The East Carolinian, October 15, 1998







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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15 .1998 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 17
r
Rape reported B-GLAD holds vigil for slain student
on 1st street
www.tec.edu
Suspect acquaintance of victim;
police interviewing witnesses
Victim of Wyoming hate
crime remembered
Amy Sheridan
assistant news editor
A 19-year-old female non-student reported being raped
in her residence on the 1400 block of 1st Street, an area
heavily populated by students, Sunday night.
The rape reportedly occurred at 10:38 p.m. The
alleged perpetrator was an acquaintance of the victim.
"The vast majority of sexual assaults involve people
that know each other said Tom Younce, Assistant
Director of the ECUPD. "It is very unusual to have a
stranger raping a young person
The victim immediately reported the rape to the
Greenville Police Department (GPD). She was then
taken to the Pitt Memorial Hospital emergency room,
where a rape kit was administered.
Police are currently interviewing witnesses who were
apparently within the residence that evening.
"We are still in the investigative point of this case
said Sgt. Richard Allsbrook, supervisor of Family
Services.
Allsbrook would not comment on whether other peo-
ple were present during the alleged sexual assault.
Charges have yet to be filed in the case. After the
GPD has finished investigating, the case will be pre-
sented to the Assistant District Attorney's office. The
SEE RAPE. PAGE 3
Steve Losey
news editor
Bisexuals, Gays, Lesbians, and Allies
for Diversity (B-GLAD) held a candle-
light vigil Wednesday to remember
Matthew Shepard, the University of
Wyoming student whose death
Monday brought national attention to
anti-gay hate crimes.
"A 21 year old student was beaten to
death B-GLAD adviser Jeff Gersh
said. "It very well could have been here.
It very well could have been me
The vigil was held at 8 p.m. in front
of the Sonic Plaza. Senior Johnny
Holden, president of B-GLAD, Gersh,
Residence Hall Association president
Sherri Ingram, and Lynn Roder of
Counseling and Student Development
spoke at the vigil.
Holden spoke emotionally about
Shcpard's death and how it affected
him.
"I feel angry and betrayed by a part
of humanity Holden said. "A part that
is cold, cruel, without warmth, compas-
sion, and acceptance. Never forget,
never again
Gersh spoke about hate crimes and
hostile reactions some had toward
Shepard's death.
"A group has decided to boycott
Shepard's funeral, carrying placards
that say things such as 'Fag Matt 'Burn
in hell (and) 'No tears for queers
Gersh said. "(These are supposedly
A moment of silence was observed after the candlelight vigil for 21-year-old Matthew Shepard.
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMBER
Christian groups. If you see yourself as
a Christian, I ask you to visit their web-
page. It's www.godhatesfags.com. E-
mail them. Let them know that is not a
true Christian value. It's not a true
Jewish value. It's not a true value of any
major religion
A woman who asked not to be iden-
tified stepped forward to share her
experiences.
"I'm a family member of someone
who's gay she said. "I risk my job by
standing up and speaking. I have been
in situations with my family members
where we were terrorized. I ask you to
challenge your faith community and
stand up for what is right
Shepard was a former student at
Catawba College. Some of those pre-
sent at the vigil were acquainted with
Shepard.
"I met him in Raleigh last year
sophomore Craig Garner said. "He was
just an average kid. I felt like someone
ripped my heart out when I heard the
news). I don't see how humans can do
this to other humans
Holden could not recall any
instances of hate crimes occurring on
campus. He said that instances of
harassment in residence halls were
dealt with swiftly.
Professor attends
judicial process
conference
African-Americans'
role in criminal
justice discussed
Amy Sheridan
assistant news editor
More than 200 correction profes-
sionals from North Carolina and
the Southeast headed to Raleigh
last week to discuss the role of
African-Americans in Criminal
Justice.
The Annual Conference and
Training Institute of the North
Carolina State Chapter of the
National Association of Blacks in
Criminal Justice (NABCJ) took
place Oct. 8, 9, and 10.
"The sense of seeing so many
people together at one time for
the conference was important
said Dr. Paul Knepper, chair of the
Criminal Justice Department. "We
have to know about the contribu-
tions black people have made in
this country
The theme of this year's confer-
Dr. Paul Knepper attended the Natl. Assoc. of Blacks in Criminal Justice conference
PHOTO BY STEVE LOSEY
ence was "Corrections in North
Carolina-Bringing It All
Together Workshop topics
included juveniles, corrections in
South America, and innovative
drug treatment programs. Some of
the speakers and presenters were
Irving Joyner, a professor at NC
Central Law School, Richard
Moore, secretary of the NC
Department of Criminal Control
and Public Safety, 5th Judicial
Court Judge Joseph E. Turner, and
Gwendolyn Churn, director of
Youth Services in the NC
Department of Health and Human
Services.
"The interest was in the contri-
bution of African-Americans in our
criminal justice system Knepper
SEE JUSTICE. PAGE 3
Fewer students on
academic probation
This is the fourth in a series of
articles intended to
examine the trend of rising GPAs at ECi
Workshops offered to
raise low GPAs
Proposed law may allow parental notification
ECU, other schools to
decide implementation
Peter Dawyot
staff writer
Lawmakers hope under-age students will shape up under the new law.
FILE PHOTO
A law proposed by Senator John
Warner of Virginia will allow institu-
tions to notify the parents of students
who violate rules against drugs and
alcohol.
ECU is considering whether it will
make use of the law by writing letters
to parents of students who violate drug
and alcohol laws. First the university
will go through a process to get feed-
back from students and the communi-
ty as to what these groups believe
should be done.
"This is not an easy decision said
Mary Louise Antieau, Associate Dean
of Student Life. "We will need input
from students as to how they feel
about the law
Warner has seen drastic increases in
the number of alcohol related cases
involving college students in Virginia.
He hopes the law will curb under-age
SEE DRINKING PAGE 3
JASON ZlEBART
STAFF WRITER
The past few years have seen an
overall decline in the number of
students on academic probation at
ECU.
According to an Academic
Difficulty Report from the Office
of Undergraduate Studies, 355 stu-
dents were on academic probation
last fall. During the spring, that
number jumped to 751. The num-
ber of students presently on proba-
tion is 277.
The report also included factors
that students said contributed to
their academic difficulty. Some said
they had a lack of motivation.
Others said they had an inadequate
balance between extracurricular
activities and class work.
The 1997-1998 Undergraduate
Catalog lists academic warning, aca-
demic probation, and academic sus-
pension as three different types of
academic difficulty. Students with
one to seven credit hours and no
grade point average (GPA) are put
on probation. Students with 8 to 31
credit hours must have at least a
1.35 GPA to avoid probation.
Students with 32 to 63 hours must
have a 1.6 GPA, and those with 64
to 95 hours must have a 1.8 GPA;
Those with 96 or more hours must
maintain a 1.9 GPA or higher. If
students are attempting a second,
undergraduate degree, they havej
must have a 2.0 GPA.
Don Joyner, Assistant Dean in
the Office of Undergraduate
Studies, said that the definition ot
academic warning was changed this
semester. A student with less than;
32 credit hours used to be placed or
warning if his or her GPA was les$
than 1.75, and a student with 32 o(
more credit hours was placed or
warning if his or her GPA was less
than 2.0. Now a student with any
number of credit hours is placed on
warning if his or her GPA is less
than 2.0.
"A lot of people think their
GPAs are too low Joyner said.
Even with the higher standards,
fewer students are on academic
warning and probation than last
year. According to Joyner, there are
three main reasons that have conJ
tributed to this decline. The first
reason is that ECU is admitting stu-
dents with higher GPAs. Second,
students are focusing more on acad-
emics because many programs have
high GPA standards. The high
SEE GPA PAGE 2
f
MMM
Ml






