The East Carolinian, October 8, 1998






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www.tec.ecu.edu
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Answer in next week's TEC
Carolinian
Pirates look to
extend
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to four
Saturday
Sports, pap 10
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8 ,1998 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 15
Fleming sentenced for
Medical Foundation scam
Three months, $60,000
restitution ordered
Steve Lose?
NEWS EDITOR
Van Fleming was sentenced to three
months in prison Monday and ordered to
pay $60,000 in restitution after pleading
guilty to charges of abetting embezzle-
ment and conspiracy to embezzle funds
from the ECU Medical Foundation.
Fleming received a five year suspend-
ed sentence along with special condi-
tions. He was
ordered to file finan-
cial statements
while he is on proba-
tion. If the prosecu-
tion chooses, the
amount of restitu-
tion can be
increased to the
amount of $177,700.
Fleming will begin
to serve his jail sen-
tence at a time to be
determined by his probation officer.
"It's a standard sentence for that type
of crime Attorney General Pat Murphy
said.
yutyutyutyu
PH0T0 COURTESY OF
GREENVILLE P0
Former Medical Foundation presi-
dent and Fleming conspirator Robert
Adams had confidential knowledge of
the Medical Foundation's upcoming
land acquisition plans. He hired
Fleming and the two worked together
to set up several dummy companies.
According to Mike Ball, attorney for
the Medical Foundation, the first trans-
action was conducted under the name
of GRK Associates, Inc. GRK sold a
piece of land to the Medical
Foundation and made a profit of
$450,000. A second, under the name
Maid Marian, Ltd netted Adams and
Fleming $385,000. In each instance,
the corporations completed the transac-
SEE FLEMING. PAGE 3
Homecoming Court finalists
announced at reception
King, Queen to be
named at halftime
Caroline: JoriaN
STAFF WRITER
ECU'S 1998 homecoming
court was named at a recep-
tion in Mendenhall Monday
night, narrowing the lead to
sixteen candidates who are
vying for the titles of King
and Queen.
"I think this is a milestone
for this year's candidates
because they are the first
homecoming court to be
voted on by internet said
Sarah Henderson,
Homecoming Committee
Chair. "I wish them all luck
and I am very excited for all of
them ,
Tht 1998 King and Queen will
be named on Saturday during half-
time.
Guest speaker at the reception
Was Phillip Home, ECU's associate
vice chancellor for Alumni
Relations. Home recognized the
Peaceful plaza
Since construction completed, the sonic plaza has been full of gathering crowds, children playing on the
steps and students hurrying into Joyner Library. Moments of quiet are few at campus' newest public area.
Members of the Homecoming Court gathered at a reception in Mendenhall Monday. Among the court are
the King and Queen who will be announced Saturday during halftime of the Homecoming Game.
PHOTO BY KIM McCUMBEP,
Most Outstanding Alumni, includ-
ing Mark Kemp, former senior edi-
tor for Rolling Stone and current
vice president for Music
Development at MTV, and
Kevinam, Williamson, "Dawson's
Creek" producer as well as screen-
writer for Scream, Scream 2, and I
Know What You Did Last
Summer. Also in attendance will be
Ronnie Barnes, head trainer for the
New York Giants; Michael Shane,
consultant to President Clinton;
Dr. Claud Hughes, a reproductive
science specialist; Lee Holt with
the U.S. Postal Service; J.B. Daris,
furniture industry executive; and
Harold Jones, professor emeritus at
the ECU School of
Music.
"Alumni are looking
for a way to make a
meaningful contribution
to those who come after
them Home said.
This year's theme is
"Purple Pride Through
The YearsRetro '70s,
'80s, and '90s
"The Purple Pride
part of the theme was
kind of for the Alumni,
and the retro part was for
the students said Sage
Hunihan, Homecoming
Committee member. "It
will be interesting to see
how each organization
interprets it
Queen candidates for this year
are Jennifer O'Connor, represent-
ing ECU Pan Hellenic Council;
Mary Ruth Davis, of Gamma
Sigma Sigma service sorority;
Angela demons, representing
ECU Chapter of the NAACP;
Allysun Singletary, representing
SEE HOMECOMING PAGE 2
Changes deter
non-visitor parking
Warcen chosen for first Joyner award
Senior Amanda Maready pays a parking meter in the Fifth and Harding lot. Many stu-
dents have had to find new places to park due to the shorter meter time.
PHOTO BY STEVE10SEY
Work teaching adult
off-campus students honored
D E V O N W II I T B
STAFF WRITER
Dr. Louis Warren, an elementary and middle
grades education professor, has been awarded
the first Max Ray Joyner award for Faculty
Service through Continuing Education for his
work in teaching adult, off-campus students in
Craven County.
"He is one of the most student-oriented, car-
ing faculty members on campus said Dr.
Marilyn Shear, dean of the School of Education.
Warren began his work with off-campus stu-
dents in 1995 when the Division of Continuing
Education developed a new program to offer
classes in Craven and Carteret counties. The
program was designed to
help students who could
not commute to the ECU
campus complete their
undergraduate degree
courses by taking classes
in Havelock and
Morehead City. Warren
describes the program as a
way of "reaching out" for
the students. Many of the
students have full time
jobs and families, so they
are very appreciative to
have a teacher come to
them.
"He is genuinely inter-
ested in the students in
and out of class said
senior Amanda Gamer,
student and advisee of Dr. Warren.
Warren refers to the off-campus students as
"ideal students" and said that they work hard
Two hour meter limit
shortened to one
Dr. Louis Warren teaches elementary and
middle grades education courses.
PHOTO BY KIM McCUMBER
and always give their best.
The Max Ray Joyner
award was initiated in 1997
during ECU's celebration
of offering continuing edu-
cation programs throughout
the region for 50 years. It is
named after Max Ray
Joyner of Greenville, a for-
mer chairman of the ECU
Board of Trustees.
Twenty-four other faculty
members were also nomi-
nated for this award. Diana
Henshaw, director of the
Division of Continuing
Education, said Warren is
"very representative of the
off-campus students
The nominations were
submitted by off-campus students and the final
decision was made by the Continuing
SEE WARREN, PAGE 4
Steve Losev
news editor
Parking and Traffic Services
reported that the parking lot at the
corner of Fifth and Harding Street
has seen less students and staff
and more visitors since the time on
the parking meters was shortened.
The maximum time for the
parking meters in the Fifth and
Harding lot was shortened from
two hours to one on September 21.
The lot was originally intended to
be used by visitors and students
who had to make brief visits to the
campus. However, Parking and
Traffic Services found that stu-
dents and staff were using the lot
to park their cars during classes.
"It's helped the turnover in that
lot a great deal said Pat Gertz,
director of Parking and Traffic
Services. "People were using the
lot that weren't intended to
People who visit departmental
offices and need to stay longer
than one hour can receive a visi-
tor's parking permit from Parking
and Traffic Services. The permit is
good for one day.
"What we established those
meters for were for visitors to the
campus to use Gertz said.
"Students and staff used them,
and it defeated the purpose of the
lot
When the changes to the
meters were made, eleven spaces
were reserved for visitor parking
only.
"You're still able to use the
meters Gertz said. "It's just that
long-term parking is unavailable
Some students expressed frus-
SEE MITER. PAGE 2





1
2 Thursday. October 8, 1998
news
Tin Em Cifolinim
-
news
briefs
Police check for
illegal merchandise
BRAND NAME
BARGAINS!
Bombs left at
Fayetteville abortion
clinics
FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. (AP) -
Bombs were found Saturday out-
side two abortion clinics previous-
ly targeted by arsonists.
A device consisting of several
sticks of dynamite, a detonator and
a timer was found near the front
door of the Carolina Women's
Clinic in the morning, sheriffs
officials said.
About three miles away, anoth-
er bomb was discovered outside
the Hallmark Women's Clinic.
Police refused to release addition-
al details about the device.
Hog plant fined for
ruptured pipe
TAR HEEL, N.C. (AP) - The
N.C. Department of Labor has
fined Smithfield Packing
Company $6,300 for a July acci-
dent in which a pipe ruptured and
injured four people.
Four people were sent to the
hospital after the 18-inch pipe that
carried hog bones and fats explod-
ed when excessive pressure inside
caused it to rupture.
Labor inspectors investigated
the blast for almost two months
and then issued two citations
last week.
NCpenalties among
tougfest in country
St'SANNE MlLENKEVICH
STAFF WRITER
Greenville and ECU police officers
will keep an eye out for unlicensed
ECU merchandise outside of
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium while
ECU battles Alabama-Birmingham
this Saturday.
"People try to sell unlicensed t-
shirts and hats out of their trucks or
vans in the parking lots and outly-
ing areas ECU Police Chief
Teresa Crocker said.
The sale of unlicensed merchan-
dise is a felony according to a North
Carolina law that was enacted in
1995 against counterfeiting mer-
chandise.
"The North Carolina law about
counterfeiting is one of the tough-
est in the country and is used as a
model by other states assistant
athletics director Lee Workman
said.
According to Tom Younce, assis-
tant director of the ECU Police
Department, the sale of unlicensed
merchandise up to $3,000 in retail
value is a Class 2 misdemeanor
which means a maximum fine of
$1,000 and 60 days in prison. If the
retail value is from $3,001 to
$10,000, the charge becomes a
Class I felony that has a maximum
of 10 years in prison. From $10,001
and up it is classified a Class H
felony that carries 20 years in
prison.
The sale of counterfeit merchan-
dise is also a violation of the Anti
Counterfeit Consumer Protection
Act. This is a federal offense that
carries a maximum 20 year sen-
tence.
No one has been arrested at
ECU for counterfeiting merchan-
dise since the state law was enacted
in 1995. The few people who were
cited had under $3,000 worth of
merchandise so were only charged
with misdemeanors.
The sale of unlicensed merchan-
dise directly hurts ECU in two
ways, according to Lee Workman.
"ECU does not receive a royalty
SEE MERCHANDISE. PAGE 3
pnnection
' Division of U.B.E.
210 E. 5th St.
758-8612
M-S 10-6
Sun 1-5
Master Plan guides
campus development
Clinton calls for work
against global crisis
WASHINGTON (AP) - Calling
for more work to ward off a wors-
ening global economic crisis,
President Clinton says he wants to
build a new financial system that
reduces risk so countries can safe-
ly benefit from free capital mar-
kets.
Clinton was presenting his
ideas Tuesday at the opening
annual meetings of the
International Monetary F"und and
World Rank, which bring together
financial officials from 182 nations.
Lite rac
:v bill
Senat
bill passes
e
WASHINGTON (AP) - A bill to
help voung children learn to read
cleared the Senate on Tuesday in
time for President Clinton and
Republicans to claim another leg-
islative achievement for schools
this election season.
The bill - a compromise
between separate measures
approved earlier by the House and
Senate - was passed by a voice
vote. It goes to the House.
ECU at midpoint of
three phase plan
A m v Sheridan
staff WRITER
ECU is halfway through the second
phase of the Master Plan, which
was first developed in July 1992.
The intent of the master plan is
to guide and facilitate the growth
and development of the university
through approximately the next ten
years. In 1992, ECU was given a $5
million bond from the UNC-sys-
tems General Assembly to assist
with the costs of campus renova-
tions. Since the Master Plan was
implemented, it has provided the
university with a well-defined set of
guidelines for future campus devel-
opment.
The four major goals contained
in the Master Plan are to create a
distinguished campus environment,
provide for the functional needs of
all campus users, establish and
maintain an ongoing planning
process, and strengthen relation-
ships with the city of Greenville.
