The East Carolinian, October 22, 1998






I
Thursday:
High: 72
Low: 63
Friday:
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Online Survey
www.tec.ecu.edu
"Should NATO engage in airstrikes against
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"Should President Clinton be impeeched?"
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Carolinian
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to Alabama.
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THURSDAY. OCTOBER 22 .1998 VOLUME 74. ISSUE 18
Remember to set your
clocks back one hour at mid-
night on Saturday.
DeMarco files
petition of review
Testimony in benefit
hearing concludes
Steve L o s e y
NEWS EDITOR
After two unsuccessful appeals to
the Board of Trustees (BOT) and
the Board of Governors .
(BOG), former professor
Sal DeMarco has filed a
Petition of Review with
the Wake County Superior
Court accusing Chancellor
Richard Eakin of violating
due process rights guaran-
teed by the North Carolina
and U.S. Constitutions.
Testimony also concluded
Tuesday in an
Employment Securities
Commission hearing to
decide whether DeMarco should
receive unemployment benefits.
In the Oct. 9 petition, Alan
McSurely, attorney for DeMarco,
called Eakin's April decision to
overrule a due process committee's
unanimous decision not to termi-
nate DeMarco's employment
"arbitrary and capricious The
petition also alleges that Dr.
Michael Rastetter, chair of the
Communications Sciences and
Disorders department, intimidated
witnesses that testified for the due
process committee.
"I never intimidated a witness
at all Rastetter said. "I don't
know where DeMarco gets this
information
DeMarco allegedly
used profanities dur-
ing meetings,
ridiculed colleagues,
arranged appoint-
ments after he was
ordered not to, and
intimidated those
around him.
An impartial due
process committee,
made up of tenured
professors, ruled that
DeMarco's actions were "unfortu-
nate" but did not warrant firing.
"A bed-rock element of Due
Process is an impartial decision-
SE� DEMARCO. PAGE 2
Edwards holds
town hall meeting
Unveils education
platform at Wrigfit
SlS ANNE MlI.ENKEVICH
STAFF WRITER
Democratic Senatorial candidate
John Edwards unveiled his public
education platform at a town hall
meeting with ECU students and
faculty Thursday at Wright Plaza.
"Public schools are the most
important issue right now
Edwards said.
Edwards called for a reduction
in class size. He said that it i$ a
poor learning environment to have
children sitting on top of each
other with very little individual
attention from teachers.
Edwards also said that schools
need to have more computers and
technologies available to the stu-
dents.
"It is important to have the
tools and know how to use the
technology to advance in today's
society Edwards said.
Edwards also wants more after-
school programs available for chil-
dren who aneiconsidered at risk of
getting iiitrtreuble.
"Studies- ;show that from the
time when school ends until the
time when parents get home from
work fsthe time most trouble
occiirs Edwards said. "We need
SEE EDWARDS. PAGE 3
Extra punishment for hate
ECU adds sanctions to
prejudiced lawbreakers
Steve Los e y
news editor
After the death of gay University of Wyoming stu-
dent Matthew Shcpard, some have worried that
such an incident could happenat ECU.
"This very well could have been one of us B-
(JI ,AD adviser Jeff Gersh said.
If a student at ECU committed a hate crime,
the student would face additional penalties other
than those handed down by the courts.
"We would make the sanction appropriate to
what happened said Mary Lou Antieau, associ-
ate dean of students. "First, we would determine
if there was a violation of the Code of Conduct. If
there was a violation, we would then decide on the
sanction
The Code of Conduct forbids harassing, abus-
ing, threatening, endangering, injuring or threat-
ening to injure another person or their.
Dean of Students Ronald Speier said that there
have been many instances of harassment motivat-
ed by bias at ECU.
"We have instructed the honor board to take
motivation into consideration Speier said.
"We've been doing that for the past 10 years
Though North Carolina's laws against hate
crimes do not mention gays and lesbians, ECU
includes homosexuality as a possible motive for a
hate crime.
"ECU takes this very seriously, and as such,
we do more than other schools Speir said.
At the candlelight vigil held last week to

B-GLAD adviser Jeff Gersh spoke at the candlelight vigil on the issue of hate crimes.
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMBER
remember
Shepard, Gersh criticized the way North Carolina defines hate
crimes.
"North Carolina does have laws against hate crime, but it
does not protect gay and lesbian people Gersh said.
ECU's Police Department has been voluntarily participat-
ing with the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation
(SBI) since late 1995.
"North Carolina's way ahead of most states in the country
said Tom lounce, assistant director of the ECUPD. "They
voluntarily instituted hate crime reporting six years ago
The ECUPD sifts through reports, looking for any that fit
the requirements of a hate crime. If one is found, it is reported
to the Division of Crime Information at the SBI, which then
passes it on to the FBI.
There have been only three incidents reported to the
ECUPD since the program began. In February 19, racially
inflammatory notes were left on a bulletin board in a residence
hall. In October 1996 and November 1997, harassing phone
calls were made to gay individuals.
No criminal charges were made in any of those incidents.
North Carolina has two statutes in place that address hate
crimes. Statute 14-3, Committing a Misdemeanor Because of
Prejudice, relates to the punishment of misdemeanors com-
SEE HATE. PAGE 3
Hate Crimes in
North Carolina ip 1
Bias against
White
Black "
I
American Indian .
Asian
Multi-Racial Group
H�paH-
ncidents Offenses
Other!
Jewish
Catholic
Prorjjstarrc
Islamic -
Other religion
Gay
- Lesbian
� Homoscmial
Heterosexual
Bisexual
Student Health Center to
add extra rooms
Space to cut waiting
room crowds
Jason Ziebart
staff writer
The Student Health Center
is beginning renovations and
additions to a building that will
cut crowding and create a more
professional environment.
Carol Himes, facilities
architect for facilities planning,
design and construction, said
that the renovations are an
upgrade of the current services
and facilities.
"The renovation will be in
two phases Himes said.
First, there will be an addi-
tion to the old building which
will wrap around to the back of
the building, adding more
treatment rooms to the Health
Center. The extra rooms will
allow more space for patients
to wait for the doctor. This will
also help cut down on a crowd-
ed waiting room.
'The big thing is the extra
treatment rooms. They allow
more privacy for the students
said Kay Wilkerson, director of
Student Health Services.
The renovation will also
provide more storage space,
allowing more medicines; to
be on hand. There will also
be more efficient space for
the staff.
"We want it to be more of
a professional environment
Wilkerson said.
The renovation will not
affect the services offered by
the Health Center.
"The existing building
will be fully operational dur-
ing renovations Himes
said.
The East Group was cho-
sen by a committee to help
with the renovations of the
SEE CENTER. PAGE 2
Jarvis renovations
ready to begin
New security features,
microfridgss planned
Student Health Center additions will provide more space.
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
RACHAEL HlGDON
STAFF WRITER
Renovations for Jarvis Residence
Hall are scheduled to begin in 45
days, now that the asbestos is
completely removed, and should
be opened by January of 2000.
Jarvis was chosen for renova-
tion because it was "in the worst
shape" of all the halls, Housing
Director Manny Amaro said.
The roof will be replaced with
red tile similar to the original style,
and the front porch will be left as
it is.
"The whole Fifth Street front
will keep the traditional look
said Carol Hines, project manager
and facilities architect.
Most of the original features of
the hall will be left intact.
"We are keeping the vaulted
ceilings and using lighting to
reflect the traditional lighting of
the building Amaro said.
Jarvis will feature microfridges,
state-of-the-art bathrooms and
utilities and new features such as
centralized air conditioners that
are controlled by the resident.
SEE JARVIS. PAGE S
l