2 Thundiy, Ottobir IS. 1998
news
Thi Em Carolinian
3 Thun
Wyoming student dies
after beating
! LARAMIE, Wyo. (AP) - A gay
" college student who was lured
" from a campus hangout, beaten
11 and lashed to a split-rail fence died
Monday, and the two young men
arrested in the attack now face
murder charges that could bring
the death penalty.
Matthew Shepard, 21, died at
Poudre Valley Hospital in Fort
" Collins, Colo while on life sup-
' port. His skull was so badly
' smashed that doctors could not
' perform surgery, hospital president
1 Rulon Stacey said.
The University of Wyoming
student had been in a coma since
bicyclists found him in near-freez-
ing temperatures Wednesday
evening. They at first mistook him
' for a scarecrow.
' Russell Arthur Henderson, 21,
' and Aaron James McKinney, 22,
were originally charged with
attempted murder, kidnapping and
aggravated robbery, and jailed on
$100,000 bail each.
Police said that with Shepard's
death, the charges against them
will be upgraded to first-degree
murder, which carries a possible
death sentence.
Their girlfriends - Chasity Vera
Paslcy, 20, and Kristen Leann
Price, 18 - were charged with being
accessories after the fact. Police
said the women helped dump
bloody clothing and initially lied
about their whereabouts.
Police said that robbery was the
main motive but that Shepard
apparently was chosen in part
because he was gay. The 5-foot-2,
105-pound Shepard had been beat-
en twice in recent months, attacks
he attributed to his homosexuality.
In a statement issued by the
hospital, Shepard's mother, Judy
Shepard, urged parents to hug their
children and enjoy every day with
them.
"He came into the world prema-
ture and left the world premature
and they are most grateful for the
time they had to spend with
Matthew the hospital president
said.
Of the 41 states that have hate-
crime laws, 21 states specifically
cover offenses motivated by the
victim's sexual orientation. Efforts
to pass a hate-crime law in
Wyoming have failed several
times.
On Monday, the giant rainbow
flag that symbolizes the gay move-
ment was lowered to half staff in
San Francisco's Castro District.
College students rallied in down-
town Denver to remember
Shepard and denounce violence.
And in Laramie, where the long-
planned Gay Awareness Week
began, some students wore yellow
and green armbands to send a mes-
sage of peace.
"It's a great loss to everyone,
whether they knew him or not. He
was an incredible individual said
Jim Osborn, a friend of Shepard's
and chairman of Lesbian Gay
Bisexual and Transgendered
Association, a University of
Wyoming student group.
Police said the two men lured
Shepard out of the Fireside bar late
Tuesday or early Wednesday by
telling him they were gay. The
three of them got in McKinney's
SEE SHEPARD. PAGE 3
GPA
continued from page t
standards of the programs also
affect the type of students that
apply to ECU.
"The academic culture of the
university is changing Joyner
said.
Finally, workshops are provid-
ed for students that are on warning
or probation. They offer advice on
subjects such as becoming a suc-
cessful student, time manage-
ment, note-taking skills, and acad-
emic motivation. They are held
throughout the semester at either
the Academic Support Center at
Brewster B-103 or the Center for
Counseling and Student
Development at 316 Wright.
"I see the students coming and
going to the workshops said
Shawn Coward, a tutor in the
Academic Support Center. "The
workshops are not as popular as
they should be, but it gets them
on the right start before they ruin
their college career
Students placed on probation
are required to attend one of these
workshops. They will stay on pro-
bation for the remainder of the
semester and then be placed on
warning or be considered in good
standing depending on their
GPAs. Students on warning are
encouraged to attend one of the
workshops, but are not required.
' Democratic Senatorial Candidate
John Edwards will speak
J Thursday, Oct. 15 at 10 a.m. at
Wright Plaza. Edwards plans to
deuut his education platform at a
, town hall meeting with students,
faculty, and staff.
A car show will be held from 8
a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday
at the lower level parking lot at
( Minges Coliseum to raise money
Hey You
The following changes
to parking will take
place between
Oct. 15 and Oct. 20.
Three spaces in the com-
muter lot by Kinko's will
be blocked Thursday and
Friday while a manhole
is being placed.
Flcklen Drive will be
closed to through traffic
on either Thursday or
Friday between 6 and 7
a.m. If the road is closed
when transit service
begins the pool access
road, AKA Pirates Walk
will be used.
Wright Circle and
Beckwith Drive will be
closed Friday from 8 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m. for an event
held in Wright
Auditorium. Parking
along the Beckwith Drive
curb will not be available
during the event.
A construction project
will affect 40 parking
spaces and two entrance
ways in the parking lot
south of Mendenhall
from Saturday through
Tuesday.
for cystic fibrosis. Represent NC, a
local car club, is sponsoring the
event along with Hudson Signs,
Enhanced Performance, Robert
Swelding, Nameplates, Bergen
Brunwig, Bob's Pizza, and Page
One. Spectators will be admitted
for free and registration for entries
in the car show will cost $25.
Contact Joel Geniesse at 321-8937
for more information.
MATCH POINT
When building a campfire,
clear a 5-foot area around
the pit down to the soil.
REMEMBER, ONLY YOU CAN
PREVENT FOREST FIRES.
PRESENTS
YESHUWAH
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A Contemporary Christian Band
Bringing the very best in Christian jazz, R&B,
Rap and Reggae to Gospel Fans Both Young & Old
Saturday, Oct. 17 @ 7:00pm
4584 Reedy Branch Rd.
(Road Behind Pitt Community College -
One Mile South of PCC)
Admission Is FREE
For More Info Call Ross Bennett @ 752-9151
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Advance tickets $9 public, S8 ECU foullystaff,
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news
Tho Eott Carolinian
Shepard
continued from page 2
You drank.
You danced.
You had se
Some-fci�J �
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Call Carolina Pregnancy Center 757-0003
209-B South Evans Street (downtown near Courthouse)
truck, where the beating began,
police said.
Later, Shepard was tied up and
pistol-whipped as he begged for
his life, and he was robbed of his
wallet and black patent leather
shoes, police said. A .357 Magnum
used to beat Shepard was found at
McKinney's home, police said.
McKinncy's girlfriend, Ms.
Price, and his father Bill
McKinney, told The Denver Post-
that the two men didn't set out to
kill Shepard but wanted to get
back at him for making passes at
McKinney in front of his friends.
At the fence where Shepard
was left behind, there was a single
basket of flowers Monday.
Justice
continued from page I
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Debbie O'Neal, Owner
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Freshman Marilyn Ward, a
criminal justice major, became a
member of the NABCJ at the con-
ference and called it a very reward-
ing experience. Ward felt that
future conferences should be
attended by all criminal justice
students.
"It was a rewarding experience
to meet so many people in the
field, and there are so many differ-
ent options in the criminal justice
field Ward said.
The national chapter and the
North Carolina state chapter met
together from Wednesday through
Saturday morning at NC Central
University. The NABCJ was start-
ed in 1973 at the University of
Alabama and now has more than
4,000 members. The conference
was open to any interested parties.
The NABCJ prides itself on
being a multiracial and nonparti-
san association of criminal justice
professionals and community
leaders who are dedicated to
improving the administration of
justice. The North Carolina
Chapter has over 250 active mem-
bers. Membership and participa-
tion in NABCJ activities are open
to all, irrespective of race, creed or
national origin.
Drinking
continued from page 2
drinking at universities around the
country, according to Antieau.
Between August 1997 and
August 1998, cases involving
underage drinking and ECU stu-
dents reached 676. The new law
will make it legal for ECU to send
letters home to parents whether
the student is on or off campus, no
matter what type of police force
catches the offense.
"Violations occur from many
different areas of the school's alco-
hol laws Antieau said. "Arrests
fall into categories from DUIs,
under-age drinking in dormitories,
to tailgating offenses. Most of the
violations occur, however, when
under-age students attempt to buy
liquor at ABC stores
An 18-year-old freshman, who
asked not to be identified, was
fined Saturday after being caught
drinking at the Homecoming
game. He feels that he should not
have to answer to his parents if he
does not live with them.
"I don't live at home, and I pay
my own bills" he said. "It was my
problem, not my parents. They
shouldn't be involved in this
Sgt. LaFrance Davis of the
ECU Police Department said she
understands where the students
are coming from and believes that
people must weigh the pros and
cons of the law.
"Many would say that the law
infringes on the privacy of the stu-
dent, but I believe that we may
see a decrease in the number of
cases of underage drinking if the
law is passed Davis said.
"Students don't want their parents
I o
know about their drinking habits if
II can
be prevented
Greenville police attorney Blair
Carr also feels that the new rule
might lead to a decrease in student
drinking.
Rape
continued from page 1
Assistant District Attorney will
make a decision on whether to
bring charges against the suspect.
In February, a Cotten Hall resi-
dent reported being raped in her
dorm room by a stranger. On Sep.
22, a freshman reported being
raped in the Garrett Hall residence
of an acquaintance. In February, a
21-year-old woman claimed she
was raped in the Sigma Phi
Epsilon back house, but charges
were dropped due to lack of evi-
dence.
The Cotten and Garrett Hall
rapes are still under investigation.
However, Younce said that he
hopes the Garrett Hall investiga-
tion will be cleared up by the end
of next week.
Both the ECUPD and the GPD
stress prevention and education as
the safest defenses against rape.
"The ECU Police Department
focuses on prevention and the
ECUPD also has a full time pre-
vention officer who works with
other campus organizations on the
prevention of sexual assault
Younce said.
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Thuridw Iklnh.r IS
opinion
eastcarolinian
AMI L.ROYSTER Editor
Heather burgess Managingun�
STEVE LOSSY News Ediloi
Amanda AUSTIN trowes Ediior
Jason Feather Phmofdiim
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Chris Knotts Stall illustrator
Stephanie WHITLOCK M Design Manager
JANET RESPESS Advertising Manager
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BOBBV TLCCLE Webmaster
� Strain to ECU crxnmun.r, ,m, 188�, im CarrM, wbw�, � rjrjo tepn �, imas ,�, rnuntlrri. ll� leM tutorial hi tact townn i�
m�iwn si IM Eaional Board Ins East Carolinian raatiraes amis id ins tloi. knitd m 2S0 araraa. alack mat a idmd lor Mem, m bitray. Ha last
Caroknian natives ike ngn lo Mil or mm tenets lo atitkantai. U Wises must be ttjntd Itnen should M sddirssM at Opinion M,i� .Ins las,
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Tuesday we learned of a shocking murder. Two young men attacked a gay University of
Wyoming student. The men beat him, tied him to a fence and left him for dead in near-
freezing temperatures. He died in the hospital because his skull was too badly crushed for
surgery.
Although robbery was the purported motive for the attack, the fact that the victim had
already been beaten twice in recent months places the crime well within the bounds of a
hate crime.
But hate crime isn't always as violent or as blatant. Homosexuals are harassed in less
obvious ways every day on campus, made to feel inferior because of their sexual
orientation while others of us take our sexual freedom for granted.
Minority students also fight an uphill battle every day against the glares, whispers and
outright racial slurs they endure from their fellow students.
Women are not only raped, but sexually harassed and subjected to inferior treatment as
well, simply because of their gender.
Although we all enjoy the freedom of thought, which includes the right to hate anyone
without cause, our freedoms end when they do harm to others physically or
psychologically. We need to learn how to keep our thoughts to ourselves and to treat
everyone as equals if we expect the same respect from others.
Hate crimes come in all sizes, from the shortchanging of a woman by a man who does
repairs on her car to the lynching of an African-American man by the Ku Klux Klan, but all
hate crimes hurt the individual and the community.
Individuals have a right to feel safe in their community, especially one as diverse as a
college campus. The world is a cruel place, but there should be one place where we can
feel safe to be ourselves.
We all live together and share a common goal: the betterment of ourselves through
education and broader horizons. So why is it so hard for us to accept each other's
differences? If we can't begin to learn from and support each other now, when can we?
OPINION
Columnist
Brian
HALL
Hate crime laws create problems
OPINION
Columnist
Ryan
KElMNERMUR
Reader's romance savvy tested
Just remember to be
yourself, unless it's you
that spits fingernails
across the room. In any
case, enjoy the wonderful
world of LOVE!
I have always been pretty lucky on
the love scene. Not really always.
I have had just as many hardships
as the next guy, but the good far
outweigh the bad, I assure you.
You don't know what love is until
you go through an "initiation" for
lack of a better word. You need to
have many relationships that don't
work out so that you can base the
next one on that. Take, for
example, the last girl you dated
bit her fingernails and spit them
across the room, and that didn't
exactly turn you on. Then, the
next girl you are interested in
should be able to answer "no" to
the question, "if we were eating at
a restaurant and we were waiting
for our food to come out, would
you sit there and bite your nails
and spit them across the room?"
That is first date material. I
believe that the first date should
be the date where you get
everything out in the open such as:
1. You know, I have a tattoo of
the Righteous Brothers on the
back of my knee.
2. I didn't think I was fully
rehabilitated. I guess they just
needed the bed.
3. I have not eaten in six
weeks.
4. I'm a bed-wetter.
You get the idea. The first date
should pretty much give some sort
of idea as to how you are going to
act around each other. During the
next date, if all goes well, you
should hear things like this:
1, I went to the Bahamas once.
2. You mean you like cats too?
3, This pizza is very greasy.
4. Are you saying that you have
a car too?
And so on, and so on. At any
case, the third date should be
pretty routine, as if you have been
friends for years. This is when the
conversation moves along to
things as:
1. I rented Congo last night.
2. How was it?
3. Well, I didn't expect quite so
many apes.
Are you starting to get it? Here
is a test for you to take.
Remember what we have learned.
1. Which of the following
might you hear on a first date?
a. I went fishing yesterday.
b. I went fishing last week.
c. I plan to go fishing tomorrow.
d. I wish I had a few less ears.
2 Which of the following
would you expect to hear on the
second date?
a. If only there were more
giraffes in the world.
b. The aliens said that they
were not interested in my body,
but I know different.
c. If I owned a bar, I wouldn't
allow bullfrogs to drink more than
one Fuzzy Navel.
d. I have a boat.
3 Ditto for the third date.
a. If only there were less
giraffes in the world.
b. I have a great body, and the
aliens would agree with me.
c. I don't think there should be
a drinking age for bullfrogs.
d. I watched the marathon of
"Love Boat" last night.
4 How would you break up
with someone?
a. Fake a heart attack at their
birthday party.
b. Fake a stroke a Christmas.
c. Fake going onto labor during
a movie (girls only hopefully).
d. Say "I don't think this is
working out
e. Both a and c.
f. None of these.
g. All of these.
5 Two trains, A and B, are
traveling at the same speed and
going in the same direction.
Which train will arrive first?
a. A
b. B
c. Who knows?
d. Who cares?
Now tally up your scores by
which: A-l point, B-2 points, C-3
points, and so forth. The higher
your score, then the more you will
score (if you know what I mean). I
hope I have cleared up a few
things for you. Just remember to
be yourself, unless it's you that
spits fingernails across the room.
In any case, enjoy the wonderfui
world of LOVE!
Hate crime laws create a
penalty for holding
unorthodox, though legal,
opinions. But when these laws
fail to stop hate crimes, which
they will, the next logical step
is to outlaw those opinions.
B-GLAD (Biscxuals, Gays,
Lesbians and Allies tor Diversity)
held a candlelight vigil October 14
to honor Matthew Shepard.
Shepard was an openly gay
student at the Universiu of
Wyoming who was cruelly beaten
to death recently. While it has not
yet been proven, it appears that
this murder was motivated by
irrational hatred of his sexual
orientation.
But the other reason for B-
GLAD's vigil raises some serious
questions that should be carefully
examined. According to Rich
Elkins, web and e-mail
coordinator for the group, the
gathering was also "to draw
attention to hate crimes, their
victims and the need for hate
crimes legislation
Congress is , currently
considering the Hate Crimes
Prevention Act. This bill, co-
sponsored by Sen. Ted Kennedy
(D-Mass.) and Sen. Aden Specter
(R-Penn.), and supported by the
president, would make it easier for
federal law enforcement to
intervene in local affairs. It would
also expand the list of protected
classes to include sexual
orientation, gender and disability.
Hate crime laws increase the
penalty for a crime based upon its
motivation, so criminals who
assault or murder because of a
hatred for a group could receive
extra time in prison. While this
seems fair and perhaps even a
good idea, there are several
reasons for concern.
First, on a purely practical level,
these laws are almost completely
symbolic. The Hate Crimes
Prevention Act, despite its name,
will not prevent anything.
Moreover, almost no one would
receive any extra punishment. For
example, in 19 a total of 27
people received extra time for
violating hate crime laws.
Hate crimes are a problem in
America. But, they are only a tiny
blip on our overall crime problem.
In 1995, there were 1.3 million
interracial crimes (where victim
and perpetrator were different
races). The same year, the FBI
recorded only 4,831 racial hate
crimes, or less than one-half of one
percent of all interracial crimes.
Remember, also, that most crime
occurs intraracially.
But symbols can be important.
The mere fact that these laws
accomplish almost nothing is not a
sufficient reason not to pass them.
The problem is that they create an
even greater threat than the
crimes that they seek to punish.
I late crime laws create a
penalty for holding unorthodox,
though legal, opinions. But when
these laws fail to stop hate crimes,
which they will, the next logical
step is to outlaw those opinions.
Think that this can't happen? It
is already beginning. According to
the Alberta Report, Sylvia
MacEachern was investigated for
more than two months by the
Ottawa hate crimes unit after
criticizing a proposed AIDS
curriculum for Canadian Catholic-
schools on an Ottawa radio station.
This is the real danger, not a
few thousand heinous acts
committed by individuals. Once it
becomes permissible for
authorities to persecute and
prosecute for beliefs, the ones
most in danger are minorities.
Freedom of speech and thought
are the only defense they have
against the tyranny of the majority,
yet it is these very groups that are
seeking to throw away this
defense.
Not only are these laws
dangerous, they are also
unnecessary. All crimes, regardless
of motivation, need to be
prosecuted. Shepard would not
have suffered any less, or be any
less dead, if his killers had
murdered him for some other
reason. These murderers need to
be executed because of what they
did, not why they did it.
President Clinton came within
16 words of being exactly right in a
letter that supported the Hate
Crimes Prevention Act, which he
sent to congressional leaders this
summer. In it he said "I hope that
we can join together to reaffirm
that no American should be
subject to violence on account of
his or her race, color, national
origin, religion, sexual orientation,
gender or disability Read that .
sentence again, stopping at the
word violence. That should be the
message that we send.
So I encourage B-GLAD and
everyone else to show support for
all victims of crime. But we should
not support this solution. The
price is just too high.
OPINION
Marvelle
SULLIVAN
Columnist
Ridicule of Greek system unwarranted
"When power corrupts, poetry cleanses
John F. Kennedy
35ifa U.S. President
is interesting that the very
people who complain about the
Greek system have never had
any first-hand knowledge or
experience with it. Why does it
bother these people, who have
no affiliation with it, so much?
This column is in response to the
people who are still fascinated with
bashing the Greek system and its
participants. There was a cartoon
on the editorial page of the East
Carolinian last Thursday that
depicted a fraternity pledge
cleaning up the lawn and thinking
to himself, "This will make me a
better person someday; this will
make me a better person
someday while a fraternity
brother screams, "hurry up and get
that lawn clean, pledge
Why is there an incessant need
to ridicule the Greek system? The
very individuals who do so have no
inkling of what the Greek system
is, what it stands for, or the way in
which it is organized. These
ridiculers base their biases and
judgments on what they have
heard and what they have seen on
television, movies and after-school
specials. Therefore, their
defamatory remarks and portrayals
are not accurate but are rather
convoluted and naive.
If the Greek system were so
appalling, it would not thrive the
way it does on campuses around
the country. Why would an
organization that supposedly
invades people's individualism and
self-respect maintain a following
that ranks it as one of the largest
(and most structured) organizations
on campus?
It is interesting that the very
people who complain about the
Greek system have never had any
first-hand knowledge or
experience with it. Why does it
bother these people, who have no
affiliation with it, so much? No one
makes anyone join a fraternity or
sorority. It is a matter of personal
choice made by each individual.
Before and after membership is
attained, no one is bound to it, and
his or her status is not based on a
"like it or leave it" basis. It is also
interesting that the people who
scrutinize fraternity and sorority
organizations and members do so
in the name of "rights and
individualism That makes no
sense and its senselessness and
incoherence is embodied in the
fact that those who attack Greeks
are in fact attacking people's
individual rights to organize,
assemble and affiliate with
organizations of his or her choice.
Now who is really being intrusive
and simple minded here?
I could list statistics a mile long
citing the benefits of the Greek
system and Greek life, i.e.
community service, higher grade
point averages, career and
leadership opportunities, etc but
that is really not the point. The
point is that there is no reason or
urgent need of any kind to
constantly degrade fraternities and
sorortties. These people have a
right to do what they wish to enrich
their college experience the way
that they see fit. To continue to
ridicule these people is petty,
unimpressive and
counterproductive. Plus, it is just
getting old. There arc so many
important and worthy causes out
there. College (and life) is too
short to hold hostility towards
something that is not going away.






