The East Carolinian, November 12, 1998






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WWSPP

Thursday
High: 65
Low: 42
Friday
High: 65
Low: 45
Efc
Online Survey
Did you vote in the
November 3 election?
28 Yes 71 No
www.tec.ecu.edu
Did you use the telephone to register for next
semester?
Carolinian
No need to leave campus for quality health care.
.Focus, (Kg) 13
THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 12 .1998 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 24
Attorney concludes report on controversial fliers
Housekeepers found
offensive art in Jenkins
Building
Si vwni: M ii. f.nk k vicii
E I i I I � B I I e R
University Attorney Toi Garter recently
concluded her investigation of posters, per-
ceived as racially offensive, found by
housekeepers on three floors of the
Jenkins Art Building in January.
Three housekeepers first discovered
posters in the Art Building on Jan. 12.
They removed the posters and brought
them to Dr. Brian I laynes, the assistant
vice chancellor for student affairs.
After the posters were brought to Dr.
Haynes, he contacted Karen Boyd, assis-
tant dean of students, and together they
discussed the concerns of the "racist
posters" with Toi Carter who began her
investigation of the incident on Jan.16.
"I was unsure whether the posters rep-
resented a prank, an art project or an effort
to intimidate African Americans Carter
said in her report about the investigation.
On Jan. 20, housekeepers discovered
more posters in the Art Building titled
"Survival The posters showed a photo-
copied drawing showing how slaves were
packed like sardines in a slave ship.
The posters consisted of photocopied
black and white photographs portraying a
brutal lynching, two minstrels in black face
and a group of three African American men
attempting to protect themselves from the
force of water directed at them from a
water hose. Along with the photographs
were photocopied pages from a pocket-
sized edition of Webster's New World
Dictionary.
In the 14 page report issued to
Chancellor Richard Eakin on Oct. 20,
Carter concluded that the efforts made to
determine who was responsible for posting
the materials proved unsuccessful. The
report outlines the circumstances of the
incident and concludes that the posters
were not left specifically for housekeepers
to find.
While the report says that the flier was
most likely an artistic statement. Carter
believes the person or people responsible
for posting it were careless in the method
they used to present their views.
"There wasn't any sensitivity about the
issue (latter said.
"We considered the matter very seri-
SEE FLIERS, PAGE 2
In response to January complaints from housekeepers who found posters like the one above on three floors of the Jenkins Art Building, University Attorney Toi
Carter turned in a report on the incident to Chancellor Eakin Oct. 20. The report outlined the details of the incident and concluded that the still unidentified person
responsible was making a controversial, artistic statement.
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
Library construction
almost finished
$32 million makeover of
Joy ner draws to a close
Kelly Graham
, I I 1 � K I I K R
As phase III of the construction at Joyner
Library' comes to an end the staff members
at the library prepare to move their depart-
ments. Phase III is the last of a two year
old, $32 million make over. It has been a
part of a two year project. The two earlier
phases involved building a new wing and
renovating the east wing. The third phase
involves the renovation of the west wing.
The west wing will be 85,000 sq.ft. There
will be space for more group studies, grad-
uate study carrels, faculty studies and more
quiet study space.
"What the students will be most
excited about is that the building will be
over said Dr. (Jail Munde, the associate
director of library services.
The west wing will be open, "ready or
not said Munde, Jan. 4. Also opening is an
interior courtyard.
There will be a total of four floors
including the basement. The basement
will be the periodical department and
Copiserve. The first floor will contain
media and teaching
resources and the
expanded reference
department. Sharing the
first floor will have an
eighty-terminal worksta-
tion that will stay open as
long as the library is
open.
The second floor will
house government docu-
ments.
This is the first time we've been out of
the basement in about 30 years said
Michael Cotter, Interim Head of
Government Documents.
The one-third of Joyner's collection
that was taken to remote storage areas
during the renovation will be returned to
the the third floor. On this floor there will
also be more quiet study areas.
Joyner will be keeping its same main
entrance. There is "no firm plan to
reopen the old entrance said Munde.
There will be no additional entrances.
Presently group studies have been built
in the place of the entrance.
On Dec. 1 the first of a 90-day process
of replacing the books that were placed in
storage will begin. When phase III is com-
plete, "all 1,300,000 volumes of books
SEE PHASE. PAGE 3
Nobel Prize winner
spoke on Peacemaking
The third phase of the Joyner Library construction include renovating
the west wing and includes more quiet study space for students.
PHOTO BY KEUY 6BAHAM
Renovations at Joyner Library create new entrance.
PHOTO BY KEUY GRAHAM
Department of Labor conducts audit
Interviews conducted for
past two weeks on campus
SlISANNF. MlL.BNKE.VlCH
STAFF WRITER
The United States Department of Labor is
continuing to conduct a routine audit of
ECU's affirmative action policies.
The Department has been touring the
campus for the past two weeks interview-
ing staff and faculty members and review-
ing university records.
"No complaints have been made by
anybody at the school to spark the audit
said Dr. Carrie Moore, Equal Employment
Opportunity (EEO) officer. "It is a routine
audit which will be going on at all North
Carolina Universities
The investigation involves reviewing
EIO policies concerning pay equity,
recruitment and retention practices, and
professional development of the staff as
well as the improvement of women and
minority staff members.
The auditors have also been looking at
records to make sure the university is fol-
lowing the proper procedures of employing
SEE AUDIT. PAGE 2
Ramos-Horta focused on
the power of nonviolence
Si's AS NK Mil. INK'S VICII
STAFF WRITKR
Human rights activist and winner of the
1996 Nobel Peace Prize, Jose Ramos-
Horta, delivered the annual National
Honors Society of Phi Kappa Phi lecture
Tuesday, Nov. 10, in Hendrix Theater.
The lecture, titled "Peacemaking:
The power of nonviolence focused on
how the world, especially the United
States, needs better leaders who have the
vision and creativity to make the world
"The lesson is that no amount of vio-
lence, threat or force yielded on people
with dreams and vision will succeed.
Violence will melt away with time,
only citizens with dreams, hope and
faith are eternal
Jose Ramos-Horta
1996 Nobel Peace P(i;e Winner
more peaceful.
"If we want a better millennium, we
need people with vision and courage
Ramos-Horta said, "The problem is that
there are not enough politicians, not
enough political leaders with vision and
leadership to influence society
Ramos-Horta said we need politicians
like John F. Kennedy and Robert
Kennedy who were individuals with
dreams, vision and courage.
According to Ramos-Horta there are
Jose Ramos-Horta
delivered annual
National Honors
Society of Phi
Kappa Phi lecture.
PHOTO BY HUMBERTO
SALGAOO
about 30 to 40 vio-
lent conflicts affect-
ing the underdevel-
oped world today.
"These con-
flicts Ramos-
Horta said, "could
have less casualties
or could have been
prevented if coun-
tries would stop
delivering weapons
that fuel conflicts
Ramos-Horta
believes that the
desire for economic growth is one of the
main causes of conflict in third world
nations.
"Indonesia Ramos-Horta said, "is
violating human rights, repressing stu-
dents and repressing the media all in the
name of economic growth .
Ramos-Horta blames the lack of
democracy for causing a poor economy in
underdeveloped countries.
"The absence of political freedoms
brought about economic disaster
Ramos-Horta said. "The U.S. cannot
ignore the need for political reforms
Ramos-Horta called on the United
States to take a leadership position to
stop supporting leaders with malicious
intent and to use creativity to find a way
to bring justice to the world,
"After years of fake policies and sup-
port of tyrants, I beg the U.S. to show
some leadership Ramos-Horta said.
Ramos-Horta believes that violence is
not the answer to making developing
nations successful economically, politi-
cally or socially. Instead, nations need to
take better care of the people to be suc-
cessful.
"The lesson is that no amount of vio-
lence, threat or force yielded on people
with dreams and vision will succeed
Ramos-Horta said. "Violence will melt
away with time, only citizens with
dreams, hope and faith arc eternal





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Thursday
High: 65
Low: 42
Friday
High: 65
Low: 45
Online Survey
Did you vote in the
November 3 election?
28 Yes 71 No
www.tec.ecu.edu
Did you use the telephone to register for next
semester?
Carolinian
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12 ,1998 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 24
No need to leave campus for quality health care.
.Iook, page 13
Attorney concludes report on controversial fliers
Housekeepers found
offensive art in Jenkins
Building
Si sans i: M 11. K sK BVtGH
�. i.mi- w k i r i: K
University Attorney Toi Carter recently
concluded her investigation of"posters, per-
ceived as racially offensive, found by
housekeepers on three floors of the
Jenkins Art Building in January.
Three housekeepers first discovered
posters in the Art Building on Jan. 12.
They removed the posters and brought
them to Dr. Brian I laynes, the assistant
vice chancellor for student affairs.
After the posters were brought to Dr.
Ilayncs, he contacted Karen Boyd, assis-
tant dean of students, and together they
discussed the concerns of the "racist
posters" with Toi Carter who began her
investigation of the incident on Jan.16.
"I was unsure whether the posters rep-
resented a prank, an art project or an effort
to intimidate African Americans Carter
said in her report about the investigation.
On Jan. 20. housekeepers discovered
more posters in the Art Building titled
"Survival The posters showed a photo-
copied drawing showing how slaves were
packed like sardines in a slave ship.
The posters consisted of photocopied
black and white photographs portraying a
brutal lynching, two minstrels in black face
and a group of three African American men
attempting to protect themselves from the
force of water directed at them from a
water hose. Along with the photographs
were photocopied pages from a pocket-
sized edition of Webster's New World
Dictionary.
In the 14 page report issued to
Chancellor Richard Eakin on Oct. 20,
Carter concluded that the efforts made to
determine who was responsible for posting
the materials proved unsuccessful. The
report outlines the circumstances of the
incident and concludes that the posters
were not left specifically for housekeepers
to find.
While the report says that the flier was
most likely an artistic statement, Carter
believes the person or people responsible
for posting it were careless in the method
they used to present their views,
' "There wasn't any sensitivity about the
issue Carter said.
"Wc considered the matter very seri-
SEE FLIERS. PAGE 2
In response to January complaints from housekeepers who found posters like the one above on three floors of the Jenkins Art Building, University Attorney Toi
Carter turned in a report on the incident to Chancellor Eakin Oct. 20. The report outlined the details of the incident and concluded that the still unidentified person
responsible was making a controversial, artistic statement.
PHOTO BY MARC CP.IPPEN
Library construction
almost finished
$32 million makeover of
Joy ner draws to a close
Ki,i.i.v Graham
s ! ATI' WRITER
As phase III of the construction at Joyner
Library comes to an end the staff members
at the library- prepare to move their depart-
ments. Phase 111 is the last of a two year
old, $32 million make over. It has been a
part of a two year project. The two earlier
phases involved building a new wing and
renovating the east wing. The third phase
involves the renovation of the west wing.
The west wing will be 85,000 sq.ft. There
will be space for more group studies, grad-
uate study carrels, faculty studies and more
tjuict study space.
"What the students will be most
excited about is that the building will be
over said Dr. Oail Munde, the associate
director of library services.
The west wing will be open, "ready or
not said Munde, Jan. 4. Also opening is an
interior courtyard.
There will be a total of four floors
including the basement. The basement
will be the periodical department and
Copiserve. The first floor will contain
media and teaching
resources and the
expanded reference
department. Sharing the
first floor will have an
eighty-terminal worksta-
tion that will stay open as
long as the library is
open.
The second floor will
house government docu-
ments.
This is the first time we've been out of
the basement in about 30 years said
Michael Cotter, Interim Head of
Government Documents.
The one-third of Joyner's collection
that was taken to remote storage areas
during the renovation will be returned to
the the third floor. On this floor there will
also be more quiet study areas.
Joyner will be keeping its same main
entrance. There is "no firm plan to
reopen the old entrance said Munde.
There will be no additional entrances.
Presently group studies have been built
in the place of the entrance.
On Dee. 1 the first of a �0-day process
of replacing the books that were placed in
storage will begin. When phase 111 is com-
plete, "all 1,300,000 volumes of books
SEE PHASE. PAGE 3
Nobel Prize winner
spoke on Peacemaking
Ramos-Horta focused on
the power of nonviolence
The third phase of the Joyner Library construction include renovating
the west wing and includes more quiet study space for students.
PHOTO BY KELLY GRAHAM
Renovations at Joyner Library create new entrance.
PH0T0 BY KELLY GRAHAM
Department of Labor conducts audit
Interviews conducted for
past two weeks on campus
S U S A N N K M 11. E N K E V I C II
STAFF WRITER
The United States Department of Labor is
continuing to conduct a routine audit of
ECU's affirmative action policies.
'The Department has been touring the
campus for the past two weeks interview-
ing staff and faculty members and review-
ing university records.
"No complaints have been made by
anybody at the school to spark the audit
said Dr. Garrie Moore, Equal Employment
Opportunity (EEO) officer. "It is a routine
audit which will be going on at all North
Carolina Universities
'The investigation involves reviewing
EEO policies concerning pay equity,
recruitment and retention practices, and
professional development of the staff as
well as the improvement of women and
minority staff members.
'The auditors have also been looking at
records to make sure the university is fol-
lowing the proper procedures of employing
SEE AUDIT, PAGE 2
S I' S A N N E M 11. K N K E V I C II
STAFF WRITER
Human rights activist and winner of the
19 Nobel Peace Prize, Jose Ramos-
Horta, delivered the annual National
Honors Society of Phi Kappa Phi lecture
'Tuesday, Nov. 10, in Hendrix Theater.
'The lecture, titled "Peacemaking:
The power of nonviolence focused on
how the world, especially the United
States, needs better leaders who have the
vision and creativity to make the world
"The lesson is that no amount of vio-
lence, threat or force yielded on people
with dreams and vision will succeed.
Violence will melt away with time,
only citizens with dreams, hope and
faith are eternal"
Jose Ramos-Horta
1996 Nobel Peace Piiie Winner
more peaceful.
"If we want a.better millennium, we
need people with vision and courage
Ramos-Horta said, "The problem is that
there are not enough politicians, not
enough political leaders with vision and
leadership to influence society
Ramos-Horta said we need politicians
like John E. Kennedy and Robert
Kennedy who were individuals with
dreams, vision and courage.
According to Ramos-Horta there are
Jose Ramos-Horta
delivered annual
National Honors
Society of Phi
Kappa Phi lecture.
PHOTO BY HUMSEHTO
SALGA0D
about 30 to 40 vio-
lent conflicts affect-
ing the underdevel-
oped world today.
"These con-
flicts Ramos-
Horta said, "could
have less casualties
or could have been
prevented if coun-
tries would stop
delivering weapons
that fuel conflicts
Ramos-Horta
believes that the
desire for economic growth is one of the
main causes of conflict in third world
nations.
"Indonesia Ramos-Horta said, "is
violating human rights, repressing stu-
dents and repressing the media all in the
name of economic growth
Ramos-Horta blames the lack of
democracy for causing a poor economy in
underdeveloped countries.
"The absence of political freedoms
brought about economic disaster
Ramos-Horta said. "The U.S. cannot
ignore the need for political reforms
Ramos-Horta called on the United
States to take a leadership position to
stop supporting leaders with malicious
intent and to use creativity to find a way
to bring justice to the world.
"After years of fake policies and sup-
port of tyrants, I beg the U.S. to show
some leadership Ramos-I lorta said.
RamosI lorta believes that violence is
not the answer to making developing
nations successful economically, politi-
cally or socially. Instead, nations need to
take better care of the people to be suc-
cessful.
"The lesson is that no amount of vio-
lence, threat or force yielded on people
with dreams and vision will succeed
Ramos-Horta said. "Violence will melt
away with time, only citizens with
dreams, hope and faith arc eternal





