The East Carolinian, November 3, 1998






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Tuesday:
High: 74
Low: 56
Wednesday:
High: 74
Low: 55
Online Survey
Have you ever seen an
instance of police brutality?
39 Yes 61 No
www.tec.ecu.edu
"Did you vote in the November 3 election?"
Carolinian
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3 ,1998 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 20
Best and Worst Halloween Costumes as seen down-
town in Greenville this Halloween. Ibe top ten cos-
tumes are counted down from best to worst!
features, p�p 6
Broad speaks on leadership Marks to address
Fall graduates
UNC president encourages
connective leadership
Racii.m.i, Higoon
S I'M I- R1TER
UNC system president Molly Broad
addressed the annual luncheon of the
Women Administrators in North Carolina
Higher Education (WANCHE) on "con-
nective leadership" Friday; October 30, in
Mcndcnhall.
"It is important for women to have sup-
port from other women in their careers in
such a male dominated field said Rita
Rodabaugh, Dean of Instruction at Wilkcd
Community College.
The speaker chosen for this year's event
was Molly Corbett Broad, the new presi-
dent of the UNC system, who began her
job this past July. The VVACHE executive
committee picks speakers who, as Stillion
says, arc voices on the cutting edge of
higher education issues
Broad spoke on the topic of "connective
leadership which she believes combines
interdependence and individuality.
According to Broad it is of the utmost
importance for women to keep up with the
changing role of women in ieadership posi-
tions in our global economy.
"Knowledge in our work force will
make the difference Broad said.
According to Stillion, Broad is not only a
leader who talks about "connective lead-
ership she models it.
The luncheon is held every year in con-
junction with the convention of The North
Molly Broad addressed the Woman Administrators in NC Higher Education.
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
Carolina Association of Colleges and
Universities (NCACU), which was held at
the Greenville Hilton. Women administra-
"Ourfirst purpose is to provide
networking for women who want
careers in administration and also
to track the progress of those women
in North Carolina
Judith Stillion
Associate Vice-Piesidem of Academic
Affairs ai UNC General Admission
tors from community colleges, four-year
and private universities constitute the
group. There is
no formal mem-
bership, however
there are campus
liaisons at across
the state who
keep their areas
updated on
upcoming events.
WANCHE
was formed in
1977 through the
American Council
on Education's
National
Identification
Project, in which
North Carolina
was one of the
twelve original
states to participate.
"Our first purpose is to provide net-
working for women who want careers in
administration and also to track the
progress of those women in North
Carolina said Judith Stillion, Associate
Vice-President of Academic Affairs at
UNC General Admission and a member of
the WANCHE executive board. "We sup-
port, nourish and educate women adminis-
trators at all levels in North Carolina
WANCHE members believe it is
important to meet to increase the ppportu-
nity for networking and support for women
administrators. Throughout the day,
WANCHE participants were able to
explore the ECU campus on guided tours
before and after the luncheon.
"I think that this is a unique organiza-
tion in the diversity of its participants
said Janet Daniels, Director of Adult and
Evening Students at UNC-Charlotte.
Professor from Biochemistry
Department chosen to speak
Caroline Jordan
staff writer
Fall commencement is scheduled for
Saturday, Dec. 12 in Williams Arena at
Minges Coliseum. Delivering the com-
mencement will be Professor
Richard H. Marks from the
ECU Department of
Biochemistry.
"We do not offer honoraria
to our own faculty and staff
James Leroy Smith, executive
assistant to the chancellor, said.
"Perhaps the honor is a signifi-
cant recompense
According to Marks, the
focus of the speech will be on
the importance of education,
but "it's not crystallized
enough to share yet
Marks, a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of
the University of Richmond, earned his
doctorate from Indiana University and
completed his postdoctoral at the
University of California at Santa Barbara.
Richard Marks
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU
NEWS BUREAU
"It's an honor to be asked to speak
Marks said. "I'm looking forward to it
Last Spring Marks was presented one of
the 1998 Board of Governors Awards for
Excellence in Teaching by UNC system
President Molly Corbett Broad and Board
of Governors Chairman C. Clifford
Cameron Jr.
During a special ceremony on April 29
at North Carolina Central University,
Marks was presented a commemorative
bronze medallion and a $7500 cash prize.
One faculty member from each of
the sixteen UNC system schools
was honored.
Marks, who has been with
ECU's School of Medicine since
1976, also received ECU'S
Teaching Excellence Award in
1995.
The pre-commencement cere-
mony will begin Friday, Dec. 11
with a social and dinner in Marks'
honor.
"It turns out that this year's
schedule has two ceremonies
indoors, one at 8:30 and the other
at 11:30 Smith said.
A graduating class of about 2,500 and an
audience of about 12,000 is anticipated at
this year's fall commencement address.
Edwards campaigns at Wright Plaza
Town hall session on
racial issues televised
University, UNC-TV
sponsor forum on campus
Devon White
staff writer
Senatorial candidate John Edwards addressed students Friday at a rally in Wright Plaza to gain support and get young people involved in politics.
PHOTO BY JENNIFER MASON
Senatorial candidate
tafgks young voters
Jennifer Mason
staff writer
Democratic Senatorial candidate John
Edwards held a rally in Wright Plaza Friday
to gain supporters and get young people
involved in politics.
"Everyone is important and everyone
needs to get involved Edwards said. "We
need to reach out to those people whose
lives we touch and get them to vote
Edwards is a staunch supporter of pub-
lic education and spoke about his views on
student loans.
"We need to provide support so all kids
who want to go to college have the means
Edwards said. "Student loans have to be
less costly, with lower interest rates. We
need to open up the opportunity for kids to
go to college easily. We need to also reduce
class size, put computers in every room,
and make sure that there is adequate class-
room space instead of trailers
Being a North Carolinian, where the top
commodity is tobacco, Edwards wants to
protect tobacco farmers.
"The only way I would be in favor of a
raise in the taxes on cigarettes is if it would
be beneficial to the tobacco farmers
Edwards said.
SEE EDWARDS PAGE 2
Community leaders discussed racial issues
in the Willis Building Sunday in front of a
live audience at a televised town hall ses-
sion sponsored by ECU and UNC-TV.
During the session, a panel of commu-
nity leaders discussed behaviors and the
consequences of race-based thinking on all
levels and legislature affairs in Greenville
and Pitt County. The discussion was mod-
erated by Jay Halloway, host of Black
Issues Forum and director of UNC-TV
Learning Ventures. The
audience was incorporat-
ed into the discussion by
allowing questions and
comments to be directed
at the panel. People of all
ages attended not only to
listen, but to speak out
honestly about the issues
that affect race relations.
The panel consisted of
Greenville City Mayor
Nancy Jenkins,
Councilwoman Mildred
Council, Javier Castillo,
member of the North
Carolina Governor's
Advisory Council on
HispanicLatino Affairs
and Vice President of
LBA Group, Jim Rouse, president and
owner of the Minority Voice Incorporation,
WOOW and WTOW radio, Bishop Randy
Royal of the Coalition Against Racism, and
Barbara Finner of the West Greenville
Development Corporation.
The meeting was one of 11 Black
Issues Forum town hall meetings that are
being held on UNC system campuses
throughout the state. The Town Hall
t
meeting is also a part of Public
Television's nationwide outreach cam-
paign on race issues.
"The whole purpose of this is to hope-
fully start a dialogue; to get people more
involved with the issues said Alice
Fuller, associate producer of The Blacks
"The whole purpose ofthlsls
hopefully start a dialogue; to
get people more involved
with the issues
Alice Fuller
Associate Producer of The Blacks l:sues Forum.
Greenville Mayor Nancy Jenkins was a panel member at the race
forum.
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
Issufes Forum.
The Black Issues Forum is a weekly
public affairs program disposed to inquir-
ing about the needs and concerns of the
black community and to educate the pub-
lic about solutions and issues that might
help to benefit overall living in
North Carolina.






2 TgtUiy, Novmulu 3, 1898
Th� Ent Carolinian
3 Thundiy,
ECU students receive Women
in Science Scholarships
Edwards
continued tram page I
Glaxo-Wellcome to pay
'tuition for juniors
Devon White
staff whites
Two ECU students are among 46
, North Carolina undergraduates
�'who have received the 1998 Glaxo-
Wellcome Women in Science
, Scholarships.
The scholarship pays tuition for
junior Nykoll Williams and junior
.Nicole Morris up until they gradu-
ate, and includes a laptop and print-
er to help with their studies. This
scholarship will not be given to any
other ECU student until Morris
, and Williams graduate from ECU.
On Oct. 5, Williams and Morris
i attended a day-long session at
Glaxo-Weilcome's Cornwallis
Campus. They had the opportunity
to tour the facility, participate in
group career discussions, and meet
with their newly assigned mentors
from Glaxo-Wellcome.
The idea of mentoring the stu-
"The idea of mentoring the
students is wonderful. It
gives them active support with
major decisions, such as
career choices
Nancy Spalding
ECU arts and sciences representative.
dents is wonderful. It gives them
active support with major decisions,
such as career choices said Nancy
Spalding, ECU arts and sciences
representative.
The Women in Science Scholars
Program combines scholarships
with a distinctive mentoring pro-
gram. This program connects each
student with a Glaxo-Wellcome
female scientist who serves as a
mentor throughout the student's
undergraduate career.
Williams said that she is "most
thankful for the mentor program
Each school selects up to two
students from its science depart-
ment for the program. Every
female in the science department
with a GPA of 3.0 or higher had the
chance to apply for the scholarship.
The student was required to fill
out an application explaining why
she should be chosen, and obtain a
letter of recommendation. A com-
mittee composed of a representa-
tive from the arts and sciences
department, a representative from
Financial Aid, and a representative
from the vice chancellor's office
made the final decision on who
: False alarms plague campus