I
2 ThanJiy, Octobir 22, 1898
news
The Eitt Carolinian
Award winning author to address banquet
Recipient of Rakigh
Awand to speak on
writing experiences
Devon White
staff wkit6h
Journalist and acclaimed novelist
G.D. Gearino will speak on his
writing experiences tonight at the
annual Friends of Joyner Library
banquet The evening will begin
with a reception at the home of
Chancellor Eakin at 6:15 p.m.
Following the reception will be
the annual banquet beginning at
7:30 p.m in the Great Room of
Mendenhall Student Center.
Gearino's work includes
What the Deaf-Mule Heard, Counting
Coup and the soon to be published
A Place Called-Blue Hole. What the
Deaf-Mute Heard was filmed as a
Hallmark Hall of Fame production
for CBS and became the most
widely viewed movie in Hallmark's
history in November 1997. The
production also
achieved the
highest rating
for a TV-movie
since the early
1990's. The
19 novel
received the Sir
Walter Raleigh
Award for
Fiction.
"People are
often interested
in hearing what
happens to a
writer as he watches his book turn
into a movie Gearino said.
Gearino has written a popular
features column in the Raleigh News
& Observer since 1993 and has been
6.D. Gearino
photo couansv of
JOTNER II8B�R�
writing fiction novels for six years.
"Being a local writer, Gearino
has readings from work all around
the triangle area Gail Munde,
associate director of Joyner Library,
said.
Before coming to North
Carolina, Gearino worked as a
reporter, editor and columnist at
newspapers in Florida, Michigan,
Colorado, Wyoming, Montana and
Alberta, Canada. He is a native of
Georgia and graduate of the
University of Georgia.
The Friends of Joyner Library is
an organization composed of com-
munity members that include a
variety of people from the
Greenville area. Retired ECU fac-
ulty, alumni, business executives
and many others are all a part of the
organization. The purpose of the
group is to benefit the library in any
way possible.
"We believe that the library is
the heart of the community said
Fred Ragan, a board member of
Friends of Joyner Library.
The organization is currently
forming a group specifically aimed
at students who are genuinely
interested in working to benefit the
library, called Student Friends of
Joyner Library. The program is
still in planning but should be open
to students by November.
The banquet is open to anyone
who is interested in improving the
library.
"By having this banquet we
hope to inspire people to join the
Friends of Joyner Library Linda
Coward, temporary lesion to
Friends of Joyner Library said.
"We expect it to be an evening
of good friends, good food, and a
wonderful speaker said Munde.
If you have any questions, or
would like to make reservations
please contact Linda Coward at
328-4089.
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New dining hall to
provide better service
Annomo'mer
West campus facility to
seat 600 people
Peter Dawyot
staff whiter
Students who live on West campus
will soon have a closer and better
equipped dining facility in their
own backyard.
Plans for the $7.4 million, two-
story dining hall have already
begun.The 3,300 square-foot hall
will be able to hold a capacity of
600 people, 230 more than
Mendenhall. Along with its size,
ECU hopes to develop a more
comfortable atmosphere for stu-
dents.
Frank Salamon, director of din-
ing services, and Bruce Flyc, direc-
tor of facilities construction, were
among members of a committee
which flew across the country in
order to gain ideas for the dining
hall's setting. Yale, Boston College
and UNLV were among some of
the colleges viewed with hopes to
develop better ways for ECU to
improve the restaurants attitude
and setting.
"We wanted to look at architec-
ture and how food was presented at
other university dining halls
SEE DIKING HAIL. PAGE 3
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Other asp
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of the dining
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Salamon hi
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"Food will
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call
It
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DeMarco
continued from page 1
maker wrote McSurely in the
petition. "When even one member
of a decision-making panel is
biased, the petitioner's due process
"They're getting me on the
Non-disabled faculty admit
getting angry and using
loud voices
Sal DeMarco
Fnmei Professor
rights, as guaranteed by both the
North Carolina and U.S.
Constitiutions, are violated
University Attorney Ben Irons
said that Eakin followed the
University Code in his actions.
"The manner in which faculty
members are charged in discharge
proceedings and the manner in
which the charge is reviewed are
specified in the University code
Irons said. "The University takes
the position that the University
code is drafted in accordance with
constitutional requirements
The petition requests that the
Superior Court overturn Eakin's
decision and restore DeMarco to
his former position with full back
pay and benefits. It also asks for
reasonable attorney's fees to be
paid to DeMarco.
DeMarco also claims that ECU
discriminated against him because
of his disability.
"They're getting me on the
conduct DeMarco said. "Non-
disabled faculty admit getting
angry and using loud voices. These
people arc allowed to use loud
voices and derogatory remarks, but
I'm held to a different standard
Irons declined to comment on
DeMarco's claims of discrimina-
tion.
DeMarco has been denied
unemployment benefits because
termination due to misconduct
does not qualify one for benefits.
Testimony concluded Tuesday
with DeMarco, Dr. Richard Shine,
the professor who was allegedly
shoved in a December 19 meet-
ing by DeMarco, and Dr. Ralph
Scott, the chair of the due process
committee. DeMarco said the rul-
ing should come within three
weeks.
DeMarco claims that his behav-
ior was not unreasonable and that
many faculty members cursed dur-
ing meetings.
"I only used the F-word twice
in the last 15 years DeMarco said.
Shine has testified that
DeMarco's behavior was well
beyond simple cursing.
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Health Center
continued from paga I
�Student Health Center. East
Group designer Richard Johnson is
�in charge of the renovation plans.
On Sept 17, the project was
.overbid by companies that would
be doing the construction. In four
to six months there will be a rebid.
�During these months, Johnson will
jlook over the renovation plans to
see if anything can be changed that
would cut the costs. The finalized
plans will then be taken to
Chancellor Eakin for approval.
The bond issue that is to pay for
the project is $3,250,000. This
includes design fees, engineering
fees and construction costs. The
money for the renovation is self-
appropriated by the Health Center.
Student health fees will increase
because of the renovation.
"The increase will be spread
over several years until the bond is
retired Himes said.
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TICKET SALES: Student Stores - Oct. 21,22,4 23
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Hate
continued from page 1
mined "because of the victim's
race, color, religion, nationality, or
country of origin If the motive
behind a misdemeanor is preju-
dice, the penalty will be increased.
Someone who would normally
receive a maximum sentence of 60
days in jail and a $1,000 fine would
receive as much as 120 days in jail
and a fine to be set by the judge.
A criminal who would normally
receive 120 days and a fine could
get as much as one year in jail.
Statute 14-3 does not make any
provisions for felonies.
"The penalty will only be
enhanced if the prosecution can
show a racial motive police attor-
ney Blair Carr said.
The prosecution must prove a
crime was racially motivated to
enhance the penalty. They could
show direct evidence, such as wit-
nesses that saw the defendant
shouting racial epithets during the
crime.
Circumstantial evidence could
also prove a crime was motivated
by prejudice. For example, hate
propaganda found in the defen-
dant's home denouncing blacks in
the case of a black victim. Carr said
that the penalties for hate crimes
are "not much
"I don't think you're going to
stop a bigot by increasing the
penalties Carr said.
Dining Hall
continued from page 2
throughout the country Flye
t' said.
Other aspects looked at were
ways to better serve the customers
of the dining hall. "ECU wants to
give its customers more of a restau-
rant feel when coming into the
dining hall as opposed to the usual
feelings of a cafeteria Flye said.
Salamon hopes to feature more
demonstrational cooking.
"Food will be prepared fresh,
giving more of a marketplace set-
ting, with food prepared to cus-
tomers specifactions in order to
give more appeal to the atmos-
phere of the restaurant" Salamon
said.
Salamon said that funding for
the creation of the hew dining hall
comes completely from profits of
current ECU restaurants and din-
ing halls.
"We arc a self-supported auxil-
iary with 100 percent of the the
funding coming from profits from
food sales Salamon said. "If a stu-
dent does not purchase food from
the dining halls, they are not pay-
ing for the creation of the dining
hall
Restaurants along Fifth Street
have shown little concern about
the dining hall taking business
away.
Flye believes that downtown
restaurants are not worried about
competition because the only peo-
ple who will know about the hall
will be students and faculty.
"Since we do very little advertis-
ing for dining halls, and the build-
ing's layout will blend into the
campus, most people from the
downtown area will not recognize
West End Dining Hall as a restau-
rant Flye said.
The Flanagan Sylvan
Amphitheater between Clement
and Fletcher will have to be torn
down to make way for the new
facility.
"The location was chosen due
to the number of dorms in the
area Flye said. "This is why this
dining hall will be in such a prime
location
After completion of the new
cafeteria, plans will then be made
to close down the Mendenhall din-
ing area. The cafeteria will then be
expanded to be used by The Spot.
ECU hopes to begin construc-
tion by the end of 1999 and possi-
bly be finished by fall 2001.
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Jarvis
continued from page I
There will also be new security
features including One Card entry
and a sprinkler fire-alarm system.
The usual common spaces will
not be included on each floor. To
remedy the loss of this space, a
"Governor Jarvis turned the
first spade of dirt to build the
hall. He was instrumental in
bringing ECU to Greenville,
so the building holds historical
importance to the community
as well
Carol Hines
Project manager and facilities architect.
new building will be built where
the courtyard is and will be the
community space of Jarvis. To
keep the traditional look, two fire-
places will be installed in the
study areas.
The layout of the rooms will
remain basically the same, except
closet space will be replaced with
built-in wall units of drawers and
racks. The rooms and bathrooms
will have a modern face, but the
halls and exterior will keep their
historical appearance.
"I think the project is great
Amaro said. "We made the deci-
sion three years ago and the cost is
affordable for us to do it"
The hall was closed down last
year and has undergone the
process of asbestos removal. State
law mandates that the area must
be completely contained during
the asbestos removal, so a fence
was put up around Jarvis. Some
utility work has already been
done, but Housing Services is still
in the process of choosing a con-
tractor.
The cost of the renovations to
Jarvis will be $5,095,000, which is
under the national average for a
similar renovation project. The
cost averages between $31,000
and $32,000 per resident. The
national average for renovations to
dorms is $35,000 per resident
The cost of renovation will be
covered by students' rent. The
Housing Service is an auxiliary
enterprise, independendy funded
by students who pay to live on
campus and use campus facilities.
"I think the renovations are
wonderful Hines said. "The
building will be safer and more
comfortable but will still keep the
flavor of the campus
Construction began on Jarvis in
1907, and it is the oldest building
on campus.
"Jarvis opened its doors in
1909 Amaro said. "The academ-
ic building had not been finished
yet so they held the first day of
classes at East Carolina in the halls
of Jarvis
"Governor Jarvis turned the
first spade of dirt to build the
hall Hines said. "He was instru-
mental in bringing ECU to
Greenville, so the building holds
historical importance to the com-
munity as well
Edwards
continued from page I
to give these kids at risk a place to
go"
Edwards wants an effort to
make school buildings more ade-
quate. He said that there is not
enough space for students in the
schools and that some schools have
to use trailers to accommodate the
students.
"Funding for these projects
could come from pay cuts in the
bureaucracy in Washington in the
Department of Education
Edwards said.
Edwards also discussed the
need to focus on funding Pell
Grants, reducing loan fees and con-
tinuing scholarships so that all
students have the chance to go
to college.
"I think funding grants and
scholarships is a big issue because
it can help students who might
otherwise not go to college because
they can't afford it" said Lynn
Mitchell, a graduate student in the
Political Science Department
Edwards is opposed to private
school vouchers because he says it
takes money away from public
schooling.
"We desperately need every
dollar in public schools to pay for
more teachers and adequate class-
rooms Edwards said.
Edwards said that public educa-
tion needs to be talked about more
so that something will be done
about the problems.
"We need a passionate advocate
for public education Edwards
said. "I can do it because it means
a lot to me
Mark A.Ward
ATTORNEY AT
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4 Ttmttdiy, Octobir 22. 199B
news
Tht East Ciroliniin
Rally against police
brutality to be held
A rally protesting police brutal-
ity will be held today beginning at
3 p.m. at 14th and Dickerson.
Speakers will address the
crowd at 4 p.m. on their experi-
ences with the police.
Idols of the King
tickets on sale
Tickets are now on sale for
Idols of the King, a musical about
the fans of Elvis Presley.
Tickets arc $12 for students,
$20 for staff and faculty, and $25
for the public and for door tickets.
The Fleming Agency congratulates Bill Jova on being named one of
Northwestern Mutual's lop interns for 1998. Our program is rated one of
Have you beard from Bill jova;
the top 1(1 internships in the country
along with companies like Boeing,
Citibank, J.P. Morgan and 3M Bill's
accomplishment will he recognized in
an ad appearing in the October 26
Issue of Sports IllustrateI. Learn
more about Northwestern Mutual's
sales internship program. You can earn real money and get a head start
on a rewarding financial services career. Call us today.
Bill Jova, Coluce Agc.vt
The Fleming Agency
217 Commerce Street
Greenville, NC 2"85S
252355-7700
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7�r-
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it East Carolinian
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5 Thursday. Octob.r 2? maa
opinion
That flit n.rolini.n
the 1 � �
eastcarolinian
AMY L.ROYSTBR Editor
Heather Burgess ManagingUm
STEVE LOSEY News Editor
AMY SHERIDAN Assisianl News Editor
Amanda Austin Features drat
Mario sciieriiaufer SpaitEdiw
Chris Knotts Stall niusiiBtot
Jason Feather PimmEdiia
STEPHANIE WHITLOCK Ad Design Msnagei
JANET RESPESS AdvertisingMinagei
Brian Williams layout Manager
BOBBY TliGGLE Webmaster
Sernma Hie fCU community since �M. (he East Carolinian publishes 11.000 capias every Tuesday and Tharsday the Kid erjitmiel in each edition is (he
opinion ot hat Eddonil Boeid. The Cast Caiolmian welcomes leneis to the editor Iwiiiad to M worts, which may be edlled for decency oi brevity the Easl
Caiolinian leseives lha nghi to edil oi (eject tenets foe publication AH tetters must be sajneo tenets should be addiessad lo Opinion ednoi The East
Carolinian Student Publications Building. ECU. Giaanvnli. ?7B5M353 Fot information, call 262 3?B 6366
oumew
Rape is one of the most heinous crimes imaginable. Over the past few years, there
have been several rapes on campus which have all generated news, fear and public uproar.
In these cases, there have been suspects, convictions, and cases where the rapist got away
in the end.
In some cases, the victims never come to terms with the nightmare they have
undergone. In others, the victim may be too terrified to speak up and let the authorities
know that she has been raped so that action can be taken.
We at TEC want to remind victims that help is not far away. If you are raped, there
are ways to make certain the rapist is caught and put in prison, or better yet, the ground.
In a world of false accusations, a rape kit will prove the crime s existence. These
can be administered to the victim at Pitt County Hospital. The rape kit takes semen, hair
and skin samples that can be matched to the rapist. We strongly urge the victim not to
wait. It is wise not to shower or cleanse your body because it may contain the evidence
jhat will lead to the apprehension of the rapist.
It is also extremely important to report the crime to the police. Report to the ECU
Campus Police as well as the Greenville Police Department. This will launch an
investigation which will also lead to an apprehension.
If it happens that you are raped, let someone know about so that the proper
measures can be taken that will lead to another criminal in his place - behind bars. It is
understandable that this is a difficult event to cope with, but repression only gives the
papist more time to find another victim and strike again. Had his last victim spoken up, it
fray never have happened to you.
There are also ways to avoid a possible rape situation. Never walk anywhere on
dampus at night by yourself. Go places in groups - large groups. Take advantage of the
emergency phones with the blue lights. This allows you to safely be escorted by a campus
policeman to your destination. If you are not close to an emergency phone, call a friend or
the police to escort you from wherever you are. That is what friends and the police are for -
protection.
Rape happens, and unfortunately it happens on our happy little ECU campus.
Protect yourself and take necessary precautions in order to prevent such a horrible thing
from happening to you.
OPINION
Columnist
Brian
Hall
Cynicism poisons society
Most recently, a study just
released by the Pew Research
Center for People and the
Press showed that only about
one-third of Americans trust
the federal government.
If you don't know who Bell is,
count yourself lucky. Bell hosted
the fourth most popular talk show
in the country. It is estimated that
he had anywhere from 6.5 to 15
million regular listeners. And just
what were all these people listing
to? Paranoid rantings about UFOs
and secret government projects.
The fact that so many people
were willing to believe this kind of
lunacy points out an even larger
problem. Our culture is awash in
cynicism. The evidence is
overwhelming.
A poll taken in 1994 showed
that the majority of Americans
believed that politicians care more
about special interests than
ordinary people, more about
keeping office than the best
interests of the county, and that
campaign promises are made with
no intention of their being kept.
A 19 study showed that only
one-third of workers thought that
management was "trustworthy
and even-handed
Most recently, a study just
released by the Pew Research
Center for People and the Press
showed that only about one-third
of Americans trust the federal
government.
This cynicism is eating away at
the foundation of our democracy.
Because so many people believe
the worst about our leaders, they
don't bother paying attention to
campaigns. Because politicians are
expected to lie and break their
promises, we don't hold them
accountable when they do. And
every time that this happens, it
merely reinforces the already
existing cynicism.
Most importantly, this climate
discourages honest people from
participating. Why would any
decent individual subject him or
herself to the pain and frustration
of trying to run for office when
doing so will only make a large
percentage of the population
doubt his or her motivation? And
so cynicism becomes a self-
fulfilling prophecy,
Cynicism has an undeniable
appeal. Cynics can believe that
everyone is motivated by
selfishness, while they are
virtuous. They can also believe
that everyone else is foolish for
buying into all the lies. For that
matter, why even bother trying to
stay informed if nothing anyone
says is believable?
All of this is not to say that
everything that public officials say
should be accepted at face value.
But the proper attitude to take is
one of healthy skepticism, not
cynicism. It is fine to question the
arguments made on behalf of a
policy; the arguer's motivation is
irrelevant the truth of the
proposition.
Think of skepticism and
cynicism as acid. A small amount
used carefully will clean a valuable
item. A large amount will destroy
it. As we prepare to vote in the
next few weeks, try to remember
the difference.
"Life is either a daring adventure or nothing. To keep our faces toward change
and behave like free spirits in the presence of fate is strenght undefeatable
Helen Keller
Educator
OPINION
Columnist
Stephen
Kleinschmit
Mandatory minimun no good
These are laws that say that
for certain offenses, a
mandatory minimum of time
must be served in jail without
parole. This sounds good in
theory. But the people who get
locked away are non-violent
first time offenders.
Do you ever feel that the law
makers aren't listening to your
concerns? Well I do. Have you
ever noticed that some of the
things that you like to do are
illegal? Well, I figure that the laws
of this nation aren't adequately
reflecting the will of the people.
I lerc arc some examples of laws
that the public at large doesn't
support.
Marijuana. I would say that a
very large proportion of our
population would support the
legalization of marijuana. I don't
smoke it, but I can find nothing
wrong with it. Heck, alcohol is
legal, and it kills thousands and
destroys the lives and marriages of
thousands more. I find nothing
wrong with a drug that makes
people want to eat junk food and
go to sleep. The only reason it was
outlawed in the first place is
because the cotton barons of the
1930s influenced congress to
outlaw hemp because it posed a
threat to the profits of the cotton
industry.
Mandatory minimum laws.
These are laws that say that for
certain offenses, a mandatory
minimum of time must be served
in jail without parole. This sounds
good in theory. But the people
who get locked away are non-
violent first time offenders. True
story. A mother of three gives a
friend a ride to work and the guy
accidentally drops his stash of
LSD in her car. The mother drives
home and is stopped for speeding.
The cop searches the car and finds
the LSD. Mom gets stuck with
rapists and murderers for a period
of no less than 15 years without
parole. Even judges denounce
these ridiculous laws, which they
claim are as reasonable as sending
a jaywalker to the electric chair.
The drinking age. I could buy
tobacco, serve in the military, be
charged as an adult, pay taxes and
vote as an 18-year-old. But I can't
go out and pick up a six pack of
Miller Lite. What is wrong here? I
guess my country thinks that I am
a man since I have enough
responsibility to endure incredible
agony and hardship to fight for my
country, but in the same respect, I
am just a child when it comes to
buying a beer. Sort of hypocritical,
isn't it?
I feel that our lawmakers as a
whole are pushing their own
agendas, and are turning a blind
eye to their constituents. They are
too worried about getting re-
elected by the old retirees who
actually vote. This is where we
come in. Young people as a whole
don't vote because they feel like
they are too busy or too cool, or
some other lame excuse. But if we
all would actually vote, we would
have nothing to complain about.
There are a lot more of us than
them, so why do we let them tell
us what to do? It was the work of
forward-looking progressives like
our parents who finally ended
segregation by uniting together for
a common cause. If they didn't
stand up to the old school
lawmakers, we could still have
segregation today.
LETTER
to the Editor
Southern bashing uncalled for
Mr. Kleinschmit,
I am sorry to inform you but you
crossed the line in your remarks
about Southerners in the Oct. 13th
edition of The East Carolinian.
Southern people are not the
stereotype you described in your
opinion column. I believe you were
confused with "poor white trash"
who live all over the country,
including the North.
Sure I'm a good ole Southern
boy who was born and raised in
Southern Wake County who drives
a four-wheel drive Chevy truck,
listens to Country music, and loves
to hunt and fish. But, my friend,
this does not make me a middle
school dropout with no teeth who
beats his wife. A true Southern
gentleman treats ALL women with
respect and has more manners than
any negative-thinking, know-it-all
Yankee does. You also mentioned
that the only difference between
"us and them" was that
Southerners cuss too much, whicli
is also a miss-led stereotype. You
forgot to mention the real
differencessuch as liberal political
beliefs, large noses that you talk
through, and an attitude that
believes nothing is good enough
and nothing can please you. By the
way, over one-third of the races on
the NASCAR circuit are in the
North, just thought I would clear
that up while it was on my mind.
I cannot believe you had to say
something about the Civil War! I
happen to have five Confederate
flags hanging in my room along
with one on my permanent North
Carolina license plate because I am
a proud member of The Sons of
Confederate Veterans This is all
heritage to our ancestry and
background, no hatred involved.
Personally I have never crossed the
Mason-Dixon Line and don't
intend to because it must be pretty
bad since you say all Yankees want
to move down here. If this is so,
then why must you bash Southern
culture and its people?
Finally, the real difference
between us is that Northerners
don't have the guts to address these
issues face to face; they just hide
behind the black and white print. If
you want to talk bad about
Southerners, give me a call some
time. I'm in the book.
Brad Makepeace
Construction Management
totkzEdiUr
Got something to say? Need somewhere to say it?
Bring your letter to eastcarolinian, located on the 2nd
floor of The Student Publications Building
J