2 Thursday. Novembir 12. 1998
news
The East Carolinian
I
news
briefs
NATIONAL DEMOCRATS
BOAST OF VICTORIES
IN WASHINGTON
STATE
WASHINGTON (AP)
National Democratic leaders on
Wednesday touted their election
gains in Washington state, where
two Democratic House victories
helped narrow Republicans' majori-
ty.
Republicans nationwide lost a
net of five House seats, due in part
to Washington state losses by Rep.
Rick White and state Sen. Don
Benton.
the world
PHILIPPINE BANKS
GRANT NATIONAL
STEEL INDEFINITE
DEBT
MORATORIUM
MANILA, Philippines (AP)
National Steel Corp the country's
largest steel manufacturer, has been
granted an indefinite debt moratori-
um by its creditors, a bank official
said Tuesday.
National Steel has encountered
problems meeting its maturing
obligations due to the weaker peso
and higher interest rates.
Creditors decided to give
National Steel an indefinite debt
moratorium since all of the compa-
ny's 12 billion pesos (dirs 300 mil-
lion) in loans are covered by assets,
Philippine National Bank chairman
Edgardo Angara said.
University participates
in Finnish conference
NC TASK FORCE
RECOMMENDS UNC
GROWTH
fcHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) An
additional 5,500 students should be
Accepted at the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill over the
fiext 10 years, says a task force on
fcnrollment growth.
I The panel recommended
Thursday that the enrollment at
UNC reach more than 30,000 stu-
dents by 2008.
NC SIXTH FRATERNITY
DECIDES TO GO ALCO-
HOL FREE
feALEIGH (AP) A sixth fraternity
at North Carolina State University
rjas proclaimed itself alcohol free,
jchool officials said.
Theta Chi has been alcohol free
this fall for the first time in its 46-
year history on campus.
Theta Chi adopted a nationwide
plan requiring all chapters to ban
alcohol from their chapter houses by
2003, with a preliminary review of
ijts effects in 2001.
Scandinavian
connection puts ECU
in Helsinki
Peter Dawvot
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Telephone lines, cameras and
microphones at Joyner Library let
ECU and city officials participate
in a conference Wednesday in
Helsinki, Finland.
Diane Henshaw, director of the
Division of Continuing Studies and
Richard Ringeisen, Vice
Chancellor of Academic Affairs,
represented ECU while
Greenville's mayor Nancv Jenkins
spoke on behalf of the city. The
conference on community devel-
opment was being held in the
Arabia Ranta suburb of Helsinki.
"Arabia Ranta wants to become
the high tech model city for
Northern Europe said Henshaw.
"The conference chose ECU as a
test and demonstration of the city's
new data transmission network
Ringeisen believes this is just
the beginning of an ongoing
process.
"Last year Yahoo ranked ECU
as one of the top 25 most techno-
logical schools in the nation said
Ringeisen. "We intend to continue
to upgrade our technology for the
program. Technology is advancing
at such a fast pace that it seems as if
we are constantly going up a down
elevator
With this technology ECU has
been able to communicate with
students who live across the globe.
"For the past five years we have
been working with the fiber optics
programs said Jams Byrd,
Distance Learning Specialist.
At first the cost of the entire pro-
gram was around $20,000 per ses-
sion, but now costs have been cut
to as little as one-third of that.
"Everyday this technology
allows us to teach students on a
world wide basis said Byrd.
Transmission between
Greenville and Europe was a mile-
stone event. The transmission
which originated in Finland and
required the use of three ISDN
(Integrated .Service Digital
Network) phone lines. The ISDN
lines and equipment produced a
video image that was slightly ani
mated in quality, but participants
deemed it to be perfectly accept-
able for exchange of information.
After the joining of the two par-
ties it was evident of a sense of
patriotism for the two cities. After
the interviews Henshaw and a few
other members of the Greenville
panel headed for Helsinki and will
return on Fridav.
w . I i CrJ
SP C3k W Ci
November 8, 1998
2:14 pm - A resident of Fletcher
Hall reported the larceny of his wal-
let from his room.
2:16 pm - A faculty member
reported the larceny of a computer
disk drive from a room in the
Brewster Building.
5:15 pm - Three non-students
were issued trespass warnings after
being found skateboarding outside
the General Classroom Buildine.
5:15 pm - A non-student who
had been banned on a previous
occasion was issued a state citation
for trespassing.
November 9, 1998
1:14 pm - A student from Belk
Hall reported receiving threatening
and obscene messages on her voice
mail.
6:30 pm - Officers were dis-
patched to Belk Hall in reference to
a strong odor of marijuana. One stu-
dent was charged with possession
of drug paraphernalia and issued a
campus appearance ticket. Four
other students from Belk were
issued campus appearance tickets
for possessing and using marijuana.
Fliers
continued from page I
ously and feel that it was unfortu-
nate that it caused some of our
housekeepers grief said Dr.
George Harrell, assistant vice chan-
cellor of administration and
finance, "It is unfortunate that an
apparently well meaning student,
in attempting to make an artistic
statement, didn't realize the effect
that it had on others
Upon the conclusion of Carter's
report, the university considers the
incident closed.
"Hopefully this incident will
raise public conscience about
racism
Audit
continued from page 1
teachers, staff and faculty and to
make sure that there are no foul
practices.
Interviews have also been
conducted by the Department of
Labor with staff and faculty mem-
bers concerning how they are treat-
ed by their employers.
"We think that our
employment practices are fair and
that our files are in compliance
with affirmative action polices
said Richard Brown, Vice
Chancellor. "We feel safe with the
audit
The University will use
the results and the information
gained from the audit to its advan-
tage.
'The audit can help clari-
fy the weak points in a particular
area where the university may
need to improve Moore said.
The results of the audit
will not be released until a later
date since the audit has not yet
been completed.
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Do you agree with
this statement?
A society is more liberated to the extent that fewer people are
denied human rights or opportunities or in any way oppressed
due to race, religion, ethnicity, gender, age, sexual preference,
property ownership, wealth, income, or statist authoritarian-
ism and exclusion. Reducing and ultimately removing such
hierarchies of reward, circumstance, status, or power would
improve society.
If so, join us at our meeting.
Nov. 18, 1998 7:00pm G.C. 1007
Organization for a Liberated Society
ELC.U. chapter
A SocialPolitical Forum
SII
BU
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news
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� We are Greenville's only hearth
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Tuesday -ThuRsday: 19 p.m FridAy: 1-10 p.m Saturday: 12-10 p.m.
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NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
TATTOOING BY AWARD WINNING ARTISTS!
From downtown, go straight down Dickinson Avenue
Extension, located at 4685 US Hwy. 13, Greenville.
M � CHECK US OUT
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The only place in Greenville
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1-800-397-8575
Thursday, November 19,1998 � 1 pm 'til 5 pm
Hilton � Greenville, NC
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�X Barber & style
Pirate special
$7.00
Haircut
2800 E. 10th St.
Eastgate Shopping Center
Across From Highway Patrol
Behind Stain Glass
Mon Fri. �-6
walk-ins Anytime
752-3318
Say Pirates
& Get Hair
Cut for $7
Every time.
Phase
continued fiom page l
A Paint your Own Pottery Studio
iM date
NIGHT!
FRIDAY 6-9PM
20 OFF ALL POTTERY
COMPLIMENTARY SNACKS
1920 Smythewyck Dr.
Behind Bowen Cleaners
Off Charles Blvd.
756-6839
Closed Monday
Tues & Wed 10-7 � Thurs & Fri 6-9
Sat 10-6 -Sun 1-6
Debbie O'Neal, Owner
will be under the same roof said
Munde.
"The move will be a time of
great challenge said Pat
McGee, head of the teaching
resources center (TRC).
It will be a time of great chal-
lenge because they have to move
as well as continue with providing
service to the patrons to the
library. TRC alone will be
responsible for moving about
5,000 books as well as the depart-
ment's equipment.
Over all, each of the depart-
ments are excited about making
the move. There will be more
office space and enough space to
house all of each department's
collection, with the exception of
the periodicals department. They
are still going to have to separate
the large collection because they
accumulate periodicals at such a
fast rate.
Land of Contrasts
So you used the
Cliff Notes when you
had to read Don
Quixote. Now you can
see up-close the
windmills he battled,
and much more.
All-you-can-eat dinner menu: Roasted pepper salad, steak with blue cheese sauce, chicken with red
peppers, sauteed artichoke hearts, red bliss potatoes (oven browned), caramel custard. Spanish
hard rolls, water, coffee, and tea.
Wednesday, November 18, 1998 Hendrix Theatre, 4pm & 7:30pm
TRAVT1 ADVENTURE FILM
&THEME DINNER SERIES
IT DOESN'T MATTER
HOW YOU GET THERE
Films are free to students with a current, valid ECU One
Card, Dinner tickets are $12 each. To reserve your dinner
ticket, come to the CIO in Mendenhall Student Center by
Friday. November 13, 1998 and pay with cash, a meal
card, or your declining balance. Dinner wilt be served at
6:00pm in the Great Room.
CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE HOURS Monday - Friday 8:30am
to 6:00pm 252.328.4788 or 1.800.ECU.ARTS;
Deafspeech impaired access 252.328.4736
INREACH'98
"What Your Heart Desires'
SATURDAY NIGHT
NOVEMBER 14, 1998 8 7:00pm
MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH
(1510 GREENVILLE BLVD)
WITH PERFORMANCES BY:
THE PRAISE TEAM
'BOBBY SANDERS
ZACCHAEUS TREE
SOULED OUT
EVERYONE IS WELCOME
SPONSORED BV THE SU'J
BAPTIST STUDENT UNION
For more info, oil th� BSU ' 152-4646 or Br.nt 8 758-3950
Free admission; there will be a love offering.
family
fare
Tfce AtffiW of Sleepy MolIohJ
Salurday, November 14, 1998
2:00 p.m Wright Auditorium,
East Carolina University
This thrilliru tale of IcnaboJ
Crane and the ileadless ilorseman
promises 4i44les, ooseourrips,
and audience participation.
Advance tickets $9 public, $8 ECU facultystaff,
$5 ECU stud.ntyoulh. Dew tickets available
1:00 p.m. day el skew. All ticketi $9 at the door.
ECU Central Ticket Office, Monday-Friday,
8:30 o.m4:00 p.m 2S2 328-4788;
1-800-ECU-ARTS; or deaf speech -Impaired
access 252-328-4736
.?
Look Around
PROTECT YOUR
GROUND
Fire-safe
landscaping
can protect
your home.
Learn more about it.
http:www.usfa.fema.gov
United Slates Fire Acbniniitration
Federal emergency Management Agency
ready to ride?
TEC is looking for
someone to fill a top
management position
with significant
responsibility
and good pay
Requirements:
Macintosh Experience
Photoshop
QuarkXpress
Experience Managing people
Organizing Employee Schedules
Coordinating Production & Press
Some late evenings required
Have you
worked at a college
publication before?
TEC has teamed "P
Kith Barnes and Noble
to bring book reviews to
Wednesday's Fountainhead
in our new piflgram
easli. �
Carolinian
Reviews fa-
Ronald
ik IB" l�Mktnu fcir Mb lunik lours lo
mad and mvi lvi srftfs l�(flod
cause. Each Srt�atw m till danafc1 lite'
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4 Thuriday, Novimfair 12, 1998
news
The East Carolinian
Benefit conceit for Honduras
"Scott Free" to play at
Methodist Student
Center on 5th Street
Peter Dawvot
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOt
The Wesley Foundation of ECU
will be sponsoring a benefit concert
by "Scott Free" on November 18 at
7 p.m at the Lion's Den coffee
house, located within the
Methodist Student Center on 501
E. Fifth St.
Members of "Scott Free" first
met in Detroit in the 1980's and
quickly realized that they shared
much in common, including the
same name.
" We had so much in common
said Scott Wilkinson, United
Methodist Campus Minister. " We
both sang tenor, played guitars,
wrote our own songs, and even
shared an enthusiastic faith in
God
Soon after the meeting the two
formed a Christian folk pop jazz
duo and have since performed over
400 concerts and sold over 10,000
copies of their recordings.
Since the formation, the two
have collaborated on many differ-
ent musical recordings, and are cur-
rently working on a greatest hits
album. Work together however, has
become much harder since
V lkinson accepted a job as ECU's
campus minister.
Wilkinson accepted the job at
ECU in June of 98, and has worked
hard to get students involved with
the campus ministry.
The concert is free to the public,
however donations will be accepted
for relief efforts for Honduras and
Nicaragua, which were damaged by
a recent hurricane. Other areas of
the donations will be used to pay
for a mission trip to the area later in
the Spring.
" We have several connections
in the Honduras and Nicaragua
area. People seem to be very con-
cerned with the devastation, and
want to pitch in and help said
Wilkinson " We just want to pro-
vide a way to play a part in the
i
Thanksgiving Buffet Nov. 16 & 17
Join ECU Dining Services on
Monday, Nov.16& Tuesday, Nov.17 from
11 -30am -2:00pm for our Thanksgiving Buffet
at Sweetheart's.
MENU
Roast Turkey w Cranberry Chutney � Honey Cornish Hens �
Ham w Plum Chutney � Spinach. Basil & Walnut Salad �
Endive-Orange & Flat Leal Parsley Salad � Smashed Potatoes
& Fried Shallots � Herbed Bread, Cracker & Leek Dressing �
Sugar Snaps w Basil & Lemon � Knotted Rolls & Cranberry
Muffins � Dessert Buffet
All-You-Csrs-To-Est Buffet Only
$7.50 w Advantage Dollars
7.50 plus tax w cash
Make vour reservation today by calling 328-4751.or 328-4772
CaahTecVaXJmI Dollar (.ECU Departments! Account number.
accepted.
HELP ECU DINING SERVICES HELP GREENVILLE!
BI-ANNUALS
Deadline for SGA Bi-Annuals
is November 13,1998
All requests must be turned into the
SGA office by 5:00pm
If you have any questions
you can call the SGA officei
328-4726 J
receive $1 OFF your Thanksgiving Buffet ticket, i
will be donated to Greenville's food bank.
BETA GAMMA SIGMA
National Honor Society for Schools of Business
The ECU Chapter Established in 1968
Dean Ernest B. Uhr and the Faculty of the School of Business at East Carolina
University Proudly Congratulate the Fall 1998 Inductees into Beta Gamma Sigma
Fall 1998 Inductees
The following inductees represent the top 7 of their junior class, or top 10 of the senior
class, or top 20 of the masters students.
SCH00LKIDS
KJliLU.KlJb Si
STORE
When you have to
have your music now
Enormous selection of
used CD's, Imports,
Locals, Vinyl's & Indies.
SpeciaI orders FA3 Till
JUNIORS:
Sara Elizabeth Baisey
John Randall Briley
Annamarie G. Britton
Quintin Hamilton Gilfus
Donna Lynn Weakley-Marion
Brandon Andrew Taylor
SENIORS:
Timothy Daryl Divers
Rebecca Harmon Guffey
Gary Allen Mersman
Margarette Virginia Miller
Rebecca Lynn Poucher
MASTERS:
Kathleen Sue Austin
Monica Leslie Bray
Todd Young Chadwell
Tangela Craft
Billy Russ Darrow Jr.
Carlyle Milton Dunshee II
Holly Marie Durham
Daniela Eisenhauer
Merl Leroy Galusha III
Katrin Henning
Susan Elizabeth Jacobsen
Rebekah Reith Madre
Walter Worsley Peel
Kimberly Brenda Steel
Timothy Shawn Strother
Burkhard Tiessen
The inductees will be formally inducted on Thursday. November 19, 1998. at 4:00 PM in room
1032 of the General Classroom Building. The public is invited to attend
BETA GAMMA SIGMA OFFICERS AND NOMINATING COMMITTEE:
Dr. Douglas K. Schneider, President Mr. Thomas Bull, Student Vice-president
Dr. Daryl M. Guffey, Secretary Mrs. Laurie A. Eakins, Nominating Committee
Dr. Robert Frankel, Secretary-elect Mrs. Beth S. Eckstein, Nominating Committee
Dr. Mark G. McCarthy, Treasurer
00LKZZ&
Stop by our new store and enter to
win cool swag prizes and pick up
some free goods!
Not your everyday
deadbeat, record store
424 Evans St. Mall
757-7766
Mon-Sat 10-11 Rock�Blues�R&B�CountryJazz�Hip Hop�World Music
Sun 12-6
ft
5Thuradav. Novemt
To ma
There are als
their Second,
of gun conr.ro;
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background c
blame.
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create turmoi
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around at our
robbed last w
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obtained legs
TEC
sometimes al
we need to e
wouldn't hav
even ECU's
In th
have to pass
most horrent
were a victin
or her Secon
safety is moi
LETT
I was wond
noticed the rec
I am not talk
fountain or the
am referring l
occur right uni
that we as stu
after the fact.
Maybe you
am talking abc
you who have
time, let me re
was that Aral
know, the gre
dogs and thos
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Mall Sorry,
yard. Finally,
deal over the :
the deal that