The first stage of development,
which was allotted a five-year peri-
od for construction, included the
building of the Student Recreation
Center, the renovation of the
Joyner Library, and the building of
Todd Dining Hall. The first stage
of development was completed
before the five year deadline,
paving the way for the early begin-
ning of the second phase.
"The most impressive thing is
when you go through the Master
Plan and see how much has been
accomplished in such a short time
said Richard Brown, vice chancellor
for Administration and Finance.
The second phase of develop-
ment includes designing the
Student Health building, expand-
ing Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium, and
making notable improvements on
one of the science and technology
SEE PLAN, PAGE 3
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US diplomats leave
embassy in Tajikistan
MOSCOW (AP) - The last diplo-
mats have left the U.S. Embassy in
Tajikistan, where work has been
suspended because of concerns
about terrorism, the ITAR-Tass
news agency reported Saturday.
Clinton sends military
contingent to Sierra
Leone
WASHINGTON (AP) - President
Clinton says he has sent a U.S. mil-
itary contingent to Sierra Leone to
help with possible evacuations
from Liberia.
In a letter to congressional lead-
ers, Clinton said he ordered a
stand-by force of about 30 military
personnel to go to Freetown, Sierra
Leone, to be ready to evacuate
American citizens from Liberia's
capital, Monrovia.
Homecoming
continued from page 1
Sigma Sigma Sigma; Amy Garner
from Alpha Delta Pi; Lindsay
Muller, representing Cotton and
Fleming; Shannon Hooks, of
National Student Speech,
Language and Hearing Association;
and Carey Craig, representing
Lambda Chi Alpha.
King candidates for this year
include Eric Gabriel, representing
Jones Hall; Jon Strickland from
ECU Ambassadors; Josh Lake, rep-
resenting the American Marketing
Association; Dennis Norton, from
Student Union; Tommy Price of
Delta Zeta Sorority; Joshua
Beardsly, of Cotton-Fleming Hall;
Jonathan Cray, representing
National Speech, Language and'
Hearing Association; and Peter
DiBernardo, representing Chi
Omega.
Meter
continued from page 1
tration at the changes to the meters.
"I don't usually park here, but
when I do, it's a nuisance student
Lynn Boyd said. "The meters need
to be more than an hour, because
students use them during classes
Students sometimes worry about
returning to the lot before time
expires after a long class.
"Even if you go to only one class,
the teachers usually hold yu over
sophomore Sean Stevens said.
"Most of the time you can't get out
of here in an hour
Gertz emphasized that the lot is
still open to students.
"If you have to go to the student
store, or the registrar, or the cashiers
office, or Whichard, you still can,
but only for an hour Gertz said.
Students who used to park at the
Fifth and Harding lot frequently
have been forced to alter their park-
ing habits.
"I used to park here often
senior Amanda Maready said. "I
just spent 45 minutes looking for a
parking space. It's ridiculous. You
can't even find a parking space and
this was one of the few places you
could. All these plans they ECU
come up with and none of them
seem to consider the students N
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i Em Cifolinim
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Thi Etit Carolinian
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Fleming
continued from page 1
tions in less than a day.
The company that conducted a
third transaction was not implicat-
ed in the case.
'There was an anonymous call
in December of 1995 to the State
Auditor's hotline Ball said.
"Adams was suspected of double
billing reimbursments for travel
expenses
The investigation led to closer
scrutiny by auditors for the state
and ECU that uncovered the land
transactions.
Adams accepted a plea bargain
for his charges in July and was
given a seven year suspended sen-
tence. Adams was also ordered to
serve a five month jail sentence
and pay restitution to the Medical
Foundation in the amount of
$197,000.
"The sentence was the state's
recommendation in light that he
cooperated and was willing to tes-
tify against Adams Murphy said.
"Adams has already made a
$115,000 payment
Adams is expected to complete
the restitution payments he was
ordered to make.
The Medical Foundation has a
civil suit pending against Adams
and Fleming.
"It's about more than money
Ball said. "The Medical
Foundation's reputation has been
damaged. We've made great
strides to get our house in order
and recoup the damages
Fleming was unavailable for
comment.
Plan
continued from page 2
buildings. This phase is sched-
uled to be completed in the mid-
dle of 1999.
"The early completion of the
second phase has a lot to do with
the strong leadership shown at this
university said Bruce Flye, direc-
tor of Facility Services.
The final phase of the ECU
Master Plan has already started to
be implemented. Currently, the
university is beginning its
attempts to find a company that
specializes in campus planning, so
the third and final phase of the
Master Plan can be drawn out and
accomplished. Meetings will be
held in December to decide the
parameters of the third phase.
The university is still waiting
for a new $200,000 budget from
the General Assembly of the UNC
system. Focus groups have already
begun to form, and the Master
Plan is expected to be completed
within the next ten years as
scheduled.
Merchandise
continued from page 2
Watch for TEC's
latest publication
Ml I Iwnwwit HajHPi �" Ua iMM
prnMnkem
rrtuf
from counterfeit merchandise so it
loses money Workman said,
"Also, the logos are not recognized
as good taste by the university
Workman said that there is no
way of knowing how much money
ECU has lost from the sale of unli-
censed merchandise. Because peo-
ple were made aware of tins illegal
merchandise when the matter first
arose, the problem is now decreas-
ing.
"Legitimate merchandise
should have the red, white and
blue official seal that says 'officially
licensed collegiate products'
attached to it Workman said.
While officers won't make spe-
cial efforts to target counterfeit sell-
ers at football games, looking for
them is part of their routine respon-
sibilities.
"Finding counterfeit merchan-
dise is not our number one problem
on game day Crocker said.
The ECU Student Media Board invites
applications for the position of
Day Student Representative
for the 1998-99 academic year.
Applications are available from the Student Media
Board office on the second floor of the Student
Publications Building.
The deadline for submitting an application is
Tuesday, Oct. 20 at 4 p.m.
For information, call the ECU Student Media Board
office at 328-6009.
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4 ThurtiUy, Octobir 8, 1998
news
The East Carolinian
Warren
continued from page 1
�-Education Committee of the
Faculty Senate.
This is a well deserved award.
Louis Warren is a truly caring and
conscientious teacher and adviser
fsaid Dr. Parmalee Hawke, director
I bf Teacher Education.
v;
Warren has been at ECU for
nearly five years. In 1994, after
completing his doctorate at the
University of Georgia, he joined
the School of Education. He also
has a master's degree from UNC-
Pembroke and a bachelor's degree
from UNC-Chapel Hill. Warren
chose ECU because it has a repu-
tation as being a leader in the field
of education.
"I feel honored to be teaching at
ECU Warren said.
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It's that time
On the horizc
Hordes of alum
only one thing.
Homecoming
learn more aboi
come off smoot;
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on the future.
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campus since th
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Once you're I
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still plenty mon
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scheduled to pt
enjoy.
Hopefully, E
of the Homecoi
Pirates have an i
continue with a






Wmgfmsmmmmam SefRB
ast Carolinian
5 Thur�d�. Qclohar 8 Iflflg
opinion
Th. fill nnliniin
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eastcarolinian
AMY L.ROVSTER Editor
HEATHER Bl'RGESS Managing Editot
STEVE LOSEV News Editor
Amanda Austin Features Editor
JASON FEATHER PhotoEdiiot
TRACY M. LAUBACH Sports Editor
MARIO ScherhaIIFER AssisiMSpotTs Editor
CHRIS' KNOTTS Stall Illustrator
STEPHANIE WlllTI.OCK Ad Design Manager
JANET RESPESS Advertising Managii
BRIAN WILLIAMS layout Manager
Bobby Tiigclk vVebmastet
Seivino 'he ECU community since 10, the test Cnotinian pubttstm 11,000 copies eveiy Tuesday mil thuisdir The leer) eonwiel in each edition is Die
opinion ot the Iditontl Boaid the East Ceioliman welcomes letieis to till ednot limited to 760 wonts wtiicti may be edited loi decency oi bimty. the East
Cuohniin leseiees the rigtw to edit oi (eieci leneit loi publication AB tellers most be sgned teneit should be addressed to: Opinion edltot .the Eatl
Carolinian Student Publications fluiktino, ECU. Cieenvilla. ??BS8A3S3. Foi inlonnatton. cell 919 VS 6366
oumvw
It's that time of year again.
On the horizon you can hear the booming of marching bands and the rumbling of parades.
Hordes of alumni are zeroing in on Greenville, armed with fistfuls of memories. It can mean
only one thing.
Homecoming is here, and it brings with it many opportunities for students to have fun and
learn more about the school. A lot of time and effort has gone into ensuring that the events
come off smoothly. This year also marked the first time that the voting for the Homecoming
Court was done online, showing just one way ECU remembers the past while keeping an eye
on the future.
This is one of the few times when ECU is lucky enough to have so many alumni coming
back. Even those who graduated just a few years ago will marvel at the many changes to
campus since their college years. While they are here, take a few moments to talk to some of
them and learn a little bit about what life at ECU used to be like.
Once you're through with that, check out a few of the events around campus to celebrate
this week. Even if you missed the events during the first half of Homecoming week, there are
still plenty more things to do. Coming up is a pep rally, a parade, the crowning of King and
Queen, and, of course, the Homecoming football game.
There will be plenty of entertainment for everyone to enjoy at the Piratefest pep rally. The
Marching Pirates, Pure Gold dance team, and the gospel choir are among many others
scheduled to perform. Anyone who goes there should be able to find a little something to
enjoy.
Hopefully, ECU students don't need any encouragement to go to this game. The tradition
of the Homecoming game is as much a part of the South as grits and sweltering heat. The
Pirates have an outstanding winning record of Homecoming games that will, with a little luck,
continue with a victory at Saturday's game against the University of Alabama-Birmingham.
OPINION
Columnist
Stephen
JLEINSCHMIT
Computer requirement necessary
know a lot of people don't
like computers. Just think
how hard it was for my 50-
year-old mom, to learn how
to use a computer. When she
went to college, it was
considered high tech to have a
solar calculator!
To all those of you that run away
from modern technology as if it
were laced with Anthrax, a new day
of educational endeavor is upon us.
Many colleges nationwide are
requiring all incoming freshmen
and students to purchase a
computer. Western Carolina and
Virginia Tech are just two southern
colleges who have made this leap.
And since ECU is probably trying
to move up on the list of the most
wired (or weird) college campuses
nationwide, I believe that it is
imminent in the next two years
that we are going to do the same.
I support this requirement. If
you are supposed to be smart
enough to study at a university, you
should be proficient at using a
computer. I was happy to buy my
computer last year, instead of
having to go to the Aycock
computer lab where my computer
would crash on an hourly basis. I
also liked playing around on it. I
had a Budweiser screen saver that
had the frogs on it, but I had to take
it off because I kept on getting
awakened at 3 a.m. by those frogs
goingBudWeiseEr.
I know a lot of people don't like
computers. Just think how hard it
was for my 50-year-old mom, to
learn how to use a computer. When
she went to college, it was
considered high tech to have a solar
calculator! Let's face it, in any
college major you are going to have
to present your work in a
professional manner, a feat easily
accomplished by a computer. Even
your old buddies from high school
who went to the nearest podunk
community college have had to use
computers for their classes, even if
they have their associate degrees in
TVyVCR repair or gun repair.
I support everyone being on the
internet. I have met people on the
net that I didn't even know I was
related to. I met a guy named
Helmet Kleinschmit that turned
out to be my great uncle. He lives
in Berlin, Germany, not a part of
the United States, even though
someone at a party tried to
convince me that it is. I can also
find information on time travel
theory, investing, and obscure
historical figures that professors
assign reports on. Basically, with so
much information at my finger tips,
why would I need to walk through
the annoying sonic tragedy and go
to Joyner Library where books
are obsolete before they even hit
the shelves?
