The East Carolinian, October 29, 1998







Thursday:
High: 74
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Online Survey
www.tec.ecu.edu
"Have you ever seen an instance of police
brutality?"
'Should NATO engage in airstnkes against Kosovo?"
Carolinian
Alcohol
Awareness
Week
encourages safe
Halloween.
Features, page i
55 Yes 45 No
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29 ,1998 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 19
Clayton leads
Social Security
Reform panel
Congresswoman Eva Clayton speaks at the Willis Building.
PHOTO BY JENNIFER MASON
Forum includes Greenville mayor;
discusses future of retirement
reermlk prepares
i:nii'RH Mason
stAfi white
Congresswoman Eva Clayton, 1st District representa-
tive to the House of Representatives, led a Social
Security reform forum Tuesday in the Willis
Building.
The purpose of the forum was to discuss concerns
about Social Security with citizens and to inform them
of what changes are taking place. Panelists included
Nancy Jenkins, mayor of Greenville; Fred Lilley, dis-
trict manager of the Greenville branch of Social
Security Administration; Tom Rogers, regional coor-
dinator of the Concord Coalition; and Eaddy Roe,
Southeastern regional director of Economic Security
2000.
"Social Security is a valuable commodity and a
commitment on the part of the government Clayton
said. "People count on it to be there for them when
retirement comes around, and if things stay the way
they are, the people are in for a shock
Money will be available for those who are present-
ly close to retirement and for baby boomers.
However, there are so many baby boomers that peo-
ple retiring forty years from now will not receive full
benefits.
"The only way the current college students will
get the full social security benefits rather than the pro-
jected 75 percent is if the money being collected now
is invested in stocks, bonds, mutual funds or some
othet interest bearing investment Roe said.
Social Security Was created 60 years ago by
www.tec.ecu.edu
Police from surrounding
counties help keep order
SlSANNK. Mil. K N K K V I i: II
SI All" WHITER
As Halloween quickly approaches, police and
campus organizations arc making preparations
to keep Saturday night safe.
The Greenville Police Department (GPD)
will team up with other police departments
and associations to avoid situations that have,
in the past, resulted in violence.
"The Greenville Police Department is
working closely with ECU, the Downtown
Area Association of Restaurants and Taverns,
highway patrol, and the sheriff to keep the
streets safe said Melissa Bartlett, GPD Public
Affairs Coordinator.
The GPD will use the Mutual Aid
Agreement to draw extra law enforcement offi-
cers to Greenville. Officers from the ECU,
Winterville, Farmvillc and Washington police
departments as well as the Pitt County Sheriffs
Department will help with crowd control
Saturday.
"There will be 120 law enforcement officers
in the downtown area as well as some K-9
units Bartlett said.
Bartlett said that in 1988, police were forced
to tear gas unruly crowds on I Ialloween.
"It was just a matter of crowd control
Bartlett said. "The number of people got out of
hand and the police department wasn't able to
control the crowd
Representatives from the Student
Government Association (SGA) will mix with
the crowd downtown to watch out for hot spots.
They will alert the GPD of any potential prob-
lems.
Bartlett said that the GPD is preparing for a
Students spill into Fifth Street during last year's Halloween. Police will cordon off streets according to the size of the crowd.
PHOTO BY STEVE10SEY
larger crowd and will make its decisions on
what streets to block off as the night pro-
gresses and crowds grow.
"There will also be a traffic check point to
check for drunk driving Bartlett said. "But
the location will not be released
The GPD will also receive the help of the
ECU Police Department (ECUPD) on
Saturday night.
"We will start beefing up on Friday said
Tom Younce, assistant director of ECUPD.
There will be three additional ECU
police officers patrolling throughout campus
on Friday night and nine additional officers
on Saturday night. Another six ECU police
officers will pair up with Greenville police
officers in the downtown area as a part of the
Mutual Aid Agreement.
Younce said that this addition of officers is
no different than what the department has
done in previous years, even though larger
SEE HALLOWEEN PAGE 8
President Franklin D. Roosevelt to be one part of a
three-legged retirement plan. The other two parts are
pension and savings. However, most families today
find it difficult to save their money because the cost
of living is too high.
"It's hard to save money in today's society
Rogers said. "People save what little they have left of
their paychecks after they pay their bills and the gov-
ernment, but then something comes along and the
money they have saved has to go towards that. The
old system simply doesn't work anymore. That's why
we have reform discussions such as this one
Faircloth, Heston tour
clinics in Jenkins Center
- impressed by what they saw said
SmatOr, aCtOr CallfOr Phyllis DeAntonio, administrator
j of the Jenkins Center. "The center
mOTe research money is state of the art and we do have a
lot going on about breast cancer
Spot to expand in Mendenhall
Work begins after new
dining hall complete
Jason Ziebart
staff writer
Fhe dining hall in Mendenhall
vill be used for expansion of The
jpot and entertainment provided
jy the Student Union after the
ew West Campus dining hall is
juilt.
The area where the dining hall
is now will provide entertainment
and more space for students. A
stage, sound system and lighting
will be provided for whatever form
of entertainment the Student
Union comes up with in the future.
"Right now the Student Union
Stk Ldsev
NEWS EDITOR
Sen. Lauch Faircloth and actor
Charlton Heston toured the facili-
ties of the Leo Jenkins Cancer
Center Monday.
Longtime
friends, Faircloth
and Heston have
been visiting sites
around North
Carolina and
about
cancer,
and
Dining services will move to the West End dining hall.
PHOTO BY JASON FEATHER
holds the Pirate Underground,
where up and coming bands can
play Mendenhall Director Bill
Clutter said. "There could be
events like that
According to Frank Salamon,
director of dining services, the Spot
SEE MENDENHALL PAGE 3
speaking
breast
Faircloth
Heston toured the
medical oncology
clinic, where can-
cer patients
receive
chemotherapy, and
the radiation
oncology clinic,
where patients get radiation thera-
py-
"Faircloth and Heston were
research
For years, both Faircloth and
Heston have donated their time
and services to help the cause of
breast cancer.
"Senator Faircloth has been
very supportive of breast cancer
DeAntonio said.
Heston's wife,
I ,ydia, is a breast
cancer survivor,
and Faircloth
was one of the
co-sponsors of
the breast cancer
stamp. Each 40
cent stamp sold
raises eight cents
for breast cancer
research.
"The senator
was instrumental
in getting the
stamp passed
Murphy said.
Over eight
million have been sold so far.
At the Jenkins Center, Faircloth
talked about the stamp and the
"Faircloth and Heston
were impressed by what
they saw. The center is
state of the art and we do
have a lot going on about
breast cancer research
Phyllis DeAntonio
Administcalor ot the Jenkins Cemei
Charlton Heston at the Jenkins Center.
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMBER
importance of raising money for
breast cancer research. Heston
spoke about his wife being diag-
nosed with breast cancer.
After leaving the Jenkins
Center, Faircloth and Heston trav-
eled to NC State. Faircloth hon-
ored over 70 businesses who have
committed to use the stamp to help
raise money. Tuesday, Faircloth
and I leston met w ith breast cancer
survivors in Charlotte to congratu-
late them on their recovery.





3 Thundiy, C
2 Thunday, October 29. 1998
The East Carolinian
.
br JLr Congressional Candidates r r
in the November 3rd elections r
Eva Clayton
(D) District 1
On health care- "I support the recommendation to provide health care to
those moving from welfare to work. We cannot insure adequate health
care for every American if we won't even continue adequate health care
for elderly Americans. It makes no sense to destroy the Medicare program
in a blind and visionless march towards a balanced budget
On tobacco legislation- "Congress must ensure that any federal agree-
ment provides sufficient resources to help tobacco farmers make whatever
transition is required. We have made a significant beginning in deterring
children from smoking, but much more remains to be completed before
any agreement is finalized
On student loans- "(Congressl has designed (HOPE Scholarships, which
will give every single American the chance to go to college. These scholar-
ships are designed to make two years of college as universal as a high
school education is today
On health care- "The government should stay out of the medical prac-
tice. A person should be able to go to whatever medical doctor he or she
feels comfortable with, not who the government sends them to. Every doc-
tor's office is a private unit in the free enterprise system. I say, let (the
doctor call the shots. Let him say, 'I want you to go see this guy
On tobacco legislation- "The government has wasted too many years on
the taxing of tobacco. A tax on tobacco would be devastating for North
Carolina. It should not be taxed out of existence by the government The
government ought to keep its greedy hands off tobacco. "
On student loans- "I couldn't have gone to school without student loans.
I think the money should be more spread out (Right now, 90 percent of
the money goes to 50 percent of the students
Jon Williams
(D) District 3
Ted Tyler
(R) District 1
crtrck
SCenB
Belk Hall was
issued a state
citation for pos-
session of drug
paraphernalia.
October 25, 1998
2:00 pm - A student reported
the larceny of his bicycle from the
bike racks southeast of Minges
Coliseum.
October 26, 1998
12:24 am - A resident of
Greene Hall was issued a campus
appearance ticket after drug para-
phernalia was found in her room
during a consent search.
10:47 am - A staff member in
Financial Services reported
receiving a bomb threat for the
General Classroom Building. A
building search was conducted
with negative results.
2:00 pm - A resident of
Fletcher Hall reported the larce-
ny of her purse from her room.
2:55 pm - A student was trans-
ported to PCMH by Greenville
Rescue after she tripped south of
the General Classroom Building.
3:19 pm - A resident of
Fletcher Hall reported the larce-
ny of money from her wallet. The
incident occurred in her room.
4:47 pm - A resident of Belk
Hall reported the larceny of his
vehicle from north of Belk Hall.
The vehicle was last seen being
towed by a pickup truck.
5:15 pm - A female student of
Belk Hall was served a criminal
summons for a worthless check.
8:06 pm - A male student of
8:22 pm - A
student report-
ed the larceny of his keys from a
locker at Scales Fieldhouse.
October 27, 1998
10:00 am - A resident of White
Hall reported the larceny of his
wallet, gold watch, and gold
necklace from his room.
10:11 am - A faculty member
reported the larceny of her 25th
anniversary black and gold clock
from her office. The clock was
presented to her by Chancellor
Richard Eakin.
4:17 pm - A resident of Greene
Hall reported receiving harassing
phone calls in her room from an
unknown male caller.
10:00 pm - A student was
arrested at the police department
on a failure to appear warrant.
10:25 pm - Two students
reported the larceny of their ball
caps, a sweatshirt, two ECU One
Cards, and dorm keys from an
unlocked locker in the
Recreation Center.
October 28, 1998
2:55 am - A student was arrest-
ed after officers discovered him
and another person smoking mar-
ijuana in the amphitheater west
of Fletcher Hall. The other indi-
vidual refused to give and identi-
fication and ran when confronted
by officers. Charges are pending
identification of second subject.
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Walter Jones
(R) District 3
On health care- "I support affordable health care and believe we need to
protect Medicare and Medicaid. We particularly need to work on rural
health care issues in eastern North Carolina, including preserving access to
health care
On tobacco legislation- "Tobacco has been an important industry in our
state for a long time, but the days of federal price supports are numbered.
I will work for timely buyouts of quotas to help our farmers invest in
other crops
On student loans- "The combination of student loans and part-time jobs
enabled me to get my education. In many cases student loans provide the
only opportunity for students in eastern North Carolina to further their
education beyond high school, and for that reason I strongly support the
federal student loan program
On health care- "This session, I supported the Patient Protection Act,
because it focuses on accessibility, affordability, and accountability.The bill
would require basic patient protections, create more choices and greater
accessibility, and hold insurance companies accountable so that our
nation's patients receive affordable, quality health care
On tobacco legislation- "As a representative of the Third District, I have
never stopped fighting to protect the local farmer and the hardworking
American citizen from increased taxes. This year, Congress rejected
Senator John McCain's tobacco tax bill. And as long as 1 am in Congress,
you have my commitment that I will never stop working to make sure
there is no new tobacco tax and that tobacco farmers and their families are
protected
On student loans- "This congress passed the Taxpayer Relief Act of
1997, which allows families the opportunity to receive a $1,500 credit for
the first two years of a child's post-secondary education, or a $1,000 tax
credit for any year of a child's post-secondary education
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3 Thunday, October 29, 1998
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Mendenhall
continued from page 1
will be moved to the dining area to
allow more space. Salamon said
that the old location of the Spot
will most likely be knocked down
and used as an easier way to get to
the new food court area.
Salamon called the plans "pre-
liminary
"Mendenhall cannot handle
the number of students in that area
of the campus said Al Matthews,
vice chancellor of Student Life.
Over the past few years,
Mendenhall has seen a few minor
renovations such as better lighting
and a partition that hid the dish
washing area. However, nothing
has been done to help with the
congestion of students.
"Once we move out of
Mendenhall dining hall we can
start work Salamon said. "We will
create some form of a food service
programming space with a type of
food court
Matthews said that the Board of
Trustees has had the idea of a new
dining hall for about ten years.
The new dining hall should be
up in about two and a half to three
years, according to both Matthews
and Salamon. The changes to
Mendenhall will begin approxi-
mately a year after the new dining
hall is completed.
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4 Thartday. October 29. 1998
news
Tha East Carolinian
5 Thurtday,
.news
briefs
Writers to raise food
Today Greenville will have its
first Annual Share Our Strength
Writers Harvest at the Upper Crust
at 212 East Fifth Street.
Local writers, including faculty
and graduate students, will be
reading short selections from their
work. Participating writers include
Alex Albright, Pat Bizzaro, Julie
Fay, Jeff Franklin, Mary Carroll-
Hackett, Bill Hallberg, Brett
Hursey, Dale Jacobs, Peter
Makuck, Randall Martoccia,
Lillian Robinson, Bob Siegal,
Robin Springer, and Luke
Whisnant.
Share Our Strength is a
National Organization which helps
coordinate readings across the
country to benefit local foodbanks.
There will be a suggested dona-
tion of $5 and non perishable food
items will also be accepted. All
proceeds will benefit the
Greenville Community Shelter.
For information regarding the
local event, please contact Dale
Jacobs at 328-6698 or Heidi Jacobs
at 328-6676.
Blood drive in Brody
A Red Cross blood drive will be
held today from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in
room ZW-40 of the Brody Building.
UNC
mi "fe
Administi
president to
speak
school system president
Jroad will address the fall
On meeting of the Women
Administrators in North Carolina
Higher Learning Friday at 12:30
p.m. in the Mendenhall Great
Room.
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Opart 9am - 8pm � Monday Thru Saturday
Alcohol Awareness Week - October 25-31
Events
The Wall - Monday through Thursday, 10:00-2:00, Wright Place
Join SADD ant take time to write and read how alcohol has affected
our lives. Also available will be an information table.
Wall of Remembrances - Tuesday-Friday, 11:30-l :30, The Mall
Come and remember someone who has lost their life because of an
alcohol related situation. Poems, letters, notes, pictures are welcome.
Where's Norm? - All week - find Norm and win a CD-ROM!
Look around campus to find Norm, the lava lamp, and return him to
210 Whichard and win a CD-ROM. Hint - he is blue and black, with
sunglasses, and is about 2 feet tall.
Have a Halloween to Remember - make a pledge to not drink on
Halloween. Pledge forms available at The Wall, Student Recreation
Center, Health Promotion and Weil-Being (210 Whichard), Student
Health Center.
Alcohol 101 - come to the party and do the new CD-ROM program at
computer labs in Mendenhall, Austin, Brewster, Residence Halls,
Joiner Library, or 210 Whichard Resource Room.
Safe Halloween Pledge - Mendenhall and Student Recreation Center
Join others in signing up to make it a safe Halloween. Look for large
sign-up posters, also available at Midnight Madness, Saturday Night
9:00-1:00. While there, try a Moctail!
For further information about these events contact the office of
Health Promotion and Weil-Being, 210 Whichard, 328-6793.
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� East Carolinian
5 ns lerl "S NE 1 � lib roni i
5 Thunday, Octofaar 29, 1898
news
Tha Eaal Ceraliaiaa
UNIVERSITY
HAIRCUTTERS
Bl Phil'i
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Club H.lrcutwrs TMttr
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Specializing
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DC COMICS ARE JUST
PART OF THE
EXCITEMENT
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919 Dickinson Avenue
Greenville, NC 27834
1-252-758-6909
Halloween
continued from page I
Healthcare is a growing and
exciting career field. As a .
w
volunteer, you can get a head
start by learning job skills and
gaining experience while you
help people in need. With
more than 100 volunteer areas
to choose from, there's sure to
be a position that fits your
interests. Call Pitt County
Memorial Hospital Volunteer
Services at 816-4491 today.
You'll be glad you did.
www.uhseast.com
crowds are expected to be down-
town because of the home football
game that day.
"Additional people increase
the potential for problems
Youncc said. "But we arc looking
forward to a fun time and keeping
it safe
The SGA will sponsor extra
bus routes Saturday. Four extra
buses will be rented from the
ECU transit system with the exec-
utive budget.
B.D.U Panlstomalch MAI flight Rainwan