17
fc,
Thundav November 12 1998
opi n i on
Thii Fm' i
eastcarolinian
AMV LROVSTER Mm
Heather burgess MwagingEdiw
AMY SHERIDAN NewsEdhoi
PETER DAWVOT Assillim Hem Edilor
AMANDA AUSTIN FtnmstdiiM
EMILY LITTLE Head Copy Ediin
Mario Sciierhaufer SponsEditor
TRACY HAIRR Assiiimi Spons Edilor
CHRIS KNOTTS SiillWuiinin
Jason Feather PhoioEdim
STEPHANIE WIIITI.OCK AdOosignMimgec
Janet Respess AdvemsiogMimgii
DENNIS S. NORTON Wire Editor
BOBBY TUOOLB Webmism
S�v�g IN ECU mmminiiy n HA IN En Cmlniin milfcNi 11.000 nws mn tariff �l !��'�� IN Md ednnmrVi ncti idiion b ��
opimo ol �� l�o�il M. IN Em Cin��i mtaimfi Wins lo IN i4l�. tairi lo SO . mudi nw bt idind l� deetmt r� biiwn Il� Em
Curtain '��! IN mill in tdn � leml Mm lot publitinon M Mm nun b� s(md limn slmld M addinsnd to Oonm MM .IN Em
ClioliMn. Sludwl Pillion� B���J. EOJ. Gutmla. JJB6EH353 E�' mtamwm. all �? 3H 6366.
OUNIQW
To many people living in Southern states, gun control means hitting your target.
There are also those who strongly oppose gun control because they feel that it strips them of
their Second Amendment right. The high number of gun-related crime has led to a plethora
of gun control laws such as permit laws and a background check of the intended owner.
Hunters are affected by gun control laws because they have to endure these rigorous
background checks before they can obtain a gun to hunt, and gun related crimes are to
blame.
Ask yourself if these laws are actually as bad as they seem. There is conflict on either
side of the fence. If there were no laws, guns would be free to any and everyone who wants
to buy, whether it is for pleasure, sport, safety, or criminal intent. The fact that the laws exist
create turmoil from the hunters and marksmen who want their right to bear arms.
The key in this argument is safety. A few weeks ago, a man was carrying a gun
around at our football game, and another publication reported that a local business was
robbed last week at gunpoint.
Laws or no laws, guns are still extremely easy to obtain. Even when they are
obtained legally, they are still more likely to be used for a criminal purpose.
TEC feels that safety is the greatest concern in this matter. It is a shame that we are
sometimes afraid to walk down the street by ourselves because we live in an unsafe world. If
we need to enforce laws on guns to ensure a better world then so be it. In this is the case, we
wouldn't have to deal with those who feel it is necessary to carry a gun to a football game or
even ECU's campus.
In the long run, there are no rights withheld if you can still obtain a gun; you just
have to pass through a few checkpoints. The main point is that gun-related crimes are of the
most horrendous acts in the country, and the numbers are increasing. If someone you knew
were a victim of a gun related crime, would you agree that the assailant was carrying out his
or her Second Amendment right? Rational thinking on a college level should agree that
safety is more important.
LETTER
Students have no voice in big decisions
I was wondering if anyone has
noticed the recent changes at ECU.
I am not talking about the new
fountain or the Sonic Plaza thingy. I
am referring to the changes that
occur right under our noses; things
that we as students find out about
after the fact.
Maybe you don't know what I
am talking about. Well, for those of
you who have been here for some
time, let me remind you. First there
was that Aramark contract You
know, the greasy pizza, $1.50 hot
dogs and those biscuits! Then last
year there was Barefoot on the
Mall Sorry, on the Mendenhall
yard. Finally, there was the Pepsi
deal over the summer You know,
the deal that sent millions to the
school and left the rest of us
without a choice on what we could
drink. I was a little surprised to say
the least, especially being from
Atlanta, where I can enjoy a nice,
cold Coca-Cola.
Well, let us forget those little
oversights and move on to the latest
decision by the powers that be.
Picture this: I am walking toward
Mendenhall to get some cash when
I notice something. My lovely
Wachovia ATM has been replaced
by a piece of plywood! Can you
believe that? A staple of my
beloved South ripped out and
replaced by another bank that paid
more money.
What? That's right. It seems that
the school has once again sold us
"Chance favors the prepared mind
Louis Pasteur
Scientist
OPINION
Columnist
Christopher
Coppedge
South Park funniest show on TV
South Park is a phenomenon.
It is crude, obnoxious and
extremely funny. I heard a
report that the Christmas
episode last year had half the
audience the Super Bowl
usually gets.
In August of 1997, television
spawned one of the most horrid
and obscene shows ever to air.
South Park. This show, on
Wednesdays at 10:00 on Comedy
Central, contains scenes full of
death, profanity, carnage,
hermaphrodites, destruction, and
of course Mr. Hankey the
Christmas Poo. With a show being
so violent, vile and disgusting, was
there any doubt it would be an
instant success?
I began watching South Park
during October of '97, two months
after it first aired. I remember
passing the cartoon while I flipped
through channels, never giving a
thought to watching it. Finally I
saw the fearsome foursome with
guns. As I watched the end of the
hunting episode I could not stop
laughing. Before the group shot
anything with fully automatic
weapons, they screamed, "It's
coming right for us then
continued to blow the animal to
bits. I know people who hunt and
act the same way. I could not
believe that a half hour of complete
stupidity would be so entertaining.
South Park quickly gained fans
from college students everywhere
and enemies from every parent
group. South Park is a
phenomenon. It is crude,
obnoxious and extremely funny. I
heard a report that the Christmas
episode last year had half the
audience the Super Bowl usually
gets. Fans everywhere have shown
their support for the show by
buying shirts, stickers and hats. Of
course with any good thing comes
the moral groups. The moral parent
groups have whined and
complained about the themes
explored in the show. They do not
believe South Park is suitable for
children. Well the show is not
meant for children, so shut up.
Most of the moral groups do not
realize that the shows usually
contain a good positive message in
them, some more hidden than
others. The problem' is, most
people who complain about the
show have never even seen it. It's
preceded by a warning, after all.
Unfortunately the newer
episodes have not been able to
surpass the original six. The show
is still the funniest thing on
television, but compared to the
originals South Park is becoming
OPINION
Stephen
Kleinschmit
out for cash. We pay tuition fees to
be ignored. Not just once or twice,
but over and over again. I do not
think that it is right for some guy in
a suit to make my campus
decisions. Tell us what is going on
here!
I understand that the school
needs more money. Fine. I
understand that some of the money
is used for the good of the school.
But it is wrong to make these kinds
of decisions without our input. We
as students should-be informed and
should have some say in what
happens at this school.
Chris Loga
Senior
Communication
If you are supposed to be
smart enough to study at a
university, you should be
proficient at using a
computer. I was happy to
buy my computer last year,
instead of having to go to
the Aycock computer lab
where my computer would
crash on an hourly basis.
To all those of you that run away
from modern technology as if it
were laced with Anthrax, a new-
day of educational endeavor is
upon us. Many colleges
nationwide are requiring all
incoming freshmen and students
to purchase a computer. Western
Carolina and Virginia Tech are just
two southern colleges who have
made this leap. And since ECU is
probably trying to move up on the
list of the most wired (or weird)
college campuses nationwide, I
believe that it is imminent in the
next two years that we are going to
do the same.
I support this requirement. If
you are supposed to be smart
enough to study at a university, you
should be proficient at using a
computer. I was happy to buy my
computer last year, instead of
having to go to the Aycock
computer lab where my computer
would crash on an hourly basis. I
also liked playing around on it. I
had a Budweiser screen saver that
had the frogs on it, but I had to
take it off because I kept on
getting awakened at 3 a.m. by
those f�Ks
goingBudWeisc.Er.
I know a lot of people don't like
computers. Just think how hard it
was for my 50-year-old mom to
learn how to use a computer. When
she went to college, it was
considered high tech to have a
Wrvkb & Letter
to tk& BaJJtov
Got something to say? Need somewhere to say it? Bring
your letter to eastcarolinian , located on the 2nd floor
of The Student Publications Building
�V
"hellalame It would be sad if the
censors made the show limit
content, which seems very
unlikely. The only other possibility
I can think of is, the makers are
running out of material or are trying
to stretch material. I believe the
first season was a trial run, so they
had some of the best stuff just to
get a following. They have slacked
off but continue to shock audiences
into uncontrolled laughter.
Even though I think that South
Park has lost a little of its appeal, I
continue to watch faithfully. I love
to use quotes from South Park.
The only source better for quotes is
wrestling. Now there is an episode
cross over that I would love to see:
WWF and South Park combined. I
don't think you can go wrong
combining two of the top rated
shows that have huge college
followings. First you have to create
the characters. I can see Vince
McGarrison, the third grade
teacherowner with the Big Boss
Mr. Hat. Of course now you need
the main wrestlers. The two
characters who cannot talk, Kenny
and Kane, would become Kaney.
Stan and Mankind would make an
excellent Stankind. Kyle and X-
Pac would form Kyle-Pac and of
course the two toughest S.O.B.s of
the shows, Steve Austin and Eric
Cartman, would make Stone Cold
Eric Cartman. Now that episode
would definitely be hellacool!
Computers should be required
solar calculator. Let's face it, in any
college major you are going to have
to present your work in a
professional manner, a feat easily
accomplished by a computer. Even
your old buddies from high school
who went to the nearest podunk
community college have had to
use computers for their classes,
even if they have their associate
degrees in TVVCR repair or gun
repair.
I support everyone being on the
internet. I have met people on the
net that I didn't even know I was
related to. I met a guy named
Helmet Kleinschmit that turned
out to be my great uncle. He lives
in Berlin. Germany, not a part of
the United States, even though
someone at a party tried to
convince me that it is. I can also
find information on time travel
theory, investing, and obscure
historical figures that professors
assign reports on. Basically, with so
much information at my finger
tips, why would I need to walk
through the annoying sonic
tragedv and go to Joyner Library
where books are obsolete before
they even hit the shelves?

