The East Carolinian, October 6, 1998







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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6,1998 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 14
Breast cancer walk raises awareness
Sororities, School of Nursing among sponsors
during
Breast
S T K V E L () 8 E Y
NEWS EDITOR
Greenville Mayor Nancy Jenkins
proclaimed October 3-9 Breast
Cancer Awareness Week
Saturday's Pink Ribbon
Cancer Walk.
The walk was held at the
Carolina Kast Mall and organized
by several organizations including
"Most people know somebody
that's had breast cancer It's a
universal disease that touches
many people, not just the
person with the cancer
Sharon Edwards
Project manager of Partners in
Breast Cancer Education at ECU
the American Cancer Society,
Gamma Sigma Sigma, Alpha Kappa
Alpha, and the ECU School of
Nursing.
"Breast cancer awareness is very
important to women and their fam-
ilies Jenkins said. "We have such
an outstanding center here, of
course, for all kinds of cancer. I
think East Carolina is especially for-
tunate to have good study and
good treatment (with the Leo
Jenkins Cancer Center, part of
University Health Systems of
Eastern Carolina
The purpose of the walk was
to raise public knowledge of
breast cancer. Several tables were
set up in a clearing inside the mall
with assorted information on
breast cancer available.
Pamphlets on topics such as early
detection and mammographies
were available in both Spanish
and English. Pink ribbons were
also available for anyone who
wished to have one, and a video
on display showed proper self-
examination techniques.
"Most people know some-
body that's had breast cancer or
have had a family member with
breast cancer, or they themselves
have had breast cancer said
Sharon Edwards, project manag-
SEE CANCER. PAGE 3
Mary Mattheis of the American Cancer Society and Greenville mayor Nancy Jenkins present a breast cancer stamp.
Eight cents out of the stamp's 40 cent price will go toward breast cancer research.
PHOTO BY STEVE LOSEY
Ireast Cancer
Awareness Week
Breast cancer is the most common form of
cancer in women.
One out of eight women will develop breast
cancer in her lifetime.
Breast cancer is the second leading cause of
death for women in North Carolina and the lead-
ing cause of death for North Carolina African
American women.
Mammography can detect the presence of
breast cancer up to two years before it can be felt
with self-examinations.
� Nearly 100 percent of women whose breast
cancer is detected early are alive five years later.
� Recommended screenings for breast cancer
include routine mammographies, examinations by
a physician, and monthly self-examinations.
lnfanTWiancwjnesyafMa)wNancyJt
Game day
attendance
record broken
40,607 crowd Dowdy-Ficklen
for victory over Army
Fans of both teams packed Dowdy-Ficklen Saturday.
PHOTO BY MARC CRtPPEN
Amy Sheridan
staff writer
The attendance record for a home football game
was broken Saturday when 40,607 fans crowded
into Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium.
The ECU-Army game also marked the largest
distribution of student tickets ever in ECU histo-
ry. Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium, with its new upper
deck, now has the capacity to hold up to 43,000
people.
The previous attendance record at Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium occurred on September 20, 1997
in a 26-0 shut-out loss to the University of South
Carolina. The attendance at that game reached
SEE ATTENDANCE PAGE 2
Plans for pirate
statue underway
Art professor chosen by
committee as sculptor
Jason Z i e b a r t
STAFF WRITER
A pirate's imposing figure may soon
tower above the entrance to the Ward
Sports Medicine Building, thanks to the
sculpture endowment from Irwin Belk.
The Pirate Sculpture Committee
introduced several ideas and viewed pos-
sible models for a proposed pirate statue
Saturday. Words such as "bold
"courage "leader and "competitive"
were mentioned to help visualize its
appearance. Jodi Hollnagel, a professor in
the School of Art, was chosen to sculpt
the statue. Hollnagel brought in two clay
models as demonstrations of her work
and to help generate further ideas for the
final statue.
"We're going to work together as a
team to determine what aspects this
pirate should have Hollnagel said.
The platform that the statue will stand
on will be approximately 10 to 12 feet
high. The statue itself is to be two times
life size and made of bronze. The com-
mittee did not decide how the platform
will look, but wants it to somehow relate
to the statue.
The committee's main concern is to
get the technicalities of the statue worked
out so that Hollnagel
can begin work as soon
as possible. The antic-
ipated deadline is
before the start of next
year's football season.
Points of discussion
at the meeting includ-
ed such things as
stance, appearance,
and overall characteristics of the statue.
Billingsley said that it would be good if
the pirate were as historically accurate as
possible. Items such as boots, an eye
patch, a hat, and other pirate accessories
were talked about, but nothing was final-
"We're going to work together as a
team to determine what aspects this
pirate should have
ECU police officers'
volunteer efforts honored
Jodi Hollnagel and proposed models of the future pirate statue.
PHOTO BY JASON ZIEBART
Jodi Hollnagel
School ol An professor
ized. However, the future location of the
statue was determined to be in front of
the Ward Sports Medicine Building.
The Sports Medicine Building was
chosen because of its proximity to
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium and Minges
Coliseum.
The Pirate Sculpture Committee of
the Pirate Club first met earlier this
semester to discuss the initial proposal of
the statue. The idea was initiated by
Bobby Vause, an alumnus of ECU and a
member of the Pirate Club.
Funding for the statue will come from
the $100,000 that Irwin Belk donated to
the expansion of the new foundry at
,ECU.
"Basically, we decided to take advan-
tage of a gift by Mr. Belk said Phil
Dixon, committee chair.
Michael Dorsey, Dean of the School of
Art, guaranteed that the foundry will be
ready to go by the time the committee
confirms the characteristics of the- new
statue.
The Pirate Sculpture Committee was
created to provide proper representation
to several populations in Greenville. SGA
president Eric Rivenbark represents the
student population. Walter Williams, a
member of the Board of Trustees, repre-
sents the Greenville community. Dennis
Young represents the Pirate Club. There
SEE STATUE. PAGE 3
Plaques awarded by
Special Olympics
St S ANNE M II.ENK E V I C II
STAFF WRITER
Sergeant LaFrance Davis and
Officer Curtis Hayes of the ECU
Police Department were presented
plaques for their efforts in coordi-
nating the I-aw Enforcement Torch
Run fund raiser for the Special
Olympics.
With the help of Davis and
Hayes, the ECU Police Department raised
over $5,000 last May for the Special Olympics.
"We needed to do more this year than last
since last year we raised nowhere close to
$5,000 Davis said.
The Law Enforcement Torch Run
involved over 2,500 law enforcement officers
that represent nearly 180 North Carolina agen-
cies. The officers participated in a two week,
2,000 mile torch relay to pass the Special
Olympics "Flame of Hope" throughout North
Carolina.
Davis and Hayes organized the efforts to
raise the money for the Torch Run. Fund rais-
ers included the sale of t-shirts and hats as well
as donations from the ECU community and
money earned from a dunking booth at the
1998 Barefoot on the Mall.
In addition to raising money for the event,
Davis and Hayes also participated in the run
Chief Teresa Crocker, Sgt. LaFrance Oavis, Officer Curtis Hayes,
and Associate Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance
Layton Getsinger celebrate awards for the Torch Run fund raiser.
PHOTO COURTESY OF LESLIE CRAIGLE
from Greenville to Farmvtlle.
"This accomplishment took the efforts of
ECU and the Police staff as well as Officer
Hayes Davis said.
The effort was supported by Layton
Getsinger, associate vice chancellor for
Administration and Finance. As a token of
appreciation for the support, Davis, Hayes,
and Police Chief Teresa Crocker presented
Getsinger with a torch run cap.
"This was a great opportunity to do some-
thing special for the community Crocker
said. "We really appreciate the help of the
campus community and its support
The ECU Police Department will be the
only law enforcement agency to be featured
on a promotional t-shirt that lists agencies that
raised $5000 or more. The shirt will
be used to raise money for the 1999
Special Olympics.
I





2 Tundiy. Oetobir 6. 1998
news
TheEajt Carolinian
BOT plans for retreat
with Chancellor
New buildings, more
students to be discussed
Steve Losev
NEWS EDITOR
The Board of Trustees (BOT) set
an agenda last Thursday for its
, upcoming retreat with Chancellor
J Eakin. The central issue discussed
5 will be the way ECU responds to
5 the demands of a growing universi-
5 ty.
"The purpose of the retreat is
S to chart the course of the future
i BOT vice chair Phil Dixon said.
The UNC-systern is bracing for
massive increases in student
2 enrollment. Some estimations
2 have that number reaching as
3j much as 50,000.
S One of the major concerns of
Fthe BOT is how ECU will deal
m with the increase in students. The
�BE
four schools that will have to deal
h with the new students are ECU,
� UNC-Charlotte, UNC-Chapel
� Hill, and NC State. The BOT will
discuss estimates of how many stu-
S dents ECU will absorb.
t "The question is where will
ft they all go?" Dixon said. "Do we
- want to grow, and how much do we
� want to grow?"
Dixon said that UNC-Chapel
� Hill is not interested in expanding
to take in the new students.
Attendance
continued from page 1
��38,902. The new upper deck has
8,000 seats and it was 75-80 per-
I cent full at the game.
I "I was tickled to death by the
a student attendance said Dr.
iwHenry VanSant, associate director
of Athletics and Administration.
; "We had great attendance and we
I really appreciate the students' sup-
I port. That just shows the dedica-
f tion of our East Carolina
J .University students
VanSant also said that there
i were usually 8,000 to 10,000 stu-
� dents who attend most ECU home
I games, which means that half of
the students who are enrolled in
; the university ordinarily attend the
; Pirate home football games.
!� ECU sent 3,400 tickets to West
Point and 2,700 were sold. Also,
another 800 tickets were sent to
the surrounding military bases,
such as Fort Bragg and Cherry
�Point. The Athletic Ticket Office
estimates that 5,000 fans from
p- XArmy and the surrounding military
t'r Ibases were in attendance at
�Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium.
There were so many students in
attendance at the ECU-Army
game that some of the students
were forced to sit and watch the
game from the opposite side of the
field. By Thursday, the ticket
office had distributed all of the
tickets for the student sections,
sections 12-16. After that point,
the ticket office added Sections 1
and 11 to the student sections.
According to VanSant, the prob-
lem with the overflow of student
seats occurs because students do
not sit close enough to each other
on the benches. Less than 100
tickets are given out for each stu-
dent section because students do
not sit in the one seat that they are
allotted.
VanSant said that the only way
to assure that all students are able
to get a seat in the student section
is to implement Student Reserve
Seating. Student Reserve Seating
is a system that assigns an exact
section number and seat number
for every student ticket given out.
This would make it very easy to
assure all students to a seat in the
student section. The Athletic
Ticket Office is considering using
Student Reserve Seating if the stu-
dent attendance continues to be as
high as it has been.
��
K
Monday, Oct. 5 Meeting of Legislation Room 221 Mendenhall
�The following committees were named
-Student welfare
Micheal Papera-chair
Melissa Godwin- vice
-Rules and Judiciary
Brian Bullard-chair
Robert Shoffner-vice
-Screenings and Appointments
Chuck Sawyer-chair
Laura Benfield-vice
-Appropriations
Micheal McNally-co-chair
Overton Harper-co-chair
" am impressed with the turn out and numbers of legislators,
however I would like to see more people filling open positions of
day representatives and dorm representatives said John Meriac,
SCA treasurer.
Watch for TECs
latest publication
Whose boobs I
ant these? �
Ybu'llnever
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wkfltimrick

"We want accessibility Dixon
said. "We don't want to slam the
door in the face of the students.
What everybody is worried about is
whether we have the facilities to
accomodatc them
The idea for the retreat was
conceived by Chancellor Eakin,
the BOT, and Locke Holland, an
outside contractor.
The construction of new facili-
ties on campus will be discussed at
the retreat as well. A new science
and technology building will be
built on the site of the mainte-
nance building behind Flanagan,
which is to be torn down. A new
building for the Allied Health and
Nursing Department will be built
near the medical school and will
cost $47 million.
"We need things like more lab
space and a science building
BOT chair Gene Rayfield said.
"Those things will affect the
growth of the university
The proposed science and tech-
nology building will cost $57 mil-
lion and be one and one-half the
size of the Recreation Center.
Ways to raise money for the new
facilities will be discussed at the
retreat, as will methods of improv-
ing ECU's image.
"It's a brainstorming session on
how to improve the university
Dixon said. "We will be getting
more money because of our doctor-
al status. It's an exciting time
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ast Carolinian
3 Timdiy, Octobir 8, 1998
news
The Ent Carolinian
Cancer
continued from page 1
L
er of Partners in Breast Cancer
Education at ECU. "It's a universal
disease that touches many people,
not just the person with the can-
cer
"We get involved in a "lot of
activities and breast cancer happens
to be one of our targets senior
Shenida Anderson of Gamma
Sigma Sigma said. "We came out
here and put all the pamphlets on
the table, we set up the area, and
put ribbons out. We did little,
behind the scene type things
Several survivors of breast cancer
Get Connected to New Technology
Sponsored by Computing and Information Systems
Mendenhall Student Center - Multi-Purpose Room on Tuesday October 13,1998 from 10:00AM until 3:00PM
lture.
ithful,
3rd out.
p.m.
HI
The Presenters with a brief description of their presentations are listed below
Llnrv Abraham and Cathy McCartv (Developmental Evaluation Clinic)
Assistive Technology: Making Technology Accessible
George Bailey (Philosophy)
Portable Master Classroom
David L. Batle (Industrial Technology)
Design and Build Internet Class: ECU and Oklahoma
Amy Blaaette (Registrar's Office)
Access to Student Records via the World Wide Web
Ernest Bovce (IT Consulting, CIS)
Exchange Presentation
Alan Branlqan. Doug Barnum. Debi Crotts and Mark Kreln (CHSC)
Interactive Health Science Education: Demonstration of Four Interactive HS Applications for use on the Web CD
William Collins and Jason Barber (Department of Decision Sciences, School of Business)
Distanco Learning on the Web for Management Science 1 (DSCI 3023)
J. Barry DuVall (Industrial Technology)
Five Simple ways to Increase Interactivity with Online Students
Amy Frank (Industrial Technology)
Screencam and Demobuilder-Software for Creating Demonstrations and Tutorials
Margie Gallagher (HESCNUHM)
Student Tutorials by Students Online
Evelyn Farrlor and Margie Gallagher (HESCNUHM)
Integrating Software Components in Launching a Web Based Course
teon Glpson (CIS)
Year 2000 at ECU .
Dave Hllllet (Industrial Technology)
PC Anywhere: In the Classroom
Plane Kester and Veronica Pantelldls (Department of Broadcasting, Librarianship, and Educational Technology)
Design and Implementation of Courses for Distance Learning
Gregg Lowe (School of Education)
Eastnet: Internet ServicesResources for Public School Professional and tor those who train them
Aaron Lucler and Rich Brlnqamon (Housing Services)
Reznet: Connecting Students to the Internet Through In-room Connections and Computer Lab Access
Nancy Mavberrv (Foreign Language and Lit.)
Using the Internet to Teach and Learn Foreign Languages
Don SexauerFaculty Senate)
Using the Web Browser: As Presentation Tool and a Resource tor Students
Rodney Schmidt, Michael Dixon. and Richard Ramirez (School of Music)
Software and Internet Based Music Instruction Using MIDI and an Electronic Music Workstation
Ashley Smith. Cathrvn Sinqletary, John Humphreys (School of Education Department of Special Education)
Assistive Technology: Demonstration Of Various Assistive Devices Used In Classrooms
Donna WalshHealth Promo and Wellbeing)
Alcohol 101: State-of-the-Art CD-ROM Program to Help Educate Students About Alcohol
Brent Zimmer and Eden CoxECU Student Stores)
Distance Learning Textbook Page Using Cold Fusion
Soecial Presentation in Mendenhall Auditorium, Room 244:
10:00-11:00 Wayne Godwin and Colleagues (School of Art)
Museum Without Walls
1:00-2:00 Ivan Wallace and David Parke (BVTE)
Demonstrating Real Audio and Video use by Students, Placing Course Material Online for Distance Learning .
joined Jenkins for the proclamation
and the survivor's walk around the
mall at 11 a.m. Following walks
were held every hour on the hour
until 4 p.m.
"This is a collaborative event
said Mary Mattheis, area projects
director of the American Cancer
Society. "It's been very exciting to
work with different people in the
community who are all working for
the same cause. It's been a lot
of fun and very exciting to see
people come together to put this
event together
Statue
continued from page I
arc also representatives from the
School of Art and the faculty of
ECU.
The Pirate Club also sees the
statue as a means to generate addi-
tional revenue. Walter Williams,
president of the Pirate Club, said
that smaller replications of the stat-
ue would be good merchandising
tools "so that when someone sees a
pirate they think of East Carolina
A marketing suggestion was to give
out 18, 24, or 36 inch statues to any-
one who donates a particular sum
of money to the Pirate Club.
The committee will met again
on Saturday to finalize a letter of
intent to Hollnagel and to deter-
mine the attributes that they want
the statue to have. The exact cost
will be determined then as well.
Hollnagel thanked Carl
Billingsley, area coordinator for the ,
sculpture area for the School of Art,
and Hanna Jubran for helping with
the molds of the statues.
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�Drinking in Public
�Felonies and Misdemeanors
�Free Consultation
Phone 752-0952 752-0753
e-mail - ghb.greenvillenc.com
For a good time call.
the ECU Student Union Hotline
at 252 328 -6004, or visit our
website at www.ecu.edustudentunion.
Individuals who require accommodations under ADA should contact the Department for Disability Support Services at 252 328 - 4802 (voiosTOD) forty-eight houra prior to the atari ol the program.
For additional Information contact the Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall 5tudent Center, East Carolina University, Qreenvllle, fIC
27858 -4353; or call 252 328 - 4788, toll free at 1 800 ECU - ART5, or TDD 252 528 - 4736, 8:30 am - 6 pm, Monday - Friday.
t I






