The East Carolinian, October 27, 1998







I
Thursday:
High: 74
Low: 46
Friday: t
High: 74
Low: 55
Efo
Online Survey
www.tec.ecu.edu
"Have youfcver seen an instance of police
brutality?"
I
"Should NATO engage in atrjtrikes against Kosovo?"
55 Yes 45 No
. TtWH8er. OCTOBER 27 ,1998
luesday
VOLUME 74, ISSUE 18
Pirates lose
third game of
season to
Southern
Sports, page!
Protest draws community
attention to police brutality
j-TTiofifTTi)
www.tec.ecu.edu
Organization presents
demands at station
Asn Sheridan
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
, Students and non-students alike
: gathered together in front of the
Greenville Police Station
. Thursday to protest police brutali-
. ty'
The Federation of Partisans
Against Police Brutality (FPAPB)
and the Coalition Against Racism
(CAR) helped orchestrate the Oct.
22 protest. There were around 30
i people peacefully protesting on
the corner of 5th Street and
Greene Street.
"We came here today to speak
out against cases of police harass-
ment and police brutality said
Carlton Smith, a supervisor at the
Mendenhall Student Center.
"(We want to confront the occu-
pying army and to expose the fact
that people don't have control of
their own communities because
"The reason I am out here is
because one incident of police
brutality is one incident too
many. The police are here to
protect and serve the people,
not to brutalize them
Chris Reynolds
Sophomore al Pitt Communiiy College
people have no voice about what
goes on in the police department
The FPAPB presented
demands to start community
forums to inform people about
their rights against the police, an
end to the violation of human
rights by the Greenville Police
Department (GPD), and the police
relinquishing information regard-
ing the racial makeup of its forces
as well as the department's hiring
practices. The group's largest
demand is for a community review
board of the GPD. The CAR
would particularly like this board to
consist of trusted members of the
community, including non-white
and poor communities.
"The reason I am out here is
because one incident of police bru-
tality is one incident too many
said Chris Reynolds, a sophomore
at Pitt Community College. "The
police are here to protect and serve
the people, not to brutalize them
The protest also brought people
together who were not members of
CAR, yet still interested in the
fight against police brutality.
"This is the first time I have
attended any meeting with this
group junior Jeremy Reed said.
"I am interested in more informa-
tion from this group and about this
subject
Oct. 22 was the third annual day
of protest against police brutality.
The GPD had no comment to
CAR and did not bother the pro-
testers because they had obtained
proper permits to hold the protest.
Protesters at Thursday's rally hold signs to raise awareness of police brutality in the community.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE OAIIY REFLECTOR
Frazier awarded
Wright Scholarship
Contract means more online courses
n online courses to be offered at
Tytishia Frazier is also an office assistant at the Ledonia Wright Cultural Center.
PHOTO BY STEVE LOSEY
Academics, leadership
of winner honored
William L eLie ve k
STAFF WRITER
Senior social work major Tytishia
Frazier has been selected by the
Organization of Black Faculty and
Staff (OBFS) as the 1998 recipient
of the Ledonia S. Wright
Memorial Scholarship.
"She has chosen her discipline
of social work because she is com-
mitted to serving others said
Taffye Benson-Clayton, director
of the Ledonia Wright African
American Cultural Center. "Ty is
a model student and a model
employee
The $500 scholarship is award-
ed, annually to the student who
best represents Wright. The schol-
arship honors academic prowess,
leadership and commitment to
service. It is given on merit, finan-
cial need, campus and community
involvement and leadership.
Wright was the founder of the
first black student organization,
Society of United Liberal
Students (SOULS). SOULS has
transformed into Allied Blacks for
Leadership and Equality (ABLE).
"Leadership in and around the
ECU community takes a lot of
integrity and initiative Frazier
said. "As a minority, the scholar-
ship is important just to carry on its
legacy. I am honored to receive the
award. She (Wright) represented
someone who had a lot of leader-
ship and integrity
Frazier is a member of the
Omicron Delta Kappa National
Honor Society, has served on the
ECU Media Board, and has been
the president of ABLE and vice
SEE FRAZIER. PAGE 2
www.tec.ecu.edu
Five courses expected
by spring 1999
Sl'SANNE M ILENKEVICH
STAFF WRITER
ECU has signed a three year con-
tract with Real Education, Inc.for
$30,000 to expand the online
courses offered.
The Denver based company
will help ECU make 20 more
courses available online by the fall
1999 semester.
"Our goal is to have at least five
courses available for the 1999
spring semester Dr. David
Watkins, special assistant to the
vice chancellor of Academic Affairs
said. "The other 15 would be avail-
able by the 1999 fall semester
The distant learning program
allows people worldwide to take
ECU courses and receive credit for
completed courses through the
Internet. ECU already offers sever-
al dozen courses but wants to
expand the program.
The contract for 20 more cours-
es was negotiated by the Distant
Education Extension Advisory
Board and reviewed by the
University Legal Council.
"The Legal Council checked
the contract to make sure EC! was
not entering a contract that will
present legal problems Dr.
Richard Ringcisen, vice chancellor
of Academic Affairs said.
Funding for this program will
come from a bill that the State
I legislature is currently working on
that will provide money to public
schools for distant education.
"If the bill is delayed, KCl'uill
assume responsibility for the pay-
ments and will be reimbursed
when the State passes the pro-
gram Watkins said.
It is more economical for ECU
to expand its online program
through Real Education rather
than develop the programs itself
Ringcisen said.
ECU faculty members will pro-
vide the content for the courses
and will supervise the academic
and curriculum matters.
Alcohol Awareness Week educates students
Events culminate
Halloween night
R AC II A EL HlGDON
STAFF WRITER
Alcohol Awareness Week began
Monday to educate people about
the dangers of alcohol abuse and
will continue through Halloween
night.
"We are trying to help people
become more aware of the use of
alcohol and we have planned vari-
ous activities to increase awareness
of this drug said Donna Walsh,
director of Health Promotion and
Well-Being.
Monday through Thursday stu-
dents are invited by SADD to the
Wright Place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
to write about their experiences
with alcohol on The Wall.
Students arc encouraged to express
whatever their feelings may be,
positive or negative, about the
drug.
A new way to spread alcohol
awareness has been added with the
Wall of Rememberances, which
will be located at the fountain near
Wright Plaza.
"The Wall of Rememberances
is for us to take time and remember
those whose lives have been lost
through an alcohol-related inci-
dent Walsh said. "We are looking
for pictures, notes, or poems
Another new program is called
"Where's Norm?" Students can
win prizes from retrieving lava
lamps hidden around campus and
returning them to 210 Whichard.
The lamps, all named Norm, are
blue and black and wear sunglasses.
Alcohol 101 is a CD-rom to be
SEE ALCOHOL PAGE I





2 Tu.sdiy, Octobst 27. 1998
Tht Em Cirolinisn
Historian dies at 72
Bratton writer of
first official history
Devon White
STAFF WRITER
Mary Jo Bratton, retired professor
official ECU historian,
and author of East
Carolina University: The
Formative Years, 1907-
1982, died Wednesday
in her Greenville home
at the age of 72.
"Mary Jo Bratton
was a very fair minded,
wonderful woman
said Bodo Nischan,
chair of the History
Department. "(She was
an excellent scholar
Since 1967, Bratton
had been a faculty member of the
Department of History. In addition
to the time she spent teaching, she
was the director of graduate studies
in the History Department from
1986 to 1989. Bratton also served as
the acting chair of the department
from 1992 to 1994. She retired in
1995.
"Bratton was always friendly,
fair, and on the ball history pro-
fessor Mike Palmer said.
In 1980 Bratton was delegated
by ECU to write the school's first
official history. East Carolina
University: The Formative Years,
1907-1982, was published in 1986.
In 1997, Bratton helped to write a
summarized history of the universi-
ty for a booklet celebrating ECU's
90th anniversary.
Bratton had
received awards and
fellowships for her
articles and papers
examining the histo-
ry, culture, and soci-
ety of the South.
"Bratton con-
tributed a great
amount to ECU over
the years Nischan
said.
Bratton was born
in Bluefield, West
Virginia in 1926. Her parents were
Thomas Josiah and Irene
McKinstry Jackson. She completed
her undergraduate degrees at
Montreal College and Virginia
Polytechnic Institute. She received
a master's degree and a doctorate at
UNC-Chapel Hill.
Bratton is survived by her
children Jack, Jess, and Katherine.
Alcohol
continued from page 1
publicized this week in campus
computer labs. ECU was one of 50
schools as a trial site last year and
students here helped develop the
program which Walsh describes as
"interactive and fun
Forms will be available in
Mendenhall and the Student
Recreation Center for students to
pledge not to drink on Halloween
night. Also available will be the
Safe Halloween Pledge during
Midnight Madness at Mendenhall
on Saturday night from 9 p.m. to 1
a.m. Midnight Madness is an alco-
hol-free alternative offered which
will include food, beverages, and
games.
Coinciding with Alcohol
Awareness Week is the delivery of
drug and alcohol awareness
booklets to the residence halls.
Core surveys have shown that
74 percent of students believe
their peers drink three times a
week, when in actuality only 17
percent arc reported drinking that
often.
"We are trying to tell the stu-
dents what is really happening at
ECU Walsh said. "There is a big
difference in what is going on and
what students believe
Frazier
continued from page I
Senator Faircloth visits Jenkins Cancer Center
Mary Jo Bratton
PHOTO COURTESV OF
ECU NEWS BUKEAU
leastcarolinians
Ladder of
Production
Progression
Senator Lauch Faircloth leaves the Leo W. Jenkins Cancer Center Monday after a tour of the facilities.
PHOTO BV KIM MCCUMBER
president of ECU Thespians of
Diversity. She has also been active
in the community, volunteering at
the New Directions Shelter, My
Sister's Closet and the Little Willie
Center.
She plans to attend graduate
school to study family therapy.
"Tytishia has shown her skills in
the leadership since her arrival at
the university Benson-Clayton
said. "She was a transfer student
and had to transition during her
first semester here. But after the
semester she flourished as an acad-
emic and a leader. The first semes-
ter she concentrated on grades and
made academics a priority. The
second semester she was able to
build a solid GPA that she used to
branch out to other organizations.
Ty is not only active on campus
but also in various committees and
institutions
According to Benson-Clayton,
Wright built a comprehensive pro-
gram on campus to serve and sup-
port the blacks at ECU. Blacks are
now the largest minority group at
ECU. The Lcdonia Wright
center holds programs such as
tutorials, rap sessions and student
academic and leadership
achievement ceremonies.
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��POT
Where's Norm?
Since this is Alcohol Awareness Week,
it gives you the opportunity to look
around campus to find Norm.
When you find him, return his to
210 Whichard and get your free
CD-ROM!
He could be anywhere.
iSd
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Hint: He is about 2 ft. tall, looks something like his picture,
and he has a "Please Return Me" tag.
While you are at it, you just might try the Alcohol 101
program at the computer labs across campus.
Bet you'll learn something!
JUST VISIT ANY OF THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS
HEALTH PROMOTION & WELL-BEING 210 WHICHARD
JOYNER LIBRARY MEDIA & TEACHING RESOURCES CENTER
CAMPUS COMPUTER LABS AT
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
AUSTIN 208, BREWSTER D214
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Tlit Eatt Carolinian
:ier
om paga 1
J Thespians of
also been active
volunteering at
ms Shelter, My
the Little Willie
ittend graduate
ily therapy,
own her skills in
:e her arrival at
Jenson-Clayton
ransfer student
ion during her
But after the
ihcd as an acad-
rhe first semes-
d on grades and
i priority. The
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hat she used to
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ive on campus
committees and
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rehcnsive pro-
serve and sup-
2U. Blacks are
iiority group at
Ionia Wright
rams such as
is and student
leadership
)nies.
3 Tuaiday, October 27, 1998
news
Tht East Carolinian
re,
1101
ms:
tRD
ENTER
Sj Pi Delta's 2nd Annual �Ja
WU-K-Cmj Wl Contest
TICKETS
(Jreek
Advanced 2
At (lie Door S3
Advanced S3
At the Door S4
Tuesday Nov. 10
9pm at the Attic
FUN & PRIZES
0
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Now at NewSouth Bank Basic Checking!
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Annovncmar
301 E.Arlington Blvd.
Greenville 321-2600
Member FDIC
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off regular-priced
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INTERESTED?
CALL 1-800-MARINES
http.Vwww. Marines, com
Marines
The Few. The Proud.
If you want the challenge, call Capt Reed
at (800) 270-9874-1815
or meet on campus on Oct. 28 & Nov. 17
More than the
Swedish Ski Team
beer commercials
showed.
AU-you-can-eat dinner menu:
Fruit and cabbage salad,
Swedish meatballs, monk fish
with black pepper, steamed
broccoli with cheese, potato
dumplings, thousand leaves
torte, lucia buns (orange-
flavored dinner rolls), water,
coffee, and tea.
Sweden
Tuesday, November 3, 1998 Hendrix Theatre, 4pm a 7:30pm
TRAVE ADVENTURE FILM
& THEM DINNER SERES
IT DOESN'T MATTER
HOW Y00 GET THERE
Films are free to students with a current, valid ECU One
Card. Dinner tickets are 512 each. To reserve your dinner
ticket, come to the CTO in Mendenhall Student Center by
Thursday, October 29, 1998 and pay with cash, a meal
card, or your declining balance. Dinner will be served at
6:00pm in the Great Room.
CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE HOURS Monday - Friday 8:30am
to 6:00pm 252.328.4788 or 1.800.ECU.ARTS:
Deafspeech impaired access 252.328.4736
Gamma Sigaaa Sigma's
8th annual pick-a-pirate
m
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MALE AUCTION
'You've tried the rest
Now bring your money and buy the best
DATE: Tuesday, October 27, 1998
TIME: Doors open at 8pm-Bidding starts at 9pm
WHERE: Main Room of the ATTIC
TICKETS: $4 at the Door
Proceeds to benefit TEDI Bear Child Advocacy Center Call Karen @ 328-3934 for more info
RHA officers elected
to represent students
Fund-raisers, activities
planned
Caroline Jordan
staff writer
The ECU Residence Hall
Association (RHA) officers for
1998-99 were elected to serve as
leaders for students living in ECU's
14 residence halls.
Junior Sherry Ingram was
Elected president of the RHA.
Ingram will be the main student
representative in all areas of on-
campus housing.