c





I
1
I
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7 Thursday, N
6 ThTidiy, Novimbtr 12, 1998
The East Carolinian
Four Seats Left
Jason Latour
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J
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�szsxS
7 Thursday, November 12, IS
f pa f 11 rps
The East Carolinian
On the lookout for
Prostate
Approximately 39,200 men die each year from prostate cancer
Phillip Gilfus
STAFF WRITER
Prostate cancer kills 39,200 men each year
in the United States alone, and there does
not appear to be a cure in sight. This type
of cancer is one of the leading causes of
death in men and doctors are hard at work
to find a way to decrease the number of
men who are diagnosed with this disease.
The only way men can protect themselves
now is through early detection and by tak-
ing some preventive steps.
The prostate, a gland found only in
men, is about the size of a walnut and is
located under the bladder. According to the
American Cancer Society, eighty-nine per-
cent of men diagnosed with this cancer will
survive for at least five years. Another sixty-
three percent will survive at least ten years.
"Excluding skin cancer, prostate cancer
has the most common malignancy said
Mary Mattheis of the American Cancer
Society.
There are several risk factors that
increase a man's chance of getting prostate
cancer. This cancer is most commonly
found in North America and northwestern
Europe. For any man who has a father or
brother with prostate cancer, their risk is
double for getting it. If a man has relatives
who were stricken with the disease at a
young age, the risk for cancer skyrockets.
A man's age plays a big part in their can-
cer risk. At the age of fifty, prostate cancer
is a concern for every man. Eighty percent
of all prostate cancers are diagnosed in men
over sixty-five.
"No one knows exactly what the cause
of prostate cancer is said Kenneth Briley
from the Leo VV. Jenkins Cancer Center.
It is still a mystery among the medical
community to what causes prostate cancer.
While some studies have linked high levels
of certain male hormones to occurrences of
cancer of the prostate, their work is still
inconclusive.
However, since many risk factors have
been connected with this male cancer,
some preventive steps can be taken. "A
diet low in fat and consisting mostly of veg-
etables, fruits, and grains is associated with
reduced risk of prostate cancer declares
the American Cancer Society. A decreased
intake of high-fat foods from animal
sources and choosing most of one's food
from plant groups can lower the risk of can-
cer. Smoking has also been linked to
prostate cancer in some studies, but those
findings are controversial at this time.
The use of vitamins have also shown a
possibility in affecting the chance of
prostate cancer. Researchers have found
that taking fifty milligrams of vitamin E
daily can lower a man's cancer risk by more
than thirty percent. Men who are currently
taking vitamin A should be aware that they
might be increasing their chance of cancer.
Doctors recommend that anyone who is
taking vitamins should use caution and
avoid excessive doses.
Early detection is a key in helping can-
cer-stricken men survive longer with their
disease. Some warning signs of prostate
cancer for all men include inability to uri-
nate, difficulty starting or stopping urine
flow, blood in the urine, and pain or burn-
ing during urination.
The American I'rological Association
strongly encourages prostate cancer screen-
ings for men starting at mid-life. Those
men who find that they have many risk fac-
tors may want to have screenings done ear-
lier. The American Cancer Society recom-
mends that every man over forty should
have a digital rectal exam as part of their
annual physical checkup. (lancers found by
screening are usually smaller and have a
tendency to spread less, giving men a bet-
ter chance for treatment.
Surgery is, on average, the most com-
- prostate cancer is the most common cancer found
in men
- prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death
in men, right behind lung cancer
- risk for getting prostate cancer increases with age
- risk of prostate cancer is twice as common in black
males than white males
- the cause of prostate cancer prostate cancer is unknown
&
SEE CANCER. PAGE 8
.

Local artists displayed at new Student Union sponsoring i
Evans Street Art Gallery annual New York trip I
Many works from
School of Art shown
Phillip Gil ft s
STAFF WRITE!
When you think of downtown
; Greenville, do images of clubs,
bars, and other night life places
icome to, mind? The Uptown
Greenville Revitalization
Movement wants that image to
change, and with the opening of
the Evans Street Art Gallery, that
change is now beginning.
On October 14, the ribbon cut-
ting took place at the art gallery
which promises "to preserve
Greenville's special 'small town'
charm
Located two doors down from
the Courtside Cafe, which is across
from the Pitt County Courthouse,
the gallery has a restored 1940's
facade.
"There is a lot of artistic talent
n Greenville said Billie Morris,
who created and opened the
gallery. "The community needs a
chance to have access to it, we
hope we can give them access
Morris is a former elementary
school teacher who, along
with her husband, decided
that Greenville needed a
place where local artists
could display their works
as well as view the works
of others.
"I've always loved art
and I just enjoy the oppur-
tunity to be able to talk
with artists Morris said.
Beginning more than a
year ago, Morris talked
with members of the Pitt
County Arts Council and
other art councils in the
surrounding counties.
After traveling to art
shows throughout the
state, she developed con-
tacts that she thought
would help in the devel-
opment of her new
gallery.
Already having train-
ing in the business field,
Morris began the busy
process of actually creat-
ing the gallery.
The gallery itself con-
tains spotlights and other
special lighting that
enhances the aft works on
display. One can see
paintings of eastern
North Carolina land-
scapes upon first entering
the building There
84 to attend during
Thanksgiving break
Nina M. Dn v
SENIOR WRITER
ers enter-
tained while
the hours fly
by.
Upon
their arrival
into the "Big
Apple the
ECU
will
into
E d i
crew
check
the
son
Works created by professors and students can be
seen at the Evans Street Art Gallery.
PHOTO By MARC CRIPPEN
SEE GALLERY. PAGE 9
The ECU Student Union is spon-
soring their trip to New York City.
It will take place over
Thanksgiving break for those who
want to either get away from the
usual turkey and festivities or
check out the sights and sounds of
the city that never sleeps.
"This is an annual trip that has
been going on for the last 23 years
said Stephen Gray, director of
Student Activities.
84 ECU students, faculty and
staff members and immediate fam-
ily will leave on November 24 at
midnight on an American charter
bus line. According to Gray, by
leaving at midnight, the people can
sleep on the bus and by the time
they reach New York, they will be
rested and will have the whole day
to enjoy the sights.
"Leaving at midnight extends
the trip Gray said.
If one doesn't want to sleep, the
buses come equipped with televi-
sions and VCRs to keep the travel-
Hotel, which
lies close to
many touris-
tic locales.
"It's one
of the older
hotels in
New York
Gray said.
"It's located
right in the
theatre dis-
trict and only
a block away
from Times
Square
To check
out the
hotel, log
onto the Student Union web page
for more information�
www.ecu.edustudentunion
Rooms are set up as twins (two
people per room), triples (three
people per room), and quads (four
people per room). You can either
select who you would like to stay
'
Students and faculty
PHOTO
have signed up to attend NY trip Nov. 24.
COURTESY OF WORLD WIDE WEB
with or take pot luck and be placedi
with someone. (�
From there, it is up to you to�,
decide what you would like to do.
"This is the best part of thc.
whole trip Gray said. "Nothing i
planned
1 SEE MEW YORK. PAGE I
no
f
i





Thursdiy. Novimbir 12. 1998
features
The Eait Carolinian
9 Thursday. M
Cancer
continued from page 7
New York
continued from page 7
rrion form of treatment for prostate
cancer. Some doctors will use radi-
ation therapy to treat men with the
cancer. Other hormone medica-
tions are also prescribed as well.
Prior to leaving for New York, a
mini-orientation is held to go over
rules, regulations, and New York
bus and subway information.
"This gives the people the
opportunity to do exactly what they
would like to do at their leisure
Gray said. "Our emphasis is fun
and enjoyment on this trip
Both Gray and president of the
Student Union, Kristin Edwards,
will be in attendance on the trip as
chaperones.
"I will be the student trip leader
to answer any questions or prob-
lems that may arise Edwards said.
"I'm looking forward to it. I've
never seen New York over
Thanksgiving break before
Gray said they would have
office hours where people could
reach them if any questions or con-
cerns should arise.
The trip will last until Saturday,
November 28. The ECU clan will
venture back to the Emerald City
at midnight, arriving here at noon.
I
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forget to
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coupon
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East Carolinian
� 7"SjE
9 Thursday. November 12, 1998
features
The East Carolinian
own
t CJ-�-�J�
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Gallery
continued from page 7
are also two fountains in the gallery
which contribute to the atmos-
phere.
"I was surprised looking at the
prices said one visitor.
"Everything is very reasonable
Many local artists have con-
tributed their works to the Evans
Street Gallery.
Their works include paintings,
ceramics, sculptures, jewelry, furni-
ture and other novelties. The fea-
tured artists whose works are on
exhibit until November 20 are
Susan Fccho and Kellcy Cleaton.
Fecho's art is mainly in two-
dimensional art and is called
"Mixed Media Cleaton's main
workings are in the area of ceramics
and pottery. The reception for
these artists will take place on
November 17.
Richard Pear and Roger
Kammcrcr are also local artists who
will be dispriaying their works from
November 23 thru December 5.
Pear will be displaying his pottery
works while Kammerer's planned
exhibit will contain paintings and
pen and ink drawings about "old
Greenville" architecture.
"I love doing paintings about
mostly rural life and the history of
Pitt County Kammerer said.
The featured artist for the end
of this year will be Teresa Muse
who will be showing her watercolor
works.
Many ECU graduates and stu-
dents have their art displayed cur-
rently at the gallery.
"We invite art students, or even
non-art students, to come here to
have their work displayed and have
a chance to observe other works
Morris said.
Right now the gallery faces the
trouble of looking "under construc-
tion with Evans Street being their
only entrance.
Though Morris was told that the
street would be finished in time for
the Christmas parade, it is clear that
the gallery will have limited visibil-
ity to contend with for the time
being.
The hours of the gallery are
Monday thru Friday, 10:30 a.m. to
6:00 p.m and Saturday, 11:00 a.m.
to 5:00 p.m.
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I
I