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Thursday, October 15. 199B
comics
The Em Carolinian
Four Seats Left
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WARNING ! ! !
The opinions
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Kevin Jordar
Is this what comes to your
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are you a
" PIMP"
Most politicians are pimps,
because they play on people's
weakness of wanting a bjuer
life. They guarantee ihe mou.i,
and the stars to ihU3. faithful,
who will follow (heir lead. The
only problem, is that a lot of
them don't keep up their end of
the deal.
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they are using people
to elevate themselves
to higher social slandings
among themselves and Or are you getting
society. � PIMPED.
Remember childrens,
this world is all about
who's pimpin' who.
figure it out
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'6 Thursday, October IS,
199S
features
The East Caroliniin
O'Connor represented
by Panhellenk Council
Nina M. Dry
SENIOR WRITER
Marketing Association (AMA),
served on the SGA legislative last
year, and was secretary for the
Student Welfare Committee.
According to O'Connor, it is still
a shock to have won this
great honor.
"It's so unbelievable that so
incredible feeling. I am so blessed
to receive such an honor. It was the
best way to wrap up my
senior year
O'Connor will return to next
year's homecoming game to crown
the 1999 homecoming queen.
"It's a moment I look forward
Strickland represented
by ECU Ambassadors
; All hail the lovely Jennifer
J O'Connor, for she is this year's
Homecoming Queen. O'Connor
; was nominated by the ECU
j Panhellenic Council to be a poten-
rial candidate.
"The Panhellenic Council con-
sists of eight member who oversee
all of the sororities on campus
O'Connor said.
The ECU senior is the rush
director on the Greek Council. She
takes care of all the sorority rush
responsibilities each semester.
' O'Connor was overjoyed with
her nomination onto the home-
coming court.
"It was such an honor to know
that the Panhellenic wanted me
to represent them during
Homecoming O'Connor said.
O'Connor is quite involved in
and outside of the University. Just
to name a few, she is a member of
,Chi Omega sorority, has recently
been inducted into the American
Nina M. Dry
SENIOR WRITER
time he water skis and participates
in water skiing competitions.
"I have been water skiing for
about seven or eight years
Strickland said.
Strickland was overcome at the
idea of being named this
year's king.
"I was overwhelmed
said he was happy that he won such
a high honor, yet at the same time
was pleasantly surprised.
"Jon is a good guy said Jennifer
O'Connor, this year's homecoming
queen. "He definitely deserved
to win
Strickland will be returning next
year with O'Connor to crown the
The shock in Jennifer O'Connors eyes was apparent when she was announced as the
'98 Homecoming Queen during halftime at ECUs Saturday game.
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMBER
many people believed in me to
vote me into court O'Connor
said. "It was such an incredible
moment that I will never forget. To
see my parents' faces was such an
to O'Connor said. "I get the
chance to come back and be apart
of the University one more time
Hear ye, hear ye! The honorable
Jon Strickland has been selected to
be this year's ECU homecoming
king. This ECU senior was nomi-
nated by the ECU Ambassadors.
According to Ambassador member,
Ryan Jasen Henne, the
Ambassadors are the official hosts
of ECU. They work directly with
the offices of Alumni Relations and
Chancellor Richard Eakin.
Strickland works as the Emeriti
Coordinator for the Ambassadors.
"I keep all the ambassadors
informed on what's going on and
coordinate the alumni functions
Strickland said.
According to Strickland, it was a
huge honor for him to have the
Ambassadors nominate himas a
potential candidate for this year's
homecoming king.
Besides Strickland's involve-
ment with the Ambassadors, he also
is a member of the Finance
Management Association (FMA)
Honor Society and during his free
Jon Strickland grins as he shakes hands with Chancellor Richard Eakin after being
announced as the '98 Homecoming King during halftime at Saturday's game.
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMBER
Strickland said. "I didn't know how homecoming king and queen of
to react, but .t was quite an impact 1999. But until then, long live the
�"m.?- king and queen of 1998!
Like most people, Strickland
Eight receive Chancellor's Award for Excellence Wanen honored with
Recipients receive
plaques, extra leave
Phillip Gilfus
Staff writer
-Recently, eight members of the
ECU faculty received the
Chancellor's Award for Excellence
during a reception at Mendenhall
Student Center.
This award, which has been
given annually since 19, was pre-
sented by Chancellor Eakin to rec-
ognize staff members in various cat-
egories.
The winners were given a cer-
tificate of recognition, a purple
plaque, and sixteen extra hours of
annual leave.
This award, developed by the
ECU Department of Human
Resources, is given to staff mem-
bers for various categories. In the
area of devotion to duty, Carolyn
Miller, Thurman Ramsey, Rudy
Shepard, Mail Services supervisor,
and Cynthia Smith, political sci-
ence office assistant, received
appreciation from the chancellor.
"I had won a business award
which is given quarterly Shepard
said. "Because of that, I was nomi-
nated in the area of devotion to
duty
Other winners were nominated
by their department chairs.
"My department chair and one
other faculty member recommend-
ed me Smith said.
In the human relations category,
Carolina Moreno and June Urback
won.
"My supervisor wrote a letter to
the award committee about my
work in this department and about
the volunteer work that I do out-
side the university said Moreno,
an x-ray technician in radiation
oncology in the School of
Medicine.
Moreno has also won the
Governor's Award for his distinc-
tion in human relations.
"I was nominated last year, but
didn't win said Urback, secretary
in the Department of Allied Health
Sciences. "I didn't even know that
I had been nominated again
The remaining awards were
given to Nancy Mize for public ser-
vice and Amy Grimes for safety and
heroism.
"I had witnessed a lady being
attacked in the parking lot of Pitt
County Hospital Grimes said. "I
later testified and the criminal
eventually pleaded guilty
The Chancellor's Award for
Excellence was developed by Greg
Miller of Human Resources. Miller
presented the idea to Chancellor
Eakin and it was warmly received.
"The chancellor wanted every-
one to feel like a winner Miller
said. 'That is why he recognizes
the winners, as well as the nomi-
nees, during the award ceremony
The winners were encouraged
to invite their fellow workers to the
reception. During the ceremony,
Chancellor Eakin recognized all
the nominees.
Eakin also spoke about the win-
ners and read portions of the letters
that had been sent by their depart-
ment chairs and reviewed by the
committee.
The committee overlooking the
award is part of the Praise
Committee in Faculty
Development. It is an eight person
review committee that receives the
nominations which are made dur-
ing the spring. This year, most win-
ners found out on August 1 through
the mail that they won.
The reception at Mendenhall
was enjoyed by all.
"We all felt very honored
Smith said.
Max Ray Joyner Award
First ever recipient
chosen from slate of 24
Erin Alderman
staff writer
Creating a new award is an excit-
ing experience, but to be the first
recipient is an experience a teacher
will never forget. �
The Max Ray Joyner Award was
named after Max Ray Joyner, a for-
mer East Carolina trustees chair-
man, alumnus benefactor and an
adult continuing student as well.
Continuing Education students
nominated 24 faculty members for
Louis Warren, Continuing Education
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMBER
the award and then the faculty
Senate committee on Continuing
Education chose the recipient.
According to Diana Henshaw,
director of the Division of
Continuing Education, the award
SEE WAMUN. PAGE 7
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Students moy attend I
together. Guest posse;
Plon Office ftom 9om
plate of o Satuiday nil
information, contact tl