wSm
4 Tymliy, fltlatur 8,
opinion
Tha Fail n�rnlin;nL
I the I � �
eastcarolinian
AMY L.ROVSTER Edilor
HEATHER BURGESS Minajing Edilor
Steve Losev News Ediiot
Amanda Austin Features sdim
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TRACY M. LAUBACH SporuEdilor
Mario scherhaufer AssistantSponsUm
CHRIS KNOTTS SnH Hlttuniw
STEPHANIE WHITLOCK M Design Manager
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Brian Williams layout Manager
BOBBY TlJOGLE Webmaster
Sowing the ECU community wirt t9�. the Ent Catoluiien puWisfin 11.000 copers ewry luesday and lhursdiy Ida told editorial in lach edition �the
optiKHi ot tha Edrloriel Board Iha Eati Caroteiian welcomes letters la the ediloi. limned 10 ffl woids when mar he adiiad (or decency or Dievity The Ea�
Cerolwijn reserves Itw rrahr to edu at reran UHim ror publication Al letters mini be sejned Letters should he addressed to Opinion editoi .The East
Carolinian, Student Pookatioos Bialdma, ECU. GreenwHe. 285M3M. far mtormaiton. can 919.328.6368
OUNIGW
On Saturday a walk was held to raise awareness of breast cancer in everyday life. Sadly,
wftile more people are aware of the dangers of breast cancer today than ever, many people are
nqt as aware as they should be of the prevalent and deadly disease,
a
Breast cancer strikes one out of eight women in their lifetime. Most people will know
sopieone who was a victim of it at one time or another. Though many people do not consider
research and treatment of breast cancer a pressing concern, it is severely needed to improve
the lives of women worldwide.
te"
Education of the public is also a very important step in curing the disease. The sad truth
apout most victims of breast cancer is that it did not have to develop into a life-threatening
illhess. Cancer can be caught in very early forms by such simple methods as routine
I'
mpmmograms and self-examinations. Though considerable steps have been taken, many
wBmen still do not go to their doctors for these quick and potentially lifesaving procedures.
.Early detection of breast cancer is crucial for a victim's chances of beating the disease. The
survival rate of women who had their cancer detected early is very close to 100 percent.
.iMammograms can detect possible forms of cancer years before lumps can be felt with self-
examinations. Some women mistakenly believe that they are enough to avoid cancer. While
self-examinations are necessary precautions, they can never fully take the place of a
physician's mammogram.
h woman who has a mammogram performed routinely can learn of the presence of a tumor
as much as two years before a woman who only performs self-examinations, and as such, has
i
twb more years of treatment. Those treatments quite often mean the difference between life
and death.
OPINION
Columnist
Christopher
COPPEDGE
Parents Weekend allows quality time
; You know who loves Parents
'� Weekend more than parents
; and students? Wal-Mart and
; the local restaurants. I think
' beside move-in day and the
day we return from Winter
; Break, Parents Weekend is
the busiest. I went to Wal-
j Mart Saturday and I think I
; saw ten cash registers open.
JAs we grow and become more
involved in our adult lives, it's good
�to take a weekend and hang out
Avith the parents. Sometimes it is
Jhard to go home, for one reason or
Janother, so the next best thing is
�having home come to you. I love
�Parent's Weekend. It means I get
io see my parents and they will
take me out to dinner and
Jshopping.
; I think Parent's Weekend was
�developed by a bunch of broke and
hungry students who knew how to
get money and food� invite the
parents to a football game. I know
this isn't true, but that's how
Parent's Weekend goes. The good
thing is, the parents love to come
down and feed us and go to the
game.
Congratulations to the football
team for giving us a great game
while beating Army. Every
touchdown pass seemed to get
longer as the game went on.
Something that struck me as odd
were the fans. The game was
exciting but the crowd seemed
really calm, much unlike the
previous Parent's Weekend games
I have attended. For the first time
I did not hear a "bullshit" chat after
a bad call. As a matter of fact I
hardly heard and profanity at the
game. It seemed like ECU fans
toned down for the parents this
game.
Saturday reminded me of the
Ice Cube song, "Today was a good
day The parents came over, but
not too early. They took me out to
eat twice off-campus, I can never
thank them enough for that. We
ate dinner at Applebee's and had to
wait, even after nine-thirty. The
food was great, as usual. If you ever
get the chance, order a Chili
Cheese Tatar Skillet. It's an
appetizer and I've had it before. I
still think it is the greatest meal I
have ever eaten and it always gets
better each time I order one. I
recommend it to everyone. There
is no way to truly describe the Tatar
Skillet and do it justice.
You know who loves Parent's
Weekend more than parents and
students? Wal-Mart and the local
restaurants. I think beside move-in
day and the day we return from
Winter Break, Parent's Weekend is
the busiest. I went to Wal-Mart
Saturday and I think I saw ten cash
registers open. I was shocked to say
the least. Lines at restaurants did
not subside until after nine o'clock.
Parent's Weekend makes everyone
happy, as it was designed to do.
As for me, my weekend was
great. I really enjoyed my parents
coming down and hanging out. I'm
also glad because my supplies were
running short and now I'm stocked
up for at least another month. I
hope everybody else fared as well
as I did.
.LETTER
to the Editor
Starr not to blame for Clinton's wrongdoing
I am responding to Stephen
jKleinschmit's October 1 editorial.
jHis comments contained two
�points that I think are convoluted
Jyet typical of the view Clinton's
J"spin doctors" are suggesting.
J Kleinschmit's assertion that Ken
�Starr is ripping away the sanctity of
the Executive Office is absurd. Bill
JClinton is the only person that can
Jdestroy the sanctity of that office
'because he is the one serving in it.
Sf you think rationally, you'll have
Jr,o agree. This investigation is solely
Jfhe result of Clinton's "spin
��doctors" want Americans to believe
Starr is at fault for the investigation.
It is just another example of turning
the criminal into the victim.
Klcinschmit further asserted
that Bill Clinton couldn't get
anything done because of Starr's
report. Starr's report is not the
problem; it is Clinton's travel
agenda. Since the report became
public, Clinton has been touring
America in search of a photo-op or
crisis to propel him above his
indiscretions. This strategy
shouldn't be any surprise - Clinton
has always fled Washington for the
safety of "town hall meetings" or
fund raisers when things weren't to
his liking. If Clinton wants to do
America's business, maybe he
should clear his travel agenda.
Mr. Klcinschmit, the present
state of the Presidency is the fauit
of Bill Clinton, not Starr. Clinton
sowed long ago the seeds of the
problems he is now reaping.
Clinton must accept responsibility
for his actions and their
consequences.
David Mitchell
Senior
Construction Manageme
OPINION
Columnist
Marvelle
SULLIVAN
College time for self-discovery
Now is the best and most
crucial time to discover who
we are and what we stand
for. It is too easy to go
through the motions of
college and of life without
attaining a sense of self and
general meaning.
e.e. cummings once wrote, "To be
nobody�but�yourselfin a
world which is doing its best, night
and day, to make you everybody
elsemeans to fight the hardest
battle which any human being can
fight This-statement epitomizes
the challenges and obstacles that
college presents in almost every
facet of a student's life. Yes, we are
here to receive an education that
propagates the attaining of our
career goals, but college is so much
more. The socialization factor we
encounter teaches us.so much
about ourselves and the people we
know dearly and not so dearly.
Every day our actions, motives,
values, and ideals arc questioned
which can lead to an intense
evaluation of ourselves and our
lives.
Now is the best and most crucial
time to discover who we are and
what wc stand for. It is too easy to
go through the motions of college
and of life without attaining a sense
of self and general meaning. When
the day ends, we have to be able to
live with ourselves and what we
have done. This isn't to say we
can't make mistakes because
everything happens for a reason,
but at some point wc have to
escape from the broad gray areas
and make definitive decisions �
about who we are, what we want,
and where wc are going.
Along the way, many cliches will be (
fully realized, such as, life really �
isn't fair people DO change jj
waiting IS the hardest part. These �;
realizations will all result in making S
us better people and better
equipped to face adversity down
the road despite the fact that
amidst a crisis it is hard to be U
objective and positive. Burn-out is '
an epidemic in college because not
only do we have to face personal
things without family and familiar
surroundings, but we also have to
go to class and keep everything
together. If students can get
through college, receive a degree I
and possess some semblance of
common sense and sanity, then J
they've completed the first hurdle J
of adulthood. Don't make hasty,
bad decisions based on temporary 'j
situations that will have a negative J
and permanent effect on the rest of �;
your life. J
OPINION
Ryan
Kennemur
Columnist
Music lyrics leave a lot to desire
Back when our parents were
our age, they would turn on
their little transistor radios,
and out would come the
sounds that now everybody
is willing to sample, but no
one is willing to learn from.
Bands like the Beatles, The
Rolling Stones, The Byrds
and the Beach Boys were
coming together to show the
world that there is more to
music than just sound.
Okay, it's time for my opinion
column. My opinion ismusic
these days really sucks. The
following article may offend your
musical tastes, but rest assured that
is not the reason for my writing it.
The reason is simply to open your
eyes to the other possibilities that
are right in front of you.
I suppose that the mainstream
radio is the best place to start. You
know the kind of musicthe
Matchbox McCain with the Third
Eye that's Far Too Blind on
Marcy's Playground. I realize that
this type of music is really popular
around campus, but you know
what? This music is sickening to
me. It takes no effort at all to write
a song using three chords (usually
D, G, C) and put some words with
it, and yet here are all these bands
doing just that, and making
millions off of it. I tell ya, it just
burns my biscuits!
Also, there arc those
bandsexcuse megroups of
people in the same room" that are
nothing but singers. N-SYNC and
the Backstreet Boys are nothing
more than New Kids of the 90s.
And I don't know what to think of
the Pre-Maternal Spice Girls
Minus Big Fat Red-I leaded Spice.
They don't write their own songs
and they don't play anv
instruments, so how can we call
them musicians?
And don't get me started on
country music these days! I don't
sec how they can dare to call that
stuff they play on the country
airwaves "country music It's too
popish to even resemble real
country. The whole punch bowl is
just filled with a bunch of pretty
faces with nothing important to
say. Yes, I'm talking about Bryan
White. All the true country singers
nowadays are either dying of
Parkinson's Disease or are phased
out because they are not attractive
enough to show on CMT.
Apparently, looking at Willie
Nelson at noon has been known to
bring up some peoples' lunches.
And that other stuffcall it
"techno call it "dance call it
"euro-trash The bottom line is
that it shouldn't be considered
music if no one has to play an
instrument or sing. Computers are
not instruments, and it kills me to
that that "Lil' Johnny DiskDrive
the kid who never played in the
band in high school and sang like a
17-year cicada, can grow up, and
using a program of his own design.
" express many opinions. But I am not the first man to do it; American
freedom consists largely in talking nonsense
E.W. Howe
Newspaper publishing
make a fortune.
I know what you are probably I
thinking. "Ryan-Dogg, we realize ,
that you don't like the music that is ;
played these days, but what else is I
there?" Well, the only thing I can '
say to that iswe need to take a I
trip back in time.
Back when our parents were our '�;
age, they would turn on their little 'I
transistor radios, and out would 1
come the sounds that now
everybody is willing to sample, but g
no one is willing to learn from.
Bands like the Beatles, The
Rolling Stones, The Byrds and the ,�
Beach Boys were .coming together
to show the world that there is
more to music than just sound. �
Vocalists like James Taylor, Carol
King, and Aretha Franklin were
pouring their hearts out in '�
between. A whole barrage of
different musical sounds, and all of -J
them being played on just one .�
radio station. !
I guess I just wish that the 8
campus would go out and listen to �
some of its parents' old records and
realize just what music can be. If �
we don't listen to the bands that �
MTV wants us to, then the record �
companies may get it through their J
tiny heads that we aren't going to �
be overtaken by the effortless crap �
they are throwing at us these days. I
Until then, I will leave you with j
this quote, just to show you how I �
feel about my readers. ;
"I'll be your crying shoulder. I'll !
be love suicide. I'll be much R
better when I'm older. I'll be the "
greatest fan of your life
Whatever that means.
0





