 20)
Your ideas and information could
make the difference, be sure you
inform those who can get the
wheels turning. Self- sacrifice for the
sake of loved ones is a joyful gift.
But there are those who might want
to take exception to your plans.
TAURUS:
(April 21-May 21)
Clear communication will be very
important. Follow up as soon as
possible on all correspondence. You
are set to make things happen and
now have all you need at your dis-
posal to do so. Go for it! Changes
need to be made at home - the sug-
gestions won't be met with
enthusiasm.
GEMINI:
(May 22-June 21)
An unexpected money gift will give
you the chance to try something
new. You feel like you're walking off
the edge of your usual routine, and
the feeling is exhilarating. Take care
of your own needs, which may
include taking some time for your-
self. Be prudent.
CANCER:
(June 22-July 23)
Always remember that change is the
only constant - for your idea of self
may be a bit shaken up now.
Attitude is everything when dealing
with situations and people out of
the norm. There are a few relation-
ships important to you that need
attention; be sure to state your
needs clearly.
LEO:
(July 24-August 23)
Something important you have been
looking forward to is about to
appear. Don't let your ego get the
best of you and induce you to do
something really risky. You're look-
ing for a leadership role, but the
time isn't right. Wait for the perfect
moment to make your bid.
VIRGO:
(August 24 - September 23)
All seems quite well this week. In
fact, you are probably sitting on top
of the world. This satisfaction can
come from several areas. Perhaps
your love life is improving, or you
may have just accomplished some-
thing at work. Pay very close atten-
tion to all you hear now.
LIBRA:
(September 24 - October 23)
Although you are an easy going
character, you may easily offend
someone if you are not at your
diplomatic best. Spiritual inspira-
tion comes in the company of like-
minded friends. There is a real
opportunity for success, but only if
you're willing to change.
SCORPIO:
(October 24 - November 22)
Continue to insist on quality and
honesty in all your dealings, espe-
cially when issues are in the spot-
light. It may be the best time to
examine how to best use your tal-
ents and abilities, and whether or
not you need to shift gears where a
job is concerned.
SAGITTARIUS:
(November 23 - December 21)
The darker side of family members'
personalities may emerge if you are
dealing with money. Remember that
you can only do so much when
someone else controls the situation.
A requirement of personal interac-
tion must be that you will be treated
as an equal. No need to divulge
secrets.
CAPRICORN:
(December 22 - January 20)
You are in danger of being seduced
by something that has an attractive
outer appearance, but won't hold up
under close scrutiny. If greed is a
part of your motivation, put a stop
to it immediately. Don't criticize
another unless it is done with the
compassion.
AQUARIUS:
(January 21 - February 19)
Your energy level is at top speed -
slow down and be a bit more cau-
tious. It's time to talk about your
need for a great deal of indepen-
dence in relationships, so there are
no uncomfortable surprises later.
Clarify your point of view and
assure others no offense was meant.
PISCES:
(February 20-March 20)
Romance is in the picture, but be
aware of jealous behavior. Point out
that you are no one's possession.
Words of love may get an immediate
response, but be assured that you
are appreciated. Your primary rela-
tionship will distract you from your
work if you don't get a grip.
Birthday This Week:
Your daily grind may now become
more frantic and all-consuming,
which may lead to depleted health.
Rest and relaxation are definitely in
order for the next several months -
to rejuvenate your frazzled energies.
Make sure all communications are
crystal clear; messages may get easi-
ly confused.
Horoscope by Miss Anna
Things to
Downtown
18 Wednesday
Locals night only at Peasant's Cafe
(No Cover!)