The East Caroliniin
that he won such
at the same time 1
rprised.
;uy said Jennifer
:ar's homecoming
Initely deserved I
be returning next
nor to crown the .
ikin after being
day's game.
and queen of
n, long live thje
998!
vith
ward
ng Education
UMBER
the faculty
i Continuing
e recipient,
i Henshaw,
division of
�, the award
GE7
7 Thursday. October 15. 1998
features
Warren
continued from page 6
The East Carolinian
was designed to "honor faculty
who have taught off campus. (The
award) honors and recognizes their
contributions
Louis Warren, the first winner
of ECU's Max Ray Joyncr Award
for Faculty Service Through
Continuing Education believes
that the award has had a great
impact on him.
"(The award) makes me realize
students really take note of what
I'm trying to do(it) made me want
to work that much harder. I have
a lot to work up to and have
great expectations of myself
Warren said.
Warren says that in teaching
many times you don't receive a
lot of needed feedback and this
award, "reaffirms that I am reach-
ing my students
Henshaw believes Warren to
be, "a fine example of (the) caring
faculty who work with our off
campus students
In addition to prestige, the Max
Ray Joyner Award also comes with
a $1,000 dollar cash prize.
before Warren began teaching at
ECU five years ago, he taught ele-
mentary and middle school grades
in Moore County schools for
three years.
Today Warren teaches courses
in elementary and middle school
grade curriculum.
Originally from Sampson
County, Warren said that many of
his ancestors and relatives also
attended ECU and he is, "proud of
the rich heritage ECU has for pro-
ducing teachers, just to be on the
faculty is pretty exciting
Warren believes his teaching
philosophy is to, "instill the beliefs
in a student that they can achieve
at anything He explains that
building self confidence is very
important to bring out the best
in a student.
"Sometimes Warren said, "a
student's self esteem is really
low - I work on building their
self confidence
Even after the award Warren
still believes there are many things
he has left to learn and there is
always room for improvement.
"Each year I try to get better
Warren said. "I learn a lot from my
colleagues, students, clinical teach-
ers and the meetings I attend.
Teaching is such a reflective
practice, I'm always trying to do
things better
covering the
Quotes
Pet mistakenly named
on subpoena
TOWN OF PLWAUKEE, Wis.
(AP) � Police officer Terry
Nordquist was looking for a man
named Beau Humcke. Instead, he
found the family's pet Labrador.
Nordquist went to the Humcke
home in the town of Pewaukee
to serve a subpoena on a
Beau Humcke.
When the officer asked Heddy
Humcke to bring out Beau, she
returned with the family's pet yel-
low Labrador.
"We have been laughing ever
since Ms. Humcke said. "It was
just the funniest thing She and
her husband, Michael Humcke
own the dog.
The mix-up came after Ms.
Humcke listed her dog's name
instead of her own as "victim" on a
form filed with town police for
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a court case.
Beau was injured in July when
he was attacked by another dog.
The injury resulted in a $100 vet-
erinary bill.
The owner of the other dog
asked for a Municipal Court trial to
contest a vicious dog citation issued
after the attack.
After discovering the mix-up
Tuesday, Nordquist replaced the
dog's name with Ms. Humcke's,
and she attended the court hearing
Wednesday.
"She was a substitute witness
for Beau, Michael Humcke said.
The owner of the other dog
pleaded no contest to a reduced
citation for having a dog run loose.
Traffic stop leads
policeman to lost father
LOS ANGELES (AP) � Paul
Benitez thought the policeman was
staring into his eyes to see if he was
drunk, but there was another rea-
son: Officer Kelly Benitez realized
he had found his long-lost father.
"Were you ever married to a
woman named Debra?" Officer
Benitez asked the man in the beat-
up Ford Thunderbird he had just
pulled over for driving with an
expired registration tag.
No, he said, but he had dated a
woman with that name about 30
years ago. Then he noticed the
officer's nametag.
"Oh my God, I'm your dad
the driver said.
"Sometimes a scream is better than a thesis
Ralph Waldo Emerson
"There is no sincerer love than the love of food
George Bernard Shaw
"I am not young enough to know everything
Oscar Wilde
"Behind every great fortune there is a crime
Honore de Balzac
"The covers of this book are too far apart
Ambrose Bierce
"Anything that is too stupid to be spoken is sung
Voltaire
"Too many pieces of music finish too long after the
end Igor Stravinsky
'Victory goes to the player who makes the next-to-last
mistake
Chessmaster Savielly Grigorievi tch Tartakower
find that the harder I work, the more luck I
seem to have
Thomas Jefferson
"Do or do not. There is no 'try
Yoda (The Empire Strikes Back)
"Whether you think you can, or that you can't, you
are usually right"
Henry Ford
'When you have to kill a man, it costs
nothing to be polite
Sir Winston Churchill
is unbecoming for young men to utter maxims
Aristotle
Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very
persistent one
Albert Einstein
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MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER OCT. 31, 1998 9PM UNTIL 2AM
ECU ID GETS YOU IN TREE, A GUEST PASS LETS YOU BRING A FRIEND
Students moy attend for free by using their ECU One Card. One guest per student will be admitted with a guest pass. Student and guest must enter
together. Guest posses will be available beginning Monday, Ottobei 76 ol the Cential Ticket Oldie from 8:30am lo 6pm and lodd Dining Hall Meal
Plon Office horn 9am lo 5pm. On October 31, guest passes will be available only at the Sludcnl Recreation Cenlet fiom I lam to 10:30pm. In
place of a Saturday night Hendrix film, Halloween cartoon shot Is will be shown as part ol Midnight Madness (Guest posses required.) For additional
information, contact the Centra! Ticket Offke Monday through Friday fiom 8 30om lo 6pm at 378 488
T
25 Off Your Entire Check At Darryl's
Just show your ECU student ID at the
Darryl's across from campus and get a 25
discount on your entire dinner check. Try our
famous Saucy Barbecued Pork
Ribs. Award Winning Fajitas
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Steaks. Fresh Vegetable Pasta,
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ECU students. So stop by tonight
and enjoy East Carolina's favorite
place for food and fun!
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800 East 10th Streei
il
-1007





Thmtdty, Octob�r 15, 1998
The East Carolinian
9 Thurid
on the football field
ECU on quest for fifth
straigfit victory
Travis Barkley
senior writer
ECU will put its four game winning
streak on the line this Saturday when
the Pirates travel to Legion Field to
take on the University of Alabama,
who enters the game with a 3-2
record. Last week the Crimson Tide
defeated Ole Miss 20-17 in overtime.
Alabama's only losses have come against
Florida and Arkansas.
After facing wishbone teams for the
last three games, the Pirates will finally
see a more traditional attack this week.
Head coach Steve Logan says he just
hopes his team remembers how to play
against a conventional offense.
"We're going to be a little bit out of
our element due to the fact that we've
played three wishbone teams in a row
Logan said. "We're going to get spread
out all over the field and have to see if
we can remember how to line up, liter-
ally. So we've got a tall order against us
Logan said that unlike most of
ECU's previous opponents, Alabama
has a variety of offensive and defensive
packages.
"They've gotten themselves into
some very multiple schemes on both
sides of the ball Logan said. "They've
got a one-back, two-back, no-back
y. offense, shotgun. The defense is very
multiple, a lot of man coverage, very
aggressive. I'd compare them favorably
to Virginia Tech
Tech blasted ECU 38-3 in the season
opener. Logan feels that
Alabama may have even
more team speed than the
Hokies.
"They're faster than
Virginia Tech in my opinion,
particularly on offense
Logan said. "The tailback
they've got is a real deal guy.
He'll be the best back we've
seen this year
That tailback, junior
Shaun Alexander, leads the
Crimson tide in rushing with
551 yards, averaging 5.2
yards per carry. Alexander
has scored nine touchdowns,
eight rushing and one receiv-
ing to lead the team in scor-
ing.
Much like ECU,
Alabama uses two quarterbacks,
senior J.D. Phillips and freshman Andrew
Zow. Zow, the more athletic of the two, is
slated to start against the Pirates.
"They're a little more simplistic on
offense with the freshman Logan said.
"When the senior is in there they run a lot
more stuff
Senior nose quard Travis Darden says
developing a strong pass rush will be impor-
tant, regardless of who the quarterback is.
"We haven't been against an offense yet
that throws a whole lot Darden said.
"They just kind of spread you out, so we've
got to get a good pass rush up front. The
guys are aware of that and we're going to
see if we can get that accomplished
Logan said the teams that have had suc-
cess against Alabama have gone right at
them.
"The two teams that hurt them ran right
at them, which tends to negate some of the
speed they have Logan said. "They
haven't dealt with any option whatsoever.
Some of our option schemes will concern
them and hopefully slow down some of
their inside-out pursuit that they've got
Starting right tackle Samein Jones said
ECU's depth on the offensive line may
wear down the Alabama defense.
"We substitute a lot of offensive linemen
throughout the game Jones said. "We
were fresh and able to wear out UAB last
Saturday. I think it will be a key for this
week also
Saturday's game will likely be played in
David Garrar
(red-shirt freshman)
Pos.QB
Ht. 6-3
Wt. 240 lbs.
Hometown: Durham, N.C.
High School: Southern Durham
High School Career Highlight
Started 40 games
Accounted for 9,023 yards of total offense
Accounted for 113 touchdowns
Junior year
1,800 yards passing (32 td)
1,400 yards rushing (24 td)
Senior year
Threw or ran for 31 touchdowns
Garrard shows potential to
be'future starting quarterback
FHEN SCHRAMM
� RNIQR WRITER
Source: ECU media guide
mm
ECU �
Passing
Stats
completions
yards
- attempts
701
3
Jr mterceptioas
Source: Sfortt ImoroMrion
David Garrard left high school as a highly regarded and promis
ing quarterback prospect and came to ECU to play ball with
the Pirates. He worked hard in spring practice and has lived up
to all his expectations so far this season.
This fall Garrard has played beyond his years, providing
ECU's football program with much needed and often explo-
sive offensive skills.
ECU's coaches did not hesitate to redshirt Garrard when he
joined the Pirates in 1997 as a 6'3" freshman from Southern
Durham High School. Starting 40 games for Southern
Durham, where he amassed for 9,023 yards of total offense and
accounted for 113 career touchdowns, Garrard was listed
among North Carolina's top 25 prospects following his senior
season.
"I knew once 1 came to East Carolina that I would be red-
shirted. It was hard at first, but I got used to it so it was all
right Garrard said.
Being red-shirted gave Garrard a chance to get more com-
fortable with the role of a college quarterback.
"I got to go to practice, learn the plays, go to meetings and
get a feel for the college atmosphere. So I think it helped me a
lot for this year Garrard said.
It wasn't until last spring that Garrard began to raise the eye-
brows of many ECU football fans. In the final scrimmage of'98
spring drills, Garrard completed 6 of 10 passes for 164 yards.
He also rushed for 56 yards on 8 attempts.
"I thought I did pretty well for a freshman. I thought I was
reading my keys, looking at the coverageetting the
receivers. I thought I did pretty good Canard said.
This summer Garrard worked hard to make himself a more
complete quarterback.
"I did a lot of off-field running to get in be3i
ter shape so I could be more mobile in the
pocket. I was also going in film so I could
read my keys a little better. I just did
some extra things for this season
Garrard said.
SEE GARRARD. PAGE 10