Tilt Eail Carnliniiu. 5 Tand.y, October 6. 1998
Four Seats Left
ery
iad gray areas
vc decisions
friar, we wanr,
ing.
cliches will be
)s, life really
X) change
x part. These
iilt in making
and better
Iversity down
he fact that
i hard to be
Burn-out is
e because not
face personal
and familiar
: also have to
p everything
nts can get
:ive a degree
semblance of
sanity, then
e first hurdle
t make hasty,
on temporary
vc a negative
on the rest of
sire
are probably i
;g, we realize S
: music that is g
it what else is �;
ly thing I can �
:ed to take a �
ents were our
on their little �
i out would I
that now j
o sample, but �
) learn from. B
eatles, The I
lyrds and the I
fling together 'I
that there is
just sound. �
Taylor, Carol
ranklin were ;
rts out in !
i barrage of ;
ids, and all of
on just one �
ish that the
and listen to �
i records and .
ic can be. If 9
s bands that �
:n the record
:hrough their J
sn't going to ;
ffortless crap �
s these days. I
ve you with ;
w you how I �
shoulder. I'll ;
II be much ��
: I'll be the j
your life
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6 Tutidiy. October 6. 1998
features
7 Tuesday, I
The East Carolinian
Passport to Education
people go places
Nicholas Kalapos
staff writer
It used to be that no formal education
was considered complete without studying
in another country. ECU has agreements
with 14 countries for studying abroad and is
a member of ISEP, the international stu-
dent exchange program. ISEP offers over
100 additional countries to study in.
"We are making agreement with addi-
tional countries constantly" said Dr. Linda
McGowan. "The best way to find out what
we have to offer is to come by
One of the big advantages to studying
abroad is the total immersion in a culture.
There is also a difference difference
between what you can learn in a class and
what you can learn in a culture.
One ECU student, senior Laura
Sawyer, went to the University of
Mannheim, a business school in Germany.
Sawyer, who had three years of German
in high school and two years at ECU, told
me that even through this she wasn't fluent
by any means.
"Being there, you pick up the language
really fast Sawyer said.
One worry students may have is that it's
expensive to go to another country to
study, but in reality, it's not.
The dollar has never' been stronger
oversea and the cost is the same as it would
be if you were attending ECU, for the
equivalent amount of time. They offer a
year, a semester and summer sessions, so
you can pick the one that's best for your
school schedule.
Language is only one of the advantages
of studying abroad. The experiences you
can have will stay with you forever.
While Sawyer was in Germany her uni-
versity went on strike for a few weeks.
'They set up tombstones and coffins to
make the courtyard look like a graveyard
Sawyer said. "Then we had a sign that said
'The University is dead
According to sawyer, another perk to
overseas travel is that though she wasn't
old enough to drink in the United States,
she was old enough in Germany.
"We would go to the Wine Tasting
Festivals and we went to October fest
Sawyer said. "The university would spon-
sor parties every week and here you would
think, University party ,yuck, but these
parties were blow outs and one party alone
had a budget of $30,000
ECU junior Javier Castillo, also had the
opportunity to travel overseas. Castillo
spent'five months at the University of
Ecuador.
Castillo found Ecuador beautiful.
"I spent almost every weekend in the
mountains Castillo said. "It was great to
have the chance to explore a new place
According to Castillo, overseas travel is
easy.
"All I needed was my plane ticket and
spending money Castillo said.
Both Laura and Javier encourage other
students to take part in the overseas travel
experience.
"Without a doubt Castillo said.
"I would absolutely encourage anyone
to go sawyer said. "I managed to get it
and will still graduate in four years, but it
would have been worth it to stay an extra
semester
Going to a foreign country can be a little
intimidating. Feeling likeyou don't know
anyone, being away from family and
friends and not being able to speak the lan-
guage can all be scary.
Sawyer felt all of these fears.
"Everything I worried about I should
have just cleared my mind of because it
was not an issue sawyer said. "I just had
the best time and learned so much. It
changes the way you look at things
As Americans, we often forget that the
rest of the world has ideas that are different
form our own.
"Many people see America as an inter-
national bully Sawyer said. "A lot of peo-
ple know that Germany wouldn't be where
it is today without the United States and
the Marshall plan, but most Germans don't
remember that because it didn't happen in
their lifetimes
Sawyer summed it up best
when she said, "If I can do this, I
can do anything .
Sawyer said that the
experience had
changed her. She is not
as intimidated by some
things as she used to be.
Maybe traveling
abroad is not for you,
but before you make
that decision, stop by
the International Affairs
Office in the
International House
and speak with Dr.
McGowan and see.
Maybe you'll find an
adventure you never
knew you needed.
Professor makes 170 mile canoe trip onTar River
Wildlife, water
"documented on journey
Nina M. Dry
SENIOR WRITER
Summer breaks include fun in the
sun, beach trips and relaxation time
for most people. This includes Dr.
David Knowles, an ECU biology
professor, who canoed 170 miles of
the 212 mile Tar River this sum-
mer, taking pictures and observing
the vast scenery.
"The very upper parts of it
weren't very canoe-able Knowles
said. "It was too srhall
Knowles divided this trip into
two segments. In May, he began
in Grandille County, located in
the Piedmont, and came down
to Greenville.
"From Grandille to Greenville
was an eight day trip Knowles
said.
Knowles put his adventurous
;trip on hold when he went to
'Central America on a research pro-
Knowles sailed over 170 miles down river
PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID KNOWLES
ject. Upon his return, he resumed
with his canoe trip. He went from
Greenville to Washington, NC in
one day in July.
"Geologically and ecologically,
the river makes a nice transition
from the Piedmont to the Pamlico
sound Knowles said. "There is
very little development around the
river. It's mostly a green corridor
from the source to its mouth
Even though Knowles took this
trip for the recreational aspect of it,
he did measure some of the basic
water quality such as visibility, dis-
solved oxygen, sedimentation, and
PH.
"I wanted to get a general idea of
the condition of the water
Knowles said. "It all seemed to be
normal
He also observed the changes in
vegetation along the banks.
According to Knowles, Louisburg,
NC is a major transition point along
the Tar River.
Knowles uses the pictures he
took of this trip in his classes
and makes the photographs avail-
able through the Pamlico-Tar
River Foundation.
"I'm currently creating a web-
site containing the pictures and
written text on my trip on the Tar
River Knowles said. "It will also
contain the geology and ecology of
the river, links to government web-
sites that provide information about
water quality, and links to federal
government websites that have
information about water dis-
charge
Knowles said that within a cou-
Many
pie of months the website
will be up and can be
accessed through the
Pamlico-Tar River
Foundation website.
According to
Knowles,he noticed on his
trip that the Tar River is
in pretty good shape.
"People should recog-
nize the beauty and scenic
quality of the river
Knowles said. "Once peo-
ple realize that, more
efforts will be put into
maintaining it
While on his trip,
Knowles saw a lot of ani-
mal life along the banks
such as 50 different
species of birds, deer, and
a bald eagle.
There are some water quality
problems, some which have been
created by the people.
"Trash gets into the river by a
couple of primary sources
Knowles said. "One is trash through
storm drains. People should realize
that all the trash in the streets�
most of the cigarette butts, plastic
bags, plastic cups after keg parties,
beer and soft drink cans and bot-
tles�goes into the storm drain
untreated directly into the river
The other source is people who
are actually using the water for fish-
ing or boating.
"It's hard to understand why
some people who use the river for
their enjoyment would throw trash
in it Knowles said.
Knowles said that the people
th
Six Professors awarded
Prizes include $1,000,
reception, brunch
PHI 1.1. IP (ill. Fl'S
STAFF WRITER
nature pictures were captured during trip.
PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVIO KNOWLES
who live around Tar River do not
take advantage of what they have.
"The Tar River is an under real-
ized recreational resource
Knowles said. "There are some
really nice stretches that students
can canoe on, which they can rent
from the Rec Center. You see lots
of wild life, nice scenery, and rela-
tively few people
Knowles said Greenville to
Washington, NC is deeper so
heavier boats and skiers can enjoy
that area.
Students who are interested in
becoming more involved in the
understanding and preservation of
the river, the Pamlico-Tar River
Foundation is one of the organiza-
tions to join. There is also the East
Carolina Eco-ECU club, the envi-
ronmental club on campus.
Does your professor deserve a pat
on the back? Does heshe keep you
interested and give you motivation
to learn? Here at ECU, six profes-
sors who have shown these charac-
teristics and more have been
rewarded with the 1998 Board of
Governor's Distinguished
Professor for Teaching Award.
The recipients this year include
Michael Bassman, Matthew Mahar,
Elizabeth Markowski, Frederick
Niswander, Donald Parkerson, and
Waiter Pories. They all represent
different departments, but these
teachers have many similarities.
Receiving of the BOG
Distinguished Professor Award
symbolizes exceptional teaching
ability, dedication, and ability to
stimulate student interest.
"You have to love your subject
matter said Elizabeth Markowski,
professor in the School of Human
Environmental Science. "The
greatest benefit of the labs that I
teach is that I get to speak with the
students one-on-one
Some professors, at the end of
the day, arc left wondering why
they chose a life consisting of grad-
ing papers, giving lecture upon lec-
ture and dealing with apathetic stu-
dents.
The BOG Distinguished
Professor for Teaching Award,
which is given to six professors at
each of the sixteen UNC-systcm
schools, tries to recognize profes-
sors, who do not always receive the
positive recognition they deserve.
"I think that ECU has many
good teachers said Matthew
Mahar, .School of Health and
Human Performance professor. "It
is a good place to be, whether
you're a professor or a student
The award includes the bestow-
ing of $1000, a reception during
the spring, which recognizes both
winners and nominees and this year
a brunch sponsored by Chancellor
Kakin was added.
The committee that selects the
award recipients is composed of six
people, five faculty members and �
one student
"People always say what a plea-
sure it is to be on the committee
said Dorothy Clayton, Director of;
Faculty Development. "It is a
chance to see such dedicated exam
pies of teaching and also one gets a
chance to look at different
approaches to teaching
The committee goes through
the many portfolios submitted by
the hopeful professors. This portfo- j
lio includes the nominee's state-
ments about their philosophy of
teaching, copies of their syllabi, a
SEE AWARDS. PAGE 7
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7 Tuesday, October 6, 1998
features
The Eitt Carolinian
East Carolinian
Dridering why
listing of gradi
ture upon Icc-
apathetic stu-
Jistinguishcd
hing Award,
professors at
I JNC-systcm
ignizc profes-
ys receive the
ley deserve.
I' has many
id Matthew
Health and
professor. "It
be, whether
student
s the bestow-
:ption during
ognizes both
and this year
y Chancellor
� selects the
nposed of six
lembers and �
what a plea-
committee ;
, Director of
it. "It is a
icated exam-
so one gets a
t different
3es through
ibmitted by
This portfo-1
inee's state-
lilosophy of
:ir syllabi, a
E7
the piRAte experience
(there is a little RA in all of us)
University Housing Services Is now accepting applications
for Spring 1999 Resident Advisor positions
The Resident Advisor position It jxlremely rewarding. The friendships and
sklllt that form as a result of being a Resident Advisor last a lifetime.
As compensation, RA's receive a free single room, a 9-meal advantage
account, and a MQ5 stipend per semester. The position Is considered a
scholarship worth a cumulative total of approximately t4800. Please keep
In mind that In order to be considered for the position you must meet the
following qualifications at the time of application:
� 0e at least a second semester freshman
Have a clear Judicial record with UHS Pean of Students office
� Have at least a 2.5 overall grade point average
Applications can be picked up at a Coordinator's office or at 100 Jones HalL
The deadline for applying Is October 16
for more Information ptm� call University Housing at M8-468!
Awards
continued from page 6
Student Opinion of Instructional
Survey form, a recommendation
letter from the dean of the College
of Arts and Sciences or the
Professional School and from at
least three former students and
peer evaluations. The portfolios
can be no longer than fifty pages.
When one considers the number of
applications the committee re-
ceives, it is apparent that the com-
mittee does not have an easy job.
"What is surprising, in a very
good way, is that the committee
usually ranks each of the nominees
very high Clayton said. "It is
quite a selection process
This annual award which has
been around for five years, is one of
three teaching awards.
Other awards are the BOG
Award for Excellence in Teaching
and the Alumni Distinguished
Professor for Teaching Award.
Considering the fact that there are
approximately 1200 faculty, and
only ten professors receive these
recognitions each year, these peo-
ple are truly worthy of praise.
Quotes-
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Pitt Comity Fair
October Stfi-XOtli
ALL THIS WEEK
EXHIBIT BUILDINGS
MAIN EXHIBIT BUILDINGS
AGRICULTURAL AND COMMERCIAL. Eastern Carolina shows off
its regional pride by displaying its bountiful AGRICULTURE, flourish-
ing INDUSTRY, quality EDUCATION and SCIENTIFIC and
ENVIRONMENTAL pursuits. Visit our new commercial building
CHILDREN'S BARNYARD BUILDING
SWINE & SMALL ANIMALS plus;
CHILDREN'S PETTING ZOO ! THE MOST POPULAR PLACE ON
THE GROUNDS!
SHEEP AND LAMB BUILDINGS
Wednesday October 7, 6:00 PM Pitt County Lamb Show
Wednesday, October 7 7;30 PM Flock Show
Friday October 9, 6:00 PM Open Heifer Show
for ALL of Eastern North Carolina. EXPANDED SHOWING!
CATTLE BUILDING
Eastern North Carolina's finest Cattle, Steers, Horses and Big Farm
Animals. Plus; Open lamb show, Saturday, October 10, 10:00 AM.
18 BUILDING VILLAGE OF YESTERYEAR
Finest exhibit of its kind in the south! Building after Building of Pure
Nostalgia plus the 500 HP Sawmill Steam Engine. A must see!
THE 1998 MIDWAY
AMUSEMENTS OF AMERICA America's largest carnival company
(1998 Guiness Book of World Records) will bring two units to
greenville with 35-40 thrilling rides, shows, music, mirth and memories.
As usual the BIGGEST Midway East of Raleigh!
GENERAL ADMISSIONS
199S FREE ATTRACTIONS
1.CHILDREN OF ALL AGES will love the barnyard located in the swine
building! A wonderful collection of animals to feed, touch, and hold. Small
charge for pony rides! Sponsored by Turnage Insurance Co.
2. MERRY HEART AND CO One of the finest puppet shows for kids in the
nation today! 3 shows nightly Mon-Sat.
Sponsored by New South Bank of Greenville
3. BABOON LAGOON a wonderful entertaining and educational show that
you will cheer and applaud . Direct from the Virginia State Fair. Got to see it
to believe it! Monday thru Saturday 3 shows daily. Main midway sponsored
by Pepsi Cola Bottling Co. of Greenville.
4. DEMOLITION DERBY in the Grandstand. Saturday night, 5 pm The Pitt
County Fair Demolition Derby promises to bring you action packed thrills that
have entertained the fair going crowd for three years.
5. ALL THE WAY FROM NEW YORK the sensational Michael Blaine
Hypnosis Show Tuesday-sat Two one hour shows nightly on the big stage
6. WELDE'S BIG BEAR SHOW another thrilling and educational show by
johnny welde. Johnny and his six big bears are guaranteed to entertain the
entire family to the fullest. Sponsored by Garris-Evans Lumber Co of
Greenville
7. THE OLD CAROUSEL ORGAN will belt out midway music all night every
night again the years as well as the giant german fairground organ built in
germany 1895! Independent & Main Midways. Sponsored by fiookei �ikJ
Buchanan Insurance Co.
visit us on the web at wvwv.skantech.compittcountyfair
79tli Anniversary 1920-1998 Ami Still Groxv
Adults $4.00-Kids free with school pass until 6:00PM. Kids $2.00 at night and Saturday. Monday, October 5, through Thursday, October 8 are OPTION NIGHTS Wristbands are for sale inside
the gate for $10.00 or you may purchase straight ride tickets. FREE PARKING. i��iras �� ror sate insrae
?.?�nA� 3H,BD�V�?�Da"y.re,lec'or Famiy Mi9ht- C"P a sPecial Fair couPon ,rom ,he �V "�� for $1.00 discount per person at the gate, Children admitted FREE with parents
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sion!
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7 - All SENIORS ADMITTED FREE 1-6 PM
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7 - ECU and PITT COMMUNITY STUDENT - admitted for $2.00 with student ID
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10 - Wristband on sale inside gate until 4:00 PM and Honored until 6:00 PM
� Kw. ruiw. ui t,i� yaw, wiHiuieii auHiiiitru rncc wim parents.
Pitt County Fair