Social PhobiaViewpointFrom Here
OnPeoples Faught at Backdoor
19 Thursday
Jah Works at Peasant's Cafe
Carol Dashiell and Company at Staccato's
20 Friday
Kiss Army and Conspiracy The Attic
Fat Mamma at Peasant's Cafe
The Magic Pipers at Corrigans
21 Saturday
The Nighthawks at The Attic
Babba Seth at Peasant's Cafe
The Treehuggers at Corrigans
22 Sunday
Open Mic night at Peasant's
Cafe
The Groove Riders at The
Courtyard Tavern
24 Tuesday
Studio 54 night at the Attic
Sunnywheat at Peasant's
Cafe
Wednesday, November 18,1998 5





I
Free Time
November
1H Wednesday
-Travel-Adventure Film Series: Spain,
Land of Contrast at 7:30 in Hendrix
-Poetry Forum at 8 p.m. in 248 MSC
-School of Anything does Anime at 8
p.m.in221MSC
-Percussion Players with Mark Ford,
director.al 8 p.m. in Rm. 101 of the
A.J. Fletcher Music Center
-TBA at The Cave in Chapel Hill
-Tarot Bolero,Sweben at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill
-The Reverend Morton Heat, The
Amazing Royal Crowns at Cat's Cradle
in Carrboro
19 Thursday
-Armageddon at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
-Symphonic Wind Ensemble and
Symphonic Band with Scott Carter
and Christopher Knighten, conduc-
tors, at 8 p.nv in Wright Auditorium
-Mother Courage at 8 p.m. in McGinnis
Theatre
-Melanie Sparks at The Cave in Chapel
Hill
-The Accelerators, Big Joe Festus at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill
20 Friday
-Armageddon at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
-Jazz at Night at 8 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium
-Mother Courage at 8 p.m. in McGinnis
Theatre
-Tweaker, Basement at The Cave in
Chapel Hill
-Glass Candle Grenade at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill
21 Saturday
-Armageddon at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
-Mother Courage at 8 p.m. in
McGinnis Theatre
-Jack Black at The Cave in Chapel Hill
-Maki, Punch Drink at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill
22 Sunday
-Armageddon at 3 p.m. in Hendrix
-Sunday in the Gallery: Guitar
Ensemble with Elliot Frank, director,
at 2 p.m. at the Greenville Museum of
Art
-Mother Courage at 2 p.m. in
McGinnis Theatre
-Memphis at The Cave in Chapel Hill
-2 Monday
-Mother Courage at 8 p.m. in
McGinnis Theatre
-Guitar Ensemble with Elliot Frank,
director, at 8 p.m. in the Willis
Building Auditorium
-Greg Hawks at The Cave in Chapel
Hill
24 Tuesday
-Mother Courage at 8 p.m. in
McGinnis Theatre
-Sharking Teeth at The Cave in Chape
Hill
-Combustible Edison at Cat's Cradle
in Carrboro
Video Review
Skip class Bueller style
Ryan Kennemur
Movie Reviewer
3 12 outof4Ryans
Ferris Bueller's Day Off is a teenybop-
per film that could only be made by
John Hughes. This movie captures
the essence of being young, all the
while being a mainstream comedy
and a hysterical one at that.
We meet Ferris Bueller (Matthew
Broderick),and right from the get-go
it's obvious (but not lo his parents)
he is faking an illness so he can stay
home from school. This is the basic
symbolism upon which the entire
movie relies: all the adults seem out
of touch. The fact the parents aren't
smart enough to realize he's faking
shows how clever kids can be. We
also meet Ferris'jealous sister Jeanie
(pre-Dirty Dancing Jennifer Grey),
who has a bad case of sibling rivalry.
This element drives a lot of the
action and is a plotline not often
found in most movies involving
teens.
Ferris proceeds to narrate the film in
a classy, funny way. He's not one for
fancy book-learnin, but he does
Ferris proves thai brains beat brawn any old time
know a lot about life, people, and
having fun.
What he wants to do is take a day
off and show his best friend how to
have some fun. The friend is the
depressed hypochondriac Cameron
Frye, portrayed by Alan Ruck, who
shall always be known for this role.
Ferris has a kind of psychological
control over Cameron and when he
tells him to come pick him up,
Cameron refuses, but then guilt trips
himself into going along with it.
We also meet Ed Rooney (Jeffrey
Jones), the school principal who is
obsessed with catching Ferris to
show the example he sets is "a first
class ticket to nowhere Rooney is
somewhat of the cliche anal-re'ten-
tive administrator, but the atmos-
phere of the film is so zany and satir-
ical even the typical elements seem
fresh.
So Ferris, his girlfriend Sloane
(Mia Sara),and Carqeron take on the
city of Chicago. They also take
Cameron's father's Ferrari essentially
to add to the risk.
Unlike most comedies, the protago-
nists in this story aren't trying to
overcome a conflict, they are just
being themselves and doing and say-
ing funny things. They do get into a
few situations that could blow their
cover, but their teenage wit and fast
thinking save them every time.
See Feins, continued on page 7
BINGO NIGHT
AT MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
;�'TifTHflWIIMlTTMniTl'll
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21ST, AUDITORIUM 244
Sponsored by the ECU 5rudenr Union Special Eventj Committee.
For more information, call 328-6004.