I Less than one percent
pulled intentionally
Peter Dawyot
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
"Fire alarms are continuing to be set
iff throughout the ECU campus.
I Police and fire fighters, howev-
Jer. have had little problem with
tactual fires. Most calls have been
false alarms, set off by sensitive
tsmoke detectors. Campus detec-
ttors have been set off by smoke
?from cigarettes or even steam from
�showers.
While there are many cases of
�false alarms on campus, cases of
deliberate ones are very rare.
"Very few false alarms are
pulled intentionally said Deputy
Chief Ron Moore of the Greenville
Fire Department. "Less than 1
percent of false alarms come from
people who intentionally set off
alarms
Doug Tripp, who is in charge of
health and safety at ECU, said
penalties for setting false alarms
can range from a $5(X) fine to 30
days imprisonment.
The number of false alarms has
risen in the past few years due to
the installation of new smoke
detectors. Slay and Umstead are
the first two dorms which have
smoke detectors in every room, a
transition which will eventually
take place over the next few years
to all dorms on campus.
Since the addition of the new
detectors in the two dorms, over 80
alarms have gone off with only one
involving a fire. The most recent
case of an alarm, Oct. 22, was
caused by heat in the laundry room
of Umstead.
Tripp sees pros and cons to
dealing with the new alarms.
"On the good side, people are
notified a lot quicker if there is a
fire, hut on the Cownsjde it is
much easier to have a false alarm
Tripp said.
Resident hall advisor Angela
Aften and others are working hard
to reduce the number of false
alarms.
SEE ALARMS PAGE 3
would be selected to represent
ECU.
Spalding said she "enjoys work-
ing with the program. Some of the
finest students come out of it
The 1998 class was one of the
largest of striving female scientists
ever inducted into the Women in
Science Scholars Program.
The Glaxo-Wellcome
Foundation, founded in 1986, sup-
ports statewide and national activi-
ties that help to meet current and
anticipated needs in health and
education. The foundation focuses
on programs that stress the under-
standing and application of health,
science and mathematics at all edu-
cational and professional levels.
Glaxo-Wellcome, Inc. is the sole
contributor to the foundation. It
accepts grant applications from
nonprofit, non-exempt, charitable
organizations and institutions.
GREAT
PRICES ON
SILVER
JEWELRY
onnection
Division of UJEkE.
210 E 5th St. M-S10-6
758-8612 Sun 1-5
j Post-grad competition raises GPAs
Student expectations
produce hitter grades
Jason Ziebart
staff whiter
Some professors at ECU feel that
more post-graduate classroom com-
petition, not a lowering of stan-
dards, has resulted in higher GPAs.
Dr. Paul W. Dowell, director of
undergraduate studies for the
Department of English, said that he
believes the main reason for the
increase is that students are raising
their demands and expectations.
He said that they no longer want an
average grade, but rather a high
grade that proves excellence.
"When I was in school, a 'C was
okay Dowell said.
Dowell said that he once had a
freshman accuse him of ruining her
chances of getting into graduate
school because she did not earn a
high mark in one of his classes.
Dowell said that the increase
most likely started during the draft-
ing period for the Vietnam War. If
someone failed out of school, they
were eligible for the draft.
"Teachers didn't want to fail
somebody and see them go off to
war with the potential of being
killed Dowell said.
Today the draft is gone, but the
demand for high grades is still in
effect. Students today are faced
with more competition for jobs after
graduation. Higher grades give
them a greater chance of getting the
job they want.
"Overall, most students are try-
ing to work harder lecturer Steve
Harding said. "This semester I've
got an honors class, and they're real-
ly good
Harding also credited technology
and more professors working with
students as reasons for the increase
in GPAs.
Having taught for six years,
Harding said he has had chances to
fine tune his grading system. He
also said that he has seen a steady
average of GPAs over the past few
years.
"I set my class up so students
have opportunities Harding said.
A major issue focused on in this
election is the quality of health
care.
"We definitely have to reform
health care in America Edwards
said. "It has to be changed so that
the patients and their doctor, not
their insurance companies, can
make decisions on how to best treat
the patient
Edwards also stated that govern-
ment must regain the trust it has
lost with the American public.
"We have to do something to
restore people's faith in the govern-
ment Edwards said. "Those in
power have been lying and cheat-
ing taxpayers for so long that citi-
zens don't want to even listen to
what the politicians have to say
anymore. That has to change
u
I-
News Briefs
REGISTRATION FOR GENERAL COLLEGE STUDENTS
General College students should contact their advisers the week of
November 2-6to make arrangements for academic advising for Spring
1999. Early registration week is set for November 9-13.
PROGRAM TO HELP PEOPLE COPE WITH CANCER
The Leo Jenkins Cancer Center is offering "I Can Cope an
educational and support program for people with cancer, their families,
and friends. Held each week in the second-floor lobby of the cancer
center. The program begins Tuesday, Nov. 3 and lasts until Tuesday,
Dec. 1. Each session lasts from 6-8 p.m. Call for information Ellen
Walston at 816-7943.
JURIED ART EXHIBITION CALL FOR ENTRIES
The Arts Council of Wilson announces the Second Juried Art
Exhibition from Jan. 10 through Feb. 27. The deadline for submission
of exhibits is Dec. 4. Artists must be 18 years or older and live in
Wilson, Pitt, Nash, Edgecombe, greene, Wayne, or Johnston Counties.
All forms of media are accepted. An entry fee of $10.00 must
accompany exhibit. Call for more information (252)291-4329.
Brown & Brown
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
Truth,Equality,Justice
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i Em Cirolinim
3mpanies, can
iow to best treat
red that govern-
the trust it has
:an public.
) something to
h in the govern-
ed. "Those in
ring and cheat-
i long that citi-
even listen to
is have to say
:o change
UDENTS
the week of
ig for Spring
JCER
Cope an
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Juried Art
submission
and live in
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Ages18-40
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Thundiy, October 29, 1998
news
The East Carolinian
UNIVERSITY
HOUSING
SERVICES
Avcock
"Patches" Hill
Robert Gray
Carl Brienzi
Stephanie Webb
Barbara Hoessle
Ami Brasure
Laurie Horwitz
Bridgette Anderson
Lee Ann Eagle
Seth Campbell
Jason McHone
"Travis" Thomas
BeJk
Brian Ott
Jeff Tyler
Craig Taylor
Adrian Floyd
Joe Zawasky
Nancy Wazennegger
Kirsten Kordecki
Kara Maryansky
Amanda Wiznial
Erin O'Boyle
Melissa Stuart
Clement
Jason Franklin
Lynn Stewart
Mary Schubert
Emily Benton
Jennifer Angevine
Sandra Houston
Chrissy Holt
Shonda Levan
Kelly Keyeck
GottenFleming
Karen Floyd
Nicole Blanchflower
Jaime Bradley
Bridgette Flynn
Elisa Kellogg
Wendy Herron
Heather Holzworth
Nicky Goins
Joshua Beardsley
Lakeisha Palmer
Sarah Drye
Fletcher
Mavis Grant
Riley Lee Tuck
Heather Natalie
Chad Jewett
Amy Ferrell
Robert London
Tiffany Joseph
Natalie Davis
Amy Miller
Debbie Bartz
Kati Watson
Sebastian Hagerman
Karla Duncan
Garrett
Doug Yale
Brandon Young
Chris Wingfield
Kevin Smith
Dennis Adams
Gabriel Ollison
Brian Alkire
N'namdi Miles
is jy
Greene
Shawnda Canady
Angela Lecompte
Kelmira Gibbs
Laurie Benfield
Kristin West
Tyler Blackwelder
Corey Pressley
Tory Bryant
Eva Reaves
Jones
Kelly Glass
Doug Smith
Natisha Lowery
Celena Haaland
Jessica Danylo
Rachel Lindsey
Susan Wright
Jason Evans
Eric Gabriel
Scott
Nick Jones
Matthew Malone
Doug Hoskins
Lucas Curtis
Troy Martin
Nicolas Campbell
Chad Hux
Jeremiah Johnson
Derrick Hammon
J.C. Hand
Chris Innis
SlayUmstead
Vanessa Cullers
Joe Cade
Brenton Aspinwall
Anna Asbell
Emily Freeman
"Pete" Whitley
Carl Mothes
Valerie Rose
Nicole McClam
Eyuphan Karca
Brandon Huss
Jennifer Keiger
Tamika Dopson
Tyler
Candra Midgett
Krystyna Dehu
Lindy Hemming
Kristina Gibson
Dedra Hemphill
Erika SNAarts
Kelly furlough
Kristine VanRensselaer
Leigh Guptin
Georgeanna Sykes
White
Amy Staton
Kelly Allen
Wayne Richardson
Heather Hines
Jon Evans
Alarms
continued ffom page 2
"We are educating residents not
to burn incense or candles, to be
careful when smoking, and, if possi-
ble, to undercook popcorn Aften
said.
So far this has been successful.
Onlv 15 false alarms have been
recorded in the two dorms this year.
The state requires schools and
colleges to practice fire drills on a
regular basis to encourage safety
and awareness. Once every quarter,
ECU alarms are set off in order to
prevent tragedies from occurring
due to faulty equipment or unpre-
pared dorm residents.
"The worst fire ECU has had in
recent years happened in 1989 at
Clement hall said Tripp. "The
sixth floor social room was com-
pletely gutted due to a cigarette
dropped on a couch
Since that time, ECU has had
only a small number of fires, the
most recent being a small fire in
Aycock in 1997, which was also the
result of a cigarette. Even with so
few threats, ECU is still prepared to
deal with dangerous situations by
providing sensitive alarms
and fire extinguishes to each
dorm floor.
Sue? lie?
October 30, 1998
2:46 am - A staff member report-
ed the odor of marijuana coming
from a room in Garrett Hall. After
an initial investigation, officers
obtained a search warrant for the
room. The officers seized con-
trolled substance, drug parapherna-
lia and alcoholic beverages from the
room. The resident was not pre-
sent during the search and charges
are pending contact with the resi-
dent.
9:35 am - A staff member at the
Recreation Center reported the lar-
ceny of two magnetic signs from
her vehicle.
12:16 pm - A faculty member
reported receiving harassing phone
calls in his office in Brewster.
October 31, 1998
2:12 am - A student was arrested
for larceny and possession of bur-
glary tools after being caught taking
the wheels off bikes west of Gotten
Hall.
Stadium for possession of a weapon
on campus as he was attempting to
enter one of the gates when an
Event Staff observed the .22 caliber
pistol in his pocket
5:50 pm - Greenville Fire and
Rescue responded to a trash can
fire in the parking lot east of the
Motorpool lot.
7:47 pm - A non-student was
charged with DWI and improper
turn after being stopped at Tenth
Street and College Hill Drive.
2:49 pm -
arrested at
A non-student was
Dowdy Ficklen
MAKE SURE YOU SHOW YOUR
RA YOUR APPRECIATION
FUNDING
WORKSHOP
WHEN: WED NOV. 4 @ 5:00
WHERE: 221 Mendenhall
WHY: To ansyper questions
concerning the SGA funding proqi
s.
Don't forget that the dead!
for Spring Bi-Ahhuals is Nov. 13!
If you have any questions call the SGA office & 3284726;
��o
Find out about the professional and
higher education programs offered by
ECU as well as other institutions
East Carolina
University's First
Annual Graduate &
Professional School Fair
Thursday, November 5
10:00AM-2:00 PM
All Undergraduate &
Graduate Students invited
In the Mendenhall Student Center
Cosponsored by the ECU Graduate School &
The Graduate Student Advisory Council





,4 Imin. NgvambBr 3,1988
opi" i on
The East Carolinian
eastcarolinian
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Saoing me ECU commoniiy since B�. the im Cwokniin pufilishts 11 000 copes every tostsy and Thursday the lew) ettnofui in each edition is me
opinion of me f flitmill Boefd The East Carolinian welcomes town to rhe ednoi. limited to ?50 wordi. wfiich may be edited toi decency oi b'evtiy The f asi
Citoman reserves me nahi ro edit or re,ect letiers for pubkaikn. All Mm musi be sinned Limn should be accessed to Opin-on eflitcu The East
Cwetifflan. Student PuMiwmms Building. ECU GieefmiHe. 27B5W3M fm mtwmnwn. call ?52 32B.6386
ouwiew
RACISM�if you think you should stop reading this editorial because it does not apply to
you, think again. You are the exact person this editorial was written for. The people of our
"generation have not had to deal with blatant racism as much as our parents' generation.
" Instead, racism has slipped dangerously into much more subtle and just as dangerous
j- -forms.
" Stop and look at your group of friends. Does everybody have the same skin tone, eye color,
and hair color? Are any of your friends a shade darker or lighter than you? If you look
JRiround and realize that all of the people you choose to keep company with look just like
r 70U, ask yourself, "Why?" There is so much diversity in this world and on this campus,
why would you limit your group of friends to people who are just like you?
On Sunday, November 1st an open forum on racism took place on campus in conjunction
jjKwith ECU and UNC-TV. The forum highlighted race relations on UNC campuses,
specifically the ECU campus. There was also a panel discussion about behaviors and the
j consequences of race-based thinking.
� "While the forum has passed, TEC hopes the discussion on race relations isn't over.
We could all benefit from searching our lives for subtle forms of racism. For example,
when describing a person of a different race, do you characterize him or her as 'the black
ir"
� kid I sit next to in Anatomy class'? If so, take a moment to think of a more-open minded
j way to see people. Why should race be the major component of your description of
another person? When you walk home from the library after dark and see a group of males
� talking up ahead, do you get nervous if the group is not the,same race you are? When you
; meet someone with skin that is not exactly white or black are you overwhelmed with
I curiosity about their racial background to the point that you would offend them by asking
; 'what are you
The forum last weekend gives TEC an excellent opportunity to point out that racism is
� much more than skin heads and men in white hoods. In fact, the only real chance for
; improvement in race relations comes by addressing subtle issues everyone faces.
OPINION
Columnist
Marvelle
Sullivan
Police overstep their bounds
When a ticket is issued to an
individual for a common
misdemeanor such as
possessing an open container,
a search of this individual
andor his or her personal
property is unfounded.
Halloween festivities are a quite
euphoric and definitely chaotic
East Carolina tradition which lends
! itself to tremendous hordes of
random people barging their way
I into Greenville so they too can
I experience what has become a
I university party phenomenon. As
1 a countermeasure, the Greenville
Police Department mobilizes its
; force among other area forces in an
� attempt to combat the maddening
! crowds. Consequently, many
citations are issued and many
arrests occur for both students and
visitors alike. Tickets and arrests,
while hindering the ambience to
some extent, arc understandable
and purposeful in light of our laws
and regulations.
The problem arises though,
when police take it upon
themselves to add insult to injury
by going above and beyond their
intended purpose and duty and
essentially taking things too far.
When a ticket is issued to an
individual for a common
misdemeanor such as possessing
an open container, a search of this
individual andor his or her
personal property is unfounded.
This unwarranted police behavior
is becoming routine on college
campuses because the police
apparently believe that simply by
being college students, it is very
probable that we're committing
crimes within the near vicinity. So
searching the premises is
reasonable and justified.
Unless 1 have been completely
misinformed we have the right to
be free from "unreasonable search
and seizure See Fourth
Amendment rights. If there is no
probable cause, the police (or any
other law enforcer) cannot rifle
through you or your property.
There was a clear reason for the
creation of this amendment and a
clear reason for its existence today.
It prevents the abuse of power and
of individual freedom. The abuse
that is occurring extends beyond
both the Halloween and
Greenville scenes. A Supreme
Court case is being reviewed right
now concerning a police officer
stopping and searching a motorist
in Iowa. Yes, the police officer
DID find an illicit substance blit-
he had absolutely no reason to stop
the motorist in the first place.
Cause is at the heart of the issue.
Without it, what the policeman did
or did not find is a non-issue.
Admittedly, the Greenville
police force is not some evil entity
that is wanting, willing, and
waiting to violate ECU students'
rights. They usually have the best
intentions, but remember: the road
to hell is paved with good
intentions. Because of their role
they should be respected, but
because we are citizens (who
happen to pay their salaries), we
should also be respected. Basically,
the moral of the story is: know and
exercise the full extent of your
rights. If you don't, no one else
will do it for you.
Got something to say? Need somewhere to say it? Bring your letter to
eastcarolinian , located on the 2nd floor of ThejStudent Publications Building
OPINION
Columnist
Stephen
Kleinschmit
Halloween costume lowdown
Then there are the bad ones.
Marines dressed as Marines,
the Scream outfits, ghosts,
hypodermic needles, O.J.
Simpson, Bart Simpson,
Princess Diana with blood on
her face, fake cops, drunks,
the seven dwarfs: smoky,
smelly, pushy, pukey, swervy,
easy, and doc.
Well, once again we have
experienced Halloween. We have
all seen some crazy stuff this
weekend, so here are some of the
things I saw. These are the best
costumes, the worst costumes,
assorted weird sights, and safety
concerns that I witnessed, so take a
look to see if you made the list.
I tcre are the good ones. Monica
Lewinsky with knee pads, a bag of
weed, cigarettes, various alcoholic
beverages, naughty angels,
pregnant nuns, matching Crayola
crayons, a clown with the evil
looking contact lenses, Catholic-
school girls, Mr. Hankey the
Christmas poo, Presidents
Kennedy through Reagan, cat
women, colors, togas, L.L Wes
Hendrix, Jim Matheny as Elvis
Presley, or fellow opinion
columnist Ryan Kcnnemur as
himself.
Then there are the bad ones.
Marines dressed as Marines, the
Scream outfits, ghosts, hypodermic-
needles, O.J. Simpson, Bart
Simpson, Princess Diana with
blood on her face, fake cops,
drunks (there were a lot of these),
the seven dwarfs: smoky, smelly,
pushy, pukey, swervy, easy, and
doc. Those were some of the
assorted tasteless and overdone
outfits that I see every year, so if
you were one of these, please think
of something else next year, ok?
Finally, there are the wild things
people were doing! Topless
women were riding on guys
shoulders. Drunks were dancing
rather precariously from second
and third story windows. People
climbed up light poles and street
signs. Last year, I felt that it was
funny, but this year it felt really
dangerous. I saw a lot of people
taking chances with their lives and
the welfare and safety of others. I
really didn't have much fun
downtown this year because I was
too worried that I and others were
at risk.
But overall I had a pretty good
time this weekend. Of course I had
fun just taking in the sheer
spectacle of it all. I wasn't
downtown long, so I wasn't sure if
the police threw tear gas again this
year. But hopefully this gave us:
students at ECU a chance to unite
and do those wild and crazy things
that we wouldn't tell our parents
about. I just hope that next year
people will be a bit safer.
OPINION
Columnist
Christopher
Coppedge
Columnist says smoking stinks
Smoking is proven to be
unhealthy. With all the facts
about the disease and
addictive properties of
nicotine, how can anyone
choose to smoke? It does not
make sense. Smoking causes
many different diseases
including lung cancer and
emphysema. So if you want
to one day cough up your
lungs, continue smoking.
The world is overrun with
stupidity. I'm not only talking
about the Springer, homosexual
transvestite satan-worshiper type
either. I see this type of stupidity
everyday, and I don't understand it
at all. I cannot believe how many
"educated" people smoke. It's
everywhere, like an epidemic. I
remember back in third grade,
when we learned about fire safety.
They told us in a fire we should
cover our mouths and nose and
crawl out of the building. The
reason: because death in a fire is
usually due to smoke. In other
words, smoke is bad for you!
Everyday I see people
voluntarily take smoke into their
bodies through a cigarette. I really
cannot find the reason for smoking.
I have asked some of my friends
who smoke but none ever gave me
a good, concrete answer. Some
women have told me that they
smoke in order to lose weight.
Studies have shown that there is a
correlation between teenage
smoking and eating disorders. This
is a huge problem. Cigarettes are
not a substitute for food and
exercise. There is no easy way to
lose weight. Most women who try
to lose weight by smoking tend to
gain weight because their lifestyles
become less active. There are ways
to lose weight, eat right and go to
the gym, but by smoking you do
more damage to your body than
good.
Smoking is proven to be
unhealthy. With all the facts about
the disease and addictive
properties of nicotine, how can
anyone choose to smoke? It does
not make sense. Smoking causes
many different diseases including
lung cancer and emphysema. So if
you want to one day cough up your
lungs, continue smoking. Not only
does smoking cause these diseases,
but it also reduces the lungs and
body's ability to fight bacteria. This
is the reason for many smokers
getting sick easily. With all the
airborne viruses and bacteria, is it
wise to lower your defenses?
It has been proven that smoking
during pregnancy can cause
miscarriages and birth defects. I
know many women who smoke
now that want to have kids
someday. To give your child every
opportunity to live a healthy life
you must stop smoking during
pregnancy. I'm pretty sure you
cannot quit smoking in one day
after you have been smoking for a
couple of years. I've seen people
try to stop, they always say this is
the last one to every cigatette in the
pack. Quitting is not easy. Would it
not be a great idea to stop now,
instead of waiting until your
pregnant? You will be healthier and
so will your baby.
Smoking after your child is
born is wrong too. People who quit
smoking for a period and start back
are more likely to develop lung
cancer. Plus smoking around
children is harmful to them.
Second-hand smoke is not a myth.
There is a high percentage of
disease and deaths caused by-
second-hand smoke. Smoking
around your kid will lower his
immune system, and in turn lower
his quality of life.
My biggest problem with
smoking is second-hand smoke
because it affects me. If you want to
char and destroy your own lungs,
fine by me. When you smoke
around me you char and destroy my
lungs, which doesn't make me
happy. When people smoke around
me I usually walk away. If I wanted
to destroy my lungs by smoking, I
would go out and buy my own pack
of cigarettes.
Above all, smoking is totally-
disgusting. I hate to look at people
when they smoke. I wonder if they
really know what they're doing to
themselves. Smoking stinks. It
causes your clothes, as well as other
peoples' clothes, and breath to
smell bad. Coughing up that
phlegm is also extremely attractive.
To me it seems like a waste of
money. It's almost like Russian
Roulette� you pay for the chance-
to develop a nasty terminal disease.
I think the price of those nicotine
patches cost half of what a pack a
week for a year does. So essentially
it pays to quit. Through all my
searching I still haven't found any
reason to smoke. It causes more
damage than good, so I see it as
plain stupidity.
"Chance favors the prepared mind
Louis Pasteur
Scientist
5 Tmiday. No
Four Sea
WEI
A L
ED
EVI
SA1
EA