"We are looking forward to
doing new and different things
Ingram said. "This year we are
going to try to start a little broth-
ersister weekend and also hold a
campus wide formal
Also elected were junior Sara
Ehlers as vice president, freshman
Marisa Kelly as secretary, freshman
Joseph Croom as treasurer, and
senior Elaine Lackey as national
communication coordinator.
"RHA is a great opportunity for
any student to develop leadership
skills Croom said. "It's not a very
stressful job, but it's a very impor-
tant one
Croom is in charge of handling
the RHA's $18,000 budget as well
as coordinating fund-raisers.
"The budget is handed out by
the school Croom said. "We are
allotted two dollars per student. We
also get revenue from different
sources, such as bed linens and the
microfridgc
The RHA will be selling "exam
buckets" as a fund-raiser. The
buckets will include candy and
stress relief balls and can be pur-
chased by parents for students.
Another RHA sponsored activi-
ty is "Midnight Madness which
will be held at Mendenhall on
Halloween.
"It's an alcohol-free event with
movies and games Ingram said.
"RHA will be helping out Student
Leadership
According to Ingram, the RHA
is also involved in various volunteer
programs, including Habitat for
Humanity and the Ronald
McDonald House.
Members of the RHA are
attending conferences across the
United States in order to obtain
new ideas for enhancing campus
life.
"We are getting ready to go to
the South Atlantic Residence Hall
Conference Croom said. "In the
spring we'll go to Wisconsin
Part of the budget is allocated
for sending officers to conferences.
"Any student is welcome to
come to RHA and voice their opin-
ions Croom said.
The RHA meets Mondays at
4:30 p.m. at Mendenhall Student
Center. �
Announcements
Congresswoman Eva Clayton will lead a panel discussing
Social Security on Tuesday at the Willis Building, 300 E First St
from 10 to 11 a.m.
The Biomechanics Laboratory Lecture Series will present a 3
p.m. public lecture titled "Assessment of Fall-Risk from
Measures of Postural Stability: A Realistic Goal?" The presenta-
tion will be given in the Pat Draughon Room on the second floor
of the Ward Sports Medicine Building.
An information seminar will be held for students who plan to
work in health-related professions from 3:30 to 6 p.m. in room B-
102 of the Brewster Building.
A Red Cross blood drive will be held Thursday from 10 am.
to 4 p.m. in room 2W-40 of the Brody Building.
General College students should contact their advisers the
week of November 2-6 to make arrangements for academic
advising for Spring Semester 1999. Early registration week is set
for November 9-13.
Tuesday - Thursday Specials'
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� Shrimp & Trout Combo $5.95
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4 Tttiid.v Qdoh�r27 Iflfl
1 the I � �
eastcarolmian
AMV L.ROVSTER Editor
HEATIIKR BtlROESS Managing Minn
STEVE LOSBV News Editor
AMV SHERIDAN Assistant News Editor
Amanda AUSTIN Features Editor
Mario Sciieriiaufer SpansEdiror
CHRIS KNOTTS SllllIllustrator
Jason Feather PhotoEditor
STEPHANIE WlllTLOCE Ad Design Manager
JANKT RKSI'Ess Advertising Manager
BRIAN Williams layout Manager
BOBBV TUCOLB Wsbmaslar
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We've all had that one teacher who truly inspires, the one who pushes you to expand your
limits and find a passion for learning. We've also all had professors that flat-out don't do
their job. Whether they fail everyone who walks through the door or ignore the needs of
their students, they don't deserve to be at the head of a classroom.
As students, we have the means to affect the world around us. At the end of each
semester, we are given forms to evaluate our teachers. Unfortunately, many students look
at these forms as little more than another chore to do. Often, we rush right through
evaluations without giving them the attention they need and justify it by saying, "It
doesn't really matter what I say
Some feel that evaluation forms are another rubber stamp ECU hands out. Actually, the
opinions students express weigh heavily when a professor comes up for tenure. If you
think you have the professor from hell, speak up! If he or she is really that bad, others will
feel the same way and the powers that be will wake up and take another look.
Now that midterms are over, we should begin to give a little advance thought to these
matters. Are you happy with the way your classes are being taught? If not, is it honestly
because of faults of the teacher? If that's what it is, by all means, say so. However, back up
what you say with reasons besides, "Man, this guy sucks There is a space on the form for
written comments and while it is not required it is importnat. If you put plenty of reasons
behind your scores of "1 people will begin to take notice. If you don't give them any
, reasons, do you expect the people who look at the forms to pay attention? They won't take
; you seriously if you don't take them seriously.
Members of the younger classes won't remember this, but the evaluation forms used to
be a lot less specific. The written portions were only added after people complained that
they weren't detailed enough. If the written parts are just left blank, what good was
adding them? TEC would like to encourage the administration to make the written
portion mandatory too.
SGAs at some schools publish results of teacher evaluations for the students. An index of
each professor would be valuable for us. Rather than relying on hearsay when it comes
time to choose next semester's teachers, we could see what past classes have had to say.
Many of us are putting ourselves into years of debt for this school. It's only reasonable to
want to make the most informed choice possible.
OPINION
Marvelle
Sullivan
Notification laws not needed
Parental notification is a
measure taken by the law in
regard to juvenile offenses.
Therefore, also allowing
universities to implement this
measure is suggesting that a
college student is not an adult
and should be treated
accordingly.
A law, proposed by John Warner
of Virginia, if passed will give
universities (among other
institutions) the right to notify
parents of students who commit
alcohol and drug violations. The
proposal's aim is to deter under-
age drinking and drug offenses
that supposedly run rampant on
campuses around the country.
Lawmakers feel that the threat of
parental notification will compel
students to "reconsider" before
taking any actions deemed
criminal by the university codes of
conduct.
While the proposal may be a
well-intended attempt to curb
student alcohol and drug use, it is
certainly not a very well thought-
out deterrent. A college student is
an adult. Whether or not he or she
is a mature adult is not the issue.
Part of college life (and any post-
high-shool graduation path) is the
slow but sure attainment of
responsibility and accountability.
To notify parents at every offense
most assuredly impedes the
student's capability to deal with
the consequences of his or her
actions, i.e. breaking the law.
Parental notification is a
measure taken by the law in
regard to juvenile offenses.
Therefore, also allowing
universities to implement this
measure is suggesting that a
college student is not an adult and
should be treated accordingly.
This is a very dangerous concept
that could be used in other areas
that would prove to be
very detrimental to students
everywhere.
Another very important issue is
privacy. Since a student is legally
an adult, not to mention a citizen
of the United States, there are
certain rights which are
"inalienable Students have a
right to privacy in the personal,
medical AND legal matters that
pertain to them. To inform
anyone (even if it is a parent) of
such matters is a direct violation of
that privacy.
It is understandable that
universities and lawmakers
become very frustrated with
student alcohol and drug
violations, and hence, search for
any way to curb these offenses.
However it is not understandable
that any entity would forgo
common sense to accomplish this.
When an individual can serve in a
war and vote for a president, then
surely this same individual can
choose what personal information
to tell his or her parents. Whether
university administrators,
lawmakers, or police agree or feel
that it is in the individual's best
interest is a non-issue. Essentially,
the university's parenting of
students and violating their
privacy (and thus violating a basic
principle of our country) will
eventually do more harm than
good. So, the adoption of this
policy, if it is indeed passed, would
be an unconscionable short and
long-term mistake.
"Chance favors the prepared mind
Louis Pasteur
Scientist
OPINION
Columnist
Stephen
Kleinschmit
NBA strike reveals poor sports?
First of all, they want more
money. That is fine. But the
players want to have partial
ownership of the teams. Well
guess what. Owners are the
bosses, and players are the
employees.
The NBA strike has to be the
stupidest thing I have seen in a
long time. In a country where we
view our sports stars as "heroes
our children's so called role
models have decided to sell
themselves, and their fans out, so
they can make even more money.
Here arc sonic of the things that
annoy me about the player's
demands.
First of all, they want more
money. That is fine. But the
players want to have partial
ownership of the teams. Well
guess what. Owners are the
bosses, and players are the
employees. They have agreed to
work for their boss, and they get
paid well. The player's demands
have gone above plain fairness,
and that's why the owners won't
accept their demands.
Second, they want to be paid
during the strike. I'm glad the
judge told them hell no. These
little pretty boys want to have
their cake and eat it too, and it's
not fair to the fans and the owners.
I leek, they even have the super
rich Michael Jordan negotiating
for themwhen he's not on TV
lying about how much he likes
MCI or Rayovac batteries.
Doesn't it annoy you that
someone who makes almost
-�inety million a year in salary and
endorsements is telling their fans
that they're not being paid
enough?
Finally, the players have even ;
speculated about forming their j
own league. Well I am sure that a I
league led by money grubbing, '
inconsiderate, Latreile Sprewell j
and Dennis Rodman wannabes '
would be a whole lot better than
the way it is now (sarcasm). I'm
sure that if this would happen,
basketball would become a
spectacle, instead of a
sportpretty much like �
professional wrestling with a ball. j
I think I'll probably stick to the C
NCAA games from now on. They ;
seem to like to play, regardless ;
of money.
OPINION
Ryan
Kennermur
Space program mostly hype
And yes, there was that
Astronaut Ice Cream stuff. It
was a good marketing idea, to
be honest. Charge three bucks
a pop for a brick of
Neapolitan chalk and watch
the kids go ape poop.
This time, I'm gonna talk about
the nation's space program, and
what's going on with it.
For starters, I don't like the
space program. I like the idea of
it; I just don't really see any
advances coming from it. The
only really useful thing that
NASA ever brought typical
Americans was Velcro.
You're probably thinking,
"But Ryan-Dogg! What about
Tang?" Well, here's the skinny
on Tang. It is a dehydrated
orange beverage that became
famous because it was part of the
diet of those guys who landed on
the moon. When it came out in
the early 70s, people flocked to
their local markets and bought it
by the metric ton, never giving a
thought to the fact that it didn't
taste particularly good, and it
caused something that rhymes
with "miarhhea
And yes, there was that
Astronaut Ice Cream stuff. It was
a good marketing idea, to be
honest. Charge three bucks a
pop for a brick of Neapolitan
chalk and watch the kids go ape
poop.
But aside of the useless
products we have, and that's
including the Hubble Telescope,
they still can't seem to capture
our attention like they did with
the moon landing. They even
have that channel on television-
you know the one. It consists of
slow-moving shots of the earth,
back and forth. It's like the
Kennedy assassination tape, only
it lasts a few light-years longer.
Boring photos plus no sound
multiplied by the American
attention span equals "nobody
cares The least they can do is
interrupt the silence with a
random alien popping up and
threatening to destroy the
universe.
But no! Instead, to boost their
popularity, they are instilling the
presence of Senator John Glenn.
As you may know, he was the first
man in orbit. Now, at age 77, he's
back and about to go into the
great unknown once again. The
blast-off is scheduled for
Thursday, and the reporters have
been going nuts over it.
Glenn's presence is based
around the project of Geriatrics
in Space, which is a lot better
than their usual projects, which
include "Pigs in Space "Ants in
Space and the ever-popular
"Opinion Columnist Stephen
Kleinschmit in Space
For now, I'm not sure whether
I believe that Glenn is involved
solely for the advancement of
knowledge. It seems like a
pretty good idea to get more
media attention, and thus more
money to waste. At any rate, I'll
be praying for Senator Glenn,
seeing as he is now in his upper
seventies. Let's just hope they
pack a lot of Ensure.
Got something to say? Need somewhere to say it
Bring your letter to eastcarolinian, located on the 2nd
floor of The Student Publications Building
Life's Mean
WARNliN
�the opinii
�this spre;
JMINE
ALL MINI
if you doi
Iread PIN
Iwrite me at
bdm69@
Studenls may attend fi
together. Guest posses
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place of a Saturday nig
information, contact th
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PP�tfWtPs$s;j
5 Tuesday, October 27. 1998
comics
The Cut Carolinian
Four Seats Left
Jason Latour France
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IF THE STICK S 6LME.IT
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ACROSS
1 Aromatic wood
6 Tycoon Turner
9 Naighbor o(
Togo
14 Martini garnish
15 Top trump
16 In the
neighborhood
17 Singing
chipmunk
10 Hal! a bikini ��
19 Breathing
20 Omits
22 Facats
23 Sticky stuff
24 Rig pigs
26 Approved
30 Sollies
34 Cpic tales
35 Love-lit
30 Scoffers
comment
37 Memo acronym
38 Uproar
39 Verne's captain
40 Ritzy rock
�it Repair a ham
42 "The Taming o!
the "
43 Get too thin
45 Trivial
46 Plot ol land
47 Mechanical
tooth
40 South American
beast of burden
5! Monazise metal
57 Sort down
58 Inventor
Whitney
59 Small crown
60 Cheat
01 � Alamos
62 Lawn-cam tool
63 Relative speed
64 Casual
agreement
65 Selling point
DOWN
1 Anlhracite, e.g.
'2 French pronoun
3 Operatic prima
donna
T�! �-Jaffa
5 Bridgo miscuas
6 Forbidden
7 Light (an
fi Coup de grace
9 Cilyonihe
Clyde
10 Alternative to
standard
medicine
11 LSD. to users
12 Church part
13 Beer picks
21 Grassy ground
25 Whiff
26 Type of orange
27 Deejay Casey
28 Old World lizard
29 Kisser or mush
30 Concur
31 Film enbe Roger
32 Firs! to spot a
comet
33 Ostentatious
35 Ascetically
38 Carolina cape
39 Org. of Lightning
and Flames
41 Aclor Montalhan
42 Herbal quaff
44 Arose
45 The Raven-
post
47 Fresh tud firm
48 Took off
40 Dotogna money
50 Genesis
char-cater
52 Lotion ingredient
3 HelpfuHiintt
54 Recycled
clothes
55 Poplar or plane
56 Bret or Most
Ek
VIRTUAL REALITY NASCAR
COSTUME CONTESTCASH PRIZES
FREE FOOD, ORINIU MUSIC
CARTOON SHORTS
BINGO,0J DANCE
VIDEO KARAOKE
WIZARD ON CALL
PSYCHIC HOTLINE
FORTUNE TELLERS
EVIL LANDING
MIDNIGHT BUFFET
MENOENHALL STUDENT CENTER OCT. 31, 1998 9PM UNTIL 2AM
ECU ID GETS YOU IN FREE, A GUEST PASS LETS YOU BRING A FRIEND
Students may attend (or free by using their ECU One Cord. One guest per student will be admitted with a guest pass. Student ond guest must enter
together. Guest passes will be available beginning Monday, October 76 at the Central Ticket Office from 8:30am to 6pm and Todd Dining Holl Meal
Plan Office from 9am to 5pm. On October 31, guest posses will be available only at the Student Recreation Centei from I lam to 10:30pm. In
ploce of a Saturday night Hendrix film, Halloween cartoon shorts will be shown as part of Midnight Madness. (Guest passes required.) for additionol
information, contact the Central Ticket Office Mondoy through Friday fiom 8:30am to 6pm at 378 4788.