6:00 PM
BTSico
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19 through SATURDAY, N0UEMBER 21 AT 8 PM
SUNDAY MATINEE, NOVEMBER 22 AT 3 PM
"QneRarfy You Don'tWaatXo. MfssP
K
THURSDAY, OECMBER 3 through SATURDAY, DECEMBER 5 AT 8 PM
SUNDAY MATINEE, DECEMBER 8 AT 3 PM
4�JtWJ�te
&
G Wednesday, November 18,1998





ODDITIES
N.C. officers, dogs, helicopter
chase after thief suspect
CREEDMOOR, N.C. (AP) It took a
police chief, more than 90 officers, a
helicopter and three dogs to chase
down a man accused of stealing a
$500 space heater.
Leroy Howard, who police call the
"unluckiest crook alive was arrested
and charged with running from
police, stealing the heater and other
offenses.
Howard, who had been wanted for
weeks by Oxford police, was being
Saturday held under $41,000 bond
in the Granville County Jail.
The chase began when Creedmoor
Police Chief Ted Pollard saw the 30-
year-old Kitrell man on Monday
loading a space heater into a truck.
Pollard said when he stopped and
asked Howard what he was doing,
Howard jumped in his truck and
drove off.
Pollard followed the truck until it got
stuck in mud crossing a field. Then
he said Howard got out and ran into
the woods.
Just then three more police officers
arrived and discovered the truck had
been stolen from the city of Oxford.
But Howard's luck would get worse.
Two wildlife officers driving by the
field led their tracking dog into the
woods after Howard.
Then, as if on cue, two vans carrying
15 armed members of the North
Carolina Prison Emergency
Response Team arrived after hearing
the commotion on the radio.
The rest of the 80-member platoon
with two more dogs was called in
after the others searched unsuccess-
fully for about an hour.
"There was no way he was going to
escape now Pollard said.
Now all police needed was some
help from above, and it just so hap-
pened a highway patrol helicopter
getting repaired nearby flew over to
assist.
Finally after spotting Howard and
then losing him, a PERT officer
found him covered with leaves in
some bushes.
The full monarchy: Charles
keeps clothes on at
birthday tribute
SHEFFIELD, England (AP) The dif-
ference between "The Full Monty"
and "The Full Monarchy" is
elemental: Prince Charles keeps his
clothes on.
But the heir to the throne was a hit
nonetheless Friday at a 50th birth-
day party staged in his honor featur-
ing a cast member from the hit film
about unemployed Sheffield men
who turn to stripping.
The icing on a birthday cake in the
shape of a security guard's cap pro-
claimed "The Full Monarchy" Cast
members all wore such hats in the
movie's finale.
Charles visited a set used in the
1997 movie about the Yorkshire
industrial city to promote the work
of his charity, the Prince's Trust.
Taking a lead from Hugo Speer, who
played one of the main characters,
"Lunchbox in the film, Charles
quickly mastered the steps and .
joined in recreating a scene where
the men start practicing their dance
routine while waiting in line at a job
center,
"I've even been given a bit of chore-
ography on how to do things in a
queue Charles said.
"He's a cinch, a natural Speer said
of the prince. "He asked for a few
tips but didn't need them. It looks
like he's been practicing in his bed-
room
After his performance to the song
"Hot Stuff" by Donna Summer, the
prince was serenaded by hundreds
of youngsters who sang' � Happy
Birthday to You
During an earlier visit to a drug
rehabilitation center in Sheffield,
Charles encountered a warm admir-
er in 78-year-old Elaine Glaza.
"Can I kiss you?" she asked.
"Absolutely said Charles, and some
bystanders shoutedGo on,
Charlie Mrs. Glaza also gave him
cuff links and a carnation after she
kissed his lips.
Charles, who reaches the half-centu-
ry mark Saturday, began his birth-
day celebrations Thursday night
with a private party at Hampton
Court Palace. On Friday night, Queen
Elizabeth II planned a party at
Buckingham Palace.
Camilla Parker Bowles, Charles'
longtime love, was among the guests
Thursday, but the event produced no
pictures of the two of them together.
She is hosting a party for Charles on
Saturday at Highgrove.his country
home.
� Dinner, continued from page 4
I holiday season, ifs anybody's guess,
j "Ifs a mystery, but that's the beau-
� ty of it Gray said. "When the new
program is introduced in 1999, we
! hope to have the people saying
S 'wow
Both students and staff members
anticipate the return of our
Christmas tradition.