ttOflii
IOKIHINHYSARMYNAVY
1501 S0U1H IVANS Sf GHt'ENVILIi. NC 2U34
"I wanted to think of a way to
make it safer said Cliff Webster,
SGA chief of staff. "Having extra
buses will help to decrease drunk
driving
The SGA Halloween Transit
will run on 15 minute interval
from 10 p.m. until 3 a.m. on
Saturday night
The University Housing
Service will also look to keep the
residence halls safe.
Security guards will be
assigned to each residence hall on
Saturday night All entrances to
the buildings will be locked and
only the front doors will be used
for entry and exit
No overnight guests will be
The East CaroMan it looking
for responsible students to set
adverungforthepeper.Cal
326-2000 for more into.
University Health Systems of Eastern Carolina includes Pitt County Memorial Hospital. East Carolina University School of Medicine, private practice physicians, community hospitals and other health affiliates.
1IC has teamed up
with Barnes and Noble
to bring book reviews to
Wednesday's Fbuntainhead
in our new program
mian
Ronald McDonald House
W are looking for follow book lovers to
read and review best sellers for a good
cause. Each Semester we will donate these
best sellers to the Ronald McDonald House
where they will be availible for the family
members of terminally ill children to read.
If you would like to write a review
lle.w� call Mki-ah at 328-6366
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6 Tlmntfiv, Otutu 29,1888
opinion
Thu Fast Harnli1ta
1
eastcarolinian
AMV L.ROVSTKR Editor
HEATHER BtlROESS Managing Editor
AMT SHERIDAN NewsEdilor
AMANDA AUSTIN' Features Elinor
EMILY LITTLE Head Copy Editor
Mario sciiehhai i er Sports Editor
TRACY 11 I R R assistant Sports Eililoi
CHRIS K NOTTS Sl�II tttlSttalr:
STEPHANIE WlllTI.OCk Ad Design Manager
JANET RESPESS AJvenisinrjManager
Brian Williams layout Manager
Jason Feather Photo Editor
BOBBY TllOOLB Webmaslei
Serving me ECU cemmurury unce J97S. lira rot Carolinian puelnhes ll.OOfl cnpuiseweif tuesdayied 3tnirs1ay the teat) etfiiorul meachenor is the
opinion at me Ednarial Board, the Ease Carolinian watcnmas tolets re the eOeor, hrmied 10 KO worth, which man he ednerj tm decent, or tjrewlv The ail
n rasarvn rhe fejhi to edit or reiecr miers lor pubkalien AH leners must he ironed terms should be addressed lo Opinion ediiol the f asl
Carolinian. Srudanr PuOtrcanoo! Bothlina, GDI, GreemrSe. 7IB3B4353 or information, call ft2.3?9 6366
OUfflGW
Halloween doesn't just mean "trick or treat" for many ECU students. Although
everybody is usually dressed up, it's not only about costumes either. For many ECU
students, Halloween stands for big block parties with kegs and bands and for drinking at
the bars downtown. Greenville's downtown turns into New Orleans' Bourbon Street
during Mardi Gras. The streets will be blocked off and too crowded for even Greenville's
Police, who will watch ECU's wildest party from the roofs of the bars. Unfortunately, this
sounds exciting to those too young to have grown tired of the downtown mob or too young
to remember some of the dangerous events of years past like macings and stabbings.
Halloween is also the time when many students will drink more than they can handle. If
you plan to start drinking in the afternoon (instead of cheering for our football team) you
might end up in big trouble when you stumble downtown after losing your friends at a
party. You might even wake up in jail after passing out or get caught driving to a late-night
party on Halloween night. Worse, ghouls abound waiting to prey on women, especially
easy targets who are drunk or alone. If you live in the residence halls, don't forget to
double-check that nobody takes advantage of the event to get access into your building.
If you don't want to spend a cold Halloween night downtown dealing with masses
of intoxicated souls, you can have a lot of fun of the safe variety at the Midnight Madness
at Mendenhall Student Center. What could be better than free food, prizes, costume
contests, Bingo and dancing the night away with a DJ. All you need to join the expected
2,000 to 3,000 students and guests is your ECU One Card.
Take it from an editorial board whose members have been at this university long
enough to know that the downtown Halloween tradition isn't all it's cracked up to be.
Throw a party of your own or head to Midnight Madness, because no treat is worth some
of the tricks that might happen in Greenville on Halloween.
LETTER
to the Editor
Space program's merits undercut
Apparently, our opinion columnist
Ryan Kennemur is not well
informed. The space program is a
very essential part of our federal
expense budget.
First, I will gladly admit that the
NASA station is boring and no one
cares except for a few eccentric
scientists. The majority of people
do not keep up with NASA and its
projects. However, that does not
mean that the program should be
abolished.
The space program, contrary to
popular belief, is not just about
seeking out new life and new
civilizations and boldly going where
no human has gone before. It is also
about making things better for life
here on Earth.
The Hubble space telescope is
for exploration, yet most space trips
are not for finding alien life. Many
important technologies have come
out of the space program. The
artificial heart, which has saved
many lives, was developed in space
for the astronauts. Many important
manufacturing processes, for
plastics especially, have been
developed in space. Our national
defense rests largely on the
satellites our space program put up
there. Modern TV' entertainment
works off of satellites. How do you
think there are overseas calls? We
certainly do not have a cable
running under the ocean. All this
was done through the space
program.
Overall, the space program has
demonstrated its worth and is very
practical, even though it is not
viewed that way. I think your
opinion was poorly informed, Mr.
Kennemur. And if you think the
space program should be abolished
now, you haven't seen anything yet!
Adam Younce
I'ndecided Major
Write, & Letter
to me? Editor
Got something to say? Need somewhere to say it?
Bring your letter to eastcarolinian, located on the 2nd
floor of The Student Publications Building
umnists
Columnists dual over rights of gay clubsS
Stephen
Kleinschmit
Another example is Meredith
College, an all women's
college. Having men at
Meredith would only cause
problems during the week.
Let's start out with an example.
The mighty Citadel and The
Virginia Military Institute became
coed schools because they were
state supported schools that
received funding from the
government. Even though it
saddens me to see such a proud
tradition come to an end, it seems
logical that it happened. State
supported institutions cannot
discriminate against race, sex, or
national origin. But private schools
can.
Britt
Honeycutt
The issue is, gay and lesbian
students are suing to form student
funded organizations at private
colleges, especially at religious
colleges. Now this is wrong.
Allowing students to form any
organization that is against the
whole purpose of the school is
wrong. Why would anyone
knowingly go to a college where
the entire purpose of the college
experience is to become a more in-
depth Christian, Jew, or whatever,
just to spit in the face everything
that is good and decent?
Conversely, what if someone
would try to go to a strictly gay and
lesbian privately funded college
and form a student funded hate-
mongering organization that would
harass homosexual students and
generally go against the grain of the
school's principles of openness and
acceptance? I think then that they
would deny them their request for
funding as well. It's not a one way
street. The same principles of
fairness apply, and religious
colleges have the right to teach
their beliefs in a conducive
environment as anyone else.
Another example is Meredith
College, an all women's college.
Having men at Meredith would
only cause problems during the
week. This way they concentrate
on their studies during the week,
and go party at State on the
weekends. The same thing applies
to the whole women in combat
debate. I know that many women
and men agree that if combat units"
were integrated, our minds, male or
female, would not be totally
concentrated on what we should be
doing. So either way, we function ;
more effectively in environments
where we are comfortable. Many
people at religious colleges arc
uncomfortable with homosexuals
and since the administration tries
to keep the students and alumni
happy, they go with the will ofthfc
majority. w
I think that the whole reason!
that gay and lesbian students
would even try to establish a school S.
funded organization is for political 8
reasons. They could
form their own off-campus ij
organizations easily, but they seeiM
to want to win some sort of I
landmark victory by having a"
church financially sponsor their
homosexuality. A lot of people are
tolerant in regards to
homosexuality, but they do rial
accept it. But as we see in incidents5
around the country, people become
very violent when somebody tries
to force an opposing belief on the
vast majority. I feel that it-
homosexuals would not force theif
ideas onto organized religion, they J
would get along with one another a I
lot better.
Despite the common
conception, religious schools
would not he stepping outside
of their doctrines to support a
gay club. After all, what is
their founding principle if not
Topic: School-sponsored gay
organizations in private colleges.
The Law: Of course privately
funded colleges can choose what
they wish to support.
The Verdict (according to me): A
college's decision not to support
gay organizations is mean-spirited
and punishable by being
considered a bunch of bastards.
Gay organizations - and I'm not
talking about the Glee Club here,
folks- have a valid purpose on
campus, whether you agree with
the ideologies that they represent
or not. Any college who's function
is to educate, enlighten, and
prepare its students for the future
has an ethical responsibility to both
expose its students to things
foreign to them and to provide
opportunities to find like minds. If
there is a demand for it, it should be
met.
We're not talking about letting
the students run morally amuck
through the courtyard. This is
about acceptance. Even religiously
founded schools need to realize
that by excluding the gay
community, they are alienating an
entire sect of humanity.
Segregation has been done away
with, and now, for the most part
people aren't judged by skin
pigmentation. Granted, we still
have a long way to go to abolish
racism, but we have made gigantic
bounds in the past fifty years.
Never would an organization for
the members of any ethnic
background be discouraged, let
alone completely denied. Why base
it on what you do with your private
parts when the lights go out?
Despite the common
conception, religious schools would
not be stepping outside of their
doctrines to support a gay club.
After all, what is their founding
principle if not "love for all"? Gay
clubs are not there to criticize
others or to convert them or to
preach the validity of
homosexuality. They are here to
provide a particularly tormented
group of people with an outlet and
a place where they are understood.
Homosexuals are not.
overwhelmingly accepted in our
society, believe it or not. That is
currently changing, but the fact is
that thousands are brutally
attacked, mangled, and killed every
year simply for loving with no
boundaries. An organization that
gives people a place to go when
they are harassed and educates the
public about a lifestyle that they
don't understand can't be bad.
Gay people generally aren't out !J
to get you. They aren't out to get J
anyone. It's not like a funding a I
Nazi hate group or a cult when the I
field trips include going to the J
movies, burning some crosses tin '
some lawns, getting ice cream, 3
sacrificing a goat or two, or having ;i 4
picnic, you know? If fraternities ate I
allowed, why not a gay club? TheyB
practice the same things
brotherhood, fellowship, solidarity
service. They arc just like you.
There is a slight hypocrisy in the
views of these colleges. They
preach love, but only for those ho
fit into the ideal. Is that what their j
prophets and saints would ha e.J
condoned? It seems to me that
more hate is spread in these
institutions of higher learning than
actual enlightenment and true 2'
education. Educated people don'tB
hate. They understand other j
cultures, other philosophies, and!
other ways of life, and theya
recognize that it is the differences S
between them that makes the ij
world this bizarre, wonderful place j�
that it is. Wouldn't life be boring if j?
everyone was a straight, Anglo- ij
Saxon, middle class, Protestant!
man? To go through your life with j
preconceived stereotypical ideas off
homosexuals is ignorance, and tojj
base judgments on those notions is, J; j
sadly, stupidity. Colleges should j
never propagate stupidity.
If private and religious colleges (
really practiced what they j
preached, gay organizations would f
be abundant on campuses. What is!
their founding philosophy? Loved
for everyone - no boundaries.
7 Thunday, Octnh
Four Seats I
10,BttNll! WHOSE 1
CHICK. CaUlK" 10�.
PU�1 ON ToC Of 1
M-i
r 7tQ K06orcA
ur re 300 re
1 cm Jmim (A
wr�t Fi 3, -
3�
wr tota.
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LADII
guys ir
LADlEi
BOYS-