HAUNTED
HOUSE'98
OCTOBER 28th & 29th
7-llpm
TICKETS: $2 IN ADVANCE,
$3 AT THE DOOR
LOCATED AT DELTA SIGMA PHI
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(ACROSS FROM WENDY'S)
FOR INFORMATION CALL 252-757-1817
PROCEEDS GO TO THE MARCH OF DIMES
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�PWiVHWi
� T�tid�y. October 27. 1998
features
The East Carolinian
7 Tundi
GETMGM
Academic Support Center offers
tutoring, counseling strategy courses
www.tec.ecu.edu
Phillip Gilfus
STAFF WRITER
As midterms come to a close, many ECU students find that
their grades are not looking so good. But, do not fear, there
are many places on campus to help the struggling student.
The Academic Support Center recommends workshops
as the first step to building a better academic career. They
offer workshops dealing with such areas as academic moti-
vation, career exploration, note-taking strategies, reading
for comprehension, stress management, test anxiety, test-
taking strategies, and time management The Center for
Counseling and Student Development offers workshops on
"Becoming a Successful Student" and "Academic
Motivation Both help students explore how to better their
academic performance.
"The academic motivation workshop is especially
important said Dr. Nancy Badger of the Center for
Counseling and Student Development. "A lot of students
can get tired and give up on school
The times and places of Academic Support Center work-
shops can be picked up at B103 Brewster Building.
Workshops provided by Student Development take place
on Mondays and Tuesdays starting in November.
"We usually like to schedule the workshops around the
"Just ask the professor about his or her tests and
how you should study for them. Teachers can be
creatures of habit, just by looking at your past
tests, you should be able to figure out what your
final will look like
Don Joyner
Associate Dean of Undergraduate Studies.
middle of the semester, during registration Badger said.
Students who feel completely at a loss on what to do may
attend counseling sessions. These include individual and
group sessions. Call the Center for Counseling and Student
Development at 328-6661 for more information.
Another option available to students is tutoring.
"We have tutors mostly for freshmen and sophomore
classes said Marsha Lassiter, tutor. "There are some for
upperclassmen classes, but someone should speak to pro-
fessors in their department if they really need help
For more information on tutoring, call 328-6931 or stop
Students who slack off for the first half of the year often find themselves in a jam when the D's and F's
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
begin to have an impact, but many options are available for academic help.
by B103 Brewster.
A way to help improve studying for a class is to simply
talk with the professor.
"Just ask the professor about his or her tests and how you
should study for them said Don Joyner, assistant dean of
Undergraduate Studies. "Teachers can be creatures of
habit, just by looking at your past tests, you should be able
to figure out what your final will look like
In the end though, it is up to the students themselves to
study. There are many tips on how to study that everyone
can do. When reading or studying for a class, try to take a
break every fifty minutes. This helps retain information.
It is also important to set priorities about one's life. This
can help students maintain a balance between work, study
and fun.
A handout from the Office of Undergraduate Studies
states, "Make social interactions a part of your life, not you
life
Before it becomes too late, one should always keep
a eye on their grade point average before it falls too low.
At the end of the semester, there might be a stamp signify-
ing an academic warning, or worse, academic probation on
your report card. For those students (including transfer stu-
dents) who have attempted 8-31 semester hours, a 1.35
GPA is needed. If completing 32-63 hours, a GPA equal
of higher to 1.6 is needed to avoid academic probation. An
1.8 GPA is need for 64-95 hours and an 1.9 GPA for 96 or
SEE STUDYING. PAGE 7
Easy
Study
ips:
Tl



C
F
E
Spoi
Special
4
he
� Try to study at the same time and place everyday so it becomes habit.
� Don't study in a too relaxed environment, you may be tempted to gox
to sleep.
� Think ahead about schoolwork, try to plan out the semester.
� Go to class, it reinforces the subject information and allows you to ask
the professor questions.
� Sit near the front of the class (It helps you pay attention).
� Study way before the test, not the night before (That should just be a
time of review).
� When you miss a class, always get notes from others.
123
Check In:
11
11
127
Check In:
II
11
ii:
Recreational safety precautions
important both on, off campus
Arkansas Repertory Theatre
performs Idols of the King
Alco
Exercising with others
decreases crime, injury
Nina M. Dry
SENIOR WRITER
Even though the winter season is
quickly approaching, many ECU
students are striving to maintain
healthy and fit. They do so by using
exercise, such as running or walking
on and around campus.
While keeping in shape, stu-
dents must also strive to keep safe.
According to Tom Younce, assis-
;tant director of the ECU police
department, the campus area is a
relatively good one, but students
still need to be aware of what is
going on around them.
Younce also said that the best
' place to exercise is at the Student
Recreation Center.
"I encourage students to exer-
cise at the rec center Younce said.
They have an incredible facility
Students often exercise in the areas surrounding campus
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
that students can take advantage
of
If you cannot make it to the rec
center and you have to exercise
around your apartment complex or
residence halls,
there are measures
you can take to keep
safe in different cir-
cumstances. ,
"If you plan on
running in the
evenings, wear
reflective clothing
Younce said.
This allows other
pedestrians and
drivers to see you
coming.
It is also best to
run against the flow of traffic so
you can see it coming toward you.
Younce said it's best not to jog or
Showtime 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium
Nina M. Dry
SENIOR WRITF.R
SEE SAFETY. PAGE 7
Tips Recreational Safety
�Try to do most exercising at the Student Recreation Center
�Always exercise in groups, not alone
Ive clothing during the evening and night hours
iffic
Hey, all you Elvis Presley fans!
Hold on to your blue suede shoes
because tonight the Arkansas
Repertory Theatre presents Idols of
the King at 8 p.m. in the Wright
Auditorium.
Written by Ronnie Claire
Edwards and Allen Crowe, this per-
formance began touring in early
September. The show started in
Arkansas, where it ran very success-
fully, and continued doing well on
its 28 state tour. Their last stop will
be in Ponoma, NJ on November 13.
The musical is more about the
fans than it is about the King him-
self.
"It's about Elvis' devoted fans
who worshiped himsaid Carol
Woodruff, marketing director of the
department of University Unions.
"Some might call
them loony, but
it's a comical
view of the fans'
devotion
The cast con-
sists of three peo-
ple: Kevin
Bartlet, Dale
Dickey and
Lance Zitron.
Bartlet and
Dickey portray
the many fans of
Elvis� some
funny, others
touching, all
obsessed.
"To name a couple, there is a
motorcyclist and his ditzy girlfriend
who are hitchhiking Woodruff
said. "The girlfriend would like to
write songs for Elvis. There's also
an older couple who have placed
their toilet on display because Elvis
used it once
Between the scenes, Lance
Zitron, the Elvis impersonator and
accomplished actor, recreates many
of the King's popular songs such as
Love Me Tender, Blue Suede
Shoes, Jailhouse Rock, and Return
to Sender. He will be accompanied
Show begins at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium, Tuesday Oct. 27.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THEATRE ARTS
by a live four-piece band.
Zitron will then place the icing
on the cake for all Presley fans dur-
ing the grand finale.
"Zitron will end the show wear-
ing the legendary white sequined
jumpsuit and cape, singing some of
the King's greatest hits Woodruff
said.
According to Woodruff, even
those who aren't die-hard Elvis fans
will find this performance to be
quite an experience.
"This production should sell out
wherever it goes Woodruff said. "I
SEE IDOLS PAGE 7
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The East Carolinian
nic help.
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be a
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uesday Oct. 27.
md.
lace the icing
sley fans dur-
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lould sell out
)druff said. "I
17
7 Tuesday, October 27, 19
features
The East Carolinian!
The Haunted Forest
October 28, 29, & 30
640:30pm
R�9ir
Admission:
Adults - $3
Children under 10 - $1
Frisbee Golf Course
ECU Campus
Sponsored by ECU Department of Leisure Studies with r' Jf'
Special Guest Governor's One on One Program: Power of One Xl�f-
EARN $$$
h�JiSlLC-en T10" wl?e contributing to the future of medicine. We need
healthy individuals to participate in medically-supervised research studies to help
to ouanX WdiCa,ti0nS- Y?- may ��� �"��� You have to meet certain criteria
to qualify for a study, including our free medical exam and screening tests
See below for our current study opportunities.
if you qualify or f
or for more information about these and other
PPD PHARMACO
I-800-PPD-CRU2 (1-800-773-2782)
Visit our website for more study info.
httpwww.citysearch.coir�rduppdpharmaco
Current Study Opportunities
COMPENSATION
REQUIREMENTS
H8c
Check In
Checkout: Up tO $700
116 3:00p.m. 119 8:30a.m.
Outpatient Visits: I l9-4:30pm. I II 0 & I ll l-6:30am & 6:30pm, I ll2-5:30am
Healthy, Non-smoking
Males & Females Ages 18-40
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Outpatient Visits: 1123, 1124, 1125, 127, 128, 129
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Healthy, Non-smoking
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Conducting clinical studies since I 983
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Alcohol Awareness Week - October 25-31
Events
The Wall - Monday through Thursday, 10:00-2:00, Wright Place
Join SADD ant take time to write and read how alcohol has affected
our lives. Also available will be an information table.
Wall of Remembrances - Tuesday-Friday, 11:30-1:30, The Mall
Come and remember someone who has lost their life because of an
alcohol related situation. Poems, 'letters, notes, pictures are welcome.
Where's Norm? - All, week - find Norm and win a CD-ROM!
Look around campus to find Norm, the lava lamp, and return him to
210 Whichard and win a CD-ROM. Hint - he is blue and black, with
sunglasses, and is about 2 feet tall.
Have a Halloween to Remember - make a pledge to not drink on
Halloween. Pledge forms available at The Wall, Student Recreation
Center, Health Promotion and Well-Being (210 Whichard), Student
Health Center.
Alcohol 101 - come to the party and do the new CD-ROM program at
computer labs in Mendenhall, Austin, Brewster. Residence Halls,
Joiner Library, or 210 Whichard Resource Room.
Safe Halloween Pledge - Mendenhall and Student Recreation Center
Join others in signing up to make it a safe Halloween. Look for large
sign-up posters, also available at Midnight Madness, Saturday Night
9:00-1:00. While there, try a Moctail!
For further information about these events contact the office of
Health Promotion and Well-Being, 210 Whichard, 328-6793.
Safety
continued from page 6
walk on extremely populated
streets. The more congested they
are, the higher the chances are of
having an accident.
"I discourage people to run on
such streets as 10th and 5th because
of all the traffic
Younce said.
Also, there is always safety in
numbers. If possible, a workout
partner is a good idea because you
can watch out for one another. If
you do not have people to work out
with, be sure to let someone know
your whereabouts.
"Inform someone of your exer-
cising plans as far as where you're
going to be, how long you're going
to be there, and when you plan on
returning Younce said.
If you plan on jogging around
campus and you feel unsafe, the
blue lights that are strategically
places throughout campus are there
for your use.
The blue lights arc an excellent
tool to use if one feels
that they arc being followed
Younce said.
Even if you can not speak into
the call box, the ECU police will
know exactly where you are by the
blue light you have pressed.
Younce said if you arc
joggingwalking off campus and
you feel unsafe, go to a well-lit,
well-populated area.
Another thing to look out for is
loose animals. It's quite intimidat-
ing when you're jogging down the
street and a dog comes out of
nowhere. You can never be too sure
if the dog is friendly or if it wants to
take a bite out of your leg. In situa-
tions like these, it's best not
to panic.
"If you were jogging and you
approach an animal, stop said
Brenda Tripp, an animal control
officer. "Running away will only
increase the animal's prey drive
Tripp said telling the animal
"NO in a firm voice as they come
toward you will also help prevent
the dog from coming after you.
Also, if you see an animal loose
in the same area on more than
one occasion, there are things you
can do.
"If you have a routine exercise
route and you see a dog in that area
frequently, call the Animal Control
Center and we'll come and check
the situation out Tripp said.
Studying
continued from page 6
covering the
o7beat
Truly Awful Painting
Exhibited
ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) � A trav-
eling exhibit of "bad art" started
with a painting found in a trash can.
Scott Wilson picked up what is now
called "Lucy in the Field with
Flowers" five years ago and gave it
to his friend.
Jerry Reilly was taken by
the painting's extreme clash of sub-
ject, proportion and color and, fate-
fully, asked for more. Now, he is
executive director of The Museum
of Bad Art in Boston, which owns
more than 200 irresistibly awful
pieces of art, 90 of which can be
seen until Oct. 17 at The Ellipse
Arts Center.
"It just grabs you by the throat
said Reilly, a computer program-
mer, of that first painting. 'The
more you look at it, the more
you realize bizarre things have
gone wrong
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students) who have attempted 8-
31 semester hours, a 1.35 GPA is
needed. If completing 32-63
hours, a GPA equal
of higher to 1.6 is needed to avoid
academic probation. An 1.8 GPA is
need for 64-95 hours and an 1.9
GPA for 96 or more hours.
Though it may seem that a
world of reports, projects, and
endless homework can seem too
much at times, do not worry. ECU
provides many services that have
the purpose of making sure stu-
dents stay in school for four or
five years and becoming success-
ful students.
Idols
continued from page 6
think it's a show students will like.
After all(Elvis is the one who
inspired rock and roll
This is your last notice for this
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Auditorium. If you haven't pur-
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you can still get them at the door.
"All tickets purchased at the
door will be $25 Woodruff said.
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8 Taudiy, October 27, 1998
The East Carolinian
Football program drops third loss of season
Post-season play
chances put on line
Travis Barki.ey
senior whiter
ECU's hopes of playing in a post
season bowl game may have been
dashed on Saturday after
Southern Missippi routed the
Pirates 41-7.
The loss dropped ECU's
record to 4-3 overall, and 1-1 in
Conference USA. ECU must win
its last four conference games to
have a shot at a bowl game. C-
USA has tie-ins with two bowls,
sending its champion to the
Liberty Bowl and a second team
to the Humanitarian Bowl. As it
stands now, Tulane and Southern
Missippi are in line to take those
spots.