5 Tuaiday, November 3, 1998
comics
The Eeit CiroftDtin
Four Seats Left
Jason Latour Everyday Life
Mike Litwin

Raymond Sanders
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Claudius
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show
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Answers in Wednesday's Fountainhead
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6 Tuesday, November 3, 1998
features
7 Tuesday, Novi
The East Carolinian
Post rape resources available
both on, off campus
Counseling always
available to victim
Ni. M. Din
s !�: I (I H rt K I I K K
Rape is a scrims crime that people
fear and would never want bo hap-
pen to them. Unfortunately, it's a
crime that does exist and people
should know there arc resource
centers both on and off campus it it
does happen.
Associate Dean of Students,
Laura Sweet, works with students
who are involved in crises such as
rape and help them through the
process.
According to Sweet, the victim
is the one who calls the shots.
"I make sure the person knows
what all of their options are and also
make sure that she can go on with
her daily activities Sweet said.
One campus resource would be
the Honor
Board. If the
incident hap-
pened between
two students
and it takes
place on cam-
pus, the case can
be taken to
them.
"The Honor
Board consists of
a panel of the
students' peers
who have been
trained in the
judiciary
process Sweet
said. "Both stu-
dents go in front
of the board and
tell their side of
the story
If one doesn't
feel comfortable
going to the
Honor Board or
if the case does-
n't meet the board
the case can be
Greenville Police.
According to a Study Conducted
on 32 College Campuses.
�One out of four women surveyed
victims of rape.
�84 of those already knew their
attackers.
�57 of these rapes occurred on dates.
�One In 12 males students surveyed bad
commuted acts that met the legal
definitions of rape or attempted rape.
�75 of males surveyed Involved In rape
had used a substance (alcohol andor
dints).
�10 of reported rapes have had a male
vtctbn.
s specifications, "It's difficult, but the faster you
taken to the get help the easier it will be to go
SEE RAPE, PAGE 7
Students encouraged to save a life
through blood donation
Monthly blood drives
held on campus
P H I L L-t P G I L F tl S
STAFF WRITER
Have you given blood lately? Or at
all? Chances are that you could be
the key to a person's survival. Blood
donations are commonly held here
at ECU and students are encour-
aged to give the gift of life to people
in need.
In order to give blood, there are
The American Red Cross helps with
many blood drives in the community.
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
some requirements for
potential donors. One
must be in good health,
be at least seventeen
years old and weigh
110 pounds minimally.
Also, it is necessary to
fill out a questionnaire,
which contains mostly
yes-or-no questions,
and to complete a
mini-physical.
There are some
people who are not
allowed to give blood.
Someone who has had
a tattoo or any kind of
body piercing within a
year is not qualified to
give blood. However,
there are some excep-
tions, though not many, to this rule:
people who have had there ears
pierced at a reputable place, people
who have tattoos in a surgically
clean place, etc.
"On many people it can be diffi-
cult to find a vein said Marjorie
Hinson, a Red Cross nurse. "Some
are deferred from giving blood if we
can't find a vein
Last Wednesday an emergency
In order to Donate
blood you must:
�Be in good health
�Be at least seventeen years old
�Weigh 110 pounds
�Fill out a questionnaire
note: If you have had a tattoo or any
body piercing within a year you can
not donate (some exceptions apply)
blood drive was held in
Christcnbury for the first time. A
recent blood drive had been can-
celed and it was necessary to
replace it as quickly as possible.
"The ECU Volunteer Services
and the medical education depart-
ment deserve a lot of credit for set-
ting this up this blood drive said
SEE BLOOD. PAGE 7
.
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7 Tuesday, November 3, 1998
features
The Eiit Carolinian
ft
Blood
continued from page 6
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Debbie Page of the Mid-Atlantic
Regional Blood Services of the
Red Cross. "Everything has gone
so well. I am really impressed
Following a student donor
through the blood-giving process,
one must first go to Registration
where a questionnaire is given to
the potential donor. After the stu-
dent finishes filling out the ques-
tionnaire they meet a Red Cross
nurse who gives them a mini-phys-
ical. Next the student is led to a
bed where the actual blood dona-
tion takes place. The person's arm
is scrubbed for sanitation purposes,
and then the needle comes in to
play.
"Actually it just stings a little
said Amy Berridge, donor. "After
that you can't feel a thing
The actual blood donation takes
eight to ten minutes. One pint is
extracted and the person is then
told to sit for ten minutes. The pint
of blood is replenished in the body
after twenty four hours. Food is
provided for the donors afterwards
to build up their strength.
After giving blood, there are few
recommendations to follow. One
should drink plenty of fluids for
twenty four hours. Also, a person
should avoid smoking for thirty
minutes after donating and should
not exercise for twenty four hours.
A blood drive occurs at ECU
monthly at Mendenhall Student
Center. The next chance to give
blood will be on November 17 in a
blood drive sponsored by Epsilon
Sigma Alpha.
There are six blood types, some
are more rare than others. All blood
types are needed, but people with
type B and O- are encouraged to
donate, since the supply of those
types are always low. No matter
what blood type one has, everyone
is encouraged to give blood.
"I just can't imagine having
someone in my family not being
able to get blood Berridge said.
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Who says political science is boring?
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Rape
continued Irom page 6
on with your life Sweet said.
Another thing one should do if
they have been raped is to seek
medical attention immediately.
Although the Student Health
Center (SHC) does not administer
rape kits r.ic otter other methods
for helping the victim.
"Since we do not do rape kits,
we send the person to the Pitt
County Medical Hospital
(PCMH) said Beth Credle, a
graduate student in the Health
Education department at the
SHC. "However if the person
wants, someone at Student Health
will accompany the person to the
PCMH
According to Credle, SHC drjes
offer HIV testing, pregnancy tests
and emergency contraception.
According to ECU police Sgt.
LaF ranee Davis, rape is not some-
thing that can be dealt with alone.
There are counseling centers that
the victim can go to both on and
off campus.
"Victims should call a rape cri-
sis center Credle said. "On cam-
pus there is the ECU Mental
Service and the ECU Center for
Counseling and Development.
Off campus you can call the Real
Crisis Center
Although rape can not always
be prevented there are ways of
keeping out of risky situations.
"Always know the people you
are hanging out with Sweet said.
"When you go downtown, drink in
moderation and do not stay around
people who are drinking a lot
"Know that you never owe any-
one sex Credle said. "Set sexual
limits and communicate those
limits with your partner
"When you're downtown,
watch your drink Davis said.
"Date rape drugs can easily be
slipped into one's drink. Never
walk home alone and nescr bring
strangers home from downtown
The Real World
ECU
A Diversity Experience for First-Year Students
c j FRESHMAN - Check out this incredible diversity experience. Learn
oUnday more about why people sometimes seem so different. The Workshop is
November 15,h FREE, and all participants will receive dinner, materials, and a gift to
5:30-9:00PM remember the evening by. Call the Office of Orientation and the First-
Year Experience ASAP to reserve a spot (328-4173) - space is limited.
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EVERY TUESDAY NIGHT
8 & 8-BALL POOL
TOURNAMENT
STARTS AT 10:30pm
. CASH POT
covering the
otfbeal
Daredevil takes
61-story plunge
NEW YORK (AP) � It's a bird!
It's a plane! It's a parachute?
A Norwegian parachutist
jumped from the 61st floor of the
Chrysler Building on Tuesday,
three days after he leaped from the
86th-floor observation deck of the
Empire State Building.
The 32-year-old daredevil iden-
tified himself only by his first and
middle names, Thor Alex. In
Norway, the Oslo newspaper
Dagbladet identified him as Thor
Alex Kappfjell, an offshore oil
worker. He said he wanted to jump
from the 110-story twin towers of
the World Trade Center, the city's
tallest buildings, but security was
too tight.
"You're always afraid he told
the New York Post. "It makes you
sharper. There is no room for mis-
takes. One mistake and you die
Parachutine from a building is
illegal in New lork City, However,
police had received no complaints
about either leap, Officer Olga
Melendez said today.
Kappfjell told the Dagbladet
that Saturday's jump from the
Empire State Building was "fan-
tastic. This was my biggest dream
for many years
Workers at the art deco Chrysler
Building in mid-Manhattan
popped their heads out of windows
as he shimmied down a fire hose
from a vacant floor to a projecting
eagle's head from which he leaped.
"Relax, I'm going to do a para-
chute jump he assured them
before he made the 20-second
descent.
He claims to have made 210
jumps from mountains and build-
ings, including the Eiffel Tower.
Dog saves cat
from hawk
OSHKOSH, Wisconsin (AP) �
Some dogs chase cats. Samson
saves them.
Samson, a 100-pound (45-kilo),
Rottweiler-Saint Bernard mix,
saved a year-old cat named Baby
from a hawk that tried to scoop up
the tiny animal with its talons.
The 5-year-old dog has been
friends with Baby since she was
adopted by his owner Jerry
Krueger. He took preventative
measures when he saw the hawk
eying Baby from afar.
"How he knew tiut hawk was
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there, I don't know Krueger
said.
Neighbor Roger Hanneman
said he witnessed Tuesday's inci-
dent from his yard as the hawk
dove for the cat.
With his hackles raised,
Samson barked and ran to Baby,
knocking her off her feet with his
nose. Hanneman said the big dog
then placed his body over the cat
to protect her, and the hawk flew
away.
"It was over in 10 seconds, it
happened so fast Hanneman
said. "The dog protected that
cat
Before this attack, Samson had
protected her against a neighbor-
hood dog.
Childsuspended'for
giving sauce to others
CASTLE ROCK, Colorado (AP)
� A sith-grade girl was suspend-
ed from school for passing around a
capful of Dave's Insanity Gourmet
Hot Sauce and giving stomach
aches to more than a dozen class-
mates.
No one became seriously ill in
the incident Wednesday at Rock
Ridge Elementary School.
"I think it was an innocent dare
that turned out to have real serious
consequences school district
spokeswoman Jill Fox said.
The girl poured some of the
sauce into the bottle cap during
morning snack time and let stu-
dents dip their fingers into it for a
taste.
Six pupils went home after
being checked by paramedics.
Eight others complained of stom-
ach aches but remained in school,
and one girl was treated at the
school clinic.
Reindeer takes police
for a chase
HIGHLAND TOWNSHIP,
Mich. (AP) � The runaway rein-
deer has been recaptured.
A reindeer that escaped from a
ranch in Oakland County's
Highland Township on
Wednesday was caught Thursday
in Hartland.
A Hartland woman caught the
reindeer napping in her back yard
Thursday morning, WHMI-FM in
Howell reported. She called police
and animal control, but they said
that there was nothing they could
do. Two women finally got a leash
on the animal after enticing it
with corn. They led it to a horse
trailer so it could be transported
back home.
The 200-pound reindeer
belongs to Milford carpet company
owner Doug McNabb.
The reindeer is one of three
that escaped from a township
ranch Tuesday night. Two females
were quickly captured. The bull -
was seen in a trailer park early �
Wednesday and police tried to-J
apprehend it.
"A deputy drove alongside it in �
his patrol car this Wednesday
morning and could almost touch it -�
before it took off running again
Oakland County Sheriffs Sgt. ��
Steve Parker told The Detroit
News.
Reindeer are generally docile ;J
creatures, but the bull is rutting it's J
breeding season � making it more J
aggressive and active than normal. J
Parker said deputies gave up on,�
catching the animal when it went 9
into the woods. He said the I
major concern was keeping it
away from traffic. 3
Snacks help SCpoliced
solve burglary
HILTON HEAD ISLAND, South.
Carolina (AP) � A box of donut
proved be more than a police-
officer's snack. It turned into ��
clue that may have helped.
South Carolina authorities solve a
31
string of burglaries.
When burglars broke into a ser-J
vice station early Monday, the�
moved a box of Krispy Kremer
donuts that had been delivered ts
the doorstep. That tipped deputies
that the burglary happened after;
the donut man made his roundsjj
said sheriffs Sgt. David Randall. �
The delivery man, found art
hour later on his route, remembered
seeing three men in a black truckj
parked along the road when he
dropped the donuts at around 1J
a.m.
Three hours later, an alarm went
off at Island Gold Works and
deputy spotted the truck. Threi
men were arrested. They are alsaj
suspected in other area burglaries. ;j
Indiana psyenic otters
ghostbusting services
SOUTH BEND, Ind. (AP) �
Don't call Christine Kaminsky a
psychic she considers it a little
demeaning.
"We like to call ourselves clair-
voyants just because the 'Psychic
Friends Network' has destroyed
the name, and we don't want to be
in the fortune telling business she
said.
Kaminsky prefers paranormal
investigator. Ghostbuster for short.
But that's not all she does as the
vice president of One Star In Site
Inc a South Bend-area business
that specializes in the unusual.
There's also spiritual cleansings,
medical intuition, psychic investi-
gation and business advice � all for
$90 to $135 an hour.
"There's so many variables in
our business that the insurance
companies didn't want to touch
us said Caleb Storms, the One
Star in Site president. "If we go
into a house for a haunting and
things start flying around the room,
it's going to be difficult to file the
claim
Storms and Kaminsky said busi-
ness � cleansing buildings of neg-
ative energy, counseling area busi-
nesses and doing two to
three ghostbustings a month � has
done well since opening almost a
year ago.
The two friends who met four
years ago after discovering they had
similar powers with the paranormal
say they make a decent living deal-
ing with the dead. They even have
a page on the World Wide Web
advertising their services at
www.onestar-insite.com.
"The response we've gotten is a
lot better than we thought said
Storms, who sometimes lists intu-
itive counselor as his job title on tax-
forms. "People have been actually
kind and very welcoming
Both said they had similar expe-
riences in discovering-
their "powers
Storms first noticed something'
special after his older sister died
when he was 5 years old. He said
her spirit paid him visits until he
was about 10, when he began-
to shut out his powers because
he realized others didn't share his
capabilities. Storms said he later-
turned to alcohol and drugs until an
near-fatal overdose when he was'
17 or 18 that landed him in-
rehab and got him back in touch1'
with his powers.