snorts
iiiJilL���The East Carolinian
Football sends Army Cadets home defeated
8 Tundty. October 6,
30-25 win improves
Pirate record to 3-1
I
Travis Bark lev
senior writer
An ECU record crowd of 40,607
watched the Pirates defeat Army
on Saturday 30-25 in Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium.
The previous record of 38,902
was set last season in a shut-out
loss to South Carolina.
Quarterback Bobby Weaver made
sure the Pirates wouldn't be
blanked this time, as he led the
team to three touchdowns on its
first three possessions. Both
Weaver and David Garrard took
advantage of man to man coverage
in the Army secondary to find
wideouts LaMont Chappell and
Troy Smith on numerous long
passing plays. Both Chappell and
Smith had over 100 yards receiv-
ing in the game. Chappell said
going deep was a big part of the
Pirate game plan.
"We knew that they were going
to play man coverage against the
receivers Chappell said. "So that
gives us a chance to throw a lot of
deep balls and a lot of comebacks
Chappell admitted he was
somewhat surprised that Army
stayed in man coverage.
"I guess I'm kind of surprised
because I felt that if we hurt them
for a little while I kind of figured
that they would go to zone cover-
age Chappell said.
Army's adjustments never came
however, allowing ECU to rack up
384 passing yards and a 21-0 first
quarter lead. Head coach Steve
Logan said he stressed the impor-
tance of getting out in front.
"We had two premises going
into the game Logan said.
"Number one, get off to a good
start and number two, win the
fourth quarter. We jumped out 21-
0 and won the fourth quarter 3-0
Army battled back in the second
quarter, scoring 17 points to cut
ECU's lead to 27-17 at the half.
Senior safety Kelvin Suggs said
Army's comeback wasn't a matter
of ECU letting up; the Cadets are
Quarterback Bobby Weaver throws a pass.
PHOTO COURTESY 8Y MARC CRIPPEN
just a good team that refuses to
quit.
"The triple option is something
that you're never going to get down
pat Suggs said. "They're always
going to make plays, no matter how
you play against them. They're
going to make big plays.
Fortunately we were able to keep
our composure and go out and
make plays too
Junior linebacker Jeff Kerr
echoed Suggs' sentiments.
Humanitarian Bowl
to host runner up
C-USA to send second
place team to Boise
Stephen Scmramm
SENIOR WRITER
Every year college football fans
dream of their teams concluding
seasons with glorious victories
under the warm sunshine of
Miami, on the hallowed ground
of Pasadena, or the blue turf of
Boise, Idaho. The Humanitarian
Bowl, which is broadcast nation-
ally on ESPN2, is held each year
in Boise, and after only one year
of existence has linked a deal
with Conference USA.
This summer C-USA agreed
to send its second-place team to
Boise. The two-year deal has the
C-USA runner-up play the Big
West Conference Champion.
Last year's inaugural game pitted
Cincinnati against Utah State.
Though Cincinnati was a member
of C-USA it went to the bowl as an
at-large selection.
"I think anytime there are addi-
tional bowl opportunities for your
team it's outstanding ECU ath-
letics director Mike Hamrick said.
"It's definitely something to look
forward to. You get to go to a bowl
game, get on national television
and get three-quarters of a million
dollars
The deal gives a second bowl
tie-in to C-USA. The only other
bowl with ties to the conference is
the Liberty Bowl, in which the
conference champion will play.
"I think it legitimizes the con-
ference, for that bowl gives us
credibility nationally and helps the
conference in a variety of ways like
recruiting and national exposure
Hamrick said.
Reaction from players about
this new opportunity was over-
whelmingly positive.
"The fact that there is a new
bowl tie-in for the second-place
team is a good experience ECU
flanker LaMont Chappell said. "It
makes C-USA more like other
conferences. With more than one
tie-in there are a lot of chances for
other teams
The game will be held on
December 30, 1998 on the blue
turf of Boise State University's
"It's definitely something to
look forward to. You get to go
to a bowl game, get on national
television and get three-quarters
of a million dollars
Mike Hamrick
ECU athletics director
Bronco Stadium. Though Boise
may not be high on many fans' lists
of destinations for the new year,
the Pirates have no reservations
about playing there.
"I've been to Boise and it's a
great community. They've got a
nice stadium and they do a great
job with it. They take a lot of pride
in their bowl game. I think it's
something our players and coaches
can look forward to very much
Hamrick said.
"I talked to some of the
Cincinnati players and they said
that it was a good experience and
that they had lots of fun
Chappell said.
The new bowl opportunity
gives the Pirates something new
for which to strive.
"It would mean a lot because
we haven't been to a bowl game
since 1995. To go to a bowl would
mean a lot to get respect national-
ly and from other teams
Chappell said.
'They're in it until the end
Kerr said. "They don't quit. I'll be
proud to have any one of them
represent my country any day
Fans, players and coaches were
inconvenienced during the game
by a malfunctioning scoreboard.
The scoreboard remained out of
commission for the entire game,
leaving most people in the dark
about time remaining, down, dis-
tance and game score.
Running back Leonard Henry
said playing without a scoreboard
was extremely frustrating.
"I was asking the referee or
asking the coaches what time it
was Henry said.
Senior defensive tackle Brian
Johnson said playing without the
scoreboard was a mixed blessing.
"It's good and bad Johnson
said. "In the beginning when it
was 21-0, we couldn't look up
and see 21-0. It keeps you from
thinking, 'Well this game is over
because you don't know how
much time is left. You don't know
what's really going on, so you just
have to play every down like it's
the last down
Johnson had three tackles and
recovered a fumble in the game,
his first as a starter. He said the
record crowd helped get the play-
ers pumped up.
"It was just nice to see all of
those people there. I'll never forget
that my whole life Henry said.
"When we came out we were
very excited, especially the seniors,
it was real big for us Johnson said.
"At the beginning of the game
when we all huddled in the end
zone, me, Rod Coleman and Travis
Darden just looked around and
said, 'Man this is great, this is what
it's all about
The Pirates came out strong on Saturday, defeating the Cadets 30-25 for their first conference win of the season. With over 40.000
fans packed into the stands to support the men in purple and gold, ECU set a new attendance record at Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium.
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
Kerr said it was important that
the fans not only showed up but
that they stayed for the entire
game.
"I can't thank the fans enough
Kerr said. "Usually at halftime you
look up and a lot of people are
gone. But we looked up at halftime
and it was still packed
ECU will try to break another
attendance record on Saturday,
when the Pirates play their home-
coming game against UAB. Kickoff
is set for 3:30 p.m.
StatsARMYECU
First Downs2022
Net Yards Rushing301140
Net Yards Passing81384
Total Net Yards382524
Time of Possession30:5229:35
Third Down Conversions4ofl58 of 16
Sacks: Number-Yards3-213-22
�Source: ECU Sports Information
srortss
Congratulations GO PIRATES
The women's soccer team came back to beat Florida Atlantic on
Saturday for a 2-1 victory. This was the team's second consecutive
win and brings its record to 6-3 on the season.
The men's cross country team finished third at the Wake Forest
Cross County Invitational with 47 points behind Wake Forest (37
points) and East Tennessee State (43 points). The team was led by
Stuart Will and Justin England.
Michael Huez and Kenny Kirby of the men's tennis team won the
No. 2 doubles flight of the NikeWolfpack Invitational, beating the
duo from N.C. State 8-5 for the championship.
The women's tennis team claimed four singles flights and one
doubles flight at the UNC Wilmington Fall Invitational. Winners
for the Lady Pirates include: Anne Svae, Asa Ellbring, Meredith
Spears, Andrea Terrill and Catherine Morgan.
Swim team breaks
four school records
Promising season
appears to be ahead
Stephen Scmramm
SENIOR W RITBR
Last week the ECU swim team
held its annual pcntathalon. The
pcntathalon is one of the presea-
son intra-squad meets the team
holds. This year's pcntathalon saw
four meet records broken and
many promising times.
The pentathalon is made up of
five events in which every swim-
mer competes. The events, the
200 yard individual medley, the
100 yard butterfly, the 100 yard
backstroke, the 100 yard breast-
stroke and the 100 yard freestyle,
give the coaches a good idea of the
team's progress.
"It gives the coaching staff an
opportunity to see where we are in
regards to conditioning and in
regards to racing ability. It's early
but we had some really really good
swims head coach Rick Kobe
said.
Freshman Amy I lendrick set a
SEE SWIMMING. PAGE 10
Volleyball picks up two conference wins
Team defeats VCUand
William and Mary
Eric Couch
staff writer
The Lady Pirate volleyball team
took two conference wins in a row
this weekend with victories over
Virginia Commonwealth and
William and Mary.
The team picked up its first con-
ference win over VCU with a 3-1
victory. The Pirates had to come
back in the early part of the match
after finding themselves down 5-0
in the first game for a VCU victory.
It looked to be more of the same
in the second game with VCU
jumping out to the first seven
scores of the game, but that was
before the Pirates rallied and took
the second game. The Pirates
would never look back after that
and dominated the next two games
to clinch the match.
Sophomore Cinta Claro had 25
kills and LuCinda Mason added 20
kills. For Claro, 25 kills was just
one short of her career high.
Shannon Kaess added nine kills
and a team high 11 digs. Freshman
Lisa Donovan tacked on 58 assists
to bring her season total to 659,
which ranks ninth all-time on the
ECU single-season charts.
In the second game of the week-
end the Pirates took on William and
Mary. The last win over William
and Mary by a Pirate volleyball
team was in 1982, which was
marked a stretch of 22 consecutive
losses to the Tribe.
The Pirates overcame those
odds and took three out of four
games to win the match over the
Tribe. In the first game, ECU
came back from an 11-7 deficit to
take a 15-13 win. In the second
game the Pirates overcame a sec-
ond deficit and came back from 13-
3 by scoring the last 12 points of the
game for a 15-13 win. The Pirates
fell short in the third game but
clinched the match in the fourth
with a 15-11 score.
SEE V0UEYBAU PAGE I
I
I
Who's
ftfflfc
on the volleyball court
Cinta Claro
In the last two games, Claro
has led the Pirate team with 39
kills. She has also contributed
13 digs and four service aces.
LuCinda Mason
In the two wins this weekend,
Mason added 29 kills. She also
helped with 22 digs and seven
blocks?
novan
i added to her
1st total with 77
r mark of 659 now
ith iMMilron the ECU
single-season charts.
i
I
I
I





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ECU
22
140
384
524
29:35
8 of 16
3-22
Information
aks
rds
every swim-
: events, the
medley, the
the 100 yard
yard breast-
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Rick Kobe
endrick set a
'AGE 10
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139
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9 Timdiy, October 6, 1998
sports
Thi Eut Carolinian
Adaptive Sports Day to be held
GROUP THERAPY
EVERY TUESDAY NIGHT
at THE SPORTS PAD
4 PEOPLE
4 SHOTS
1 PITCHER
1 LOW PRICE $8 & 8-BALL POOL
Hmm CASH POT
ARISE to host event
on Oct. 17
Jason Latour
staff writer
With a number of planned activi-
ties and events in the coming
weeks, ECU students, staff and
faculty will have the opportunity
to participate and learn more about
the Adapted Recreation and
Intramural Sports Enrichment pro-
gram (ARISE).
The program offers a whole host
of events in the next month,
including its continuing
Wheelchair Basketball program
and climbing wall exhibitions, as
well as the Adapted Sports Day, its
biggest event of the month.
The Adapted Sports Day is
scheduled for Oct. 17 and will offer
demonstrations on adapted sports
such as volleyball, basketball,
handcrank biking, scuba diving,
kayaking and wheelchair basket-
ball.
"We have a variety of activities
planned for Adapted Sports Day,
designed to give people the oppor-
tunity to try out adapted sports
program director Terry Edwards
said.
"People will be given the
opportunity to try out sports like
wheelchair basketball, or hand-
crank biking and hopefully they
will gain an appreciation for what it
is like to play sports with a disabili-
ty
Participating in the event is the
The ECU Student Media Board invites
applications for the position of
Day Student Representative
for the 1998-99 academic year.
Applications are available from the Student Media
Board office on the second floor of the Student
Publications Building.
The deadline for submitting an application is
Tuesday, Oct. 20 at 4 p.m.
For information, call the ECU Student Media Board
office at 328-6009.
Volleyball
continued from page 8
Once again, Claro led the Pirates
with 14 kills and eight digs and
Mason added nine kills, 12 digs and
five blocks. Donovan had 19 assists
and two service aces with 11 digs
and a career high five blocks. Liz
Hall added her own 3 kills and a
match high 18 digs.
Head coach Kim Walker was
very pleased with this win.
"This was a great win for us
because ECU hasn't beaten
Wilmington Wheel Chair
Basketball Team. The team will
give skills demonstrations, teach
techniques and offer a large pre-
sentation.
Edwards hopes that the demon-
strations will encourage more peo-
ple, especially those who arc dis-
abled, to participate in the pro-
gram.
"Just seeing these sports makes
people more interested Student
Recreation Center director Nancy
Mize said. "This event should
serve as a good forum to spread
awareness
Edwards said that many stu-
dents on campus are not aware of
the opportunities that are offered
for the disabled.
"The challenge is reaching peo-
ple with these opportunities
SEE ARISE. PAGE 10
William and Mary for a very long
time. It was a great job by our ath-
letes and a real team effort. Wc
stepped up and did everything we
had to do to win Walker said.
Next up for the ECU volleyball
team is UNC-Wilmington. The
match is at home and is set for
tonight at 7 p.m.
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1





mmmm
l
10 Tundiy, Octobtr 8. 1898
sports
Th� East Carolinian
ARISE
continued from page 9
Edwards said.
Many of the events, such as
kayaking and scuba diving, will also
tie into the Aqua Exercise program
which is offered through the
Student Recreation Center swim-
ming pool. These programs will
begin some time in the coming year
and are planned to give an opportu-
nity for the physically disabled to
learn about Aqua Exercise. The
goal is to have at least five sessions
in the near future and then to
encourage participants to come in
on an individual basis.
Another new addition to the
ARISE program is the use of email
to send out news about upcoming
events. Edwards feels the use of
email is a key component in
spreading information about
ARISE and says she has received
good feedback from it. Email infor-
mation is currently only posted for
staff and faculty but plans to broad-
en its use in the future.
Swimming
continued from page 8
new meet record with a stunning
100 backstroke time of 58:46.
"Amy Hendrick swam a 100
backstroke that was one tenth off of
our varsity record. Normally you
don't set those records until later in
the season when everybody's rest-
ed Kobe said.
Courtney Foster set a new pen-
tathalon record in the 100 freestyle
with a time of 54:45. Other event
winners were Allison Holland with
a 2:16.35 in the 200 individual med-
ley, Cammy Crossen with a 1:01.37
in the 100 butterfly and Samantha
Perry with a 1:08.35 in the 100
breaststroke.
On the men's side, Matt Jabs set
a pentathalon record in the 100
freestyle with a time of 47.48. In
addition to the freestyle, Jabs also
won the 100 breaststroke with a
time of 1:02.03. Richard Chen won
the 100 butterfly with a time of
53.41. In the 100 backstroke, Paul
Pinther won with a 54.53. Will
Hudgins won the 200 individual
medley with a time of 2:00.98.
The final intra-squad meet is the
Purple and Gold meet on Oct. 15th.
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Films are free to students with a current, valid ECU One
Card. Dinner tickets are $12 each. To reserve your dinner
ticket, come to the CTO in Mendenhall Student Center by
Thursday, October 8, 1998 and pay with cash, a meal
card, or your declining balance. Dinner will be served at
6:00pm in the Great Room.
CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE HOURS Monday - Friday 8:30am
to 6:00pm 252.328.4788 or 1.800.ECU.ARTS;
Deafspeech impaired access 252.328.4736
Get Pierced &
amf'�
eyebrow,
oarcartilag�
navel:25
We will beAt any
competitor's advertised
prices!
Large selection of imported
and domestic jewelry!
�We do all
exotic piercings
� Wt specialize in tattooing and
body piercing only
� Wo ore Greenville's only health
department inspected studio
� Wo have boon in business over 8
years with 15 years experience
Tuesday TrmRsday: 1-9 p.m Friday: HO p.m Saturday: 12-10 p.m.
CALL US! 756-0600
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
TATTOOING BY AWARD WINNING ARTISTS!
From downtown, go straight down Dickinson Avenue
Extension, located at 4685 US Hwy. 13, Greenville.
Let's Oo
Krogering!
Caffeine Free Piet Cokei, Sprite,
Diet Coke or
Coca Cola Classic
6-pack 20-oz. btls.
Frozen
Kroger
Pot Pics
7-oz
'1
Serve 'n Save
Lunchmeats
1-lb. pkg.
Campbell's
Tomato Soup
1075-oz.
25109
SENIORS
SHOW YOUR PURPLE PIRATE PASS NOW
AND RECEIVE A FREE T-SHIRT
WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY
OCTOBER 7 AND 8
9AM-2PM
IN FRONT OF STUDENT STORE
WRIGHT PLAZA
Raeford Smoked Turkey Breast
or Russer Va. Brand Ham or
Canadian
Maple Ham
Pound
3
99
Tablets, Gel Oaplets or
Liqui-gels
Advil
Caplets
40-50-ct.
3
99
100-oz. Liquid or
Surf Powder
Detergent
33-42-load
4
99
WED
7
THUR
8
FRI
9
SAT
10
Items & Prices Good Through October 10,1998 In
Greenville. Copyright 1998 Kroger Mid-Atlantic. We
reserve the right to limit quantities. None sold to
dealers.
L
ino