Since Tulane and ECU do not
play this year, there was talk from
Liberty Bowl organizers that the
two schools would meet in
Memphis if both went undefeat-
ed in conference play. Southern
Missippi made sure that didn't
happen, now the Pirates need to
win out and hope someone in C-
USA upsets one of the top two
teams.
ECU got off to a fast start
against the Golden Eagles, with a
nine-play 76-yard opening drive.
Freshman running back Leonard
Henry ended the drive with a 17-
yard touchdown run, the first of
his career.
"Scoring my first college
touchdown against an opposing
team like Southern Missippi, it
was a real big thing Henry said.
"I was hoping I would get back in
there again, but didn't. It was a
real big moment for me. I will
never in my life forget it
Unfortunately for the Pirates,
their fast start didn't last.
Southern Missippi scored 41
unanswered points, beginning
with Eddie Shaw's 54-yard punt
return for a touchdown. Shaw's
return was the latest special teams
breakdown for the Pirates.
ECU head coach Steve Logan
said up until Shaw's return his
team had preformed well on punt
coverage.
"That was the number seven
punt team in the nation that we
SEE FOOTBALL. PAGE 9
Overall
STANDINGS
W-LW-L
Tulane3-06-0
Southern Miss3-14-3
Louisville2-24-4
Army2-22-5
ECUl-l4-3
Houstonl-l2-5
Memphis1-21-6
Cincinnati0-40-8
Source: C-USA Media Relations
The Pirates will look to recover from their loss to Southern Miss this Saturday when they
take on Conference USA opponent Houston at home.
PHOTO COURTESY OF CONFERENCE USA MEDIA GUIDE
Swim team competes at American
Women defeat Eagles,
men come up short
Eric Couch
staff writer
The ECU women's swimming
team took charge and defeated
the American Eagles 130-105
Saturday in Washington, D.C.
This event marked the first
dual meet of the season for the
Pirates and they won six events
against the Eagles.
Head coach Rick Kobe was
very proud of the Pirate's effort
on Saturday.
"The women were able to
dominate from the start and get
the season off on the right foot
Kobe said.
Dana Fuller won the first indi-
vidual victory of the season in the
1000-meter freestyle with a time
of 10:27.66. Soon after Hollie
Butler took the very next victory
when she won the 200-meter
freestyle in a time of 1:56.35.
Butler also took the 500 free in
5:10.12 for her second victory.
A piece of ECU history was
also set in stone on Saturday as
freshman Courtney Foster won
the 50-meter freestyle with a time
of 24.81. This time marks the
fifth fastest time in the history of
the event for women's swimming
at ECU. Foster also won the 100-
meter freestyle in 53.87 which
falls seventh on the ECU all-time
list.
The
men's com-
petition was
a much clos-
er match-up
but the
Pirate men
could not
top the
Eagles and
Rick Kobe dropped
head swimming coach their season
opener 123-
117.
"The guys lost a fiercely
fought battle but remained close
till the end Kobe said.
Andy Byrnes took the first win
for the Pirates in the 50-meter
freestyle with a time of 21.79.
Adam Gaffey, a last year college
national champion set a time of
9:39.36 in the 1000-meter
freestyle which ranks fourth on
ECU's all-time charts.
On Sunday both teams saw
repeat performances at James
Madison. The Lady Pirates won
their second meet in a row while
the men lost their second straight
to the Dukes.
For the women, Butler had
"The women were able to
dominate from the start and
get the season off on the right
foot
Rick Kobe
Head Swimming Coach
two victories with wins in the 200
and 100-meter freestyles. Also
Brooke Wise presented a winning
time of 2:11.95 in the 200-meter
butterfly.
Another mark was made in the
books on Sunday with freshman
Heather Hagedorn winning the
200-mctcr backstroke event with
a time of 1:06.80 which is the sec-
ond-fastest in ECU history.
ECU also posted a win in div-
ing with freshman Jessica Hunt
scoring 216.98 on the 1-meter
board.
ECU's men scored seven vic-
tories on the day but it just was
not enough as JMU defeated the
Pirates in a very close meet.
Adam Gaffey had two victories
of his own winning the 1000-
meter freestyle and the 200-
meter freestyle. Richard Chen,
Josh Ltpree and Paul Pinther
also had individual victories for
the ECU men.
The diving team swept the
competition as Willy Hayes and
Ryan Baldwin both posted wins
against the Dukes on Sunday.
Kobe was once again pleased
with both teams on Sunday.
"We are pleased with where
we are at right now and have to
get ready for another tough two
meets next week Kobe said.
Campbell hosts tourney
Women's tennis makes
strongshowing
Todd Tai.i.madge
staff writer
Over the weekend the ECU
women's tennis team played at
the James R. Nisbet
Intercollegiate at Campbell
University.
The tournament consisted of
players from Charleston
Southern,Coastal Carolina, ECU,
Georgia State, Morehead State,
Hampton, and host Campbell.
The Lady Pirates sent seniors
Anne Svae and Catherine
Morgan, along with freshmen
Meredith Spears and Andrea
Terrill to the tournament.
I Anne Svae was able to get a
number one seed and a bye for
the first round on Friday. She won
her second-round match against
Georgia State's Nina Jansen, 6-3,
6-0. Later that day, she won
against Charleston Southern's
Julie Harnios, 6-2, 6-3.
"I had a lot of confidence
going into this tournament Svae
said. "I have been playing real
good tennis lately
Catherine Morgan lost her
first-round match against Georgia
State's Jovana Kriskapa, 6-3, 6-1
on Friday morning. She was able
to bounce back later that day and
beat Morehead State's Amy
Haybarker, 6-1, 6-0, in her conso-
lation match.
Meredith Spears defeated
Campbell's Megan Cannon, 6-1,
6-1, on Friday before falling to
Georgia State's Kristina Jensen, 6-
1, 6-2. Andrea Terrill came up on
the losing end of her first-round
match, 7-6(7-2), 6-4, against
Charleston Southern's Kim Taber.
Terrill had a bye in the consola-
tion bracket before losing to
Coastal Carolina's Megan
Romine, 6-0, 6-1.
The team of Svae and Morgan
joined together for a No. 2 seed in
the doubles side. They were able
to advance to the semi-finals after
defeating Georgia State's
SEE TENNIS PAGE t
ECU grows with
stronger competitors
Playing bigger teams
makes a bigger name
Jim P h e l p s
SENIOR WRITER
ECU's name becomes better
known every time the school plays
bigger, better teams. Pirate athlet-
ics has grown in name over the
years through play with nationally
known teams.
"When you play nationally
known teams you get a great deal
more national publicity Henry
VanSant, assistant athletics direc-
tor, said. "You're on ESPN score-
board, you're on ABC scoreboard
Playing against bigger competi-
tion not only helps ECU's name
grow, but it also helps the universi-
ty's pocketbook. People are more
likely to buy tickets to see nation-
ally known teams.
"Look at the attendance for last
Saturday's game against Army,
which is certainly a nationally
known team, and you see the dif-
ference between that and what we
do against UT-Chattanooga
VanSant said.
Football is not the only sport
that feels these effects. All the
sports share in this, especially bas-
ketball. The Pirate basketball
team also receives a lot of coverage
when it plays nationally known
teams.
ECU's track team has played
many nationally known teams such
as Nebraska, and traveled to other
meets with national powers. This
high-profile competition also helps
recruiting.
"Playing these nationally
known teams helps in recruiting
VanSant said. "All your top athletes
want to play against these national-
ly known teams
While ECU has played many
nationally known teams in the past,
it is currently adding more top
teams to the lineup. The baseball
schedule for this year reflects this
with teams like N.C. State, Wake
Forest, North Carolina and Ohio
SEE NAMES. PAGE S
Stcdr
ECUUSM
First Downs1518
Net Yards Rushing240147
Net Yards Passing102193
Total Yards342340
Penalties-Yards10-757-33
Time of Possession29:1230:48
Source: ECU SID
Volleyball splits
weekend games
Pirates defeat Vttpnia
Commonwealth
Jason Latour
staff writer'
The ECU Volleyball team earned
a split in its two home Colonial
Athletic Association games this
past weekend, losing a tough
match to William and Mary on
Friday, and earning an impressive
win over Virginia Commonwealth
on Saturday.
After falling behind early
against the William and Mary
Tribe, the team rallied behind the
play of Lucinda Mason who
helped the Pirates claw back into it
before eventually losing the first
match 15-9. The inspired play of
Tara Tobias and Ellen Gazdowicz,
who recorded 12 kills and 12
assists, led the Tribe to a 15-10 vic-
tory in the second match. In the
third'match ECU came out strong,
led by the play of Clinta Claro who
recorded 12 kills in the game, but
the Pirates weren't able to over-
come the strong defense of the
Tribe, eventually losing 15-10.
The Pirates turned it all around
on Saturday with an impressive
straight game win over the VCU
Rams snapping a three-match con-
ference losing streak in the
process.
"After Friday's loss to William
and Mary, I told the athlete's to
just wash it out of their minds, put
it behind them head coach Kim
Walker said. "Apparently they did
that. We came out aggressively and
made better decisions
Claro continued her strong play,
helping lead the Pirates to an early
7-0 lead in the first game before
taking the game 15-9. The Pirates
continued to pound the ball by ral-
lying to a 15-10 win in the second
game. In the third ECU pulled
away from a 9-9 tie late in the game
with the help of Mason whose ser-
vice ace broke the tie. From that
point on the Pirates never looked
back, scoring five of the last six
points to take the game 15-10.
"These athletes decided to for-
get what has happened in the past
and looked almost unstoppable
Walker said.
Mason paced the team, finish-
ing with nine kills, three aces, five
digs and five blocks. Shannon
Kaess also contributed heavily to
the team's strong play, adding eight
kills and nine digs.
The split leaves ECU with a 9-
13 record overall and a 3-5 CAA
record. The squad takes the court
next Friday, traveling to Baltimore,
MD to take on Morgan State. The
Pirates then return to conference
action with an away
match against James Madison
on Saturday, Oct. 31.
Team Leaders
(Vs. William and Mary)
Lucinda Mason -10 kills, nine digs, three blocks
Liz Hall- seven kills
Clinta Claro-12 kills, three blocks
Shannon Kaess- four kills, 11 digs, two blocks
(Vs. VCU)
Lucinda Mason-nine kills, three aces, five digs, five blocks
Shannon Kaess- eight kills, nine digs
Liz Hall-seven kills, seven digs
Clinta Claro-12 kills
Source: ECU Sports Information Department
I
I
I
1
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9 Tueidiy, October 27, 1998
sports
The Eaii Carolinian
Football
continued from page 9
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sent out on the field Logan said.
"We had preformed beautifully all
year long, we've been coached well.
It wasn't a great run, it didn't
need to be a great run, there was no
contain. We've just got to go back
and reemphasize it again
Against Southern Missippi, ECU
was flagged for holding on four
straight kickoff returns, leaving the
offense with terrible field position
for most of the game. Junior wide-
out LaMont Chappell was called on
to return kicks against Southern
Missippi but had several returns
brought back because of penalties.
Southern Missippi freshman
Derrick Nix led all rushers with 116
yards on 27 carries and scored two
touchdowns. Junior linebacker Jeff
Kerr said Nix was as good as adver-
tised.
Kerr returned to the Pirate line
up after Missippiing the Alabama
game with a concussion. While Ken-
was glad to be back on the field, he
said he was disappointed with the
way the game unfolded.
"It's just sickening to us, really
Kerr said. "We know that we're a lot
better defense than what played last
week. We've just got to come up
with the plays
Logan said making plays turned
out to be the difference in the game.
"The score is not indicative of
the difference in the programs
Logan said.
ECU will look to rebound on
Saturday when the Pirates host the
Houston Cougars. Game time is
3:30 p.m.
Tennis
continued from page 8
Find out about the professional and
higher education programs offered by
ECU as well as other institutions
East Carolina
University's First
Annual Graduate ft
Professional School Fair
Yea, Buffy, I totally can't
believe they really printed
my letter to the editor
Names
continued from page 8
"Like, I heard they want to
publish yours too
All letters to the Editor must be
. typed. 250 words or less. Must
include your name, major, year, anfl
phone �. Send to:
East Carolina University
2nd Floor Student Pub. Building
Greenville, NC 27852
State all appearing on the schedule.
This year the Pirate football
program is continuing to dive into
huge competition with teams like
Alabama, and will lock horns in the
future with other nationally known
teams such as Duke, North
Carolina at Chapel Hill, N.C. State
and Miami.
"Our schedule is getting more
nationally competitive each year
VanSant said. "It's important for all
our sports to play strong, nationally
known teams. If you really want
to be good, you have to play
good teams
Kriskapa and Jensen. The other
doubles team of Spears and Terrill
lost in the first round to Coastal
Carolina's Rominc and Jenny
Clack. Both Spears and Tcrrill
were done for the tournament.
"Catherine stepped up and
played real well Svae said. "We
played extremely well even
though we had not played togeth-
er as a doubles team before
On Saturday, Svae lost her
semifinal match to Coastal
Carolina's Emma Kidd, 6-1, 7-6,
finishing third for the tournament
Morgan moved on to the semifi-
nals in the consolation round by
beating Coastal Carolina's Megan
Romine, 6-0, 6-1. She was able to
then hold off Hampton's Christina
Ferreira, 6-4,6-4, to win the cham-
pionship match.
"Kidd played a different style
of game that I was not ready for
Svae said. "I know that with this
loss I can be more prepared for the
future
Svae and Morgan then went on
to win their semifinal match
against Coastal Carolina's Kidd
and Jamie Mascn, 8-6. They came
up a little short to Georgia State's
Uta Dittmer and Nina Janscn, 8-4.
They were the number one seed
for the tournament
The women's team next tour-
nament is at the Rolex
Championship at Wake Forest
November 6-8.
Thursday, November 5
10:00AM- 2:00 PM
All Undergraduate a
Graduate Students invited
In the Mendenhall Student Center
Cosponsored by the ECU Graduate School a
The Graduate Student Advisory Council
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10 Tuesday, October 27. 1998
classifieds
The East Carolinian
FOR RENT
FOR SALE
HELP WANTED
GREEK PERSONALS GREEK PERSONALS ANNOUNCEMENTS
NEWLY REFURBISHED condo. 4
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erdryer for sale. Brand new $600
negotiable. Call 830-2069.
SLEEPER SOFA and smoked glass
dining room table with 4 chairs
$200; excellent condition; call 757-
1949, please leave message.