Got something to say? Need somewhere to say it?
Bring your letter to eastcarolinian, located on the 2nd
floor of The Student Publications Building
OPINION
Columnist
Marvelle
SULLIVAN
ECU deserves equal funding
Why should ECU not receive
the same funding as other
schools? How are we suppose
to raise the bar while
maximizing present potential
if we have to compete with
schools that not only possess a
better reputation, but are also
are more attractive because
of their relatively larger
cashflow.
ECU's Board of Trustees has
admitted that because of ECU's
"academic reputation we do not
receive as much state funding as
other universities such as UNC-
CH and other Triangle schools.
Students in the Eastern part of the
state have, on the average, lower
SAT scores which predicts a lower
academic ability and potential at
college.
While the correlation between
lower SAT scores, student
performance, and lower university
funding may be coherent at first, it
is actually quite ludicrous! Why
should ECU not receive the same
funding as other schools? How are
we suppose to raise the bar while
maximizing present potential if we
have to compete with schools that
not only possess a better
reputation, but are also are more
attractive because of their
relatively larger cash flow. Yes,
excellence should be rewarded and
recognized, but state schools are
state schools. There should not be
a large disparage of the monetary
allocation among state schools.
Whatever inequity that exists
should be based on the population
of the universities. Since ECU is
one of the largest universities in
the state, the funding should be
very comparable to NCSU, UNC-
CH and ASU.
The aforementioned points are
derived from the theory that ECU,
when compared to other
universities may not measure up,
but this really isn't the case. Our
schools of medicine, nursing, and
art (just to name a few) are among
the top in the state�and nation.
ECU's average student GPA is
rising a tenth of a point ever year.
While that may not sound
remarkably outstanding, it is
definitely a feat despite the
mysterious rise's cause. What
ECU lacks is a bold and prominent
public relations approach. We have
the academic "goods" but we just
don't sell them very effectively.
ECU students and parents pay
taxes just like any other
university's students and parents.
Likewise, we deserve the same
funding as other schools. Our
legislators need to recognize our j.
university's accomplishments and
merits and in return allocate money
to us accordingly, even if they do "
not feel that ail schools are worthy
of equal tax dollars. We do not J
need to concede to be treated I
unfairly in this matter. An intense
push for more recognition will ,�
improve the quality of future
applicants and thus, the education
students receive. This will result '�
in benefits for our faculty, staff, and i
of course, students.
OPINION
Ryan
Kennemur
Columnist
Vagrants need to get off their bums
Call them what you will.
Bums, hoboes, wastes of life.
It's all the same really, and
the bottom line is that they
have enough initiative to come
up to absolutely anyone and
ask for money. But they don't
have enough initiative to
clean themselves up and go fill
out a job application.
Opinion Time! This week's
column is about downtown, and
the crazies that inhabit it.
I don't know about you, but I
get hassled every time I go
downtown to visit the CD store or
to get some of those 20 cent wings
(excuse me25" cent wings.
What a sorry thing to do!)
Picture this. You're walking
along, minding your own beeswax,
and all of a sudden you start to hear
footsteps following the same step
pattern as yours. You glance
behind you, only to meet eye to
eye with a withered old man with a
doe-eyed look on his face. You can
guess what he's going to say to you,
but before you get to show him the
white lining of your pockets, his
toothless mouth opens to speak.
Out of his mouth comes a smell
that is normally associated with
paper mills and sewage treatment
plants, and a sentence.
His voice sounds like Bob
Dylan gargling hot asphalt. You
say something to the point of
"excuse me?" He repeats himself,
only this time louder. He says
"Hey man, do you have any
change you could lend me?" On
that note, isn't it funny how they
sometimes use the word "lend?"
Like they �re go'ing to remember
you on the street or take down
your mailing address to pay you
back for the 12 cents you so
humbly gave them.
Call them what you will. Bums,
hoboes, wastes of life. It's all the
same really, and the bottom line is
that they hav& enough initiative to
come up to absolutely anyone and
ask for money. But they don't have
enough initiative to clean
themselves up and go fill out a job
application. I think that as long as
they have enough self-confidence
to approach these people, they
should be hired as pollsters for the
next election. Then you'd hear'
something like, "Excuse me sir or'
madam, how would you rate
Mayor Jenkins' performance this
term? That good, huh? Okay,
wellhow about a couple bucks for
the effort?"
Don't think I am cold hearted.
I have given them money on
various occasions, never really
giving a thought to how they are
probably going to spend it. The
way I see it, if you want to do
something to help them, you
should just run into Cubbies and
get a hot dog and give it to them.
That way at least you know where
the money is going.
It's inevitable that there are
always going to be people that
would rather beg for money than
earn it. It is up to us as a
community to help these people
pick themselves off the ground
and make them valued members
of society. Until we do, we might
as well learn to live with the fact
that we are going to be approached
by these people that our parents
warned us about.

"Thenewshas become a matter of opinion Salman Rushdie Novelist
.A






6 Thuttdty, Octobtr 8, 1998
comics
The Em Cirolinim
Four Seats Left
Jason Latour Ants Marching
Victoria Kidd
Mike Litwin
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25 Off Your Entire Check At Darryl's
Just show your ECU student ID at the
Darryl's across from campus and get a 25
discount on your entire dinner check. Try our
famous Saucy Barbecued Pork
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r ECU students. So stop by tonight
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Does not include Alcoholic Beverages
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tt Carolinian
7 Thursday, October 8. 1998
features
The East Carolinian
toria Kidd
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Nicholas Km.apos
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At tyneti�wf��nei�Iswr�yqgi8 ago,
amphitheaters were the center of culti
imd remained so for many hundreds
years. And amphitheaters, just like the
Olympic games, are.one of the many tra-
ditions derived from the ancient world
that still survives today. Though the use
of the amphitheater in our modern world
has declined.
For many years amphitheaters were
attended by. the ancient Greeks and
Romans as a moans of entertainment and
social interaction. This ancient tradition,
though many modem amphitheaters can
be found'across the world, has made a
drastic decline, including here at ECl '�
Between the narrow passage oi
Clement and Fletcher halls, an amphithe-
ater can be found sheltered by a row of tall
bushes. The site which has remained at
ECU for a number of decades, though
beautiful to look at has rarely been used
for performances or activities and we are
now nearing a time when this amphithe-
ater too will decline, just as ancient
amphitheaters, when the construction for
the new west campus dining hall begins
The amphitheater, hidden behind a row of bushes between Clement and Fletcher Halls, has not been used for a formal production in nearly three decades.
PHOTO BY NICHOLAS KAIAPOS
and the amphitheater is removed.
Here at ECU, neither the music nor
the theater departments have taken the
opportunity to the utilize the amphithe-
ater here on campus, mainly claiming that
the area was too small for a production.
"We used it for rehearsals a few times
when the mall was booked said Carol
Pendcrgrass, Drama Professor. "It was
too small for anything else
The cultural center considered using
the amphitheater, but, "It never panned
out, probably because of the weather
That last known performance that took
place at the campus theater dates back to
the 1970's when a band named The
Association brought their show to ECU,
and played their hit song, Windy.
The role of the amphitheater and out-
side productions has taken such a drastic
fall that here on campus many faculty
members can not even recall when the
amphitheater was built, or why.
Stuard Aronson, a retired professor that
was with the university from 1971 until
1991, used the amphitheater for auditions
for his play, "Black Beard: Knight of the
Black Flag
"In my thirty years, the theater depart-
ment used it for nothing but auditions
though students sunned themselves there
during the summer Aronson said.
Amphitheaters have a long history
both in American and in ancient Greece
and Rome. They originated in Greece
to honor Dionysus and needed an area
that provided superb acoustics so that the
chorus, which was a part of a theater
production, could be heard in the audi-
ence. Therefore, sections of a hill would
be cut into semi-circular shape to provide
the needed effect. Seats were added and
the grade of the hill provided excellent
viewing. From these religious beginn-
ings sprang the wealth of tragedies
and comedies.
In Greece the works of many writers
such as Euripides, Sophocles and
Aristophanes could be viewed. Audiences
often times spending as many as ten hours
a day watching five or more performances.
Eater in Rome amphitheaters were
built by Pompey, Nero and many others
in various locations such as Nimes,
Verona, and Aosta.
These amphitheaters were elliptical in
shape with tiered rows of seats.
At one time amphitheaters held a pur-
pose. In the Roman Empire, the
Amphitheatrum was used for plays, fights,
public speeches, etc. Because of the large
cost of many of these events, many
amphitheaters in the Roman empire were
built near or attached to military bases and
used for parades, weapons training and
tactical training.
For many here at ECU the amphithe-
ater is a resting place on the way back
from downtown or a place to do home-
SEE THEATRE. PAGES
10 students attend leadership
workshop in New York
Activities aimed at
team work, leadership
Nicholas Kai.apos
stapp w rite r
Ten students involved with
leadership development at ECU
took a recent trip to New York to
attend workshops and ropes
training courses in leadership.
The ten students traveled to
State University of New York
(SUNY) at Ferdonia for three days.
"They set up a 'ropes' course for
us and we did a creativity workshop
for them then had a discussions on
how to bring what they had learned
back to our college and the commu-
nity said Jim Sturm, director of
student leadership development.
The purpose of a "ropes" course
is for building confidence and team
working skills. The course is usually
comprised of ropes
strung throughout
the trees with vari-
ous way that they
must be negotiat-
ed and once you
start you don't
touch the ground
again until you fin-
ish.
Ropes courses
arc intended to
create a strong
bond between the
participants and
create an environ-
ment of team
work.
Now that the
students have
returned to ECU
they arc working
to figure out
the best way to ser-
vice our school
and town with the
valuable informa-
tion the have
brought back
with them.
" W e
have weekly
and
Campus statistics below
national averages
Heather Burgess helps pull Jessica Seeley over a 12 foot
wail as Paul Kaplan and Chris Loga help push.
PHOTO COURTESY OF HEATHER BURGESS
10 students participated in the Leadership trip to New York.
PHOTO COUHTESY OF HEATHER BURGESS
meetings
are preparing to
send out informa-
tion to
various organi-
zations and
groups
Sturm said.
Those stu-
dents who
took part in
the trip were
sophomores,
juniors and
Seniors, but no
freshman.
"The stu-
dents had to
have complet-
ed either the
chancellor
leadership pro-
gram or the
emerging leaders program to
have been eligible for the trip
Sturm said.
The costs for the trip were
taken care of by both the leader-
ship development group and the
individuals who attended the
workshop.
According to Sturm, Student
Ecadership paid for the van but
the students paid for their own
food and lodging.
One of the members of
Student Ecadership, junior Paul
Kaplan, President of Delta
Sigma Phi he explained what
the group is planning to do now.
"Our group is working to be
qualified to run ropes courses as
well as coming up with
workshops we have a myriad of
ideas Kaplan said.
SEE NEW YORK. PAGE I
Phillip Gilfis
staff writer
How many times a week do you
think the average ECU student
consumes alcohol? Why do you
think they drink? How do you think
ECU drinking habits compare to
other campuses? These questions
and more were asked during the
Spring 1997 CORE Institute
Alcohol and Other Drug Survey,
and the results may surprise you.
Out of the 1200 students who
were given the survey, over fifty
percent responded. They answered
questions ranging from personal
alcohol use, drug use and their
opinions of alcohol use on campus.
"This survey is very important
said Donna Walsh, director of the
Office Of Student Health
Promotion and Wcll-Being.