ggjj STANDINGS
Swimmers hold annual meet today
� ConferenceOverall
W-LW-L
Tulane2-04-0
ECU1-04-1
Army2-12-3
Louisvillel-l3-3
Southern Missl-l2-3
Houstonl-l1-5
Memphis0-10-5
Cincinnati0-30-6
1 Source: Conference USA Release
Competition known to
predict season success
Todd Tallmadge
sports whiter
front of a crowd of over 83,000 which would
be the fifth largest crowd to see a game in
ECU history. Neither Logan nor the players
are overly concerned about playing in front
of such a large crowd.
"South Carolina is the same type thing-
80,000 people going crazy Logan said.
"These kids have been there, done that. I
think that our players will respond favor-
ably
Darden said you can't get intimidated
when playing a school with a storied past
like Alabama.
"You respect that with the tradition and
things but you've just got to go out there
and play ball, just like we've been playing
every Saturday Darden said. "It's going to
be a packed house and that's all fine. We're
just going to go with the scheme the coach-
es give us and try to play ball
Jones supported Darden's comments,
saying that it doesn't matter who ECU
plays, they just have to execute on game
day.
"Coach Shank (Steve Shankweiler,
offensive line coach) has told us that we
don't play opponents, we play the game of
football Jones said. "All we can do is go
out and execute our game plan
"We'll just have to go out and turn it up
a notch in practice this week Jones said.
"We'll practice at 110 percent and hopeful-
ly everything will work out
The game will be televised locally by
WITN. Kickoff is set for 3:00 p.m.
The ECU men's and women's swim teams
open their seasons today at the Purple and
Gold meet.
The Purple and Gold meet i� an dual
meet between the teams. The men divide
up evenly and swim against each other.
The same is done with the women's team.
"The Purple & Gold meet tells us as a
coaching staff where the teams are after
almost 10 weeks of training. We start our
strength and conditioning program the
moment the swimmers come back for
school. We swim over 50,000 yds a week,
which is over 12,050 laps head coach
Rick Kobe said. "With the teams not being
at top shape until sometime in January, we
use this meet as a gauge as to where we
want to be by then
i The meet also serves as a means of set-
ting personal goals for many of the swim-
mers.
"This meet gives us feed back as to
where our training is at this point. It gives
me personally a marker as to where I want
to be in the season senior men's swim-
mer Richard Chen said.
"We use the results as an outlook for our
goals on the up-coming season senior
women's swimmer Niki Kneel said.
As usual, one of the primary goals for
the team this season is to come out on top
within the conference.
"Our goals for the season, as they are
every year, are to have an undefeated sea-
son and to win the CAA conference meet
Kobe said. "We have won conference
before but have not been able to have the
undefeated season to go along with it
The men's team finished in third last
season, and looks to rebound from that
placing.
The women's team has won three of
the last four CAA titles with a second placed
finish last year to UNC-Wilmington.
"Our biggest rivalry is UNC- j
Wilmington senior women's swimmer ;
Allison Holland said. "We want to get the
championship back after coming in sec-
ond to them last year
Kobe feels that the year's team has the
potential to reach the goals that have been
set.
"This girls squad should be the best in
school history Kobe said. "We have the
most depth in the distance freestyle and
backstroke on both the men's and
women's squad
The Purple and Gold meet will be held
today at 3 p.m. at Minges Aquatic Center'
in Minges Coliseum. The Aquatic Center
holds over 300 people. The meets are
known to produce a sell-out crowd, so-
arrive early for a seat and a chance to see
the team in action.
Wit
VIC
Card
Women's soccer falls to top-ranked team
Tribe shuts Pirates out in
last 10 minutes of play
Tracy Hairr
senior writer
On Tuesday, the ECU women's soccer
team lost its third conference game to
nationally ranked William and Mary. The
Pirates are now 7-4-1 on the season and 2-
3 in CAA play.
There was an obvious amount of ten-
sion during the first half of the game with
the teams' goalkeepers equally on the
defense from the players' attempted shots.
"William and Mary is an excellent team,
one of the top ten in the nation head
coach Neil Roberts said. "We were playing
under a lot of pressure
I
The Pirates eventually out-
shot the Tribe 8-7 after 45 min-
utes. In the second half, howev-
er, a corner kick from William
and Mary's Missy Wycinsky,
currently ranked second in the
nation for scoring, eluded the
Pirate defense and put the
Tribe ahead 1-0 in the 80th
minute. Nine minutes later,
Tribe member Janet Sury
scored another goal, and
though ECU made five more
potential shots, the shutout
was determined.
'The game proved to be a
big test for us, and one that I certainly
don't think we failed Roberts said. "We
just learned a great deal about things to do
on our attacking end in future games
With three more games against CAA
contenders scheduled throughout the rest
(
jugho
of the season, the
team intends to focus
on improvement.
"We're in a situa-
tion right now to posi-
tion ourselves in good
seating for the confer-
ence tournament
Roberts said. "I've
been real proud of
the progress we've
made so far, so hope-
fully we'll win the
rest of our conference
games and bear
teams like William
and Mary J
More action for the women will contin
uc when the Pirates host CAA opponent
James Madison Sunday at Bunting Field
at 12 p.m.
The Lady Pirates dropped their
third conference match Tuesday.
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMMBER
Pric
Prices In Th
V Reserve





last Carolinian
is won three of
h a second place
ilmington.
ry is UNC
nen's swimmer;
want to get the
:oming in see-
r's team has the
that have been
I be the best in
"We have the
e freestyle and
e men's and
set will be held
quatic Center �
quatic Center
Tie meets are
out crowd, so.
chance to see
earn
! season, the
itends to focus
rovement.
're in a situa-
ht now to posi-
rselves in good
for the confer-
tournament
s said. "I've
eal proud of
Dgress we've
3 far, so hope-
'e'll win the
ur conferenc
and bear
like William
i
n will contin
(A opponent
hinting Field
9 Thunday. October 15. 1998
Harris Teeter
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Bananas
The East Carolinian
Golf team finishes fourth
at Mocs Fall Invitational
Expectations cut short
according to coach
Stephen Schiamm
seniob writer
The ECU men's golf team finished
a disappointing fourth at the Mocs
Fall Invitational in Chattanooga,
Tenn. on Tuesday. The Pirates had
high scores in the first round and
shot well in the later rounds but
never managed to contend for the
top spot.
"I was disappointed that we did-
n't have a shot at winning head
golf coach Kevin Williams said.
"We had a bad first round and that
took us out of it
The Pirates' final team score,
878put them in a tie for fourth
with Central Alabama and behind
Coastal Carolina, Georgia Southern
and Chattanooga.
"I think we are similar in talent
with Coastal Carolina, Georgia
Southern and Chattanooga, but
after the first round we just didn't
have a chance Williams said. "We
can't keep shooting ourselves in
the foot. We've got to get more
solid starts
Despite the high early scores,
Williams was pleased with the
strong play of his freshmen. The
Pirates were led by freshman
Micheal Chad Webb. Webb shot a
74 in the first round and followed it
up with 71 in the next two rounds
to finish three-over-par and in a tie
for 15th overall. Fellow freshman
Frank Adams finished four-over-
par and 19th overall.
"I was pleased with our fresh-
men. Frank Adams and Micheal
Chad Webb were solid Williams
said. "Their input was invaluable
The strong play of the Pirate
freshmen lightened the load car-
ried by junior and perennial team
leader Marc Miller. Miller finished
in a tie for 24th overall with an
eight-over-par 221.
"Marc Miller didn't play well. It
used to be that when Marc was bad
we were really bad. Our two fresh-
men) are a lot like Marc. Micheal
Chad Webb has got the lowest
average on the team and Frank
Adams' average would be lower if
it weren't for his bad first tourna-
ment. Now, we can take the hit
when Marc doesn't play well
Williams said.
The Pirates' troubles on
Tuesday were due to the slow start
and a lack of production from the
fifth spot. The Pirates' first four
competitors, Miller, Webb, Adams
and Shane Robinson have carried
the team thus far. The fifth spot
has been the weak link.
"I'm proud of the top four guys
we've got. We've just got to find
that fifth guy. We haven't counted a
fifth score all year. We've got a
whole on our team that we've got
to fill. We need someone to step
forward and give a contribution
from the fifth spot Williams said.
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4
m





10 Thursday, October IS. 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
Garrard
continued from page 8
u
This season, the time spent
J watching from the sidelines and the
hard work in practice and over the
summer are finally paying off.
Garrard has appeared in all of
ECU's five games this year. Each
time, however, he has come in off
ithe bench.
�' "It's been a fairly solid perfor-
mance for a freshman head foot-
ball coach Steve Logan said. "He's
done some nice things. But he's not
anywhere near where he needs to
be to get 70 snaps a game or play a
whole college football game
According to Logan, Garrard is
evolving into a more complete
quarterback.
"He's progressing nicely. He
used to get stuck on one receiver
visually and now he's moving his
eyes and finds the second and third
receivers Logan said.
The process of molding Garrard
into a more complete quarterback is
not yet concluded.
"It seems like with any young
quarterback, you get a certain num-
ber of snaps and you begin to lose
your concentration. He has to get to
the point where he can have 60 or
; 70 snaps and does not lose concen-
tration Logan said. "He's pro-
gressing and he's got some nice
skills. It's nice to see him develop-
ing. It's a good process
Garrard made his first appear-
ance at Dowdy-Ficklcn this year
against the University of
Tennessee-Chattanooga. In that
game he provided the crowd with
the first of many exhibitions of his
explosive offensive talent. His 40-
yard touchdown pass to LaMont
Chappcl electrified the ECU fans
and started the onslaught that
would result in ECU's 31-0 thrash-
ing of the Mocs.
"It was a bootleg and I came off
and I had a little pressure so I tried
to scrape him. He went around me
and he kind of got lost and I saw
LaMont Chappel come out of the
back end real quick. I knew I had a
quick shot to get it to him and I just
put it up there and it just fell right
into his hands Garrard said.
After putting up quality num-
bers against Ohio, Garrard came in
late to preserve ECU's win over
Army.
Saturday, after Ernest Tinnin
threw two early interceptions
against UAB, Logan turned to
Garrard to jump start the Pirate
offense. Garrard did not disappoint
his coach, as he had possibly his
greatest game yet as a Pirate. He
connected on two touchdown pass-
es and threw for a career high 189
yards in guiding the Pirates to a .26-
7 win over the Blazers.
Garrard has already put his name
in the future of the quarterback
position at ECU, a future he hopes
will come soon.
"I'm really just trying to improve
my performance and get ready for
the years to come Garrard said.
BIRMINGHAM, AL
EAST CAROLINA vs. ALABAMA
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LARGEST
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PLUS DISCOUNTED SURF CLOTHING: MCD, SMP, COUNTER CULTURE, RUSTY
BILLABONG, GIRL STAR, PORN STAR, PIMP GEAR, SEEDLESS, & MUCH MORE
CHECK US OUT IN DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE BESIDE BW-3'S. NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY! FOR MORE INFO CALL 758-8874
"COFFEE BRAKES"
� Join financial aid representatives to learn how "the system works
� Receive scholarship and grant information.
� Learn how to find grant information on your own.
� Learn how to complete financial aid forms quickly and efficiently.
� All commuter and adult students are welcome.
Monday, October 26
4.00-5:00 p.m.
In The Underground, Mendenhall Student Center
ADULT AND COMMUTER STUDENT SERVICES is housed in 211 Whichard and exists to
aid commuters and students over 24 in making the most of their college experience Students
are encouraged to stop in to meet the new Director, Shelly Myers. exPenence- scents
m�TU7! 1 RIDER B0ARDS are 'ocated in the Wright Place and the lower floor of
Mendenhall Student Center, Check them out and share a ride.
cTmSs bycTgleai - �PP�rtUni,ieS �� �" ��
I 0VfER 2i7 �Si9n on t0 lhe Ecu Adu" Student Listserve and receive campus information
SIlVtC no subiect' WKSS5
blTv fhfmHnDnfnY th TpHE PINNACLE- The ECU Chapter of the Pinnacle celebrates its -
"� h! P'nnaCle IS a "a,ional honora,V �" students over 25 with a 3.0 overall
m�mh�h H39e �h "ST S6,Vice involve�n- Each semester members apply o
! v&VESMSSceremony'Nomina,ion app,icaIions ,or F-19��
THE DRIVING FORCE OF ECU
Cosmetic Surgery CoulbSe
Your Answer
w
facial Enhancements
(FACE LIFT, EYELID LIFTS)
LASER CENTER
(Laser Resurfacing, Hair Removal,
Port Wine Stain, & Vein)
PERSONALIZED SKIN CARE PROGRAM
Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, PA
Howard G. Dawkiro, Jr. M.D F.A.C.S.
Board Certified Plajtx Surgeon
Limited enrollment Call for your reservation
(800) 553-2772
www.hdawkins.com
The only place in Greenville
to get the hottest surf ware,
skateware, & accessories.
CHECK US OUT AT THE PLAZA MALL. (NEAR THE FOOD COURT) 321-1884
Complementary Seminar
Tuesday, October 27- 7pm
T
ENJOY OUR NEWWINTER INVENTORY
l1?11 BHA,lli PAMTS' "OODIES.T-SHIIITS. ORESSES.HMCHES. SIM6USESSH0ESSUCHAS-
LOST 6MUTM VANS f UEL HIC AMERICA BILIA00MB
ES SMP RUSTY MCD ETNIES OSIRIsVzEKiEL
�PLUS THE LARGEST SELECTION OF BODY JEWELRY
TEAM FUSION
Kevin Roberts, Robbie Morris.
Jarrette Moore, Brandon Shaw,
Chad Rodger, Brandon Faucette
OVER 50 DECKS
IN STOCK 11
4
GREENVILLE'S PREMIERE SKATE
SHOP. WHERE WE DON'T STOP
s 1 Thurn
ONE BED
'Club. $24
�Ities. No di
"ferred.
LANGST)
$100 off c
apartment
all appliam
tions, over
$410. Call
WALK T
$275mon
wood Apt
ville. 758-6
ECU ARE
tral heat.
washerdn
Inside. No
. month thru
WANTED:
an efficienc
beginning
$288mo.
2518.
WILDWOC
dishwasher
or 252-33:
and spacioi
CONDO FC
do, newly r
12 baths.
Available i
daytime, 56
WESLEY C
off deposit
apartments,
washerdry�
pus. Availab
1921.
RINGG
Now Ti
1 bedroi
Efficier
CALI
ROOiVin
SEEKING FE
perclassmen
room apartm
utilities. Plea:
0230, for mo
MF ROOM!
2 bedroom, 2
River, $282.5'
12 phone. V
7083.
HARDWORK
looking for th
apt. $235 a
Ringgold Towi
location! 758-
PLAYERS CL
to sublease,
month utilitiei
quired. Wasr
and bath. Call
message.
AAAA! SPfl
1 of 6 small
recognized by
Business Burs
ethics in the
breaktravel.cor
SCIENTIFIC C
$50. Very bas
ows $75. If int
758-8788.
AKC DOBERIV
and dewormec
male, $100. A
2204.
PIANO: YA
CVP83, like nev
$2800. Call aft
AAAA EAR!
City! Room wi
eludes 7 free pi
New Hotspot-Sc
coa Beach1
el.com 1-800-6
D(
FOR USEl
TOMMY
NAUTIC
POLO
ani;
SHIRTS, P
GOLC
� Stereos, (Syst
tv
(DRIVI
ONEC