AAAA! EARLY Spring Break Spe-
cials! Bahamas Party Cruise! 6 days
$279! Includes most meals! Awe-
some beaches, nightlife! Departs
from Florida! springbreaktravel.com
1-800-678-6386
AAAA EARLY Specials! Panama
City! Room with kitchen $129! In-
cludes 7 free parties! Daytona $149!
New Hotspot-South Beach129! Co-
coa Beach $149! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
SONY EQUALIZER 7-bands per
channel 5 factory and 10 user pre-
sets Equalization Curves Fluorescent
spectrum Analyzer display Cursor
control System Remote control
$175.00 328-3535.
AAAAI SPRING Break Travel was
1 of 6 small businesses in the US
recognized by the Council of Better
Business Bureaus for outstanding
ethics in the marketplace! spring-
breaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386
FOR SALE: couch, sectional, for
$150; couch and loveseat for $100.
Call 752-7290.
Dapper
Dan's
Retro and Vintage Clothing,
Handmade Silver
Jewelry k More.
417 Evans St. Mall 752-1750
HALLOWEEN
IS COMING
NETWORK CARDS- Everything you
need to get your PC on the internet
in the dorms for $45. Includes card,
cable, warranty and configuration.
Call Alan, 328-8117. References
available.
SERVICES
WILL DO typing for you. 10 years
typing experience. Professional qual-
ity. $2.00 per page. 321-0668
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
19191496-2224
GIVE US TIME
TO REPAY
YOUR LOAN.
After just three years in
the Army, your college
loan could be a thing of
the past.
Under the Army's Loan
Repayment program, each
year you serve on active
duty reduces your indebt-
edness by one-third or
$1,500, whichever amount
is greater, up to a $65,000
limit.
This offer applies to
Perkins Loans, Stafford
Loans and certain other
federally insured loans
which are not in default
And this is just the
first of many benefits the
Army will give you. Get
the whole story from
your Army Recruiter.
756-9695
ARMY.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
www.goarmy.com
WANTED
Student worker to assist in
set-up, data entry of accounting
program. Come by Student
Media office for information
or call 328-6009.
DJ. FOR HIRE
NYC D.J. READY TO
HYPE UP YOUR PARTY
For all functions & campus
organizations
Call J.Arthur @ 252-412-0971
TUTORS NEEDED: Do you have a
3.0 or better GPA? Are you interest-
ed in becoming a tutor for the Office
of Student Development-Athletics?
We need individuals capable of tu-
toring any & all levels (0001-5999) in
the following subject areas: ACCT,
ASIP. BIOL, CHEM, CSCI. DESN.
ECON, EMST, GEOG, JUST, MATH,
MGMT, MKTG. PHIL, PHYS, & SOCI.
Undergraduate students are paid six
dollars an hour ($6) and graduate
students are paid seven dollars an
hour ($7). If this sounds like the job
for you or if you have any other ques-
tions, please contact Isha Williams
at 328-4691 for further information.
YOUTH IN-LINE Hockey Coaches.
The Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department is recruiting part-time
youth In-Line Hockey coaches. Ap-
plicants must possess some knowl-
edge of the hockey skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 5-18, in
hockey fundamentals. This program
will run from early October to mid-
December. Salary rates start at
$5.15 per hour. For more informa-
tion, please call Ben James or
Michael Daly at 329-4550 after
2PM.
SALES AND marketing internship.
Northwestern Mutual Life. Gain valu-
able sales experience and earn good
money. Looks great on resume. Call
Jeff. 355-7700.
COOKS. LINESERVERS, and cater-
ing assistants needed for positions
with ECU campus dining. Stop by
the Aramark Office in Mendenhall
Student Ctr. to apply. Great pay, ben-
efits & flexible schedules. No exp.
necessary. EOE
THE ANIMAL Emergency Clinic is
interviewing veterinary techni-
ciansassistants for full and part-
time positions. Must be available
nights, weekends, and holidays. Sal-
ary and benefits based on experi-
ence. For more information, call 355-
3825 or stop by the clinic.
1999 INTERNSHIPS! Attention un-
dergraduate business students. Now
interviewing on campus for manag-
ers across Virginia. North and South
Carolina for summer of 1999. Aver-
age earnings last summer $7,000.
Call Tuition Painters at (800) 393-
4521 or e-mail at tuipaint@bell-
south.net
"ATTENTION READERS" Need-
ed, more people who desire $1190-
$1487 mo. pt or $357O-$5950 mo.
ft. Work from home. Full support.
Proven. Call amazing recorded mes-
sage, 355-9248.
YOUTH BASKETBALL Coaches
The Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department is recruiting 12 to 16
part-time youth basketball coaches
for the winter youth basketball pro-
gram. Applicants must possess
some knowledge of the basketball
skills and have the ability and pa-
tience to work with youth. Applic-
ants must be able to coach young
people ages 7-18, in basketball fun-
damentals. Hours range from 3 p.m.
until 7 p.m. with some night and
weekend coaching. This program
will run from the end of November to
mid-February. Salary rates start at
$5.15 per hour. For more informa-
tion, please call Ben James or
Michael Daly at 329-4550 after 2
p.m.
VARSITYBOOKS.COM SEEKS
student managers to direct on-cam-
pus operations for rapidly growing e-
commerce business. This paid part-
time position is ideal for innovative,
highly-motivated, exceptionally
bright, go-getters who want to prove
experience isn't everything. Call 202-
256-5048 for more info.
CHILD CARE wanted for 2 small
boys. Nonsmoker. Reliable transpor-
tation. Experience & references re-
quired. Flex hours available 2-3 af-
ternoons per week. Call 758-9280.
FREE CD Holders, T-shirts, Prepaid
Phone Cards. Earn $1000 part-time
on campus. Just call 1-800-932-
0528 x 64.
PART-TIME HELP wanted. Apply
Friday 9-1 p.m. Monday 5-6 p.m
Wash Pub, 10th Street, 752-5222.
ABSOLUTE SPRING Break Take
2" 2 Free Trips on Only 15 Sales
andEarn $$$$. Jamaica, Cancun,
Bahamas, Florida, Padre! lowest Pric-
es! Free Meals. Parties & Drinks.
"Limited Offer 1-800-426-
7710www.sunsplashtours.com
EARN WHILE YOU learn, up to
$1,000.00 wk. Day and night
shift. Clean, secure working at-
mosphere. Playmates Adult En-
tertainment. 252-747-7686 for in-
terview.
ARE YOU a female graduate stud-
ent? Live in position available, bene-
fits including: free room and board,
free parking and a monthly stipend.
If you are interested, please call 758-
5568.
ECU STUDENT Technicians needed
to provide technical support for ev-
ents held in Mendenhall Student
Center and Wright Auditorium. Tech-
nical support may include setting up
sound equipment, projection equip-
ment, stage unloading and loading
of trucks for major touring compa-
nies, and maintaining technical
equipment. Become a part of an ex-
citing team and fun-filled at-
mosphere today! Apply in person at
the Mendenhall Student Center Job
Board.
PART-TIME Instructor needed Mon-
Thurs. afternoons to provide individ-
ualized instruction in a positive learn-
ing environment. Individual must be
competent in reading and math. Cer-
tified teacher preferred, but not re-
quired. Pick up application or send
resume to Sylvan Learning Center,
PO Box 1297, Kinston, NC 28503.
INTERNSHIP AVAILABLE in public
relations. Gain valuable experience
in public speaking and human re-
sources. Call Gerri at 355-7897.
IN-LINE Hockey Rink Attendant. The
Greenville Recreation & Parks De-
partment is recruiting individuals
with some background knowledge
with in-line hockey. Applicants will
be responsible for overseeing both
the skateboard park and in-line hock-
ey rink at the Jaycee Park. Salary
rates range from $5.15 to $6.50 per
hour. For more information, please
call Ben James or Michael Daly at
329-4550 after 2PM.
$1250 FUNDRAISER credit card
fundraiser for student organizations
You've seen other groups doing it,
now it's your turn. One week is all it
takes. No gimmicks, no tricks, no ob-
ligation. Call for information today. 1-
800-932-0528 x 65. www.ocmcon-
cepts.com
SPRINGBREAK. CANCUN, Florida.
Jamaica. South Padre. Bahamas.
Etc Best hotels, parties, prices.
Book early and save Earn money
trips! Campus repsorganizations
wanted. Call Inter-Campus Programs
1-800-327-6013 222 www.icpt.com
STUDENT REPS-Like meeting new
people? Have a couple hours free
from classes during the day or even-
ing? Flexible schedule? You can earn
extra cash! Marketing positions avail-
able for students to promote credit
cards on your campus for a Fortune
500 Co Call Rahim. (800) 592-
2121x133.
aa
m
I CdnCUn-dtt)diCaBaridt�)dS
$m � $59
CAMPUS REPS SIGN UP ONLINE !
18002347007
wvuw.entltt'sssuinmertours.com
DIANA KIMMEU DeAnn Ingram,
and Lindsay Mueller: Welcome to
our Gamma Sigma Sigma family.
BigLil was great! We love our little
sisters! Love, Erica and the Karens
SISTERS OF the Week: Alpha Phi -
Kendra Latham; Alpha Omicron Pi -
Noell Ellingworth, Tawni Hines;
Alpha Delta Pi-Shana Maxson,
Lindsay Peeler, Alison Barrow; Alpha
Xi Delta-Michelle Kimsey, Sarah
Evans, Chi Omega -Jennifer
O'Conner, Carey Craig; Delta Zeta -
Erin McCracken, Heather Shultis;
Sigma Sigma Sigma -Ashley Rankin,
Megan Wakefield; Zeta Tau Alpha -
Megan Guthrie, Wendy Melton; Pi
Delta -Rachel Kirk, Leslie Gams
CONGRATULATIONS CHI Omega
on a great flag football season. You
guys did awesome! Thanks, Jarred,
for all your help. Love, the sisters
and new members of Chi Omeg
THE PANHELLENIC Council would
like to thank everyone who partici-
pated in the Blood Drive!
ERICA AND Karen Toher: I'm so
glad to be part of our family. You two
are the best Gamma Sig's to be tri-
plets with. Love, Karen Flores
SISTERS AND pledges of Epsilon
Sigma Alpha, thanks to those who
helped in making luminaries. Good
luck, pledges, on your project. Hap-
py Birthday October Girls!
OTHER
GAMMA SIGMA Sigma's 8th An-
nual Pick-a-Pirate is tonight. Every-
one is welcome! Admission is $4 at
the door. Doors open at 8. Bring
your wallet and buy the man of your
dreams! It's in the Attic's main room.
Proceeds benefit the Tedi Bear Cen-
ter.
TWO PLAYFUL, adorable kittens
need a good home. Please call 353-
4088 if interested.
SPRING BREAK - Plan Now! Can-
cun, Jamaica, Mazatlan, & S. Padre.
Early bird savings until Oct. 31st.
America's best prices & packages.
Campus sales reps wanted. Earn
free trips cash. 1.800.SURFS.UP
www.studentexpress.com
ANNOUNCEMENTS
SPRING BREAK 99! Cancun Nas-
sau Jamaica "Mazatlan ' Acapulco
" Bahamas Cruise Florida Florida '
South Padre. Travel Free and make
lots of Cash! Top reps are offered
full-time staff jobs. Lowest price
Guaranteed. Call now for details!
www.classtravel.com 800838-6411
HEALTH PROFESSIONS Career In-
formation Seminar October 27, 1998,
Brewster B-102, 4:00-6:00 p.m.
"SUCCESS STORY" Learn how this
ECU father-son team made it big.
Tuesday, October 27th, 12 noon,
Mendenhall Student Center Great
Room 3. Light lunch provided.
HALLOWEEN CARNIVAL, spon-
sored by Sigma Sigma Sigma, Chi
Omega, and Alpha Delta Pi; Oct.
30th from 3-8 p.m. at the Chi Ome-
ga and Alpha Delta Pi houses. Child-
ren 14 and under welcome, admis-
sion is 1 canned food; donations ac-
cepted, proceeds go to Greenville
Homeless Shelter
CO-REC Flag Football reg. meeting:
anyone interested in playing co-rec
flag football for intramurals must at-
tend the registration meeting on Oct
27 at 5:30 in Mendenhall Room 244.
For questions please call 328-6387.
COME "ROLL" with us On Nov.
9th. the Adventure Program will be
hosting a Kayak Roll clinic. Sign up,
get wet, and learn the basics of kay-
aking and the "Eskimo Roll Be sure
to register by November 7th, 5 p.m.
Member cost is $5. Come see what
everyone's talking about! For further
info, contact Dept. of Recreational
Services @ 328-6387
B-GLAD BISEXUALS Gays Lesbi-
ans and Allies for Diversity meets
Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m. General
Classroom Building room 3006.
FITNESS TRAINING Partner Train-
ing still available at the SRC. Contact
328-6387 for more information on
getting the help you need to get
started!
NEED A PART TIME JOB?
RPSINC.
Is looking for iwxux uanduks to toad vans and
unload trailers for the am shift hours 3:00am to 8am
17.00hour; tuition assistance available after 30 days.
Future career opportunities In operations and manage-
ment possible. Applications can be filled out at 2401
United Drive (near the aquatics center) Gteenvilie
BECOMING A successful student-
Test Anxiety Workshop: Thursday
3:30-4:30. The Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development is of-
fering the following workshop on Oc-
tober 29th. If you are interested in
this program, please contact the
Center at 328-6661.
CO-REC FLAG football reg. meet-
ing: Anyone interested in playing co-
rec flag football for intramurals must
attend the registration meeting on
Oct 27 at 5:30 in Mendenhall 244.
GOLDEN KEY will meet Tuesday,
Oct. 27 at 5:30 in GCB Room 1003
Come and get all the information
you need to know about GRE. We
will learn about strategies as well as
test dates. Join us!
STRESS MANAGEMENT work-
shop: Wednesday 3:30-4:30.on Oc-
tober 28th. If you are interested in
this workshop, please call 328-6661.
SMOKING CESSATION Workshop:
Thursday 3:30-5 p.m. on October
29th. If you are interested in this pro-
gram, please call 328-6661.
PSI CHI MEETING open to all cur-
rent members and others interested
in joining. Wednesday, October 28
at 5 p.m Psi Chi Library. Rawl 302.
Hope to see you there!
COME "ROLL" with us! On Nov. 9th
the Adventure Program will be host-
ing a Kayak Roll Clinic Sign up. get
wet, and learn the basics of kayaking
and the 'Eskimo Roll Be sure to reg-
ister by Nov. 7th at 5 p.m. Come see
what everyone's talking about For
further info contact Adventure Pro-
grammingDept. of Rec. Services @
328-6387.