"Alcohol use is a problem and this
information needs to get out to
the students
The survey results showed that
95 of ECU students abstain from
drinking from Sunday through
Wednesday. Another H47t reported
drinking once a week or less. When
asked whether they had been
involved in binge-drinking (drink-
ing five or more drinks in one
sitting), 34 of students replied
they had "in the last two weeks
During the thirty day period
prior to receiving the survey, stu-
dents revealed that 499B of them
Alcohol 1 choice among students
Many students choose to drink alcohol,
rather than engage in drug use.
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMBER
had consumed beer, 46 liquor and
26 wine.
"Based on what I've seen on !
campus, I don't believe this
survey said Jon Rogers, freshman. !
SEE ALCOHOL. PAGE 9
Tobacco, drugs rank below alcohol
Smokers 5 times more
likely to use drug
Erin Alderman
staff writer
While alcohol is the leading drug
used on college campuses, that
does not mean that tobacco and
marijuana are left in the dust.
According to a survey conducted
in 1997 alcohol use ranked first
place followed by tobacco and mar-
ijuana use.
61 of the students reported
trying tobacco at least once. 24 of
the
students
in the survey
said that they had
used tobacco at least three times in
the last week.
69 of students reported that
they hadn't used Marijuana in the
last year and only 5 had used the
drug three times in the last week.
But, marijuana still ranks third
place as the most popular drug
on campus.
Tobacco which contains the
addictive substance nicotine has
many negative effects on the
bodv. Nicotine has been linked to
coronary heart disease and may
increase the risk of death due to a
heart attack by 2 to 4 times.
Nicotine has also been proven to
cause emphysema, lung cancer and
chronic bronchitis.
Marijuana, the third most popular
drug on campus, is the most
frequently used illicit drug in the
I S.
Many times alcohol and marijuana
and tobacco are used together. One
out of every four young adults had
an alcoholic drink at the same time.
SEE DRUGS PAGE I
y Employer





8 Thurttfay. October 8. 1998
features
The East Carolinian
9 Thurtdi
New York
continued from page 7
Kaplan and other participants
felt that the most valuable aspect of
the training was the ropes course.
"The ropes course because it
really brought us together and I
was surprised at how well we
worked as a team Kaplan said. "I
learned how to make an organiza-
tion like this work on our campus
Though the the group has no
immediate plans to return to New
York they would like to plan a
trip to Appalachian State
University and do the ropes course
offered there.
The New York group also
expressed interests in return to
ECU again, which they visited
last spring.
Drugs
continued from page 7
Teamwork was the point of the ropes course at student leadership workshop.
PHOTO COURTESY OF HEATHER BURGESS
Young people are also five times
more likely to use pot if they are
cigarette smokers. Marijuana users
between the ages of 18 and 25 are
one and a half times more likely to
be male. 74 of marijuana users are
more likely to try cocaine.
Marijuana may have many
effects on the user by impairing
short term memory, concentration,
judgment and fine motor skills.
Memory loss may continue even
three to six months after marijuana
use is discontinued. Some studies
have even shown that the use of
marijuana during pregnancy can
lead to birth defects.
Feel like you're missing out on
all the fun?
Walsh said that the survey found
that while many students felt that
Across tie Miles is a meiff column mitten by several ECU
�nts dironicRngthir experiences abroad in a diary format.
00$
m
ija
International letter
For those of you who don not
know me, which is pretty much
everyone, my name is Blake
Norman. I have a major in phi-
losophy and hope to attend law
school after graduating from
ECU. A few semesters ago I
heard Dr. Linda McGowan
speaking to a group about inter-
national exchanges. I decided
that having "study abroad" on
my law school applications
would be quite helpful in deter-
mining my future success, so I
decided to go for it. So here I am
now a year later in England.
I just came into Leicester (pro-
nounced Leh-ster) two days ago.
The first thing I noticed about
England was immediately step-
ping off my plane it's cold.
Mind you 48 degree weather
isn't really bad, but I was wear-
ing short sleeves. After taxiing
my ggagc around Gatwick
Airport, which is huge, I caught a
coach to Leicester.
While sitting on the coach, I saw
much of the countryside. The
scenery was incredible�there
were large rolling hills that seemed
to extend into the distance forever.
There were countless farms and
pastures filled with sheep. As I
looked at the farms, I saw huge
manors which seemed out of place
in the middle of nowhere. I also
saw old broken down dwellings
that one would hope no one would
live in, but sadly that would be
mistaken.
In the cars that passed by I saw
families, couples, truck drivers�
real people�people that we forget
about living in the U.S. We dismiss
the English as being prudish, fair
skinned people who have bad
teeth. By sticking this and similar
stereotypes on another nation, we
dismiss the possibility of individu-
ality and we forget that each per-
son is real, with individual
Homecoming
VooK
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Same Week Sale runs October 6-10, 1998. Sale prices not valid with other coupons or discounts.
Not valid on previously purchased merchandise or on special orders.
everyone else was frequently using
drugs few, if any, actually reported
doing so.
The survey found that while
74 of the students thought their
peers drank 3 times a week only
17 reported doing so.
Walsh also said that according to
the survey 95 of ECU students
don't drink Sunday through
Thursday and of the students who
do, 25 drink on Thursdays and
75 drink only on the weekends.
Walsh also said that 18,000 stu-
dents can't fit downtown, so many
students are doing something else
and finding other ways to have fun.
Many students may not realize
the seriousness of the conse-
quences that can occur when a stu-
dent is caught with drugs or under
the influence . Not only are you
subject to state laws but may vary
well face punishment at the school
as well.
The disciplinary actions that are
taken by the school vary from
offense to offense. ECU's policy on
substance abuse says that, "for a
first-time offense involving the ille-
gal possession of any controlled
substance, such as Rohypnol, barbi-
turates or marijuana, the minimum
penalty shall be probation for a peri-
od to be determined on a case-by-
case basis The student must also
participate in a drug education and
counseling program, consent to reg-
ular drug testing and do community
service.
A second offense can lead
to expulsion.
Disciplinary action for the illegal
use or possession of alcohol vary
with the degree of infraction
and the circumstances involved.
Penalties may include, a warning,
probation, fine, community
service or the involvement in
an alcohol education andor coun-
seling program.
To spread awareness the
Department of Health Promotion
and Well Being will sponsor
Alcohol Awareness Week the last
week of October. One event
planned for Monday through
Thursday will be a "wall" in front of
the Wright Place.
Walsh encourages students to
stop by and write on a "brick" and
share how alcohol has affected their
lives or just stop by and read how
others have been affected.
Walsh also recommends that for
further information on drugs and
their effects you can pick up more
information available in pamphlets
around campus in the Joyner
Library, Health Center, General
Classroom Building or in
Mendenhall.
Theatre
continued from page 7
work, while others just talked.
With the destruction of the ECU
Amphitheater another piece of the
past dies. Will anyone miss it?
thoughts and feelings. Once we
realize this the world becomes
much larger.
My most startling discovery on the
coach trip was from neighbor who
was reading a copy of The Daily
Mirror. As I looked over his shoul-
der, I even saw seven, no I'm not
exaggerating, full pages devoted to
Bill Clinton's antics, which they
call "zippergate I was astonished
to see this much focus on an
American president in a British
paper.
The owner of the hotel I stayed in
knew all about the scandal in intri-
cate detail. This worried me for
two reasons. First, by the looks of
it, the world has picked up on the
president and is denouncing him
as a sexpot who can't be trusted. Is
this how we want the world to
view the U.S.? Second, British cit-
izens are more informed in US pol-
itics than American citizens, even
without a
scandal. If
you don't
agree, how
much do
you know about Tony Blair or the
Scottish separatist movement?
I am now in my dormitory,
Knighton Hayes. It is a converted
Victorian mansion that now houses
70 students. Only about four oth-
ers are in the hall right now as
courses don't start for two weeks.
There is no television or radio and
I am bored out of my mind. I'll
keep writing regularly, if only to
alleviate the boredom. If anyone
wants to know anything specific
about England or the study abroad
experience, feel free to email me
at jbn0319@mail.ecu.edu
Looking
for feature
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The East Carolinian
Monday through
: a "wall" in front of
iragcs students to
:e on a "brick" and
j has affected their
3 by and read how
1 affected,
commends that for
:ion on drugs and
i can pick up more
lable in pamphlets
s in the Joyner
Center, General
uilding or in
9 Thursday, October 8, 1998
features
Ths Eait Carolinian
atre
com page 7
ters just talked,
tion of the ECU
ither piece of the
tyone miss it?
Icing i i
jaturei
ters.
ce necessary )rs apply i GPA ZO and extra cashi i n j' '
he student
Idg. 2nd floor
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Homecoming '98
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Be the "first down" here and take
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Alcohol
continual! from page 7
ECU
Alumni Association
Inviting you to attend three special events for Homecoming'98
J�i2Z on the sonic Plaza; Friday, October 9 at 9PM: Free
Tailgate '98 at Pirates Cove, Saturday October 10,12:30 PM
Students $6. Make important career & social contacts with Alumni.
Alumni Party and dance, October 10 at 9PM
at the Ramada Plaza Hotel
The ECU Alumni Association salutes its sponsors:
Ramada Plaza Hotel Holiday Inn Express
Liberty Mutual Internet by Skantech
The Ad Agency of Greenville The Plaza Mall
Women's Health Center Davidson and Jones Hotel
BB&T Corporation
Fairiield Inn Rich Company of Bath
Sprint Willis Shaw, CPA
Call 328-6072 for Reservations
How to Keep Your Kids Free of Drugs.
Rule 4.
Set The Rules.
Kids need to know exactly what the rules are. The
rules have to be clear, consistent, reasonable. And
enforced. Every kid will try to find out exactly
how far he or she can go. And drugs are no place
for trial and error. To learn more about what kind
of rules to set and how to enforce them, call for a
free parents handbook.
Partnership for a Drug-Free
North Carolina �afcg
Partnership for a Drug-Free America
1 -888-732-3362
The statistics alone may not
seem like much, but when com-
pared to national standards, a clear-
er picture of ECU's drinking habits
comes into focus.
Comparing the on-campus
results to those of 45,632 other col-
lege students who completed a
similar survey between 1992 and
1994, ECU actually falls below the
national average.
"There are a lot of misconcep-
tions about ECU Walsh said.
"This survey helps show the reali-
ties of alcohol use on-campus
ECU and national averages are
the same when it comes to yearly
alcohol use. The results were also
similar about students who had
consumed alcohol on six or fewer
occasions during the last year. The
national numbers, which come
from the second Harvard School
College Student Alcohol Survey,
show some startling tendencies.
The number of students binge-
drinking is increasing, currendy it
stands at 38. The Harvard study
also showed a twenty two percent
increase in the number of students
who said they were drunk three or
more times in the previous month.
In addition there was also a thir-
ty three percent increase in the stu-
dents who say they drink with the
specific purpose of getting drunk.
In 1993, about 39 of students said
they drank to get drunk, and last
year that number jumped to 52.
ECU students gave many rea-
sons for why they drink. The top
reason given to drink was "to
enhance social activity Other rea-
sons, in declining order, include
"to have more fun "to break the
ice and "to get drunk Private
parties and restaurantsbars were
the most frequently cited places of
consumption.
The CORE Survey listed sever-
al "key findings" that attempted to
summarize their findings. ECU
students' drinking behavior is sim-
ilar to students nationwide.
Also, binge drinking is a prob-
lem for some students. The survey
further stated that alcohol contin-
ues to be the drug of choice here at
ECU. But in the end, it is shown
from the survey that drinking does
not play a significant role in most
student's lives.