"It was a lot of fun. I enjoyed it
said associate director at Mendenhall
Student Center Betty Hardee, who
performed in the Madrigal Dinners
in the past. "If they have a part for
me, I would do it again
"It was a very creative and won-
derful experience said Matt Hinson,
an ECU junior can't wait for it to
come back. It's an experience that we
never forget
Ferris, continued from page 6
Meanwhile, Jeanie and Rooney are so
obsessed with catching Ferris their
paths eventually cross and the result
is one of the best scenes, not to men-
tion the best facial expression, in any
movie of that era. In classic John
Hughes style, Ferris has toget back
home before his parents arrive to
continue faking his illness.
Ferris Bueller's Day Off is a genius
comedy. It's very funny, original, well- �
written, and well acted. It's not
preachy in terms of symbolism, but ;
its style is so brilliant it's in a class all ;
its own. What's more is the fact that i
it has the Bow-Bowchicka-chickahhh i
song and Charlie Sheen in his finest I
hour. If you haven't seen this movie,
you'd better. It's probably the best �
movie of our generation. Period. �
WlH
Skinnee, continued from page 2
included " 133f aster" and "People
Dial-7 played a short but intense set
that pumped the crowd up for our
Skinnee friends.
The crowd meandered about while
the sets were changed. Frequent trips
to the bar and bathroom were often
impeded by the 99X booth located at
the rear of The Attic (after all they were
a sponsor of the show). The crowd
moved forward as the DJ's from 99X
introduced the band that brought in
the crowd: The 2 Skinnee J's.
The band opened up in a fog of
fake smoke and dressed in weird
space-age leisure suits with a creeping
instrumental titled "Space Avengers
Return to Base As the song was clos-
ing, the two singers, J and Special J,
crept onto the stage as if everything
was moving in slow motion.
They set their positions and
slammed into"Thc Best"which had
the crowd and band jumping in sync
(except for Special J - he was impeded
by an injury) to the point where it
seemed like The Attic floor was about
to cave in.
Song after song was played with a
short spoken intro before each so that
the band could catch their breath. 2
Skinnee J's are hardcore. They have the
same grooves as 311 but with a
Brooklyn, New York, Beastie Boy atti-
tude.
The in-between song banter were
stories from the road and their past.
An interesting point of the show was
A.J. Stumpy, the band's manager and
spiritual advisor. He stood up on
stage, all hardass, then he broke into
break-dancing during the song dedi-
cated to him.
Songs new and old, including
"BBQ "Artificial Flavor'V'Irresistible
Force" and the crowd favorites "Seven
One Eight" and "You're a Champion"
were thrown into the crowd of stu-
dents, which started swinging their .
hands, chanting "You're a champion
On many occasions the crowd
obeyed as the J's shouted "throw ya
hands in the air Signs were posted on
the stage that enforced "No
Stagediving, No Slamdancing howev-
er it said nothing about crowd-surfing.
Fans were passed around like a joint at
a Phish concert and they were then
escorted out by The Attic staff.
2 Skinnee J's are off to Atlanta and
then Charlotte. They claim that they
arc a working band that never leaves
the road. Whatever they do, they need
to keep on kecpin' on because that
night, as they said, we all were "cham-
pions" at having a good time.
15. New Radicals
"You Get What You
Give"
14. Cardigans "My
Favourite Game"
13. Once Hush
"Envelope Song"
12. Cowboy Mouth
"Whatcha Gonna
Do?"
11. Marilyn Manson
The Dope Show" '
10. Ghoti Hook
Walkin' on
Sunshine"
9. Kom'Got the
Life"
8. Zebrahead "The
Real Me"
7. Dial 7 "All I
Want"
6. Jump Little
Children "Come Out
Clean"
5. Kid Rock
"Cowboy"
4. Offspring "Pretty
Fly"
3. Fighting Gravity
"Bend the Light"
2. Soul Coughing
"Circles"
1. Hipbone "Radius"
Wednesday, November 18,1998 7





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" ti every
pet I�)m Tlhice East
fenrapuis celeed
(CcauroMimlaura
Go to our wefcjste at www.tec.ecu.eayyaib�flcT on the calendar link.
Just below tfojpwejek's listincyrfirtHothe event submission form.
Or if you want a Brrortciiei'w into your browser.
Then jusi enter your event onto our campus calendar
It's just that easy. And it's one more free service of The East Carolinian.


Title
The East Carolinian, November 17, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 17, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1306
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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