6 Tllirstov. October 15. 1998
comics
Thi Etit Cirolinfan i7 Thursday, Octol
Four Seats Lett
Jason Latour Ants Marching
Victoria Kidd
(ERE ON ANiWWLTeiEVlSICNT'M Wouft 1
outs GoAr �� tomm we'�
ts'ul bloke
�s wen c�m sra this eut� auni SCACEP OP
- Sit- of ceocs biiow us �
France
Rafael Santos 3-D
Raymond Sanders'
Frozen
Jeno's Crisp
S Tasty Pizza
6.8-7.3-oz.
BUY ONE-GET ONE
FREE!
In the Pelif akery Shoppe
Fresh Baked
Jumbo Cookies
Pozen
BUY ONE-GET ONE
FREE!
Regular, Lower fat or
Low Sodium
Gwaltney
Sliced Bacon
12-16-oz. pkg.
BUY ONE-GET ONE
FREE!
Super Size
Ruffles
Potato Chips
21.5-oz.
BUY ONE-GET ONE
FREE!
WED THUR FRI
1 21 I 22 I 23
I Items & Prices Good Through OctoberM 1998 In
SAT Greenville. Copyright 1998 Kroger Mid-Atlantic. We I fWj ffl ft
24 reserve the right to limit quantities. None sold to �MMi iT,
dealers. .
mitdA,
We Charge No Application Fee.
Now Offering $300 Security Deposit for 2 Bedrooms,
& $400 Security Deposit for 3 Bedrooms.
2 and 3 Bedroom Town houses � 1V2 Baths
Water, Sewer, and Cable Included
Small Pets Ok With Fee
5 BLOCKS FROM ECU WITH
BUS SERVICE AVAILABLE
All!
Manyreti
f.materforj,
i