8 Tund�Y, Novtmfair 3, 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
Houston causes "Halloween havoc"
Pirates losing "game
from hell 34-31
Travis Barkley
senior writer
- ECU outnumbered the
University of Houston in nearly
� every statistical category except
i one: scoring points. The Pirates
dropped their third straight game
34-31 on Saturday. ECU (4-4, 1-2
C-USA) had a chance to tie in the
final seconds but a 47 yard field
goal attempt drifted wide right as
time expired.
More special teams break-
downs and a 99 yard fumble
return for a touchdown cost ECU
I the game. Houston blocked two
punts and an extra point while
� winning its second game in a row.
All 21 of Houston's first-half
points came as a result of the punt
;� blocks and a fumble return.
"That's inexcusable ECU
, head coach Steve Logan said of
the punt blocks. "I don't under-
, stand where these breakdowns
, are coming from over the last two
'i weeks. We've been so good all year
I long on that particular unit and it
cost us the game today
, According to Logan, these
breakdowns also gave the defense
team bad field positions in the last
. two weeks.
. "I've seen our defense go on the
. field in impossible situations
. because of the punt team Logan
said. "It was just the game from
First downs
Net Yards Rushing
Net yards Passing
Total Net Yards
Fumbles-lost
Interceptions-Yards
Third Down Conversions
Time of Possession
16
169
234
403
0
0
4-15
31:06
24
210
304
514
1-1
3-38
6-17
25:54
Source: ECU Sports Information Department
Junior Forrest Foster (37) and senior Kendrick Phillips (40) battle for ball possesion at Saturday's game against the Houston Cougars
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMBEfl
hell, that's all I know
Saturday's game marked the
second time in two weeks that
there has been a breakdown in the
punting game for ECU. Southern
Miss returned an ECU punt 54
yards for a touchdown one week
ago en route to a 41-7 victory.
Junior punter Andrew Bayes is one
of the top punters in the nation,
when he has been given time to get
the ball off.
"I've punted since my freshman
year Bayes said. "We haven't had
a punt blocked in three years and
tonight we had two. Our punt team
has been a bright spot for our team
this season until the last two games.
I don't know what happened
Offensively, ECU played very
well, gaining over 500 yards of total
offense. Sophomore quarterback
Bobby Weaver returned to the line-
up after a three game absence and
led ECU to a touchdown on its
opening possession. Weaver's
return was short-lived, however, as
he twisted his knee on a third
down run during ECU's second
possession. Weaver tore his anteri-
or cruciate ligament on the play
and will be out for the remainder
of the season. After the game
Logan said Weaver may miss
SEE FOOTBALL. PAGE 9
kiii a
Rushing
Leonard Henry
Jamie Wilson
David Garrard
Passing
David Garrard
Bobby Weaver
Receiving
LaMont Chappell
Buck Collins
Troy Smith
Marcellus Harris
Travis Mazyck
JJ. McQueen
No
22
15
9
Yds
109
88
21
Att-Cmp-Int
33-18-0
2-2-0
No
4
3
3
2
2
2
Yds
106
62
42
25
22
17
TD
5.0
5.9
2.3
Yds
275
29
TD
1
0
0
0
0
0
Source: ECU Sports Information Department
Runners compete at CAA meet Men's soccer drops
Men, women prepare
alternate routes
Tracy Hairr
assistant sports editor
The ECU men's and women's cross
country teams traveled to
Manassas, Va. to compete in the
annual CAA Championships host-
ed by George Mason University on
Saturday. Against some nationally
ranked teams, including William
and Mary (19th) and James
Madison (20th), the men captured
a fourth place finish.
"We were really pleased with
our effort head coach Len
Klepack said. "We had hoped for a
better place, but the team's been
consistent so far and we're allowed
to have one poor race
Leading the Pirates, Justin
England finished ninth overall with
24:47 in the 8,000 meter race, 20
seconds short of maintaining his
record-breaking time on Oct. 17.
But he still replaced Jamie Mance's
record of 24:52, made in the 19
championships. Stuart Will fol-
lowed with a time of 25:14 and 15th
place.
"We had a lot of positives
including England making all-con-
ference Klepack said. "This was
difficult considering the quality of
the competing teams
The freshman runners and their
impact varied
during the
race. Craig
Littlefield and
Justin Poretti,
times
and
respec-
ranked
and

Abrial Hayes
FILE PHOTO
with
26:53
27:01
tjvely,
fourth
fifth
the
among
Pirates.
' Unable to per-
form due to inflammation from a
spider bite, Charles Nickum was
forced to withdraw from the race.
In last year's championships the
women posted their best-ever, a
third-place finish, but this year they
slid a few places to seventh overall.
Abrial Hayes finished the 5,000
meter course with 19:36 and 34th
place, and Becky Testa directly fol-
lowed with a time of 19:38, placing
her in 35th position. Despite strug-
gling with a flu, Kerri Harding fin-
ished 41st overall. The team's per-
formance was influenced by lack-
ing its primary runner, Robin Bates,
who could not participate in the
conference championships because
of a shin injury.
"We were somewhat affected
since we had intended on counting
on Robin to be our top runner, so
"We were really pleased with
our effort. We had hoped for
a better place, but the team's
been consistent so far and
we 're allowed to have one
poor race
Len Klepack
Head men's cross country coach
that certainly seemed like a hole to
fill assistant coach Matt Munson
said. "But in the morale sense, I
think it still helped having her
there and keeping her a-part of the
team.
Soon these women, along with
the addition of sprinters and
jumpers, will start their track sea-
son, so the coaches plan on begin-
ning the training for these middle-
distance events rather than extend-
ing the cross-country competition
to the NCAA Regional Meet.
"Right now we're going to try to
gear down for track since we're
expecting to meet some real con-
tenders Munson said. "Our team
is so strong and deep that the possi-
bilities are wide open this year
Their first indoor meet will be
Dec. 12 at George Mason, and after
Christmas break they expect to be
in full swing.
The men however, will advance
for the regional action on Nov. 14 in
Greenville, S.C.
A total of 32 teams will be com-
peting, among whom will be five of
those currently ranked in the
nation's top 25.
"Our goal this year is to make
ourselves a factor in the.top 12
teams Klepack said. "We hope
that especially Justin and Stuart
continue their success in the
regionals since they've got so
much ability
two on weekend
American, George
Mason defeat Pirates
Eric Couch
staff writer
CAA Media Day favors
both ODU teams
Season favorites for
basketball announced
Jim Phf.i.ps
SENIOR WRITER
L
On Wednesday, October 27, 1998
the Colonial Athletic Association
held Media Day in Richmond, Va.
where head coaches from American
University, ECU, George Mason
University, UNC-Wilmington and
other CAA schools met and gave
press conferences. The coaches,
along with the media and sports
information directors, voted in the
men's and women's basketball poll.
The results of this poll were that
both Old Dominion University's
men's and women's teams were
labeled favorites for the upcoming
season.
ODU men's coach Jeff Capel has
four starters and three double figure
scorers returning from a squad
which finished 12-16 last season.
The team will be lead by senior
guard Mike Byers and senior for-
wards Mark Ppag and Cal Bowdler.
Stan Simmons from UNC-
Wilmington was voted Preseason
Player-of-the-Year on the men's
team.
ODU women's head coach
Wendy Larry will count on a pair of
standouts from a Lady Monarch
squad which captured its seventh
consecutive CAA title and
advanced to the "Sweet 16in the
1998 NCAA Tournament. Senior
forward Mery Andrade will be the
leader for the Lady Monarchs. She
received all 29 votes as the
Preseason Player-of-the-Year.
The men's preseason all-confer-
ence squad was comprised of Poag,
UNC-Wilmington senior guard
Stan Simmons, William & Mary
senior guard Randy Bracy, James
Madison University senior forward
Chatney Howard, and George
Mason University sophomore for-
ward George Evans.
The women's preseason AI1-
CAA squad consists of three players
who garnered Second Team honors
last season: Virginia
Commonwealth University junior
forward Marika Rasmusscn, JMU
senior swing player Kish Jordan,
and American University senior
guard Kari Gaskins, and ODU
senior guard Aubrey Eblin.
This promises to be a competi-
tive season for all the CAA teams.
Halloween weekend resulted in
havoc for ECU's men's soccer team
when it lost at home Friday to
American University and away at
George Mason University on
Sunday.
American University managed
to jump out early with three goals
in the first half to take a solid lead
at Bunting Field,
resulting in a 4-0
defeat for the
Pirates on Friday.
The losses took
ECU to a record of
3-12-1 overall and
1-6 in the CAA.
"This was a dis-
appointing loss for
our team ECU
head coach Will
Wiberg said.
Wiberg felt that the
Pirates were frus-
trated after being Scott LaFevers
scored on early.
"We made the
situation worse by committing fouls
and put ourselves in the position
where we were playing down
Wiberg said.
As for American, this was the
first CAA victory for the Eagles this
season, resulting in a 1-4 confer-
ence record.
The Eagles scored early at 2:14
in the first half, when Angel
Lanchas contributed AU's first
goal. Then again at 23:59, Tevor
Ellis put American up 2-0 with the
second goal of the game. Other
scorers for American were Bob
Brennan at 30:56 and Adam Rosen
at 73:07 to wrap up the game over
ECU.
Playing goalie for the Pirates
were Matt DeStefano and George
Meek. DeStefano and Meek com-
bined for six saves with four goal
allowed. For American, it was JefJ
Angelucci and Mike Gorsegne);
who combined for the shutout, bu�
neither one earned a save.
On Sunday the Pirates went to a
road game against George Mason
for another CAA match-up.
This game, too, proved unfavorj
able for the Pirates who experi-
enced yet another 0-4 shutout, lo�
ing this time to the Patriots. This!
was ECU's third consecutive corfcj
ference loss.
GMU's Scott Thelen scored twjb
goals on the day with one goal conv
ing only three minutes into thi
game. Additionally, the Patriot
(right) dribbling remains fruitless on Friday
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
Alex Teixeira chipped in threp
assists in the shutout for George
Mason.
ECU was outshot 20-3 in the
game with George Mason coming
on strong with its four goals!
George Meek was in goal for 82
minutes for the Pirates with four
saves and four goals allowed. Dino
Stambolitis played the last eight
minutes with no saves and no goals
allowed.
Next the Pirates will host the
Wolfpack of NC State starting atj
2:30 on Wednesday afternoon;
before they have their final home
game of the regular season
at Bunting Field on Friday,
Nov. 6 at 3 p.m. against
Virginia Commonwealth.
aga
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9 Tuesdav, November 3, 1998
sports
The Ent CiroliniM
irolinian
55

ir
Avg
2
1
0
TD Long
1 57
0 28
Long
57
30
28
22
14
11
rops
s with four goal�
irican, it was Jeff
dike Gorsegne
the shutout, bxijf.
i a save.
Pirates went to
t George Masoirj
natch-up.
, proved unfavogs
tes who experii-
0-4 shutout, o�-
le Patriots. Tim
consecutive cor�
heien scored tw�
ith one goal confi
iinur.es into the
illy, the Patriot
s fruitless on Friday
lipped in three
itout for George
hot 20-3 in the
e Mason coming
its four goals!
is in goal for 82
Pirates with four
ils allowed. Dino
d the last eight
aves and no goals
tes will host the
State starting at
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Women's soccer beats American
Pirates ready for
CAA tournament
Todd Tallmadge
staff writer
The ECU women's soccer team
concluded its season with a big win
over American University 2-1 in
overtime last Saturday. The team
now prepares for the CAA
i Championship starting this week.
The Lady Pirates finished with
their first ever winning season at
10-6-1 and 3-5 in the CAA. The
win also enabled the women's team
to get a 6 seed in the tournament
' this week against George Mason.
George Mason defeated the
Pirates in a regular season game 7-1
back on Sept. 18.
"We are pumped Roberts said.
"Wc are jacked about the chance to
play George Mason again. We
played our worst game of the sea-
son when we lost to them. This
gives us a chance to avenge that
game. All of their shots went in and
wc could not get anything
Hopefully, Saturday's victory
gave the team the mental power to
step up against the favored Patriots.
"Today's win gives us a lot of
confidence going into the first
round sophomore Erin Cann said
after winning the nail-biter against
American University. "We feel that
this now gives us an opportunity to
get even with the teams that beat
us earlier in the season
The Pirates will try to improve
their performance from last year's
CAA tournament.
"We are better prepared going
into the tournament compared to
the disappointing loss against
William & Mary in last year's tour-
nament sophomore Kim
Sandhoff said. "The team has been
pulling together more in the last
three weeks
The Pirates are going into the
championship fairly free of injuries.
According to Roberts, they have
just a few lingering bumps and
bruises from the season.
According to Sandhoff, the team
not only seems to be more than just
physically fit for the upcoming
main event of the season.
"Coach Roberts has been men-
tally preparing us the whole season
for this Sandhoff said. "We as a
teamare peaking right when we
need to
In addition, other schools seem
to have taken notice of this year's
strong Lady Pirates performance
over the season.
"The team believes that we
have gotten a lot of respect from
around the league Cann said.
"We have a lot of potential and
should have won a few more games
but just could not put the teams
away
The women's team is preparing
to open the first round this week of
the CAA Women's Soccer
Championship at Virginia Beach,
Va. from Nov. 3-8. They will play
the first round on Nov. 5 at 7:30
p.m. If they win, the team will play
the winner of 2 William & Mary
vs. 7 Virginia Commonwealth on
Friday, Nov. 6 at 8:30 p.m.
Football
continued from page 8
spring practice because the injury
occurred so late in the season.
David Garrard subbed for
Weaver and had his best game to
date, throwing for 275 yards and a
touchdown without throwing an
interception. Garrard was aided by
a strong running game that pro-
duced 210 yards. Leonard Henry
led all rushers with 109 yards on 22
carries, becoming the first Pirate to
rush for 100 yards since Scott
Harley ran for 351 against NC State
in 19. Henry said this loss is diffi-
cult to take because it came at
home.
"This is a tough one Henry
said. "Southern Miss was a tough
one to swallow as well, but this one
here was even tougher because
these guys beat us in our own
house, and we had a chance to win.
We had our chances today and
things just didn't work out
Saturday's game was hotly con-
tested with tempers flaring on sev-
eral occasions. Senior center Danny
Moore was involved in one such
altercation with Houston's defen-
sive end Patterson Owens.
"My responsibility was to cut
him and get him on the ground
Moore said. "As I was getting up he
grabbed my leg and pulled me
down. He rolled over on top of me
and took his hand and pushed it up
under my face mask.
Coach Logan stressed to us, 'Do
not, what ever you do, you do not
throw punches. You keep your com-
posure I was just laying on my
hands and I just more or less got
beat down for about ten seconds
Golden Key National
Honor Society
Induction & Reception
Saturday, November 7, 1998 2:00 pm
Hendrix TheatreMendenhall Student Center
New Members, current members, family & friends are invited
TEC has teamed up
with Barnes and Noble
to bring book reviews to
Wednesday's Fountainhead
in our new program
eastr �
carauraan
Reviews tr
Ronald
Wc aiv lookiii" far Hlow hook kivers lo
read ami rw v hl sofa's f"fa jshkI
cause. Each Swtwdtv ht will donate iIxn'
lustsellerS lo In� Hwialil Milkmaid llniN'
mImit they uill lie iHiiilible fcr llie fainilv
minim ol terminal ill children to twl.
II mmi would like lo tuile a levied
plea call Miifali al ICYMKi
before the referee even got close to
me
No penalty was called on the
play, one of several breaks that
seemed to go Houston's way during
the game.
With ECU leading 31-27 in the
fourth quarter, Garrard appeared to
pad the lead with a 57 yard touch-
down pass to Troy Smith. The play
was called back due to an offensive
holding call. Logan said the referee
made the call even though he
couldn't give the number of the
player he flagged.
Cornerback Kevin Monroe
picked off Cougar quarterback
Jason McKinley on Houston's next
possession, McKinley's third inter-
ception of the game. But ECU
could not run out the clock and had
to punt, allowing Houston the
chance to score the go ahead touch-
down.
Monroe recorded two intercep-
tions on the day but said he would
trade them for mother victory.
"It's always good for a defensive
back to get interceptions Monroe
said. "But I'd rather have no inter-
ceptions for winning the football
game
Senior tight end Buck Collins
probably had his best game of the
season so far, catching three passes
for 62 yards. He said the team is
especially disappointed because it
felt Houston was a team it should
have defeated.
"Any time you lose to a team
you should beat there is a lot of
frustration Collins said. "We
needed a first down in the fourth
quarter with four minutes left on
the clock. I think that would've
secured the win but we didn't go
out and do it
ECU has a short week to prepare
for its next game, as the Pirates
travel to Cincinnati on Thursday.
CRIMINAL � TRAFFICDWI
MICHAEL A. HOLLOMAN
Attorney at Law
123 W. 3rd Street, Suite 2
Greenville, NC 27858
252-329-0165
www.PirateLaw.com
BIG TUESDAY
BIG BEERS
LITTLE PRICES
BIG FOOD
LITTLE PRICES
355-2946
Located in Winn-Dixie Market Place on corner of
Greenville Blvd. & Arlington Blvd.
TEC is looking for
someone to fill a top
management position
with significant
responsibility
and good pay
Requirements:
Macintosh Experience
Photoshop
QuarkXpress
Experience Managing people
Organizing Employee Schedules
Coordinating Production 6; Press
Some late evenings required
Have you
worked at a college
publication before?.