Thursdiy, Novembar 12, 1998
focus
The East Carolinian
Good health starts here
Tmtdiy, No
Sei
continue
ECU Health Services:
more bang for the buck
No need to leave campus for quality health care
Student Health Services
are unlimited
Mandy Hanks
staff writer
Students can take advantage of free medical care at Student Health Services
FILE PHOTO
Colposcopy Clinic and physical
examinations.
The Student Health Services
has an in-house pharmacy. The
pharmacy buys its medicine on a
state plan which makes the cost of
these products about 50 percent
less than buying retail drugs at a
local pharmacy. Some cost compar-
isons of commonly prescribed
drugs between CVS and the
Health Services are Amoxicillin, an
antibiotic, where thirty 500mg
tablets at CVS cost $15.59 versus a
price of $6.16 at the Health
Services; Triphasil, birth control, at
CVS costs $26.44 versus $10 at the
Health Services; Allegra, for aller-
� gies, twenty 60mg tablets cost
$22.89 at CVS versus $18.36 at the
Health Services; Ibuprofen, pain
killer, fifty 200mg tablets prices at
$5.99 at CVS versus $1.06 at the
Health Services; Sudafed, for
cough and colds, twenty-four
tablets cost $5.99 at CVS versus
$1.06 at the Health Services; and
Prednisone, steroid anti-inflamma-
tory, twenty-one lOmg tablets are
$5.99 at CVS versus $4.40 at the
Health Services. The prices of the
drugs offered at Student Health
Services are always cheaper than
CVS between 10 and 70 percent.
When the cost of manufacturing
a drug increases so do the retail
prices, but at Student Health
Services, if the cost to buy the drug
from manufacturers increases,
Hewiny
For Life
Mark A. Thigpen
STAFF WRITER
Most students want to stay healthy,
though many get sick sometimes
and need medical care. When this
happens, most students turn to
Student Health Services (SHS) at
ECU. SHS is convenient and pro-
vides treatment very close to that of
an Urgent Care facility at an afford-
able price.
At the Beaufort County
Hospital Emergency Room an ini-
tial visit is around $150. The
Urgent Care in Greenville has an
initial visit price of $66 However,
Student Health Services initial
price is free because the fee is
included in tuition, but the draw-
back is rhat Student Health is only
open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday,
Tuesday, Thursday and Friday
between 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. So, if you
get sick on the weekends or late at
night, you're out of luck. Your only
alternative then may be the
Emergency Room, which is open
24hrs. a day. You may have to pay
more at the Emergency Room, but
at least you will get seen. Costs at
both the Emergency Room and
Urgent Care depend upon services
provided. And, unlike at SHS, you
are obligated by law to pay the full
amount of the bill. Student Health
Service provides a pamphlet of the
cost of all lab work, x-rays, vaccines,
SEE BUCK. PAGE 10
There's a valuable resource on campus that
many students don't take advantage of. It's
neither the rec center nor the computer lab.
It is Student Health Services (SHS).
"I think a lot of students will be surprised
at what we have to offer said Heather
Zophy, Director of Health Education at
SHS.
Any currently enrolled ECU student has
paid a health fee and can take advantage of
the many services that SHS provides.
Services include urgent care, mental health
care, clinical care, health education and a
pharmacy that provides both prescription
drugs and over-the-counter medications at a
greatly reduced cost.
The urgent care clinic is available during
business hours. Students are assessed and
treated according to urgency.
"We do not have overnight facilities
Zophy said. "After 5 p.m. students have to
make a judgment call
SHS has 2 full-time clinical psychologists
on staff. Medication can be dispensed for
students with severe depression.
"We tend to treat the more acute emo-
tional problems Zophy said.
The clinical care services include an
allergy clinic to assist you with your allergy
injections. Colposcopy is a procedure
offered to women who have received an
abnormal Pap smear. Physical therapy is
offered to students with a referral from a
health care provider. The cost varies accord-
ing to the services needed.
SHS provides students with most forms
of birth control. Emergency contraception,
birth control pills, Depo-provera implants
and condoms may be obtained from the cen-
ter. Students can be fitted for a diaphragm,
but the pharmacy does not sell it. This year
for the first time SHS offers free and confi-
dential HIV testing.
In the event of a serious or life-threaten-
ing diagnosis, Student Health will refer you
to a local doctor. "We have a great relation-
ship with the ECU
School of Medicine, Pitt
Memorial Hospital and
the local doctors. We will
do everything we can.
When it is out of our
realm, we will refer stu-
dents to someone else
Zophy said.
Treating the ill is not
the only focus of
Student Health.
"Our mission is
health education Zophy
said.
Student Health provides preventive edu-
cation and outreach programs to organiza-
tions around campus. Topics include, but are
not limited to, substance abuse, eating disor-
health care.
"I think tr
accountability ai
"Students ru
dent in their he
Student Hes
sion is to educ;
the health care:
students wants ;
said.
According to
B
contrnoei
Medications at the SHS pharmacy are always affordable
FILE PHOTO
ders and pregnancy.
SHS is currently staffed with 50 employ-
ees. Included are four physicians, seven
nurse practitioners and one physicians assis-
tant.
"I would rate
our services top
notch Zophy
said. "The staff is
good, certified
and willing to
help students as
best we can
According
to Zophy, an
exciting new
addition is expect-
ed to open in the
year 2001. The
addition, which
was co-designed by students, will provide
Student Health with 12,500 ft. of additional
space including labs and more rooms result-
ing in less waiting time for the students.
ATTENTION
�����!���!�
Please pay the cashier
for Ay(t medicine
QBSDU!
Thanks
mm
Zophy encourages students to come by
and offer feedback on the services that
Student I lealth provides. "Without student
input, we don't know what they want
Zophy said. "There arc comment and sug-
gestion forms in the lobby at all times
The results of the last student survey
revealed that 93.1 percent of students arc-
happy with the services offered by Student
Health.
"We are trying to help students under-
stand the health care system so they know
when and where to go when they arc on their
own Zophy said.
Did You Know?
� SHS served 38,669 students from July
1997-June 1998.
� SI IS doctors can write prescriptions for
medications not carried in the SI IS pharma-
cy.
� SHS offers preventive education semi-
nars to organizations like sororities and fra-
ternities.
� All services and tests are confidential.
retail price wi
the next school
pharmacist a
(
Health care at the SHS a reliable resource
U

A d n i e Mullen
sWf writer
A few years ago, a student in
Greene Hall was afraid to go to
Student Health Services (SHS)
because she had heard bad things
about it. Now that former student,
Heather Zophy, spends everyday at
SHS. She is the director of health
education and she says mispercep-
tions about SHS need to be erased.
Some common misperceptions
that Zophy has heard include the
belief that medical students are the
health care providers and that the
lab work isn't reliable, making mis-
diagnosis common.
With ECU being known for the
School of Medicine it's easy to
make the assumption that medical
students provide the health care at
SHS, but Zophy says only residents
who have graduated from college
and are in their third of fourth year
of medical school work at Student
Health.
There is usually one resident
per month, according to Jolene
Jernigan, FNP the Clinical
Coordinator at SHS. Residents do
not work alone. Each resident is
assigned to a medical professional
who looks over his or herjwtient
charts, Zophy said. If a student is
seen by a resident, his or her chart
is looked at by two trained individ-
uals, she said.
Student Health Services sends
out-of-house lab work to Lab
Corp a nationally recognized lab
analysis company, Jernigan said.
Lab work actually done at Student
Health is done by trained profes-
sionals who have daily quality
" think the reliability and
accountability are there.
Students need to feel confident
in their health care provider
Jolene Jernigan
FNP the Clinical Coordinator at SHS
checks on their machines and
records, she said. The lab profes-
sionals at SHS are sent slides and
are graded as to the quality of their
lab analysis, Jernigan said.
Student Health Services at ECU
are accredited by the Joint
Commission on Accreditation of
Healthcare Organizations, a nation-
al organization.
Zophy and Jernigan both said
that specific lab results such as
strep throat and mono have a cer-
tain lapse of time before they
would show positive test results.
"It takes three to five days for a
strep throat culture to progress for a
positive test result. This should
explain why a student could
receive a negative strep test at SHS
and a few days later receive a posi-
tive strep test at hisher family doc-
tor. The key is to follow-up and go
back to the doctor if you still don't
feel well said Dr. Tom deBeck,
director of clinical medicine.
Jernigan was supportive of stu-
dents questioning the quality of
SEE SERVICES. PAGE 10
Heather Zophy's goal is to educate students about their health
FILE photo
D





Tulidty, Novtmbtf 10. 1998
focus
Thi Elll CifBlinilH
Services
continued from page 9
health care.
"I think the reliability and
accounubility are there she said.
"Students need to feel confi-
dent in their health care provider
Student Health Services' mis-
sion is to educate students about
the health care system. "It runs on
students wants and needs Zophy
said.
According to Zophy, phone sur-
veys are conducted almost every
semester along with periodical
short handout surveys. Comment
boxes are provided in various
places throughout the building for
student input. If a student has a
problem with service at SHS, the
simple task of filling out a com-
ment card can and has changed
things. Christina Hour a student
at ECU, had a bad first experience
at SHS. "I came here (SHS) with a
cold and was told to take Tylenol
she said. "I ended up in the emer-
gency room having a respiratory
attack and severe chest pain
Houtz said. "Student health has
responded to that with signs and
tried to inform students about
chest pain
Houtz said she continues to visit
SHS and her experiences have
been good since. Houtz was in the
Student Health waiting room
recently, and she wasn't alone.
Approximately 350 students
patients are seen everyday at SHS.
Despite mispcrceptions about
Student Health Services, 93.1 per-
cent of students had a good to
excellent overall experience at
SHS according to the Health
Education Office.
Buck
continued from page 9
y
e
retail price will not change until
the next school year, according to a
pharmacist at SHS. Student
Health Services will provide a
price list of the costs of drugs they
carry in stock upon request
The major disadvantage of
going to the SHS rather than to an
Urgent Care facility or the
Emergency Room is that a patient
may never see a doctor, while in
the other facilities it is pretty much
guaranteed. This lack of doctor
participation may result in bad
prognosis, but for routine exams,
allergies and other ailments the
Student Health Service is quite
capable and is well equipped with
nurse practitioners to handle-your
needs, according to an official at
SHS.
fro
cM�
3
tfC
HW'
Dome by
ccs that
: student
I want
and sug-
cs
t survey
lents are
Student
s under-
ev know
: on their
rom July
jtions for
i pharrna-
ion semi-
; and fra-
ifidential.
www.clubhouse.ecu.edu
health
Atlantic
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Did you see news happen? Did you make news happen? Do you belong betvyeen our covers
s? Calleastcarolinianat 328-6366.