p H11.1.1
STAFF
3
��Homecoming wc
;Jcxciting time ft
�but for alumni a
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alumni were be
Outstanding Alui
On Friday, Oc
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"There were
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Assistant direci
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The Eitt Cirolinlan
Victoria Kidd
jnd Sanders
you JA3
ee.
oms,
ths
7 Thursday, October 22. 1998
features
The East Carolinian
rAlumni honored at Homecoming
Phillip G l l p u
STAFF WRITER
i , i Club. This was attended by the
Many return to alma aiumni and mends of the
r r i university, as well as as the general
materforjun, banquets pubhe.
That afternoon a reception for
the winners of the Outstanding
Alumni Award was held by
Chancellor Richard Eakin at his
fi, home. This year's winners were
Ronnie Barns, J.B. Davis, Claude
Hughes Jr Harold Jones, Mark
Kemp, Michael McShae, and Kevin
Williamson.
"This award honors ECU
alumni for outstanding achieve-
ments in their chosen professions.
Nominations are solicited in
DecemberJanuary, and February.
The Alumni Associations awards
committee chooses recipients at
the spring based meeting held each
year during Alumni Weekend
states the alumni section of the
ECU website.
The winners all work in various
careers. Barns is a nationally-
renowned athletic trainer, who cur-
rently works with the New York
Giants football team. Davis is the
President and CEO of Klaussner
Furniture Industries of High Point.
As a researcher and professor at
Cedars Sinai Hospital in Los
Homecoming week was not only an
;exciting time for ECU students,
ibut for alumni as well. Many past
graduates returned to Greenville
4for a weekend of fun and fraterniz-
tfig. It was also a time where many
alumni were bestowed with the
Outstanding Alumni Award.
On Friday, October 9, the morn-
;ip.g began with registration for the
returning ECU graduates.
i � "There were people from all
�over said Carolyn Thompson,
�Assistant director of Alumni
Relations. "Homecoming weekend
;jVas very well attended by alumni
� Later that day, many joined a
golf and tennis tournament which
was held at Greenville Country
ECU alumni gather for games and banquets during the Homecoming 1998 celebration.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU ALUMNI CENTER
Angeles, Ca and at Bowman-Grey
School of Medicine in Wake Forest
university, Dr. Hughes was recog-
nized. Jones is a professor emeritus
here at EGO because of his extraor-
dinary work in the music depart-
ment. Kemp is a former senior edi-
tor of Rolling Stone and now works at
MTV as the Vice President in
charge of Music Development.
Awards were given to many former ECU students who have gone on and began successful careers in many different fields.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU ALUMNI CENTER
McShae works as a political consul-
tant and a lobbyist in Washington
DC. Williamson is most notably
know as the screenwriter for the
movies Scream and Stream 2, and
who is also a creator of the televi-
sion series "Dawson's Creek
A banquet was then held in
honor of the winners at Mendenhall
Student Center. That Friday night,
a jazz concert took place at the
Sonic Plaza, which was opened to
the public. Carroll Dashiell and the
jazz ensemble performed.
On Saturday morning, a brunch
was held for the visiting alumni at
the Taylor-Slaughter Alumni
Center. It was from here that the
alumni watched the Homecoming
Parade. Afterwards, they made
their way to Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium for a tailgating party.
At the homecoming game, the
Outstanding Alumni winners were
again recognized on the football
field before the kickoff. Here
Chancellor Eakin presented the
recipients with their plaques.
As for the game itself, many
alumni sat in the coveted Upper
Deck seats.
"We usually buy a section and
SEE ALUMNI. PAGE B
Students build their own businesses
Two students build
careers while in school
Nicholas KalaPos
staff writer
Many students have to work to stay
in school. Some work only a few
hours a week at jobs ranging from
data processing to baby-sitting.
Other students have to keep full-
time jobs while attending classes, or
fhey wouldn't be able to afford to
go to school. Then there are those
people who do something outside
pf the norm and employ themselves
by starting their own businesses.
Thaedeus Jenkins and
lohamed Hussein are two of those
ivho went outside of the "norm"
find started their own businesses.
Hussein, a junior at ECU, runs
pn internet auction with the help of
& few others. Ohano Entertainment
s owned and operated by
Thaedeus and his partner. The
Chano Entertainment company
Works with music. They set up
shows and concerts, DJ, and do
label promotion in the local area.
. Jenkins says that this isn't for
everyone. He not only has his own
business, but is also a staff writer for
Expressions and the rap director for
jjVZMB, the on-campus radio sta-
tion.
i With an intense workload and
School to worry about, sleep may be
lard to come by.
"I rest on the week-
ends, sometimes, when I
don't have something
going Jenkins said. "I
have a partner, so we bal-
ance some things, which
gives me more time
Time is the most
needed commodity
when you are trying to
run your own business.
Mohamed Hussein
has a similar way of man-
aging his time.
"I do the best I can
Hussein said. "I work all
day. I don't sleep too
much. I don't sleep
much at all
Thaedeus Jenkins has
had to make many sacri-
fices to keep his busi-
ness up and running.
"Money and time
Jenkins said. "There's
not enough time in a day. You keep
rushing here or there, and there's
never enough money
"Last summer, I was in summer
school and had the opportunity to
go to Canada on an expense-paid
tour, but I made the right choice
and stayed in school and let my
partner go instead Jenkins said.
Money is an important factor in
starting a business and in the begin-
ning it may take a little of your per-
sonal account.
"Right now, it's just starting
off Hussein said. "I used my own
personal money. Right now we're
looking for investors for the busi-
ness
While looking for investors,
Hussein says that returns should be
between 100 and 300.
Jenkins pays most of his expens-
Thaedeus Jenkins works many hours as a career man, student and DJ at WZMB on campus.
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMBER
es with the money that he makes
from his business, but also con-
fessed, "There isn't always enough
for me to do much on
Jenkins is a junior here at ECU
and is majoring in communications
journalism. Jenkins started doing
karaoke as a kid with his friends,
but it wasn't until he met a comedi-
an named Talent, who came here
to school, that he started getting
together a business.
"Talent was a comedian and did
bookings Jenkins said. "I le got
me going and showed me how to
get my ideas together
As for the future, Jenkins and
Hussein have their own plans,
including expanding on the busi-
nesses that they have already start-
ed.
"In five years, I want mv busi-
ness to be competing with larger
internet auctions Hussein said.
"I would like to start my own
label and get a studio Jenkins
said.
Thaedeus Jenkins also has some
ideas about starting his own paper
that would cover both North and
South Carolina.
"Mainly we'll focus on enter-
tainment, but also cover high school
and college sports Jenkins said.
Jenkins does not have anything
solid yet on this, but it is an idea. So
next time that you are reading
Fxprcssions or listening to rap on
WZMB, remember Thaedeus
Jenkins and the others, like
Mohamed Hussein, who run their
own businesses and be happy that
you don't have their schedule.
Building futures
through co-op office
Internships, paid jobs
available in most fields
www.tec.ecu.edu
Erin Alderman
STAFF WRITER
Interested in getting paid or acade-
mic credit for work in a field you're
interested in entering? Then co-op
education may be your answer.
Dr. Mary Cauley, director of
Cooperative Education, said that
co-op allows the student to, "apply
skills they learned in the class-
room
Cooperative Education, for
which a student is normally paid
while still enrolled at ECU, has
three different programs a student
can be involved in.
The alternating plan lets a stu-
dent alternate semesters between
work and school. The parallel plan
allows a full time student to work
part time after classes. The last co-
op program available is a summer
plan. With the summer plan a stu-
dent can work full or part time dur-
ing the summer.
The Cooperative Education
Department can also help a student
find an internship. An internship is
normally for class credit and most
do not offer a salary. Students
involved in work study can also
look into co-op to help them find a
job.
Sounds great , so
what now?
Cauley says the first
step in getting involved
is to attend a 45 -
minute to a hour ses-
sion on Mondays and
Thursdays at 1 or 4 pm
in the General
Classroom Building.
In this seminar you
will receive a packet of
information that will let
you know what to
expect and some forms
to fill out. From there
Cauley said that you can look up
the major in which you are interest-
ed and the area in which you want
to work via the internet at
www.ecu.educoophome.htm.
Under each major offered at
ECU is a listing of internships and
co-op opportunities available in the
state you chose. From there you
can copy down the job numbers
and bring them into your coordina-
tor.
When meeting with a coordina-
tor you can discuss what the
requirements for the position are,
and if you are still interested the
next step is building your resume.
A coordinator will work with you to
develop your first resume, if you
don't already have one. Then your
finished resume will be sent to the
employers you are interested in and
interview appointments with any
interested employers will be set up.
"Currently Cauley said, "there
are about 3,000 students involved
in the program. At any time one-
third of that are working
Cauley recommends that your
junior year is the best time to gain
your work experience since you
have some knowledge of the field
you have chosen. But if you are
interested in working earlier
Cauley said that the summer of
your freshman year would be the
earliest. '
Co-op works a semester ahead
however so anyone interested in
working in the summer should get
involved now since many compa-
nies have any early deadline.
Cauley believes that the co-op
program is one way to test your
employment decision.
"It's like test driving a car
Cauley said.
According to Cauley, after being
in a co-op or internship many stuj
dents know whether they really !
I
SEE CO-OP. PAGE 9
Students interested in co-op should visit with an
adviser. Internships and paid jobs may be available.
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMBER
Avoid speeding
tickets via internet
Sites developed to
search for lawyers
Erin Alderman-
staff WRITER
Ever gotten a speeding ticket in a
town you never hope to see again?
While receiving a speeding ticket is
never fun, finding a lawyer to rep-
resent you in court in another coun-
ty can make the experience that
much worse.
To help aid in the search for a
lawyer and lessen the hassle, two
North Carolina-based law firms
have recently taken to the internet.
Traffic Law Network at
www.trafficlawnetwork.com is
operated by Bachman & Swanson,
a firm in Durham. The network,
which has been running for almost
six months, helps you find a traffic
law attorney in the county where
you received a citation. The site
asks that you fill out a simple ques-
tionnaire including what happened,
when and how. Then the service
will put you in contact with an !
attorney in the appropriate jurisdic-j
tion.
David Swanson, a partner in the .
firm, says he got the idea through a
traffic law center.
According to Swanson there
were a lot of people who received
tickets out of state, so he developed !
the sight to provide his clients with !
better service.
The site also includes informa-1
tion on speed traps throughout the j
United States and allows you to add
ones you know of as well. This fea-
ture is great for those of you who
plan to travel and want to avoid I
popular ticket areas.
Swanson hopes to make the site'
more comprehensive in the future. I
According to Swanson his firm is I
involved in many more aspects of �
the law and he hopes to add these;
services to the site.
Speedingticket.net at
www.speedingticket.net is another
service available via the internet.
The service, which launched on
labor day weekend, is operated out
SEE SPEED PAGE I
I