Tha Fast Enroling
1
SHOI
4 here
have, 3
7 Thurcdiy, Oclobir 29 1998
comics
The Em Cwriimtn
Four Seats Left
Jason Latour Everyday Life
Mike Litwin
me thins applies
men in combat
at many women I
t if combat units
ir minds, male or
not be totally
lat we should be
ay, we function
n environments
nfortable. Many!
us colleges arel
:h homosexuals
linistration tries
aits and alumni
h the will of th
n off-campus ,?
but they seem1
some sort of -
by having a .
y sponsor their
ot of people arc-
regards tu
it they dp not.
see in incident!
people become
somebody tries
lg belief on the
feel that i�.
I not force their! t
d religion, theyjl
:h one another a 4
if!
:style that the)
n't be bad.
-�rally aren't out
ren't out to i j
te a funding a I
a cult when the i
going to the')!
me crosses on J;
ng ice cream, j
two. or ha ing a ,
f fraternities are I
gay club? They ft
a me things
ship, solidarity�!
st like you.
lypocrisy in the I
olleges. The) 1
y for those who I
that what theirfl
ts would have -J
is to hie tha) I
'cad in these j
t learning than �:
ent and true
d people
erst
losoph�
fe, and they J
the differences J j
at makes thejl
onderful place0
ife be boring if�
:raight, Anglo-1?
iss, Protestant H
your life with j
typical ideas of v
orance, and to '
hose notions is,
alleges should
Jtdity.
iigious colleges 5;
what they J
azations would r
ipuses. What is J
osophy? LoveJ
undaries
people don't JJ
tand other ji
:ophies, and!
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6 Ttiyntfu. flttntit 28,1888
opinion
The East Carglj,
1
eastcarolinian
AMV IRovsTF.lt Erriioi
Heather Hikcess Managing Urn
Amv Sheridan NemMiioi
Amanda Austin Features Editor
Emilv LITTLE HsailCopy Ednor
MARK) SCHERIIAUFtR SpurB Fidlw
TRAC1 11AIK K Unisian! Spot ElllIQf
Chris Ksorts SMfMaiw
STEPHANIE WH1TLOCK Ad Design Mararrrj.
JANET RESPESS Advertising Manager
BRIAN WILLIAMS layout Manager
Jason FEATHER Phoio Ediiw
BOBBY Tl'CCILE Webmaster
Serving ire ECU eommamt, sinca 19A ttie E�r Cjretinian publishes 000 tuples every luesday amt Ihtinslay- The Mad ettitrjrial meach adl'lon is The
opinion of inn Editorial Board the East Carolinian welcomes reiieis to trie ednor. liTiiictt 10 M words, wrucb may beetaten toi decency orbreviry The East
Cerokntan rtservts (tie ngbr to adit or reject Hirers lor publication. All tellers musr be signed I errors should be addressed to: liprnrau edaor .ttie East
Carolinian. Student Publications fjuildmrj. ECU. Gleenville. 78bfl4363 Era mtoimanon. call TV J78 0366
oumsw
Halloween doesn't just mean "trick or treat" for many ECU students. Although
everybody is usually dressed up, it's not only about costumes either. For many ECU
students, Halloween stands for big block parties with kegs and bands and for drinking at
the bars downtown. Greenville's downtown turns into New Orleans' Bourbon Street
during Mardi Gras. The streets will be blocked off and too crowded for even Greenville's
Police, who will watch ECU's wildest party from the roofs of the bars. Unfortunately, this
sounds exciting to those too young to have grown tired of the downtown mob or too young
to remember some of the dangerous events of years past like macings and stabbings.
Halloween is also the time when many students will drink more than they can handle. If
you plan to start drinking in the afternoon (instead of cheering for our football team) you
might end up in big trouble when you stumble downtown after losing your friends at a
party. You might even wake up in jail after passing out or get caught driving to a late-night
party on Halloween night. Worse, ghouls abound waiting to prey on women, especially
easy targets who are drunk or alone. If you live in the residence halls, don't forget to
double-check that nobody takes advantage of the event to get access into your building.
If you don't want to spend a cold Halloween night downtown dealing with masses
of intoxicated souls, you can have a lot of fun of the safe variety at the Midnight Madness
at Mendenhall Student Center. What could be better than free food, prizes, costume
contests, Bingo and dancing the night away with a DJ. All you need to join the expected
2,000 to 3,000 students and guests is your ECU One Card.
Take it from an editorial board whose members have been at this university long
enough to know that the downtown Halloween tradition isn't all it's cracked up to be.
Throw a party of your own or head to Midnight Madness, because no treat is worth some
of the tricks that might happen in Greenville on Halloween.
to the Editor
Space program's merits undercut
Apparently, our opinion columnist
Ryan Kennemur is not well
informed. The space program is a
very essential part of our federal
expense budget.
First, I will gladly admit that the
NASA station is boring and no one
cares except for a few eccentric
scientists. The majority of people
do not keep up with NASA and its
projects. However, that does not
mean that the program should be
abolished.
The space program, contrary to
popular belief, is not just about
seeking out new life and new
civilizations and boldly going where
no human has gone before. It is also
about making things better for life
here on Earth.
The Hubble space telescope is
for exploration, yet most space trips
are not for finding alien life. Many-
important technologies have come-
out of the space program. The
artificial heart, which has saved
many lives, was developed in space
for the astronauts. Many important
manufacturing processes, for
plastics especially, have been
developed in space. Our national
defense rests largely on the
satellites our space program put up
there. Modern TV' entertainment
works off of satellites. How do you
think there arc overseas calls? We
certainly do not have a cable
running under the ocean. All this
was done through the space
program.
Overall, the space program has
demonstrated its worth and is very
practical, even though it is not
viewed that way. I think your
opinion was poorly informed, Mr.
Kcnncmur. And if you think the
space program should be abolished
now, you haven't seen anything yet!
Adam Younce
Undecided Major
Writf & Letter
to tk& Editor
Got something to say? Need somewhere to say it?
Bring your letter to eastcarolinian, located on the 2nd
floor of The Student Publications Building
umnists
Columnists dual over rights of gay clubs
Stephen
Kleinschmit
Another example is Meredith
College, an all women's
college. Having men at
Meredith would only cause
problems during the week.
Let's start out with an example.
The mighty Citadel and The
Virginia Military' Institute became
coed schools because they were
state supported schools that
received funding from the
government. Even though it
saddens me to see such a proud
tradition come to an end, it seems
logical that it happened. State
supported institutions cannot
discriminate against race, sex, or
national origin. But private schools
can.
The issue is, gay and lesbian
students are suing to form student
funded organizations at private
colleges, especially at religious
colleges. Now this is wrong.
Allowing students to form any
organization that is against the
whole purpose of the school is
wrong. Why would anyone
knowingly go to a college where
the entire purpose of the college
experience is to become a more in-
depth Christian, Jew, or whatever,
just to spit in the face everything
that is good and decent?
Conversely, what if someone
would try to go to a strictly gay and
lesbian privately funded college
and form a student funded hate-
mongering organization that would
harass homosexual students and
generally go against the grain of the
school's principles of openness and
acceptance? I think then that they
would deny them their request for
funding as well. It's not a one way
street. The same principles of
fairness apply, and religious
colleges have the right to teach
their beliefs in a conducive
environment as anyone else.
Another example is Meredith
College, an all women's college.
Having men at Mereditii would
only cause problems during the
week. This way they concentrate
on their studies during the week,
and go party at State on the
weekends. The same thing applies
to the whole women in combat"
debate. I know that many women
and men agree that if combat units
were integrated, our minds, male or
female, would not be totally1
concentrated on what we should be,
doing. So either way, we function
more effectively in environments
where we are comfortable. Many
people at religious colleges arc,1
uncomfortable with homosexuals
and since the administration tries
to keep the students and alumni
happy, they go with the will of trmy
majority. j
I think that the whole reasonII
that gay and lesbian students!
would even try to establish a school
funded organization is for political
reasons. They couldj
form their own off-campus
organizations easily, but they seenW
to want to win some sort of�
landmark victory by having a �'
church financially sponsor their
homosexuality. A lot of people ire
tolerant in regards tp
homosexuality, but they do not,
accept it. But as we see in incident
around die country, people become
very violent when somebody tries
to force an opposing belief on the
vast majority. I feel that it
homosexuals would not force their
ideas onto organized religion. Cheyl
would get along with one another a I
lot better.
Britt
Honeycutt
Despite the common
conception, religious schools
would not be stepping outside
of their doctrines to support a
gay club. After all, what is
their founding principle if not
Topic: School-sponsored gay
organizations in private colleges.
The Law: Of course privately
funded colleges can choose what
they wish to support.
The Verdict (according to me): A
college's decision not to support
gay organizations is mean-spirited
and punishable by being
considered a bunch of bastards.
Gay organizations - and I'm not
talking about the Glee Club here,
folks- have a valid purpose on
campus, whether you agree with
the ideologies that they represent
or not. Any college who's function
is to educate, enlighten, and
prepare its students for the future
has an ethical responsibility to both
expose its students to things
foreign to them atd to provide
opportunities to find like minds. If
there is a demand for it, it should be
met.
We're not talking about letting
the students run morally amuck
through the courtyard. This is
about acceptance. Even religiously
founded schools need to realize
that by excluding the gay
community, they are alienating an
entire sect of humanity.
Segregation has been done away
with, and now, for the most part
people aren't judged by skin
pigmentation. Granted, we still
have a long way to go to abolish
racism, but we have made gigantic
bounds in the past fifty years.
Never would an organization for
the members of any ethnic
background be discouraged, let
alone completely denied. Why base
it on what you do with your private
parts when the lights go out?
Despite the common
conception, religious schools would
not be stepping outside of their
doctrines to support a gay club.
After all, what is their founding
principle if not "love for all"? Gay
clubs are not there to criticize
others or to convert them or to
preach the validity of
homosexuality. They are here to
provide a particularly tormented
group of people with an outlet and
a place where they are understood.
Homosexuals are not-
overwhelmingly accepted in our
society, believe it or not. That is
currently changing, but the fact is
that thousands are brutally
attacked, mangled, and killed every
year simply for loving with no
boundaries. An organization that
gives people a place to go when
they are harassed and educates the
public about a lifestyle that they I
don't understand can't be bad.
Gay people generally aren't QUtl
to get you. They aren't out tp gel J!
anyone. It's not like a funding a I
Nazi hate group or a cult when the 3
field trips include going to the '�
movies, burning some crosses on ;J;
some lawns, getting ice cream.
sacrificing a goat or two, or lia ing t
picnic, you know? If fraternities arc 7
allowed, why not a gay club? TheyH
practice the same (hingS-H
brotherhood, fellowship, solidarity. B
service. They are just like you.
There is a slight hypocrisy in the �$
views of these colleges They!
preach love, but only for those who;
fit into the ideal. Is that what their l
prophets and saints would have
condoned? It seems to me thatj
more hate is spread in these�
institutions of higher learning than
actual enlightenment and true a
education. Educated people don't 3
hate. They understand other-
cultures, other philosophies, and!
other ways of life, and they
recognize that it is the differences ;J
between them that makes theij
world this bizarre, wonderful placeH
that it is. Wouldn't life be boring if jj
everyone was a straight, Anglo-1
Saxon, middle class, ProtestantH
man? To go through your life with "
preconceived stereotypical ideas on
homosexuals is ignorance, and to
base judgments on those notions is
sadly, stupidity. Colleges should
never propagate stupidity.
If private and religious
really practiced what they
preached, gay organizations would r.
be abundant on campuses. What is l
their founding philosophy? Loved
for everyone - no boundaries
ol leges H
Thundiv. Octol
I
Four Seats
A CHlt cuim' to
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rTws Kosorc'
v� ro 300 Tt
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AJJ o JmtrA,
u,rr �� 04
rrtts ge ro
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GUYS II
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LADIEJ
BOYS-