3-ON-3 BASKETBALL: It's here
again, 3-on-3 intramural basketball.
Anyone wanting to participate must
attend the registration meeting on
Tues Oct. 27 at 5 p.m. in Mendeni
hall room 244. For further info;
please call 328-6387. j
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION Work-
shop: Thursday 1:30-2:30. The Cen-
ter for Counseling and Student De-
velopment is offering the following
workshop on October 22 nd. If you
are interested in this workshop, con-
tact the Center at 328-6661.
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: Thursday 3:30-5PM on
October 29th. If you are interested in
this workshop, please contact the
Center at 328-6661.
BACKPACKING EXPEDITION!
There will be a backpack trip to the
top of Mount Mitchell, Nov. 6-8th.
This will be a 8-10 mile hike, in win-
tery conditions, to the "highest peak
in the east Registration deadline is
Oct. 30th, 5 p.m. All equipment,
food, and transportation provided.
For further info, contact Dept. of Re-
creational Services @ 328-6387.
REGISTRATION FOR General Cot
lege Students. General College stud;
ents should contact their advisers
the week of November 2-6 to make
arrangements for academic advising
for Spring Semester 1999. Early reg-
istration week is set for Nov. 9-13.
COMMUNICATING AND Resolv-
ing Conflict: (CRC) Workshop: Thurs-
day 11:00-12:00. The Center for
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering the following work'
shop on October 22nd If you are in
teresied in this workshop, contact
the Center at 328-6661. '
GOLDEN KEY National Honor Sof
ciety will meet today in GCB Room
1003 at 5:30. Please join us.
ALCOHOL AWARENESS Week-
October 26-31. Learn how to take
care of yourself and others. Visit The
Wall and The Wall of Remembranc-
es. Sign the pledge. Have a safe Hal-
loween.
FITNESS TRAINING Partner Train-
ing still available at the SRC. Contact '
328-6387 for more information. ;
COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN Church
will be hosting a Hallelujah Fun Time
for children ages 4-12 on Saturday;
Oct. 31 at 1 p.m This event is d
signed as an alternative to Hallo-
ween. Activities include games, a
puppet skit, snacks, and ministering
of the Word of God and will be held
at Community Christian Academy,
2009 Pactolus Road. Greenville For
info, call 551-9143
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS minis,
try meets each Tuesday 6-8 p.m. at
First Presbyterian on the corner o
14th and Elm St. Join us for dinner'
and a program. For info, or a ride call
Kim 9 752-8758 or 3m@broad
cast.net.
I





The East Carolinian
successful student-
orkshop: Thursday
lenter for Counsel-
Development is of-
tg workshop on Oc-
u are interested in
lease contact the
3t
'ootball reg. meet-
ssted in playing co-
ar intramurals must
ration meeting on
) Mendenhall 244.
vill meet Tuesday,
i GCB Room 1003
ill the information
w about GRE. We
rategies as well as
s!
GEMENT work-
r 3:30-4:3O.on Oc-
j are interested in
sase call 328-6661.
ATION Workshop:
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erested in this pro-
328-6661.
IG open to all cur-
i others interested
ssday, October 28
Library. Rawl 302.
here!
ith us! On Nov. 9th
gram will be host-
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amural basketball:
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ation meeting on
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For further info;
87. ;
TIVATION Work-
30-2:30. The Cen-
and Student De-
ing the following
)ber 22nd. If you
pis workshop, con-
328-6661.
lajor or a Career
lay 3:30-5PM on
u are interested in
ease contact the
I.
EXPEDITION!
ckpack trip to the
chell, Nov. 6-8th.
mile hike, in win-
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OR General Ceil
eral College stud:
ct their advisers
iber 2-6 to make
cademic advising
r 1999. Early reg-
t for Nov. 9-13.
G AND Resolv-
Workshop: Thurs-
The Center for
itudent Develop-
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2nd. If you are in-
orkshop, contact
i66i. :
itional Honor Sof
ay in GCB Room
;e join us.
1ENESS Week-
irn how to take
others. Visit The
of Remembranc-
Have a safe Hal-
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the SRC. Contact '
information.
IISTIAN Church
llelujah Fun Time
-12 on Saturday,
This event is de
native to Hallo-
elude games, a
and ministering
and will be held
istian Academy,
. Greenville For
AMPUS minisv
iday 6-8 p.m. at
n the corner of
lin us for dinner
nfo. or a ride calf
or 3m@broad'
DONT MISS THE FUN!
DON'T MISS THE DISCOUNTS!
HIDDEN DISCOUNT TAGS V HALLOWEEN TREATS
Between 4:00 pm and 7:00 pm on Thursday,
October 29th, look for SPECIAL HIDDEN SALE
TAGS on select merchandise throughout the
w store!
Find a Skull on the tag and TAKE 20 OFF the
regular price, Spiders are 30 OFF, and
Ghosts are 40 OFF! Quantities and sizes of
the specially priced merchandise are limited,
so SHOP EARLY!
DEAD ITEM SALE
- 75 OFF ASSORTED ITEMS
FROM ALL DEPARTMENTS
SSHi
See PeeDee and the
ECU Cheerleaders
Thursday, October 29
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
DEAD ITEM SALE V FREE REFRESHMENTS
i TAKE A KID TO THE
W FOOTBALL GAME SPECIAL!
ECU ATHLETICS SPECIAL PROMOTION:
Take A Kid to the Game!
Saturday, Oct. 31
Purchase 1 full price adult ticket and
Set 1 child's ticket FREE!
103198 only, walk-ups only at Gate 1, subject to ticket availability.
30 OFF
ALL REGULAR PRICE
CHILDREN &
YOUTH
APPAREL
TUES OCT. 27 - SAT OCT. 31,1998 ONLY
25 OFF
ALL REGULAR PRICE
PURPLE &
GOLD
APPAREL
FRI. 0CT 30 � SAT, OCT. 31, 1998 ONLY
Don't forget to pick up your football tickets,
Tuesday through Thursday, 9 am - 7 pm.
Ronald E. Dowdy
Student Stores
Where your dollars support scholars!
Wright Building � 328-6731
Monday - Friday: 7:30 am - 7:00 pm � Saturday: 9:00 am - 3:00 pm
Discounts apply to regular price merchandise. Subject to stock on hand. No other discounts or prior purchases apply. Hidden tag discounts may not be taken on substitute merchandise
Not valid on special order items.





k BiwrtKty iUNCr at wmt wwcnin with TMr pxvijxon of stupcnt uf
Let the
Madness Begin?
You're facing a dilemma. Spending a cold Halloween night downtown
dealing with masses of overzealous and possibly intoxicated souls is
a scary prospect. Then again, the thought of a quiet night at home on
Halloween is a drag. What's a fun-loving student like you to do?
Why not join 2,000-3,000 students and guests and come into Mendenhall
on this night? Midnight Madness, sponsored by the Division of Student
Life, offers a free Halloween bash that's full of stuff to do, free food, free
entertainment, free novelty attractions, and free giveaways. There will be
plenty of chances to win cash prizes, either by winning at the costume
contest or Bingo. Besides the free prizes and giveaways, students can feel
the rush of driving a virtual stock car, learn their fates from fortune tellers,
make a music video, and dance the night away.
Forget the hassle of trick-or-treating for free food! ECU Dining Services is
offering the perfect Halloween menu to satisfy any sweet tooth. Join other
ghosts and goblins at Midnight Madness for free candy apples, cotton
candy, snow cones, popcorn, and peanuts. From 11 p.m. -1 a.m.
Mendenhall will serve a Midnight Breakfast Buffet. Don't miss our
scrambled newt eggs with lizard tails and fish scales, haggish hashbrowns,
ghoulish grits, tombstone biscuits, monstrous milk, and orange blood!
Midnight Madness starts at 9 p.m. and ends at
2 a.m. Students need only present their ECU
One Cards to enter the bash. Each student may
obtain one guest pass, which must be picked
up prior to the event. Guest passes can be
picked up beginning October 26 at the Central
Ticket Office from 8:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. or at
the Todd Dining Hall Meal Plan Office
from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. On Halloween, guest
passes may be picked up at the Student
Recreation Center from 11 a.m. - 10:30
p.m. In place of a Saturday night Hendrix
film, Halloween Cartoon Shorts will be
shown as part of Midnight Madness
(guest passes required).
Carve Your
Way to Cash
Enter ECU Dining Services'
Halloween Pumpkin Carving Contest
and you could win $100 in cash.
Beginning October 26, pick up a
pumpkin from either Todd or
Mendenhall Dining Hall, carve it
in your spare time, and return it
to either Dining Hall before
noon on October 29. Entries
will be judged and the grand
prize winner will be determined
at Midnight Madness on
October 31.
Midnight
MWiness
at a
Olance
Video Karaoke
Open Glow-Bowling and Billiards
Virtual Reality Nascar
Evil Landing
Free Breakfast Buffet
DJ Dance
Costume Contest
Bingo
Fortune TellersWizardsPsychics On Call
Cartoon Shorts
HAVE A HALLOWEEN
TO REMEMBER
MAKE A PLEDGE AND PLAY IT SAFE
For a Halloween to remember, follow these tips
� Respect other people's rights, and your own.
� Choose not to drink.
� Respect State laws and campus policies.
� Stay out of dangerous situations involving alcohol, whether in a car, a bar, or a bedroom.
PLAY IT SAFE AND SIGN THE PLEDGE!
HAVE A HALLOWEEN TO REMEMBER!
r
� I promise not to drink on Halloween.
� I will not ride in a car when the driver has been drinking.
� I will watch out for my friends, take care of myself, and have a safe Halloween.
Signed:
Phone:
Return to 210 Whichard: Health Promotions & Well-Being
for the prize drawing for a CD-ROM!
II






Arts & Entertainment Magazine of The East
last Carolinian g
vmMnkmd.
Wednesday, October 28.1998
Christopher Salerno
Staff Writer
Halloween is afoot in the Emerald City and it just may be the most
anticipated social event on the ECU party calender.
Downtown streets are shut down to cars while the people min-
gle freely, masquerading through the bowery and passing through
the bars. The open-street atmosphere makes it easy for those in
costume to see and meet their fellow freaks as they wind their way
through the crowd.
The downtown Halloween ceremonies have taken some beat-
ings in the past. A bad rap wasn't even the worst of it. Crowds who
refused to go home when asked by police were maced until they
left
Much of the added commotion and festivity is due to the area's
sudden Halloween population surge. People come from the ends of
the earth for a taste of the ECU Halloween street spectacular. Every
corner of your house ends up slept in. Your cousin and his next
door neighbor from Hoboken pass out, smearing clown make-up
on the kitchen floor tiles. Your roommate decide to have a late-
night gathering for all the people he found dressed as Alice from the
Brady Bunch.
Costumes are very important for Pirates with spirit.
The latest trends in television and scandal, along with the old
standbys, are among what will be seen this year on the scene.
"We sold out of the Monika Lewinsky wigs and berets in six
hours said Party Success' Ian Tortorella. The packages are officially
marketed as "The Intern
Of course right next to that get-up is, yes, you guessed it, Bubba
Clinton. The difference with the Bill Clinton mask is that, unlike the
See Halloween, continued on page 7
oscare
The freaks come out at night
CD Review
Reviewer gets
Ana in
his pantz
Movie Review
Carrie puts the whammie on assorted popular girls' and their ilk VideoReview
Our not-quite
exclusive-but-fun-
to read interview
with TV's
Space Ghost
L
mkridt
fountainhead � 2nd Floor Student Publications Building Greenville, NC 27858 � Phone 328-6366 � Fax 328-6558 � Advertising 328-2000 � www.fountainhead.BGU.edu





CD Review
&
Ryan Kcnncmur
Staff Writer
Son Volt
Wide Swing TYemolo
9 out of 10
Son Volt is a band. They spawned
from the now extinct country-rock
pioneer band called Uncle Tupelo,
which disbanded in the early 90s.
Jay Farrar (now thesongwriterlcad
singer of Son Volt) worked in col-
laboration with Jeff Tweedy to pro-
duce four almost equally brilliant
records, picking up hordes of fans
spanning the country.
Then, in 1993, following the
release of their finest album enti-
tled Anodyne, Farrar shrugged his
shoulders and left the band high
and dry, causing them to split up
and head down separate roads.
Tweedy went on to form the criti-
cally praised rock outfit Wilco,
while Farrar set up his stakes with
Son Volt.
When Son Volt put out their
first album, Trace, many found it to
be everything they could hope for.
Its delicious blend of hard rocking
riffs and slow acoustic gems was
alluring. Then, in 1997, the band
followed up with the record
Straightaways. This album was
basically a continuation of Trace,
but it didn't do anything to expand
on the sound, and thus was widely
considered a disappointment.
Some started to wonder if Farrar
had run out of ideas.
Well, some people should quit
their wondering and go pick up
the new disk Wide Swing Tremolo.
Son Volt is back in full force, and
this is shown quite clearly from
the start with their opening track
"StraightfaceThe song is a flat-
out rocker, complete with loud
crunching guitars and harshly dis-
torted vocals.
This leads us into the next song
"Driving the View which has the
words "underground hit single"
written all over it. It has a lovely
melody, and the harmonies provid-
ed by bassist Jim Boquist arc possi-
bly the most consistently perfect in
the country rock genre. Indeed,
these first couple songs are a more
hyped-up side of Son Volt than
most of us have ever heard, which
brings us to the third songJodel
Jodel is the biggest waste of
space I have ever listened to. It is 41
seconds of off-key harmonica, and
that is putting it nicely. I hate it.
This song is the sole reason for this
album not getting 10 out of 10. It's
that bad. I'd feel more comfortable
listening to a swarm of 17-year
cicadas climaxing with one unify-
ing yet piercing screech. Nope,
"Jodel" is not a good song.
Just when you think that this
band is completely out of their
See Son Volt, continued on page 3
m 6 ImrtwamMi Migum o Thf Ent CitBfcun
Amy LRoyster Editor in Chief
Heather Burgess Managing Editor
Miccah Smith Editor
Stephanie Whillock Designer
Brian Williams Layout
Janet Rcspcss Advertising Mantger
Bobby Tuggle W�6mwier
Serving, ihe FtU cwnmumty since 19?. the fast Caroliniari p
11,000 copies eveiy luesriay and 1 hursday. .000 copies of ihe
Fmintainhead. out new arts and entertammeni magame. are pub
fished eveiy Wednesday. The lead ediltmat in each edition ol he East
Carolinian is Ihe opinion of the i duonal Board. The Fast Carolinian
welcomes letter to Ihe editof. limited to 750 wonts, which may be
edited tot decency or brevity. Ihe fast Caioliman reserves the right to
edit oi reiect letters tor publication All letters must be s-qned Letters
should be addressed to Opinion editor .the last Carolinian. Student
Publications Huttding. FCU, Greenville, ?flb843SJ. For information
cat) 919.378.6366
2 Wednesday, October 28,1998
W
Band Review
Cashmere Jungle Lords rock!