���
8 Thuriday. October 22. 1988
features
Th� East Ciroliniin
Alumni
continual) from page 7
Coop
continued from page 7
then sell tickets to the alumni
said Frank Doolcy,
Communications Director of the
Alumni center. "But some do buy
their own tickets and sit wherever
they want Dooley said.
After the winning game, a final
ceremony was held for the alumni
at the Ramada Inn Hotel. A social
and dance was held here where a
band called "Rissc" performed.
"There was standing room
only said Thompson.
As a result of the many activi-
ties during Homecoming, the
Alumni Association has produced
a special section on their web
page. Here one may take a tour of
"Virtual Homecoming This
includes photos of the
Homecoming Parade, the tailgate
parties, and the Outstanding
Alumni winners receiving their
awards. The address for the web-
site is http:www.ecu.edualum-
nihomehtm.
want to do the job for the rest of
their lives.
Studies have shown that stu-
dents involved in the program not
only have a higher GPA (a 3.0 com-
pared to a 2.8), but also find jobs
after graduation several months
sooner than their peers (2.7 months
compared to 6.4 months).
Another benefit Cauley points
out is that a lot of times a company
a student has worked with through
co-op will offer a student a full time
position after graduation.
Reccntly.Cauley said she spoke
with IBM and they said that they
had hired 20 students because they
had co-oped with the company.
Donna Worthey, a student
involved in the co-op program for
her second year, said that co-op was
"awesome
An interior design major,
Worthey said that her experience in
the Cooperative office has given
Speed
continued from page 7
of Moorcsvillc by John White and
partners.
According to White, he got the
idea from a friend who is also an
attorney and now a shareholder in
the project.
He took his friend's idea and
then developed it into spced-
ingticket.net. The service includes
her the knowledge she needs for
future careers and helped with her
office skills.
Stephanie Lassiter, now a tech-
nical writer with Ericsson Inc is a
former co-op student.
"My co-op experience helped
me break into the field Ericsson
said. "People were calling me. It
was an invaluable experience for
my career in technical writing. If it
were not for co-op, I wouldn't be
here today
sites for finding an attorney or
insurance agent, joining an auto or
travel club and offers DMV infor-
mation. The auto club, which
White says is a lot like AAA, offers
an array of great services for a very
reasonable price.
According to White you can
look forward to many new develop-
ments on the site in the coming
future.
White also intends to support
MADD (Mothers Against Drunk
Driving) and SADD (Students
Against Drunk Driving) by offer-
ing them free advertising on the
site. White says that while the main
purpose of the site was to help
motorists find an attorney he also
hoped to bring about an awareness
of speeding.
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v
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mmm t
9 Thursday. October 22. 1898
features
Thi Eait Carolinian
VISA �MMW
Your Neighborhood Food Market
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Two roads diverged in a wood and J
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800 East 10th Street � 752-1907





10 Thufidiy. October 22, 1998
snorts
?s- - V -M- JKJThe East Carolinian
Pirates look to rebound against Southern Miss
ws.
ECU visits Eagles for
C-USA showdown
Travis Bark ley
SENIOR WRITER
ECU will look to bounce back
from a tough, one-point loss
against Alabama when the Pirates
take on the University of Southern
Mississippi this Saturday in
Hattiesburg.
After last Saturdays nail-biter
against Alabama with the Pirates
missing one extra point and having
another try blocked and returned
for two-points, ECU will make
some changes in its kicking game.
ECU prepares to avenge two straight defeats against Southern Mississippi.
FILE PHOTO
Punterplacekicker Andrew Bayes
has previously been unable to
place kicks because of a groin
injury, but head coach Steve Logan
said Bayes will kick against
Southern Miss.
"Andrew will do the kicking this
week, Brant (Rivers will do the
kicking off Logan said. "His
groin has healed up and it's time to
get him back out there
Southern Miss enters the game
SEE FOOTBALL. PAGE 11
Men's X-Country
finishes first
Abscence of Bates
affects Women steam
Stephen Sciiramm
SENIOR WRITER
The ECU Men's cross country
team came away with an
impressive victory Saturday,
winning the Hampton
InnNorth Carolina Collegiate
Cross Country Championship
at Lake Kristi here in
Greenville. The Pirates finished
first out of ten teams, all from
North Carolina. The victory
marked the highest-ever finish
for the host team at the meet
and is the Pirates' third victory
of the season.
"They did very well, they
won the State Championship. I
feel very proud of their accom-
plishment. They've been work-
ing very hard ECU men's
head cross country coach
Leonard Klepack said.
Junior Justin England fin-
ished first overall with a time of
24:27 on the 8,000 meter course.
Just two seconds behind
England was sophomore Stuart
Will, who finished second at
24:29. Both Will and England
ran times among the five fastest
in the course's history.
"It was an overall team victo-
ry. The fact that we took first
ECU hosted the N.C. Championships
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUM8ER
and second was important.
The other runners gave the
team a balanced attack
Klepack said.
Sophomore Steve Arnold
finished fifth with a time of
24:54. Junior Brian Beil fin-
ished eleventh at 25:07.
Freshman Charles Nickum
finished 20th with a time of
25:32.
"We've only got one senior,
Andrew Worth, so we've got to
feel good about next year
Klepack said. "This is just a
highlight for us right now
The ECU women's team
also ran this weekend in the
Hampton InnNorth Carolina
Cross Country Championship.
They were without the team's
best runner, junior Robin
Bates, who was out with a shin
SEE CROSS COUNTRY PAGE 11
Creatine popular with athletes
Drug is the only performance
enhancer allowed by NCAA
S ri; I'll en Sciiramm
SENIOR WRITER
Women's B-Ball
has new look
Coaching staff among
many changes
Todd Tallmadce
sports writer
The ECU women's basketball
team opened its new season this
week with a completely new
coaching staff and new opportuni-
ties.
During fall break the Lady
Pirates started their twice-a-day
practices. The team looks to
bounce back from last seasons' dis-
appointments by having individual
workouts with a focus on condition-
ing since the beginning of the fall
semester.
The team will have four new
coaches to guide the team, lead by
head coach Dee Gibson. Gibson
came to ECU after being an
assistant coach at the
University of Nebraska.
The other new coach is
Todd Buchanan, who
coached at the University of
Montevallo, a Division II school.
Jennifer Mitchell, who was an
assistant at Virginia
Commonwealth University last
year, and Randy Rueth, who was a
coach at Middleton High School in
Wisconsin, are also assisting Gibson
this season.
"The city of Greenville has
been real receptive to the new
staff Gibson said. "We know that
the city wants a good women's bas-
ketball team. We are hoping to
bring the winning attitude back to
ECU
The women's team only has one
returning senior, Beth Jaynes. The
coaches will look to juniors Misty
Home and Danielle Mclvin to help
Jaynes carry the team.

This summer the nation was awed by the blasts
St. Louis Cardinals' Mark McGwire sent out of
America's ballparks. Almost as well document-
ed as his home runs was his use of legal over-
the-counter performance enhancing drugs.
Like McGwire, every college athlete strives to
improve his or her performance. However,
when hard work and dedication are no longer
enough, some turn to medications.
In the United States, there are a variety of
legal performance enhancers on the market,
many of which are banned by the NCAA. The
NCAA only endorses the use of one such drug,
Creatine.
Creatine occurs natural-
ly in the liver through the
synthesis of amino acids.
Creatine can also be
obtained through a diet
high in meat and fish,
though it may be lost dur-
ing cooking. This forces
many athletes to get
Creatine in their bodies
through supplementation.
Creatine enhances a
muscle's ability to do work.
It also adds volume to muscle cells by increasing
their water content. It is especially useful in
sports that contain intermittent bouts of high
intense activity. These qualities have made it a
part of ECU's training program.
"The reason we use Creatine is because num-
ber one, it works and number two, it hasn't been
banned ECU strength and conditioning coach
Jeff Connors said.
ECU athletes have the option to take
Creatine. If they choose to, they can look for-
ward to two stages of Creatine use. The loading
phase is a period of five days where the athlete
takes a daily dose of .45 grams per kilogram of
body weight. After the loading phase is complete
the athlete enters the second and final phase, the
maintenance phase. In this phase the athlete
takes half of the amount they took during
the loading phase, 0.225 grams per kilogram
Creatine allows for greater endurance during workouts and is used by approximately one-fifth of all ECU athletes.
FILE PHOTO
of body weight.
"We take Creatine on a voluntary basis. We
try to stay with these guidelines in administering
the product Connots said.
Connors estimates that one-fifth of all ECU
athletes take Creatine. Most of these athletes
play sports such as football, baseball and track,
sports that involve fast twitch muscle use.
ECU is not alone in its reliance on
Creatine.
"Among college football programs at the
college level, there are still a vast number of
programs that take Creatine Connors said.
As with any non-natural supplements,
Creatine does not come without its prob-
lems either.
"Last year there were many complaints
of Creatine causing muscle cramps, yet
many research studies have not been able
to reproduce this in the lab Connors said.
Connors believes that the problems
associated with Creatine are results of poor
quality Creatine and misuse of the product.
The lack of knowledge about the long-term
effects of Creatine are also a problem.
According to Connors, Creatine users defend
their stand by saying that many former Soviet
athletes have been using the product for
SEE CREATINE. PAGE 12
Benefits of
Creatine
-Increases creatine stores for increased energy
-Increases muscle cell wate content
-Increases glycogen resy thesis
-May have other health benefits for people
with comprised energy production
"We as players have been real
positive about the coaching
changes Jaynes said. "We have
adapted well to the situation
Gibson enjoys working with the
team and expects the Lady Pirates
to put up some fights this season.
"With the team being young,
this will help us in the ftiture
Gibson said. "We feel that we
should be able to compete in all of
our games this season though
"We have set basically three
goals for this season Gibson said.
"We are looking to be better than
last year, to have a .500 season, and
to win three CAA conference tour-
nament games. If we win the three
tournament games we will make it
into the NCAA national tourna-
ment
According to Gibson, the team
on top should be Old Dominion
once again. "They should be
ranked nationally in most presea-
son polls. The other teams that
should stand out are James
Madison, George Mason, and
Virginia Commonwealth Gibson
said.
To compete with these teams,
Coach Gibson plans to push the
ball and play a fast, up tempo
offense. They will play an in-your-
face, man-to-man defense to try to
frustrate the opposition.
The women's team will play its
first exhibition game at home on
Nov. 6, at 7 p.m against a Finnish
Team. All students are encouraged
to attend. �,
Men shut-out UNCP
Soccer team ties
Braves 0-0
Mario Scherhaufer
sports editor
Having outshot UNC-Pembroke
14-10 and recording a complete-