The East r.aroJjnja
JL,
Me.
�sf here
have 3
-
clubs
me thing applies
men in combat
at many women
t if combat units
ir minds, male or;
not be totally
uit we should bei
ay, we function
n environments I
nfortable. Many!
ns colleges arc,1
:h homosexuals
linistration tries
:nts and alumni
h the will of th
e whole reason 1
sbian students
stablish a school
n is for political l
ey could
n off-campus jj
but they seenN
some sort or j
by having a �
y sponsor rheir
:)t of people arc
regards tp
t they do not,
see in incident
people become
somebody tries
lg belief on the
feel that it-j-
1 not force their
d religion, they!
:h one another a f
style that they
n't be bad.
:rally aren't out
ren't out to get
te a funding a
a cult when the
going to the
ime crosses on
ng ice cream,
two, or has ing '
fraternities are
gay clubr They
ame things-
ship, solidarity,
st like you.
lypocrisy in the
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7 Thundiy, October 29. 1998
I
Four Seats Left
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Tht E�tt Cwoftifrn
Jason Latour Everyday Life
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Victoria Kidd
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w�mm
8 Thursday, October 29.
The East Carolinian
No money;
make your
own costume
Shops seem too expensive for
average student
N I N A M. D K V
senior vm ri t k
That time of year is upon us once again. The holi-
day that Greenville and ECU is so well known
for�Halloween! As students prepare for big party
blowouts, trick-or-treating and dressing up, local
stores stock their shelves with fake blood capsules,
wax lips and candy corn.
Some of our local party shops such as Party
Makers Flowers and Balloons also stock up on a
variety of costumes, novelty items and decorations.
"We've (Party Makers) been in Greenville for
four years now said Rose I lathaway, owner. "Not
only do we sell a variety of costumes during
Halloween, but we also sell seasonal costumes
such as rabbit and santa outfits and rent mascot
costumes
According to Hathaway, Party Makers has cos-
tumes for virtually anyone�infants, toddlers,
young adults, adults, plus sizes and even some-
thing for the pets. Even though Greenville is a col-
lege town, a wide range of people come to buy cos-
tumes.
"Many students come in and purchase cos-
tumes, but so do business people who are allowed
to where costumes at work I lathaway said.
Many ECU students may purchase costumes,
but the word seems to be creating your own and
being original.
"I made my own costume because the cos-
tumes at the mall are expensive, cheaply made and
you're only able to wear it once said Sara Ehlers,
an ECU junior. "Anyways, it's cheaper, easier and
more original when you make your own
"I'm making my own costume said Mike
Caston, an ECU freshmen. "I lomemade costumes
are the best. They're more expressive when you
do them yourself
"I have created my I lallowccn costume all four
years that I have been at E( :l said Jenny Inlow,
an ECU senior. "Costumes from shops are too
expensive, especially if you're only going to wear it
once. Besides it's more creative when you make
your own
"I'm buying pieces of my costume from a thrift
SEE PREPARATIONS PAGE 9
Top Ten Things ECU Students
are doing for Halloween '98
10� Conjure spirts with a Ouija Board
9� Hold a Seance
8� Go to some Hauted House
7� Go around town smashing- pumpkins
6' Watch Horror Movies
5� Trick-or-Treating
4 Drink
3 Midnight Madness at Mendenhall
2 Partying
!� Go downtown
lourcr students on cjmpus
ABcohol Awareness
across campus
Many activities planned
for entire week
Phillip Gitftis
STAFF WRITER
One startling statistic states that an average of 4,000
Americans die from alcohol poisining each year.
That is why ECU has created an annual Alcohol
Awareness Week, which is this week.
The Center for Counseling and Student
Development, the Health Center, the Office of
Health Promotion and Well-Bein, and many other
offices and organizations have joined to create a
week of alcohol awareness and safety.
This awareness program began many years ago
in the form of the National Collegiate Alcohol
Awareness Week (NCAAW). This was started to
"help encourage responsible, legal decisions about
alcohol and aim to reduce the incidence of alcohol-
related problems on college campuses and in col-
lege communities according to the NCAA.
However, this awareness week takes place during
the third week of October, which is when ECU has
fall break. It was decided that the week would be
moved to the week after fall break, which then
made it include Halloween.
"We really want to encourage people to have a
safe Halloween said Donna Walsh, director of the
Office of Health Promotion and Well-Being. "And
with this week containing both I lallowcen and a
football game, we want to make sute every knows
the danger that alcohol can pose
One special event that has taken place this week
is "The Wall which can be found at the Wright
Place. Starting Monday and ending today, from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m, Students Against Drunk Driving
(SADD) have created a place where students can
write down and post on a board how alcohol has
affected their lives. Everyone is welcomed to read
the comments being posted. Some sample messages
about what alcohol means to peo-
ple include; "My grandpa died
from alcoholism "The less I
drink the better off I am "It has
given me a beer belly and
"Puke, puke, puke
Some other messages of a more
personal nature have been written
and displayed. Near the fountain
area in front of Whichard Building,
from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m a
"Wall of Rcmcmberences" has
been erected all week. Students
have created different tributes to
love ones who have been seriously
affected or killed because of alco-
hol. This project was given the go-
ahead by the Center for Counseling and Student
Development. Both of these "walls" are sponsored in
part by by the Health Center.
Also taking place this week is the "Where's
Norm?" contest. Strategically placed around campus
are three "Norms Norm is a two foot tall, blue and
black lava lamp that has a tag telling the person who
finds him to return him to 210 Whicard. The person
Many put memories on wall
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
Alcohol Awareness Week is complete with a wall for students and faculty to express how alcohol has affected their lives.
who finds any of the three Norms will get a CD-
ROM from the Office of Health Promotion and
Well-Being. There are also additional prizes for those
who do not have a computer accessible to them.
While many students may not find the time to go
to any or all of these activities, alcohol awareness may
have already found its way into many classrooms.
The faculty has been requested by the health ser-
vices on campus to bring the subject of
alcohol to their students. Whether it is an
economics teacher lecturing about the alco-
hol industry or a psychology class that has
discussed alcoholism, many students have
found the subject of alcohol being brought
to them.
Perhaps the biggest event of this week is
the "Midnight Madness" that will take
place at the Mendenhall Student Center
and the Recreation Center on Halloween
night, starting at 9 p.m.
"We usually have 2500 to 3000 student
for this said Carol Woodruff, Director of
Marketing of Student Activities. "But
because it falls on a game day and a
Saturday this year, we expect that number
to be higher
"Midnight Madness" was created for students as
an alternative to drinking. Many activities are
planned including a Virtual Reality Race Car, a cos-
tume contest, food, a D.J and much more. There
will also be a place where students can sign a pledge
stating "I will watch out for my friends, take care of
myself, and have a safe Halloween
Events taking place on Alcohol Awareness Week
The Wail- Monday through Thursday, 10:00
am to 2:00 pm at the Wright Place
Wall of Rcmtmberanct- Tuesday through
Friday, J 1:30 am to 1:30 pm in front of Whichard
Building.
Wherr's Norm?- AH week, find Norm, the lava
lamp, and win a pr�e!
Midmght Madness- Mendenhall Student
Center and Student Recreation Center. Satui
night, from 9:00 pm to 1:00 am.
Each year, students spend $5.5 billion on alcohol,
which is more than they spend on soft drinks, tea,
milk, juice, coffee, or books combined. And approxi-
mately 240,000 to 360,000 of the nation's 12 million
current undergraduates will ultimately die from alco-
hol-related causes. Alcohol Awareness Week pro-
vides a good service to ECU and everyone should be
reminded to keep safe this Halloween.
Male faculty members outnumber Ghosts, goblins haunt
female in pay, positions held Ganett Hall for charity
Men earn more, hold
i more positions
Nicholas K a l a p o s
STAFF WRITER
Since women first entered the
work force they have been paid less
than their male counterparts. As
we prepare to enter into a new cen-
tury, it is hard to believe that our
society still has not broken this stig-
ma.
At ECU, there still appears to be
a significant difference between
male and female salaries. From
1993 through 1997, the average
salary for a male faculty member
went up $6,701 while women's
salaries went up only $6,112, a dif-
ference of $589. But why?
According to John Durham,
director of public relations and Jim
Smith, executive assistant to the
chancellor, in order to evaluate pay
differences they would have to
look at an individual case, which
would require two very similar fac-
ulty members. These charts only
give an overview.
"There are many issues such as
research, rank, years with the uni-
versity, et cetera that go into deter-
mining the pay of a faculty mem-
ber Durham said.
ECU male to female faculty
ratio is also fairly disproportionate
at 736 males to 406 female faculty
members, which is almost a 2 to 1
difference, (page 91, 1997-1998
"There are many issues such
as research, rank, years with
the university, et cetera that
go into determining the pay
of a faculty member
John Durham
Director of public relations
Fact Book)
"This is a problem that you will
see at many, if not all colleges
Smith said. "ECU has a strong
commitment to diversity
ECU has made a"Strategies for
Distinction" pamphlet available to
help others see the direction that
the university plans to take up until
the year 2000.
On page five of the pamphlet,
Goal 6 states, "Ensure respect for
the individual rights and human
diversity
According to Smith, faculty,
especially at higher ranks, has very
little turn over. Looking into this,
you will find that normally results
from tenure, which is basically a
contract for life that a school can
offer a faculty member. You don't
see many staff members with it
who leave.
Examining the pay difference
over the years you see that the
numbers have fluctuated a lot, but
has generally increased. From 93 to
94 the difference dropped from
SEE EQUALITY, PAGE 10
All Proceeds go to
needy in Greenville
Nina M. D r y
SENIOR WRITER
Halloween is fast approaching and
many students plan on participat-
ing in a few holiday festivities such
as haunted house hunting. But
how many haunted houses are
around the Greenville area? The
one in Winterville? Well that's
great and all if have a car to get
there and some money to get in
with. There's actually no need to
go very far because we've got a
haunted house right in our back-
yard.
Garrett Hall presents the
Haunted Hotel on October 29
(that's today, folks) and October 30
in the Garrett I lall basement from
8:00 p.m.to 11:00 p.m. Your ticket
in is one can of a non-perishable
food. All items collected will be
donated to needy people through-
out the Greenville area. So not only
are you getting a good scare, but
you will also be helping those who
are less fortunate.
"Garrett Hall is trying to give
back to the community and have a
good time said Doug Yale, an RA
in Garret Hall.
This is definitely the residence
hall that keeps on giving. On
Thursday Garrett will be putting
on a special Haunted Hotel perfor-
SEE GARRETT PAGE 8
?





Thuuday, October 29, 1988
The East Carolinian
US
leir lives.
;ness Week
sduy, 10:00
y thi
f VVhi
m, the lava
Student
:r. Sati.
on alcohol,
drinks, tea,
nd approxi-
i 12 million
: from alco-
Week pro-
is should be
aunt
larity
presents the
3n October 29
I and October 30
basement from
D.m. Your ticket
non-perishable
Elected will be
people through-
area. So not only
good scare, but
lping those who
i trying to give
inity and have a
oug Yale, an RA
y the residence
on giving. On
will be putting
:d Hotel perfor-
T. PAGE 8
features
The East Carolinian
Pirate Jewelry
now available
� RST CUR OLItlH
UniVCRSITY
the new logo
available at
riRRTES
Floyd Cr. Robinson Jewelers, inc.
'Your Independent Diamond Jeweler"
www.fgrobinsinom
HRS.M-f 9-6, Sat 9-3
60S E. Arlington Blvd. Arlington Villiage SU-7000
Preparations
continued (torn page 8
shop and borrowing the rest said
Michael Kovach, an ECU sopho-
more. "Costume shops are too
expensive for the average college
student"
Although many students find
half the fun of Halloween in mak-
ing their own costumes, you will
still find a few students who will
still go out and purchase theirs.
"I bought a costume at this
Halloween shop in the Plaza
Mall said Leroy Salazar, an ECU
sophomore. "They had a bit of a
variety of things to choose from
Whether you purchaserent
your costume or rummage through
your closet and create an original
masterpiece, the main objective is
to have fun. Happy Halloween!
Garrett
continued from page 8
mance from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00
p.m. for the Boys and Girls Club.
"We want to give the children
a safe place to come and have a
fun time said Chris Wingfield,
an RA in Garrett and co-chairper-
son of the Haunted Hotel.
Vlasic introduces
'world's largest pickle'
BI& TUESPAY
Prof
BIG FOOD
LITTLE PRICES
BIG BEERS �j
LI I I LC rV.LJ Eatli�&i)riniuSaloon
355-2946
Located in Winn-Dixie Market Place on corner of
Greenville Blvd. & Arlington Blvd.
CHERRY HILL, N.J. (AP)�
Vlasic Foods International plans
to introduce a giant pickle that
it claims is the world's largest:
10 times larger than an
ordinary pickle.
The chip-shaped pickle mea-
sures 16 inches long and i inches in
diameter and will cover an entire
hamburger, guaranteeing a pickle
piece in every bite, Vlasic said
Monday.
The company spent the past
four years developing the new
pickle, "Hamburger Stackers
The pickle is made from specially
cultivated cucumbers grown by the
Cherry-Hill based food giant
Vlasic spokesman Kevin
Lowery said cucumbers used for
the pickles were
specially grown for size, taste
and crispness. Cucumbers that size
grown with traditional methods
would have the texture of a water-
melon and wouldnot be ideal for
making pickles, he said.
The pickle was secretly devel-
oped under the code name,
"Project Frisbee
Halloween
Attic Sale
It's Scary Everything Is On Sale!
Thurs. 22nd Thru Sat. 31st
Located in Arlington Village Beside At Barre
i Come Rummage through you'll be
surprised at what you might find!
IT?
WpMB
te will be Llithe tailgating field
Saturday from 11:30 a.m. until 3:30 p.m.
Come ply Twister with your favorite DJ
We will be giving away promotional items and accepting
canned goods for "The Family Values Food Drive For every
2 cans of food you bring on Saturday, you will be registered
to win tickets to see KORN on Nov. 10, MARILYN MANSON on
Nov. 11 or DAVE MATTHEWS on Nov. 28
Join BOB SMITH, WZMB's own voice of Pirate
footb.all, Saturday for the play-by-play of this
week's game with the University of Houston
starting with our pre-game show at 3 p.m.
91.3
Dear Students:
4
Halloween is always an interesting
time around East Carolina. From the exciting
festivities in Mendenhall, to future pirates
collecting candy, Halloween is always a
huge event. In addition, many of our stu-
dents venture downtown to celebrate with
the other ghosts and goblins in a one-of-a-
kind celebration. With limited parking, the
major problem with heading to Mendenhall
or downtown for many students is how they
are going to get there and return safely to
their destination.
This year the Student Government
Association asks that all students stay off the
roads for the simple fact that you never
know when that vampire in the next car has
had too much blood, so to say. In return, the
SGA is providing a shuttle to Mendenhall '
and downtown that will run every fifteen
minutes from 10pm until 3:30am. These
shuttles are servicing areas in which many
students live and plan to have pre-Halloween
activities. Keep Halloween responsible and
fun for everyone, utilize the SGA Halloween
transit.
Sincerely,
Student Government Association
SGA Halloween Transit
October 31st: 10pm-3:30am
(buses will run on 15 minute intervals)
ECU B
The ORANGE Route
Mendenhall
Village Green @ Fifth
University Apartments
Cedar Lane and Tenth
Breckenridge Square
Twin Oaks
Cannon Court
Eastbrook
Village Green @ Tenth
College View Apartments
Cypress Gardens
Dogwood Hollow
Edge of Campus (Music Building)
campus, and everyone using ECUSTA must observe the policies and guidelines outlined in the Clue Book.
The BLACK Route
Mendenhall
Speight
Wesley Commons
Court
First Street
rst Street
rst Street
First Street
eth
BLACK MAP
ORANGE MAP
MMfJW1
IfMimlL. ii. ��� -i- AtI X-J�-Jk, St � �V �
sga@mail.ecu.edu