I
Thursday, November 12. 1998
Pirates'
strong
opening
sports
The East Carolinian
Mario Scherhaufer
sports editor
Pirate fans, get ready for an unques-
tionably different version of the
ECU men's basketball team this
season. After losing four senior
starters from last year the Pirates put
their youngest team under fourth-
year head coach Joe Dooley on the
floor. Nevertheless, there is no rea-
son to worry. The two exhibition
games against Court Authority and
Next Level All-Stars have shown
that the potential of the team is by
no means weaker than last year's.
And the young team doesn't have to
prove anything.
Of course, the personnel losses
can scarcely be neglected. Still,
Dooley and his new coaching squad
are excited about the season to
come. Strong recruits and matured
returners give Pirate fans hope for
the future. After losing 73 percent of
their scoring and 64 percent of their
rebounding, the future is now for
ECU's young team. It's your turn
now to help them paint their future
purple and gold by filling the arena.
The Pirates will definitely need
your support in the upcoming sea-
son with very challenging oppo-
nents.
The 1998-99 ECU Pirates will
try to rebound from a disappointing
season. While precocious, with
eight freshmen and sophomores on
the roster, coach Dooley's team pos-
sesses increased athleticism and
proficiency. Hopefully, the growing
process will be a rapid one and the
Pirates can interlock the newcomers
1 with their experienced players as
they look for a successful crusade
this season.
Despite a lineup full of seniors
last season, the Pirates accom-
plished only a disappointing 10-17
record overall and were just 5-11
(seventh place) in the CAA. It was
the Pirates' first losing season since
1992-93. Nevertheless, the 7-6
home record marked the 10th
straight year that the Pirates have
had at least a .500 mark on their
home court in Williams Arena at
Minges Coliseum. Let's try to keep
this record running.
Alico Dunk and Garrett
Blackwelder are expected to lead
the young team. While we remem-
ber Dunk for his assists and as the
lone returning senior this year,
Blackwelder's most notable move is
his outside shot. It was exactly this
shot which sparked the 15-0 run of
the Pirates in their first exhibition
game when they came from behind
to defeat Court Authority 82-66.
Neil Punt and Alphons van
Ierland improved immensely after
struggling with injuries last year.
Van Ierland led ECU with seven
rebounds while adding 10 points
and three steals in the Pirate's first
victory of the new season. In
Monday's game against Next Level,
van Ierland turned out to finish with
a team-high 18 points and also
pulled down seven rebounds. After
Monday's game Dooley gave him
credits for setting the tone for ECU
and for moving more deliberate
offensively.
The most outstanding contribu-
tions to ECU's basketball program
in its two exhibition games came
from Evaldas Joeys and Larry
Morrisey. Joeys, who joined the
Pirates this year, coming from
Nebraska where he averaged 16
points and seven rebounds as a
sophomore, will offer the ECU line-
up quite a contrast from a year ago.
Both Joeys and Morrisey performed
in ECU's exhibition games on a
solid note by hitting back-to-back
three-pointers and field goals.
Twin
Towers
of Pirate Basketball
Hall, van Ierland stand out on and off court
Tracy H air r
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
Around the ECU campus, and now ready to begin action on the courts,
Alphons van Ierland and Quincy Hall tend to stand out with their seven-
foot statures. Without a doubt, these guys are exceptionally tall, but does
this necessarily entail a love for playing basketball or an innate possession
of the required skills for this sport? Maybe not for everyone, but for I lall
and Van Ierland, playing basketball is currently an influential aspect of
their lives.
Handling a basketball is certainly nothing new for Hall. Since he was
four years old, he was encouraged to play by watching his dad.
"When I was coming up, my dad, who's 6'6 played in a recreational
league Hall said. "I would go with him to play and he would always toss
me the ball, so my basketball career started early
Hall began growing fast, but he never really underwent a growth spurt
until he was about to enter high school.
"When I was in the eighth grade, I was 6'4" and rising to my ninth grade
year I grew to 6'9 Hall said. "From then on it seemed to be an inch every
year until I reached this height
Now at this well-above-average height, Hall admits that he receives dif-
ferent reactions when people either meet him for the first time or others
around him decide to discuss sports. And one of the most popular questions
is whether or not he plays basketball since he's so tall.
"It all depends on how people go about asking Hall said. "Sometimes
they want to ask 'how's the weather up there but sometimes they are
afraid to ask even if they want to because they see me around campus and
can tell that I don't smile a lot
Aside from all stereotypical assumptions and biological facts, Hall as an
athlete is sincerely affected by playing basketball.
"Right now I play just for fun Hall said. "But hopefully it will be for a
living in my future .
For Van Ierland, who is one of ECU's scholarship-athletes, being tall has
never been anything outstanding.
"I've always been taller that everyone else in my class Van Ierland
said.
Similar to Hall, questions often arise that relate to height, and at times
such inquisitive minds are welcomed, but during others Van Ierland would
rather not be bothered with the topic.
"So many people want to know how tall I am and if I play basketball,
and I don't really care if they ask Van Ierland said. "Sometimes when I'm
in a bad mood, I just don't want to deal with it, but overall I don't really
SEE TOWERS. PAGE 12
Thurtday,
w w w . t e
Pirate
gjvesthet.
F.R
SEN
The ECU woi
tipped off the
bition beating
Fc
Quincy
Hall
weight: 215
date of birth: 3-28-76
major: child development and
family relations
position: center
came to us from: Northland
Pioneer Junior College
favorite athlete: Michael Jordan
role model: his mother
Alphons
van Ireland
weight: 230
date of birth: 10-30-77
major: nutrition
position: center
came to us from: Koning Willem
II College
favorite athlete: Hakeem Olajuwon
favorite motto: play hard and
enjoy life.
strained a knee
don in hisankl
in the Cincinn;
"Kwabena
the season, Jefl
the season
(Kerr) is in a c
weeks. He d
break his foot
Tc
Football team ready for season home finale
Cardinals' offense has
to be destroyed for win
Travis Bark ley
senior writer
Saturday's home finale in Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium promises to be a
high scoring affair when ECU takes
on the Louisville Cardinals.
The Cardinals are ranked No.l
in the nation in total offense, aver-
aging 546 yards per game.
Louisville is ranked third in passing
offense and seventh in scoring
offense, averaging over 38 points a
game.
Junior quarterback Chris
Redmon leads Louisville's potent
offensive attack, throwing for 383
yards a game. This season Redmon
has rewritten the Louisville record
book, owning every major single
season and career passing records.
Redmon started against ECU last
year in Louisville but was only 21 of
47 for 234 yards with two intercep-
tions.
Pirate head coach Steve Logan
says Redmon has improved since
last season, mainly because of the
offense implemented by new
Louisville coach John L. Smith.
"We've got one of the better col-
lege quarterbacks in the country
coming in here this Saturday
Logan said. "He's a much better
quarterback than he was last year.
He's got a much better scheme
around him
Logan says it will be important
for ECU to change its coverage
schemes.
"You can't give him anything
exclusive or he'll pick you apart
Logan said. "You can't be just man
and you can't be just zone, so we're
going to have to come up with some
stuff that's going to give hirn a little
bit of confusion
Senior noseguard Travis Darden
says the Pirate defense must pres-
sure Redmon to have a shot at win-
ning.
"We
much
know they're pretty
one dimensional
Darden said. "They're going
to pass a lot and we're not
going to stop that. But we've
got to get some type of control
of that to have an opportunity
to win the game, and 1 think
we'll get that done. We need to
hit him and hit him a lot. We
need to get him out of the
pocket so he's not just standing
there eating us up
ECU will try to contain
Redmon and company without
junior linebackers Kwabena
Green and Jeff Kerr. Green
SEf FOOTBALL. PAGE 12
Cardinals ,
to wtvtefa
Chris Redmon
QB7 6-3 215 Jr.
265 of 417 passing 3450 yds 23 TD's
14 INT's
Ibn Green
TE 6 6-2 225 Jr.
39 rec. 664 yds 17.0 avg 9 TD's
Arnold Jackson
WR10 5-8 160 Jr.
75 rcc. 925 yds 12.3 avg 7 TD's
Leroy Collins
RB 26 6-0 200 Jr.
165 carries 877 yds 5.3 avg 15 TD's
Source: LoubviUs Media Guide
mind
When Van Ic
court, he's botr
and often relea:
of stress.
"One examp
jyade or sometl
my way, I love (
and play hard
Van Ierland a
ing his playing
along with Ha
longer he'll still
The
I
E
$
Local
Unlimited
2!
Men's basketball defeat Global Sports All-Stars 101-82
www.tec.ecu.edu
Pirates win Mr second
exhibition game
Jonathan Russell
staff writer
ECU men's basketball team rallied
to beat the Global Sports All-Stars,
101-82, in their second exhibition
win of the season as Alphons van
Ierland lead the Pirates with 18
points and three blocked shots
Monday night. ECU took advan-
tage of the Global All-Stars lack of
depth in the second half to over-
come a four point halftime deficit.
The Pirates set the tone early by
pounding the ball inside to van
Ierland in an effort to exploit the
mismatch in size at the center posi-
tion. This opened up the perimeter
shooting to Larry Morrisey, who
capitalized on it by hitting four sec-
ond-half three-pointers.
Alico Dunk, the only senior on
the Pirate roster, did an excellent
job of leading the young ECU
team.
"I like leading the team because
they are willing to learn Dunk
said. "Everybody is so unselfish
that it makes the team a better enti-
cy
The Pirates bench came alive in
the second half with Garrett
Blackwelder's seven unanswered
points to give ECU the early lead
which sealed the victory. Quincy
Hall also had 10 points coming off
of the bench t6 help ECU solidify
the win.
"The kids played unselfishly
and did a nice job of playing their
roles head coach Joe Dooley said.
"We needed another win to gain
Tlv
some momentum for the season
opener against Jacksonville State
on Saturday.
"I'm anxious for the season
opener to see how we stand
among some other teams Dooley
said. "I feel that the team is fit and
ready to play on the road this
Saturday
The Pirates are on the road for
their first two games before they
will be back in action at Minges
Coliseum against Southwestern
Louisiana on Tuesday, Nov. 24, at
7 p.m. Be sure to come out and
support the Pirates in their regular ECU's David Tylor (11) watches teammate
season home opener. performing a lay-up against All-Stars.
f PHOTO BY KIM MCCUHBER m
s
Si
�� . v






I
1
Thursday. November 12, 1988
Women's basketball beats Finnish team
sports
The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
Pirates rebounding
gives them a 41-26 win
EMC COUCH
SENIOR WRITER
n
:
��
wtck
Is 23 TD's
ID's
fD's
15 TD's
The ECU women's basketball team
tipped off their season with a exhi-
bition beating of Team Finland with
Football
continued from page 10
strained a knee and Kerr tore a ten-
don in his ankle. Both were injured
in the Cincinnati game.
"Kwabena is probably out for
the season, Jeff is definitely out for
the season Logan said. "He
(Kerr) is in a cast for the next six
weeks. He did everything but
break his foot
a score of 83-55.
In the win on Friday the Pirates
out-rebounded Team Finland 41-
26. Head coach Dee Gibson has had
the team performing intense
rebounding drills in practice and it
seemed to pay off for ECU. First-
year head coach Gibson has empha-
sized the importance of aggressive-
ness under the boards, a fact that
will complement her defensive phi-
losophy.
"We work on rebounding every
day in practice and I want us to be a
strong rebounding team Gibson
said.
As a team the Pirates really per-
formed well on offense. ECU
outscored Team Finland 32-12 in
Before he was injured, Kerr was
having a tremendous game against
Cincinnati. He recorded 12 solo
tackles, one sack, an end zone
interception, broke-up a pass and
knocked quarterback Deontey
Kenner from the game with a jaw
injury. For his efforts, Kerr was
named Conference USA player of
the week.
While Louisville's offense has
been prolific, its defense has been
more horrific, ranking 110 out of
112 Division 1-A schools in total
Towers
continued from page 10
mind
When Van Ierland is busy on the
court, he's both enjoying the play
and often releasing different forms
of stress.
"One example is, if I have a bad
jyade or something else doesn't go
my way, I love to just get out there
and play hard
Van Ierland also plans on pursu-
ing his playing career further, but
;ilong with Hall, for some time
longer he'll still be pressing on as a
Pirate. ECU's basketball season is
presently underway, and both guys
feel positive about the 1998-99
team.
"This is my third year
here and I really feel that the whole
program is growing, especially
because we keep recruiting good
players Van Ierland said. "Plus,
we're going to be playing against
some really good teams
Hall also is particularly opti-
mistic since the addition of new
members will encourage changes.
"We've got a bunch of new guys
in and we're still practicing twice a
day Hall said. "We're working real
hard, so hopefully we can turn this
program around
82
1
s
V �i
4 1 1 1
Ci.1

is teammate
All-Stars.)
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the last 12 minutes of the game.
"Offensively, we put it together
tonight. I knew that we could score,
and the girls showed it tonight
Gibson said.
ECU returns with a roster of five
post players who will be challenged
on the glass for the remainder of the
season. Leading in that challenge
will be senior center Beth Jaynes
who ranked eighth in the CM in
blocked shots last season and led
the team in blocked shots as a fresh-
man.
ECU will open their regular sea-
son at home on Nov. 16 against
Campbell University. The exhibi-
tion game against TTT Riga is
tonight in Williams Arena at 7 p.m.
defense. Senior center Danny
Moore says the Pirates will have to
light up the scoreboard to have a
shot at winning.
"Their offense is ranked No. 1
nationally and they're going to
make some plays Moore said.
"We're going to have to put some
points on the board. If we can
adjust and put some points on the
board, we can win this game
Saturday's game will be the last
chance to see the Pirates at home
this season. KickotTis set for 2 p.m.
The Real World
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While results of this year's pro-
gram remain unpredictable, assis-
tant coach Darren Savion feels that
the abilities of these players will
certainly be depended upon. And
though it is often unusual to have
players of such height on a team, it
may be even more odd that both
Van Ierland and Hall have equally
proved their strength in situations
that normally disadvantage taller
people.
"It is really rare to have these
seven-footers on the team, but both
guys work extremely hard just like
the others Savion said. "Both are
very agile and can move, run and
jump, and there's no doubt about
their athleticism
The College FlI
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b