game shutout for ECU's goalkeep-
er Matt DeStefano wasn't enough
for the ECU men's soccer team as
it went into two overtimes before
finishing in a 0-0 nail-biter on
Sunday afternoon. ECU moves to
2-8-1 on the season while the
Braves, who are ranked No. 16 in
Division II, now own an 8-2-2
record on the year.
The Pirates kept up their good
performance from last week's first
CAA win of the season over in-
state rival UNC-Wilmington, and
SEE SOCCER. PAGE 12
SOUTHERN� ERST
MISS ffigj Errrlinr
Sherrod GideonTroy Smith
WR 11 6-0 175WR 26 6-3 185
Greenwood, MississippiGreenville, N.C.
USM's career receiving yardage leaderECU'S career receiving yardage leader
No. Yds Avg TD LongNo. Yds Avg TD Long
37 600 16.2 7 4232 590 18.4 4 57
Todd PinkstonLaMont Chappell
WR 87 6-1 180
WR 80 6-2 163Roxboro, N.C.
Forest, MississippiNo. Yds Avg TD Long
No. Yds Avg TD long19 355 18.7 3 50
23 414 18.0 4 61
Roderick Coleman
Adalius ThomasOLB 57 .6-3 255
Philadelphia, Fa.
DE 97 6-4 249ECU's career sack leader (33)
Source: ECU and USM Sports Information Depts.
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Football
continued from page 10
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volunteer, you can get a head
start by learning job skills and
gaining experience while you
help people in need. With
more than 100 volunteer areas
to choose from, there's sure to
be a position that fits your
interests. Call Pitt County
Memorial Hospital Volunteer
Services at 816-4491 today.
You'll be glad you did.
www.uhsoast.com
on a two-game winning streak after
defeating Army 37-13 at West
Point The Golden Eagles are 3-3
overall, 2-1 in Conference USA.
All three of their losses have come
to teams in the Top 25, at Pcnn
State 34-6, at home to Texas A&M
24-6 and at Tulane 21-7.
Southern Miss has beaten the
Pirates over the last two years in
Greenville and holds a 17-6 advan-
tage in the series. ECU's last win
against Southern Miss came in
Hattiesburg during the 1995 sea-
son. In that game, the Pirates
faked a long distance field goal in
the final seconds, drawing a pass
interference penalty on Southern
Miss. Place-kicker Chad Holcomb
then kicked the game winner from
much closer range for a 36-34
Pirate win.
Senior tight end Buck Collins
says the series has evolved into
quite a rivalry and that a lot is rid-
ing on Saturday's game.
"This is the biggest rivalry, I
think, that we have on our sched-
ule Collins said. "From the
beginning of the year coach Logan
told us we had to go through two
teams to win a conference champi-
onship: Army and Southern Miss.
We've already beaten Army, so if
we come out and win this game
Saturday we'll be on our way to a
conference championship
The game will be televised by
Fox Sports Net beginning at 3:30
p.m.
For more information, please
visit our website at
www.tec.ccu.edu
Cross Country
conlinoed from page 10
injury. The Pirates finished tenth
out of twelve teams.
Leading the way for the Pirates
was sophomore Becky Testa. Testa
finished 27th overall with 19:10 on
the 5,000 meter course. Senior
Kerri Harding finished 40th with a
time of 19:19. Freshman Abrial
Hayes finished 52nd at 19:41,
while sophomore Fran Latrje fin-
ished 69th at 20:23. Senior Erin
Cottos rounded out the top five
with a 83rd place finish and a time
of21:13.
The men's and women's teams
will next compete at George
Mason in the CAA Championships
at Manassas, Va. on October 31.
University Health Systems of Eastern Carolina includes Pitt County Memorial Hospital, East Carolina University School of Medicine, private practice physicians, community hospitals and other health affiliates.
www.attic-nighklub.com
Free sandwich
with purchase of
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Come see us at
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off Evans St.
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MBMI
12 Thrift OctgUr 22, 1998
Creatine
continuid from page tO
decades.
Despite all the evidence on the
benefits of Creatine, many athletes
decide not to take it.
"I don't have a problem with it
: (Creatine). I just don't take it I
don't take anything. I just go off my
ability that God gave me and the
weight training that coach Connors
puts us through said ECU line-
backer Rod Coleman. I'm not into
taking drugs or supplements to
enhance my ability or performance.
That comes through hard work
Creatine is the only legal sub-
stance to be used by NCAA ath-
letes. The number of banned per-
formance enhancers continues to
grow as the market becomes crowd-
ed with newer drugs with bolder
claims. Connors sees the growth of
the market first hand as free sam-
ples of new drugs clutter his desk
drawer.
"I don't mess with these prod-
ucts. People send them to me, but I
can't distribute them because
they're not legal Connors said.
"They all do the same thing and
they are all banned by the NCAA
and the Olympic Committee
Any product that increases the
level of testosterone or increases
the user's heart rate is
banned under NCAA by
law number 31.2.3.1. Products
such as Nbrandrostenedione,
Dchydroepiandrosteronc(DHEA)
and Androstenedione all fall under
this category and are banned.
Androstenedione, which is legal
in Major League Baseball, became
famous this year after McGwire's
confession to taking them.
"I don't think you can say that
Mark McGwire's success is attrib-
uted to Androstenedione, because I
don't think it has such a significant
effect Connors said. "(He's) trying
everything he possibly can to maxi-
mize his performance and within
the realm of what's legal
Soccer
continuad from page 10
came out strong in the first half
attacking the Braves' defense.
ECU's best chance of the first half
came 8 minutes before halftime
when Brian Denoo had a good shot
from 20 yards but UNCP keeper
Eric Gossctt had a great save. The
Pirates were unable to capitalize
before heading into the intermission
scoreless.
The Pirates' best scoring oppor-
tunity of the day came with 10:15
left in the first overtime as midfield-
er Garland Gill looked to have a
clear path on the left side of the goal
but missed on his only shot of the
game.
ECU almost didn't make it into
overtime as UNCP's Bryon
Coltrane, with only 1:13 remaining
in regulation, put the ball off
DeStefano leaving it free in the box
before ECU's Nick Errato cleared it
on the goal line.
sports
Tba Eitt Carolinian
"Christmas in October"
BULLRIDING SPOSORED BY
MARTIN CO. SOCIAL SERVICES &
P�R�0 NATIONAL BULL RIDING TOUR
$1 FROM EVERY TICKET SOLD WILL BE DONATED TO THE MARTIN.
Co. Social Services for needy families for Christmas j
. -
Coming to Sen. Bob Martin
Ag Center at Williamston, NC.
OCTOBER 23RD & 24TH
SHOWS nightly at 8pm
Adult tickets $10
Children $8
Children under 6 admitted free
Come out and see top cowboys from all over
the nation compete for top prize money at
the world's toughest playground.
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL: 252-554-4467
tfARTYNlAfcfcRS WUtSEKTS
SATURDAY NIGHT HiULCW��K
FEATURING A CAST OF HUNDREDS OF COSTUMES
COSTUMES WIGS
ACCESSORIES
PARTY GOODS
we will order
your special order!
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
EXTENDED HOURS
FOR THE HOTTEST LICENSES &
DESIGNS IN COSTUMES
FINEST STUDENT
HOUSING AVAILABLE
MAKE-UP
MASKS
Attic Sole
i Its Scary Everything Is On Sale!
s Thurs. 22nd Thru Sat. 31st
Located in Arlington Village Beside At Barre
Come Rummage through you'll be surprised
1 at what you might find!
DON'T MAKE THE MISTAKE
OF NOT DISCUSSING THIS
WITH YOUR PARENTS
SEE THEM NOW
NEW CONDOMINIUMS
FOR SALE
(SPECIAL FINANCING AVAILABLE)
OR RENT
3 BEDROOMS
3 BATHROOMS
3 WALK IN CLOSETS
NEAR CAMPUS
UNIT PLAN
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-440-5378
Beat the
clock?
Order any pizza with up to 2 toppings any time
between 6 p.m. and 9 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday
or Wednesday, October 26-28 only-and the
time you order is the price you pay!
Price not valid with any other offer.
Central Greenville & ECU 1 Jk
758-6660
1201 Charles Blvd.
C1998 Domino's Pizza, Inc Limited time offet Campus store only.
$1.00 Bud
$1.00 Natural
$1.25 Mixed Drinks
LADIES FREE � LADIES SHOOT POOL FREE FROM 8-12
GUYS IN FREE W ECU ID � CHECK OUT THE HOOCH GIRLS
Sharhys
LADIES LOCK UP 10-12 � LADIES ONLY (MALE
USE SHARKY'S ALLEY ENTRANCE
.250 Draft
$1.00 Bud
$1.00 Natural Light
Splash
KARAOKE GONG SHOW 10-12 - $50 FIRST PRI
IN FREE WECU ID - USE 5TH ST. ENTI
Upper Deck
.250 Draft
$1.00 Bud
$1.00 Natural Ugh
SINK THE 8- BALL ON THE BREAK
Ft
13 Thursday, Octi
; NEWLY REFUfl
� bedrooms, 2
hook-up, appn
i feet, great spac
: WILOWOOD V
er, dishwasher,
; 8900 or 252-3
; fordable and sp,
; WALK TO ECl
� $275month. A
i glewood Apts.
! Greenville. 758-1
WESLEY COI
4100 off depoi
bath apartment;
iluded, washei
Jrom campus.
$440. Call 758-
RIIMGGOL
Now Takin
1 bedroom.
Efficiency
CALL?
TOWNHOUSE
yvith ceiling fai
washerdryer, di
�er and cable inc
Jniles from ECl
tarol at 252-826
CCU AREA 3
Central heat, w
(fans, washerdi
spotless inside.
fc)K. $500 mom
39502.
LANGSTON Pi
if 100 off depos
bath apartments
eluded, all applia
er connections,
Available now.
?921.
TWO BEDROO
Jentral airhea
front porch, no
&55-7799. Close
R00MMA1
WANTED: SOI
Jease an efficienc
Towers beginnini
Jiished $288mi
call 752-2518.
�i
PLAYERS CLUE
ed to sublease.
First month utili
posit required. V
room and bath. (
leave a message
AKC DOBERN
shots and dewoi
one female, $10
fcn, 752-2204.

AAAA EARLY
pity! Room with
fludes 7 free
149! New Hot:
f 129! Cocoa Be;
fcreaktravel.com
1
AAAA! EARL
Specials! Baham.
Jiays $279! Incli
Awesome beach
parts from Florid;
el.com 1-800-67!

O.UEEN SET f(
boxspring mattn
jmly $180. Also
JJoth in excellent
leave message, 3
IS COI
AAAA! EARLY
& Jamaica! 7 nig
Jrom $399! Incl
Prinks, parties!
pl.com 1-800-678





Elit Carolinian
ober"
3l
UR
) the Martin,
Christmas ;

IN
NC.
REE
MALL OVER �
ONEY AT
J54-4467
�5378
1-12
GIRLS
m
rs
13 Thursday, October22. 1988
FOR RENT
; NEWLY REFURBISHED condo. 4
; bedrooms. 2 12 baths. WD
hook-up. approx. 2000 square
i feet, great space. 752-7738.
! WILDWOOD VILLA, washerdry-
; er, dishwasher, 3 story. Call 752-
; 8900 or 252-332-6783. Very af-
; fordable and spacious.
; WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
� $275month. Available now. Tan-
i glewood Apts 125 Avery St.
! Greenville. 758-6596.
WESLEY COMMONS South:
100 off deposit, 2 bedroom, 1
lath apartments, watersewer in-
cluded, washerdryer. 6 blocks
from campus. Available now.
$440. Call 758-1921.
RIIMGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
TOWNHOUSE2 BEDROOMS
with ceiling fans, garden patio,
washerdryer, dishwasher, icemak-
�er and cable included. Less than 2
Jniles from ECU (bus stop). Call
"Carol at 252-826-5719.
ECU AREA 3 bedroom house.
Central heat, window air, ceiling
frans, washerdryer, just painted,
epotless inside. No yardwork. pets
SDK. $500 month thru Dec. 830-
$502.
i
LANGSTON PARK Apartments:
$100 off deposit, 2 bedroom, 1
bath apartments, watersewer in-
cluded, all appliances, washerdry-
er connections, over 900 sq. ft.
Available now. $410. Call 758-
;i921.