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10
ihoppe
e
'irate Special
Wjoq
faircut
) SPECIALS
Burger $5.25
erk
alad $5.75
d $6.95
al Two $7.95 j
icken Skewers;
RANTEED
TITUDE
i corner
ily
eenuille
irfware,
sories.
IRT) 321-4884 :
ESSUCHAS: 2
ABONG
IEL
�,11 Thunday, October 16, 1998
classifieds
Th� East Carolinian
1
HERE SKATE 1
IN'TSTOP
FOR RENT
'ONE BEDROOM available at Players
'Club. $240 per month plus 14 utili-
ties. No deposit. 757-3627. Male pre-
ferred.
LANGSTON PARK Apartments:
$100 off deposit, 2 bedroom, 1 bath
apartments, watersewer included,
all appliances, washerdryer connec-
tions, over 900 sq. ft. Available now
$410. Call 758-1921.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$275month. Available now. Tangle-
i wood Apts 125 Avery St. Green-
ville. 758-6596.
ECU AREA 3 bedroom house. Cen-
tral heat, window air, ceiling fans,
washerdryer, just painted, spotless
inside. No yardwork. pets OK. $500
. month thru Dec. 830-9502.
FOR SALE
AAAAI EARLY Specialsl Cancun
& Jamaica! 7 nights air and hotel
from $3991 Includes free food,
drinks, parties! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
HELP WANTED
MOVING SALE: 2 bedroom suites,
couch, loveseat, sectional sofa, fu-
ton, desks and more. 931-0113
CAR FOR sale: 94 Ford Taurus.
White with blue interior. V-6. Excel-
lent condition. Loaded with car
Phone. $5,200. Call 756-9081.
WANTED: SOMEONE to sublease
an efficiency apt. in Ringgold Towers
beginning Nov. 1. Fully furnished
$288mo. For more info, call 752-
2518.
WILDWOOD VILLA, washerdryer,
dishwasher, 3 story. Call 752-8900
or 252-332-6783. Very affordable
and spacious.
Dapper
Dan's
Retro and Vintage Clothing,
Handmade Silver
Jewelry fc More.
417 Evans St. Mall 752-1750
CONDO FOR Rent: 2000 sq.ft. con-
do, newly renovated. 4 bedrooms, 2
12 baths, washerdryer hook-up.
Available immediately. 752-1899
daytime, 561-2203 pager nights.
WESLEY COMMONS South: $100
off deposit. 2 bedroom. 1 bath
apartments, watersewer included,
washerdryer, 6 blocks from cam-
pus. Available now. $440. Call 758-
1921.
HALLOWEEN
IS COMING
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
SERVICES
AAAAI EARLY Spring Break Spe-
cials! Bahamas Party Cruise! 6 days
$279! Includes most meals! Awe-
some beaches, nightlife! Departs
from Florida! springbreaktravel.com
1-800-678-6386
ROOMMATE WANTED
SEEKING FEMALE graduate or up-
perclassmen to share nice 2 bed-
room apartment. Half rent and half
utilities. Please call Stephanie, 439-
0230, for more information.
MF ROOMMATE wanted to share
2 bedroom, 2 bath townhouse in Tar
River, $282.50 month 12 electric,
12 phone. Wanted ASAP. Call 329-
7083.
HARDWORKING FEMALE student
looking for the same to share 2 BR
apt. $235 a month 12 bills at
Ringgold Towers. Free parking! Great
location! 758-6978
PLAYERS CLUB roommate needed
to sublease. $240 a month. First
month utilities Free! No deposit re-
quired. Washerdryer, own room
and bath. Call 756-7539 and leave a
message.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA IKY SPORTS
(919)49X224
DJ. FOR HIRE
NYC DJ. READY TO
HYPE UP YOUR PARTY
For all functions & campus
organizations
Call J.Arthur @ 252-412-0971
FOR SALE
AAAA! SPRING Break Travel was
1 of 6 small businesses in the US
recognized by the Council of Better
Business Bureaus for outstanding
ethics in the marketplace! spring-
breaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386
SCIENTIFIC CALCULATOR (T1-82)
$50. Very basic laptop with Wind-
ows $75. If interested call Stacey at
758-8788.
AKC DOBERMAN pups with shots
and dewormed. two males, one fe-
male, $100. Ask for Cameron, 752-
2204.
PIANO: YAMAHA Clavinova
CVP83, like new. disc drive, 88 keys,
$2800. Call after 6 p.m 321-6889.
AAAA EARLY Specials! Panama
City! Room with kitchen $129! In-
cludes 7 free parties! Daytona149!
New Hotspot-South Beach $129! Co-
coa Beach $149! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
NUTRITIONAL SUPPLEMENTS
25 off. Don't get ripped off at
the mall. All major brands of-
fered. Call and compare. Person-
al training and nutritional con-
sultations from a proven certi-
fied personal trainer. Call Todd
413-6156.
ECU STUDENT Technicians needed
to provide technical support for ev-
ents held in Mendenhall Student
Center and Wright Auditorium. Tech-
nical support may include setting up
sound equipment, projection equip-
ment, stage unloading and loading
of trucks for major touring compa-
nies, and maintaining technical
equipment. Become a part of an ex-
citing team and fun-filled at-
mosphere today! Apply in person at
the Mendenhall Student Center Job
Board.
1 SPRING Break company is now
hiring motivated individuals to prom-
ote America's best Spring Break va-
cations. Sell trips, earn cash, go free!
1-800-234-7007 www.endlesssum-
mertours.com
SPRINGBREAK. CANCUN, Florida.
Jamaica, South Padre. Bahamas,
Etc Best hotels, parties, prices.
Book early and save Earn money
trips! Campus repsorganizations
wanted. Call Inter-Campus Programs
1-800-327-6013 222 www.icpt.com
YOUTH BASKETBALL Coaches.
The Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department is recruiting 12 to 16
part-time youth basketball coaches
for the winter youth basketball pro-
gram. Applicants must possess
some knowledge of the basketball
skills and have the ability and pa-
tience to work with youth. Applic-
ants must be able to coach young
people ages 7-18, in basketball fun-
damentals. Hours range from 3 p.m.
until 7 p.m. with some night and
weekend coaching. This program
will run from the end of November to
mid-February. Salary rates start at
$5.15 per hour. For more informa-
tion, please call Ben James or
Michael Daly at 329-4550 after 2
p.m.
YOUTH IN-LINE Hockey Coaches.
The Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department is recruiting part-time
youth In-Line Hockey coaches. Ap-
plicants must possess some knowl-
edge of the hockey skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 5-18, in
hockey fundamentals. This program
will run from early October to mid-
December. Salary rates start at
$5.15 per hour. For more informa-
tion, please call Ben James or
Michael Daly at 329-4550 after
2PM.
PART-TIME Instructor needed Mon-
Thurs. afternoons to provide individ-
ualized instruction in a positive learn-
ing environment. Individual must be
competent in reading and math. Cer-
tified teacher preferred, but not re-
quired. Pick up application or send
resume to Sylvan Learning Center,
PO Box 1297, Kinston, NC 28503.
ARE YOU a female graduate stud-
ent? Live in position available, bene-
fits including: free room and board,
free parking and a monthly stipend.
If you are interested, please call 758-
5568.
ABSOLUTE SPRING BreakTake
2" 2 Free Trips on Only 15 Sales
andEarn $$$$. Jamaica, Cancun,
Bahamas, Florida, Padre! lowest Pric-
es! Free Meals, Parties & Drinks.
"Limited Offer 1-800-426-
7710www.sunsplashtours .com
CASHIER TELLER needed imme-
diately. Work 6-20 hours per week.
Work on Thurs. andor Fri. only.
Must pass criminalcredit check.
Send resume to PO Box 493, Tar-
boro, NC 27886.
IN-LINE Hockey Rink Attendant. The
Greenville Recreation & Parks De-
partment is recruiting individuals
with some background knowledge
with in-line hockey. Applicants will
be responsible for overseeing both
the skateboard park and in-line hock-
ey rink at the Jaycee Park. Salary
rates range from $5.15 to $6.50 per
hour. For more information, please
call Ben James or Michael Daly at
329-4550 after 2PM.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU �. ,�,�
L A 5 rl sad �howl Coodjeaw,
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TIMBERLAND
ABERCROMBIE
EDDIE BAUER
TOMMY HILFIGER
NAUTICA
POLO
AND OTHER NAME BRAND MEN'S CLOTHING
SHIRTS, PANTS, JEANS, SWEATS, JACKETS, SHOES, ETC.
WE ALSO BUY AND SELL:
GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
QUICK, EASY, HELPFUL
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
414 S. EVANS (UP THE STREET FROM CUBBIES)
752-3866
TUESDAY - SATURDAY, 9:00 - 5:00
(DRIVE TO THE BACK DOOR BEHIND PARK THEATRE)
ONE OF THE FAVORITE STUDENT STORES FOR YEARS
(IF YOU ARE SELLING, ID IS REQUIRED)
MAKE EASY money! Go on Spring
Break for Free! USA Spring Break off-
ers Cancun. Bahamas, Jamaica, and
Florida packages and is currently ac-
cepting applications for campus
sales representatives. Call 1-888-
SPRINGBREAK.
WANT EXPERIENCED rider in
huntseat or dressage to ride and
help maintain a green warmblood
cross. Located near hospital. Call
752-6752 for information.
1993 INTERNSHIPS! Attention un-
dergraduate business students. Now
interviewing on campus for manag-
ers across Virginia, North and South
Carolina for summer of 1999. Aver-
age earnings last summer $7,000.
Call Tuition Painters at (800) 393-
4521 or e-mail at tuipaint@bell-
south.net
BANQUET AND waitstaff needed.
Day and evening shifts. Experience
preferred but not necessary. Apply in
person, Ramada Plaza Hotel. No
phone calls please.
CRUISE SHIP Employment - Work-
ers earn up to $2,000month
(wtips & benefits). World Travell
Land-Tour jobs up to $5,000-
$7,000summer. Ask us how! 517-
336-4235 Ext. C53621
THE ANIMAL Emergency Clinic is
interviewing veterinary techni-
ciansassistants for full and part-
time positions. Must be available
nights, weekends, and holidays. Sal-
ary and benefits based on experi-
ence. For more information, call 355-
3825 or stop by the clinic.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT - Fishing
industry. Excellent student earnings
& benefits potential (up to
$2,850mo. RoomBoard). All
skill levels. Don't pay outrageous
agency fees! Ask us how! 517-336-
4171 ext. A53621
HELP WANTED
EARN WHILE YOU learn, up
to$1,000.00 wk. Day and night
shifts. Claan, secure working at-
mosphere. Playmates Adult En-
tertainment. 282-747-7686 for in-
terview.
FREE CD Holders. T-shirts. Prepaid
Phone Cards. Earn $1000 part-time
on campus. Just call 1-800-932-
0528 x 64.
GREENVILLE RECREATION and
Parks Department will be holding an
organizational meeting for all those
interested in officiating in the winter
adult basketball league. Position
pays $12-$ 15 a game. Clinics will be
held to train new and experienced
officials. However, a basic knowl-
edge and understanding of the
game is necessary. The meeting will
be held Monday. October 26. 1998
at 7:30 p.m. at Elm Street Gym. Ex-
perience requirements, clinic sched-
ule, and game fees will be dis-
cussed. For more information,
please call the Athletic Office at 329-
4550 between the hours of 2-7p.m
Monday thru Friday.
DRUMMER LOOKING for band
to play original music. Call Bryan
at 524-5712.
LOSE WEIGHT while you sleep!
100 natural. Minister Mimms lost
30 pounds in 5 weeks. Dr. Hack-
worth lost 38 lbs. in 8 weeks. I lost
6 12 inches in 2 months. Call Cin-
dy at 919-736-7131.
GREEK PERSONALS
CONGRATULATIONS TO Racheal
Royall, Amanda Smith, and Audra
Kennedy for being accepted to nurs-
ing school! Love, your Delta Zeta sis-
ters
CHI OMEGA would like to congratu-
late Jen O'Connor on winning
Homecoming Queen. We're so
proud of you!
ALPHA DELTA Pi would like to
thank Dr. Schneider for all his help
making our new web page. You are
the best advisor and we all love you
very much!
LAMBDA CHI, thanks for an awe-
some social last Thursday. We had a
blast and can't wait to do it again
soon. Love, the sisters and new
members of Alpha Xi Delta
THANK YOU to Tommy Price for
representing us on the Homecoming
court. You did a great job! Love, the
sisters and new members of Delta
Zeta
GREEK PERSONALS
CONGRATULATIONS TO Michelle
Nixon on your Phi Kappa Psi lavalier
from Lee! Love, your Delta Zeta sis-
ters
ANNOUNCEMENTS
PERSONALS
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA Phi
on your victory in flag football last
week. Good luck in your next game.
Love, the sisters and new members
of Alpha Phi
CONGRATULATIONS TO Kelly
Woodell for making the top 25 in the
Miss Hawaiian Tropic Contest. We
are so proud of you! Love, your Delta
Zeta Sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS TO Alpha
Phi's sister of the week, Kendra
Latham and new member Erica Har-
tley. Keep up the good work girls.
Love, the sisters and new members
of Alpha Phi
SIGMA NU: Thank you for an awe-
some social last Thursday. We had a
blast and look forward to getting to-
gether with you again! You guys are
great Love, the sisters and new
members of Pi Delta
CONGRATULATIONS ANDREA
Long and Kelley Kauff for getting
into nursing school. We love you
guys! Love, the sisters and new
members of Chi Omega
SISTERS AND PLEDGES of Epsilon
Sigma Alpha, we hope everyone has
a great fall break. We love you!
ALPHA PHI would like to congratu-
late Jen Mock on doing an excellent
job with Parent's Weekend. Love,
the sisters and new members of Al-
pha Phi
PI DELTA Big Sisters love their new
Little Sisters. We are proud of you
guys! Keep up your hard work
FLAG FOOTBALL way to go on a
great season. We are so proud of
you. Love, the sisters and new mem-
bers of Alpha Xi Delta
HAPPY 21 ST Birthday Jennifer Den-
ton! I hope you have a great day to-
morrow. You are a Super Pi Delta Lit-
tle Sis! Love, your Big Sis, Anne.
CONGRATULATIONS TO Kendra
Latham on doing a great job plan-
ning homecoming. Love, the sisters
and new members of Alpha Phi
DELTA ZETA would like to thank
everyone who attended our spaghet-
ti dinner and helped make it a great
success.
THANK YOU, Chi Omega, for work-
ing with us on all homecoming ev-
ents. We had a great time and hope
to continue the tradition. Love, the
brothers of Sigma Alpha Epsilon
PI DELTA sisters and new members
hopes everyone has a safe and fun
Fall Break!
TAU KAPPA Epsilon, thanks for
showing our parents a good time
last weekend. Love, the sisters and
new members of Alpha Phi
ALPHA OMICRON Pi. thanks for
the great time Sunday night. Your
girls looked great and we are going
to do it again! Love, your Daddies
SPRING BREAK 99! Cancun' Nas-
sau Jamaica 'Mazatlen ' Acapulco
' Bahamas Cruise ' Florida Florida �
South Padre. Travel Free and make
lots of Cashl Top reps are offered
full-time staff jobs. Lowest price
Guaranteed. Call now for details!
www.classtravel.com 800838-6411
SPRING BREAK - Plan Now! Can-
cun. Jamaica, Mazatlan. & S. Padre.
Early bird savings until Oct. 31st.
America's best prices 6 packages.
Campus sales reps wanted. Earn
free trips cash. 1.800.SURFS.UP
www.studentexpress.com
FRESHMEN, IT'S time to Make
Your Mark at ECU. "Become involved
on campus" "Meet other student
leaders" "Build your resume' "Make
new friends' Register for Emerging
Leaders. Applications available now!
Need more info? Then call us, 328-
4796.
VISIT THE Wall-Alcohol Awareness
Week, October 26-31 at Wright
Place. See how alcohol has affected
penoie's lives. Monday through
Thursday, 11-2.
RESIDENT ADVISOR applications
for Spring positions due Oct. 16 in
100 Jones Hall. Applications avail-
able in Housing or at any residence
hall coordinator office.
COUPLES FELLOWSHIP on Satur-
day, October 17 at 10 a.m. at Com-
munity Christian Church, located at
1104 North Memorial Drive in Green-
ville. All married couples are invited
to attend the meeting ministered by
Pastor James and Sister Delores Cor-
bett. This ministry is designed to
provide godly fellowship and preach-
ing to married couples in order to
equip and strengthen godly marriag-
es. For more info call 551-9143.
PASTOR JAMES D. Corbett of
Community Christian Church will be
hosting the Amazing Grace Program
on Thurs Oct. 8 at 7 p.m. This pro-
gram is designed to minister to
those surrounded by. involved in or
overcoming the drug culture. Every
Thursday at Community Christian
Academy, 2009 Pactolus Road.
Greenville. 551-9143.