am am �
I

10 Thundiy, Octobir 29, 1998
Equality
coniinmd Irom page 8
$6,212 to $6,105, but then in raises
to $7,029 in 95 and again in to
$7,330. Which is it high mark for
the 93 to 97 chart.
Last year the difference
dropped to $6,801. (numbers calcu-
lated from page 104 of the 1997-
1998 Fact Book taking the average
difference of all ranks in the male
and female categories.) This could
have many reasons such as the
number of male faculty in higher
paying jobs or just the higher num-
features
The Eatt Carolinian
ber of male faculty
Even with the wide range dif-
ference of male and female faculty
members hired, university repre-
sentatives guarantee there is equal-
ity.
"We at ECU arc committed to
recruiting across the board Smith
said. "I have no doubt that in the
next 7 to 9 years we will be more
diverse
It is true that in today's colleges
and universities there is a growing
diversity in the student body. This
could lead to a more diverse facul-
ty and schools across the boards,
but how much will they be paid
and how many will be turned
away?
Town or Farm
USE SMOKE ALARMS
Install smoke alarms on every level of
your home. Test batteries monthly.
United States Fits Administration
Federal Emergency Irtaiogement Agency
http:wrww.vsfa.fMM.gov
ANORAKS
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atalog
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eastcarolinian
Advertising Department
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career goals?
You Will Gain Experience in:
� Calling on local advertising clients
� Helping to develop creative advertising
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� Local advertising account servicing
Applications are available at The East
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Publications Building or call 328-2000
for more info.
The East
Carolinian
Advertising
Department
Can Help
You Get The
Needed
Experience
Before you
Graduate.
i the i � �
eastcarolinian
FUNDING
ORKSHOP
� NOV. 4 @ 5:00
WHERE: 221 Mendenhall
rVHYrTb answer questions
concerning the SGA funding process.
"� �� ��
Don't forget tMjtf the deadline �� r
for Spring Bi-Annuals is Nov. 13! J j
If you have any questions call the SGA office @ 328-4726
COOL LINE 752.5855
easaisfcs
You drank.
You danced.
Youhadseo
rissi�3
Free Pregnancy Tests
Call Carolina Pregnancy Center 757-0003
209-B South Evans Street (downtown near Courthouse)
MY DOG LUCY
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he East Carolinian
VBWHNVmiWaiJJBJjjBJBjBJ
Y
11 Thursday. Octob- 29. 1938
features
Thi Ettl Ciroliniin
Support student-run media
EN TO WZMB
91.3
E ONLY REAL
IEW MUSIC"
RADIO IN
REENVILLE.
oastcarolinian
To receive TEC,
check the subscription desired
complete your name, address,
and send in a check or money
order to: circulation dept.
U First class mail$40 '
? Student Pubs Bide
Second class mail$110.00 pnj
ITvZ.? Greenville, NC 27858
Find out about the professional and
higher education programs offered by
ECU as well as other institutions
East Carolina
University's First
Annual Graduate &
Professional School Fair
Thursday, November 5
10:00AM - 2:00 PM
All Undergraduate &
Graduate Students invited
In the Mendenhall Student Center
Cosponsored by the ECU Graduate School &
The Graduate Student Advisory Council
covering the
eat
MESSAGE FROM
VIRGIN MARY EXPECTED
TO DRAW 100,000
CONYERS, Ga. (AP) Thousands
of believers have been streaming
into Nancy Fowler's farm east of
Atlanta since last week, getting
ready for what she says will be the
last public message she relays from
the Virgin Mary.
Mrs. Fowler has been addressing
crowds at her farm for nearly eight
years, supposedly conveying mes-
sages given to her in visions by the
Virgin Mary.
She says Tuesday
will be the last such
message, and nearly
100,000 people are
expected in this town of
� 60,000.
"We assume it will
be the last message. We don't know
for sure said Tony
Jatcko, the spokesman for
Loving Mother's Children, a volun-
teer organization that helps Mrs.
Fowler. "We'll have to wait and see
what happens tomorrow
Mrs. Fowler receives personal
messages almost daily and Jatcko
said he expects those to continue.
From October 1990 to May
1994, Mrs. Fowler delivered the
messages on the 13th of each
month. Then she announced that
the Virgin Mary would appear with
a public message only once a year
on Oct. 13.
Mrs. Fowler announced last
October that this year's public mes-
sage would be the last. Jatcko says
almost all visionaries eventually get
a message saying the visions will
end.
"There's a point in time when
you get tired of telling the children
what to do Jatcko said.
The local Catholic hierarchy has
not endorsed Mrs. Fowler's visions,
but a Catholic church moved next
to the farm in April.
Some who have heard the Virgin
Mary's messages said they have
witnessed miracles, such as a
woman cured of cancer or a rosary
turned to gold. Some said they have
smelted roses, a traditional sign that
the Virgin Mary is near. Others said
they have taken photographs that
show the Virgin Mary or heaven's
gates. Still others said they simply
experience a feeling of inner peace.
The Haunted Forest
October 28, 29, 30
640:30pm
lain or Shine
Admission:
Adults - $3
Children under 10 - $1
Fnsbee Golf Course
ECU Campus
Sponsored by ECU Department of Leisure Studies with Jjr-A
Special Guest Governor's One on One Program: Power of One ���f-A
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER OCT. 31,1998
9PM UNTIL 2AM ECU ID GETS YOU IN FREE
A GUEST PASS LETS YOU BRING A FRIEND
I
VIRTUAL REALITY NASCAR
COSTUME CONTESTCASK PRIZES
FREEFOO0.0RINK.&MUSIC
CARTOON SHORTS
BINGO. DJ DANCE
VIDEO KARAOKE
VIZARD ON CALL
PSYCHIC HOTLINE
FORTUNETELLERS
EVIL LANDING
MIDNIGHT BUFFET
Students mny attend for free by using their ECU One Card. One guest per student will be admitted with a guest pass. Student and guest must enter together. Guest passes will be available beginning Monday, October 26 at the Central Ticket Office from
8.30am to 6pm and Todd Dining Hall Meol Plan Office from 9am to 5pm. On October 31, guest passes will be available only at the Student Recreation Center from 1 lam to 10:30pm. In place of a Saturday night Hendrix film, Halloween cartoon
will be shown as part of Midnight Madness. (Guest passes required.) For additional information, contact the Central Ticket Office Monday through Friday from 8:30am to 6pm at 328-4788.
HMHHHHB
������niB





12 Thursday, October 29. 1998
features
Th� East Carolinian
Across A Milts is a wttil) mimm Brian by srvtroi ECU
students ckrvnieinf litir ixptrienm aimed in a diary format.
0SX�s
tk
I know that many of you have little appre-
ciation for the country in which you live. I
was once like that�not caring about many
of the things we take for granted. For
those of you who feel this way, trying liv-
ing in England a bit. I'm not saying that it
is not a great place, but there are a few
things that really make you nostalgic for
the good old USA.
The first major difference is the media. If
you want a television in England, you have
to pay roughly $160 for a license. If you
don't have a license, men in trucks come
around and check with radars to see if you
are watching TV (I am not making this
up). If they pick up a signal, they have the
right to search your home for the offending
television�for which you are fined
$1,600. Many of you may think that $160
is not much to enjoy the simple pleasures
of television. All you get though, are five
channels which are almost always as enter-
taining as watching grass grow.
At least you have a radio, right? Sorry,
wrong. The Indian music channels out-
number English speaking ones. You say,
I'll just read newspapers then. That would
work, as long as you aren't looking for real
news. Most of the newspapers are tabloids,
looking at impertinent news items for
entertainment purposes. Sample items
include stories about celebrities, stories
about peculiar people, Bill Clinton (this is
not news) and gratuitous nudity (again I
am not making this up).
The E iglish accent is considered to be
very beautiful and proper. This is true, in
small doses. I originally chose to come to
England because I was too lazy to learn
another language. I thought, "Hey, I know
English�this will be a piece of cake
Minutes ago, I had a four minute conver-
sation with someone and I didn't under-
stand a word of it And that wasn't the first
time. It seems that I have to ask "what?
"excuse me?" and "pardon me?" a bit too
much. Recently someone asked me if I
could help him find the toilet.
He had to repeat it four times.
The phones here are also a problem. In my
dormitory, there arc only two phones
which nearly seventy people use. In other
TEC is looking for someone to
fill a top management
position with significant
responsibility and good pay
Requirements:
Macintosh Experience
Photoshop
QuarkXpress
Experience Managing people
Organizing Employee Schedules
Coordinating Production & Press
Some late evenings required
words, to receive a call, you have to be near
the phone at precisely the right time and
no one can be using it. If you want to make
a local call, even if it's your own line, it
costs around $0.10 a minute. There are,
however, calling cards from which you can
debit your calls, these cards always run out
at the worst possible time and when you
have no extra change, "just a minute, let
me see if I have those reservations Click.
I'm really having a great time here, aside
from the quirks of the English. Whoever
keeps sending me all that gold, don't stop.
And whoever isn't, better start or you'll get
a mean talking-to by the English mafia.
Cheers,
JamesBlake Norman
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13 Thursda'

Tei
forh
ECU will try
when the Uri
this Saturday
showdown.
ECU dowr
28-27 in the i
two schools.
Homecoming
completing It
Smith's 50 ya
quarter put th
seven lead ch;
; Head coac
though this y
Saturday's gan
"They're o
rypical young
the season got
these guys by
that I'm loot
along the sami
Houston cr
jive 2-5 overal
played a brut
,so far, losing
imd at home
Tennessee am
are currently r;
the AP and ES
past week th
fTexas 31-9.
Leonard Hem
joverlook the C
"You can't i
of the season
go in and pla;
'that are given i
Inc
jolfc
II Pirates fti
Kitty
STKI'IIK
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tied to Kitty H
this week for t
invitational. Th
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0thoutofl9K
"In college g
Consistent. Tl
played well this
)ur top four gu
i Consistent, very
hat this time, ar
Men
Kirbyand
strongpe
Tono T,
SPORT'
The ECU men's
eted at the Ui
Carolina 1998 Fs
ast weekend,
ivolved in foui
nd four doubles
The team se
)liver Thalen,
�tephan Siebi
oopeCalaja
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rh� Eltt Carolinian
eone to
gement
lificant
�od pay
ments:
Experience
Photoshop
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ging people
) Schedules
ion & Press
js required

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13 Thunday, October 29,
OLvjl PTh.E�,Cr0,ini�
Pirates strive to keep good home record
5thVwFb
www.tec.ecu.edu
Team facing Cougars
for Halloween home game
Tra is Barki.i:v
SENIOR WRITER
ECU will try to break its two game losing streak
when the University of Houston comes to town
this Saturday for a Halloween Conference ISA
showdown.
ECU downed the Cougars in Houston last year
28-27 in the only previous meeting between the
two schools. Dan Oonzalez ruined Houston's
Homecoming, throwing for four touchdowns and
completing 26 out of 33 passes for 337 yards. Troy
Smith's 50 yard touchdown catch in the fourth
quarter put the Pirates ahead and was the last of
seven lead changes in the game.
; Head coach Steve Logan feels that even
though this year's Cougar team is extremely young,
Saturday's game will be close.
"They're only playing three seniors and so, like a
.typical young football team, they're getting better as
the season goes along Logan said. "I ,ast year we beat
these guys by one point and the numbers
that I'm looking at suggest something
along the same lines
Houston enters the game with a decep-
tive 2-5 overall record. The Cougars have
played a brutal non-conference schedule
,so far, losing at California and Tennessee
land at home to Minnesota and UCLA.
Tennessee and UCLA arc undefeated, and
arc currently ranked in the top four in both
the AP and ESPNUSA Today top 25 polls,
past week the Cougars defeated North
Texas 31-9. Freshman running back
Leonard Henry says ECU can't afford to
overlook the Cougars, despite their record.
"You can't underestimate any team now at this time
of the season Henry said. "We just basically have to
go in and play our game, execute our opportunities
'that are given to us.
Ketric Sanford
RB 5-8 203 Jr.
152 act 649 yds
4.3avg4TD
TT
Jason McKinley
QB 6-3 222 So.
�129 at 255 1423 yds
11 TD 8 inc
Orlando Iglesias
WR 6-3 215 So.
36 rec 394yds
l0.9avg6TD
Source: Houston Sports Information
The football team is preparing to snap the two-games away loosing streak by running drills during practice.
FH.E PHOTO
"Coach explained to us that a win would cure all
this anger and bitterness that we have after losing to
Southern Miss
The diminutive Ketric Sanford leads the (lougars in
rushing, averaging just over 92 yards a game. Though
short in size at 5'8
Sanford has plenty of
speed. Logan says
Sanford may be the
fastest running back
inC-l ISA
"I don't have any
40 yard dash times in
front of me, but on
film in Conference
USA, he probably is
the fastest back in the
conference Logan
said. "He's put on
some weight. Last year he looked to be a 175. 180
pounder. They're listing him at 205 now and he's car-
rying the weight well.
"lie's very quick and he can run a touchdown in
from a long way. I le's really good on the cutback and
David Garrard practices for the home game
against the Houston Cougars on Saturday.
FILE PHOTO
that's where he's made his living
Junior linebacker Jeff Kerr is impressed with
Sanford but says he's not in the class of Southern
Miss runner Derrick Nix, who burned ECU for 116
yards last week.
"Ketric Sanford is a good running back, but he's
not a Nix style runner. 1 le's a cut back style runner
Kerr said. "When you are playing a cut back style
runner, all you've got to do is have guys playing
assignments. You've just got to play the backside cut
back
In addition to stopping Sanford, Logan says his
team must put pressure on Houston quarterback
Jason McKinley. McKinley has thrown for over 1,400
yards and 11 touchdowns so far this season.
"Last year he played well against us. He throws a
nice ball Logan said. "He's not a particularly
mobile quarterback. Although he can escape a rush,
he's not going to run down the field and hurt you nec-
essarily.
"He can get the job done if you give him time.
We've got to get some pressure on him, that is what
the kc will be. We've got to get back there in the
backfield with him
t v U on Halloween
Year OpponentScore
1941 atErksinew14-7
1953 Appalachian St.w40-7
1959 Appalachian St.L0-28
1964 at The CitadelW19-10
1970 atFurmanW7-0
1981 at West VirginiaL3-20
1987 Miami Fla.L3-41
4-386-113 �
Source: ECU Sports Information
Senior linebacker Rod Coleman leads ECU in
sacks with eight and will try to add to that total on
Saturday. Coleman says helikes to keep up with where
he ranks in the conference but it's not a major concern.
"I try because it's a big part of my position, but I
don't get really caught up into it Coleman said. "It
SEE FOOTBALL. PAGE 14
Inconsistency hurts
golfers at Invitational
Pirates finish 10th at
Kitty Hawk
Stephen S cur a mm
SENIOR WHITER
t
jjThc ECU men's golf team trav-
Sfcled to Kitty Hawk, N.C earlier
Jthis week for the ODUScascapc
Invitational. The Pirates' inconsis-
tency caused them to finish tied for
�10th out of 19 teams.
"In college golf you've got to be
Consistent. The reason we've
"ilayed well this season is because
nir top four guys have been very
insistent, very solid. We didn't get
:hat this time, and that did hurt us
head golf coach
Kevin Williams
said.
The Pirates
were paced on
Monday by
Ires h m a n
Michael Chad
Webb. Webb's
Scott Campbell 70 left him in a
fue photo tie for 13th
place after the
first day. Fellow freshman Frank
Adams shot a 73 on Monday that
gave him a tie for 36th overall. The
three other competitors. Scott
Campbell, Marc Miller and Shane
Robinson shot 74, 75 and 77 respec-
tively. After Monday the Pirates
were tied for tenth.
"We were like a football team
WiGSScorn
yLODl 'Seascape Invitational
I Jt�.jJrf' J 23(t) Scott Campbell 3 33(c) Marc Miller T 49(t) Chad Webb 6l(t) Shane Robinson 76(t) Frank Adams74-70-144 E 75-71-1462 70-80-1506 77-75-1528 ' 75-82-15511
Soured; Sports Information !qumiicnt
Blackbeard's Bench
rewards Pirate fans
Tuition among prizes
for best basketball fan
that played one good half
Williams said.
When play resumed Tuesday, it
was Campbell who led the Pirates.
Campbell shot 70 on the second
day. Miller followed that disap-
pointing Monday with a 71 on
Tuesday. Unfortunately, the rest of
the Pirate competitors did not fare-
as well. The freshmen who carried
the team on Monday, followed up
their solid first rounds with disas-
trous second rounds. Webb shot an
80 and Adams shot an 82 on
Tuesday. Robinson finished some-
what better with a 75.
"The first day we had two guys
play well, but they didn't get any
help from the other three. On
Tuesday we had two different guys
play well but they didn't get any
help from the other three, either
Williams said.
The Pirates. w ill compete next in
their last fall tournament at the
First National South Intercollegiate
on November 2-3.
Mens tennis competes in South Carolina
Kirby and Thalen gjve
strong performance
Tono Tai. l. maoge
SPORTS WRIT-ER
Tie ECU men's tennis team com-
eted at the University of South
Carolina 1998 Fall Invitational this
ast weekend. The team was
ivolved in four singles divisions
nd four doubles divisions.
The team sent Kenny Kirby,
liver Thalen, Michael Huez,
tephan Siebenbrunner, and
oopcCalajo.
4 t X
Kenny Kirby, playing in the B-2
singles, defeated Furman's Jon
Navaro, 6-1, 7-5. in the second
round after receiving a bye in the
first. Stephan Siebcnbruiiner, play-
ing in the B-3 singles, won his first-
round match over USC-Aiken's
Mark Klysner, 6-2, 6-3. He then
moved on to win against USC-
Spartanburg's Gale Johnson, 6-0, 6-
0.
Oliver 'Thalen, playing in the A-
1 singles, won his first round match
against American's Clacs Thenfors,
6-1,6-2. He later fell to number one
seed Justin O'Neal of Florida.
Roope Kalajo, who tied for first
place in the A-l singles consolita-
tion bracket last year, fell to
Charleston Southern's Sandeep
t last year, f
Southern's Sa
j
" am very pleased with the
way the guys played today.
We faced tough competition,
and were able to bring home
some great wins
Tom Morris
Tennis head coach
Yeni Readdy, 6-3, 6-2, after getting
a bye in the first round.
In other B-2 action, Michael
Huez lost his second-round match
against UNCC's Jasper
llukebosch, 6-3, 6-2. Huez
received a first-round bye. He later
moved on in the consolation brack-
et by beating Georgia Southern's
Alejandro Franqui.
The team of Kalajo and 'Thalen
lost to Georgia' s Carlson and Pitts,
8-2, in the first round of the dou-
bles A-2 division. Siebenbrunner
and Slate, playing in the B-3 dou-
bles, lost their match to Bethune-
Cookman College's Miles and
Wellington.
"1 am very pleased with the way
the guys played today, " ECU head
coach Tom Morris said. We faced
tough competition, and were able
to bring home some great wins
T SEE TENNIS. PAGE tS
TODD T.U. I. MADGE
SPORTS WRITER
Are you ready for Pirate basket-
ball? Well, fans, Pirate basketball
is ready for you. Move over you
"Cameron Crazies the
"Blackbeard's Bench" is here.
The Sports Marketing
Department has created a new
support group for the Pirate bas-
ketball teams called
"Blackbeard's Bench ' The
"Bench" will consist of 10-15
original members who will try to
recruit at least 10 people each to
come to the ECU basketball
games and help raise the level of
enthusiasm at Minges Coliseum.
"The original members will
get a free t-shirt and be able to
attend pregame socials assistant
director of Marketing Chris
Loney said. "When you become a
member you will get a punch card
with the numbers 1-20. After get-
ting your card punched for com-
ing to eight men's or women's
basketball games you will get a
free t-shirt. When you then come
to 10 games you will be able to
get a coupon for a free pizza
By coming to 12 games you can
get free Gatorade gear, and 14
games will enable you to get
admission into the pregame parry.
If you attend 20 home men's and
women's games, yoiS will get a
pizza party for 10.
If you can attend 20 games, you
are entered inro a grand prize
drawing for the spring 1999 semes-
ter of in-state tuition and books
from Pepsi.
These prizes will given out
after the men's and women's sea-
son has been completed.
As an ECU student you already
get in to all the men's and women's
basketball games for free, but the
seats you're guaranteed as a sup-
port group member are right
behind the teams' benches.
"When you become a member
you will get a punch card with
the numbers 1-20. After getting
your card punched for coming
to eight men s or women s
basketball games you will get a
free t-shirt. When you then come
to 10 games you will be able to
get a coupon for a free pizza
Chris Loney
Assistant Director nl Marketing
If you are interested in joining
"Blackbeard's Bench" please con-
tact the Sports Marketing
Department at 328-4530.