TWO BEDROOM brick duplex,
Jpentral airheat, private drive,
front porch, no pets. 756-8444 or
"355-7799. Close to campus. $430.
ROOMMATE WANTED
WANTED: SOMEONE to sub-
lease an efficiency apt. in Ringgold
Towers beginning Nov. 1. Fully fur-
fiished $288mo. For more info,
call 752-2518.
PLAYERS CLUB roommate need-
ed to sublease. $240 a month.
First month utilities Free! No de-
posit required. Washerdryer, own
room and bath. Call 756-7539 and
leave a message.
FOR SALE
AKC DOBERMAN pups with
hots and dewormed, two males,
ine female, $100. Ask for Camer-
on, 752-2204.
���
JAAAA EARLY Specials! Panama
pity! Room with kitchen $129! In-
cludes 7 free parties! Daytona
149! New Hotspot-South Beach
$129! Cocoa Beach $149! spring-
reaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386
l��
AAAA! EARLY Spring Break
Specials! Bahamas Party Cruise! 6
pays $279! Includes most meals!
Awesome beaches, nightlife! De-
parts from Florida! springbreaktrav-
ol.com 1-800-678-6386
�-i�.�-�
QUEEN SET for sale includes
boxspring mattress, will sell for
bnly $180. Also Sharp VCR $60.
Both in excellent condition. Call or
leave message, 329-0390.
Dapper
Dan's
Retro and Vintage Clothing,
Handmade Silver
Jewelry k More.
417 Evans St. Mall 752-17S0
nun I rum I uhlim li.itU dour
HALLOWEEN
IS COMING
AAAAI EARLY Specials! Cancun
& Jamaica! 7 nights air and hotel
from $399! Includes free food,
Jlrinks, parties! springbrftaktrav-
pl.com 1-800-678-6386
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: couch, sectional, for
$150; couch and loveseat for
$100. Call 752-7290.
6' RUSTY Surfboard and car
racks with or without extensions.
Call Britt, 551-1386, leave mes-
sage.
PIANO: YAMAHA Clavinova
CVP83, like new, disc drive, 88
keys. $2800. Call after 6 p.m
321-6889.
AAAA! SPRING Break Travel
was 1 of 6 small businesses in the
US recognized by the Council of
Better Business Bureaus for out-
standing ethics in the marketplace!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-
6386
LARGE CAPACITY WHITE wash-
erdryer for sale. Brand new.
$600 negotiable. Call 830-2069.
COME DOWN to Mr. Greg's Total
Care and meet thte new licensed
nail technician. October Special is
ManicurePedicure for $35. Only
with appointment. Call 353-6489.
WILL DO typing for you, 10 years
typing experience. Professional
quality. $2.00 per page. 321-0668
SERVICES
NUTRITIONAL SUPPLEMENTS
25 off. Don't get ripped off
at the mall. All major brands
offered. Call and compare.
Personal training and nutrition-
al consultations from a proven
certified personal trainer. Call
Todd 413-6156.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(919)496-2224
HELP WANTED
YOUTH IN-LINE Hockey Coaches
The Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department is recruiting part-time
youth In-Line Hockey coaches. Ap-
plicants must possess some knowl-
edge of the hockey skills and have
the ability and patience to work
with youth. Applicants must be
able to coach young people ages
5-18, in hockey fundamentals. This
program will run from early Octob-
er to mid- December. Salary rates
start at $5.15 per hour. For more
information, please call Ben James
or Michael Daly at 329-4550 after
2PM.
IN-LINE Hockey Rink Attendant.
The Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department is recruiting individu-
als with some background knowl-
edge with in-line hockey. Applic-
ants will be responsible for
overseeing both the skateboard
park and in-line hockey rink at the
Jaycee Park. Salary rates range
from $5.15 to $6.50 per hour. For
more information, please call Ben
James or Michael Daly at 329-
4550 after 2PM.
EARN WHILE YOU learn, up to
$1,000.00 wk. Day and night
shifts. Clean, secure working
atmosphere. Playmates Adult
Entertainment. 252-747-7686
for interview.
NEED A PART TIME JOB?
RPSINC.
Ls looking for lvv xvi HANntfls to load vans and
unload trailers for the am shift hours 3:00am to 8am.
57.00hour; tuition assistance available after 30 days.
Rttuiv ovewipftutunities In operations and manage-
ment jjaEnS ApptatJora can be filled out at 2401
United Drive (near the aquatics center) Greenville
"ATTENTION READERS" Need-
ed, more people who desire
$1190-$ 1487 mo. pt or $3570-
$5950 mo. ft. Work from home.
Full support. Proven. Call amazing
recorded message, 355-9248.
BANQUET AND waitstaff need-
ed. Day and evening shifts. Experi-
ence preferred but not necessary.
Apply in person, Ramada Plaza Ho-
tel. No phone calls please.
SPRINGBREAK. CANCUN, Flori-
da, Jamaica, South Padre, Baha-
mas, Etc Best hotels, parties, pric-
es. Book early and save Earn
money trips! Campus repsor-
ganizations wanted. Call Inter-
Campus Programs 1-800-327-6013
222 www.icpt.com
classifieds
HELP WANTED
1999 INTERNSHIPSI Attention
undergraduate business students.
Now interviewing on campus for
managers across Virginia. North
and South Carolina for summer of
1999. Average earnings last sum-
mer $7,000. Call Tuition Painters
at (800) 393-4521 or e-mail at tui-
paint@bellsouth.net
PART-TIME Instructor needed
MonThurs. afternoons to provide
individualized instruction in a posi-
tive learning environment. Individ-
ual must be competent in reading
and math. Certified teacher pre-
ferred, but not required. Pick up
application or send resume to Syl-
van Learning Center, PO Box 1297,
Kinston, NC 28503.
THE ANIMAL Emergency Clinic is
interviewing veterinary techni-
ciansassistants for full and part-
time positions. Must be available
nights, weekends, and holidays.
Salary and benefits based on ex-
perience. For more information,
call 355-3825 or stop by the clinic.
ABSOLUTE SPRING BreakTake
2" 2 Free Trips on Only 15 Sales
andEarn $$$$. Jamaica, Can-
cun, Bahamas, Florida, Padre! low-
est Prices! Free Meals. Parties &
Drinks. "Limited Offer 1-800-
426-771 Owww.sunsplash-
tours.com
ARE YOU a female graduate stud-
ent? Live in position available, ben-
efits including: free room and
board, free parking and a monthly
stipend. If you are interested,
please call 758-5568.
MAKE EASY money! Go on
Spring Break for Free! USA Spring
Break offers Cancun, Bahamas, Ja-
maica, and Florida packages and is
currently accepting applications
for campus sales representatives.
Call 1-888-SPRINGBREAK.
ATTENTIONAS seen on TV.
work with Jon Bender, Brad Rich-
dale's Number One Student. Look-
ing for a few people to teach busi-
ness. Work from home. Full sup-
port proven. Call amazing recorded
message, 252-355-9248.
VARSITYBOOKS.COM SEEKS
student managers to direct on-
campus operations for rapidly
growing e-commerce business.
This paid part-time position is ide-
al for innovative, highly-motivated,
exceptionally bright, go-getters
who want to prove experience isn't
everything. Call 202-256-5048 for
more info.
GREENVILLE RECREATION and
Parks Department will be holding
an organizational meeting for all
those interested in officiating in
the winter adult basketball league.
Position pays $12-$ 15 a game.
Clinics will be held to train new
and experienced officials. Howev-
er, a basic knowledge and under-
standing of the game is necessary.
The meeting will be held Monday,
October 26, 1998 at 7:30 p.m. at
Elm Street Gym. Experience re-
quirements, clinic schedule, and
game fees will be discussed. For
more information, please call the
Athletic Office at 329-4550 bet-
ween the hours of 2-7p.m� Mon-
day thru Friday.
INTERNSHIP AVAILABLE in pub-
lic relations. Gain valuable experi-
ence in public speaking and hu-
man resources. Call Gerri at 355-
7897.
$1250 FUNDRAISER credit card
fundraiser for student organiza-
tions. You've seen other groups do-
ing it, now it's your turn. One week
is all it takes. No gimmicks, no
tricks, no obligation. Call for infor-
mation today. 1-800-932-0528 x
65. www.ocmconcepts.com
ADVERTISE
IN THE
CLASSIFIEDS
328-6009
IT WORKS!
HELP WANTED
COOKS, LINESERVERS, and
catering assistants needed for po-
sitions with ECU campus dining.
Stop by the Aramark office in Men-
denhall Student Ctr. to apply. Great
pay, benefits & flexible schedules.
No exp. necessary. EOE
SALES AND marketing internship.
Northwestern Mutual Life. Gain
valuable sales experience and earn
good money. Looks great on
resume. Call Jeff, 355-7700.
TUTORS NEEDED: Do you have a
3.0 or better GPA? Are you inter-
ested in becoming a tutor for the
Office of Student Development-
Athletics? We need individuals
capable of tutoring any Et all levels
(0001-5999) in the following sub-
ject areas: ACCT, ASIP. BIOL,
CHEM. CSCI, DESN. ECON. EMST,
GEOG, JUST, MATH, MGMT,
MKTG. PHIL. PHYS. 8 SOCI. Un-
dergraduate students are paid six
dollars an hour ($6) and graduate
students are paid seven dollars an
hour ($7). If this sounds like the
job for you or if you have any oth-
er questions, please contact Isha
Williams at 328-4691 for further in-
formation.
FREE CD Holders, T-shirts, Pre-
paid Phone Cards. Earn $1000
part-time on campus. Just call 1-
800-932-0528 x 64.
AEROBIC INSTRUCTOR. Pitt
County Memorial Hospital, part of
University Health Systems of East-
ern Carolina, is seeking qualified
individuals to teach aerobic class-
es through its Employee Recrea-
tion and Wellness Department.
Persons will contract to teach on a
part-time basis. Interested candi-
dates should contact Rose Ann
Ahne between 8a.m4:30 p.m. at
(252) 816-6501. www.uh-
seast.com. EOAAA. Pitt County
Memorial Hospital
ECU STUDENT Technicians need-
ed to provide technical support for
events held in Mendenhall Student
Center and Wright Auditorium.
Technical support may include set-
ting up sound equipment, projec-
tion equipment, stage unloading
and loading of trucks for major
touring companies, and maintain-
ing technical equipment. Become
a part of an exciting team and fun-
filled atmosphere today! Apply in
person at the Mendenhall Student
Center Job Board.
YOUTH BASKETBALL Coaches
The GVeenville Recreation and
Parks Department is recruiting 12
to 16 part-time youth basketball
coaches for the winter youth bas-
ketball program. Applicants must
possess some knowledge of the
basketball skills and have the abili-
ty and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 7-18. in
basketball fundamentals. Hours
range from 3 p.m. until 7 p.m. with
some night and weekend coach-
ing. This program will run from the
end of November to mid-February.
Salary rates start at $5.15 per
hour. For more information, please
call Ben James or Michael Daly at
329-4550 after 2 p.m.
PERSONALS
ADULT AND commuters are invit-
ed to attend "Coffee Brakes Mon-
day, October 26 at 4 p.m. in the
Underground, Mendenhall. Learn
tips on.financial aid.
CONGRATULATIONS DR. Brown
on winning the National Advising
Award! You're the best! Thanks for
everything! Love, the sisters of Al-
pha Omicron Pi!
GREEK PERSONALS
CHI OMEGA would like to thank
Kappa Sigma, Pi Kappa Phi, Alpha
Delta Pi, and Sigma Sigma Sigma.
We had a blast at the three-on-
three social last Thursday night.
Let's do it again sometime!
CHRISTINA ALEXANDER - you
did fantastic in your performance
in Cabaret! We are so proud of
you! Love, your Alpha Delta Pi sis-
ters
KAPPA ALPHA, Sigma Epsilon
and Phi Psi, Doug Clark and the
Hot Nuts were awesome! We had
a great time! Love, sisters of Alpha
Delta Pi
The East Carolinian
GREEK PERSONALS
CONGRATULATIONS TO Delta
Zeta on a great football season!
Thanks to Bill for all your help.
KAPPA SIGMA, Pi Kappa Phi, Pi
Kappa Alpha, Chi Omega, and Sig-
ma Sigma Sigma, the social last
week was a blast! Hope to get to-
gether again soon! Love. Alpha
Delta Pi
DELTA ZETA - Your spaghetti din-
ner was a success! Congratula-
tions! Your sister sorority. Alpha
Delta Pi
PI KAPPA Alpha - with your terri-
fic help, our parents and us had a
fantastic Parent's Weekend!
Thanks! Love, Alpha Delta Pi
WE HOPE Everyone had a safe
and fun Fall Break! Love, the sis-
ters of Alpha Omicron Pi!
AMY GARNER- you did a wonder-
ful job representing us in the
Homecoming Court! We love you!
Love. Alpha Delta Pi
DO YOU want to see hot guys
wearing only a towel? if the an-
swer is yes. come out to Pi Delta's
Male Wild N Crazy Towel Contest
at The Attic on November 10th at
9 p.m.
PI DELTA sisters and new mem-
bers: get your dates ready! Grab-A-
Date is only two days away. Don't
miss it�it's going to be a blast
SIGMA ALPHA Epsilon would like
to thank all sororities for their par-
ticipation on our events this se-
mester.
TO THE ladies of Pi Delta, we
would like to thank you for the
great time at the social. Hope to
see you soon. Love, Sigma Nu
THANKS TO Lambda Chi Alpha
and Theta Chi for being our Adopt-
A-Frat these past two weeks. We
love you. Zeta Tau Alpha
RUGBY TEAM- Things were a bit
confusing on Wed. But we hope to
try again soon! Alpha Delta Pi
ZETA TAU Alpha would like to
send a special thanks to the sisters
and new members of Alpha Xi Del-
ta for their generous donation to
our Dress Down Day!
CONGRATULATIONS JENNIFER
Jackson and Nicole Porter for be-
ing accepted into nursing school!
Love, your Alpha Delta Pi sisters
THANKS TO all our dates on
Founder's Day! We hope you guys
had a great time at Lockdown '98!
Love, the sisters and new mem-
bers of Zeta Tau Alpha
PI KAPPA Alpha, thanks for the
social last week. Everyone had a
great time as usual. We're looking
forward to getting together again!
Love, the sisters and new mem-
bers of Delta Zeta
SIGMA EPSILON. thanks for all
of your hard work on the float! it
looked great! Love, your Alpha Del-
ta Pi sisters
PHI KAPPA Tau. thanks for com-
ing over the other night. With all
your help, you made our house
look just right! We all had lots of
fun, but now the game has begun!
MICHELLE BRUNSON - Congrat-
ulations on your engagement! We
are so excited for you! Love, Alpha
Delta Pi
CONGRATULATIONS ON your
volleyball victory! Good luck during
playoffs! Love, your sisters of Al-
pha Omicron Pi!
WE HOPE everyone had a great
Fall Break! Good luck on the rest of
the semester. Love, the sisters and
new members of Pi Delta
SPRING BREAK 99! Cancun
Nassau ' Jamaica 'Mazatlan ' Aca-
pulco ' Bahamas Cruise ' Florida
Florida South Padre. Travel Free
and make lots of Cash! Top reps
are offered full-time staff jobs.
Lowest price Guaranteed Call now
for details! www.classtravel.com
800838-6411
OTHER
SPRING BREAK - Plan Now! Can-
cun. Jamaica, Mazatlan, & S. Pa-
dre. Early bird savings until Oct.
31 st. America's best prices & pack-
ages. Campus sales reps wanted.
Earn free trips . cash.
1.800.SURFS.UP www.studentex-
press.com
FREE TO good home, one female
calico kitten, one female white
adult. Call 329-7024.
HEALTH PROFESSIONS Career
Information Seminar October 27.
1998. Brewster B-102. 4-6 p.m.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
BACKPACKING EXPEDITION!
There will be a backpack trip to
the top of Mount Mitchell, Nov. 6t
8th. Registration deadline is Oct;
30th, 5 p.m. All equipment, food;
and transportation provided. For
further info, contact Adventure
ProgrammingDept. of Recreation-
al Services @ 328-6387.
ALCOHOL Substance Intervention
Program (A-SIP): Monday 3:30-
4:30 October 26th. If you are inter-
ested in this workshop, please call
328-6661.
THE INTERNATIONAL Student
Association (ISA) thanks every-
body for coming to our meeting.
Everyone is invited to a party orr
October 23rd at 8 p.m. in the
Methodist Student Center.
VISIT THE Wall-Alcohol Aware
ness Week. October 26-31 at!
Wright Place. Monday through'
Thursday, 11-2�
ECU COLLEGE Republicans will;
be meeting on Thursday, October
22 at 6:30 p.m. in GCB 1007. Offic
ers need to meet at 6 p.m. '�
r
REGISTRATION FOR General Corn'
lege Students. General College,
students should ffljntafiLJjlBir a(H
visers the weekdf Nownber 2-6
to make arrangements for acade-j
mic advising for Spring Semester"
1999. Early registration week is set-
for November 9-13. �
3-ON-3 Basketball registration
meeting on Tues. Oct. 27 at 5 p.m.1
in Mendenhall, room 244. For fur-J
ther info, please call 328-6387. ;
GAMMA BETA Phi will hold their?
next meeting at 5p.m. Oct. 22 ir
General Classroom Room 1010.
���
ECU THESPIANS OF Diversity;
invite you to come and enjoy the
performing arts as we present;
"Taking Center Stage" The thespi
ans will show their talents in a var-�
iety of areas including singing, po
etry, drama, and much, muchj
more. Oct. 22, 7 p.m. in LedoniaJ
Wright Cultural Center. Admission
is free, refreshments will be
served. For more info call 328-
8728. "