Caleb Rose
Assistant Editor
ju Peasant's Cafe was host
rJKfJnf to 'in adventure two
BL Saturdays ago when
Richmond Virginia's
Cashmere Jungle Lords propelled a
packed house into their own little
world of Pulp music.
Imagine yourself buying a-tkket
for a trip to various places around
the world. That is the experienced in
2 hours upon seeing this fantastic
trio. The unique style of music the
Jungle Lords produce could be the
soundtrack to this adventure.
After the opening band, �
Greenville's own King Monkey,
began the evening with fueled
Rockabilly and excessive consump-
tion of Pabst Blue Ribbon, the
Cashmere Jungle Lords took the
stage and made sure everyone's seat
belts were buckled before the adven-
ture began.
After several introductory tunes,
the band hopped into a vintage
Jaguar and went on a spy hunt as
they plowed through "Paradise
from their disc titled Southern
Barber Supply, as well as "Pixie
Dust also from the album. The spy
hunt ended at the beach and it was
time to go surfing. A slew of surfin'
songs filled the ears of the crowd,
among them the album track
"Sweeper
At night on the beach when all is
peaceful, it's pleasant to hear
Caribbean sounds fill the air. The
band took a chance with these
differently flavored songs, noting
that this was one of the first times
that they had been played to the
public. Much to the band's surprise,
the tunes were a hit and with their
closing, the beach adventure was
over.
Once the Caribbean cruise had
landed, the "peasants" in the audi-
ence found themselves on the bor-
der of Texas and Mexico listening to
"Fernando a tune named after the
name singersongwriter Dominic
See Lords continued on page 7
Its Your Place
For Midnight Madness
SATURDAY. OCT. 31 FROM 9 P.M2 A.M.
AT MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
All dressed up but nowhere to go Halloween?
Come to the Midnight Madness Halloween
bash at Mendenhall Student Center. Free prizes,
video karaoke. Virtual NASCAR, psychics, bingo,
dancing, and a breakfast buffet. Your ECU One Card
will get you in free. Guest passes are available at
the Cental Ticket Office, 8:30 a.m. - 6 p.m Monday
- Friday; Todd Dining Hall Meal Plan Office, 9 a.m. -
5 p.m Monday - Friday and Student Recreation
Center on Saturday from 11 a.m -10:30 p.m.
For a Touch of Class
FRIDAY, NOV. 6 AT 8 P.M. IN WRIGHT
AUDITORIUM
Here's a chance to go high class on low cash. Hear
the St. Petersburg Academic State Symphony
Orchestra perform Tchaikovsky's Romeo and Juliet
Fantasy Overture and more. Student tickets are
available at the CT0 for $15. All tickets are $30 at
the door.
To Catch a Free Filch
OCTOBER 29-30 AT 8 P.M. AT HENDRIX
THEATRE SUNDAY MATINEE AT 3 P.M.
Where in Greenville can you see a FREE blockbuster
movie AND bring a guest? Right here in Mendenhall.
This week's blockbuster: Scream 2 (PG-13)
lb Get Your Jazz On
FRIDAY, OCT. 30 AT 8 P.M. IN GREAT
ROOM
Get down with the sounds of Bob Mincer of
the Yellow Jackets and the ECU School of
Music Jazz Faculty Ensemble. Students may pick up
two FREE tickets with a valid ECU One Card at the
Central Ticket Office. Sponsored by the Student
Union Special Events Committee.
To Chech Out New JacH City
Nothing to do for Thanksgiving? How about a phat
trip to The Big Apple? The ECU Student Union is
sponsoring a trip to New York for as little as $170.
The price includes round-trip transportation and
lodging for three nights. To reserve a spot for this
steal of a trip, drop by the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center or call 3284788.
72? Get Some Worh Done
OPEN MONDAY-THURSDAY 8 A.M10:45 P.M
FRIDAY 8 A.M. -11:45 P.M SATURDAY 1 P.M.
-11:45 P.M SUNDAY 1 P.M10:45 P.M.
Work doesn't have to bewellwork.
Not when you have a state-of-the-art facility at your
fingertips. Located on the ground floor, the comput-
er lab at Mendenhall features Pentium-based com-
puters. Power Macs, and color and laser printers.
And there's always an assistant ready to help you.
MSC Hours: MonThurt 8 a.m11 p.m Fri 8 am-Midnight; Sat Noon-Midnight; Sun 1-11 p.m.





Movie Review
l
Antz rips the rug out from under Disney
Ryan Kcnnemur
Movie Reviewer
4 out of 4 possible Ryans
Hey DisncyPixar Productions! You've
got a new butt to kiss! That's right, kids.
Dreamworks INC. picks up where they
left off with Small Soldiers and make it a
one-two punch with the release of their
newest animated masterpiece, Antz.
Let's begin with the understanding
that this is not a movie for kids. There
are a few curse words (which added to
my enjoyment), a giant army-style fight
scene that depicts soldier ants being
melted by acid-spewing termites, and
ants are burnt to cinders by a human
with a magnifying glass. Pretty hardcore
imagery.
The movie centers around one work-
er ant named Z-4195, voiced by neurotic
Unfortunately, the entire cast was wiped out when the best boy spilled 8 beer at the cast party.
Woody Allen, who is under the impres-
sion that there is more to life than mov-
ing dirt from place to place. Likewise is
Princess Bala, voiced by Sharon Stone,
who is being forced to marry General
Mandible (Gene Hackman) against her
wishes. Mandible, along with the aid of
Colonel Cutler (Christopher Walken)
plans to eliminate all the worker ants by
drowning them, thus making a supreme
society of soldier ants.
Other notable roles are Sly Stallone
as a soldier ant that falls for a worker
ant, voiced by Jennifer Lopez. Also Dan
Aykroyd and Jane Curtin play some
very WASPish wasps.
That's the basic introduction, but
there's more to the story that meets the
eye. This movie is more than just an
excuse to make another cartoon using
Toy Srory-esquc animations. Antz has
political statements out the wazoo. In
fact, it would be a good idea to go out
and read Anthem by Ayn Rand before
viewing it. Themes of socialism run
amok in almost every scene.
First of all, the newborn ants (in lar-
vae form) arc immediately set in front of
a committee and deemed whether they
are suited to be workers, in which case
they arc given a pickax, or soldiers, in
which case they are given a helmet.
Secondly, the ants are not allowed to
think for themselves. They are so used to
doing nothing but work that they actual-
ly enjoy it and ask no questions. They
arc told when to dance, when to sleep,
and anyone that defers from the norm is
punished.
By the end of the film, however, Z-
4195 is able to overcome the elements
and reform the entire commune. The
animation during the final scene is so
realistic, you can actually see the social-
ism crumbling down to the ground.
Antz is a miniature view of our own
society, and the fact that it can poke fun
at it is reason enough to see it. Like the
tag line of the movie states, "Every ant
has his day Let's hope that these partic-
ular ants have more than just one day in
the sun, for these insect stars will be
shining for years to come.
become a mem
Launch your
organization
into cyberspace
r.
www.
clubhouse
acu.edu
Sun Volt, continued from page 2
minds, they follow up with "Medicine Hat which is a catchy albeit lyrically
confusing little ditty, and possibly the best song on the disk.
The remainder of the disk is just as strong, mixing the usual spellbind-
ingly beautiful hard-road ballads with the crunchy guitar-fueled rockers
that Son Volt fans have come to appreciate. It's like their other albums, only
better.
On the opening track, Farrar sings of carrying in a new day. A new day,
indeed.
answers to Tuesday's East Carolinian Crossword
Wednesday, October 28,1998 3





�p�
Space Ghost sends message of hope
Mkxah Smith
Interviewer to the Stars
ML Mi
M B OK, don't read this if
��'ilf'mF you don't know who
Space Ghost is. You'll
just end up confused and angry, and
I don't want that
But if you're a huge fan, like me,
you'll be pleased to know that I got
to talk to Space Ghost live on the
phone the other week with some
other college media people from
around the country, courtesy of
Rhino Records. We had the best
time. I hope you enjoy reading our
� interview, ft is a tribute to my mad
journalism skills!
This transcript segment is from our
actual interview on October 15.
SG: Hello young Americans!
ME (Laughing uncontrollably)
SG: Micxah's been carbo-loading!
ME: (coughing) Tm coughing!
SG: Oh, you're coughing?
ME: Hello, I'm a big old fan of yours!
SG: Oh, give Daddy a big phone kiss!
ME: I read your review in Ray-Gun.
SG:How'dIdo?
ME: It was the bestestOo you get
paid more for being a superhero, or
are you discriminated agaiast and
actually paid less?
SG: Ifs actually less, because some
bosses are cheapskates. You're doing
the TV show but you're still having
to save the world. There's no bonus
I m QOflM bf funnels tor ttii
for saving the world.
ME: (Laughing uncontrollably)
SG: Bless Miccah's heart
MR- (Laughing uncontrollably)
SG: God bless Mkxah, she's getting
me through this.
ME: First off. Space Ghost, fun says
hi I just wanted you to know that
SG: fun owes me money!
ME: Do you have a girlfriend? Are
you eligible?
SG: Space Ghost is what they call on
your planet "sweet available beef
ME: II be calling you
laterWhafre you doing for
Halloween, Space Ghost?
SG: 111 be sitting here handing out
chick peas, as usual.
Regrettably, the interview was cut
short Otherwise, I could have
brought you all the inside scoop on
what Space Ghost eats for midnight
snacks
BEACKBEARD'S
BENCH
AHOY, YE PIRATE STUDENTS:
The Sports Marketing Department and Pirate Basketball are looking for some enthusiastic students to become charter
members in BLACKBEARDS BENCH As a charter member you will receive the following:
� An original BLACKBEARD'S BENCH t-shirt.
� Pre-game "parties" with Coach Dooley's game plan for the opponent.
All we ask is that you recruit your friends to attend the games. Each student will receive a punch card with the numbers 1-
20. At the end of each men's and women's home game, the Sports Marketing Department will punch each card with a
special mark. You can earn a BLACKBEARD'S BENCH t-shirt, pizza coupons, Gatorade gear, admission to the pre-game
parties and a pizza party for 10. Anyone who attends 20 games will be entered Into the grand prize drawinq of free
tuition for Spring 1999, compliments of Pepsi. ���� a
Pirate hoops needs an intense atmosphere in Minges Coliseum, and it all begins with YOU. Support Coach Dooley, Coach
Gibson and the Pirate basketball teams during the 1998-99 season!
For more information call the Sports Marketing Department at 328-4530.






0 9
horoscopes
ARIES:
(March 21-April 20)
Your mood might be cranky, result-
ing from tensions either at home or
at work. Speak softly and avoid any
disagreements with others. You are
in a practical frame of mind and
sharp u matters of money. It's a
happy time for romance and love.
TAURUS:
(April 21-May 21)
Spend extra time with family - fun
and adventure will be highlighted. It
may be the perfect opportunity for a
heart-to-heart talk with your chil-
dren. Roadblocks are likely in realiz-
ing a financial goal, you're doser
than you think. Your passion deep-
ens.
GEMINI:
(May22-June21)
You and your mate get along
throughout the entire week. All
those chores that really need to get
done will be accomplished like
clockwork. Your career is highlight-
ed, so don't be surprised if you
receive a raise or promotion. Keep
your patience around children.
CANCER:
(June 22-July 23)
Start the week in a practical frame
of mind. Take time alone and treat
yourself to something that will
make you feel extra special. Some
co-workers are be critical and sar-
castic, but otherwise work runs
smoothly. Your career is about to
take a big step forward. Managers
are impressed with your effort.
LEO:
(July 24-August 23)
Listen to a friend's advice on money
matters - an objective point of view
is what you need. Your sweetheart
may be feeling neglected, and
accuse you of unrealistic expecta-
tions - so make the time for
romance and more intimacy. It's
time for a few practical steps to
improve your image.
VIRGO:
(August 24 - September 23)
There will probably be a strong urge
to immerse yourself in creative pur-
suits. Keep an open mind and you "
may be pleasantly surprised at the
results. Both business and house-
hold projects enjoy favorable influ-
ences; and you may get a bonus for
recendy positive efforts.
LIBRA:
(September 24 - October 23)
The more you depend on your
reserves, the stronger you are. You
inspire family members likewise.
There are some self doubts lingering
which only you can work through.
Self-improvement efforts will suc-
ceed. Remember - if you can't say
any thing nice, don't say anything at
all.
SCORPIO:
(October 24 - November 22)
Spend time with close friends and
you'll find that your friendships and
loves are very fulfilling. There is
someone trying to undermine your
position with flattery and bribery.
Keep your cool. There will be great
news about money, and possibly a
new, lucrative job offer.
SAGITTARIUS:
(November 23 - December 21)
It will be an effortless and pleasur-
able week for you. Keep in mind you
do have the power to make all sorts
of changes for the better. Everyone
seems overly emotional as of late, so
be on guard for lies and accusations.
Harmony will be restored at home
by week's end.
CAPRICORN:
(December 22 - January 20)
Wherever you are, you will be sur-
rounded by friendship and luck.
Unexpected money is coming your
way. Both family and work responsi-
bilities are heavy, take one situation
at a time. Be aware that guidance
comes through your dreams.
Positive vibes continue at home.
AQUARIUS:
(January 21 - February 19)
You need to travel in order to check
out an opportunity to increase your
income. Don't neglect a mate who's
starving for attention. Both your
professional image and reputation is
boosted to new levels. Your charm
and magnetism take you through
any sticky situations right now.
PISCES:
(February 20-March 20)
It's a week of heavy mental stimula-
tion and challenges. Both innovative
and unconventional approaches
work. Your assert iveness takes you
far at work and your family's happy
and enjoys being together. Plan your
entertainment and include others
from the sideline.
Birthday Week:
Your closest relationships are stable
for now, but your inner voice may be
prompting you to take time alone
for self-renewal. Professional
advancement is at hand, so keep
yourself on the straight and narrow.