1 0 Tuesday, November 3, 1998
classifieds
The East Carolinian'
FOR RENT
FOR SALE
HELP WANTED
HEIP WANTED
GREEK PERSONALS
OTHER
SPACIOUS 2 bedroom apt. 2
blocks from ECU campus. No pets!
Call Dogwood Hollow Apts. at 752-
8900 for more details.
LOOKING FOR a quiet place so you
can study? Eastgate is the place for
you. 1 bedroom, WD included. No
pets. Cafl Woodcliff Rentals at 758-
5005.
NEWLY REFURBISHED condo, 4
bedrooms, 2 12 baths. WD hook-
up, approx. 2000 square feet, great
space 752-7738.
WANTED: SOMEONE to sublease
2 bdrm 2 bath apt. in Kingston
Condominiums beginning Nov. 1,
sublease until Feb. 1 with option to
renew, $450month, no security de-
posit For more info, call Stacy at
758-6204 or Adrian at 717-0725.
PINEBROOK APARTMENTS, 1-2
BRs available, water, sewer, cable in-
cluded Reduced Deposits Novem-
ber. December. On-site main-
tenance, management, ECU bus
line. 9-12 month lease, pets allowed.
758-4015
URGENTLY NEED someone to sub-
lease a one bedroom apt. in Ring-
gold Towers from 1st November. No
deposits Fully furnished. Call 757-
1346
TWO BEDROOM brick duplex, cen-
tral airheat, private drive, front
porch, no pets 756-8444 or 355-
7799. Close to campus $430.
3 BEDROOM house, nice neighbor-
hood near university. 752-1899 day,
561-2203 (pager) night.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
ROOMMATE NEEDED. $170
month 14 utilities. Very close to
campus. Call or leave message. 758-
. 9129.
RESPONSIBLE ROOMMATE need-
ed to share a four bedroom mansion.
Only $200mo� 14 utilities. Lots of
space. You must see to appreciate.
Call Chris at 752-5080
PLAYERS CLUB roommate needed
to sublease. $240 a month. First
month utilities Free! No deposit re-
quired. Washerdryer, own room
and bath Call 756-7539 and leave a
message.
FOR SALE
SLEEPER SOFA and smoked glass
dining room table with 4 chairs
$200: excellent condition; call 757-
1949, please leave message.
�i
FOR SALE: 95 Parkpre Shock Sport
18-speed mountain bike with speed-
ometer. Jamis Durango 12-speed
mountain bike. Moving, must sell
Excellent condition 756-9537
BIKE AND in-line skates - Mon-
goose chrome, trick bike $150, and
Reidell in-line racing skates, size 9
12, $125. Call evenings, 752-6372.
AAAA! SPRING Break Travel was
1 of 6 small businesses in the US
recognized by the Council of Better
Business Bureaus for outstanding
ethics in the marketplace! spring-
breaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386
AAAA! EARLY Specials! Cancun
& Jamaica! 7 nights air and hotel
from $399! Includes free food.
drinks, parties! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
LARGE CAPACITY WHITE wash-
erdryer for sale Brand new. $600
negotiable Call 830-2069.
1997 JEEP Wrangler, blacktan,
21,000 miles, excellent condition
Call Amy, 321-0180.
AAAA! EARLY Spring Break Spe-
cials! Bahamas Party Cruise! 6 days
$279! Includes most meals! Awe-
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AAAA EARLY Specials! Panama
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cludes 7 free parties! Daytona149!
New Hotspot-South Beach129! Co-
coa Beach $149! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
FORD BRONCO II for sale, V-6. 4-
wd, 5-speed, good condition, asking
$1800 or best offer. Call 931-0255
or e-mail GAM0718@ecu.edu
SERVICES
THERAPEUTIC
MASSAGE SPECIAL
Abbott Hunsucker
iMAEd, EdS, Massage Therapist
With this coupon, just $40 for
a one-hour session�that's
20 off regular prices!
(Same discount for gift certificates)
0 t�
To celebrate the opening of
NAtunl Remedies
(formerly The Comfort Zone)
211-F Commerce Street
Greenville, NC 27858
EveningSaturday Appts.
(252) 355-2138 Eit. 3
FACULTYSTAFFPARENTS: Tutor
ing Today for a successful tomor-
row 13-year veteran school teacher
specializing in Reading, Math, and
Study Skills. Contact Robin @ 754-
8020
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
1919)496-2224
HELP WANTED
SYLVAN LEARNING Center is look-
ing for a Study Buddy for middle and
high school students in the following
areas: Spanish, chemistry, English,
and math We are seeking a reliable
person who is available Mon-Thurs
in the afternoon and early evening
hours Apply in person at 2428 S.
Charles Blvd.
MODELS FOR Portfolio. Reputable
amateur photographer seeking slim
young women for portfolio photos.
Send note, photo (if available), ad-
dress, and phone for immediate rep-
ly. Paul Hronjak. ' 3015-A Wynfall
Lane. Wilson, NC 27893-9677.
NEED A PART TIME JOB?
RPSINC.
Is kmkins lor r,i kv.i rWCUK Ui hati v-aiis and
unload trailm tor (he am shitt hour, MXfcun to Ham.
S7.X)hmrr; tuition assistanu'availableattiT totiays.
lutuR'career oiijxirtiinitii in pepnkinsand manage
ment possible. Aplicationsi.an lx- rilled out at 2401
United Drlw (near Ole aquatics centerKireemillc
TUTORS NEEDED: Do you have a
3.0 or better GPA? Are you interest-
ed in becoming a tutor for the Office
of Student Development-Athletics?
We need individuals capable of tu-
toring any & all levels (0001-5999) in
the following subject areas: ACCT,
ASIP, BIOL, CHEM. CSCI DESN
ECON, EMST, GEOG, JUST, MATH,
MGMT, MKTG, PHIL, PHYS, & SOCI.
Undergraduate students are paid six
dollars an hour ($6) and graduate
students are paid seven dollars an
hour ($7). If this sounds like the job
for you or if you have any other ques-
tions, please contact Isha Williams
at 328-4691 for further information.
Covers everything needed to
connect your PC to the
internet on campus.
1yr. labor warranty &
lifetime warranty on parts.
Includes ethernet card,
cable & installation.
On-site service
PCMCIA cards $75
551-7681
CAMPUS-
computer services
x
PBLA, A non-profit organization
serving children birth to twelve years
and their families, is seeking a Direc-
tor. A minimum of an associate's de-
gree is required; a BA or BS in Child
Development or related field pre-
ferred. Duties include supervision of
staff, ensuring compliance with local
& state childcare regulations, and
long range activity planning. Salary
and Benefits are above average for
the industry and negotiable. Decem-
ber graduates are welcome and en-
couraged to apply! Please fax re-
sume' to: 252-975-0705 or mail to
PBLA, 146 Whispering Pines Rd
Washington, NC 27889. Closing
date: November 16, 1998. EOE
THE ANIMAL Emergency Clinic is
interviewing veterinary techni-
ciansassistants for full and part-
lime positions. Must be available
nights, weekends, and holidays. Sal-
ary and benefits based on experi-
ence. For more information, call 355-
3825 or stop by the clinic.
YOUTH BASKETBALL Coaches
The Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department is recruiting 12 to 16
part-time youth basketball coaches
for the winter youth basketball pro-
gram. Applicants must possess
some knowledge of the basketball
skills and have the ability and pa-
tience to work with youth. Applic-
ants must be able to coach young
people ages 7-18, in basketball fun-
damentals Hours range from 3 p.m.
until 7 p.m. with some night and
weekend coaching. This program
will run from the end of November to
mid-February. Salary rates start at
$5.15 per hour For more informa-
tion, please call Ben James or
Michael Daly at 329-4550 after 2
p.m.
EARN WHILE YOU learn, up to
$1,000.00 wk. Day and night
shifts. Clean, secure working at-
mosphere. Playmates Adult En-
tertainment. 252-747-7686 for in-
terview.
GIVE US TIME
TO REPAY
YOUR LOAN.
After just three years in
the Army, your college
loan could be a thing of
the past.
Under the Army's Loan
Repayment program, each
year you serve on active
duty reduces your indebt-
edness by one-third or
$1,500, whichever amount
is greater, up to a $65,000
limit.
This offer applies to
Perkins Loans, Stafford
Loans and certain other
federally insured loans
which are not in default
And this is just the
first of many benefits the
Army will give you. Get
the whole story from
your Army Recruiter.
756-9695
ARMY.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
www.goarmy.com
INTERNSHIP AVAILABLE in public
relations. Gain valuable experience
in public speaking and human re-
sources. Call Gerri at 355-7897.
ACCUSTAFF INCORPORATED.
Clerical positions - Current openings
for several temporary and temp-hire
positions. Hours are Monday-Friday
8-12. with some flexibility involved.
Pay ranges from $5.75-$6.50 per
hour. Graphic artist - Full-time posi-
tion available with local printing
company. Should have desktop pub-
lishing and graphic art software
knowledge. Please call to inquire or
fax resume. 502-C Red Banks Road,
Greenville. NC 27858. Phone 252-
353-8006; fax 252-353-8007.
ASTHMAALLERGIES? NEEDED:
97 people who desire immediate re-
lief to try and evaluate a new com-
pact, state- of -the -art home air pu-
rification system. No cost or obliga-
tion. Call 252-355-9248.
WZIVIB 91.3
Bring in two cans of food and
register for your chance to
win Marilyn Manson, Korn,
or Dave Matthews ticket
CUSTOMER SERVICE Representa-
tive. Bowen Cleaners is seeking de-
pendable and dedicated individuals
to fill part-time positions as custom-
er service representatives. Part-time
positions have competitive hours
and great pay. Qualified individuals
must have a positive and quality con-
scious attitude, sales personality,
and basic computer skills. Part-time
hours: 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. M-F, 8a.m.
to5 p.m. Sat.(every other weekend).
Applications will be accepted at the
Bells Fork location.
VARSITYBOOKS.COM SEEKS
student managers to direct on-cam-
pus operations for rapidly growing e-
commerce business. This paid part-
time position is ideal for innovative,
highly-motivated, exceptionally
bright, go-getters who want to prove
experience isn't everything. Call 202-
256-5048 for more'info.
LOOKING FOR a part time job? The
ECU Telefund is hiring students for
the Fall semester to contact alumni
for the ECU Annual Fund Drive
$,5.50 hour. Make your own sched-
ule. If interested, call 328-4212, M-
TH between the hours of 3-6 p.m.
LOOKING FOR a part-time job?
Help wanted at Szechuan Express in
the food court at the Plaza Day
hours from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. night
hours from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m Apply in
person No phone calls please.
FREE CD Holders, T-shirts, Prepaid
Phone Cards. Earn $1000 part-time
on campus. Just call 1-800-932-
0528 x 64
ABSOLUTE SPRING Break. "Take
2" 2 Free Trips on Only 15 Sales
andEarn $$$$. Jamaica, Cancun,
Bahamas, Florida, Padrel lowest Pric-
es! Free Meals, Parties & Drinks.
"Limited Offer 1-800-426-
7710www.sunsplashtours.com
SALES AND marketing internship.
Northwestern Mutual Life Gain valu-
able sales experience and earn good
money. Looks great on resume. Call
Jeff, 355-7700.
$1250 FUNDRAISER credit card
fundraiser for student organizations
You've seen other groups doing it,
now it's your turn. One week is all it
takes. No gimmicks, no tricks no ob-
ligation Call for information today. 1-
800-932-0528 x 65. www.ocmcon-
cepts com
PART-TIME Instructor needed Mon-
� Thurs afternoons to provide individ-
ualized instruction in a positive learn-
ing environment. Individual must be
competent in reading and math. Cer-
tified teacher preferred, but not re-
quired. Pick up application or send
resume to Sylvan Learning Center,
PO Box 1297, Kinston, NC 28503.
1999 INTERNSHIPS! Attention un-
dergraduate business students. Now
interviewing on campus for manag-
ers across Virginia. North and South
Carolina for summer of 1999. Aver-
age earnings last summer $7,000.
Call Tuition Painters at (800) 393-
4521 or e-mail at tuipaint@bell-
south.net
GREEK PERSONALS
GET READY! Pi Delta's Male Wild
N Crazy Towel Contest is only one
week away. Has your fraternity or so-
rority entered a contestant yet? Hope
to see you at the Attic next Tuesday!
Remember Greek Unity
EPSILON SIGMA Alpha congratu-
lates our new sisters! We would also
like to say what a spooktacular job
on the pledge project. We love you!
GAMMA SIGMA Sigma Nu class
pledges: your momma is so proud of
you! Keep up the good work and
thanks for the stud! Love, Terese
PI KAPPA Alpha would like to thank
Sigma Sigma Sigma for the great
time at our pre-downtown last Tues-
day. As always we hope to do it
again.
ALPHA PHI would like to congratu-
late our new sisters; Melissa Berger,
Heather Branchy. Martie Bruner.
Mary Conway, Amanda Dunn, Erica
Hartley, Becci Gift, April Honeycutt,
Wendy Hunt, Libby Jenkins, Jennifer
Johnson, Jamie McKeon, Amy
Moore, Staci Prater, Michelle Ross,
Kelley Taylor, Jessica Thomas, Mellis-
sa Wallace, Ivey Walters, Alayna
Willhite. Welcome to the sisterhood.
Love, your sisters
THE SISTERS of Alpha Xi Delta
hopes that everyone had a fun and
safe Halloween.
PHI TAU, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, and
Alpha Xi Delta, we had a great time
at the Quad Tuesday night! We can't
wait to do it again! Love, Chi Omega
ALPHA DELTA Pi would like to
thank Pi Kappa Phi for the Pre-down-
town last Wednesday! Hope we can
get together again soon.
THE PANHELLENIC Council would
like to congratulate everyone on a
successful Gamma Week, and a spe-
cial thanks to Beth Zodun for all her
hard work!
KAPPA ALPHA, Sigma Sigma Sig-
ma, and Phi Psi, glad we got to get
together last Thursday! We had a
great time! Thanks for everything.
Love, Alpha Delta Pi
CONGRATULATIONS EMILY
Greene on being pinned! We are so
happy for you and love you very
much! Love, your Alpha Delta Pi sis-
ters
DELTA CHI, thanks for the awe-
some social and the pumpkin that
you sent us. Let's do it again soon.
Love, the sisters and new members
of Alpha Xi Delta.
THE SISTERS of Alpha Xi Delta
would like to thank Sigma Alpha Ep-
silon for the awesome social and the
pumpkin that you gave us. You guys
are the best.
SISTERS OF the Week: Alpha Delta
Pi-Melissa Madsen, Chrissy Dukiet;
Alpha Phi-Ashley Phillips, Lisa Lan-
dis; Alpha Omicron Pi-Laura Kreps,
Tina Justice: Alpha Xi delta-Tiffany
Hoffman. Katrina Munday; Chi Ome-
ga-Tatum Moise; Dana Gajowski; Del-
ta Zeta-Jessica Dobbins, Heather
brown; Sigma Sigma Sigma-denise
Evans, Hilary Watson; Zeta Tau Al-
pha-Amanda Garner, Beth Wolfgang;
Pi Delta-Beth Hall. Linda Wong
CONGRATULATIONS NOAH on
representing us in the Pick-a-Pirate
contest You did a great job! Love,
Sigma Sigma Sigma
ATT: CLUBS! Raise $2,000 this
week with a CIS fundraiser. No
sales. All on campus. Call Robert to-
day, 800-567-6247!
LAMBDA CHI, thanks for the great
social. We all had a lot of fun. Love,
the sisters and new members of Al-
pha Xi Delta.
THANK YOU Sigma Sigma Sigma
and Chi Omega for working with us
on the Halloween Carnival. We had
so much fun helping to put it togeth-
er. Love, the sisters of Alpha Delta Pi
KAPPA SIGMA, we had a great
time Saturday night You showed our
new sisters a great time. Love, the
sisters of Alpha Phi
PI KAPPA Alpha. Kappa Alpha, and
Alpha Phi, we had a great time at
the Quad social with you. Hope to do
it again soon. Love, the sisters and
new members of Alpha Xi Delta.
ALPHA DELTA Pi, Kappa Alpha, and
Phi Kappa Psi - we had a great time
at the Quad Thur. night. We'll have
to do it again! Love. Sigma Sigma
Sigma
PI KAPPA Alpha would like to thank
Alpha Xi Delta for the good time at
our social on Saturday night. Hope
to do it again real soon.
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA Phi
on your victory in the flag football
championships. Love, your Alpha Phi
sisters
ALPHA PHI would like to congratu-
late Mary Conway and Melissa Berg-
er for being accepted into nursing
school and Jamie McKeon for get-
ting into therapeutic recreation.
Love, your Alpha Phi sisters
OTHER
SPRING BREAK
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Send a long self addressed stamped envelope to:
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ACT NOWI Reserve your spot
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South Padre(free meals), Cancun.
Jamaica, KeyWest, Panama City.
Group Discounts for 6. 800-838-
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SPRING BREAK 99! Cancun" Nas-
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South Padre. Travel Free and make
lots of Cash! Top reps are offered
full-time staff jobs. Lowest price
Guaranteed. Call now for details!
www.classtravel.com 800838-6411
ANNOUNCEMENTS
CAPE FEAR CanoeKayak Day
Trip Registration deadline is No-
vember 6th at 5 p.m. Member cost
is $25. (this includes everything!) For
further info, call 328-6387.
DOES THE thought of public speak-
ing panic you? Pick up some tips on
overcoming your stage fright. Tues-
day, Nov. 3 at 4 p.m. in Mendenhall
Student Center Multi Purpose Room.
GAMMA BETA Phi will hold their
next meeting at 5 p.m. Nov. 5 irk
Mendenhall Great Rooms 2 & 3.
Please come!
GENERAL COLLEGE students
should contact their advisers the
week of Nov. 2-6 to make arrange-
ments for academic advising for
Spring Semester 1999. Early registra-
tion week is set for Nov. 9-13.
LIFEGUARD TRAINING at the SCR.
Red Cross certification & CPR includ-
ed Cost covers all books, materials
and equipment. Last day to register
Nov. 4 Must attend all classes in or-
der to qualify for certification! Con-
tact 328-6387 for details. !l ;
ECU THESPIANS of Diversity pres-
ents a dramatic comedy "I've Come
Too Far" written by: Torrence Wil-
liams and Dr. Reginald Watson, star-
ring May Freeman and Ja'Maul
Brown-Johnson, Nov. 3, Mendenhall
Room 244, 7 p.m. Tickets $2
ADVISING SESSION for Pre-OT
Students will be Tuesday, November
3. 1998 in room 203 of the Berk
Building. Advising and signing of
registration forms will begin at 5:30,
please try to be prompt. If you can
not come to the Tuesday night ses-
sion, please come to the OT office,
room 306, between 8 a.m5 p.m.
the week of November 2-6.
BILLIARDS DEADLINE: anyone in-
terested in entering the billiards tour-
nament for intramurals must sign up
by Tues. Nov. 3rd in the main office
of the Student Recreation Center by
5 p.m. to be eligible. The tournament
will be held Wed. Nov. 4th at 8 p.m.
in Mendenhall lower level. For more
info, please contact 328-6387.
SMOKING CESSATION Workshop:
Thursday 3:30-5 p.m. The Center for
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering the following work-
shop on November 5th. If you are in-
terested in this program, please con-
tact the Center at 328-6661.
ALCOHOL Substance Intervention
Program (A-SIP): Thursday 3:30-6
PM. November 5th. If you are inter-
ested in this workshop, please con-
tact the Center at 328-6661.
ENHANCE YOUR climbing skills
There will be a day trip to the pinna-
cle of Pilot Mountain, Nov. 15th. Reg-
istration deadline is November 8th, 5
p.m. Member cost is $25. For further.
info, call 328-6387.
GOLDEN KEY - Don't forget our in-
duction ceremony on Saturday, Nov.
7 at 2 p.m. the reception will be in
Mendenhall Student Center.
WED NOV. 4� SENIOR RECITAL,
Tim Byrum, tuba, Willis Building
Auditorium, 7:00 P.M. WED NOV.
4- SENIOR RECITAL, Dan Miner,
tuba, Willis Building Auditorium,
9:00 P.M. THURS NOV. 5- CRE-
ATIVE ACTIVITY AWARD RECITAL
Janette Fishell, organist. Memorial
Baptist Church, 1510 Greenville Blvd.
SE Greenville, 8:00 P.M. SUN
NOV. 8- SENIOR RECITAL. Dort
Brain, piano, Willis Building
Auditorium, 3:00 P.M. SUN NOV.
8- GRADUATE RECITAL, Amy;
Banner, piano, Willis Building
Auditorium, 5:00 P.M. SUN, NOV.
8- SENIOR RECITAL. Valerie Marie
Springle, flute. Willis Building;
Auditorium, 7:00 P.M. MON, NOV.
9� GUEST RECITAL, Cassatt String
Quartet. Muneko Otani and Jennifer
Leshnower, violins, Michiko Oshima,
viola, Kelley Mikkelsen, cello,
Hendrix Theater, 8:00 P.M fa)
Ticket Information, call 252-328v
4788 or 1-800- ECU-ARTS (328-
2787).