Tharajay, Novambar 12, 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
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Prices good Wednesday, Nov. 11
thru Tuesday Nov. 17, 1998.
Effective In Our N.C. Locations
MasterCard
�Copyright 1998. Winn-Dixie Raleigh, Inc. Quantity Rights Reserved, www.winndixie.com
Runners head to NCAAs
Outstanding season
before ultimate goal
Stephen Schramm
senior whiter
The ECU Men's cross country team
has fulfilled its first set of goals in its
1998 season in an impressive style.
The Pirates won three meets, won
the State Championship for the first
time in a decade, finished no lower
than fourth in all of their meets and
filled their season with impressive
individual performances. This
weekend the team will take a shot
at their ultimate goal, competing for
a national championship, at the
NCAA District 3 Regionals in
Greenville, S.C.
"I'm trying to make them think
that this is their ultimate goal. If you
want to be a national caliber team,
this should be your goal said
Leonard Klepack, head men's cross
country coach.
Last year, the Pirates finished
20th out of 29 schools at the
Regionals. They were led by Jamie
Mance, who finished 27th overall,
and Stuart Will, who placed 78th.
"Our goal is to do better than last
year. Our goal is to get into the top
12. There are so many fine teams
and we've had a very good year
Klepack said.
Mance, who was red shirted at
the beginning of the year, was not
among this year's talented cast.
This year the Pirates will send
junior Justin England, Steve
Arnold, Jason Trant, Brian Beil,
Craig Littlefield and senior Andrew
Worth, with the alternate being
Justin Poretti.
"Justin (England) and Will have
run well all year. Arnold and Beil
have consistently been in our top
four and I look for them to contin-
ue. Justin and Will's goal is to be;
among the top finishers and they
should be up there. I'm just looking
for a solid five Klepack said.
The Pirates will face tough com
petition from teams throughout the'
Southeast.
"The competition is very good.
There are six nationally ranked
teams in our region and that's a lot
Klepack said.
Two teams from the region qual-
ify for the next round in Lawrence,
Kan. with a third bid occasionally
given to a strong team.
"This is something that every
true cross country team shoots for.
They make it very difficult to make
it to the next round Klepack said.
Getting to the next round may
not be the Pirate's goal for this
weekend, but a strong showing
would cap an impressive season.
"We've already had an excellent
season and getting in the top 12
would be a bonus Klepack said.
Swimmers compete at meet
Mens, women steams
with opposite results
Todd Tallmadge
senior writer
While the lady Pirates swim team
improved its record to 4-0 with two
wins last weekend, the men were
unable to break through on to the
winning track and dropped their
record to 0-4. All of the meets so far
have been against conference foes.
The ECU women's swim team
won 133-107 over Old Dominion
University on Saturday. They then
went on to beat William & Mary
130-113 on Sunday. The men's
team lost a close meet to ODU on
Saturday 144-100, with W & M
beating them 157-85 on Sunday.
"The teams swam very well on
Saturday said Rich Kobe, ECU's
head swim coach. "We were a little
flat on Sunday
For the second time in as many
weeks the swim teams had two
meets on back-to-back days.
"These back-to-back meets put
a lot of stress on the swimmers
Kobe said. "Driving on Friday to
ODU, swimming on Saturday, then
going on to W & M on Sunday is
really tough
On the Lady Pirate team, Niki
Kreel lead the way with her wins in
the 200-meter breaststroke at both
meets (2:26.63 and 2:25.18).
Courtney Foster won the 50-meter
freestyle (24.88) on Saturday and
100-meter freestyle (54.38) on
Sunday.
The 400 medley relay team of
Kreel, Foster, Heather Hagedorn,
and Cammy Crossen won both
competitions in times of 4:03.76
and 4:01.72 respectively.
"We swam strong this week-
end Kreel said. "We swam the
relays with two of the regular four
being injured
The women's team currently
have some swimmers getting over
either sicknesses or injures. Both
Foster and Hagedorn are dealing
with nagging shoulder injuries.
"This is the most injured
women's team we have ever had
Kobe said. "We have the top two
and three breaststrokers in the CAA
dealing with injuries
On the men's side, Richard
Chen lead the way with two wins.
Chen won the 200-meter butterfly
(1:55.92) at ODU and again the
200-meter butterfly (1:58.27) at W
& M. Matt Jabs and Willy Hayes
were the only other ones to get
wins. Jabs won on Saturday in the
50-meter freestyle (21.98) and
Hayes won the 3-meter diving
event (145.2).
- "It is very frustrating and stress-
ful, we are not used to losing
Chen said. "The moral is up
despite the losses because we have
been swimming really well
The swim teams will be back in
action Saturday, Nov. 14, at 12 p.m.
at Davidson University in a three-
way meet with Georgia Southern
being the third team.
rourBreak
Take it to the Mountain
ae
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M
Intercollegiate Ski Week
The Party to End All Parties
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V 1051 per person for four nights
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Bands, Parties, & Extras:
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Call Today for
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SNOWSHOE
t5 Thursday, No
WALK TO ECl
$285month. Av
wood Apts 125
ville - 5 blocks I
6696.
? BEDROOM d
$35 dep. Cc
town and cam)
hook-up, heatim
unit. Available m
SECLUDED 2 B
tage in Historic
from campus an
itv deposit requi
$500month.B3
PINEBROOK A
3Rs available, w;
eluded. Reduce(
ber, Decembe
tenance manai
line. 9-12 month
758-4015
RINGGOL
Now Takin
1 bedroom,
Efficiency
CALL 1
FEMALE ROON
share 2 bedroorr
off 1st Street, fro
for students not
school! Dishwasl
uections. $187.5(
12 phone. Free
cable. Smokers C
7235.
ROOMMATE W,
8R apartment
$240mo WD,
males preferred.
353-0074.
FUN. RESPON
share three bedrr.
Colindale Court, i
eludes WD, ot
nliances. Be
355-2956.
FEMALE ROOM
sublease a two b
River. Please call
aegmni
ONE BLOCK froi
sible. relaxed roc
share 3 bedroo
liflat. AC. washe
utilities, phone, ci
R00MMA1
FEMALE ROOM
share 5 bedroom
house located ac
on 5th Street, on(
town. Includes ca
heat. WD, disr
and more- must
plus 14 utilities
leave message.
PIT BULL puppie
registered, brindl
and females. Sire
beautiful dogs. C
S300. Wil, 758-97
r
DO
FOR USED
TOMMY
NAUTIC
POLO
AND I
SHIRTS, PA
GOLD 4
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if East Carolinian
As
IPs goal is to be;
lishers and they
I'm just looking
epack said.
face tough com
s throughout the
on is very good,
tionally ranked
and that's a lot
the region qual-
nd in Lawrence,
bid occasionally
am.
hing that every
team shoots for.
difficult to make
I Klepack said,
next round may
's goal for this
strong showing
:ssive season,
had an excellent
; in the top 12
Klepack said.
ieet
iorn are dealing
Ider injuries,
most injured
have ever had
iave the top two
okers in the CAA
es
's side, Richard
y with two wins.
)-meter butterfly
I and again the
ly (1:58.27) at W
ind Willy Hayes
cher ones to get
Saturday in the
le (21.98) and
3-meter diving
rating and stress-
jsed to losing
e moral is up
because we have
ally well
s will be back in
3V. 14, at 12 p.m.
irsity in a three-
eorgia Southern
m.
19
ghts
IS
X �
f-1 �
irtras:
Rentals
with
verages
fffor
252
HOE
15 Thursday, November 10, 1998
FOR RENT
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt
$285month. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apts 125 Avery St. in Green-
ville - 5 blocks from campus. 758-
6596.
1 BEDROOM duplex, 811-A 1st St
$35 dep. Convenient to down-
town and campus. Includes WD
hook-up, heating and air, storage
unit. Available now! Call 413-0337
SECLUDED 2 Bedroom English cot-
tage in Historic District. Two blocks
from campus and downtown. Secur-
ity deposit required. Small pets OK.
$500month 830-2839.
PINEBROOK APARTMENTS. 1-2
3Rs available, water sewer, cable in-
cluded. Reduced Deposits Novem-
ber, December. On-site main-
tenance management ECU bus
line. 9-12 month Tease, pets allowed
758-4015
SERVICES
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
LEARN TO
SKYOIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(919)496-2224
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom, 1 bath apartment
off 1st Street, from Jan-May. Perfect
for students not attending summer
school! Dishwasher, air, WD con-
nections. $187.50 plus 12 electric,
12 phone. Free water, sewer, basic
cable. Smokers OK. Call Sallie. 329-
7235.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share 4-
8R apartment in Players Club.
5240mo WD, no deposit. Fe-
males preferred. Call Alison W. @
353-0074.
FUN. RESPONSIBLE female to
share three bedroom townhouse in
Colindale Court. $225 per month. In-
cludes WD, other furnishingap-
pliances. Beginning DecJan. Call
355-2956.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
sublease a two bedroom apt. in Tar
River. Please call 561-8385.
ONE BLOCK from campus, respon-
sible, relaxed roommate needed to
share 3 bedroom house. Central
heat. AC, washerdryer. Rent 14
utilities, phone, cable. 931-0348.
ROOMMATE WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 5 bedroom2 bath, furnished
house located across from campus
on 5th Street, one block from down-
town. Includes cable, central air, gas
heat. WD, dishwasher, backyard
and more- must see! Rent $231 25
plus 14 utilities. Call 830-2069,
leave message.
FOR SALE
PIT BULL puppies, BFKC and ABDA
registered, brindle and red males
and females. Sire 80 lbs , red nose,
beautiful dogs. Good homes only.
S300. Wil. 758-9701.
INTERNSHIP AVAILABLE in public
relations. Gain valuable experience
in public speaking and human re-
sources. Call Gerri at 355-7897.
SALES AND marketing internship.
Northwestern Mutual Life. Gain valu-
able sales experience and earn good
money. Looks great on resume. Call
Jeff, 355-7700
1999 INTERNSHIPS) Attention un-
dergraduate business students. Now
interviewing on campus for manag-
ers across Virginia, North and South
Carolina for summer of 1999. Aver-
age earnings last summer $7,000
Call Tuition Painters at (800) 393-
4521 or e-mail at tuipaint@bell-
south.net
EARN WHILE YOU learn, up
to$1,000.00 wk. Day and night
shifts. Clean, secure working at-
mosphere. Playmates Adult En-
tertainment. 252-747-7686 for in-
terview.
FREE CD Holders, T-shirts. Prepaid
Phone Cards. Earn $1000 Dart-time
on campus. Just call 1-800-932-
0528 x 64
HELP WANTED
TEMPORARY PART-TIME (20
hrs.week) positions available begin-
ning December 1, 1998-February 26.
1939 (tentative). Need: 28 Library
Moving Assistants. $6hour; 4 Li-
brary Moving Assistant Team Leader
$8nour; 4 DriverLoaders $7hour
Apply MonFri. 9 a.m3 p.m room
2400, 2nd Floor, Joyner Library.
Must be a current ECU student en-
rolled 6 hours or more, bring social
security card, drivers license, and
class schedule.
r
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
v
We Need Timberland boots
�nd shoes! Good Jeuis.
TOMMY HILFIGER
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POLO
TIMBERLAND
ABERCROMBIE
EDDIE BAUER
AND OTHER NAME BRAND MEN'S CLOTHING
SHIRTS, PANTS, JEANS, SWEATS, JACKETS, SHOES, ETC.
WE ALSO BUY AND SELL:
GOLD & SILVER -Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
QUICK, EASY, HELPFUL
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
414 S. EVANS (UP THE STREET FROM CUBBIES)
752-3866
TUESDAY - SATURDAY, 9:00 - 5:00
(DRIVE TO THE BACK DOOR BEHIND PARK THEATRE)
ONE OF THE FAVORITE STUDENT STORES FOR YEARS
(IF YOU ARE SELLING, ID IS REQUIRED)
s)
AAAA EARLY Specials! Panama
City! Room with kitchen $129! In-
cludes 7 free parties! Daytona149!
New Hotspot-South Beach129! Co-
coa Beach $149! springbreaktrav-
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AAAAI EARLY Specials! Cancun
1& Jamaica! 7 nights air and hotel
Shorn $399! Includes free food.
drinks, parties! springbreaktrav-
ljel.com 1-800-678-6386
! MONGOOSE HILLTOPPER one
year old, like new, comes with seat
lock, water bottle cage and U-lock,
$325 OBO. 329-0786 ask for Benji or
leave message.
AAAA! SPRING Break Travel was
1 of 6 small businesses in the US
recognized by the Council of Better
Business Bureaus for outstanding
ethics in the marketplace! spring-
breaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386
TELEVISIONS FOR sale: 31 inch
TCA Home Theater wstand $400
and 19 inch Magnavox wremote
$100. Call Jon at 353-5157 evenings
are best or leave a message.
BARTENDER NEEDED: must be
over 21, must have great personality.
Experience preferred. Flexible hours.
Please call 948-4788 after 6 p.m. or
946-8194 before 6 p.m.
PHARMACY TECHNICIAN to
function in innovative community
practice serving patients needs, as-
sisting in patient care, filling pre-
scriptions. Must possess excellent
people skills, superb telephone eti-
quette, ability to multi-task under
pressure. Positive attitude, willing-
ness to work at any task, a yearning
to tackle new responsibilities, ana
cooperation with co-workers defi-
nitely a must. No nights and Sun-
days. Send resume to 615-B South
Memorial Drive, Greenville, NC
27834.
SYLVAN LEARNING Center is look-
ing for a Study Buddy, for middle and
high school students in the following
classifieds
The East Carolinian
FOR SALE
CANON STARWRITER Jet word
processor: monitor, printer clip
art, spread sheet, address book