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MAKE A DIFFERENCE - APPLY NOW FOR STUDENT INPUT OH THE





I
I
10 Thursday, October 8, I998
sports
The East Carolinian
ECU hopes for tenth straight homecoming win
Pirates to hostAUB
this Saturday
Travis Barki.ky
SENIOR WRITER
ECU will attempt to run its win-
ning streak to fout games on
Saturday when the Pitates host the
University of Alabama-
Birmingham.
A win against the Blazets would
be ECU's tenth sttaight
Homecoming win, dating back to a
1988 loss to West Vitginia, 30-10.
UAB (2-2) has proven to be danger-
ous in Homecoming games, post-
ing a 7-0-1 record in the program's
brief, eight-year history. The
Blazers are 3-0-1 as the visitors in
those games.
Saturday's game will become an
annual event when the Blazer foot-
ball team joins Conference USA
next season. UAB is already a
member of C-USA in all other
sports.
Even though UAB has been a
Division 1-A program for three
years, ECU head coach Steve
Logan says his team can't afford to
overlook the Blazers.
"They are light years
ahead of where you would
think someone could be
Logan said. "I told our
football team very point-
edly, if we fail to execute
in any form or fashion, if
we fail to improve that we
will get beat and get beat
fast
UAB's two losses have
come at Nebraska 38-7
and against Kansas 39-37
in four overtimes. The
Blazers have home victo-
ries against Tennessee
Tech 38-6 and SW
Louisiana 24-13. Just like
ECU's last two opponents;
Ohio and Army, UAB is a
ttiple option team. Logan
compared its offensive
scheme to that of Army's.
"It looks just like Army
except they're much more
sophisticated in the pass-
ing game Logan said.
ECU attempted to
recruit current Blazet quar-
terback Lee Jolly. Last
week Jolly was 11 of 21 for
yards and two touchdowns, I le
added 94 yards on the ground.
"Their quarterback, if you
Rushing
Jamie Wilson
eonard Henry
lyW
Pirate Leaders
Att Yds Avg TO
54 236 4.4
104 5.2 0
87 2.7 2
No
Yds
404
291
94
51
Avg
18.4
20.8
8.5
7.3
TO
2
2
0
Att-Cmp-Int Yds TO
53-35-2 381 4
50-28-2 i 512 2
Source: ECU Sports Information Dep
Pirate football looks to give fans something to cheer about this weekend as they take on AUB for the 1998
homecoming game. The win would be the tenth consecutive homecoming victory for the team
PHOTO BY MARC CHIPPEN
217 to categorize him, is a thrower first,
also runner second Logan said. "He'll
burn you with the pass, he'll hurt
had you with the run
"The good news is we've faced
it (the wishbone), the bad news is
that they're going to know how we
line up too Logan said. "We'll
just have to sec how
we handle it
Linebacker Jeff
Kerr wasn't too
thrilled when he
learned that UAB
would be bringing
the wishbone back
to Greenville.
"I'm tired of seeing that mess
Kerr said. "There are guys coming
out and trying to take your knees
out every play and you've got to
run sideline to sideline
Kerr, who leads the team in
tackles with 59, says he hopes this
is the last wishbone team ECU will
have to face.
"I thought we were finished
with it but I guess we'te not Kerr
said. After this week I'm sure we're
through with it. They throw the
SEE FOOTBALL. PAGE 13
Volleyball team falls short in
three games to Wilmington
Loss drops team to 2-2
conference record
Travis Barki.ky
s i:ior WRITER
The ECU volleyball team had its
two match conference winning
streak snapped Tuesday night as
the Pirates fell to UNC-
Wilmington in three straight
games.
The loss dropped the Pirates to
2-2 in the CAA, 7-10 ovetall.
UNCW improved to 6-12 overall,
Z-l in the conference. The match
was extremely close for the first
two games with UNCW winning
the first game 17-15. With the score
tied at 14 in the second game, a
controversial line call in front of the
Pirate bench went against ECU,
taking away a scoring opportunity.
The Pitates just couldn't get on
track and lost the game 16-14. After
the second game it was all
Seahawks as they completed the
sweep 15-6.
Head coach Kim Walker
declined t- comment about the
controversial call, one of several
close calls that went against the
Pirates. Walker said the difference
in the match came down to attack-
ing.
"They attacked the ball better
than we did Walker said. "I
haven't even see the stats but I'm
sure they out hit us. We blocked
about the same � we dug about
the same amount of balls. We've
got to find a way to terminate the
ball, and we just didn't terminate
the ball today
Sophomore outside hitter Liz
I lall said that there are no easy
games in the CAA.
"Everybody is pretty evenly
matched Hall said. "We played
hard but our hitting wasn't where it
needed to be
Sophomore Cinta Cla.ro led the
team with 14 kills, followed by-
Shannon Kaess with seven and
LuCinda Mason with six. Kaess is
the only uppcrclassman on a very
young and talented Pirate team.
Walker said with such a young
team, the play so far has been
inconsistent, but the focus is on
improving.
"We were hitting a little higher
at the beginning of the season
than we are now Walker said.
"We're getting better every day.
We're better than we were at the
beginning of the year
While the crowds at this year's
home games have grown, there is
still room for improvement.
Walker encourages fans to come
out and support the team.
"Its an exciting game Walker
said. "We're building a good team
here. Obviously we'te very young
but we're building a team that's
exciting to watch
ECU's next game will be on
the road against High Point on
October 10.
The volleyball team was not able to recover and dropped thtee games to UNCW.
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMMBER
Soccer drops
third game
Team Totals
K E TA PCT Assists Digs Blocks
UNCW 51 22 131 .221 48 53 9
ECU 36 25 125 .088 31 48 12
Official NCAA stats
Pirates hand 3-1 win
to Campbell
Mario Si,hIR 11 ai t i k
SSIS MS I 0I I s HIITUR
After falling behind early in the
first half, the XA men's soccer
team lost its third straight game at
Bunting I'icld to Campbell
University on liicsday afternoon.
The 3-1 loss drop the Pirates to I
7 on the season, while the �in gives
'�" I ighfin' Camel a tied record of
4-4-1
f.ampbcll sophoinotc K-ici
Haiany slatted (he turfing early
with a goal in ilie 4(li minim .iliri a
iiiikumiiiHiiination within VX'A s
defense LCI unkly iinl atni
tophomou- Seoti Pokotncy scored
hl� flfM al of flic season in flic
I'M) minim after an assist minimi
from Garland Gill
I luce iinnuie mi, L I
mnioi Hrian laylor unluckily
km keif lln lull mi Ins own goal
vM �iW (umi 'anpMh Brian
Ross following i Jong ilnow in
totm Hen Hiduil Pokotoey missed
I'V fist mm hM Ul ?' dt Ptraw a
tied half time
result.
Despite having
his broken left
wrist in a cast,
Wyatt Panos won
almost all headets
for the Pirates and
missed a few close
ones early in the
second half. The high pace contin-
ued throughout the entire game
with outstanding reflex saves for
both goalkeepers, but especially for
KOI Pa, Matt DcStcfano.
freshman DcStcfano played
the complete game with ten saves
on the day and thtee goals allowed.
I he Camels sealed the win in the
6Mth minute when senior Pasi
Kmiuri scored after ihc ball iiiilin k
ily bounced oil an 1,(1 i,�(, (�k�,
who slipped and was lying on die
ground ai (hat moment
"I'lfl pioml ul the way we lame
back so ijunkly afiei being down
again early in (lie first half, bin the
defensive lapse arc what cost us
tin win M I h, ad oa. h Will
Wlhcig said
l'� appears tii have antfemive
problem with having only stored
four goals in eight game. Three
games were lout by 0 I and iheu

Men's team bring in
strong recruits
T ODD T A L L M A D (J E
SPORTS WRITER
Men's Basketball Schedule
Court Authority-
Nick Errato battles his opponent fot possession of the ball.
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMMBER
single victory this season came
against Colgate, who is currently
ranked top-25 in the nation.
According to Wiberg, 'liicsdays'
match was an even game with a lot
of chances for EdI to tie the game.
"We played a .V5-2 formation with
three attacking midfielders con-
stantly pushing up forward, but
with having A. J. Gray out for the
year and with having Panos playing
with a cast, other players really
need to step up and score Wiberg
said.
One player who did make a
strong offensive note over the last
few weeks was junior midfielder
Hun Waiter,
"We had some really unfortu-
nate goals today, and we definitely
have to improve our game against
Richmond Waiter said.
Waiter, who wa moved up into
ui wceiii.ww I!
Global Sports All-Star'
@ Jacksonville St.
Nov 4 Wed
p.m.
Nov 9 Mon
p.m.
Nov 14 Sat
p.m.
Nqv-21 Sat ' a�3 Campbell
Nov 24.Tues 'SW Louisiana
Nov 28 Sat � - @ Liberty
p.m. j
Nov 30 Mon . Appalachian St.
p.m. ' ' . !
Dec 5 Sat . American
&
2:30
7 p.m.
7:30
2 p.m.
The men's basketball taam hat baen
training regularly for their
upcoming season.
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMMBER
With new faces and a new modi-
fied offense, the ECU men's bas-
ketball team has new hopes for a
new season.
The men's team lost four
seniors and three coaches from last
year's 10-17 team.
Tony Parham is finishing up his
degree at ECU, Dink Peters is
playing with the Harlem
Globetrottets, Raphael Edwards is
playing basketball in South
America, and Othello Meadows is
in Omaha helping with Boy's
Town.
The program was able to have
another good recruiting year to
take the place of these players.
Kenyatta Brown from Brooklyn,
N.Y. was ranked in the top 75 in
most recruiting magazines across
the nation, and has joined the
Pirates along with Evaldas Joeys
from Western Nebraska
Community College. This
Lithuanian was a consensus first
team All-Juco. The other new
freshman is Brandon Hawkins
from Morganton, N.C.
"These players have a great
work ethic but are young and inex-
perienced head coach Joe Dooley
said. "They all have the potential
to offer a great deal to this pro-
gram
The other new editions to the
program are new coaches Richard
Morgan from Hampton,Va Barry
Sanderson from UALR, and
Darren Savino from St. John's
University.
'The new coaches have adjust-
SEE BASKETBALL. PAGE 12
11 Thursday, Oc
Clt
k
250m
progrt
TODD
ST
Have you evt
lead a team tc
you feel you c
sports team?
wanted to pla;
competition?
what it takes,
your name.
The club
way for stude
organizational
along with ex
itiveness in us
the opportuni
practice times
ate run, and pi
the competitit
Gray Hodg
sports for recrt
gests that bein
is a good oppc
Fi
connn
ball a lot mon
the pass a litt
ECU's off
feted a slight
week's game
Bobby Weave
"Bobby's
Logan said,
down in the
he's not in cl;
him 100 mile
see how it go
Weaver at
Pirate offens
Blazet defen
reminds him i
"This footl
like us Lo
lean, they're
and they've g
players on del
Eui
Basketball ready to roll I pu
NYON, Switzi
European Chai
ing encountet
and the Repul
weekend will
security reason;
governing bod
Monday.
The match,
Saturday in th
Belgrade, has
NB
NEW YORK
canceled the f
games Monday
labor negotiatic
union.
"At this poir
possibly be n
games before I
commissioner I
a statement. "Ii
been unable to
ful negotiations
The next cc
session is set foi
said decisions c
cancellation i
games would tx
The league c
24 games.
Union offici.





11 Thundiy, Octohir 8, 1898
sports
Thi East CtroliniM
ilinian
vm
AvgTO
4.41
5.20
2.72
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18.42
20.82
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wm
you'vegot to
ic"
the team in
he hopes this
:am ECU will
I'ere finished
're notKerr
'm sure we're
:y throw the
lil 13
to UNCW
I Blocks
9
12
oil
ule
:30
' p.m.