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28-6387.
it of public speak-
k up some tips on
stage fright. Tues-
m. in Mendenhall
ilti Purpose Room.
'hi will hold their
5 p.m. Nov. 5 in
Rooms 2 & 3.
LEGE students
leir advisers the
to make arrange-
mic advising for
399. Early registra-
r Nov. 9-13.
NING at the SCR.
tion & CPR includ-
! books, materials
ist day to register
d all classes in or-
certification! Con-
Jetails.
of Diversity pres-
imedy "I've Come
by: Torrence Wil-
lald Watson, star-
in and Ja'Maul
jv. 3, Mendenhall
Tickets $2
ION for Pre-OT
lesday, November
203 of the Belk
and signing of
vill begin at 5:30,
ompt. If you can
jesday night ses-
to the OT office,
sn 8 a.m5 p.m.
iber 2-6.
iLINE: anyone in-
i the billiards tour-
rats must sign up
n the main office
reation Center by
The tournament
Jov. 4th at 8 p.m.
sr level. For more
t 328-6387.
mON Workshop:
m. The Center for
Student Develop-
e following work-
5th. If you are in-
gram, please con-
328-6661.
ince Intervention
Thursday 3:30-6
i. If you are interr
shop, please cort-
328-6661.
climbing skills
trip to the pinna-
in, Nov. 15th. Reg-
November 8th. 5
s $25. For further
jn't forget our in-
an Saturday, Nov.
:eption will be in
it Center.
SENIOR RECITAL.
Willis Building
.M. WED NOV.
rAL, Dan Miner,
ling Auditorium.
NOV. 5- CRE-
�WARD RECITAL
ganist. Memorial
0 Greenville Blvd.
00 P.M. SUN
1 RECITAL. Dofi
Willis Building
.M. SUN NOV.
RECITAL, Amy;
Willis Building
M. SUN NOV.
L. Valerie Marie
Willis Building
M. MON NOV.
L, Cassatt String
tani and Jennifer
Michiko Oshima,
ikkelsen, cello,
8:00 P.M for-
i, call 252-328v
ECU-ARTS (328-
FITNES
a-Trainer II
5:30-6:30 pmSRC C
assroom
feguard Training
5-21D7ThF 6-10 SMC
It's About
lO
ARISE
imbing Wall
11 7 - 9 pmSRC
eelchair Baskets
1114 11 am
ketball Game
noonSRC Forum
aKing worKsnop
16 7-9 pm SRC Pool
It's About
p
ADVENTURES
Backpacking Mt. Mitchell
116 8Trip Adventure Cente
Kayak Roll clinic - 2x
119 ClinicSRC Pool
Climbing Wall
1111 7-9 pm
Canoe Cape Fear - 3x
1114 Day TripAdventure Center
Climbing Pilot Mountian - 4x
1115 Day TripAdventure Center
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1116 7-9 pm SRC Pool
It's About
INTRAM URALS
Billiards Registration deadli
A 1
Ahou
113 5:00 pm SRC 128 ,
Billiards Tournament
114 8:00 pm MSC
Badminton Singles entry deadline
1110 5:00 pm SRC 128
Pirate ChaseTurkey Trot entry deadline
1117 5:00 pm SRC 128
Pirate ChaseTurkey Trot
1121 10:00 pm SRC Rotunda
KTK-r
1
5
SRC Rotunda
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES





M
1
Attention: All currently enrolled students
Call AVRS: 328-2149
Who will have access to AVRS?
Currently enrolled graduate, non-degree and undergraduate students are eligible
to rejgister using the Automated Voice Response System during the registration
period for Spring 1999 using the new telephonic system.
Do I have to use AVRS?
No. You may also register on-line in your major department, the Registrar's office,
or any open terminal.
When can I use AVRS?
Early Registration for Spring 1999 begins November 9, 1998, at 8:00 a.m. for on-
line registration and telephonic registration. Please check the Spring 1999
Schedule of Classes or the ECU Home page for the allocation of registration days
and all relevant times, dates, and deadlines.
What do I need to do before I can use AVRS?
V Take care of all obligations to the University.
V Obtain your Personal Identification Number (PIN). Without a PIN you cannot use
the system.
V Obtain your Registration Code from your adviser during advising week
(November 2-November 6). (Graduate and
non-degree students do not require a registration code.)
for more information on
AVRS
http:www.registrar.ecu.eduregistraravrshtml
Allocation of Registration Days
Graduate students, 2nd Degree Students
Nov 9 w'tn physical disabilities, registered
with Department for Disability
Support Services, & students with
75 or more semester hours credit.
Nov 10
Students with 46-74 semester
hours credit and those eligible
prior to this period.
Nov 11
Students with 1-45 semester
hours credit and those
prior to this period.
Nov 12
All students eligible.
Nov 13
All students eligible.
It Is especially important that faculty
advisers insure that students list
alternate courses rather than sections on
the course request form. Terminal
operators cannot allow students to add
courses not listed on the form since they
are not permitted to give academic
advice to students. Terminal operators
will routinely check the availability of
alternate sections when a primary
course-section request is unavailable.
What is a pin?
It's a "Personal Identification Number" (PIN) just exactly like the PIN you use aj
your bank for your Automatic Teller Machine card. It is a four to eight digit number
that you obtain over the Web.
To acquire a PIN, you must access STUDENT RECORDS & REGISTRATION on
the ECU Home Page (http:www.ecu.edu) On this page you will find STUDENT
RECORDS which indicates that it requires entry of Student ID and PIN.
Instructions for choosing, activating, and using your PIN can be found here. Upon
successful selection of a PIN, an Activation Code will be mailed to your campus e-
mail address. You must check your e-mail to retrieve your activation code.
Questions?
If you have any questions, call the Registrar's Office at (252)-328-6524; Monday
through Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Registration Terminal Locations
School
1
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1-3 Nursing 108
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of HESC
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GCB 2026