CO-REC FLAG football reg. meet-I
ing: Anyone interested in playing,
co-rec flag football for intramuralsj
must attend the registration meet-
ing on Oct. 27 at 5:30 in Menden-
hall, room 244. For further ques-
tions, please call 328-6387. "
� ����� �-�����i
COME "ROLL" with us! On Nov
9th the Adventure Program will be"
hosting a Kayak Roll Clinic. Sign;
up, get wet, and learn the basics;
of kayaking and the "Eskimo Roll
Be sure to register by Nov. 7th at 5�
p.m. Come see what everyone's,
talking about For further info con-J
tact Adventure Program
mingDept. of Rec. Services @;
328-6387.
PROTECT YOURSELF
Don't Become a Victim of a Crime. The PERSONAL ALARM is an ear splitting
130 db alarm activated by simply pulling a pin or by using the onoff switch.
Easy to carry - hooks onto your belt or purse.
Only $17.95
Send check or money order to:
BftR Security Products
305 Oak Grove Ave.
Greenville, NC 27834
1-800-757-4080
2S2-757-3011
We also carry pepper spray, car alarms, stun guns, child guardians





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Atlantic
ess Communications
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KNOCK, KNOCK.
WHO'S THERE?'

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"WHY ARE YOU CRYING?'
"BECAUSE I DIDNT GO TO CHICO'S HALLOWEEN
COSTUME CONTEST! THE WINNER GETS $100 GIFT
CERTIFICATE! PLUS I MISSED ALL THE FUN
"YOU DIDN'T MISS IT! IT'S SATURDAY OCT. 31ST.
BUT GO EARLY - JUDGING STARTS AT 8PM
"KNOCK, KNOCK'
'inn �" Tiir-no"
WHO'S THERE?
I AM!
"
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DOWNTOWN TRANSYLVANIA 757-1 666
$25 & $15 GIFT CERTIFICATES TO 2ND AND 3RD PLACE!
TRY ONE OF OUR WITCHES BREW -WITCH BREW IS FOR YOU?
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UNITED STATES �m mmm mm�M0
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SCHOOLKIDS RECORDS
Selling our soul for Rock and Roll one CD at a time!
our
store
ool
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Pi
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COALITION
INDEPENDENT
MUSIC
STORES
'�W&
;p
OK
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424 Evans St. Mall
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Mon-Sat 10-11
Sun 12-6
ft
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by and catch
Special orders ?FAST
Fri 23rd at 5:30 PM
Rock�BluesR&B�Country�Jazz�Hip Hop�World Music
ww
"Have you
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55�
att(
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Organiz
demam
Amv
ASSIST!
Students and
: gathered toge
� Greenville
. Thursday to p
. ty-
The Fedc
Against Polict
and the Coali
(CAR) helped
22 protest. Tl
people peace
the corner (
Greene Street
"We came
out against ca
ment and po
Carlton Smith
Fr;
Tytishia Frazier is i
Academics,
of winner
William L
STAFF Wl
Senior social work
Frazier has been i
Organization of Bis
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Taffye Benson-Cl
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a model student
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The $500 schola
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best represents Wri


Title
The East Carolinian, October 22, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 22, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1299
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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