1
14 Thtirtdiy, Octobir 29, 1998
Football
continued from page 13
doesn't matter if I don't get any
more the rest of the season as long
as wc go out there and win
Logan compared Houston's
defense to that of ECU's with one
exception, they don't have a
defender that compares with
Coleman on the outside.
"They've played well. They're
like us in that they don't blitz too
much Logan said. "They do get
a push up the middle of the pock-
et. They've got some good players
but not what I've seen to be a real-
sports
Tin tut Csrolinian
ly sudden, sudden player off the
edge
Logan feels his team can move
the ball through the. air against
Houston's zone coverage.
"Last year we won the game
throwing the football Logan
said. "Wc went over the top of
their secondary a couple of times
with Troy Smith. They're zone
oriented. They play some man
coverage on blitz, they don't like
to do it though
Kerr says it will be important
for ECU to set the tone early on.
He said the Cougars use some
questionable tactics and last years
game became pretty physical.
"They're pretty dirty Kerr
said. "They hold a lot, they bite,
scratch and do a little bit of every-
thing else. I think we've just got to
go out and hit them in the mouth
one good time the very first play
Coleman says it will be nice to
be back home after two games on
the road.
"I just hope it's a packed house
here so we can have the crowd
behind us Coleman said. 'The
two road losses have been tough,
but we're back home now and I
think we're going to come away
with another victory
The tailgating fields will open
at 11:30 a.m. while kickoff is set
for 3:30 p.m.
P4R1YMAKERS PJIESEN15
SATURDAY MGHT HttiXW��N
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FEATURING A CAST OF HUNDREDS OF COSTUMES
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FOR THE HOTTEST LICENSES &
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WIGS
MAKE-UP
MASKS
Where's Norm?
Since this is Alcohol Awareness Week,
it gives you the opportunity to look
around campus to find Norm.
5 Thundty,
Don
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HAIRORESS1NG
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STUDENT DISCOUNT 10 foils . cuts � perms . waxing
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When you find him, return his to
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He could be anywhere
Hint: He is about 2 ft. tall, looks something like his picture,
and he has a "Please Return Me" tag.
While you are at it, you just might try the Alcohol 101
program at the computer labs across campus
Bet you'll learn something!
JUST VISIT ANY OF THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS
HEALTH PROMOTION & WELL-BEING 210 WHICHARD
JOYNER LIBRARY MEDIA & TEACHING RESOURCES CENTER
CAMPUS COMPUTER LABS AT
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
AUSTIN 208, BREWSTER D214
WHITE HALL
ULMSTEAD HALL
AYCOCK HALL
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Just show your ECU student D at Danyl's
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on your entire dinner check. Try our famous
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�Does rax Include Alcoholic Bevenges
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Thi Ent Csroliniin
5 Thuridiy, Oelob�r 29. 1998
sports
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Tennis
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Kirby won his third-round
match by default from Richmond's
Todd Parker. He was later able to
hold off Coastal Carolina's Niclas
Andhoff, 7-5, 5-7, 6-3, in the quar-
terfinals.
Siebenbrunner finished in fifth
place in the B-3 singles after beat-
ing UNCWs Rob Brown, 7-6, 7-6,
but then losing to Georgia Tech's
Jason Jeong. Slate, competing in
the B-4 singles, finished in third
place after beating Winthrop's
Schafranski, 6-0, 6-2, but then
falling to Old Dominion's Nikola
Laca, 6-1,6-3.
Kirby and Huez received a first-
round bye in the B-2 double divi-
sion. They then held off Furman's
O'Keefe and Navarro, 9-7.
Unfortunately, they then lost to
Georgia Southern's Clark and
Singer, 8-4.
Kirby was able to reach the B-2
single semifinals where he was not
able to defeat Floridia's Dylan
Mann, 6-2,6-4.
"We have had a great tourna-
ment this weekend Morris said.
" I am especially impressed with
Kenny, who was down 3-0 in the
third set and came back to win 6-3.
Today was his best match of the
fall season
ECU will next compete at the
Rolex Championships in Chapel
Nov. 6-8.
I
FINEST STUDENT
HOUSING AVAILABLE
DON'T MAKE THE MISTAKE
OF NOT DISCUSSING THIS
WITH YOUR PARENTS
SEE THEM NOW
NEW CONDOMINIUMS
FOR SALE
(SPECIAL FINANCING AVAILABLE)
OR RENT
3 BEDROOMS
3 BATHROOMS
3 WALK IN CLOSETS
NEAR CAMPUS
UNIT PLAN
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-440-5378
I
I
THIS SATURDAY DON'T MISS THE
HALLOWEEN MASQUERADE PARTY
@ CLUB VENUS
IT'S GHOULS NIGHT OUT SO
WEAR YOUR BEST COSTUME
� Judging Begins @lai
� Cash Prizes
� $1 Bud Light
� Halloween"
� Live Band






. . , . . ���"� Vj .

�����
16 Thufidiy, Ottobtr 28. 1996
Pirates get new website
sports
The East Carolinian
New up-to-date
information online
Travis Barkley
senior writer
The ECU Athletics Department
unveiled its new website, www.ecu-
pirates.com, earlier this month.
The site will serve as the official
and most complete source of infor-
mation on all Pirate sports.
Up-to-date information on
teams, student-athletes, schedules,
Pirate Club and ticket information
will be available on-line. The site
will be updated daily by ECU's
Sports Information office.
"We are extremely excited about
our new website Athletics
Director Mike Hamrick said. "This
site will serve as the official source
of information regarding our pro-
gram and will be a great service to
our fans and alumni
This is not the first time the
notion of such access to information
has been considered, however.
"It's been in the works for proba-
bly a little more than two years
Sports Information Director Norm
Reilly said. "We have had an athlet-
ics website through the ecu.edu site
and have maintained it to some
extent, but it wasn't very flashy,
graphically, as far as images. It was
somewhat an average site, and we
tried to do a good job as far as main-
taining the information. As the
internet has grown, we've had our
fans and coaches come to us that
needed more
Reilly said having a good website
is important when competing with
other schools.
Visit www.ecupirates.com
ULL0te
I TUESDAY:
I Sftitgenle ofignt
"A Touch Of Class"
756-6278
WEDNESDAY:
uWiteu iAligfit �
cDojicgk
"Skylar"
. THURSDAY:
Counhy �
bestow oMglit
Located 5 miles West of
Greenville on 264 Alt.
(Behind Aladdin Services & Limo)
� FRI. & SAT:
' Qwlic Dancats

� Doors open: 7:30 pm
� Stage Time: 9:00 pm
Get p-�erC� �
eyebrow.
oarcartilas0'
navel: ��5
to
'bi�e
�ue,
"���36
WewillbeAtany
competitor's advertised
prices!
Large selection of imported
And domestic jewelry!
� Wtdool
exotic piercings
� We sptdohe m tnttootag ad
body piercing only
� We ore Greenville's only keohk
deportment inspected studio
� We dove been in business over 8
years with IS years experience
Tuesday TrtuRsday: 1-9 p.m FridAy: 1-10 p.m Saturday: 12-10 p.m.
CALL US! 756-0600
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
TATTOOING BY AWARD WINNING ARTISTS!
From downtown, go straight down Dickinson Avenue
Extension, located at 4685 US Hwy. 13, Greenville.
The EnterSoft Network
1-888-2 7 6-4ESN
INTERNET
ECU Student Special
$18.95Month
Available at:
The little Computer Co.
Located at 106 Trade St. off Memorial Dr.
(behind Outback Steakhouse)
Unlimited Access � 100 Digital, 100 56K � No Busies
252-355-9105
The Fleming Agency congratulates Bill Jqw on being named one of
Northwestern Mulual's top interns for I9')8, Our program is rated one of
Have you heard from Bill )ova?
the lop 10 internships in ihc country
along with companies like Boeing,
Citibank. .IP. Morgan and ,M" Bill's
accomplishmcnl will be recognized in
an ad appearing in the October 2o
issue of Sports lllustrali'tl Learn
more aboui Northwestern Mulual's
sales Internship program. You can earn real money and gel a head siarl
on a rewarding financial services career. Call us loday
Bui. Jova, College Agent
The Fleming Agency
21" Commerce Sireel
(ireenville. NC 2"8SS
252355-7700
ern
(MWfl Ihi-wirtrmii
lli.ll I III' llMJUIKi'l n
The Quiet Company'
wwi,nl)rth�Mfnrmmi.il.umi
�ftrntmni Review finTitj loft Inivmthip I9M
&�
NORTH CAROLINA'S FINEST
Costuwes
2803 SOUTH EVANS ST.
GREENVILLE, NC 27834
252-756-7903
10 DISCOUNT
WITH STUDENT ID
Monday - Friday
8:00-6:00
Saturday
8:00-5:00
-PLEASE CUT, SAVE, AND SHARE-
701 East Fifth Street, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
Graduating in Dec'98 or MaySummer of 1999? I Services for Freshmen
� through Alumni
Have you registered by attending a weekly connection session? Every
Monday at 4PM in the Room 103-Career Services Building; other sessions
on other days of the week to accommodate schedules
�A variety of services for all majors
�EDUCATION CAREER DAY-Feb 26 -100 School Systems
� Congratulations to the School of Technology, DSCI Dept & Criminal Justice
for their Career Events!
, HEALTH CAREER DAY
10AM-1:30PM on Thursday, November
12,1998 Located in the Allied Health
J Building (Carol Belk). A partial listing of
i some of the employers attending include:
t r
I NC Nutrition. Serv. Div.
I Women's 6 Child. Health
I Easter Seals
j Children's Therapy services
.Durham Regional Hospital
I First Health of the Carolinas
INC Baptist Hospitals
'NC Developmental
I