LIMITED SUPPLY SO GET THERE EARLY
SPONSORED BY
ECU AMBASSADORS
&
ECU ALUMNI ASSOCIATION





Thi East Carolinian
14th St.
Jfl Nail Cam f- Salon 1sti

Airhriish � Sail Art
PEDICURE &
MANICURE
$28.00
arfor
kouts!
incewear Shop
�A
tf'�Jf�Hflf
1 LTO.
rille � 756-6670
�We do all
exotit piercings
lie in tattooing and
body piercing only
lenville's only health
lent inspected studio
n in business over 8
IS years experience
urday: 12-10 p.m.
RTISTS!
on Avenue
�eenvllle.
10W
1LY
1 Tuesday, October 6, 1998
FOR RENT
5 BEDROOM, 2 bath house. Uni-
versity area. Completely remodeled.
Very nice kitchen and bathrooms.
Next to park with ample parking.
$950. 931-0113.
WILOWOOD VILLA, washerdryer,
dishwasher, 3 story. Call 752-8900
or 252-332-6783. Very affordable
and spacious.
WANTED: SOMEONE To sublease
an efficiency apartment in Ringgold
Towers ASAP. Fully furnished.
$288mo. For more info, call 752-
2518.
CONDO FOR Rent: 2000 sq.ft. con-
do, newly renovated, 4 bedrooms, 2
12 baths, washerdryer hook-up.
Available immediately. 752-1899
daytime, 561-2203 pager nights.
ECU AREA 3 bedroom house. Cen-
tral heat, window air, ceiling fans,
washerdryer, just painted, spotless
inside. No yardwork. pets OK. $500
month thru Dec. 830-9502.
LANGSTON PARK Apartments:
$100 off deposit, 2 bedroom, 1 bath
apartments, watersewer included,
all appliances, washerdryer connec-
tions, over 900 sq. ft. Available now.
$410. Call 758-1921
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$275month. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apts 125 Avery St. Green-
ville. 758-6596.
WESLEY COMMONS South: $100
off deposit, 2 bedroom, 1 bath
apartments, watersewer included,
washerdryer, 6 blocks from cam-
pus. Available now. $440. Call 758-
1921.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED to share 2
bedroom apartment, professional,
clean, upperclassman or grad stud-
ent preferred, $245 plus 12 utili-
ties. Call 321-2114 after 5 p.m.
HARDWORKING FEMALE student
looking for same to share 2 BR apt.
$235 a month 12 bills at Ring-
gold Towers. Free parking! Great lo-
cation! 758-6978.
SEEKING SOMEONE to share nice
2 BR 2 bath apt. Half rent and half
utilities. Prefer upperclassmen or
graduate. Please call for more info,
439-0230
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP to
share 4 bedroom house walking dis-
tance from campus, fenced in yard,
screened in porch, carport. For more
info call 413-0352.
FOR SALE
AAAA! EARLY Specials! Cancun
& Jamaica! 7 nights air and hotel
from $399! Includes free food,
drinks, parties! 1998 Better Business
Bureau AwardWinner! springbreak-
travel.com 1-800-678-6386
AAAA EARLY Specials! Panama
City! Room with kitchen $129! In-
cludes 7 free parties! Daytona $149!
New Hotspot-South Beach $129! Co-
coa Beach $149! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
CAR FOR sale: '94 Ford Taurus.
White with blue interior. V-6. Excel-
lent condition. Loaded with car
phone. $5,200. Call 756-9081.
ONE YEAR old dining table and
chairs. In great condition. $300
OBO. Call 413-0352.
AAAAI SPRING Break Travel was
1 of 6 small businesses in the US
recbgnized by Better Business Bu-
reaus for outstanding ethics in the
marketplace! springbreaktravel.com
1-800-678-6386
MOVING SALE: Household furni-
ture and appliances, other items,
752-8608.
AAAA-t-l EARLY Spring Break Spe-
cials! Bahamas Party Cruise! 6 days
$279! Includes most meals! Awe-
some beaches, nightlife! Departs
from Florida! 1998 BBB AwardWin-
ner! springbreaktravel.com 1-800-
678-6386
MALE BOXER puppy. AKC cham-
pion bloodline, pick of the litter; brin-
dle with white and black mask,
ready Oct. 21 $250. Call 329-0079
for more info.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
919)496-2224
HELP WANTED
1 SPRING Break company is now
hiring motivated individuals to prom-
ote America's best Spring Break va-
cations. Sell trips, earn cash, go free!
1-800-234-7007 www.endlesssum-
mertours.com
WANTED: B6W photographer for
work on alcohol and drug misper-
ception campaign. Take photos for
media campaign. Great for resume!
Contact Donna at Health Promotion
and Wetl-Being, 328-6793.
PART-TIME CLERICAL. Parttime
data entry clerk needed for AM and
early PM hours. Close to campus.
Contact Kay Tripp at 757-2131.
MAKE EASY money! Go on Spring
Break for Free! USA Spring Break off-
ers Cancun, Bahamas, Jamaica, and
Florida packages and is currently ac-
cepting applications for campus
sales representatives. Call 1-888-
SPRINGBREAK.
WANTED: ENERGETIC telemarket-
ers to work hours: 5:30-9 p.m. Mon-
day-Thursday, 4:30-8 p.m. Sunday.
Apply in person 5-9 p.m. Energy Sav-
ers Windows & Siding, Inc Winter-
green Commercial Park, Suite 0,
Firetower Road, Greenville.
IN-LINE HOCKEY Rink Attendant.
The Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department is recruiting individuals
with some background knowledge
with in-line hockey. Applicants will
be responsible for overseeing both
the skateboard park and in-line hock-
ey rink at the Jaycee Park. Salary
rates range from $5.15 to $6.50 per
hour. For more information, please
call Ben James or Michael Daly at
329-4550 after 2PM.
CYPRESS LANDING. Now hiring
marketing assistants SunThur. 4
p.m9 p.m 20-22 hours weekly.
Great hourly wage plus bonus. Must
have strong communication skills,
like talking to people, customer serv-
ice oriented & team player. Main
function will be telephoning custom-
ers. Call Craig Wheeler MonFri. to
schedule interviews, 975-8100.
Dapper
Dan's
Retro and Vintage Clothing
Handmade Silver
fewelry c More.
classifieds
FOR SALE
PIANO: YAMAHA Clavinova
CVP83, like new, disc drive. 88 keys,
$2800. Call after 6 p.m 321-6889.
BLACK LAB puppies for sale, AKC
registered, championship blood
lines, 6 males left, going fast, $250.
756-2598 nights, 757-1265 days.
Washer & Dryers,
X-Large Capacity,
$40 a Month
call 236-5097
SERVICES
COME DOWN to Mr. Greg's Total
Care and meet the new licensed nail
technician. October Special is Mani-
curePedicure for $35. Only with ap-
pointment. Call 353-6489.
1999 INTERNSHIPS! Attention un-
dergraduate business students. Now
interviewing on campus for manag-
ers across Virginia, North and South
Carolina for summer of 1999. Aver-
age earnings last summer $7,000.
Call Tuition Painters at (800) 393-
4521 or e-mail at tuipaint@bell-
south.net
HELP WANTED
SPRINGBREAK. CANCUN, Florida,
Jamaica, South Padre, Bahamas,
Etc Best hotels, parties, prices.
Book early and save Earn money
trips! Campus repsorganizations
wanted. Call Inter-Campus Programs
1-800-327-6013 222 www.icpt.com
ABSOLUTE SPRING Break Take
2" 2 Free Trips on Only 15 Sales
andEarn $$$$. Jamaica, Cancun.
Bahamas. Florida. Padre! lowest Pric-
es! Free Meals, Parties & Drinks.
"Limited Offer 1-800-426-
7710www.sunsplashtours.com
CASHIER TELLER needed imme-
diately. Work 6-20 hours per week.
Work on Thurs. andor Fri. only.
Must pass criminalcredit check.
Send resume to PO Box 493, Tar-
boro, NC 27886.
YOUTH IN-LINE Hockey Coaches.
The Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department is recruiting part-time
youth In-Line Hockey coaches. Ap-
plicants must possess some knowl-
edge of the hockey skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 5-18, in
hockey fundamentals. This program
will run from early October to mid-
December. Salary rates start at
$5.15 per hour. For more informa-
tion, please call Ben James or
Michael Daly at 329-4550 after
2PM.
MODELS FOR photo study. Reputa-
ble amateur photographer seeking
slim young women for photo project.
Send note, photo (if available), and
phone for immediate reply. Paul
Hronjak, 3015-A Wynfall Lane, Wil-
son, NC 27893-9677.
ARE YOU a female graduate stud-
ent? Live in position available, bene-
fits including: free room and board,
free parking and a monthly stipend.
If you are interested, please call 758-
5568.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT - Fishing
industry. Excellent student earnings
& benefits potential (up to
$2,850mo. RoomBoard). All
skill levels. Don't pay outrageous
agency fees! Ask us how! 517-336-
4171 ext. A53621
EARN WHILE YOU learn, up to
$1,000.00 wk. Day and night
shift. Clean, secure working at-
mosphere. Playmates Adult En-
tertainment. 252-747-7686 for in-
terview.
PART-TIME position: new company
hiring data input person to help set
up accounting and operating sys-
tems. Accountingcomputer experi-
ence preferred: 10�15 flexible hours
per week; $6 per hour. Respond to
830-2349.
CRUISE SHIP Employment - Work-
ers earn up to $2.000month
(wtips & benefits). World Travel!
Land-Tour jobs up to $5,000-
$7,000summer. Ask us how! 517-
336-4235 Ext. C53621
WANTED: STUDENTS who like to
have fun! Need characters for the
Men in Black, part of an alcohol and
drug misperception campaign. For
more information call Donna at
Health Promotion and Well-Being,
328-6793.
SYLVAN LEARNING Center is seek-
ing a study buddy for a college stud-
ent taking accounting. We are look-
ing for a reliable person who is avail-
able immediately on MWF 12-2:30
and TTH 9-11:30. Please apply at
2428 S. Charles Blvd.
HIRING-MUST have car and driv-
er's license. Yard sign delivering for
a local company. Good pay, flexible
schedule, steady work. Yard signs
are easy to handle, take from one
job-site to the next. Paid per sign.
Page Tim at 551-7156 (Handy Help-
ers, Inc.) 2 positions available
$1260 FUNDRAISER credit card
fundraiser for student organizations.
You've seen other groups doing it,
now it's your turn. One week is all it
takes. No gimmicks, no tricks, no ob-
ligation. Call for information today. 1-
800-932-0528 x 65. www.ocmcon-
cepts.com
NOW HIRING exotic dancers, sing-
ing telegrams, and adult entertain-
ers. You must be at least 18 yrs
drug free, own transportation and
phone. Up to$1.500 weekly. Call
758-2737.
The Eait Carolinian
GREEK PERSONALS
ALPHA PHI, we had a great time
visiting the stars last Thursday night.
Let's do it again. Rock on, Sigma Pi
DELTA SIGMA Phi, thanks so much
for a great social last Thursday! We
had a blast, to say the least. Love,
Zeta Tau Alpha
PI KAPPA Alpha, Alpha Delta Pi and
Kappa Alpha, we had a great time,
as always, at Tuesday's Quad. Let's
do it again. Love, the sisters and new
members of Alpha Xi Delta
ZETA TAU Alpha would like to
thank Sigma Nu for the wonderful
P.J. Social. You guys are great. Can't
wait to do it again soon!
ALPHA XI Delta would like to thank
everyone who came to our Grab-a-
Date. It was a night to remember, if
we only could.
TO ZETA, we had a great time at
the social. Hope to see All of you
again next tie. Sigma NU
TO ALPHA Omicron Pi, thank-you
for a great time at the social. Hey
girls, we came, we saw, and we got
some. Your bad boys from Sigma Nu
PI KAPPA Alpha. Sigma Phi Epsilon,
and Sigma, thanks for the great
Quad last Wed. We had a blast.
Love, the sisters and new members
of Zeta Tau Alpha
LAMBDA CHI Alpha, we had a
blast at the roller skating social, can't
wait to do it again! Love, the sisters
and new members of Sigma Sigma
Sigma
PI KAPPA Alpha, Sigma Phi Epsi-
lon, and Chi Omega, we had a blast
at the Quad Wed. night, hope to get
together again soonl Love, Sigma
Sigma Sigma
THE SISTERS of Alpha Phi would
like to congratulate Arrington Bays-
den on making her debut. We love
you!
THE ALPHA Phi sisters would like
to congratulate Jen Cooper on her
tennis victory last week, and Becky
Gunn for dominating her division.
You guys rock!
THANKS SIGMA Alpha Epsilon for
being our Adopt-A-Fraternity last
week! We hope you had a good one.
Love, the sisters and new members
of Zeta Tau Alpha
CONGRATULATIONS MONICA
Lopez on your engagement to Pa-
trick Howerton. The sisters of Alpha
Phi wish you, the best! We love you
both!
SIGMA PI would like to introduce
our newest pledge class: Michael
Ashby, Willis Brantley, Derek Helsel.
David Ridoutt, and Matt Hurrell.
Good luck guys.
PI KAPPA Tau, Parents Weekend
was a great success! Thanks for all
your hard work! We love you guys!
Love, Zeta
ALPHA OMICRON Pi, we had a
great time at the game last week.
We had lots of fun. Love, Alpha Phi
HALLOWEEN
IS COMING
PERSONALS
LOSE WEIGHT while you sleep!
100 natural. Minister Mimms lost
30 pounds in 5 weeks. Dr. Hack-
worth lost 38 lbs. in 8 weeks. I lost
6 12 inches in 2 months. Call Cin-
dy at 919-736-7131.
GREEK PERSONALS
KAPPA ALPHA, we had a great
time tailgating with you guys at the
2nd Annual Parents Weekend, can't
wait till next time! Love, the sisters
and new members of Sigma Sigma
Sigma
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA Del-
ta Pi in your win over Sigma Sigma
Sigma in flag football! Keep up the
good work!
PI KAPPA Alpha. Kappa Alpha, and
Alpha Xi Delta, we had fun at the
Quad last week! Hope we can get to-
gether again soon! Love. Alpha Delta
Pi
ANNOUNCEMENTS
OTHER
SPRING BREAK - Plan Now! Can-
cun. Jamaica, Mazatlan, & S. Padre.
Early bird savings until Oct. 31st.
America's best prices 8- packages.
Campus sales reps wanted. Earn
free trips cash. 1.800.SURFS.UP
www.studentexpress.com
SPRING BREAK 99! Cancun Nas-
sau Jamaica 'Mazatlan � Acapulco
' Bahamas Cruise Florida' Florida '
South Padre. Travel Free and make
lots of Cash! Top reps are offered
full-time staff jobs. Lowest price
Guaranteed. Call now for details!
www.classtravel.com 800838-6411
ANNOUNCEMENTS
GAMMA BETA Phi will hold their
next meeting at 5p.m. Oct. 8 in Gen-
eral Classroom Room 1010.
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS MINIS-
TRY meets each Tuesday 6-8 p.m. at
First Presbyterian on the corner of
14th & Elm Streets. Join us for din-
ner and a program. For info, or a ride
call Kim � 752-8758 or 3m@broad-
cast.net.
WALTZ WORKSHOP, Sat. Oct. 10.
1:30-4:30 p.m. followed by potluck
dinner at 5:30 and contra dance at 7.
Location: Willis Bldg , 1st and Reade
Sts. Admission: Workshop. $3 stud-
ents. $5-6 public. Free beginner's in-
struction for contra dance. 7-7:30;
dance from 7:30 to 10:30. ECU Folk
and Country Dancers, 328-0237 or
830-4503. Come alone or bring a
friend!
GOLDEN KEY National Honor So-
ciety will meet today in GCB Room
1003 at 5:30. Please join us.
SOCCER PREVIEWREGISTRA-
TION meeting: anyone in Playing
Soccer intramurals must attend the
registration meeting on Mon. Oct. 12
at 5 p.m. in Mendenhall Student
Center room 244. Men and women's
team only, co-rec is not offered in
soccer.
STRESS MANAGEMENT work-
shop: Wednesday 3:30-4:30. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop on October 7th. If you
are interested in this workshop, con-
tact the Center at 328-6661.
BECOMING A Successful Student
Workshop: Thursday 3:30-4:30. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop on October 8th. If you
are interested in this workshop, con-
tact the Center at 328-6661.
AIR HOCKEY Registration Deadline:
The new air hockey tournament is
right around the corner Anyone in-
terested in playing in the air hockey
tournament should register by Tues-
day, Oct. 6 at 5 p.m. in the SRC
main office, room 128. The tourna-
ment will be held on Wed Oct. 7th
at 8 p.m. in the MSC Billiards Room
WANT TO work on those abs? Want
to learn how to achieve that wash-
board stomach? Then Absolutions is
for you! Register now through Oct. 6
for a Free workshop that targets that
area of the body Everyone wants to
improve! Class-format workouts last
about 45 minutes each. Call or stop
by the SRC Main office @ 328-6387.
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: Thursday 3:30-4:30PM.
The Center for Counseling and Stud-
ent Development is offering the fol-
lowing workshop on October 8th. If
you are interested in this workshop,
contact the Center at 328-6661.
SOCCER OFFICIALS Meeting: an-
yone interested in officiating intra-
mural soccer must attend the meet-
ing on Thurs. Oct. 8 at 5 p.m. in the
SRC room 202. Some skill is recom-
mended.
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
Workshop: Wednesday 11:00-12:00.
The Center for Counseling and Stud-
ent Development is offering the fol-
lowing workshop on October 7th. If
you are interested in this workshop.
contact the Center at 328-6661.
WHITE WATER Excursion! Get wet
and ready to paddle as we explore
the New River, along the Caroli-
naVirginia border. This river hap-
pens to be the Second oldest river in
the world! Dates: Oct. 23-25. Regis-
tration deadline is Oct. 16th. 5 p.m.
Member cost is $48. For further info,
contact Adventure Program-
mingDept. of Recreational Services
e 328-6387
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION Work-
shop: Wednesday 11:00-12:00. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop on October 7th. If you
are interested in this workshop, con-
tact the Center at 328-6661.
THE CIRCLE K Club invites you to
join us in Friendship. Fellowship, and
Leadership Monday nights at 7 p.m.
in the Mendenhall Mufti-Purpose
Room.
ADVERTISE IN THE
CLASSIFIEDS
328-6009
IT WORKS!
Advertise in
The East Carolinian
classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE$4.00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional words 50 each
STUDENT LINE AD RATE$2.00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional words 50 each
Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify. The East Carolinian reserves the right to refuse
fhis rate for any ad deemed to be non-student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE$1.00
add to above fine rate for either BOLD or ALL CAPS type.
All classified ads placed by individuals or campus groups must be
prepaid. Classified ads placed by a business must be prepaid unless
credit has been established.
Cancelled ads can be removed from the paper if notification is
made before the deadline, but no cash refunds are given. No proofs or
tearsheets are available.
The Personals section of the classifieds is intended for
non-commercial communication placed by individuals or campus groups.
Business ads will not be placed in this section.
All Personals are subject to editing for indecent or inflammatory
language as determined by the editors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADUNE4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue





� � - �
k �xwf fKty iUNCf t w�ur$ ??�w wtm vm division of stupcmt tiff
Joanne Student
As campus Hfe runs along each day, photogra-
phers mM be out and about to capture us, the
students, at our best H you can Identify yourself
In any of our pictures, present yoursetf to MSC
109 (Student Leadership) and point "you" out to
the staff there. Rewards win be on hand for your
efforts, so keep a close eye on these pictures!
Gets Her Wheels Don,t Be Fooled By
High Protein Diets!
I couldn't believe my ears when my parents gave me permission to look for a
car. No more looking on the ride board for a way home on the weekends, and
no more taking the bus to Harris Teeter for groceries. My life was going to
become so much easier! Of course, that's after I actually bought the car. I was
determined to do it the right way, not the way my older brother, Joe, would.
My parents started me out on the right four tires by letting me know that car
dealerships are out to make money. My father made me understand that no
matter how it may seem, the dealer will not give me anything for free. My
mother told me that it is my job as a consumer to make all aspects of the deal
work out best for me. In order to do this, I decided I would have to research
the entire purchasing process.
Before I stepped inside the dealership I went to more than one bank and a
credit union to find a car loan with the lowest interest rate. The best they
could do for me was $8,000 at 13, which was outrageous. I thought that my
dreams of driving around Greenville had just been taken right out from under
me. But lucky for me, I don't have too much pride so I asked my parents for
help. I think they had expected that I would call on them because they had
already arranged for a $10,000 loan with a 7 interest rate through their
banker, who had told them the amount I would need to put down and what
my monthly payments would be to get a quality used car.
Once again I had visions of me driving that Honda Accord to the beach on a
sunny Saturday, but I still had work to do. I set out to research the negotiation
process. I knew not to let the dealer know about my loan rates or what I could
afford to pay monthly before we had settled upon an exact price. I found how
to get the upper hand in the negotiations from Consumer Reports, which gave
me the dealer cost of the vehicle and a hint that a sticker price is usually 10 to
20 more than the dealer paid. With this information at hand, I was able to
settle on a price only 5 over what the dealer paid.
I was feeling very confident so I decided to explore any financing deals
offered by the dealer that may work to my advantage. Unfortunately
everything was too good to be true. When I began to figure the numbers I
found that a lower down payment just means more interest paid later. As my
father had told me earlier, there is no such thing as free money. Dealer
financing was not for me. With the car loan from my parents' banker I was
able to drive my 1992 Accord off the lot for $1,000 down and $239 a month.
No worries and no regrets.
While leading health and nutrition authorities such as The American Medical Association,
The American Dietetic Association, and The American Heart Association oppose high
protein diets, many Americans have been fooled into adopting drastic high-protein, crash
diets to achieve weight loss. Be aware that some high protein diets restrict your body from
gaining essential nutrients needed to lead a healthy life. If you want to be happy and
healthy at age 90, it's important to eat an assortment of fruits and vegetables to prevent
heart disease and other chronic illnesses.
Dangers of High Protein Diets
High protein diets create excess protein that is not stored as muscle or fuel. If you eat
more protein than your body can use, the protein is broken down and used for energy or
broken down into nitrogen, which can be toxic in excess amounts.
High protein diets can hurt an athlete's performance. If an athlete fills hisher stomach
with protein, heshe will not be fueling hisher muscles with carbohydrates, the body's
number one and preferred energy source.
High protein diets may make you urinate more frequently, which can increase risk of
dehydration and is a burden on the kidneys and liver.
High protein diets make the human body excrete more calcium at a higher rate increasing
the risk for developing osteoporosis and kidney stones.
High protein diets may cause other side effects including fatigue, mood swings, bad breath
and "goutlike" symptoms - a pain in the joints due to uric acid build up.
High protein diets are often high in fat - greasy burgers, sausage, egg biscuits - and low in
vitamins and fiber.
HOW DO YOU SPEND
YOUR MONEY?
Did you know that
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they spend on sodas, tea, milk, coffee, and books combined.
How to get more bang for your buck!
Graduating in December '98 or May or Summer of 1999? Maximize
use of ALL Services here at ECU! Connect (register) at Career
Services prior to your last two semesters before graduation!
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of links to job, salary, and qualification information
needed through the Outlook Occupational Handbook.