30
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Hawkins
e a great
; and inex-
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: potential
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ans to the
s Richard
Va Barry
LR, and
t. John's
ve adjust-
12
Club sports program offers
leadership opportunites
250 students active in
program this jail
Todd Tallmadge
staff writer
Have you ever thought you could
lead a team to a championship? Do
you feel you could play for a college
sports team? Have you always
wanted to play against college level
competition? If you think you have
what it takes, club sports is calling
your name.
The club sports program is a
way for students to fine-tune their
organizational and leadership skills
along with expanding that compet-
itiveness in us all. The students get
the opportunity to plan their own
practice times, how the practices
are run, and prepare themselves for
the competition.
Gray Hodges, who oversees club
sports for recreational services, sug-
gests that being part of the program
is a good opportunity for ECU stu-
Football
continued from page 10
ball a lot more, so we're looking for
the pass a little more this week
ECU's offense may have suf-
fered a slight setback during last
week's game when quarterback
Bobby Weaver sprained his ankle.
"Bobby's ankle is real sore
Logan said. "He's just staying
down in the training room when
he's not in class. They're treating
him 100 miles per hour, we'll just
see how it goes day by day
Weaver and the rest of the
Pirate offense will be facing a
Blazer defense that Logan says
reminds him of ECU.
"This football team is built just
like us Logan said. "They're
lean, they're fast, they run well
and they've got some exceptional
players on defense
dents to be involved.
"These programs give
the students a way of over-
seeing their own team
Hodges said. "The leaders
of each sport come up with a
constitution for how the
team will be run. The team
then plans the practices,
which are usually three to
five times a week
Practices are held at the Student
Recreation Center or at the new
Blount Fields.
"We currently have over 400
students involved in both the fall
and spring semesters, with over 250
students participating this fall. The
club sports are open to all student,
faculty, and staff that are currently
enrolled or employed Hodges
said. "We feel that this will give
these students a chance at leader-
ship that they will need in the com-
munity
The clubs do most of the fund-
raising to support the teams, but
Recreational Services helps with
the equipment, transportation, and
finding locations for games.
One of those players is nose
guard Curtis Jeter. Jeter is tied for
the team lead in sacks with three
and leads the team with six tackles
for losses.
"They've got a nose guard on
defense that took the center from
Nebraska and beat him to death
for 60 minutes Logan said. "The
kid from Nebraska never blocked
him, ever. It's going to be a severe
test for Danny Moore
Moore says he welcomes the
challenge of facing Jeter.
"The guy is a real short, stocky
guy (5'11 290), real quick with a
bunch of moves Moore said.
"I'm going to have to really work
hard this week in practice to pre-
pare myself mentally and physical-
ly
Moore suffered a slight hand
injury against Army but says it
shouldn't hinder his performance
this week.
"It's just a little sprain, nothing
that won't be cured by Saturday
"We help get the teams started
and then leave it up to the leaders
to handle anything that comes up
Hodges said.
The men's lacrosse team has a
match this Friday against N.C.
State at 7 p.m. Another big date on
the club sports calendar is the
weekend of Nov. 6-8 for an all day
lacrosse tournament. On
December 5-6 the ultimate frisbce
tournament will be held.
If you would like to join a partic-
ular club or to find out more about
club sports, contact Recreational
Services at 328-6387.
Moore said.
Both Logan and the players
encourage the fans to pack the
stands for Saturday's game.
"I would like to extend a real
challenge to our fans to show up
this Saturday too Logan said.
"It doesn't matter who we're play-
ing, they need to come watch us
play. If we can get 40,000 last
week, we can get 41,000 this week.
Our players deserve that. We've
got a good football team to watch
Moore says a loud fan base does
make a difference.
"It's a great feeling to run
underneath those goal posts when
you have 40,000 people out there
cheering for you Moore said. "It
gives us twice as much energy,
twice as much adrenaline and
makes us play better
Kickoff is set for 3:30 p.m.
Euro 2000 qualifying match
put off for security reasons
NYON, Switzerland (AP) The
European Championships qualify-
ing encounter between Yugoslavia
and the Republic of Ireland this
weekend will be postponed for
security reasons, European soccer's
governing body UEFA announced
Monday.
The match, due to be played
Saturday in the Yugoslav capital
Belgrade, has been put off "in
view of the political situation in
Yugoslavia and the subsequent
effects at international level a
press release said. A UEFA
spokeswoman didn't give any fur-
ther details.
A new date and possible change
of venue will be set by the Euro
2000 organizing committee in con-
sultation with the Irish and
Yugoslav national soccer associa-
tions, UEFA said.
The corresponding under-21
match between the two countries
has been postponed for the same
reasons, the release said.
Last week, England called off
an exhibition next month at
Wembley stadium against
Yugoslavia because of the conflict
in Kosovo and the possibility of
military intervention.
NBA cancels preseason games
NEW YORK (AP) The NBA
canceled the final 90 pre-season
games Monday because of stalled
labor negotiations with the players
union.
"At this point, our teams cannot
possibly be ready to play any
games before November deputy
commissioner Russ Granik said in
a statement. "It's sad that we have
been unable to have any meaning-
ful negotiations
The next collective bargaining
session is set for Oct. 8. The league
said decisions concerning possible
cancellation of regular-season
games would be made next week.
The league earlier had canceled
24 games.
Union officials had no immedi-
ate response to the decision.
When they finally meet again,
the sides will have only a few days
to strike a deal that would preserve
the 82-game regular season sched-
ule which starts Nov. 3.
Once a new agreement is
reached, it will take at least three
weeks to sign players, make trades
and hold abbreviated training
camps.
But a quick settlement seems
extremely unlikely with the parties
so far apart on the main economic
issue.
The owners made their latest
proposal 10 days ago, still calling
for a system with an absolute ceil-
ing on salaries or a "hard" salary
cap. The union said the owners
I
included 16 pages of new demands
that hadn't been discussed in any
previous meetings.
"Our proposals would result in
an average player salary of more
than3.1 million and a minimum
salary for 10-ycar veterans of $
750,000 Granik said.
"Unfortunately, the union leader-
ship has been unwilling to give any
serious consideration to what we
have offered
Both sides await a ruling from
arbitrator John Feerick on the
union's grievance over whether
players with guaranteed contracts
should be paid during the lockout
Feerick's decision could come at
any time before Oct. 19.
Students show strong
response to new sports fields
Opportunites expand
for intramurals
Casev Rlshton
staff writer
The recently-opened William Gray
and Barbara Keck Recreational
Sports Complex is the newest
addition to ECU's commitment to
health and fitness.
The complex cost the university
approximately $1.6 million and has
been in the works since March
1995.
"It's been several years now
said David Gaskins, intramural
director for Recreational Services.
"We had hoped that they (the
fields) would be ready last fall ini-
tially, but with normal construction
delays, it was not completely fin-
ished until this vear
The necessity to build this field
came about with the expansion of
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium. The ath-
letic department decided to
change the former intramural fields
adjacent to the stadium into a park-
ing lot.
"We knew we were going to
lose the old fields with the stadium
expansion and we had to explore
alternate field options.
Cooperation with athletics allowed
us to keep using the old fields until
we were able to play on the new
ones Gaskins said. "The transi-
tion worked out perfectly
Students agree that the transi-
tion has gone smoothly as well, and
are pleased with the new facilities
that are now offered. Intramural
athletes in particular have reflected
very positive attitudes about the
new facility.
"It is a great thing. It's a lot of
fun playing on these new fields
said Dan Cheney, an intramural
flag football player.
Cheney's opinion is similar to
most recreational athletes who
find this new 12-acre complex a
vast improvement from the old
fields.
"This new complex is very nice
for the students. We now have the
opportunity to host extramural
tournaments, like the rugby tour-
nament that was held out there a
couple of weeks ago said Patrick
Daniel, a Recreational Services and
intramurals assistant and athlete.
Along with these positive
remarks, however, some students
have had questions about the new
guidelines for the facility.
"It's great, but it kind of sucks
that you can't bring your dogs out
anymore intramural athelete
Ryan Sullivan said.
As an employee of recreational
services, Whitney Farmer has
heard questions and concerns
about the fact that no one is
allowed to smoke on these new
fields. "Students say they don't
like the fact that they can't smoke,
but they understand why they
can't and they appreciate the new
fields Farmer said.
The Blount Complex includes
10 flag football fields, 6 soccer
fields, or 5 Softball fields. The
fields are used for intramurals and
club sports activities. Any universi-
ty group can reserve the use of the
fields by obtaining and returning a
request form to the main office of
the Student Recreation Center at
least two weeks in advance.
"Last year, 78 percent of full
time students participated in recre-
ational services. These are remark-
Got The Picture,
II OJ
y
Get The Job
Photographers Wanted
by
nian
east
Inquire at the Student
Publication Bldg. (2nd Floor)
What does everyone think
about the new fields?
"It is a very nice facility. Everything is very clean and I can
understand why they made rules to keep it this nice
Megan Cuthrie
"I have enjoyed watching flag football on these new fields. It
feels more like an official sport with the new facility and the
nice lights
Sarah McConntU
"They are much nicer than the old ones. It makes Intramural
athletes feel more important
Jamie Demchak
"I've heard nothing but good things about it. I think the stu-
dents, including myself, are really excited about it
� Josh Simmons
"It proves that the school is not all about varsity sports and
that has made a lot of student athletes happy. Some
Intramural athletes are just as serious as scholarship athletes are
Greg (reason
able numbers and we hope to see
an increase with the addition of the
new complex Daniel said.
Flag football is the only sport
being played on the new fields cur-
rently. Soccer will be played on the
fields later in the semester and a
Punt, Pass and Kick competition
will be held next Wednesday, Sept.
30 at 8 p.m.
The complex is located behind
the Allied Health Building and
houses a central building with
water fountains, bathrooms, first
aid and storage space. The land,
which was donated by the Blount
family, is surrounded by a natural
buffer of trees and is well lit for
players' safety.
A ropes course is located in the
woods next to the fields and is also
available for use through recre-
ational services. Parking around
the complex is for university regis-
tered vehicles only. Those without
a university sticker can park in the
gravel lot across Charles Boulevard
next to Harrington Field.
For more information about the
Punt, Pass and Kick competition,
contact Recreational Services at
328-6387.
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12 Thurify, Octobtr 8. 1998
f
sports
Thi East Carolinian
4 mM
Who's 18�ft in Men's Soccer
Name: Brett Waxer
NO 18
Position: Defender (now top-scoring midfielder)
-1997: co-captain
lgoal
-1998: captain
2 goals
Strengths: considered a field general in the Pirate
backfield with a strong offensive note
Year: Junior
Major: Exercise Sport Science
Personal: Son of Phil and Barbara Waxer
Born and grew up in: East Meadow, NY.
High School: East Meadow HS (Jets)
- first team all-state selection during senior year
after tallying six goals and 10 assists
- team captain and team MVP, winning all county
honors both in junior and senior year
Name: Nick Errato
No 10 i
Position: Midfielder (with high-valued defense and
dribbling skills)
-1997:2 assists
1998:1 goal
Strengths: According to coach Wiberg his versatility
and intensity for the game
Year: Sophomore
Major: Child DevelopmentFamily Relations
Personal: Son of Ron and Kim Errato
Born and grew up in: Cary, N.C.
High School: Athens Drive HS (Jaguars)
earned Jaguars' team MVP honors in 1995 and
was an All-Cap Seven Conference selection in
both '95 and '96
Soccer
continued from page 10
midficid by Wiberg and scored
twice already this season, said that
the team's best man against
Campbell was DeStefano with his
numerous great saves.