Evaluation Centers INC.
Moses Cone Health
System. NC Div. of Mental
HealthDDSAS
The Carolinas Healthcare System
Central State Hospital
Roanoke-Chowan Hospital
SCHOOL OF INDUSTRY &
TECHNOLOGY FALL CAREER FAIR
9AM-1PM on Thursday, November 5. 1998 .
located in Rawl Rooms 105 &106.
For more information, contact 120 Rawl, 328-1634.
Guests include:
Stone Heavy Duty
Kinston Neuse Company (KNC)
Underwriters Laboratories, Inc.
Fastenal Company
Ferguson enterprises,
Inc.Perdue Farms, Inc.
Pleasant Hardware Company
ASMO
Anderson Homes
Hensel Phelps Construction
Hughes Supply, INc
Cooper Tools
ST. Wooten
Fred Smith Homes
Exploring Careers - Wednesdays at 4PM - Career
Services Room 103
Sign up for "SIGI" which helps you understand
career options. Using "1,2,3 and enter on a key-
board" is all you need to know how to do. You
may also search for careers by major.
Career Services Homepage: Some new areas
to explore and check it at this new shorter
address: www.ecu.educareer. Feel free to visit
our offices at the Career Services Building, at
701 East 5th Street.
Under Career and Occupational Information
Button, check out MACES if you want to find
out more about different majors and careers.
Other Programs at 701 E. 5th St
� Resume Preparation Workshops - Tuesdays at 4PM
� Help for Better Interviews Workshops - Thursdays at 4PM
� Dining Etiquette (Putting your best fork forward) - special session
� Using the Internet for Job Searching Workshops - special programs
� General Job Search Strategies Workshops
� Class and Club Presentations Tours of Resource Rooms
Graduate and Professional School Fair
i The Graduate School and Graduate Student Advisor
�Council along with support form the Career Services
jOffice will coordinate this first fair for anyone inter-
i ested in attending graduate schoollaw and other
� professional programs. The event will be held in the
j Mendenhall Student Center's Multipurpose Room
�from 10AM-2PM on Thursday, Nov. 5 1998 with the
� following school scheduled to participate:
Appalachian Slate Unive. Chatham College.
� East Carolina University
Fayetteville State Unive.
� High Point University
I Merideth College
NC State University
I NC AfiT State University
Pacific Graduate School of Psychology
� Savannah College ol Art & Design
I South Carolina Stale Univerisity
UNC - Chapel Hill
� UNC - Greensboro
J UNC Wilmington
University of Georgia
� Virginia Commonwealth University
I Western Carolina University
I Winthrop University
� Appalachian School of Law (in W VA) School of Law
I College of William ft Mary School of Law
I NC Central University School ol Law
. UNC � Chapel Hill School ol Law
Wake Forest University School of Law
� Temple University Podiatric Medical School
I Universidad Automnoma De Guadalajara - SOM
Graduate School
Graduate Health Sciences
Graduate School
Grad. Sch & Com Educ.
Grad. Sch 6 Sch. ol Bus.
John E. Weens Graduare School
Graduate School
Graduare School
Clinical Psychology. Ph.D. program
Graduate School
School of Business
Graduate School
Graduate School
Graduate School
College of Pharmacy. Ph.D. program
Graduate School
Graduare School
I
J t-
ALL UNDERGRADUATE & GRADUATE STUDENTS!
ALL MAJORS INVITED!
Don't miss this fair if you ever considered continuing your education!
Employers interviewing at
SprintCentral CarolinaJ.A. Jones
First UnionIBMIntegon
Lane BryantKeaneBureau of the Census
National TextilesXeroxSherwin Williams
PORTER CABLEUnderwriters LabsOlde Discount
Strickland InsuranceThe Financial GroupMarriot Corp.
Universal LeafCollins & AirmanDelta Air Lines
Ford Motor CreditFerguson EnterprisesBright Horizons
SyntelMicrosoftChildren's Ctrs
Nations BankHughes SupplyBB&T
WachoviaState Farm InsuranceFirst Citizens Bank
Target Stores
Lowe's Companies
Carmax
Roadway Express
Burlington Industries
E&J Gallo
Triangle Bank
Sears
Stone Heavy Duty
Perdue farms
NC Cooperative
Extension
Office Depot
Eckerd Youth Alternatives
Enterprise Rent a Car
First Union
IBM - Global
First Financial Group
And Others
This ad paid for by gifts from Parents and Alumni. We are grateful for their willingness to help support sharing information in this way.
Jl 7 Thursday,
WESLEY CO
off deposit,
apartments,
�washerdryer
�pus. Availabli
:1921
SPACIOUS
�blocks from I
jCall Dogwooi
8900 for moi
WALK TO I
$275month.
wood Apts
Villa. 758-659
NEWLY REF
bedrooms, 2
up, approx. 2
space. 752-77
LANGSTON
$100 off depc
apartments.
all appliances
tions. over 90
$410 Call 751
LOOKING FO
can study? Ea
you. 1 bedroc
pets. Call Wo
5005.
TWO BEDRO
tral airheat,
porch, no pe'
7799. Close tc
WILDWOOD
dishwasher, 3
or 252-332-6
and spacious.
WANTED: S(
2 btirm 2 t
Condominium
sublease until
renew. $450i
posit. For mo
758-6204 or fi
RINGGC
Now Tal
1 bedrooi
Efficient:
CALL
SIX BDRM Ik
cated on 4th I
7653 or 758-2'
ROOMMATE
two bedroom, 1
Arlington Squa
grad stu
$227.50montl
Wanted ASAP.
RESPONSIBLI
ed to share a fc
Only $200mo
space. You mu
Call Chris at 76
PLAYERS CLL
to sublease. 5
month utilities
quired. Washe
and bath. Call '
message.
ROOMMATE V
BR. apartmen
$240mo. 1
preferred. Call
0074.
' 1-2 FEMALE r
share spacious
No pets. Very
Jan. Call Kristy
message.
NO DEPOSIT
' roommate, 2 be
rent $205mon
water & sewer
353-4734.
W A I
Student wc
set-up, data e
program. Comi
office for infc
DC
FOR USEC
TOMMY
NAUTIC
POLO
AND
SHIRTS, V
GOLD
� Stereos, (Syst
k
41
(DRIVI
ONEC





The East Carolinian
�W. do all
txotk pferdags
:e in tattootog owl
body pier duo only
iville's only health
it inspected studio
in business over 8
i years experience
-day: 12-10 p.m.
Y
RTISTS!
in Avenue
�envllle.
Y
T
VS FINEST
mes
VANS ST.
SIC 27834
'903
UNT
NT ID
riday
90
ay
30
il Fair
dent Advisor
eer Services
inyone inter-
v and other
e held in the
pose Room
198 with the
icipate:
ances
Juc.
Bus.
uale School
Ph.D. program
i Pit D. program
UDENTS!
our education!
rnatives
a Car
Group
; way.
i 7 Thursday, October 29, 1998
FOR RENT
WESLEY COMMONS South: $100
off deposit, 2 bedroom, 1 bath
apartments, watersewer included,
�washerdryer, 6 blocks from cam-
pus. Available now. $440. Call 758-
:1921
SPACIOUS 2 bedroom apt. 2
�blocks from ECU campus. No pets!
tall Dogwood Hollow Apts. at 752-
8900 for more details.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$275month. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apts 125 Avery St. Green-
ville 758-6596.
NEWLY REFURBISHED condo. 4
bedrooms, 2 12 baths. WD hook-
up, approx. 2000 square feet, great
space. 752-7738.
LANGSTON PARK Apartments:
$100 off deposit, 2 bedroom, 1 bath
apartments, watersewer included.
all appliances, washerdryer connec-
tions, over 900 sq. ft. Available now.
$410 Call 758-1921.
LOOKING FOR a quiet place so you
can study? Eastgate is the place for
you. 1 bedroom, WD included. No
pets. Call Woodcliff Rentals at 758-
5005.
TWO BEDROOM brick duplex, cen-
tral airheat, private drive, front
porch, no pets. 756-8444 or 355-
7799. Close to campus. $430.
WILDWOOD VILLA, washerdryer,
dishwasher, 3 story. Call 752-8900
or 252-332-6783. Very affordable
tnid spacious.
WANTED: SOMEONE to sublease
2 barm 2 bath apt. in Kingston
Condominiums beginning Nov. 1,
sublease until Feb. 1 with option to
renew, $450month, no security de-
posit. For more info, call Stacy at
758-6204 or Adrian at 717-0725.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
SIX BDRM. house for rent Jan. 1 lo-
cated on 4th and Oak St. Call 561-
7653 or 758-2403.
ROOMMATE WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED to share
two bedroom, two bath apartment in
Arlington Square. Upperclassman or
grad student preferred.
$227.50month plus 12 electric.
Wanted ASAP. 355-8321.
RESPONSIBLE ROOMMATE need-
ed to share a four bedroom mansion.
Only $200mo 14 utilities. Lots of
space. You must see to appreciate.
Call Chris at 752-5080.
PLAYERS CLUB roommate needed
to sublease. $240 a month. First
month utilities Free! No deposit re-
quired. Washerdryer, own room
and bath. Call 756-7539 and leave a
message.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share 4-
BR, apartment in Players Club.
$240mo. 14 utilities. Females
preferred. Call Alison W. at 353-
0074.
' 1-2 FEMALE roommates needed to
share spacious 2 bdrm. 1 bath apt.
No pets. Very affordable. Available
Jan. Call Kristy � 758-1317, leave a
message.
NO DEPOSIT needed. Seeking
' roommate, 2 bdrm. 1 12 bathroom,
rent $205month, free basic cable,
water & sewer. For more info, call
353-4734.
WANTED
Student worker to assist in ,
set-up, data entry of accounting
program. Come by Student Media
office for info, or call 328-6009.
Ill IKllklll' In! �� Il'
HALLOWEEN
IS COMING
SLEEPER SOFA and smoked glass
dining room table with 4 chairs
$200; excellent condition: call 757-
1949, please leave message.
PIANO: YAMAHA Clavinova
CVP83. like new, disc drive, 88 keys,
$2800. Call after 6 p.m 321-6889.
SONY EQUALIZER 7-bands per
channel 5 factory and 10 user pre-
sets Equalization Curves Fluorescent
spectrum Analyzer display Cursor
control System Remote control
$175.00 328-3535
LARGE CAPACITY WHITE wash
erdryer for sale. Brand new $600
negotiable. Call 830-2069.
DIAMOND ENGAGEMENT ring,
1.01 carat center with accent dia-
monds mounted in 14 karat yellow
gold. Brand new. Have appraisal.
758-2887, leave message.
OLYMPIC SIZE weight bench with
300 pounds of Olympic weights.
Comes with leg extension. $400
OBO. Call.Bruce at 756-1035.
MATCHING BROYHIUL sofa and
chair, excellent condition, $100.
Contact Wayne @ 752-1893.
NEED A PART TIME JOB?
RPSINC.
Ls looking for I'AUCu. iiANixn to load vans and
unload trailers for the am shift hours 3fllam to Bam.
J 7.00hour; tuition assistance available after 30 days,
Future career opptirtunities In operations and manage-
ment possible. Applications can be filled out at 2401
United Drive (near the aquatics center) cireenville
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROUNfl SKY SPORTS
(9191496-2224
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$ (J J J fl. iiidthoeslGoodJwns.
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
We N�d Timbt'rland booty
TOMMY HILFIGER TIMBERLAND
NAUTICA ABERCROMBIE
POLO EDDIE BAUER
AND OTHER NAME BRAND MEN'S CLOTHING
SHIRTS, PANTS, JEANS, SWEATS, JACKETS, SHOES, ETC.
WE ALSO BUY AND SELL:
GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
QUICK, EASY, HELPFUL
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
414 S. EVANS (UP THE STREET FROM CUBBIES)
752-3866
TUESDAY - SATURDAY, 9:00 - 5:00
(DRIVE TO THE BACK DOOR BEHIND PARK THEATRE)
ONE OF THE FAVORITE STUDENT STORES FOR YEARS
(IF YOU ARE SELLING, ID IS REQUIRED)