Carolinian





Homecoming tradition updated with online voting
Annual activities
include parade, pep
rally, football game
Steve Losev
news editor
While Homecoming goes high
tech with online voting this year,
the traditional week of festivities
remains largely unchanged.
"There are three things that
come to mind regarding
changes to Homecoming week:
Online voting, the float judging,
and the Spirit Cup Award
Homecoming chair Sarah
Henderson said.
For the first time, voting for
King and Queen of
Homecoming was done online
this year. Web development spe-
cialist John Snowden's months of
writing code for the program
paid off with three days of suc-
cessful voting to decide the
Homecoming Court.
In past years, the float judging
was held during PIRATEFEST,
the annual pep rally-style event
held during Homecoming.
This year, the judging will
take place as the floats parade
through Elm Street, 5th Street,
and Reade Circle. The parade
will start Saturday, Ocl 10 at 10
a.m. and the judges' booth will
be located at Chancellor Eakin's
house.
The Spirit Cup will be award-
ed at the football game's half-
time this year instead of at
PIRATEFEST.
Monday, Ocl 5 at 7 p.m. will
be the reception for the
Homecoming Court. The mem-
bers of the Court will be
announced at that time.
Autograph Night will be held
today at the Plaza Mall at 7 p.m.
At least two members of each
team will be present to give
autographs to Pirate fans.
The judging of the banner
contest will be Wednesday, Oct.
7 at 11:30 a.m. at the
Mendenhall brickyard. In case of
rain, the banners will be brought
to the Mendenhall multi-pur-
pose room.
PIRATEFEST is scheduled
to begin Thursday, Ocl 8 at 7
p.m. and will be located at the
Mendenhall brickyard. There
will be many different perfor-
mances to attract students. The
cheerleading squad, the Pure
Gold dance team, the gospel
choir, the Marching Pirates, and
step dancers are all scheduled to
entertain the crowd. The show
at PIRATEFEST will end with
a fireworks display.
"The fireworks arc going to
be exciting Henderson said.
A canned food drive will also
be held during PIRATEFEST.
The proceeds will go to benefit
the Salvation Army.
Prizes will also be given out
from the Pirate Chest. A student
can receive a prize by reciting
"Purple pride through the years
retro '70s, '80s, and '90s the
theme of this year's
Homecoming. Among the prizes
are items from Dowdy Student
Stores and gift certificates for
restaurants around town.
One lucky winner will be
given the opportunity to choose
a grand prize.
"The student can choose
between something like a TV or
a CD player Henderson said.
Several alumni events are
planned for Friday, Oct. 9,
including tours of the campus,
golf and tennis tournaments, a
reception and a dinner.
Homecoming week will
come to an end Saturday, Ocl 10
with the football game against
the University of Alabama-
Birmingham. During halftime,
the King and Queen of
Homecoming and the winners
of the Spirit Cup will be
announced.
This year's Homecoming parade is slated for Oct. 10 at 10 a.m.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU NEWS BUREAU
Pirate cheerleaders are an integral pert of raising spirit throughout the week by
participating in pep rallies and autograph night.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU NEWS BUREAU
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Receptions, performances abound this week
Entertainment comes
in several forms for
this years festivities
Miccah Smith
foiintainhead editor
When you think of
Homecoming, what comes to
mind? The ECU Alumni
Association and the
Homecoming Committee have a
lot more in mind than pep ral-
lies, parades and blonde beauties
waving from the backseat of a
slow-moving red convertible.
At 8 p.m. Wednesday, rock
historian Barry Drake will pre-
sent a special lecture on '80s
rock in Hendrix Theater. In
keeping with this year's retro
Homecoming theme, Drake's
lecture will hit all the high points
of that dazzingly decadent
decade.
Drake's multimedia presenta-
tion will highlight innovative
'80s artists and the culture that
they popularized. From John
Lennon's death to MTV to com-
pact discs, the '80s were a time
when nothing remained the
same and all the rules were
changed.
Slides, inter-
views, music and
videos make this
presentation a
real eye catcher,
and it's sure to be
great nostalgic
entertainment for
anyone visiting
during Parent's
Weekend.
PIRATE-
FEST will be
held in the brick-
yard Thursday
night from 8-9,
and will feature
the Marching
Pirates and Solid
Gold Dancers.
After the din-
ner honoring this
year's outstanding
alumni, including
Mark Kemp and
Kevin Williamson,
alumni can visit the new Sonic
Plaza beside Joyner Library. In
addition to the Sonic Gates, the.
Media Glockenspiel, Mist Cloud
and Percussive 'Waterfall are
The 1998 parade will take place homecoming morning
The parade it a long standing tradition at ECU homecoming celebrations.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU HEWS BUREAU
PHOTO COURTESf OF 1971 BUCCANEER
scheduled to be up and running.
The School of Music will pro-
vide the evening's entertain-
ment
"There's going to be a combo
that's going to play said Carroll
Dashicll, director of Jazz Studies
at the ECU School of Music.
"We'll have actually 2 different
groups performing
A duo will perform for alumni
as they tour Gray Gallery Friday
afternoon, and later jazz lovers
Bern Drake will present lecture in Hendrix 8 p.m. Wed.
FILE PHOTO
will be welcome to gather
around the. Central Campus
cupola for an outdoor perfor-
mance by selected musicians
from ECU's
Jazz
Ensemble A.
The ensemble, which has
produced two albums, toured
New York this summer, perform-
ing in such prestigious venues as
the Birdland club and Carnegie
Hall.
After Saturday's
Homecoming game, the Alumni
Post-Game Social and Dance, a
perennial favorite, will be held at
the Ramada Inn. Music will be
provided by the band Rise.
Homecoming Committee
Chair Sarah Henderson says
they have tried to make each
event more special than ever
before.
"We're announcing the
Homecoming Court at the
Homecoming Court reception
said Henderson. "We used to do
it just by calling them
From this year's unique per-
formances to annual traditions,
this year's Homecoming
Committee is convinced they
have a celebration planned like
never before.
"We'ft announcing the
Homecoming Court at the
Homecoming Court
reception, we used to do it
just by calling them"
Sarah Henderson
Homecoming Committee Chair
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I
I
sponsored by.
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The 1998
Homecoming Court
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Give us your story and appear in our next ad. Calleast'carolinianat 328-6366.





I
I
Homecoming celebrates roots of education
Time for building
old, new bonds
Amanda Austin
features editor
Erin Alderman
staff writer
Some may wonder, what is
Homecoming and why do we
have it? The purpose of this
annual event can be derived
from looking at the word itself.
Homecoming essentially has
two different meanings; the first
is a coming to or returning home
and the second is an annual
event for colleges and universi-
ties for visiting alumni.
By taking these two meanings
and combining them, you can
find the true meaning of what
Homecoming is all about for col-
leges and universities; a time for
students and alumni from col-
leges and universities to return
and come together as one to cel-
ebrate their years, both past and
present, at ECU as well as to
build friendships and reinforce
the bond of old friendships.
"My concept of
Homecoming is for current stu-
dents and past alumni to cele-
brate life on campus said
Stephen Gray, associate director
of Student Unions.
Gray also believes
Homecoming is meant to be a
time when new and old students
develop new friendships and
make the old ones stronger.
"(Homecoming is coming
back to their roots where they
got their education Gray said.
Homecoming is also a time
for students and organizations to
come together as one and partic-
ipate in planned events.
Homecoming is a tradition
that has been a part of ECU
since the university's years as
East Carolina Teaching College
and East Carolina College and
dates as far back as the 1930s
when Homecoming was cele-
brated on March 8, Founder's
Day.
In the '30s, however,
Homecoming took place during
commencement until it was
eventually rescheduled into
football season.
Homecoming then held the
same purpose then as it does
now�to highlight the complet-
ed school year and to look back
on accomplishments achieved
throughout the year.
Over the years ECU has con-
tinued to celebrate
Homecoming as an annual tradi-
tion and has continually added
new features to the celebration
to better enhance both enter-
Delta Zeta aorority took part in homecoming festivities by decorating their house in past homecoming celebrations.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU HEWS BUREAU
tainment and participation in
events.
In recent years, ECU's
Homecoming celebration has
added many new features and
fun for the students.
According to Gray, in the past
five years the Homecoming
committee has successfully
added an autograph night when
all sports teams are present, a
king and queen reception,
expanded the pirate fest,
brought in more bands for the
parade and more judges to eval-
uate our bands' performances.
In addition, the judges now
verbalize their comments on cas-
sette tapes so that the band
directors can improve the bands'
future performances.
All of these features were
added in hopes to increase stu-
dent participation in homecom-
ing activities and to give stu-
dents and faculty a more vast
selection of activities to choose
from.
"In the nine years that I have
been associated with
Homecoming it has changed a
great deal said Jeffrey
Marshall, assistant director of
University Unions.
Homecoming is a celebration
for all and a time to rejoice and
celebrate your education. Events
are planned for both students
and alumni and there is an activ-
ity to suit almost anyone.
IGRACIAS!
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'GREENVILLE TIMES READER POLL 1998





Homecoming usually brings Pirate victory
ECU to host
Alabama-
Birmingfiam
Mario Scherhaufer
assistant sports editor
Since Oct. 8, 1988, when the
Pirates had thek biggest loss in a
Homecoming game against West
Virginia, 10-30, the ECU football
team had won its Homecoming
games for the past ten consecu-
tive years.
The ECU football program
only lost seven Homecoming
games since 1955, when the
Pirates won their first against
Elon, 13-0.
With a record of 0-7, Western
Carolina appears to be ECU's
favorite Homecoming opponent.
Western Carolina also stands for
ECU's highest out of five shut-
outs for a Homecoming game
which occurred on Oct. 19,1963
and ended 50-0 for the Pirates.
The attendance for
Homecoming games was only
six times below the season's
average since 1963. While the
Homecoming game always used
to attract the biggest crowd to
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium
throughout the '60s, '70s and
'80s, this changed over the last
decade.
"While we played the same
teams for Homecoming games
until the mid80s, this changed
and today it's more a matter of
what team we play and not what
the occasion is said Lee
Workman, assistant athletics
director for Special Programs.
"Today, the Homecoming week-
end is chosen by the date and
not by the team According to
Workman, the game schedule is
developed first and then the
date for the Homecoming game
will show the team that will be
the opponent for the weekend.
"Although all eleven games
of the season are very important
for us, the Homecoming game
has a special meaning, because a
lot of ex-players come to watch
assistant football coach Jerry
MacManus said. "I don't think
that a Homecoming game puts
the players under extra pressure,
but they sure don't want to be
embarrassed in front of their ex-
teammates
According to MacManus, a lot
of activities are going on besides
the game which should make it
special to the crowd.
"Just today I found out that
the University of Alabama is
going to bring their band to our
Homecoming game ECU
Homecoming chair Sarah
Henderson said. According to
ntfil
Photo
The Pirates have not been defeated in a homecoming game since 1998 when they suffered 10-30 loss to West Virginia.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU NEWS BUREAU
Henderson, the Homecoming
King and Queen will be
announced along with the Spirit
Cup Winner during halftime.
"Seven outstanding alumni
will be recognized as well
Henderson said. "Homecoming
means a lot, not only to the stu-
dent body, but also to the return-
ing alumni coming back to see
their team play and to find out
how their former coaches are
doing
This year the Pirates will host
Alabama-Birmingham for the
homecoming game, which is set
to begin at 3:30 p.m. AUB brings
a 2-2 overall record w
Greenville, while ECU stands at
3-1 thus far. The game will mark
the first time in history that the
two teams have met.
positions
available
�required experience w photography
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�good organizationtime management skills
�apply at 2nd floor student publications
building or call 328-6366
Watch for TECs
latest publication
Arts Et Entertainment Magazine of The East Carolinian m I
Whose boobs
are these?
You'llnever
guess
imtftmim





CO
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Just show your ECU student ID at Darryi's across
from campus and get a 25 discount on your entire
dinner check. Try our famous Saucy Barbecued Fbrk
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tonight and enjoy East Carolina's favorite place for
Does not include Alcoholic Beverages
Discount good only on Dinner Menu
fOI





Arts & Entertainment Magazine of The East Carolinian
Wednesday, October 7,1998
Nina M. Dry
Senior Writer
mi
W M Watch out Broadway! here's a new year of talent
dU Wk on the rise. Once again ECU's Playhouse is starting
the year off with a bang, beginning with Calmrrt this
October.
ttttWH0 For those of you who are in the dark about what the
Playhouse is, it's the performance venue for dance and theatre productions at the
Messick Auditorium.
"It's an interesting place where you can catch a rising starfsaid Jeff Woodruff,
managing director of the ECU Playhouse.
This year they're putting on five productions. Kicking it off will be Cabaret on
October 8-13. According to Woodruff, there are four different versions of this
production. The one performed by the Playhouse is closest to the original, with
some additions from the movie version.
"It's an interesting piece Woodruff saidIt"s the fun of the Cabaret versus what
is going on in the 1930s. It's extremely well written; it's a musical with a message
According to Woodruff, this musical is full show-stopping numbers and will
certainly give an audience something to think about. Tickets went on sale this past
Thursday.
Student tickets are $8-$10, staff and faculty tickets are $11-13 and the general
public can get in for $13-15. Performances will be on October 8-10 at 8:00 p.mas
well as a matinee showing at 2:00 p.m. on October 11.
On November 19-24, the production of Modier Courage and Her Children will run.
See Theatre continued on page 6
eatre c98
Preview
Ifs an exciting new season of sight and sound
Video Review
Why Do Fools
I Minima
Find out for
yourself!
Movie Review
PJ Harvey asks
the eternal
question
ri
Vfl
'IT
CD Review
Whose boobs
are these'
You'll never
guess
wktdzjHim
fountainhead � 2nd Floor Student Publications Building Greenville, NC 27858 � Phone 328-6366 � Fax 328-6558 � Advertising 328-2000 �www.fountainhead.ecu.edu





Arts & Entertainment Magazine of The East
I
last Carolinian m m
waul�
Nina M. Dry
Senior Writer
m Watch out Broadway! There's a new year of talent
4 fe on the rise. Once again ECU's Playhouse is starting
the year off with a bang, beginning with Cabaret this
October.
��Bta" For those of you who are in the dark about what the
Playhouse is, it's the performance venue for dance and theatre productions at the
Messick Auditorium.
"It's an interesting place where you can catch a rising statf said Jeff Wjodruff,
managing director of the ECU Playhouse.
This year they're putting on five productions. Kicking it off will be Cabaret on
October 8-13. According to Woodruff, there are four different versions of this
production. The one performed by the Playhouse is closest to the original, with
some additions from the movie version.
"It's an interesting piece Woodruff said. "It's the fun of the Cabaret versus what
is going on in the 1930s. Its extremely well written; it's a musical with a message
According to Woodruff, this musical is full show-stopping numbers and will
certainly give an audience something to think about. Tickets went on sale this past
Thursday.
Student tickets are $8-$10, staff and faculty tickets are $11-13 and the general
public can get in for $13-15. Performances will be on October 8-10 at 8:00 p.m as
well as a matinee showing at 2:00 p.m. on October 11.
OnNov�nberl9-24,theprodudfonofMo&iOTWWerGltii4CTi will run.
See Theatre continued on page 6
eatre c98
Preview
Ifs an exciting new season of sight and sound
Blue Velvet. just plain weird VideoReview
WhyDoFools
Fall In Level
Find out for
yourself!
Movie Review
PJ Harvey asks
the eternal
question
tn
CD Review
Whose boobs
are these?
You'll never
guess
wkwidz
fountainhead � 2nd Floor Student Publications Building Greenville, NC 27858 � Phone 328-6366 � Fax 328-6558 � Advertising 328-2000 �www.fountainhead.ecu.edu