Arts & Entertainment Magazine of The East
last Carolinian m m
wmfMmmi.
Wednesday, November 4,1998
Christopher Salerno
Staff Writer
On Saturday, November 14, ECU will welcome Theatre IV's pro-
duction of The Legend of Sleepy Hollow as part of the Family
Fare scries in the Wright Auditorium. The Family Fare series
has scheduled five stage productions in this, it's ninth season.
Washington Irving's American tale, "The Legend of Sleepy
Hollow has been a classic for readers of all ages, enduring
since the early 19th century. Theatre IV and ArtReach, two of
the nations prominent traveling children's theatres, have joined
together to bring the play to stages around the country.
The classic tale was rewritten by award winning Ohio play-
wright, Kathryn Schultz Miller, especially for the audiences of
Theatre IV and ArtReach. It is performed to promote audience
participation and holds more of a comedic approach than the
original frightening tale. The performance promises to be inno-
vative and educational. While it is geared toward younger audi-
ences, it is designed with a sophistication that can be appreciat-
ed at any age.
For those of you who know about Ichabod Crane and the
Headless Horseman, this adaptation will surely shed new light
on the old classic tale. For those youngsters and others who
haven't yet experienced the story, this award winning company
will provide you with a great opportunity.
Family Fare has spared no expense in attaining Theatre IV
and ArtReach, who happen to be the 2nd largest theatre com-
pany for young audiences in the nation. Their productions are
presented to over one million children and adults across the
country. They have received numerous awards for excellence
since starting out in 1975.
On October 17, Family Fare brought in SAIL produc-
tion company, who put on Hans Christian Anderson's
classic tale "The Ugly Duckling SAIL productions is
See Family, continued on page 4
Family Fare Series
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow will kick off a series of Family Fare plays at ECU
Golden Smog
returns with
many Weird
Tales.
CD Review
fake the funk at
Peasant's
Band Review
The Princess Bride-twisted romance for everyone Video!ReviewSt. Petersburg State Academic Symphony Orchestra to xculture ECU.kridt
fountainhead � 2nd Floor Student Publications Building Greenville, NC 27858 � Phone 328-6366 � Fax 328-6558 � Advertising 328-2000 �www.fountainhead.ecu.edu





�������m
CD Review
&.
Ryan Kennemur
Senior Writer
Golden Smog
Weird Tales
8 out of 10
As super groups go, there are only a
handful of them out there that are
recognizable to the general public.
The Yardbirds, which featured the
likes of Eric Clapton, and Temple of
the Dog, the one from the early'90s
that featured such grunge-rock
heroes as Chris Cornell and Eddie
Vedder come to mind. Well, one of
the most recent super groups
spawned from from the Alternative-
Country movement, and it's called
Golden Smog.
The roster is made up of Gary
Louris and Mark Perlman of the
Jayhawks, Jeff Tweedy of Wilco, Dan
Murphy and occasionally Dave Pirner
of Soul Asylum and Kraig Johnson of
Run Westy Run. Recently, however,
the band enlisted the help of drum-
mer ody Stephens, formerly of the
roots-rock pioneers Big Star.
Their first full album called Down
on the Old Mainstream came out in
1996. It was filled to the brim with
light-handed rockers and fun
acoustic-driven down-home songs
and was met with much critical
praise. Now, in the fall of 1998, they
have returned with a sophomore
effort, Weird Tales.
With this new album the gang
returns with a new batch of songs,
but this time the styles are varied.
Each member helped pen the songs,
thus there is no real homeostasis
between the tunes.
It starts off with "To Call My
Own a song written by Dan Murphy
( nd one of the best on the disk. It
utilizes Golden Smog's talents for
sweet and sour harmonies and
Replacements-style guitar hooks to
make for a journey into sound that
picks you up from the start and gen-
try sets you back down by the end.
Next comes the one-two punch of
"Looking Forward to Seeing You and
"Until you Came Along both of
which have the perennial jayhawks
sound. In fact, Gary Louris of the
'Hawks was the one that formed
Golden Smog in the first place, and
you can really hear his influence on
this new record.
Then comes Jeff Tweedy with his
song "Lost Love which sounds as if
it could have been on a Woody
Guthrie tribute album. Other notable
Tweedy songs are "Can't Keep From
Talking" and the gloomy, acoustic
gem "Please Tell My Brother The lat-
ter deals with a man fighting in the
war and wishing he could tell his
family that he misses them. Pretty
sad.
The biggest standout of the
album is"Keysa Kraig Johnston-
penned little ditty. The song is com-
pletely different from every song the
See Golden, continued on page 3
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Amy LRoyster Editor in Chief
Heather Burgess Managing Editor
Miccah Smith Editor
Stephanie WhWixtO
Brian Williams layout
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Agents prove to be tunktastic!
Caleb Rose
Assistant Editor
Saturday night felt like a
ajaaVvjB holiday. There was fes-
aJP livity in the air but there
f.j �� was really no reason
whyexcept for the fact
that Agents of Good Roots were
throwing down at Peasant's Cafe. For
those who didn't know, Saturday was
the chosen day for everyone to set
their clocks back one hour, so
Saturday night at Peasants was festive
because everyone had an extra hour of
fun and, most of all, good music to fall
back on.
Word must have gotten out
because Peasant's had a full house
Saturday night. This surely was a plus
for Moonboot Lover, the opening band
for the evening. Moonboot Lover
Aoanti ot Good Hooti bad gnxnw it
righteously kicked things off for the
night by delivering their own special
blend of funk. rock. Usually when a
funk rock band is thought of, the mind
pictures groups such as Parliament
Funkadelic whose members usually
total over the number ten. Interestingly
enough, Moonboot Lover
delivered precise and
powerful funk despite its
mere three members
consisting of guitar, bass
and drums (commonly
known as a power trio).
After Moonboot
Lover's electric set, the
crowd began to get antsy
and was obviously enjoy-
ing their extra hour on
this night. Hoots and
hollers filled the air as
the Agents of Good Roots
set up their instruments.
Murmurs from the crowd
indicated that this show was a CD
release party but no mention of this
reached my ears otherwise during the
See Agtnts continued on page 7
Its Your Place
For A Touch of Class
FRIDAY, NOV. 6 AT 8 P.M. IN WRIGHT
AUDITORIUM
Here's a chance to go
high class on low
cash. Hear the St.
Petersburg Academic
State Symphony
Orchestra perform
Tchaikovsky's Romeo
and Juliet Fantasy
Overture and more.
Student tickets are
available at the CTO
for $15. All tickets
are $30 at the door.
To navel to The City That
Never Sleeps
No plans for Thanksgiving break? How
about taking a bite out of the Big Apple?
The ECU Student Union sjiojisjthis
annue1 pilgrimage for as little as $170.
The price includes round-trip transporta-
tion and lodging for three nights. To
reserve a spot for this steal of a trip, drop
by the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center or call 3284788
To Catch a Free Flick
NOV. 5 - 7 AT 8 P.M. AT HENORIX THEATRE
SUNDAY MATINEE AT 3 P.M.
Where in Greenville can you see a FREE blockbuster
movie AND bring a guest? Right here in Mendenhall.
This week's blockbuster: Halloween H20(r)
To Get Work Done
OPEN MONDAY-THURSDAY 8 A.M
10:45 P.M FRIDAY 8 A.M. - 11:45 P.M
SATURDAY 1 P.M. - 11:45 P.M SUNDAY 1
P.M10:45 P.M.
Work doesn't have to bewellwork.
Not when you have a state-of-the-art facility at your
fingertips. Located on the ground floor, the comput-
er lab at Mendenhall features Pentium-based com-
puters. Power Macs, and color and laser printers.
And there's always an assistant ready to help you.
To Catch a Ride
If you have trouble getting where you need to go for
weekends or holidays, check out the RideRider
Board at the foot of the stairs in the lower levelat
Mendenhall Student Center.
To Roll a Few
MONDAY MADNESS - Give your Monday a boost
from 1-6 p.m. with 50-cent bowling (shoe rental
included) at the Outer Limitz bowling alley.
MSC Hours: MonThurt 8 a.m -11 p.m Fri 8 a.mMidnight; Sat Noon-Midnight; Sun 1-11 p.m.


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19
2 Wednesday, November 4,1998





Russian Symphony to perform at Wright Auditorium
Nina M. Dry
I Staff Writer
5
Mark your calendars
because on Friday,
November 6 at 8:00
3R' p.m the S.Rudolph
Alexander Performing Arts Series
brings to you the St. Petersburg State
Academic Symphony Orchestra at
Wright Auditorium.
Their name has recently been
changed from St. Petersburg State
Symphony Orchestra. According to
marketing director of the University
Unions Carol Woodruff, this was a
new distinction of honor given to the
orchestra.
"The Symphony was awarded the
highest honor by the Russian
Federation for Artistic Excellence
Woodruff said.
The St. Petersburg State Academic
Symphony Orchestra was founded in
1967. For over 25 years, it has per-
Wright Auditorium will host the St. Petersburg State Academic Symphony Orchestra Nov. 6
formed concerts throughout Russia
and all over the world, causing the
orchestra to receive enormous popu-
lar acclaim.
"It has been said that the St
Petersburg State Academic Symphony
Orchestra is the best orchestra in
Russia said Dr. Jo Ann Bath, a profes-
sor in the School of Music.
The orchestra has passed through
a variety of phases, but has formed its
own distinguished style, building a
dedicated following of fans and gain-
ing its own diverse repertoire. This
repertoire acknowledges the impor-
tance of cultural activities linking the
different ages of music
The renowned orchestra includes
&&come a mem
Launch your
organization
in-to oyber&p
r.
www.
clubhouse.
acu.adu
a string quartet, a wind
quintet and a string orches-
tra. They will perform an
all-Tchaikovsky program
including"Romeoand
Juliet Fantasy Overture the
"Concerto for Violin and
Orchestra in D Major, Op.
35" and "Symphony No. 5
in E minor, Op. 64
"The opportunity for peo-
ple to hear all three pieces
at one time is very rare,
incredibly special and not
to be missedBath said.
'For Romantic music lovers,
this will be the epitome of a wonder-
ful concert
"This should be the most out-
standing music program of the yean'
said ECU music professor Charles
Bath.
The orchestra is currently headed
by professor Ravil Martynov, a talent-
ed representative of the St. Petersburg
Conducting School. Martynov was
born in 1946 in Leningrad, Russia
and studied at the Leningrad and
Moscow State Conservatories.
Martynov was named Artistic
Director of St. Petersburg Radio and
TV Folk Orchestra in 1971. In 1973,
he was chief conductor of the St.
Petersburg Theatre of the Musical
Comedy until 1980. From there he
went on to become chief conductor at
various locales such as the Perm
Academic Opera and Ballet Theatre,
the Kirov Theatre, the Buryatia
Academic Opera and Ballet Theatre
and the Moscow Academic Theatre of
Classical Ballet.
Tickets are on sale now at the cen-
tral ticket office in the Mendenhall
Student Center. Prices are $15 for
ECU students and youth, $25 for ECU
staff and faculty and $30 for the gen-
eral public.
For more ticket information call
the ticket office at 328-4788 or
1-800-ECU-ARTS.
Golden, continued from page 2
band has ever done because it fuses rock, soul, and jazz. It sounds like a jazzed-
up Van Morrison tune.
The rest of the disk is standard pop fare, complete with hooks galore and
bittersweet harmonies. The whole thing ends with the Louris-penncd "Jennifer
Save Me This one is just plain weird, complete with a sonic-sounding whistle
in the background and Louris singing"oooooh" in between every line of the
song. It's not the song I would have ended with, but hey, I'm not in that band.
This disk is indeed worth listening to. If you like it, I highly suggest you go
and pick up their debut album. It's a lot more solid and light-hearted than this
one, and indeed it was more about having fun than making records.
answers to Tuesday's East Carolinian Crossword
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Wednesday, November 4,1998 3





Video Review
4
Princess Bride-a romantic classic?
Mm flk Miccah Smithsized music men in masks, political(hissss!) and Wallace Shawn as evil"Rodents of Unusual
mm Fountainhead Editorintrigue, shrieking eels, kitsch, and,incarnate with a lisp, and you've gotSize? I don't think
��Jmof course, true love!to see this movie just for the rawthey east
If you haven't seen it, there's noBelieve it or not, Bride's been aroundstar-per-capita ratioNever go in against
excuse. If you don't quote it, you'refor 11 years now! That's enough toCelebrity cameos also abound witha Sicilian when death
not an American. If you don't list itmake me feel old! It's always fun tothe likes of Fred Savage, Billyis on the line! A-ha-
as one of your top ten favoritewatch the willowy Robin Wright inCrystal, Carol Kane, Peter Falk andha-ha
movies of all time, you're probably aher first cinematic role as Buttercup,Mel Smith.If it's been awhile
guy-and to sigh over the still-hunky CaryThe scenery is fake, but the charac-since you've seen this
That's right girls, I'm talking aboutElwes as Wesdy again and again.ters aren't. Back when movies weredassic, get your buds
The Princess Bride, only one of theAndre' the Giant costars as Fezzik, amovies, special effects took a back-together with a few
most watched, most beloved andhired assassin who refuses to assas-seat to acting. Rob Reiner's directionpints of Ben and
most quoted movies of our genera-sinate. His buddy, the vengeful andbrought together a strange brew ofJerry's and plop
tion. This movie's got it all:alcoholic Inigo Montoya, is a slim-upcoming and established talent indown on the couch.
romance, torture, sudden death,mer, younger Mandy Patinkin. Adda way that no one else's ever could.One of your female
Rodents of Unusual Size, death-Chris Sarandon as the sour-faced.And who can forget the dassicfriends is bound to own
defying battle scenes, cheesy synthe-lily-livered Prince Humperdink"famous last words"?a copy.
Gianti. Wizards and Six-fingered Man. oh my!
Now Showing
Carmikel2
1685E.FiretowerRd.
$4 until 5:30 p.m.
Antz 2:15,4:30,7,9:15
Practical Magic 2,4:20,7,9:20
What Drams May Come 1:30,
4:15,7,9:45
AMightattheRaxbury 1,3:05,
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Beloved 1,4:30,8
Fieasantville 1,3:45,7,9:40
Rush Hour 1504:25,7,9:30
Vampires 1:45,4:20,7,9:30
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Buccaneer
275 Arlington Blvd.
Slat all times
Em After 7,9:45
SatSun. matinees at 1:15,4
Dead Man on Campus 7:15,9:20
SaLSun. matinees at 1,3:05,5:10
Knockqff 7,9Sat.Sun.matineesat
1,3,5
Carolina East
Cinema
Carolina East Convenience Ctr.
$4 until 5:30 p.m.
Something About Mary 7,9:35
SatSun. matinees at 1:45,4:20
Ronin 7,9:40 SaUSun. matinees at
1:15, 4
Halloween H20 7,9
Sat.Sun. matinees at 1,3,5
Blade 7,9:30 SatSun. matinees at
2,4:30
Family, continued from page 1
also one of the leading childrens'
musical companies in the nation who
utilize the dassic stories of some of
the worid's most renowned writers
such as Anderson, The Brothers Grim,
Mark Twain, Jonathan Swift and oth-
ers.
The ECU Family Fare will feature
these and other highly recognized
names in childrens' theatre through-
out its ninth season. The series is fea-
turing five live-action Saturday mati-
4MMnudaKNmmto4,
neesforthe 1998-1999 season. The
remaining shows for the season arc:
77ie Legend of Sleepy Hollow on
November 14,1998, The Adventures
of Corduroy on February 20,1999
and The House at Pooh Corner on
March 13,1999.
All Family Fare performances will
start at 2 pm in Wright Auditorium. To
purchase tickets, call or visit the
Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center. Ticket prices are $9
general ,$8 ECU facultystaff and$5