label program and games. Not
even a year old $450 or beat off-
8��8!fDav,n�" � 356-5450 or
353-2505.
FACULTYSTAFFPARENTS: Tutor-
ing Today for a successful tomor-
row. 13-year veteran school teacher
specializing in Reading, Math, and
Study Skins. Contact Robin @ 754-
8020.
areas: Spanish, chemistry. English,
and math. We are seeking a reliable
person who is available Mon-Thurs.
in the afternoon and early evening
hours. Apply in person at 2428 S.
Charles Blvd.
AAAAI EARLY Spring Break Spe-
ials! Bahamas Party Cruise! 6 days
1279! Includes most meals! Awe-
ome beaches, nightlife! Departs
rom Florida! springbreaktravel.com
1-800-678-6386
NEED A PART TIME JOB?
RPSINC.
Is looking for ev k-v ,i i iam a i rs to bad vans and
unload trailers for the am shift hours 3:00am to Sam.
S 7.u) K air; tuition asdstance available after 30 days.
Riture career opportunities in operations and manage-
ment possible. Applications can be filled out at 2401
United Drive (near the aquatics center) Greenville
HELP WANTED
PBLA, A non-profit organization
serving children birth to twelve years
and their families, is seeking a Direc-
tor. A minimum of an associate's de-
Sree is required; a BA or BS in Child
evelopment or related field pre-
ferred. Duties include supervision of
staff, ensuring compliance with local
& state childcare regulations, and
long range activity planning. Salary
and Benefits are above average for
the industry and negotiable. Decem-
ber graduates are welcome and en-
couraged to apply! Please fax re-
sume to: 252-975-3765 or mail to
PBLA, 146 Whispering Pines Rd
Washington, NC 27889. Closing
date: November 16, 1998. EOE
7ASTHMA ALLERGIES? Needed:
97 who desire immediate relief to try
and evaluate a new compact, state-
of- the -art home air purification sys-
tem. No cost or obligation. 252-355-
9248.
CUSTOMER SERVICE Representa-
tive. Bowen Cleaners is seeking de-
pendable and dedicated individuals
to fill part-time positions as custom-
er service representatives. Part-time
positions have competitive hours
and great pay. Qualified individuals
must nave a positive and quality con-
scious attitude, sales personality,
and basic computer skills. Part-time
hours: 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. M-F, 8a.m.
to5 p.m. Sat.(every other weekend).
Applications will be accepted at the
Bells Fork location.
BARTENDERS ARE in Demand
Earn $15-$30hr. Have fun and
make great $$$! Call for information
about our $99 Holiday Tuition Spe-
cial Offer ends soon! Call Raleigh's
Bartending School today Call toll
free at 1-888-676-0774.
GREEK PERSONALS
CYPRESS LANDING. Now hiring
marketing assistants MonThur. 4
g.m9 p.m 20-22 hours weekly
reat hourly wage plus bonus. Must
have strong communication skills,
like talking to people, customer serv-
ice oriented & team player. Main
function will be telephoning custom-
ers. Call Craig Wheeler MonFri. to
schedule interviews, 975-8100.
WANTED: ENERGETIC telemarket-
ers to work hours: 5:30-9 p.m. Mon-
day-Thursday: 4:30-8 p.m. Sunday.
Apply in person 5-9 p.m. Energy Sav-
ers Windows & Siding, Inc. Winter-
green Commercial Park, Suite O.
Firetower Road, Greenville.
ADULT BASKETBALL Officials
Meeting The Greenville Recreation
and Parks Department will be hold-
ing an organizational meeting for all
those interested in officiating in the
winter adult basketball league. Posi-
tion pays $12-$ 15 a game. Clinics
will be held to train new and experi-
enced officials. However, a basic
knowledge and understanding of the
game is necessary The meeting will
be held Thursday, November 12,
1998 at 7:30 p.m. at Elm Street
Gym. Experience requirements, clinic
schedule, and game fees will be dis-
cussed. For more information,
please call the Athletic Office at 329-
4550 between the hours of 2p.m
7p.m Monday thru Friday.
MODELS FOR Portfolio Reputable
amateur photographer seeking slim
young women for portfolio photos.
Send note, photo (if available), ad-
dress, and phone for immediate rep-
ly. Paul Hronjak, 3015-A Wynfall
Lane, Wilson, NC 27893-9677.
THETA CHI - we had a great time
last Thursday! Can't wait to do it
again! Love, Chi Omega
THE BROTHERS of Delta Chi sup-
port Brian Tuck in his run for IFC
president and congratulate him on a
job well done as AMC.
SIGMA ALPHA Epsilon, thanks for
the great time at PB's on Thursday!
Keep practicing the Macarena for
next time! Love, Alpha Omicron Pi
ALPHA SIGMA Phi, we had a great
time with you guys Friday night
thanks again! Love, the sisters and
new members of Sigma Sigma Sig-
ma
PI KAPPA Phi would like to thank
the sisters of Sigma Sigma Sigma
for a great sociallast Thursday, we
had a great time!
DELTA CHI Congratulates brothers
Joe "Co-Chese Biggers, Craig
"Sloth" Nolan, Brian Lew Lewis
Chris "Cheech" Lee, Richard "Dick
Grow, Rob "Taco Meat" Gray, Tho-
mas "Dogg II" Alcock, and Chris
"Backstreet Strathy. You guys did a
hell of a job. Welcome to the broth-
erhood of a lifetime. Delta Chi
TAU KAPPA Epsilon, thanks for
making the social Saturday night so
much tun! We had a great time as
usual! Love, Chi Omega
THE SISTERS of Alpha Xi Delta
would like to thank everyone who at-
tended our Stranger Mixer on Satur-
day. We hope you had a good time.
THANKS TO Sigma Phi Epsilon and
Pi Lambda Phi for being our Adopt-
A- Fraternity these past two weeks
Thanks, we love you. Love. Zeta Tau
Alpha
CONGRATULATIONS TO all the
new Zeta Tau Alpha sisters. We are
so proud of the Alpha Gamma's and
are excited to call your sisters. Love,
your sisters,
PHI KAPPA Psi. thanks for the great
tie hanging our in our PJ's! Can not
wait to do it again next year! Love,
the sisters of Alpha Omicron Pi
ALPHA XI Delta, we had a great tie
last Thursday playing a round of golf
with you! Let's do it again! Rock on!
Sigma Pi
OTHER
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Party
Cruise $279
5 y � DM UMi- fim Pm -noudn Tom
Cancun $399
7 Msa �� � Ha � Km Ft t� Mn rf OMa
Jamaica $439
� 7 N0 � . HMI � (M SIM on Food DMa
Florida $U9
Pimm 0. Dayma. Sou to t Com taaft
Spring Brtak Tr.��l-Our 12th Y�url
1-800-678-6386
EPSILON SIGMA Alpha- We hope
everyone has a great weekend. We
love you!
THE BROTHERS of Delta Chi would
like to congratulate Matt on his lava-
liering of CTuita
SIGMA SIGMA Sigma: thanks for
the "Jump and Jive . We had a blast
Friday. Hope to do it again soon.
Pledge class of Alpha Sigma Phi
PI KAPPA Phi, thanks for a fun Fri-
day night! We all had a blast. Love.
Chi Omega
THANKS FOR a great social. Delta
Zeta. We look forward to many
more. Love, the brothers of Delta Chi
THE SISTERS of Delta Zeta would
like to thank everyone who attended
our Rose Formal last Saturday. Every-
one looked great!
m-MSMffl
CanCUh-JdrtiaiCa-rJaharrlcrS
$rc $m $S9
OTHER
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lots of Cash! Top reps are offered
full-time staff jobs. Lowest price
Guaranteed. Call now for details!
www.classtravel.com 800838-6411
CRUISE SHIP Employment - work-
ers earn up to�2.000month
(wtips & benefits). Word Travel!
Land-Tour jobs up to$5,000-
$7.000summer. Ask us how! 517-
336-4235 ext. C53622
THE ECU PT program is holding a
massage clinic Tuesday, November
17th from 5p.m9p.m. at the Belk
Bldg. on Charles Blvd. Advanced
tickets are $3.0010 min. or
$4.0010 min. at the door.
"ACT NOW! Reserve your spot for
Spring Break 1999! Packages to
South Padrelfree meals), Cancun, Ja-
maica, KeyWest, Panama City. Group
Discounts for 6. 800-838-8203
www.leisuretours.com .
IF ANYONE witnessed a wreck on
Fifth Street in front of cashier's office
on Tuesday, November 3rd around
11 a.m please call me at 329-7131.
SPRINGBREAK FLORIDA, Texas,
Cancun Mexico, Jamaica, Bahamas,
etc. All popular spots. Browse
www.icpt com and call 800-327-
6013. Best hotels, prices and parties.
Reps, organizations, and promoters
wanted. Tnter-Campus Programs.
ALL PSI Chi members please come
join the officers of Psi Chi at Chico's
tor dinner on Wednesday, Nov. 18 at
6 p.m. Let's get to know each other!
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: Thursday 3:30-5PM. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop on November 12th. If
you are interested in this workshop,
please contact the Center at 328-
6661.
ADVANCED CLIMBING Sessions!
The Adventure Program will be host-
ing climbing sessions every Tuesday
from 7-8 p.m. thru Dec. 8th. Join us
each week for some one-on-one
time with our top climbing instruc-
tors. Set your ow pace and choose
what you want to learn! Registration
deadline is one week prior to each
session. Member cost is $15. For fur-
ther information, contact Adventure
ProgrammingDept. of Recreational
Services � 328-6387.
AEROBICS SCHEDULE Hotline:
Need to know when the next stress-
relieving, heart-rate raising, flab-
burning, blood-pressure reducing
aerobics class is? Dial 328-6443 ext.
2 for a listing of current class sched-
ules.
NOVEMBER CONTRA Dance! Sat
Nov. 14, Willis bldg First and Reade
Sts. Live music by Elderberry Jam.
Beginners , instruction 7-7:30
p.m.(free). Dance 7:30-10:30. Stud-
ents $3, others $5 or $6. Come
alone or bring a friend. ECU Folk and
Country Dancers. 328-7183, 328-
0237, or 830-5403
OTHER
NORTH CAROLINA Zoo Expedition.
Join us December 6th, as we ex-
plore one of the East's best habitat
zoos. You.ll see an array of animals
from North America as well as Afri-
ca. Sign up! Spaces are limited. Reg-
istration deadline is Nov. 27th. Mem-
ber cost is $15. Call Adventure Pro-
�rammingDept. of Recreational
ervices � 328-6387.
STUDY SKILLS Workshop: Thurs-
day 3:30-4:30. The Center for Coun-
seling and Student Development is
offering the following workshop on
November 12th. If yoo are interested
in this workshop, please contact the
Center at 328-6661.
ENHANCE YOUR climbing skills
There will be a day trip to the pinna-
cle of Pilot Mountain. December 5th.
This trip is great for beginners and
those wanting to test their limits. Be
sure to hurry Registration deadline is
November 27th. Member cost is
$25. Any questions? Call Adventure
ProgrammingDept. of Recreational
Services � 328-6387.
FRESHMEN. MAKE your mark at
ECU. Register for the "Emerging
Leaders Program Applications are
now available at Student Leadership
Development Programs, 109 Men-
denhall. For more info, call 328-
4796 Don't miss the bus. Space is
limited!
COMMUNICATING AND Resolv-
ing Conflict Workshop: Thursday 11-
12! The Center for Counseling and
Student Development is offering the
following workshop on November
12th. If you are interested in this
workshop, please contact the Center
at 328-6661
GET IT together.together Few peo-
ple like to do things alone, including
working out and dieting. Find a mo-
tivated friend to join you, and con-
tact the SRC Main Office (328-6387)
for details on how the two of you. to-
gether, can purchase a Partner Train-
ing package to get you both on the
right track for a healthy lifestyle.
PIRATE CHASETurkey Trot: An-
yone interested in participating in
the annual TurkeyTrotPirate Chase
had until Tues. Nov. 17th at 5 p.m. to
register. Registration can be done in
the main office of the Student Re-
creation Center. The actual race date
is Sat. Nov. 21st at 10 a.m. in front of
the Student Recreation Center. For
further information on the race
please call 328-6387.
HAVE YOU experienced the ride?
The Dept. of Recreational Services
new RPM bike classes are in high
gear, and classes are filling fast! $10
pass gets 5 full sessions. Contact
the SRC Main Office at 328-6387 for
registration information.
BECOMING A Successful Student-
Time Management Workshop:
Monday 3:30. The Center for Coun-
seling and Student Development is
offering the following workshop on
November 16th. If you are interested
in this workshop, contact the Center
at 328-6661.
Make Money at Home
Easy Work, Excellent Pay, Free Details!
Send a long sell addressed stamped envelope to:
ACE Financial Publication
Post Office Box 507
Robersonville, NC 27871
Advertise in
The East Carolinian
classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE$4.00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional words 5t each
STUDENT LINE AD RATE$2.00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional words 50 each
Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify. The East Carolinian reserves the right to refuse
fhis rate for any ad deemed to be non-student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE$1.00
add to above line rate for either BOLD or ALL CAPS type.
All classified ads placed by individuals or campus groups must be
prepaid. Classified ads placed by a business must be prepaid unless
credit has been established.
Cancelled ads can be removed from the paper if notification is
made before the deadline, but no cash refunds are given. No proofs or
tearsheets are available.
The Personals section of the classifieds is intended for
non-commercial communication placed by individuals or campus groups.
Business ads will not be placed in this section.
All Personals are subject to editing for indecent or inflammatory
language as determined by the editors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue
We reserve the right to change a deadline for holidays
or as necessitated by other considerations.





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Title
The East Carolinian, November 12, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 12, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1305
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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