I
ADVERTISE IN THE
CLASSIFIEDS
328-6009
IT WORKS!
Advertise in The East
Carolinian classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE $4.00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional words 50 each
STUDENT LINE AD RATE$2.00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional words 50 each
Must present a valid ECU ID. to qualify. The East Carolinian reserves the right to refuse
fhis rate for any ad deemed to be non-student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE$1.00
add to above fine rate for either BOLD or ALL CAPS type.
All classified ads placed by individuals or campus groups must be
prepaid. Classified ads placed by a business must be prepaid unless
credit has been established.
Cancelled ads can be removed from the paper if notification is
made before the deadline, but no cash refunds are given. No proofs or
tearsheets are available.
The Personals section of the classifieds is intended for
non-commercial communication placed by individuals or campus groups.
Business ads will not be placed in this section.
All Personals are subject to editing for indecent or inflammatory
language as determined by the editors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue
We reserve the right to change a deadline for holidays
or as necessitated by other considerations.
The East Carolinian is located on the second floor of the
Student Publications Building, across from Joyner Library.
j
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ADVENTURES
Cape Fear CanoeKayak Day Trip
1114 Trip 7am-6pm Adventure Center
Reg. Deadline: 116 by 5pm
Spring Break Scuba Cruise
312-319 Bahamas
Reg. Deadline: 111 by 5pm
Advanced Climbing Session � 3x
1027-128 Tues.7pm-8pm Adventure Center
Try Scuba - 2x
Mil 7pm-10pm SRC Pool�
Reg. Deadline: 1026 by 5pm
ARISE (
Adapted Sports Day Pre-event Social
1016 7-9:30pm SRC
Adapted Sports Day 1998
1017 10am-4pm SRC
Weights and Cardio Workout
7-8:30pm SRC Fitness Area
21-i:
mill
Tuesday 7v.
012 1026
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SRC riassrnft
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114
SR
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�on-3 Basketball Re jistration mtg.
127 5:00pm MSJ244
ig BUBHHHHtion
iards Registration deadline
3 5:00 pm SRC 128
liards Tournament
14 8:00 pm MSC
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RECREATIONAL
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:328-6387
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a breeze. Where available, you can use
your credit card or personal checking
account to start your coverage.
We've been offering dependable,
affordable coverage for over 60
years: Now you can join more than 3
million diners who've already switched
to a car insurance company rated A
I'Superior) by A.M. Best Co leading
analysts ol the insurance industry.
Till out the savings comparison
chart on the hack and call GEICO
at 1-800-882-7222 to find out
how much you may save And do
j something sensible with the
extra money - like pay
off your college loans.
now
DIRECT





Use this chart to see what GEICO
could saue you on your car insurance
YOUR CURRENT COVERAGEYOUR CURRENT PREMIUMGEICO PREMIUMYOU SAVE
Bodily Injury: Per Person Per OccurrenceCAR1 CAR 2.

Property Damage: Per OccurrenceCAR 1 CAR 2�
Personal Injury Protection or Medical Payments: Per PersonCAR 1 CAR 2

Uninsured Motorists. Per Person Per Occurrence Prppert) DamageCAR 1 CAR 2�
Comprehensive (Your C ar): DeductibleCAR 1 CAR 2

Collision (Your Car): DeductibleCAR 1 CAR 2'�
Rental Reimbursement: Per DisablementCAR 1 CAR 2
Government! mplovces Instirdnu (o � Gt.lt 0 General huunmce c �� �GI ICOIndcmnm to � GtrlCOt atttaln v. rhese shareholder-imTiedwinpanioJn not alhliatai �1th the!Government GHtO auto inMiranietsttol available in MA 01 ill ICC) Wi-lunci, ii in 20070GEICO SAVES YOU THIS MUCH$
Call GEICO today at 1-800-882-7222 for a live quote. We'll give you a line-by-line rate
comparison with your current coverage so "you can see the savings. Where available, you can use
your MasterCard, VISA. DiscoverCard or personal checking account lor instant coverage: For
better service when you call, please have your current policy and all vehicle identification
numbers and driver's license numbers hand)
all 1-800-882-7222, U hours a day. for a great ualue on car insurance, j
Or check the yellow pages tor a local office near you
DIRECT
( id out anil kiv in ow walkl





Experience Target Pharmacy
16o2549
Styles shown, reg. 19.99-29.99
COSTUME BOO-TIQUE LICENSED
COSTUMES. 15 oft all adults' and kids' Disney,
Sesame Street, McDonald's, Barbie, M&M s, Super-
heroes and more, reg 14 99-3999,12.74-33.99
m.
I
mm
�0.49


Pumpkin Hollow1" Dept. Due lo the ujaionalih of Hattoween merchortdi�





Due to the seawnolily of Pumpkin Hollow
Dept. merchandise on these 2 pages,
we cannot issue rain checks and reorder.





Experience Target Pharmacy
Girls' and toddler
girls' dress shoes.
Other styles,
sale 11.99 & 12.99
Shoe Depl
Gerber theme
blanket sleepers.
� Matching cap, bib or
booties, sale 3.39 each
Infants' ond Toddlers' Depl











Experience Target Pharmacy
CIKX OI.ATi:
CUPCAKES
1
JL 13-oz. bile-size harvest
r wrap candy by Hershey
and M&MMars. These
Each, sale shown and more.
New at Target!
22-ct. Rice Krispies Treats
Mini Squares. A non-chocolate
treat in a size perfect for
Halloween handouts.
Due to the seasonality of the Halloween merchandise on these 2 pages, we cannot issue rain checks and reorder





OUR LOWEST
PRICE OF THE
SEASON!






Experience Target Pharmacy
A BEDTIME STORY BYXHIURATION.












Experience Target Pharmacy
A BEDTIME STORY BY XHILARATION.
Sale
Xhilaration'
lounger.
lingerieIntimate
Apparel Dept
Honors single-pack rights.
Sheer-to-waist or control-top style.
Honors single-pack socks.
Ankle or trouser style. ,
Reg. 3 (or 5.97





OUR LOWEST
PRICE OF THE
SEASON!






Experience Target Pharmacy
A BEDTIME STORY BYXHIUARATION.
Q99
f Sale
Honors single-pack rights.
Sheer-to-waist or control-top style.
Honors single-pack socks.
Ankle or rrouser style.
.3 for 5.97





our lowest
PRICES






Experience Target Pharmacy
Nesco 6-qt. roaster oven with nonstick,
removable cookwel I No 4)161430
WestBend 5-qt. slow cooker with
removable crock. No 84405
Rival 4-qt. Crock-Pot with removable
crock, sale 19.99 No. 3154GR






our lowest
of the seSDnJ-
Sale
ANY SIZE HARVEST
TABLECLOTH.
Autumn Diary or
Ravenswood pattern.
Available in sizes
52x70" oblong, 70" round,
60x84" oblong or oval,
60x102" oblong and
60x118" oblong.
� 2-pk. napkins, sale 1.99
� Set of 4 napkin rings,
reg. 9.99, sale 7.99
i.
:
Gold and
Ivory Plaid
off
Gold and ivory tablecloths, patterns
shown. Available in several sizes.
Reg. 9.99-29.99, sale 8.49-25.49
� Vienna Gold placemats, runners, napkins
and napkin rings, reg. 1.99-9.99, sale 1.69-8.49
Also on sale: Vienna Silver pattern.
" M
�TARGET
V EXPECT MORE. PAY LESS.
10
V Placemat, reg. 4.99
Elegant satin and velvet table settings.
� Velvet table runner, reg. 19.99, sale 17.99
� Satin napkins, reg 2.99, sale 2.49 ea.
Both are 100 polyester
� Napkin rings, reg. 2.99, sale 2.49 ea.