CD Review
q
PJ Harvey
Is This desire?
7 out of 10
I leaned against the music store
counter, flushed and wild-eyed.
"Give me PJ Harvey or give me
death I gasped dramatically,
sighing with relief as I grasped the
cellophane-wrapped jewel case a
full ten minutes before the CD's
legal release date at midnight.
Well, now. Let's rip it open and see
what we got PJ's dense, growfy gui-
tar-infested blend of swamp, punk,
old-time scary blues, ballads and
just plain symphonic, ambient
weirdness never let me down
before.
How should I describe her voice?
Sometimes a whisper, sometimes a
shriek, it embodies the spirit of a
seductive queen of desire or a
squirming burning hellion, but it is
never the voice of an ordinary girl.
To listen to Is This Desire is to
know that PJ's been around long
enough to write her own ticket. She
couldn't care less whether you buy
hercrapornot.Shejust wants to
make some coherent record of her
mind's seething contents.
Although this album is not nearly
as raw or forceful as her previous
releases, her eerie penchant for
writing is just as blatant She
proclaims that her hair is "longer
than it's ever been" with adolescent
glee in "The Sky Lit Up
She describes herself as a prosti-
tute named A ngeline. She Plunges
i nto t he world of Catherine the
Great, who "dreamt of children's
voices, and torture on the wheel
Add the usual mix of tragic love
songs and the soft "Is this Desire?"
and PJ once again displays her
lyrical worth.
Flood helped on this album, and it
shows. PJ's once bluesy attack is
made by electronic and drum-and-
bass influences, and I can't say I'm
pleased about the whole idea.
PJ's music belongs in the old
places, the dusty shops, the
abandoned gas stations of
southern towns on hot summer
days, or outside under a sunset, not
in a cold studio. The produced,
Depeche-Modey sound has a bad
effect on her music.
As much as I admire PJ's sense of
adventure, I hope she knows
enough to leave well enough alone
next time.
Amy LRoystcr Editor in Chief
Heather Burgess Managing Editor
Miccah Smith Editor
SttphanicWhklodiD
Btian Williams lartout
jam Raps MattMng Manage
Bobby TtiggkVl
Stfving the ECU community since T97S. he an Cuohnian puNrshes
11.000 copies event Tuesday am Thuflday. 7.000 copies of the
Foufllimheed our new aris end eflteiuimnanl merjaiire. tie pub
irshed evHV wednesdey The teed ediioriel m each edition of he East
Cerolirtnn is he opinion ol the Editorial Board. The East Caroboian
etetcwnes tetters (o he ednot hmiied o ZW worts, which mat be
edntd lor decency of brevity The Etatt Catceinian reserves Ihe mjhi to
edit or refect tenets tot puMctHnn. AM tenets must be stoned letters
should be sttrtessetf to: Opinion ednw .The East Catofcnien. Student
Rdtficetions Buitdtno, ECU. Gteenvthe. 778304363. For information.
cell 91137B 6366.
2 Vfednesday, October 7,698
Wednesday
Oct7
-80s music presentation by Barry
Drake at 8 pjn. in Hendrix Theatre-
Drake, a respected music historian,
will present a polished, exciting
multimedia lecture on music's most
interesting decade. Big hair, outra-
geous artists and the debut of MTV
are just the beginning Students
can get free advance tickets with stu-
dent I.D.
- Chew on This lunch lecture at 12
p.m. in the MSC Underground
-Zony Mash featuring Wayne
Horvitz at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
-moe, Gibb Droll at Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro
Thursday
Oct8
-ECU Playhouse presents Cabaret at
free Time
8 p.m. in McGinnis Theatre
-PIRATEFEST at 6:30 in the MSC
brickyard
Deep Impact at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
-Spite, Stratotanker, The Ritalin Kids
at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
-Mike Watt, Daddy at Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro
Friday
OcL9
-1998 School of Art Faculty
Exhibition opens with a reception
and faculty talks in Gray Gallery at 5
p.m.
-ECU Playhouse presents Cabaret at
8 p.m. in McGinnis Theatre
-Dt impart at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
-Jennyanykind CD release party at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill
-Hipbone, Countdown Quartet at
Cat's Cradle in Carrboro
Saturday
Oct. 10
-ECU Playhouse presents Cabaret at
8 p.m. in McGinnis Theatre
-Deep Impact at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
- Swingin' Neckbreakers, Eugene
Swank & the Atomic Honky-Tonk at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill
-Jump, Little Children, Marvelous
Three at Cat's Cradle in Carrboro
-The Deep South Records Carolina
Music Harvest at the Walnut Creek
Amphitheatre in Raleigh
Sunday
Octll
-ECU Playhouse presents Cabaret at
2 p.m. in McGinnis Theatre
-Deep Impact at 3 p.m. in Hendrix
Theatre
See Fn� Tim. continued on page 7
It s Your Place
lb Chew on This, Boss
TODAY AT NOON IN MENDENHALL
UNDERGROUND
"Outdoor Recreation" presented by Steve Bobbit.
Grab a bag lunch from The Spot and join us down-
stairs for this informative lunch break program.
Gourmet desserts and beverages will be served.
FREE admission.
For Midnight Madness
SATURDAY, OCT. 31 FROM 9 P.M2 A.M. AT
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
All drassed up but nowhere to go on Halloween?
Then come to the Midnight Madness Halloween
bash at Mendenhall Student Center. Free prizes,
video karaoke. Virtual NASCAR, psychics, bingo,
dancing, and a breakfast buffet. Your ECU One Card
will get you in free. Guest passes are available
starting October 26 at the Central Ticket Office, 8:30
a.m. - 6 p.m Monday - Friday; Todd Dining Hall Meal
Plan Office. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m Monday - Friday and
Student Recreation Center, on Saturday only from 11
a.m -10:30 p.m.
To Check Out New Jack City
Nothing to do for Thanksgiving? How about a phat
trip to The Big Apple? The ECU Student Union is
sponsoring a trip to New York for as little as $170.
The price includes round-trip transportation and
lodging for three nights. To reserve a spot for this
steal of a trip, drop by the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center.
To Catch a Free Flick
OCTOBER 8-10 AT 8 P.M. AT HENDRIX
THEATRE SUNDAY MATINEE AT 3 P.M.
Where in Greenville can you see a FREE blockbuster
movie AND bring a guest? Right here in Mendenhall
Student Center, of coursel This week's show:
Deep Impact (R) starring Morgan Freemen and Tea
Leoni.
To Travel Back in Time
OCTOBER 7 AT 8 P.M. AT HENDRIX THEATRE
Catch this exciting, multimedia trip through the '80s
with Barry Drake, one of rock music's foremost his-
torians. Advance tickets are FREE at the Central
Ticket Office with your ECU One Card.
To Get Some Work Done
OPEN MONDAY-THURSOAY 8 A.M10:45 P.M
FRIDAY 8AM - 11:45 P.M SATURDAY 1 P.M. -
11:45 P.M SUNDAY 1 P.M10:45 P.M.
Work doesn't have to bewellwork. Not when you
have a state-of-the-art facility at your fingertips.
Located on the ground floor, the computer lab at
Mendenhall features Pentium-based computers.
Power Macs, and color and laser printers.
And there's always an assistant ready to help you.
To Rail A Few
ONE-BUCK BOWUNG-Make Wednesday and Friday
discount days by rolling 10 frames for just $1 (shoe
rental included). $1 games between 1-6 p.m.





:��
David Moore
Staff Writer
If you walked up to most people on
campus and asked "Who was Frankie
Lymon?" I would be willing to bet that
not many people could answer that
question correctly. I know I couldn't
have before I saw this movie. The
same people who don't know who
Frankie Lymon was have heard his
songs, though. This film directed by
Gregory Nava tells us all about the an
obscure late'Stfs to eariyWs pop star.
The plot is simple enough. It
seems that while in prison Frankie's
widow, Elizabeth Waters Lymon
(Vivica A. Fax), hears one of his songs,
which is once again gaining populari-
ty. Since she is down and out, she real-
izes that she should be receiving
P
Movie Review
Why do fools foil in love?
royalties from Frankie's estate. She
hires herself a lawyer and they con-
front Morris Levy, the head of
Frankie's old record label. Morris
wants to cut a deal, but while in his
office two other women burst in with
their lawyers also claiming to be Mrs.
Frankie Lymon.
So, we cut to the courts where we
relive the life of Frankie Lymon
through the testimony of these three
widows, and others. First there is Mr.
Barrett (Ben Vereen). He was the
discoverer of Frankie and the
Teenagers, Frankie's original group.
The original lead singer had a cold
when they went to perform for Levy to
get signed, so Frankie didthe part.
They were signed and began tour-
ing with The Platters and Little
Whtn Ffintio Lymon gots to Daily Qmhu. ho
�kwyi gttsi rich, chocollUy Builtt Bad
Richard. The real Little Richard takes
the stand and is thoroughly amusing
throughout the film. He adds all
the comic relief necessary, which is
good because though others try it
never really works.
Frankie met the Platters singer Zola
Taylor (Halle Barry) and after she got
used to his ghetto charm, they began
living together. However, while she was
out touring he met Elizabeth and after
saving her from a shoplifting charge,
he moved in with her.
Frankie's career skyrocketed after
he danced with a white girl on a live
TV show. He was doing so well that
Levy decided to exclude the
Teenagers, and just go with Frankie.
This broke up Frankie's family. The
others in the group were his best
friends. They grew up together, yet
Frankie let them go for his career,
which promptly started to fall off as
he begans using heroin.
Now we see the evils of drugs, yeah,
yeah,yeah.
!3ecome a member.
Launch your
organization
into cyber&pace.
WWW.
clubhouse
ecu.edu
Up to this point you cannot help
but like Frankie. He had a certain style
and charm. Once heroin enters the
picture, all of that fades away. We still
catch glimpses when he was straight,
but not enough for any real sympathy.
After leaving Elizabeth, he married
Zola, lost her house and got drafted
Through an army buddy he met
and married an intelligent southern
belle by the name of Elmyra (Lda
Rochon). After settling down, he felt
the need for music again. He packed
up and went back to New York only to
overdose on heroin. Who gets
Frankie's estate? See the movie, its
worm it Frankie Lymon, played excel-
lently
by Larenz Tate, had a life that was
definitely filmworthy.
Fnt Tim; continued from page 2
-Dick B. Hardy, Hie EtNuc at Local
506 in Chapel Hill
Man or Astro-Man? at Cat's Cradle
inCarrboro
Monday
Oct. 13
-Guest recital: Robert Van Sice,
marimba, at 7 p.m. in Room 105 in
the Fletcher Music Center
-ECU Playhouse presents Cabaret at
8 p.m. in McGinnis Theatre
-Jack Black, Simon & the Bar
Sinisters at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
-Thor, Panty Peeler at Cat's Cradle
inCarrboro
Tuesday
Oct. 13
-Travel-Adventure Film Series pre-
sents The Real World of Hong Kong
and Southern China. Films at 4 and
7:30 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
Theme dinner at 6 p.m. in the MSC
great room
-ECU Playhouse presents Cabaret at
8 p.m. in McGinnis Theatre
-Gotohells, Caustic Resin at Local
506 in Chapel Hill
-Leo Kottke at Cat's Cradle in
Canboro
Vvednesday, October 7,1998 3





I
Wfrlll
weekly top hits
15. Juliana Hatfield
"Backseat"
14.Jude"YouMama
You"
13. Baxter
"Television"
12. Brian Setter
Orchestra "Dirty
Boogie"
11. Tori Amos
"Raspberry Swirl
10. Plastiscene
"Sundial"
9. Once Hush "The
Envelope Song"
8. Seven Mary Three
"Over Your Shoulder"
7. My Superhero
"Groovy"
6. Cake
There"
Never
5. VVes Cunningham
"So it Goes"
4.LizPhair
"Polyester Bride"
3. Soul Coughing
"Circles"
2. Hole "Celebrity
Skin"
I.BeastieBoys
"BodyMovin"
4 Wednesday, October 7, S98
0fr
-0� �
horoscopes
ARIES:
(March 21-April 20)
Any family squabbles may come as a
result of tensions. Be at your best
and don't let anyone spoil your
upbeat mood. Once harmony is
restored, turn your attentions to
making plans with a few good
friends. You are inclined to be jealous
and possessive of a mate. Stay cool.
TAURUS
(April 21-May 21)
Think before you speak. That temper
of yours may flare without any
provocation. Your idealistic side
usually wins out, so try real hard to
follow your dreams. Hopefully
something that has been bothering
you for the last several months is
now gone for good.
GEMINI:
(May 22-June 21)
A friend of yours has a serious
problem and is relying on your help
to come up with a solution, so think
fast. The week will go by pretty
smoothly for it will have plenty of
variety. At least you won't have to
worry about getting bored.
CANCER:
(June 22-July 23)
It's time to take a serious look at the
romance in your life - and ask
yourself if your expectations are
realistic. Try not to take life to
seriously and have fun with those
you love. You tend to accomplish a lot
and everyone around will catch your
enthusiasm.
LEO:
(July 24-August 23)
This week brings a welcome relief
from recent pressures, so spend time
with those you love. Your strong ego
may get you in hot water with a
mate, and those old feelings of
whether you've made the right
choice or not are going to surface
again. Your plans for the future are
very realistic.
VIRGO:
(August 24-September 23)
If you feel that your friends have
been difficult to deal with lately,
perhaps you should take a good look
at yourself. Listen to what a loved
one has to say about your personal
life, there is more merit there than
you are willing to admit. Start
improving things on the job.
LIBRA:
(September 24 - October 23)
People dose to you are charming
and agreeable, but not very good
about keeping promises, so be
realistic at all times. Share some of
your more creative ideas with
someone who can take them one
step further, in a practical way. Keep
an eye on the food your eating.
SCORPIO:
(October 24 - November 22)
All you want this week is peace and
quiet, but it seems like everyone
needs to speak or be with you. Find
time to sneak off on your own. Your
feelings for a lover are intense, so try
and remain as realistic as possible.
Concentrate on organizing family
matters that need your attention.
SAGITTARIUS:
(November 23 - December 21)
The focus is on your private life for
the next month or so. This time you
may find it easier to sort out old
misunderstandings. Don't take any
risks with your money right now, '
you may regret it. You can
accomplish a lot if you move ahead
with confidence and grace.
CAPRICORN:
(December 22 - January 20)
Finish up with routine projects at
work or at home as opposed to
starting new ones. You will do best
with what's familiar right now. You
tend to worry about money, so just
be extra careful about how and
where you spend. With your
delightful charm you may get just
what you need.
AQUARIUS:
(January 21- February 19)
Even though you try your best to
please everyone, you won't be very
successful. Maybe you should try to
please yourself. You are going to be
more thoughtful and introspective
than usual. Let your thoughts move
to spiritual matters. Your have a
strong need to help and serve
humanity.
PISCES:
(February 20-March 20)
now. Thafs the kind of support you
really need. When it comes to your
homelife, things have been going in
ten different directions, it's time to
get organized. Get out and mix with
new friends.
Birthday This
Week:
Now's time to review projects and
former decisions. Re-structuring,
will be important at this time. It's
also ripe for wise investments and
business dealings. Some of your
most cherished beliefs about
security may be tested in the
coming year.
Horoscope by Miss Anna
Take the
stage, ifs
yours
Christopher Salerno
staff writer
Who among you has something to
say, a simple song to play? Who
among you has the gumption and
nerve to shout it from the
mountaintops?"Yesyou say,
"That's me. I write poems that break
men in halT
"Yes. My knowledge of music
theory is boundless and when I play
for women, they swoon and throw
roses
Well, if this is you and you truly
want to be sponsored by Velveeta
someday, you're gonna have to get out
there and show us. Let us into your
world, please. We want to celebrate
your talent Where? you ask.
Anyone who has been around
Greenville a while has seen the poet-
ry readings and open mic opportuni-
ties wax and wane, from one semes-
ter to the next, fading in and out of
the scene like that foul smell that
sometimes invades Greenville before
the rain comes. Nobody knows. Last
year there were open mics here and
poetry invitations there, but right
now the opportunities are few and
far between. While the chances are
limited to a few, these are 3 solid few.
If poetry is your game, there are
two venues to speak of. The first is
Fifth street's own Percolator coffee
shop. On any given night here, minds
flow with the joe and you can see
people writing. Some may remember
when the Percolator held a weekly
poetry invitation to freelancers. Well,
it has since been terminated but is
about to resurface.
Along with a weekly open reading
for "up and comers there will be a
Poetry Slam in the near future, which
is also an open invitation and
encourages more of a poetic perfor-
mance. In this event the audience is
encouraged to speak their minds to
the poet as he or she reads original
work aloud.
For those of you not looking to
make too much commotion, there is
ECUs own poetry forum which is
organized by distinguished professor
See Music, continued on page 7