According to ECU sophomore
Nick Errato, the victory will come
as long as the team keeps on play-
ing hard.
"But we surely need a few 'Ws'
now and we'll take them as they
come, no matter if they are ugly or
pretty Errato said. "We need to
be consistent in our game
The ECU men's soccer team
will be in action again this Friday
as it travels to the University of
Richmond to take on the Spiders
a) 7:30 p.m. The Pirates' next
home game is Wednesday, Oct. 16
at 4 p.m. when they match up
against the Seahawks of UNC-
Wilmington.
News Writer
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Mendenhall Student Center - Mulli-Pufpose Room on Tuesday October 13.1998 from 10:00AM until 3:00PM
The Presenters with a brief description of their presentations are listed below.
Llnzv Abraham and Cathy McCartv (Developmental Evaluation Clinic)
Assistive Technology: Making Technology Accessible
George Ballev (Philosophy)
Portable Master Classroom
David L. Batie (Industrial Technology)
Design and Build Internet Class: ECU and Oklahoma
Amy Blssetta (Registrar's Office)
Access to Student Records via the World Wide Web
Ernest Bovce (IT Consulting, CIS)
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Alan Braniqan. Doug Barnum. Debl Crotts and Mark Kreln (CHSC)
Interactive Health Science Education: Demonstration of Four Interactive HS Applications for use on the Web CD
William Collins and Jason Barber (Department of Decision Sciences. School of Business)
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Integrating Software Components in Launching a Web Based Course
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Year 2000 at ECU
Dave Hlllls (Industrial Technology)
PC Anywhere: In the Classroom
Plane Kester and Veronica Pantelldls (Department of Broadcasting, Librarianship, and Educational Technology)
Design and Implementation of Courses for Distance Learning
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Eastnet: Internet ServicesResources for Public School Professional and for those who train them
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Don SexauerFaculty Senate)
Using the Web Browser As Presentation Tool and a Resource for Students
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Distance Learning Textbook Page Using Cold Fusion
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10:00-11:00 Wavne Godwin and Colleagues (School of Art)
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Basketball
continued from page 10
ed well to the program, and the
community has taken to them real
well Dooley said. "The players
have responded appropriately to
the situation and have shown a lot
of respect toward the new staff
Only one senior will return to
the court for the Pirates this sea-
son.
"With only one senior, Alico
Dunk, on the team, we have the
talent but just lack the experi-
ence Dooley said. "We feel the
tough, non-conference games amd
an up-tempo offense set up the
opportunity to get us back to
where we were two years ago. We
plan to use a center by committee
approach which will enable us to
get the ball up the floor better
By playing non-conference
games against South Carolina,
Georgia, Wisconsin-Green Bay,
Southwestern Louisiana and
Evansville, Dooley feels that the
team will be at an advantage come
time for conference action. Last
year the team played the 15th
toughest road schedule in
Division I in the nation out of over
300 schools.
"The CAA is pretty much an
open race Dooley said. "The
main teams that should stand out
though this year are UNC-
Wilmington, Old Dominion,
William & Mary, and Richmond
The new season starts
Saturday, Oct 17. The team will
practice 10-12 a.m. and 5-7 p.m.
over fall break.
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14 Thursday, Qctobar 8, 1998
FOR RENT
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$275month. Available now. Tangle-
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CONDO FOR Rent: 2000 sq.ft. con-
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gold Towers. Free parking! Great lo-
cation! 758-6978.
SEEKING SOMEONE to share nice
2 BR 2 bath apt. Half rent and half
utilities Prefer upperclassmen or
graduate. Please call for more info,
439-0230.
FOR SALE
CAR FOR sale: '94 Ford Taurus
White with blue interior. V-6. Excel-
lent condition. Loaded with car
phone. $5,200. Call 756-9081.
AAAAI EARLY Spring Break Spe-
cials! Bahamas Party Cruise! 6 days
$279! Includes most meals! Awe-
some beaches, nightlife! Departs
from Florida! 1998 BBB AwardWin-
ner! springbreaktravel.com 1-800-
678-6386
AAAAI EARLY Specials! Cancun
& Jamaica! 7 nights air and hotel
from $399! Includes free food,
drinks, parties! 1998 Better Business
Bureau AwardWinner! springbreak-
travel.com 1-800-678-6386
SERVICES
COME DOWN to Mr. Greg's Total
Care and meet the new licensed
nail technician. October Special is
ManicurePedicure for $35. Only
with appointment. Call 353-6489.
CYPRESS LANDING. Now hiring
marketing assistants SunThur. 4
p.m9 p.m 20-22 hours weekly.
Great hourly wage plus bonus. Must
have strong communication skills,
like talking to people, customer serv-
ice oriented & team player. Main
function will be telephoning custom-
ers. Call Craig Wheeler Mon-Fri. to
schedule interviews. 975-8100.
LUPTON'S SEAFOOD Restaurant is
hiring waitstaff and cook helpers. No
phone calls please.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKV SPORTS
(919)496-2224
D.J. FOR HIRE
NYC D.J. READY TO
HYPE UP YOUR PARTY
For all functions & campus
organizations
Call J.Arthur @ 252-412-0971
HELP WANTED
YOUTH IN-LINE Hockey Coaches.
The Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department is recruiting part-time
youth In-Line Hockey coaches. Ap-
plicants must possess some knowl-
edge of the hockey skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 5-18, in
hockey fundamentals. This program
will run from early October to mid-
December. Salary rates start at
$5.15 per hour For more informa-
tion, please call Ben James or
Michael Daly at 329-4550 after
2PM.
WANTED: ENERGETIC telemarket-
ers to work hours: 5:30-9 p.m. Mon-
day-Thursday; 4:30-8 p.m. Sunday.
Apply in person 5-9 p.m. Energy Sav-
ers Windows & Siding, Inc Winter-
green Commercial Park, Suite 0,
Firetower Road, Greenville.
WANTED: B&W photographer for
work on alcohol and drug misper-
ception campaign. Take photos for
media campaign. Great for resume!
Contact Donna at Health Promotion
and Weil-Being, 328-6793.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS
W� Nwd Tunbrrland boot
and �ho�l Good Jeam.
ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER
NAUTICA
TIMBERLAND
ABERCROMBIE
POLO EDDIE BAUER
AND OTHER NAME BRAND MEN'S CLOTHING
SHIRTS, PANTS, JEANS, SWEATS, JACKETS, SHOES, ETC.
WE ALSO BUY AND SELL:
GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
QUICK, EASY, HELPFUL
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
414 S. EVANS (UP THE STREET FROM CUBBIES)
752-3866
TUESDAY - SATURDAY, 9:00 - 5:00
(DRIVE TO THE BACK DOOR BEHIND PARK THEATRE)
ONE OF THE FAVORITE STUDENT STORES FOR YEARS
(IF YOU ARE SELLING, ID IS REQUIRED)
classifieds
FOR SALE
CANON COLOR BUBBLE jet print-
er Model BJC600. Asking $200.
Call Eleftheria at 752-8004.
AAAAI SPRING Break Travel was
1 of 6 small businesses in the US
recognized by Better Business Bu-
reaus for outstanding ethics in the
marketplace! springbreaktravel.com
1-800-678-6386
MALE BOXER puppy. AKC cham-
pion bloodline, pick of the litter; brin-
dle with white and black mask,
ready Oct. 21 $250. Call 329-0079
for more info.
AAAA EARLY Specials! Panama
City! Room with kitchen $129! In-
cludes 7 free parties! Daytona149!
New Hotspot-South Beach $129! Co-
coa Beach $149! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
HELP WANTED
MAKE EASY money! Go on Spring
Break for Free! USA Spring Break off-
ers Cancun. Bahamas, Jamaica, and
Florida packages and is currently ac-
cepting applications for campus
sales representatives. Call 1-888-
SPRINGBREAK.
FREE CD Holders, T-shirts, Prepaid
Phone Cards. Earn $1000 part-time
on campus. Just call 1-800-932-
0528 x 64.
ABSOLUTE SPRING BreakTake
2" 2 Free Trips on Only 15 Sales
andEarn $$$$. Jamaica. Cancun,
Bahamas. Florida, Padre! lowest Pric-
es! Free Meals, Parties & Drinks.
"Limited Offer 1-800-426-
7710www.sunsplashtours.com
SPRINGBREAK. CANCUN, Florida.
Jamaica, South Padre, Bahamas,
Etc Best hotels, parties, prices.
Book early and save Earn money
trips! Campus repsorganizations
wanted. Call Inter-Campus Programs
1-800-327-6013 222 www.icpt.com
NOW HIRING exotic dancers, sing-
ing telegrams, and adult entertain-
ers. You must be at least 18 yrs
drug free, own transportation and
phone. Up to$ 1.500 weekly. Call
758-2737.
fa
IN-LINE HOCKEY Rink Attendant.
The Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department is recruiting individuals
with some background knowledge
with in-line hockey. Applicants will
be responsible for overseeing both
the skateboard park and in-line hock-
ey rink at the Jaycee Park. Salary
rates range from $5.15 to $6.50 per
hour. For more information, please
call Ben James or Michael Daly at
329-4550 after 2 PM.
CRUISE SHIP Employment - Work-
ers earn up to $2,000month
(wtips & benefits). World Travel!
Land-Tour jobs up to $5,000-
$7.000summer. Ask us how! 517-
336-4235 Ext. C53621
ARE YOU a female graduate stud-
ent? Live in position available, bene-
fits including, free room and board,
free parking and a monthly stipend.
If you are interested, please call 758-
5568.
WANTED: STUDENTS wh like to
have fun! Need characters for the
Men in Black, part of an alcohol and
drug misperception campaign. For
more information call Donna at
Health Promotion and Well-Being,
328-6793.
1 SPRING Break company is now
hiring motivated individuals to prom-
ote America's best Spring Break va-
cations. Sell trips, earn cash, go free!
1-800-234-7007 www.endlesssum-
mertours.com
MODELS FOR photo study. Reputa-
ble amateur photographer seeking
slim young women for photo project.
Send note, photo (if available), and
phone for immediate reply. Paul
Hronjak, 3015-A Wynfall Lane, Wil-
son, NC 27893-9677.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT - Fishing
industry. Excellent student earnings
& benefits potential (up to
$2.850mo. RoomBoard). All
skill levels. Don't pay outrageous
agency fees! Ask us how! 517-336-
4171 ext. A53621
EARN WHILE YOU learn, up to
$1,000.00 wk. Day and night
shifts. Clean, secure working at-
mosphere. Playmates Adult En-
tertainment. 252-747-7686 for in-
terview.
PART-TIME position: new company
hiring data input person to help set
up accounting and operating sys-
tems. Accountingcomputer, experi-
ence preferred; 10�15 flexible hours
per week; $6 per hour. Respond to
830-2349.
CHILD CARE needed in Quail Ridge
Condos mornings 6:30-8:15, after-
noons 2:30-until. Must have trans-
portation. Duties include taking
children to school, afterschool activ-
ities, helping with homework. Pay is
neg hourly or weekly. Call 353-
5317, if no answer, leave message.
1999 INTERNSHIPS! Attention un-
dergraduate business students. Now
interviewing on campus for manag-
ers across Virginia, North and South
Carolina for summer of 1999. Aver-
age earnings last summer $7,000.
Call Tuition Painters at (800) 393-
4521 or e-mail at tuipaint@bell-
south.net
CASHIER TELLER needed imme-
diately. Work 6-20 hours per week.
Work on Thurs. andor Fri. only.
Must pass criminalcredit check.
Send resume to PO Box 493, Tar-
boro, NC 27886.