Experience Target Pharmacy
me more thai
ption. Take ho
01II
Jr ffaaAMCLCp






ev
us
e- a pharmacy or heal
product purchase at 'Target, you help
children who are undergoing treatment
for life-threatening diseases at
s�jude. Children's Research Hospital.






At Target Pharmacy, we build
relationships on trust.
What is trust? Trust isn't just about taking orders or filling prescriptions. It's about taking time with each and
every guest. It's about answering questions, about your medication or anv health concerns vou mav have.
It's about peace of mind. You can always depend on Target Pharmacv to offer a wide selection of health care
products, but what we're most proud of is our relationship with our guests. At Target Pharmacv, you can trust
us to take care of your health needs, so all vou have to do is take care of vour shopping.
We're the pharmacy with theTarget store all around it.
�TARGET
Tared Pharmacies arc not located in all Target stores.
's easy to transfer vour presc rin
mi iinotriLT pharmacv usl call us or
on r nri'MTipt ii
Expires 111498
Present this coupon along with any new
or transferred prescription to be filled
at Target Pharmacv' and receive a
$10 Target Gift Certificate
Limit ont S "Ttiiiidif per coupon, one coupon per jpiesl Reproductions not
accepted I his umpvii mav Oflly be redeemed at target Pharmacv Otter not good
tor prescriptions tr.tn-tcnvd irom other target More Void where prohibited bv law
No cash value According to f-cdr-ral Law oticr not valid a anv portion ot prescnp
tion is paid lor rn a government pcugrum Ca�hicr. L�e gift certificate key. Enter
gift rertin. Jif amount tor SID. Scan coupon
�TARGET
85239"�7361
III
5 (8101)0 01473 1198
Visa nas guaranteed a $100,000 minimum conation to Target House related to Visa card sales transactions
August 30 through October 24,1998 Vend wneie prohibited by law Target lias guaranteed a $100,000
minimum donation to Target House related to Target Guest Card sales transactions t'om August 30 through
October 24.1998. Void wfiere prohibited or restricted. The Target Guest Card is a credit card issued by
Retailers National Bank. Subject to credit approval.





Target Pharmacy Special Offers
Motrin
Extra Strength
Tylenol
X49
VjEach
100-ct. pain relievers.
Motrin IB or Extra Strength Tylenol.
SNCESTANT I
"c��T
24-ct. cold medicine.
Tylenol Cold or Sudafed.
II�M
�" rDM
UlhfnV
Advil
(.old & Sinus
-TEach
Cold medicine. 40-ct. Advil Cold & Sinus;
8-oz. Dimetapp or Robitussin DM.
VjEach
30-ct. antacids. Zantac 75, Pepcid AC
or Tagamet HB 200.
2-oz. Rogaine Extra Strength for Men.
5 Minoxidil. Results as early as 2 months
Accu-Chek
dvil
SOUBaUWHCAPSUlfS S0l
sctw-Grf Pain Reliever Fever Reducer
Ciotuies advanced medicine for pain"
6"
New at Target! 80-ct. Advil Liqui-Gels.
Solubilized ibuprofen capsules.
�29
15.2-oz.
Head&
Shoulders
2-in-l
shampoo.
Shampoo plus
conditioner.
�nsodyne
Senspdyne
2J7
4-oz. Sensodyne toothpaste for
sensitive teeth.
mNEQDAY
W. Essential
EMoneSdayIWjrin.
�UKbcti
�flf7iY�m$
i.$m- SiiSiUS.
Multivitamins. 80- to 130-ct. One-A-Day
or 60-ct. Flintstones.
.Each
Band-Aid bandages. 20-ct. antibiotic
regular, 20-ct. antibiotic Xtreme Colors
and more.
SortMuip
417
Accu-Chek Advantage electronic diabetes
monitoring kit. Includes 10 test strips.
100-ct. Accu-Chek test strips, sale 49.99
Target Pharmociei are not located in all Target stores. Advertised price good through Saturday, October 24,1998.
15-oz. Softsoap
refill.





Bissell 12-amp
PowerClean upright
has microfiltration,
9-ft. self-retractin
hose, on boar
tools and more
5inus;
s
Day
I
BONUS HAND VAC
WITH PURCHASE!
99
Low Price
Dirt Devil 12-amp Ultra MVP.
HEPA-type filter, on-board tools
and more. No M08922ORC
99
129
I Mmm W Low Price
Dirt Devil 12-amp
MVP Swivel Glide with
patented swivel casters,
on-board tools and more.
No MO86420RC.
79"
f f Low Price
Bissell Little Green
Clean Machine.
Deep cleans carpet
and upholstery spills
and stains. No 17201

Buy either of these
Dirt Devil uprights and
get a free rechargeable
hand vac, a $24.99 value!
No M0820 Items ore poclraged
together Offer good only on the
models shown while quantities last
Pur water filtration systems
remove cryptosporidium and
giardia, reduce lead,
chlorine and bad tastes.
� Piir Ultimate faucet mount.
Sale 39.99 No fm40io
� 2-gal Pur Plus dispenser,
sale 37.99 no ds izoo
� 14-gal, Pur Plus pitcher.
Sale 22.99 no cr-700
Pur Plus faucet-mount system
not shown), sale 34.99
No FM3000.






Target Pharmacy Special Offers
9773
� Sale
Solid wood shelving.
6-shelf unit is 69Hx31 Wx12D"
4-shelf unit (not shown is 64Hx31 Wxl8D"
Solid wood rolling box.
Assembly required for shelving
14
73
Each,sale
KV heavy-duty
steel shelving.
5-shelf, 16" depth or
7-shelf, 12" depth.
High-back steel
step stool.
Assembly required for shelving
45-gal. Rubbermaid
wheeled trash can.
� 32-gal. Rubbermaid wheeled
trash can, 9.24
12





3
24
Sale
All items on llm page can be found n
our HardwareHome Improvement Depi
13





Target Pharmacy Special Offers
OUR LOWEST
PRICE OF THE
SEASON!
GreaHand' youth fleece
sleeping bag with clear vinyl
backpack. 29x60 100 double
brushed polyester. Sporting Goodi Depl
19
j

id

14
beautiful
4-in-l mai
Fi Hy assei











Target Pharmacy Special Offers

FREE CDcartridge
wallet with purchase
of NFL Blitz game for
PlayStation. Coupon
is on wallet.
Offer good while quantity
lasts. See Electronics
Department for details.
39.99 Low Price
Wild 9
16
PlayStation V3 racing wheel
has 300� wheel rotation, adjustable
positioning, programmable Fire buttons.
� V3 racing wheel for N64, sale 39.99
39.99 Low Price
Madden NFL '99
39.99 Low Price
NHL'99
39.99 Low Price
NASCAR '99
22.99 Sale
Megaman X 4
49.99 Low Price
Parasite Eve
swum js"m
44.99 Low Price
Tenchu: Stealth
Assassins
3
19.99 Price Cut
Resident Evil
Director's Cut






Includes rewinder
139
99
Price
:L'99
MEMOREX 4 head hi fi
VCR with rewinder. Has front
AV inputs, clock display and
remote control. No MVR4040
Price
?9
Price
lolth
Cut
ril
lut
Cut
PANASONIC
900-MHz cordless
phone with handsel
locater, 10-number 1-touch
speed dialing and handset
volume control. No KXTC901-B
Digital
Answerer
Price Cut, was 169.99
UNIDEN 900-MHz digital answerer with
Caller ID. Features speakerphone, auto call return
and handset pagerfind. Black or white. No exai�i8
Caller ID ond Call Woiling services musl be purchased separately from
local phone company
17





Target Pharmacy Special Offers
I
NTERTAINMENT
COMING ATTRACTIONS
Available Tuesday, October 20
11.88 Deana Carter, 11.88 Jonny Lang, 11.88 2-CD Aerosmilh.
Everything's Gonna Wander Thii World A Little South of Sanity
Be Alright (Live)
COMPUTER SOFTWARE
29.99 Sale
39.99 Sale
zgrnmK3
llll'11- I1 1 T1 VirusScan

99
obric Ci
fabric ref
odors, 2C
includes (
7.99 Paramount 7.99 Sony 13.95 Fox
9.99 Warner
2
fo
j Finesse c
1 shampoo
ling aii
Ooei not incli
8
Free stickers
in &t fov "Pirn
Little ghosts and goblins can create
T their own trick-or-treat sack with
funny stickers that can be used
with our Halloween shopping bag.
Get yours free at the checkout lane.
Otter good while quantity fasts.
59.99 Low Price
69.99 Sale
24.99 Sale
5
Sale
New af T
deep com
aircolou

Seutrt
Shan
Q4
Ocacr,
Neutrogc
shampoo
15 offal
18





abric Care. 16.9-oz Febreze
fabric refresher safely eliminates
odors; 20-oz. Downy starter kit
includes dispenser ball.
2J5
Finesse or L'Oreal Vive
shampoo, conditioner and
:ling aids. Various sizes.
Does not include 25.4-02 size.
New at Target! L'Oreal Feria
deep conditioning permanent
;aircolour gel.
Q49
V'Each, sale
Meutrogena. 6-oz. anti-residue
shampoo or 8.5-oz. body lotion.
15 off all other Neutrogena.
LLZjJI
CinchSak .
wrrrrr
4
99 &
Each
5-oz. Glade Simple Escapes
aromatherapy candle.
� 4-oz. Simple Escapes
aromatherapy spray, sale 1.79
Hefty Value Packs. 35-ct
30-gal. CinchSak, 90-ct.
13-gal. TwistTie and more.
Cat care. 30-lb. Fresh Step
cat litter or 183-lb. Friskies
Ocean Fish cat food.
Bonus offer good while quantity lath
Skin lotion. 13-oz. Curel or
16-oz. Lubriderm, including
new Daily UV lotion.
Skin care by biore. 6-ct Pore
Perfect deep cleansing nose or
face strips; 5-oz cleansing gel
and more. Health & Beouty Aids Oepl
1-gal. Ocean Spray.
Cranapple, cran-raspberry,
cranberry juice cocktail
and cran-grape.
19





Target Pharmacy Special Offers
Cheer laundry detergent.
42-load powder, 100-oz. liquid
or 33-load powder with bleach.
�ruf i
MA ERS
Leather suede slippers.
� Other men's and women's suede
slippers, reg. 14.99, sale 12.99
.for J Sale
Motfs. 6-pk. apple sauce
in various flavors or 64-oz
apple juice.
for sj Sale
SnaclcWell's. 5.5-oz. Zesty Cheese
snack crackers, 6.75-oz. Devil's
Food cookie cakes and more.
0991
J Exceptional Price
Pumpkin Masters pumpkin
carving kit. Creative pattern
book and tools.
Advertised sale prices good October 18-24,1998 at Target, Target Greatland and SuperTarget. To find the location of the nearest Target, call toll-free 1-800-800-8800.
�TARGET
Apply
today.
We also honor
Marshall Field's, Dayton's,
Hudson's, DiscoverNovus, VISA,
MasterCard, American Express and
debit cards. ATM available.
0 TARGET
OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 8 AM TO 10 PM.
SuperTarget in Lawrence, Oicthe, Overland Park and Shownee, KS open 7 am to midnight Pharmacy, portrait studio,
QuickPrmts photo, optical and bonk hours, where applicable, vary.
Every Target supplement i recyclable. Help protect our environment Printed in USA
Exceptional Price, Price Cut ond Low Price iterrti are
at everyday low prices If a Target store, Targe'
Greatland or SuperTarget regularly sells an item
below the od price shown, you will receive the lower
price at mot store Regular prices may vary locally on
certain Herns We reserve the right to limit quantities
to normal retail purchases Torgel Guest Cord
quoted monthly payments are subject to approved
credit, sales tax and, on account balances below
$200, a $20 minimum payment The Target Guest
Card is issued by Retailers National Bank
Newspaper Advertising Supplement �1998 Targe'
Stores A Division o( Dayton Hudson Corporation


Title
The East Carolinian, October 15, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 15, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1298
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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