HC has teamed up
with Barnes and Noble
to bring book reviews to
Wednesday's Fountainhead
in our new program
Carolinian
Ronald
We are looking far fellow book lovers to
Hf read and review best sellers for a good
cause. Each Semester we will donate these
best sellers to the Ronald McDonald House
where they will be available for the family
members of terminally ill children to read.
If you would like to write a review
please call Miccah at 328-6366







horoscopes
ARIES:
(March 21-April 20)
It's a great week to improve relation-
ships, particularly within the family.
This may be the opportune time to
reach out to someone who looks up
to you, possibly a child. Be alert to
all money opportunities, postponing
any major decisions for now.
TAURUS:
(April 21 -May21)
You are looking and feeling your
best, so use this positive energy to
your advantage � get out and accom-
plish things. Communications with
others go well - you are a mind-
reader with all around you. Tensions
elsewhere may find you taking it out
on a loved one.
GEMINI:
(May 22-June 21)
Make it a point of getting chores
and errands out of the way earlier,
because it looks like rest, relaxation
and partying is in store for later. Be
aware of the helpful insights sur-
rounding you, rapid advancement at
work may be a result of heeding
suggestions.
CANCER:
(June 22-Jury 23)
Personal financial planning is
favored. Your intuition is sharpened
concerning money matters. You may
run into an intense blow-out with a
mate or lover - keep your cool,
things will straighten out rather
quickly. Spend some time by your-
self.
LEO:
(Jury 24-August 23)
It will be a busy week for you. Hard
work on your part will bring you
closer to your career and personal
goals. Be supportive of family mem-
bers, someone is going through a
tough time. Resolve financial con-
cerns you have now, before things
get out of hand.
VIRGO:
(August 24 - September 23)
You are eager to help out wherever
needed, but avoid those who manip-
ulate your actions. Be sure that your
efforts go to a good cause. Enjoy a
break from the routine for a couple
days. Luck will find you with extra
dollars you weren't expecting at all.
LIBRA:
(September 24 - October 23)
You are ready to conquer any obsta-
cles this week. It may not be a bad
idea to spend some time alone,
because your criticisms of others
may get you in deep water. It's hard
to concentrate, and daydreaming
won't hurt - unconscious messages
have practical value.
SCORPIO:
(October 24 - November 22)
This week finds you in tune with
your lover or mate, which makes for
great fun and accomplishments for
the next several days. It looks quite
favorable for you to move closer to
your goals. If people at work-don't
argue with you, they will argue
around you- keep a low profile.
SAGITTARIUS:
(November 23 - December 21)
You need to get away from your hec-
tic routine to be alone with your
thoughts. Be confident of success in
business dealings. Avoid any
unpleasant financial surprises by
going over matters to dear up any
discrepancies. You can reach a meet-
ing of minds with opponents.
CAPRICORN:
(December 22 - January 20)
A friend challenges you to break out
of your shell and promote yourself
for advancement. Maybe it's time -
trust yourself and you'll be happier
in the long run. A great career
opportunity presents itself, and
you'll move ahead without upsetting
anyone.
AQUARIUS:
(January 21 - February 19)
Ifs hard to avoid confrontations.
Someone you have recently
befriended may turn on you. It'll be
better to remain silent than be
drawn into unnecessary arguments.
Travel is favored for the next several
weeks. If involved in litigation,
expect to win.
PISCES:
(February 20-March 20)
Career advancement seems effort-
less, so pursue your most cherished
goal. Co-workers will welcome your
great ideas. It may be a good idea to
spend a little bit of time on your
own, getting back in touch with
yourself. Resolve differences that are
putting distance between you and a
loved one.
Birthday This Week:
You usually prefer to follow the logi-
cal path rather than trusting your
intuition. However, your intuition
can enhance your accuracy about
situations when you team it with
reason. Whether you admit it or not,
you have experienced intense psy-
chic moments, which may make you
a bit uneasy.
Horoscope by Miss Anna
Things to
Downtown
4 Wednesday
Comedy Zone at The Attic:
5 Thursday
Breakfast Club at The Attic
lllphonicScrapNotchFaceoff at Backdoor
7 Saturday
Crimescene13StationsMommyheads
Anti Enemy Soldiers at Backdoor
Jump Little Children at The Attic
8 Sunday
Open Mic night at Peasant's
Groove Riders at the Courtyard
Tavern
9 Tuesday
Studio 54 night at The Attic
Wednesday, November 4,1998 5





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mgtms uuiilMM8fr
wee lime
November
4 Wednesday
-Sundance Cinema: Swicife W�igs at 8
p.m. in Hendrix
-Chew on This noon lecture in the
MSC Underground
-Pirate Underground at 8 p.m. in the
MSC Social Room
-TBA at The Cave in Chapel Hill
-The Heartdrops, Crash Cadillac at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill
-Rancid, Hepcat at Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro
5 Thursday
Halloween H20 at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
- Creative Activity Award Recital, fea-
turing Janette Fishell, organist, at 8
p.m. at Memorial Baptist Church
-Back Seat Driver at The Cave in
Chapel Hill
-The Strangemen, Spectator Pump,
Jack Black at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
6 Friday
-Halloween H20& 8 p.m. in Hendrix
-St. Petersburg State Symphony
Orchestra at 8 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium
-Exhibition: Out of the Shadow:
Photobased art from the Baltics, lec-
ture by Peeter Linnap at 7:30 p.m. in
Speight Auditorium
-Ladyfinger at The Cave in Chapel Hill
-Dave Spencer Group CD release
party at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
-Jonathan Brooke at Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro
7 Saturday
-HalloweenH20at 8p.m.in Hendrix
-Grasshopper Highway at The Cave in
Chapel Hill
-Smithwick Machine, The 440's,
Eugene Swank & Atomic Honky-Tonk
at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
-The Rachels at Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro
8 Sunday
-Halbween H20 at 3 p.m. in Hendrix
-TBA at The Cave in Chapel Hill
-C-Average at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
-Sunny Day Real Estate at Cat's Cradle
in Carrboro
9 Monday
-Cassatt String Quartet Guest Recital
at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
-John Svara at The Cave in Chapel Hill
-Silver Scooter, Tiara at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill
-Modest Mouse at Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro
10 Tuesday
-The Jonothan Byrd Band at The Cave
in Chapel Hill
-Ladybug at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
Ashley Olsen: those rosy lips, that perky
smile, that "Friends" haircut
She must be one spunky little
bundle o'trouble!
In
and
Out
Mary Kate Olsen: oh, please! Put
down that lipstick! Don't you know
youH be a bag-lady the minute you
hit puberty?
Irs painfully obvious youH never
measure up to your sister
Sweden: Travel Adventure Films
November 3rd in Irendrix Theatre it 4 and 7 pm
For a good time call
the ECU Sludenl Union Hotline at 252.328.6004,
or visit our website at www.ecu.edustudentunion.
USM@Um FBILM8
smiDEKims
Halloween H20
"JDAV NOVEM . M 3 PM
'
A Sense of Place
an interactive computer art show,
exhibiting in the Mendenhall Gallery this month
T TVF 1WT T W the P1RATE UNDERGROUND
11 Lj lVlJ01V� lertainmenl and refreshment
WJih-J.i l
MenJenhall StuJent Cei
hxWbuate wt� roquira iccommoctotWn unim ADA thotid
a � Dtpwtrnwtf for tMubUy Support Swvcm �t 252 328 4602,
twty-wcjn houn prior to tw start of ft program
fwcdrjNorwIlrrlKmftxicQntatt MenrJtnhalt SMM Cwtet, Eut 0MM VfmwHf.Qmnm,NC
27858 -4353. or ctf 252 328.4788, ft froe at 1 800 EClMRTS, or TOO 252.328.4736, 8:30 am � 6 pm. Monrfty - Fndiy






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ODDITIES
Environmentalists Hit Global
Trade Chief With Cream Pies
GENEVA (AP) About 20 environ-
mentalists threw cream pies Friday
at the chief of the World Trade
Organization.
WTO Director-General Renato
Ruggiero had just given a speech at
the Royal Institute of International
Affairs in London when the pies
flew. More than one hit Ruggiero,
said WTO spokesman Keith
Rockwell.
"When they have no more rational
arguments, the fringe elements have
to use cake Ruggiero said in a
one-sentence statement from his
Geneva headquarters. In his speech,
he had been defending a WTO
decision to overturn US. attempts to
protect endangered sea turtles from
shrimp fishermen. A group calling
itself the Biotic Baking Brigade later
issued a
statement saying its pie throwers
sent "a sticky message to Ruggiero
and the global elite: To those who
wish to dominate the world, the
world repliesLet them eat
humble pie
Someone from the group
approached Ruggiero with what
appeared to be a present, Rockwell
said, "but I told him to get out of the
way?'
"Then one guy shoved the pie hard
into his face and another brought a
second down on top of his head
accusing him of being a turtle-kufer,
Rockwell said.
Rockwell, who was by Ruggiero's
side, expressed concern about the
"very threatening and hostile" attack
on the 69-year-old Ruggiem
The WTO drew the ire of
environmental groups two weeks
ago by ruling that the United States
cannot force shrimp-exporting
countries to fit their fleets with $75
devices that protect turtles.
Rockwell said Ruggiero, who
received heavy bodyguard protection
when he was Italy's trade minister in
the 1980s, was "extraordinarily
calm
"The first thing he said wasThis is
not a bad cake Rockwell told The
Associated Press. The flavor of the
pie wasn't known, he said.
No police or guards were present.
Ruggiero wasn't hurt in the attack
and police weren't called, said
George loffe, acting director of the
institute.
A person claiming to be a member
of the Biotic Baking Brigade slapped
Nobel Prize-winning economist
Milton Friedman in the face with a
coconut cream pie in San Francisco
on Oct. 9. That pie-thrower was
arrested for misdemeanor battery
and released.
In February, pranksters in Brussels,
Belgium, hit Microsoft Corp.
chairman Bill Gates wim three pies.
Procter & Gamble chairman John
Pepper was pied less than two weeks
later in Columbus, Ohio, by animal
rights activists.
Last November, designer Oscar de la
Renta was hit with a tofu cream pie
while signing autographs at a
shopping mall in suburban
Portland, Ore.
Agents, continued from page 2
evening. The large merchandise booth
with a variety of Agents CDs, T-shirts
and other paraphernalia did hint that
this could have very well been a release
party as the floating rumors suggested.
A few minutes of silence
allowed one last chance to grab a brew
before the music started. The soothing
Barry White-ish voice of singer
Andrew Winn comforted the crowd
and eased them into the grooves that
they began to lay down.
The opening song set the
mood. Winn was playing an electric
piano, a deviation from his usual gui-
tar, however no other blueprint of
instruments could have been better for
the material played. The foursome con-
sisted of piano, bass, saxophone and
drums. All of the musicians have had
formal training and definitely have a
jazzsoul background.
The evening pressed on and
the grooves wore deeper into the souls
of the crowd. It was like a journey into
an evening of smooth love. Everyone
was feeling the music (among other
things) and everyone was gathered
together for this love of good music.
More songs soulfully
passed through the air. The crowd sang
along to the old songs the Agents chose
and the new ones were taken into their
hearts. It was a groovin' evening and it
certainly will be a long time before the
grooves wear out.
(Mi
Your Weekly Gossip Fix
Paul McCartney calls on
women to check for
breast cancer
LONDON (AP) Sir Paul
McCartney said Monday that
every woman should make
screening for breast cancer a pri-
ority.
"Unfortunately in Linda's case,
we really got to it too late
McCartney said during an inter-
view on ITN television.
Linda McCartney died in April at
the McCartney family's Arizona
ranch after suffering from breast
cancer. She was 56.
Although we had two-and-a-
half years of treatment it really
turned out to be nothing much
we could have done about it the
former Beatles star said.
His interview coincided with the
release of Wide Prairie, an album
of solo songs recorded by Linda
McCartney over the last 25 years.
1' Even though you think you
may be being a bit too fussy, or
even though the doctor tells you
you're being a bit too fussy, it's
worth getting it checked, because
the sooner you get to it the more
they can do about it McCartney
said.
BY THE THOUSANDS, SCANTLY-
CLAD PRETEEN WANNABES LINED A
MIDTOWN MANHATTAN BLOCK
NEW YORK (AP) What they
want what they reauy, realh want
is to play their favorite Spice Girl
in an upcoming commercial.
By the thousands, scantily-clad
preteen wannabes lined a mid-
town Manhattan block Tuesday
dressed as their favorite Spke
Baby, Scary, Sporty and fbsh. No
Gingers, thank you. She quit the
group earlier this year.
Producers of an upcoming set of
crjnunercials hawking a fine of
dotts and other Spice-rebped
merchandise were looking for
one set of girls, ages 5-12, to por-
tray the foursome.
The competition in the line of
platform shoes, rub-off tattoos,
bare midriffs and phony navel
rings that circled Roseland
Ballroom was downright fierce.
One 9-year-old Scary Spice imita
tor, sporting
oversized
plastic green
glasses and a
hairspray-
aided hairdo,
coolly sur-
veyed a rival
With childlike
honesty, she
remarked,
"You look
nothing like
her.
The response was immediate, and
with a faux British accent.
" Well, Scares-me-Spke, I can
sing, I can dance, I can act Well
see what they say inside
The mothers of the children
could offer only wane smil
There was little fear of embar-
rassment, however, asrfl around
them, hopefuls me In their own
The real "Wwwabees
Spice Worlds.
Mothers coached daughters, girls
rehearsed dance steps, fathers
looked at watches and at the line
ahead.
Elsa Figone, 10, visiting New York
from Rome, was among a group
that offered an impromptu rendi-
tion of " Wannabe the
Spice Girls breakout
hit. Elsa doesn't know
much English, but she
knew the words, if not
necessarily the mean-
ing
"If you wanna be my
lover, you gotta get with
rny friends the girls
sang.
Others weren't quite as
well versed.
" Honestly, I don't know Baby
Spice from heather Spke said
Bill Sanger, whose 7-year-old
daughter, Brittany, was clearly
embarrassed by her dad's faux
pas of getting the names wrong
" Oh dad blond pony-tailed
Brittany said, covering her eyes.
Please,natsoloud
ww
weekly top hits
15. Crumb "It
14. Jim's Big Ego
"Big Whoop"
13. My Superhero
"Groovy"
12. Fighting Gravity
"Bend the Light"
11. Cardigans "My
Favourite Game"
10. Wes
Cunningham "i
Gees"
9. GhotiHook
"Walking on
Sunshine"
8. Once Hush
"Whatever Feels
Right"
7. Jump Little
Children "Come Out
Clean"
6. Cowboy Mouth
"Whatcha Gonna
Do?"
5. Soul Coughing
"Rollin"
4. Halloween
Hootenany
3. Kid Rock
"Cowboy"
2. Zebrahead "The
Real Me"
1. KonTGotthe
LhV
V
A
WMnesday. November 1998 7





Go to our webJ)gat AAvvyJ�ecu.eduBilTCK on the calendar link.
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Or if you want a sTrortculfpeww into your browser.
Then just enter your event onto our campus calendar.
It's just that easy. And it's one more free service of The East Carolinian.
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 3, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 03, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1302
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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