VkkoReview
Rent Blue Veket, get the heebie-jeebies
Cristian Skinner
staff writer
To tell you, "Don't
watch this movie
before bedtime"
would be unpleas-
antly repetitive,
but the movie Blue
Velvet is another
one I certainly
don't want to dream about. After
opening on a swatch of blue velvet
waving in a breeze, the camera
shows a typical fifties-style
neighborhood where a man named
Tom Beaumont is
working in his front yard. He then
unexpectedly suffers what is
presumably a heart attack.
The camera zooms in on several
frames to insects fighting each other
in the grass. And about here is where
the audience must make the decision
about whether or not they want to see
an often incongruous dramatization of
pain and confusion, a dramatization
played against the backdrop of the soft
blue velvet that characterizes the
American ideal of life.
So, who's still with us?
Jeffrey Beaumont (Kyle MacLachlan)
comes home to help out at his father's
store after his father is hospitalized. He
finds a human ear in a field near his
neighborhood.
After reporting it to the police, more
specifically, Detective). D. Williams,
he's consoled by a father who seems to
know best.
Later that night, Jeff walks over to the
home of detective Williams, who says
They ay art imitates fife. Please say it ain't so
little about the ear and tells him not to
mention anything about it to anyone.
On the way out, he meets Williams'
daughter Sandy (Laura Dern). She tells
Jeff a bit more than her father did,
namely the name of a nightclub singer,
Dorothy Vallens (Isabella Rosscllini).
With Sandy's help Jeff gets a key to
Dorothy's apartment, and returns later
to hide in her closet so he can see for
himself what detective Williams
wouldn't tell him.
Dorothy enters the apartment, slips
on a blue velvet robe and seems to
prepare for a visitor. This "visitor" is
Frank Booth, a complete paranoid-
schizophrenic who comes by to play
out his twisted Oedipal fantasies on
her.
After some auto-erotic asphyxiation,
he beats and rapes her. Apparently
they've done this sort of thing before.
After Frank leaves, Jeffrey (who's been
watching the whole time) knocks
something over in the closet After
Dorothy threatens his life, she actually
seems to take a shine to the kid.
Interest between the two spark and
Jeff's sympathies are set
With two love interests for Jeff, a
kidnapping, a mutilation (remember
the ear), and a sadist who ends up
being even worse than you thought,
the movie takes off.
It wouldn't be accurate to call it a
smoothly joined film; it runs more like
an unoiled meat grinder. However, that
is not to say it fails to make the
audience cringe at the more absurd
and the macabre scenes.
We are taken with Jeffrey through his
loss of innocence and back to a
restoration of the appearance of the
old way of life.
If this is your type of movie, I hope
you rent this flick and watch it under a
red light bulb.
Oh, one more point of interest: Dean
Stockwell: avec powder, lipstick;
the pimp.
Androgyny, Marilyn
style! Hey Mr. Manson,
uh, Bowie was just
kidding!
- leaf I IWNIMVi
Things to
Do
Downtown
7 Wednesday
Comedy Zone at The Attic: Jeff
Schilling
8 Thursday
Jah Works at Peasant's
Stall 42, Nameless at The Attic
9 Friday
Michael Ray and The Cosmic Crew at
Peasant's
Gibb Droll Band, One Step Beyond at
The Attic
Groove Riders at Wrong Way Corrigans
i
10 Saturday
Cashmere Jungle Lords at Peasant's
Chairmen of the Board at The Attic
Jerry Thomas Band, Slip Joint at Wrong Way Coirigan's
11 Sunday
Open Mic night at Peasant's
Groove Riders at the Courtyard
Tavern
13 Tuesday
Percy Hill at The Attic
Curious Goods at Boli's
Wednesday, October 7,1998 5





fc
Band Review
Swing, Swing, Swing!
Mkcah Smith
Fountainhead Editor
OK. I think I've got the hang of it
new. When your invitation Id the
Banister's Ball at Peasant's on
October 1st says for you to dress up
in a costume, dress only in one of
the costumes listed on the invitation.
I splashed down Thursday night at
Peasant's in the middle of a sea of
pimps, prostitutes, cops, robbers and
Catholic schoolgirls all excited about
doing the Swing to the sounds of the
Countdown Quartet Ifchkinda
dumb.
Go on, ask me why. Ill tell you; I was
dressed as Carmen Miranda. After a
while, die states from men in drag
and people with pantyhose over
their heads (these were the normal
ones, mind you!), turned to grins,
and although I was the only one
there wearing plastic fruit, I had a
terrific time.
The Countdown Quartet is a hip lit-
tle swing band who know what
they're onstage for. Unlike some
bands I won't mention (they all have
the word "Daddy" in their names
somewhere), the Quartet plays real
swing, not ska with an upright bass.
The G-town crowd hung back for the
first few numbers, as usual, and
wasted plenty of opportunities to
dance, but soon we were all tapping
our feet and at least attempting rudi-
mentary moves like the "forbidden
cigarette dancethe "step, step, turn
and crash into that other couple" and
other dances that only occur when a
good swing band is onstage.
I don't think any of those people
were actually swinging. I mean, that
requires rhythm, something I haven't
seen much of on the Peasant's dance
floor for a while.
The important thing is that we were
all having a good time. Countdown
Quartet dished out impeccable
covers, originals with funny,
well-written lyrics, slow numbers
and boogie-woogie songs to boot.
My favorite cover of the night was a
delightful Samba-flavored rendition
of Ellington's classic, "Caravan
These boys have got it together. Their
style is clean, together and smooth.
Also, the frontman can play a mean
lowdown trombone, which is a good
quality.
Go see them next time they come to
town, before they hit the big-time.
But leave your plastic fruit at home.
Thtttrt. commutd tram tap 1
"This is a powerful play that will
remind people of the movie Saving
Private ffyan?VfoodmSf said. "It's
going to focus on the blood of war.
This is a definite must-see
According to the East Carolina
Playhouse Patron News, the
production is about an earthy
woman, Mother Courage, who
follows embattled soldiers in a
rolling canteen wagon. She sells dif-
ferent items to the troops. Her
loyalties lie only to her business,
which causes her to worry about the
chance of peace breaking out. Her
mentality changes, however, when
the war makes soldiers out of
Mother Courage's children.
The spring semester begins with
Dance'99 on February 4-9,
featuring many different dance
pieces ranging from ballet and jazz
to contemporary dance. One piece
will be choreographed by well-
known choreographer, Mark Denby.
"Denby is a very hot choreogra-
pher from New York Woodruff said.
"We are very fortunate in getting
him
Our Town will be next on the
Playhouse's itinerary, running from
February 25-March2.This piece is
as "classic American theater" as you
can get
"This is a touching production,
Woodruff said. "This is where the
idea that not a tot of furniture and
scenery are needed to make the
town; you can create it with words
The season will wrap up with
Hot L Baltimore.
"The tide of the movie signifies a
sign that should say'Hotel
Baltimore but the E is burnt out
Woodruff said. "It's a great kick
your-feet-back-and-have-a-good-
laugh kind of show"
Hot L is about a group of diverse
people who are living their ordinary
lives in a run-down hotel which is
about to be demolished via a
wrecking ball Play dates are April
22-27.
"We have an extremely strong
season this year Woodruff saidIf
students come to see each perfor-
mance, they will see a wide variety
of great productions
Anyone who is interested is more
than welcome to try out for any of
the performances. AD audition dates
will be posted on bulletin boards in
the Mess ick building.
I
l
a

LIVE MUSIC
PIRATE I'N'DERGKOlN'D
Foragoodtlmecaatht
ECU Student Union Hottlne
at2S2.328.6004.
of visit our website at
www.acuedustudentunion.
REBEL
The Rebel art Show
September 27th through October ioth
in Mendenhall Gallery
chev
�N TbiS
Lunc h time Lecture Series
Werln-himHMon
faduMnhaludllMatrand
October 7th
"AAattieshtreGreaOudcus"
rVeseraedtySeMBcrxatof
TrtSrCOutttocrRccreaimrTcgam
vjvvw"ic Oxuctwi
DEEP IMPACT U)VE WALKED JN
8ffsftocfc
flu
Ai exciting miltbmdla fitp through the bo's with
Urtf Orate, or of rock musk's foremost hrjtori.ns.
e0pm Wednesday. October 7, In Hendrb. Theatre
Advance ticfflcf with Ku One Card!
Fwtftitklnfcrrnitlon
o.cc�h� rNrpr,oo.pro0�m





��i
Music, continued from page 4
Dr. Peter Makuck of the English
department, and of course, "We the
Pecffe" The Poetry Forum was
established under the SGA and has
members elect, collecting yearly
dues to fund the visiting poets
series. It is essentially a workshop
with a different atmosphere than
stand-up poetry, which caters to an
audience.
"The forum is not performance.
It's a workshop. Poetry on the page is
a different product said Makuck.
The Poetry Forum is informal and
open to the public The meetings
are held on the first and third
Wfednesday of every month at 8:pm
in 248 of the Mendenhall Student
Center. You are encouraged to bring
10-12 copies of your work if you
would like to receive feedback.
So music is your game you say?
Well in that case, to Peasants Cafe
you go. The last true musical
open-mic in Greenville existence
happens on Sunday nights around
11 p.m. In this Sunday night tradi-
tion, you can see (or perform)
anything from bluegrass to
beat-box. You can play whatever you
want for about 20 minutes. The
advantages here are for those of you
looking to meet new musicians
while you make your talents known.
This is an atmosphere where
musical projects are born.
Have you heard of the Pirate
Underground? No? WfeU, maybe
you're the kind of person who trips
over your stepping stone. This
organization is here to provide the
best opportunity for those who want
to get their sounds out
CW Jameson, Popular
Entertainment Chair, has had many
inquiries about playing the
Underground, but not nearly as
many foUow-throughs.
"People haven't been interested
latdyf said Jameson. "There are
plenty of bands in town, they just
don't seem to care about playing
The equation is simple: You buy a
guitar and learn a few chords. Then
you meet a friend who plays nose
harp. Your two man band develops
a wicked style and it's time for
exposure. So you sign up to play the
Pirate Underground by submitting a
tape, photo and bio with a registra-
tion form to the Popular
Entertainment Committee at 236,
Mendenhall Student Center.
When your time comes, you and
your nose harp player have a big
chance to tear the roof off the place.
If the committee likes your
performance, they enter you into the
Battle of Bands contest If you win,
you'll rake in some prize money
($500) and five hours of free studio
time, then you get to open the 6th
annual Barefoot on the Mall event.
There you gain unlimited
exposure, get a sponsorship by
Veiveeta and go on to be famous.
Did I mention the refreshments?
C'mon people! This chain of events
is certainly possible, provided you
have the motivation and some
original thoughts.
ODDITIES
Turtle gets sniff of laughing
gas; lets go of finger
UNIVERSITY PUCE, Wash. (AP)
Laughing gas has been known to
draw people out of their shells.
Works on turtles, too.
Tired of being poked by its
8-year-old owner, a box turtle tensed
up, clamped down on the boy's
finger and wouldn't let go.
Tapping on Boxer's shell didn't work
Pulling didn't work. Offering food
dkWtwork,
Then firefighters in this Tacoma
suburb thought of taking a page
from the dentist's book and gave the
softball -sized turtle a dose of nitrous
oxide, known as laughing gas.
"Vk just blew a little in his face, he
relaxed and the kid pulled his finger
out said Steve Murphy, a Fire
Department paramedic.
He and firefighter Jerry Foss said the
boy had been poking his left index
finger between the turtle's top and
bottom shells, trying to get the
reptile to stick its head out, when the
animal clamped its shells together.
The boy trundled off to school with
ffish
Your Weekly Gossip Fix
(AP)
An obscenity-laden poem written
by John Lemon vriB be put up for
auction by the tan who received it
almost 30 years ago.
The typed work is made up of a
four-letter expletive repeated 104
times around the single word
"you. It was sent to poet Susan
Baker in 1969 after she wrote to
the Beade requesting a poem.
R is signed by Lennon and his
wife, toko Ono.
Robert Finan of the auction house
Rnan& Co. said the poem is too
unusual to estimate how much it
might bring. The auction will be
teMOalOmWTfcfcire,
"Cataloguing the item was
something of a problem, as quite
obviously it could offend Finan
said. "I am making sure that the
photocopies of the documents are
not on show at the viewing days
BOZEMmMont(AP)
Charles Kuralfs longtime mistress
isn't entitled to possessions in his
Montana fishing retreat, a judge
said
The traveling CBS newsman, who
died last year, did not clearly
declare his intent to share any
items from the home with Pat
Shannon, Judge Frank Davis ruled
Sept 22.
Ms. Shannon has said she had an
with the married Kurak over 29
years. She wanted a painting, a
desk, a leather desk chair and an
Oriental silk rug.
Kurab supported Ms. Shannon
htt&rnuy. Davis ruled earlier that
she wasn't entitled to 90 acres of
land where she and Kurait lived.
MANIUPhfflppiM$(AP)
Claire Danes'apology for her
disparaging remarks about Manila
wasn't big enough for the
Philippines'president a former
movie star himself.
"She should not be
allowed to come here.
She should not even
be allowed to set foot
hereTPreskknt
Joseph Estrada said.
On Tuesday, the City
Council declared the
19 year-old actress
persona non grata
and banned all her
movies because she
called Manila smelly, rat-infested
and weird. Miss Danes, who
appeared in "The Rainmakerr was
in Manila for several months this
yeartosnoot'Brdiedown Palace
Last week, she said in a statement
that site meant no disrespect
"Because of rlw subject matter of
our film 'Brokedovm Palace the
cast was exposed to the darker and
more
impoverished places of Manila
she said. "My comments in
Premiere magazine only reflect
those locations, not my attitude
toward the FJbpino people. They
were nothing but warm, friendly
and supportive
TOKYO (AP)
Akira Kurosawa, Japan's legendary
film director, posthumously
received a prestigious award from
the
government
i ne rropies nonor Awaru was pre-
sented by Prime Minister Keizo
Obuchi to Kurosawa's eldest son,
HisaaThe award is given to people
in Japan who contribute to the
arts, entertainment or sports.
Only Mpeopte have received the
award since it was established 21
years ago. Kurosawa, who died
Sept 6 at age 88, is the first film
director to receive the honor.
Among Kurosawa's movies
are"ltehoinon"and"The-t,
Seven Samurai"
NEW YORK (AP)
The highbrow crowd over at
The New Yorker isn't going to
like this, but the newest and
ridiestDrizetoAriiericanlit-
erature is named for Don
Irnus.
Oon Imus, the gleefully spiteful
radio host THAT Don Imus.
imus will heto choose the winners
of the Imus American Book
Awards. The Barnes 8t Nobk book-
store chain is providing the finan-
cial backing.
There wl be three awards of
$50,000 each, and one for
$10000. By contrast, the National
Book Awards'top prize is $10,000.
Imus frequently features authors
on his morning program, which
boasts an estimated 10 million lis-
tetjersnatkwwkieonrnorethan90
stations.
The idea for the awards came
about after Imus complained that
a biography he liked didn't win a
National Book Award.
Barnes 8c Nobk customers will
vote to decide some of the
nothing worse than a blood blister
on his finger.
Bigfoot Redding man says
he's seen the elusive beast
HAYFORK, Calif. (AP)
A 9-foot-tall, yellow-eyed beast
making bloodcurdling screams
turned a group of campers as shaky
as the marshmallows they were
roasting when they decided
the creature must be the
legendary Bigfoot
Tun Ford, 22, told California
Department of Fish and Game offi-
cials Thursday that he's convinced
he saw the elusive man-beast, who
he claims left tracks 6 inches wide
and 20 inches long in remote
Hayfork, about 200 miles north of
San Francisco.
"You could see his arms hanging
way past his kneesTHarmon told the
Redding Record Searchlight "It was
scary?
The Redding man said he was on a
camping and hunting trip near Mud
Springs, south of Hayfork on
Saturday when his friend,
An
28-year-old James Harmon of Reno,
Nev heard a loud rustling in the
bushes as they roasted
marshmallows.
When he got his flashlight to
investigate the noise, Ford said he
spotted an enormous, furry creature
standing about 50 yards away on the
other side of a creek.
Ford and Harmon, who were
traveling with five others, said none
of mem had been drinking or taking
drugs. They're convinced the
creature was not a bear.
Wsrlwday, October 7,1998 7





When pfanmng
Go to our webftealVvw.l P on the calendar link.
Just below treekfSlir event.sufemission form.
Or if you want ayUti0teceCie(jiuents into your browser
Then jiWfferyour event onto our campus calendar.
It's just that easy. And it's one more free service of The East Carolinian.
wr
S


Title
The East Carolinian, October 6, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 06, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1295
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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