GREEK PERSONALS
SYLVAN LEARNING Center is seek-
ing a study buddy for a college stud-
ent taking accounting. We are look-
ing for a reliable person who is avail-
able immediately on MWF 12-2:30
and TTH 9-11:30. Please apply at
2428 S. Charles Blvd.
PERSONALS
TUNE IN TO 91.3 FOR WZMB'S
OWN BOB SMITH - THE VOICE
OF PIRATE FOOTBALL!
LOSE WEIGHT while you sleep!
100 natural. Minister Mimms lost
30 pounds in 5 weeks. Dr. Hack-
worth lost 38 lbs. in 8 weeks. I lost
6 12 inches in 2 months. Call Cin-
dy at 919-736-7131.
GREEK PERSONALS
SIGMA PI, we had fun going back
in time with you guys! Ya'll always
know how to show Chi Omega a
good time.
PHI KAPPA Psi would like to thank
Delta Zeta for letting us use your
beautiful house for mid-semester
rush. Thanks for helping us make it a
success
PI KAPPA Phi, thanks for a great
weekend. You really showed us and
our parents a fun time. Love, the sis-
ters and new members of Alpha Xi
Delta
CONGRATULATIONS TO the fol-
lowing Pi Delta sisters on their new
offices: Vice President-Meredith
Dowty, Secretary-Tina Overbee, New
Member Co-Educator-Jennifer Kwiat-
kowski, Panhellenic Exec. Represen-
tative-Alexi Hasapis, Intramural
Chair-Linda Wong, Sister Activity Di-
rector-Beth Hall, and Gamma Repre-
sentative-Melissa Thomas. We're
glad you guys could fill these recent-
ly vacated offices and know you'll do
a great job! Love, your sisters
KAPPA SIGMA. Parents Weekend
was a blast. Thanks for showing our
parents a great time. Chi Omega
CONGRATULATIONS ON your
lavaliers! We love you. Love, the sis-
ters of Alpha Omicron Pi!
PI DELTA new members: You've got
some clues and your search will start
soon. Do you have any idea who
your "Big" is yet? Tomorrow night will
be a blast! Love, the sisters
ALPHA DELTA Pi would like to
thank Pi Kappa Alpha for tailgating
with us on Parents Weekend. We
had a great time and appreciate eve-
rything you did!
THE BROTHERS of Phi Kappa Psi
would like to encourage everyone to
come to Greek Fest at the Kappa Al-
pha house because tonight, toga is
back from the dead!
CONGRATULATIONS TO Alpha
Phi's sister of the week, Jenn Cole
and new member of the week, Mel-
issa Berger. Love, the sisters and
new members of Alpha Phi
THETA CHI, thanks for a great so-
cial on Thursday. We had a blast.
Love, the sisters and new members
of Alpha Phi
GOOD LUCK Christina Alexander in
the play tonight and this weekend!
We are so proud of you and know
you will be wonderful! Love, your Al-
pha Delta Pi sisters
SIGMA NU: We're really looking for-
ward to the social with you guys to-
night! Love, the sisters and new
members of Pi Delta
GREAT JOB on your intramural
games! you guys are wonderful!
Love, the sisters and new members
of Alpha Omicron Pi!
ALPHA XI Delta wishes all the
Homecoming candidates good luck.
ALPHA XI Delta supports breast
cancer awareness.
OTHER
SPRING BREAK - Plan Nowl Can-
cun, Jamaica, Mazatlan, & S. Padre.
Early bird savings until Oct. 31st.
America's best prices & packages.
Campus sales reps wanted. Earn
free trips cash. 1.800.SURFS.UP
www.studentexpress.com
SPRING BREAK 99! Cancun Nas-
sau ' Jamaica 'Mazatlan Acapulco
' Bahamas Cruise Florida Florida '
South Padre. Travel Free and make
lots of Cashl Top reps are offered
full-time staff jobs. Lowest price
Guaranteed. Call now for detailsl
www.classtravel.com 800838-6411
The East Carolinian
ANNOUNCEMENTS
YOUNG LIFE: interested in high
school ministry? come to Menden-
hall Underground 5 p.m. on Thurs-
days starting Oct. 8. Questions? Call
756-2435.
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION Work-
shop: Monday 11:00-12:00. The Cen-
ter for Counseling and Student De-
velopment is offering the following
workshop on September 12th. If you
are interested in this workshop, con-
tact the Center at 328-6661.
GAMMA BETA Phi will hold their
next meeting at 5p.m. Oct. 8 in Gen-
eral Classroom Room 1010.
BECOMING A Successful Student
Workshop Monday 11:00-12:00.
The Center for Counseling and Stud-
ent Development is offering the fol-
lowing workshop on October 12th. If
you are interested in this workshop,
contact the Center at 328-6661.
BECOMING A Successful Studentt
Workshop: Thursday 3:30-4:30. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop on October 8th. If you
are interested in this workshop, con-
tact the Center at 328-6661.
ECU COLLEGE Democrats invite fel-
low democrats to a discussion "Suc-
cessful Democratic Public Policy and
Where Do We Go From Here?" Wed.
Oct. 14 7-8:30, 212 Mendenhall. Op-
portunities to participate in Cam-
paign '98 for local candidates will be
available.
STUDENT LEADER Meeting! Want
to know what works? Share your
ideas. Meet with ECU student organ-
ization leaders for an hour or prob-
lem-solving and idea-sharing. Come
make a difference! Mendenhall, Oct.
14.
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: Thursday 3:30-4:30PM.
The Center for Counseling and Stud-
ent Development is offering the fol-
lowing workshop on October 8th. If
you are interested in this workshop,
contact the Center at 328-6661.
THE CIRCLE K Club invites you to
join us in Friendship, Fellowship, and
Leadership Monday nights at 7 p.m.
in the Mendenhall Multi-Purpose
Room.
ANNOUNCEMENTS

WHITE WATER Excursion! Get wet
and ready to paddle as we explore
the New River, along the Caroli-
naVirginia border. This river hap-
pens to be the Second oldest river in
the world! Dates: Oct. 23-25. Regis-
tration deadline is Oct. 16th, 5 p.m.
Member cost is $48. For further info,
contact Adventure Program-
mingDept. of Recreational Services
9 328-6387.
SOCCER PREVIEWREGISTRA-
TION meeting: anyone in Playing
Soccer intramurals must attend the
registration meeting on Mon. Oct. 12
at 5 p.m. in Mendenhall Student
Center room 244. Men and women's
team only, co-rec is not offered in
soccer.
SOCCER OFFICIALS Meeting: an-
yone interested in officiating intra-
mural soccer must attend the meet-
ing on Thurs. Oct. 8 at 5 p.m. in the
SRC room 202. Some skill is recom-
mended.
PASTOR JAMES D. Corbett of
Community Christian Church will be
hosting the Amazing Grace Program
on Thurs Oct. 8 at 7 p.m. This pro-
gram is designed to minister to
those surrounded by. involved in or
overcoming the drug culture. Every
Thursday at Community Christian
Academy, 2009 Pactolus Road.
Greenville. 551-9143.
Dapper
Dan's
Retro and Vintage Clothing,
Handmade Silver
Jewelry k More.
417 Ivans St. Mall 752-1750
HALLOWEEN
IS COMING
KAPPA ALPHA ORnER
OPEN HOUSE
OCTOBER 12TH-14TH (7-9:30pm)
CALL HOUSE FOR
DAVE JOYNER 754-1929
Advertise in The
East Carolinian
classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE $4.00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional
words 5$ each
STUDENT LINE AD RATE $2.00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional
words 50 each
Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to refuse
fhis rate for any ad deemed to be non-student or business
related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE .$1.00
add to above line rate for either BOLD
or ALL CAPS type.
All classified ads placed by individuals or campus
groups must be
prepaid .Cancelled ads can be removed from the
paper if notification is
made before the deadline, but no cash refunds are
given.
v
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i





The East Carolinian
JNCEMEIMTS
ER Excursion! Get wet
paddle as we explore
er. along the Caroli-
rder. This river hap-
Second oldest river in
es: Oct. 23-25. Regis-
e is Oct. 16th, 5 p.m.
s $48. For further info,
Iventure Program-
Recreational Services
IEVIEWREGISTRA-
j: anyone in Playing
jrals must attend the
rating on Mon. Oct. 12
Mendenhall Student
14. Men and women's
-rec is not offered in
ICIALS Meeting: an
d in officiating intra-
nusl attend the meet-
)ct. 8 at 5 p.m. in the
. Some skill is recom-
VIES D. Corbett of
ristian Church will be
lazing Grace Program
8 at 7 p.m. This pro-
jned to minister to
led by. involved in or
b drug culture. Every
Community Christian
09 Pactolus Road.
9143.
intage Clothing,
nade Silver
rv K More.
it. Mall 752-1750
BW
EDER.
SE
30pm)
I
The
ian
5
. .$4.00
iitional
. .$2.00
tional
ast Carolinian
t or business
.$1.00
ither BOLD
ir campus
d from the
refunds are
C
y
r.
V
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24 hours a day. With no per call service charge on all domestic calls you dial
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Men'
Plaza Men's Department
open from 8-10AM on Sat. Oct. 10
Almost everything you can get your man is on Sale
r
Excludes Tommy Hilfiger, Polo, Nautica, Calvin Klein, No Fear, Mosslmo, FUBU, JNCO, Chaps, Gant, Claiborne, Perry
Ellis, Kenneth Cole, Coach, Fossil, Greg Norman, Ashworth, Value Edge Items andTlmberland Shoes.
8 A.M. TO 1 O A.M. ONLY!
And a
All Day after 10:00 a.m.
Sportswear � Dresswear � Casualwear � Underwear
Accessories � Jackets � Jeans and Much More!
Save On Famous Names
Business
Arrow Dress Shirts
Meeting Street Dress Shirts
Van Huesen Dress Shirts
Hathaway Dress Shirts
Bill Blass Ties
Andhurst Shirts & Ties
Meeting Street Ties
Geoffry Beene Ties
Palatina Ties
Meeting Street Belts
Meeting Street Suspenders
Kasper
Haggar
Andhurst
Bill Blass
Sansabelt Slacks
American Trouser Slacks
Perry Ellis Portfolio
Casual
Meeting Street Belts
Dockers Belts
Big & Tall Sportswear
Dockers Socks
Saddlebred Flannel Boxer Shorts
Andhurst Cotton Underwear
Andhurst Pajamas & Robes
Casual
Dockers
Savane
Haggar
Saddlebred Sportshirts & Sweaters
Andhurst Sportshirts & Sweaters
M.E. Sport Sportshirts
Naturalife Sportshirts
Bugle Boy Sportswear & Outerwear
Dockers & Dockers Golf Sportswear
Arrow Sportshirts
Colours by Alexander Julian
Sportshirts & Outerwear
Grand Slam Sportshirts
and Outerwear
Sauce Sportshirts
Duckhead Sportswear
Kasper Outerwear
Pacific Trail Outerwear
Free Country Outerwear
Jantzen Sweaters
Alphine Village Outerwear
William Berry Outerwear
Natural Issue Sportshirts
and Outerwear
Aberdeen Outerwear
Members Only Outerwear
Young Men's
Levi's
Lee
Bugle Boy
(excluding value edge)
Colo
Nikoata
Ferruche
Logotel
Home Grown
Dr. Lucky
Ziza
X-treme
Diner
Fryday Club
Drummer Boy
33 Degrees
Levi's Belts
Joe Boxer Boxer Shorts
Register to Win 2
Tickets to the
Carolina Panthers vs
Miami Dolphin game
on November 15,1998.
Register in our Men's Departments
At Carolina East Mall and The Plaza


Title
The East Carolinian, October 8, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 08, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1296
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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