i Swap S ii o
classifieds
FOR SALE
OAKLEY SUNGLASSES. E-Wire.
Excellent condition. Hardly worn.
Paid $130.00. Asking $90.00 or
best offer. Call 355-3183.
AAAA EARLY Specials! Panama
City! Room with kitchen $129! In-
cludes 7 free parties! Daytona149!
New Hotspot-South Beach $129! Co-
coa Beach $149! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
AAAA! EARLY Spring Break Spe-
cials! Bahamas Party Cruise! 6 days
$279! Includes most meals! Awe-
some beaches, nightlife! Departs
from Florida! springbreaktravel.com
1-800-678-6386
MOUNTAIN BIKE for sale: Schwinn
High Timber SS with Rock Shox and
Rhode Gear bike rack $325.00 OBO.
Contact David. 321-0603.
AAAA! EARLY Specials! Cancun
& Jamaica! 7 nights air and hotel
from $399! Includes free food,
drinks, parties! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
GREAT MOUNTAIN Bikes! Trek
ZX6000 and ZX8000, like new, too
many extras to list. Call for prices or
leave message, ask for John, 329-
0534.
Dapper
Dan's
Retro and Vintage Clothing,
Handmade Silver
Jewelry k More.
17 Evans St. Mall 7521750
SERVIUCES
AAAA! SPRING Break Travel was
1 of 6 small businesses in the US
recognized by the Council of Better
Business Bureaus for outstanding
ethics in the marketplace! spring-
breaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386
COME DOWN to Mr. Greg's Total
Care and meet the new licensed nail
technician. October Special is Mani-
curePedicure for $35. Only with ap-
pointment. Call 353-6489.
UMiimim
cancon-Jamaica-Bahawias
IW $5 'S
$97 Jrf&H & o
CAMPUS REPS SIGN UP ONLINE !
18002347007
www.encilesssummertours.com
HELP WANTED
STUDENT REPS-Like meeting new
people? Have a couple hours free
from classes during the day or even-
ing? Flexible schedule? You can earn
extra cash! Marketing positions avail-
able for students to promote credit
cards on your campus for a Fortune
500 Co Call Rahim, (800) 592
2121x133.
ASTHMAALLERGIES? NEEDED:
97 people who desire immediate re-
lief to try and evaluate a new com-
pact, state- of -the -art home air pu-
rification system. No cost or obliga-
tion. Call 252-355-9248
PART-TIME help wanted. Apply Fri-
day 9 a.m1 p.m Monday 5-6 p.m.
Wash Pub, 10th Street, 752-5222. �
CHILD CARE wanted for' 2 small
boys. Nonsmoker. Reliable transpdr-
' tation. Experience & references re-
quired Flex hours available 2-3 af-
ternoons per week. Call 758-9280
1999 INTERNSHIPS! Attention un-
dergraduate business students. Now
interviewing on campus for manag-
ers across Virginia; North and South
Carolina for summer of 1999. Aver-
age earnings last summer. $7,000
Call Tuition Painters at (800) 393-
4521 or e-mail at tuipaint@bell-
south.net
ECU STUDENT Technicians needed
to provide technical support for ev-
ents held in Mendenhail Student
Center and Wright Auditorium Tech-
nical support may include setting up
sound equipment, projection equip-
ment, stage unloading and loading
of trucks for major touring compa-
nies, and maintaining technical '
equipment. Become a part of an ex-
citing team and fun-filled , at-
mosphere today! Apply in person at
the Mendenhail Student Center Job
Board.
SALES AND marketing internship.
Northwestern Mutual Life. Gain valu-
able sales experience and earn good
money. Looks great on resume. Call
Jeff, 355-7700
Three ways to
beat the high
cost of college,
1. The Montgomery Cl Bill
9. Student loan repayment
3. Part-time Income
The Army Reserve Alternate
Training Program is a smart way to
pay for college.
First, if you qualify, the
Montgomery GI Bill can provide
you with up to 87,124 for current
college expenses or approved
votech training.
Second, if you have�or obtain�
a qualified student loan not in
default, you may get it paid off at
the rate of 15 per year or $500,
whichever is greater, up to a maxi-
mum of $10,000. Selected military
skills can double that maximum.
Third, you can earn part-time
money in college, and here's how
it works: One summer you take
Basic Training, and the next sum-
mer you receive skill training at
ah Army school. You'll earn over
$1,500 for Basic and even more for
skill training. Then you'll attend
monthly meetings at an Army
Reserve unit near your college,
usually one weekend a month plus
two weeks a year. You'll be paid
over $107 a weekend to start. It's
worth thinking about Give us a call:
756-9695
MALI TOO CAMII-
ARMY RESERVE
www.goarmy.com
GIVE US TIME
TOREPAY
YOUR LOAN.
After just three years in
the Army, your college
loan could be a thing of
the past.
Under the Army's Loan
Repayment program, each
year you serve on active
duty reduces your indebt-
edness by one-third or
$1,500, whichever amount
is" greater, up to a $65,000
limit.
This offer applies to
Perkins Loans, Stafford
Loans and certain other
federally insured loans
which are not in default
And this is just the
first of many benefits the
Army will give you. Get
the whole story from
your Army Recruiter.
756-9695
ARMY.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
www.goarmy.com
TUTORS NEEDED: Do you have a
3.0 or better GPA? Are you interest-
ed in becoming a tutor for the Office
of Student" Development-Athletics?
We need individuals capable of tu-
toring any & all levels (0001-5999) in
the following subject areas: ACCT,
ASIP, BIOL, CHEM, CSCI. DESN.
ECON, EMST, GEOG, JUST, MATH.
MGMT, MKTG. PHIL. PHYS, & SOCI.
Undergraduate students are paid six
dollars an hour ($6) and graduate
students are paid seven dollars an
hour ($7). If this sounds like the job
for you or if you have any other ques-
tions, please contact Isha Williams
at 328-4691 for further information.
PART-TIME Instructor needed Mon-
Thurs. afternoons to provide individ-
ualized instruction in a positive learn-
ing environment. Individual must be
competent in reading and math. Cer-
tified teacher preferred, but not re-
quired. Pick up application or send
resume to Sylvan Learning Center,
PO Box 1297, Kinston. NC 28503.
VARSITYBOOKS.COM SEEKS
student managers to direct on-cam-
pus operations for rapidly growing e-
commerce business. This paid part-
time position is ideal for innovative,
highly-motivated, exceptionally
bright, go-getters who want to prove
experience isn't everything Call 202-
256-5048 for more info.
The East Carolinian
HELP WANTED
FREE CD Holders, T-shirts, Prepaid
Phone Cards Earn $1000 part-time
on campus. Just call 1-800-932-
0528 x 64.
INTERNSHIP AVAILABLE in public
relations Gain valuable experience
in public speaking and human re-
sources. Call Gerri at 355-7897.
ARE YOU a female graduate stud-
ent? Live in position available, bene-
fits including: free room and board,
free parking and a monthly stipend.
If you are interested, please call 758-
5568.
THE ANIMAL Emergency Clinic is
interviewing veterinary techni-
ciansassistants for full and part-
time positions. Must be available
nights, weekends, and holidays. Sal-
ary and benefits based on experi-
ence. For more information, call 355-
3825 or stop by the clinic,
ABSOLUTE SPRING Break Take
2" 2 Free Trips on Only 15 Sales
and. Earn $$$$. Jamaica, Cancun.
Bahamas. Florida, Padre! lowest Pric-
es! Free Meals, Parties & Drinks.
"Limited Offer" 1-800-426-
7710www.sunsplashtours.com
YOUTH BASKETBALL Coaches
The Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department is recruiting 12 to 16
part-time youth basketball coaches
for the winter youth basketball pro-
gram. Applicants must possess
some knowledge of the basketball
skills and have the ability and pa-
tience to work with youth. Applic-
ants must be able to coach young
people ages 7-18. in basketball fun-
damentals Hours range from 3 p.m.
until 7 p.m. with some oight and
weekend coaching. This program
will run from the end of November to
mid-February. Salary rates start at
$5.15 per hour. For more informa-
tion, please call Ben James or
Michael Daly at 329-4550 after 2
p.m.
HELP WANTED
EARN WHILE YOU laarn, up to
$1,000.00 wk. Day and night
shifts. Claan, secure working at-
mosphere. Playmates Adult En-
tertainment. 252-747-7686 for in-
terview.
PI DELTA would like to thank all
their dates who attended Grab-A-
Date on Saturday. We hope you guys
had as much fun as we did! Love,
the sisters and new members
PI DELTA sorority wishes everyone a
very Happy Halloween Have a great
time and be safe!
CONGRATULATIONS TO Pi Delta
sister Jennifer Denton on your ad-
vanced internship at Disney. We are
really proud of you and we're going
to miss you so much next semester
Keep Mickey straight! Love, your sis-
ters
FRATERNITIES�need something
fun for your new members to do?
Have them enter in Pi Delta's 2nd
Annual- Male Wild N Crazy Towel
Contest at the Attic on Nov. 10th.
Cash prizes for 1-st, 2nd. and 3rd �
place
THE SISTERS. of Gamma Sigma
Sjgma would like to thank Sigma Nu
for the Great Tie Social We had a
blast!
TO THE little sisters of Delta Zeta,
we hope you had a fun week and.
that you were surprised this morn-
ing! We love you guys! Love, your big
sis' '
THANK YOU, Sigma Phi Epsilon. for
a wonderful social last Friday. We
hope you had a good time, too.
Hope to see you again. Love. Zeta
Tau Alpha � - . �
THANKS ALPHA Delta Pi for a
great' Treasure Hunt on Thursday.
Hope to do it again Love, the broth-
ers of Sigrha Alpha Epsilon
THE SISTERS of Gamma Sigma
Sigma would like to let the pledges
know how happy vye are to have you
as or "littles BigLil Day was a
blast.
PARTY: LAMBDA Chi presents the
Night Before band party featuring
Blue Dogs. Oct 30, 11-3 a.m. Info,
call 752-3524.
CONGRATS TO Alpha Phi on win-
ning the flag football champion-
ships. Your sister sorority, Zeta Tau
Alpha, is yery. proud of you!
ZETA TAU Alpha would like to
thank Delta Chi for a great social last
Thursday. Hope to do it again soon!
EPSILON SIGMA Alpha, we hope
everyone has a safe and happy Hal-
loween. See you at Fright Night!
TO THE brothers of Kappa Alpha,
thanks for the Twister Social last Sat-
urday. Everyone had a great time!
Love, the sisters and new members
of Delta Zeta
ALPHA XI DELTA, we had a great
time with ya'll Friday night. Can't
wait to do it again. Love, the brothers
of Sigma Alpha Epsilon
ZETA TAU Alpha would like to
thank Phi Tau for being our Adopt-A-
Fraternity this week We hope you
have a great one.
OTHER
TWO PLAYFUL, adorable kittens
need a good home. Please call 353-
4088 if interested.
SPRING BREAK 99! Cancun Nas-
sau " Jamaica 'Mazatlan Acapulco
' Bahamas Cruise Florida Florida '
South Padre Travel Free and make
lots of Cash! Top reps are offered
full-time staff jobs Lowest price
Guaranteed. Call now for details!
www.classtravel.com 800838-6411
SPRING BREAK - Plan Now! Can-
cun. Jamaica, Mazatlan, & S. Padre.
Early bird savings until Oct. 31st.
America's best prices & packages.
Campus sales reps wanted. Earn
free trips cash. 1.800 SURFS.UP
www.studentexpress .com
ANNOUNCEMENTS
PERSONALS
BRENT, HAPPY 21st Birthday. I love
you always and forever! Love, Mandy
GREEK PERSONALS
REGISTRATION FOR General Col-
lege Students. General College stud-
ents should contact their advisers
the week of November 2-6 to make
arrangements for academic advising
for Spring Semester 1999. Early reg-
istration week is set for November 9-
J3.
STUDY SKILLS Workshop: Monday
11:00-12:00 and 3:30-4:30. The Cen-
ter for Counseling and Student De-
velopment is offering the following
workshop on November 2nd. If you
are interested in this workshop,
please contact the Center at 328-
6661.
VISIT THE Wall- Monday thru Thurs-
day, Wright Place, and write and
read how alcohol has affected our
lives. � ' .
HALLOWEEN CARNIVAL, spon-
sored by Sigma Sigma Sigma, Chi
Omega, and Alpha Delta Pi; Oct.
30th from 3-8 p.m. at the Chi Ome-
ga and Alpha Delta Pi houses. Child-
ren 14 and under welcome, admis-
sion is 1 canned food: donations ac-
cepted, proceeds go to Greenville
Homeless Shelter.
B-GLAD BISEXUALS Gays Lesbi-
ans and Allies for Diversity meets
Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m. General
Classroom Building room 3006.
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS minis-
try meets each Tuesday 6-8 p.m. at
. First Presbyterian on the corner of
14th and Elm St. Join us for dinner
and a program. For info, or a ride call
Kim � 752-8758 or 3m�broad-
cast.net. ' .
BECOMING A successful student-
Test Anxiety Workshop: Thursday
3:30-4:30. The Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development is of-
fering the following workshop on Oc-
tober 29th. If you are interested in
this program, please contact the
Center at 328-6661.
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: Thursday 3:30-5PM. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop on October 29th. If
you are interested in this workshop,
please contact the Center at 328-
6661.
PARTY: LAMBDA Chi presents the
20th Annual Nigh: Before band par-
ty. Featuring the Blue Dogs. Oct.
30th 11-3a.m. � the Lambda Chi
house. For info call 752-3524.
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION Work-
shop: Tuesday 1:30. The Center for
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering the following work-
shop on November 3rd. If you are in-
terested in this workshop, please
contact the Center at 328-6661.
DOES THE thought of public speak-
ing panic you? Well, you are not
alone. Pick up some valuable tips on
overcoming your stage fright. Tues-
day, Nov. 3 at 4 p.m. in Mendenhail
Student Center Multi Purpose Room.
Be there!
COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN Church
will be hosting a Hallelujah Fun Time
for children ages 4-12 on Saturday,
October 31 at 1 p.m This event is
designed as an alternative to Hallo-
ween. Activities include games, a
puppet skit, snacks, and ministering
of the Word of God and will be held
at Community Christian Academy,
2009 Pactolus Road. Greenville For
info, call 551-9143
DEATH - We all know someone who
has died of alcohol related situa-
tions. Take time to remember them
this week at the Wall of Remem-
brances, on the Mall, Tuesday
through Friday. 11:30-1:30.
SMOKING CESSATION Workshop:
Thursday 3:30-5 p.m. The Center for
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering the following work-
shop on October 29th. If you are in-
terested in this program, please con-
tact the Center at 328-6661.
ALCOHOL AWARENESS Week-
October 26-31. Learn how to take
care of yourself and others. Visit The
Wall and The Wall of Remembranc-
es. Sign the pledge. Have a safe Hal-
loween.
STUDY SKILLS Workshop: Tuesday
11:00-12:00. The Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development is of-
fering the following workshop on
November 3rd. If you are interested
in this workshop, please contact the
Center at 328-6661.
ADVERTISE IN THE EAST CAROLINIAN
CLASSIFIEDS
ONLY $225 WORDS FOR STUDENTS
IT WORKS!





iVVH
I
DONT MISS THE FUN!
DON'T MISS THE DISCOUNTS!
EEP, DEEP DISCOUNTS V HALLOWEEN TREA1
HIDDEN DISCOUNTS
Between 4:00 pm and 7:00 pm on Thursday, October
29th, look for SPECIAL HIDDEN SALE TAGS on select
merchandise throughout the store!
Find a Skull on the tag and TAKE 20 OFF the regular
price, Spiders are 30 OFF, and Ghosts are 40 OFF!
Quantities and sizes of the specially priced merchan-
dise are limited, so SHOP EARLY!
20 to 40 OFF
Assorted Apparel From
Jones & Mitchell
Polar Fleece
Mr. Augi's
GEAR
TLC
Social Awareness
Russell
30 OFF Select
ART SUPPLIES
Brush Basins, Yarha Brush Boxes, Brush
Washers, Webb Professional Palets, Fiber
Stock Storage Envelopes wo Handles,
16.9 fl oz Galeria Acrylic Paint
20 - 30 OFF
Select SUPPLIES
50 OFF
Assorted Nursing Clinical Cards
50 OFF
Assorted Bookmarks
40- 50 OFF
Assorted Tradebooks
Old Edition Textbooks
.99 each

1907 -19
BJMJi ITJiM SA,
40 - 75 OFF ASSORTED ITEMS
FROM ALL DEPARTMENTS
THESE GREAT
DISCOUNTS ARE
AVAILABLE
WHILE SUPPLIES
LAST:
THURSDAY,
4 pm - 7 pm!
Assorted Computer
SuppliesAccessories
$1.00 each
Single Red Diskettes - 50 OFF
Single Disk Containers - 30 OFF
Mouse Pads - 20 OFF
Screen Savers - 20 OFF
ROLTEK Internet Mouse - 20 OFF
Getting Started wOffice '97 -
50 OFF
(H
TAKE A KID TO THE
FOOTBALL GAME SPECIAL!
See PeeDee and the
ECU Cheerleaders
Thursday, October 29
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Don't forget to pick up your football tickets,
Tuesday through Thursday, 9 am - 7 pm.
30 OFF
ALL REGULAR PRICE
CHILDRENS &
YOUTH
APPAREL
TUES OCT. 27 � SAT OCT. 31,1998 ONLY
25 OFF
ALL REGULAR PRICE
PURPLE & GOLD
APPAREL
FRI. OCT 30 � SAT OCT. 31,1998 ONLY
Ronald E. Dowdy
Student Stores
Where your dollars support scholars!
Wright Building � 328-6731
Monday - Fridayt 7:30 am - 7:00 pm � Saturday. 9:00 am - 3:00 pm
Discounts apply to regular price merchandise. Subjert to stock on hand. No other discounts or prior purchases apply. Hidden tag discounts may not be taken on substitute merchandise.
Not valid on special order items.
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 29, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 29, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1301
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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