Your creative urges may turn into
profit.
Horoscope by Miss Anna
Things to
IDo
Downtown
28 Wednesday
Comedy Zone at The Attic: Mike
Wayans
29 Thursday
King Slender at Peasants
Buck Cherry at the Attic
30 Friday
The Back Doors (Doors Tribute) at
Peasants
Headstone Circus at the Attic
31 Saturday
HALLOWEEN Downtown!
Colouring Lesson at Peasant's
UnsoundKuttphat7 Ton Diesel at The Attic
1 Sunday
Open Mic night at Peasant's
Matt Thomas at the Courtyard
Tavern
20 Tuesday
Studio 54 night at The Attic
Hip Hop or Fresh at
Peasants
Wednesday, October 28,1998 5





Don't mess with Carrie
Tint bucket of pig's Mood nil look great with your corsage
Miccah Smith
FouMainhead Editor
4
Tj-ijr Carrie is just one of
those movies you can
turn to again and again every
Halloween for sheer, unadulterated
shock and creeping terror.
Yeah, but it's a prom movie, you say.
I know, I know. There's no excuse.
Butjusthearmeout
There's something about the lo-fi
filming style, unrelenting carnage
and utter chaos in Brian DePalma's
1976 film version of Stephen King's
first literary success that gives it a
permanent standing above any
other film of its kind since. Many
have tried, and failed, to make prom
night into such a terrifying experi-
ence onscreen.
King's formula is simple enough:
take one girl with groovy telekinetic
powers, add a psycho mom and a
horde of loudmouthed high-school
kids who hate her guts. Shake well,
and serve with a splash of pig's
blood, heh-heh.
Piper Laurie is chillingly one-
dimensional in her role as Carrie's
holy-roller Tori Amos look-alike
mother, a distant but violent crea-
ture who floats from door to door in
a black robe collecting donations for
See Carrie, continued on page 7
Midnight Madness time!
Jf Nina M. Dry
yiaf Sff Writer
3IWfc With Halloween fast
vniititi - approaching, it's
time to decide what to do on the big
night Should you go to the movies?
How about billiards or perhaps
singing the night away to Monster
Mash? Maybe a night of dinner and
dancing? Well you can do all of this
and more at the Seventh Annual
Midnight Madness on Halloween
night from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. at
Mendenhall Student Center.
There's a little bit of everything
for everyone to enjoy. They'll have
their usual favorites from years past
such as billiards and glow bowling.
"This is our second year we've
done glow bowling said Carol
Woodruff, marketing director of the
department of university unions.
"There are special pins and balls
that glow under black light"
If you are looking for a quick
glimpse into the future or the
answer to some of your undying
questions, check out the fortune
tellers, wizard, or psychic hotline for
some insight.
"Our wizard and the psychic
hodine will be available at the stu-
dent organization booth, while there
will be a couple of fortune tellers in
the Mendenhall lounge and in the
gallery upstairs Woodruff said.
Then there is the ever-popular
video karaoke. Realize those dreams
of becoming a singing sensation
and walk away with a video of your
five minutes of fame.
"Karaoke is always popular
every year" Woodruff said. "It will
be held in room 244 from 9 p.m.
until 2 a.m
There will also be a chance for
you to get your dance on with DJ J.
Arthur from 1! p.m. to 1:30 a.m.
Once you've worked up an
appetite with all of the singing and
dancing, head on over to the dining
hall for an all-you-can-eat breakfast
buffet Food will be served form 11
p.m. to 1 a.m.
Contests and games such as
bingo, a pumpkin carving contest
and a costume contest will give you
a chance to win some prizes. See
your R.A. or the resident coordina-
tor for more information.
"We will have cash prizes for the
best male costume, best female cos-
tume, and best group costume
Woodruff saidAll those interested
in participating must be in Hendrix
Theater by 11:30 p.m
According to Woodruff, other
prizes include glow in the dark and
regular mugs, wind-up knick
knacks and official Midnight
Madness t-shirts.
"The ECU Student Stores assist
us in getting those t-shirts printed
each yearrWoodruff said. "We defi-
nitely appreciate their support
There have been some new
events added to the Midnight
Madness line-up.
While going from event to event,
you can stop into Hendrix Theater
to watch cartoon shorts � mini
Halloween cartoons that will be
shown before and after the costume
contest.
The Ghoul Cafe, Mendenhall's
haunted house, has been replaced
this year with Evil Landing which
will be held in the social room. All
people involved are keeping a tight
lip as to what will be going on in the
haunted house. All that has been
said is that aliens will be involved�
-the rest is top secret.
The last new addition is the vir-
tual reality Nascar ride. According to
Woodruff there will be four cars set
up with a grandstand set up around
See Madness, continued on page 7
For a good time caU
the ECU Student Union Hotline at 252.328.6004.
or visit our website at www.ecu.edustudentunion.
LIVE MUSIC! the PIRATE UNDERGROUND
rrec enkMlainnwitl nnil
October il in tht- m�l�rl�. ,i
October 291 on the Mendenhi Brickyard from4-7pni
Native dothing, dknce, muse, and food.
&oBiored by the mtooitjonal StodentAsoatffaand
Smdent I'rrion Cultural Awrene Cooamttee
A Cultural Affair
sAa(k�� A PRICE ABOVE RUBE
wmmm fcw cnnrnjr n
THIRSTYTI!IRS!).V! oLKLAM 2 ,
EDNESDAV OCTOBER 28
AIUilms start at .8 00 pm unless otherwise not
'd and arc FREE to students la
THURSDAY OCT 29 and
FRIDAY OCT JO AT 8 PM
IVIE ON HALLOWEEN
SUNDAY NOVEMBFR 1 MATINEE AT 3 PM
Earthen Vessels
MHKIff
lfdMa�ta who r �quirt �ocommodMton�ijnteAWM�
Id t� MMM for Omimt Support SffriCM it 252 338 4�K
toflyrK hour prior to tw ni of me propwn
an exhibit of handcrafted baskets and pottery
from the southeastern Appalachian Mountains
In the Mendenhall Gallery from October 12th through 30th
Mci
�mm Worn. comrt In. CM Tim one. MeoteMI SUM M M CmU�m�, a
27858-4353:Ililli�947m uhlmmi.�. ' � �"�!On!NC
Kl;i.()iii)h
27958 -4353; 0. CH 252.32e.47S8. M to t (OO.ECUARTS, or TOO 2S2.328.4738.
830 am .6 pm, Monday-Fa





Carrie, continued from page 6
her church. Her other hobbies
include sewing, singing and self-fla-
gellating, plus ignoring and generally
repressing the delicate Carrie in a
house heavy with dark wood and
religious art.
Well, our heroine enjoys the same
warm companionship and good
times at school too, as if that were a
surprise. After joining an attack on
Carrie with tampons in a locker
room in the opening sequence, one
girl feels guilty and gets her
boyfriend, a puffy-haired jock with
GOOD GUY stamped across his fore-
head, to ask Carrie to the prom and
show her a good time.
Can we skip the rest of the movie
and go straight to prom night,
please?! (Why yes, that is John
Travolta with a bucket of pig's blood.
Now hush up.)
Carrie gets herself all duded up in a
gorgeous petal pink satin gown she
made herself, and naturally her mom
has to try to screw things up.
"I can see your dirty pillows she
says, just to keep things light.
"They're called breasts, Mama, and
every woman has them Carrie
answers.
Smart comeback. Did you ace
rhetoric last semester?
So she takes off for the prom, which
is charmingly crammed into the
school gym, not knowing of a
fiendish plot (involving Travolta and
the aforementioned bucket o' pig's
blood) to embarrass her in front of
the school.
DePalma, in his wisdom, saves all the
best stuff for last. Once you've seen
Carrie's terrifying face streaked with
pig's blood, eyes bulging, body
tensed, damnation oozing from
every pore, you'll never forget it.
The scene brands like a hot iron.
Carrie snaps the gym doors shut
with a telekinetic blast, leaving her-
self plenty of time to leisurely extract
the vengeance for which a million
tortured, misunderstood high school
girls' souls have cried out since time
began: total, brutal, indiscriminate
and full of neat pyrotechnics.
'Nuffsaid.
Lords, continued from page 2
Carpin's girlfriend was mumbling in
her sleep one day. Carpin makes a
point to dictate stories behind the
songs, a good habit for any tour-
guide. Many of the non-album tunes
had this Tex-Mex feel to them,
mainly because of Carpin's Mexican
ancestry. Don't forget your roots.
Finally, we flew out to California
to try out the movie business.
Carpin sings in the first line of "Mr.
Melrose Avcl wanna be a
Hollywood movie star If this is
true, he should consider sticking to
his night job as a musician because
the Cashmere Jungle Lords have a
unique gift in delivering such a solid
Halloween, continued from page t
traditional presidential mask, Bill is
depicted with tongue hanging out
and lipstick kisses all over his blush-
ing face. Other popular cos-
tumes include Southpark, �
Batman and, in keeping with
school spirit, the Pirate. Also
Zorro, with its basic costume, is a
popular choice among low-
maintenance guys.
"We've sold tons of Pirate stuff
because of the home football
game that dayl'said Tortorella.
"Ninety percent of the customers
have been college students
Surely we'll see our share of
crazy couples this Halloween, like
service with a smirk
guys with hairy chest
wigs and girlfriends
with pitchforks to stick
them with. Of course,
cross-dressing also runs
rampant on this night,
and not just in designat-
ed situations, either.
"Girls are buying
everything sexy, like French Maids
and Sexy Nurse costumessaid Myra
Smith.owner of Party Success.
Around the store fishnet stockings
and sex kitten outfits hang among
Hey! How d Bob Dole gel in?
the traditional Zorros
and Freddy Kruger cos-
tumes.
"We try and push
people to create original
costumes said Michael
Gwaltney, who does the
design work for Party
Makers. "Some people arc
spending 50 or 60 dollars
But the bottom line is that it's not
the price that counts on Halloween,
but how many people you can scare.
Free Time
October
28 Wednesday
-Sundance Cinema: Price Above
Rubies at 8 p.m. in Hehdrix Theater
-Chew on This: Noon lecture in the
MSC Underground
-Delta Sigma Phi Haunted House at
510 E. 10th Street, across from
Wendy's, from 7-11 p.m. A portion
of the proceeds will be donated to
the March of Dimes
-Winterville Rescue and EMS 5th
Annual Haunted House on Old Tar
Road in Winterville, from 7 p.m.
until Midnight. Profits help support
the Winterville Rescue and EMS
-Trinkett.Vibe Merchant at Local
506 in Chapel Hill
-Brett Perkins at The Cave in Chapel
Hill
29 Thursday
-Percussion Ensemble at 8 p.m. in
the Fletcher Music Center, Rm. 101
-Scream 2 at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
Theater
-Delta Sigma Phi Haunted House, 7-
11 p.m.
-Winterville EMS 5th Annual
Haunted House from 7 p.m. until
Midnight
-Trailer Bride, The Blacks at Local
506 in Chapel Hill
-The Crow Flies at The Cave in
Chapel Hill
-Cowboy Mouth at Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro
30 Friday
-Scream 2 at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
Theater
-Faculty Recital, featuring Nathan
Williams, clarinet, John O' Brien
piano and Christopher Ulffers, bas-
soon, at 8 p.m. in the Willis Building
Auditorium
-Jazz at Night at 8 p.m. in the MSC
Great Room
-Winterville EMS 5th Annual
Haunted House from 7 p.m. until
-Two Dollar Pistols, the 3 Torches at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill
-Evil Weiner at The Cave in Chapel
Hill
-Promise Ring, Jets to Brazil at Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro
31 Saturday
-Midnight Madness at Mendenhall
Student Center from 9 p.m. until 2
a.m.
-Winterville EMS 5th Annual
Haunted House from 7 p.m. until
-Masquerade with Garmonbozia,
Die Zen Frisbee Die, The Flaming
Pumpkinheads at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill
-Halloween Party with The Last of
the Great Sideshow Freaks at The
Cave in Chapel Hill
-Hobex at Cat's Cradle in Carrboro
November
1 Sunday
-Scream 2 at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
Theater
-Chamber Choir concert at 3 p.m in
at Immanuel Baptist Church
-Gam, Mad Trucker Gone Mad at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill
2 Monday
-The McCoys Art Show in the MSC
Gallery
-The Minders, Floraline at Local 506
in Chapel Hill
3 Tuesday
-Return to Sweden: Travel Adventure
Film Series in Hendrix Theater at 4
and 7:30 p.m, theme dinner at 6
p.m.
-And You Will Know Us By The Trail
Of Dead, Fura at Local 506 in Chapel
Hill
Madness, continued from page 6
it to simulate a crowd.
"Each person will have control
over their own car Woodruff said.
With so much fun and entertain-
ment, it sounds like it's too good to
be true right? You'd think that all this
would cost something � $29.99?
19.99? NOPE It's completely free
with an ECU one. card. All students
an even bring one friend along. All
they need is a guest pass which can
be picked up at the Central Ticket
Office in Mendenhall between 8:30
to 6:30, Monday-Friday or at Todd's
Dining Hall meal plan office
between 9 a.m. to 5 p.m
Monday-Friday.
If you've forgotten to pick up a
guest pass by Saturday, stop by
the Rec Center on Halloween and
pick one up between 11 a.m.
to 10:30 p.m.
WrrIB
weekly top hits
15. Meat Beat
MAnifesto "Oblivious
Humans"
14.GhotiHook
"Walking on
Sunshine"
13. Hipbone
"Radius"
12. Tori Amos
"Playboy Mommy"
11. My Superhero
"Groovy"
10. Fighting Gravity
"Bend the Light"
9. Beastie Boys
"Body Movin"
8. Primus "Scissor
Man"
7. Wes Cunningham
"Say My Name"
6. Soul Coughing
"Circles"
5. Kid Rock
"Cowboy"
4. Jim's Big Ego "Big
Whoop"
3. Jump Little
Children "Come Out
Clean"
2.Korn"Gotthe
Life"
1. Once Hush "The
Envelope Song"
Wednesday, October 28,1998





I
When plat
Go to our welpjferat wwwjteo.cu.e the calendar link.
Just below Xrpj'f1Qj00llnothe event submission form.
Or if you want a sfecjyifiipwvvw.tec.ecu.eduevents into your browser.
Then just 'Snier your event onto our campus calendar.
It's just that easy. And it's one more free service of The East Carolinian.


Title
The East Carolinian, October 27, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 27, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1300
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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