The East Carolinian, October 1, 1998






Thursday:
High: 87
Low: 68
Friday:
High: 70
Low: 60
Check out TEC's website at:
www.tec.ecu.edu
Carolinian
Former Pirates
make their
mark on
professional
football
Sptrts, p�g910
I
THURSDAY. OCTOBER 1,1998 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 13
Stadium not just for football
Type of event determines
cost of renting stadium
Steve Lobby
NF.WS FDITOR
Want to hold an event in Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium?
It'll cost you.
Many costs and factors come into play when an
organization requests to use Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium.
Any use other than a Pirate football gains must first be
approved by athletics director Mike Hamrick.
"It depends on what type of organization you are
said Judd Crumpler, assistant director of operations for
the Athletics Department. "There are different
classifications
The fees are decided by the type of organization,
what�if any�affiliation it has with the university,
and what kind of admission fee it will charge.
Non-profitnon-profit groups are non-profit organi-
zations that do not charge admission at the gate. They
are charged $4500 per day to use Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium. The Franklin Graham Organization's
Festival '98 is an example of a non-profitnon-profit
event.
Non-profitfor-profit groups are non-profit organi-
zations that sell admission tickets for a price. The use
of the stadium for a non-profitfor-profit group would
cost $6000 per day.
Events that are put on by the Student Union are
divided into two categories. An event that would be
co-sponsored by the Student Union and a non-univer-
sity organization would be charged $1500 per day.
Fees for an event sponsored solely by the Student
Union would be negotiated between I Iamrick and the
Student Union.
Ticketed events organized by promoters outside
the university for a profit, such as a concert, would be
charged $25,000 per day.
Keeping the football field in good shape is one of
the major concerns for the athletics department.
"We took every precaution and the Franklin
Graham people have been very cooperative said Jeff
Davis, assistant athletics director for Facility-
Operations. "You run a risk every time you do some-
thing like this
When preparing for Festival '98, a large mat called
a Porta Floor and plywood were set on the field to
minimize damage to the grass.
"We hope that the plywood and Porta Floor will
SEE STADIUM. PAGE 2
Costs to use
Dowdy-Ficklen
Ticketed events for profit (such as bands)- ty2tJ ,UUU per day or 12
percent of the gate, whichever is greater.
Events co-sponsored by the ECU Student Union- $15,UUU per day
Events solely sponsored by the ECU Student Union- Negotiable
Non-profit organizations that charge admission- $0,UUU per day
Non-profit organizations without an admission charge- 3p4,3UU per day
:ff Davis, Assistant Athletic Director For Facility
Class officers
sworn into SGA
Marasco elected
speaker of house
V I L L I A M L fi L 1 E V EJl
"5 t
STAFF WHITISH
The Student Government
Association (SGA) held its first
meeting of the year to swear-in
the legislature and voted-in Steve
Marasco as speaker of the house.
Joshua Beardsley, SGA attor-
ney general, swore-in the legis-
late body that was elected last
Wednesday, including class
presidents, vice presidents,
day representatives, and resi-
dence hall representatives.
"I know several of the peo-
ple personally who are going
to represent the legislative
body Beardsley said. "I
think we are going to have a
good year and I look forward
to working with everyone
Marasco was voted into the
office of speaker of the house
by the legislative body. The
speaker elects the committee
chairs for student welfare,
rules and judiciary, screenings
and appointments and appro-
priations. The members of the
legislature were given the chance
to ask for certain positions on the
committees, but Marasco has
the responsibility of picking
the chairs.
Marasco felt that his previous
experience at other schools will
help him as speaker.
"I was Student Government
president at Guilford College two
years ago, and there the president
facilitates the meetings, which is
very similar to what the speaker
does here Marasco said.
The executive branch gave its
report of the summer's accom-
plishments and the year's goals for
SGA.
According to vice president
Leslie Pulley, during the summer
the executive council sent letters
to freshmen to get involved and
added a sophisticated computer to
the SGA workroom. Members
also wrote a presentation to the
Board of Trustees on SGA's lead-
ership conference, revised the
funding packet, set up booths on
SGA attorney general Josh Beardsley.
PHOTO BY WIUIAM LELIEVER
how to get involved with the
SGA, and worked on their web-
site. Pulley hopes that their
actions over the summer will
encourage more students to
become involved in the SGA.
"If we are not going to speak
for the students, who will?" presi-
dent Eric Rivenbark said.
Blood drive held
Belk endows School of Art sculpture foundry in Mendenhall
Higher quality statues
expected as result ofgjft
Amy Sheridan
staff whiter
Longtime ECU supporter Irwin
Belk has announced plans to endow
the ECU School of Art sculpture
foundry with a $100,000 gift. In
honor of his contribution, the
foundry has been renamed the Irwin
Belk Foundry.
The foundry, located in the
Jenkins Fine Art Center, consists of a
foundry room, work spaces, a mold
making room and a kiln yard. The grant will
enable art students who work in the foundry to
do large scale castings.
Carl Billingsley, associate professor in the
School of Art and coordinator of sculpture, said
the Belk endowment will allow ECU to make
the physical improvements to the foundry that
will make it "one of the finest in our region and
most significant in our state
Phil Dixon, vice chair of the Board of
Trustees, said that this grant will boost the capa-
bilities of the machinery and the work space in
the four rooms found in the downstairs of the art
Mason Douglas welds in the newly renamed Irwin Belk Foundry.
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUM8ER
building. He also hopes that the four state-of-
the-art rooms, in conjunction with the superb art
students, will yield high quality statues.
"We will hopefully, from this new facility, be
able to make other statues which would be dis-
played on other campuses in the UNC sys-
tems Dixon said.
Michael Dorsey, dean of the School of Art,
recognized the enormous benefits the art school
will reap because of Belk's pledge.
"Mr. Belk recognized the need to support
this foundry as a professional artist's studio
Dorsey said. "With his wonderful assistance, our
area is currently being upgraded to
allow it to execute large-scale cast-
ings. This will mean even more
new and exciting opportunities
ahead for our program
Belk, a Charlotte native, has a
love of art, and especially sculp-
ture. He has commissioned vari-
ous monumental sculptures at uni-
versities and centers across the
country. Belk has proved to be a
big contributor to ECU and other
schools in the UNC system. Some
of Belk's other contributions to
this campus include the Carol
Belk Allied Health building, the
Belk and Tyler Hall dormitories,
and the Carol Grotnes Belk
Distinguished Professorship in
Art.
According to Dixon, Belk would like to see
more statues on college campuses. In addition
to the grant given to the School of Art for the
foundry, Belk has also recently bought a statue
that will be placed in the courtyard near Joyner
Library. Belk has also granted ECU money for a
statue of a pirate to be placed in front of the
Sports Medicine Building. The university
hopes to soon choose an ECU alumnae to sculpt
the pirate.
Belk is currently out of the state and was
unavailable for comment.
ROTC, Red Cross
collect donations
W I 1.1.1 A M L E L I E V E R
STAFF WRITER
Students, faculty and staff at
ECU donated 121 pints of
blood Tuesday on the first
day of the American Red
Cross blood drive.
The drive was held in Lisa
Mendenhall Tuesday and
Wednesday and was spon-
sored by ECU's Air Force Reserve
Officers Training Corps (ROTC)
Detachment 600. Last year
Detachment 600 and the Red
Cross collected 283 pints of blood
at ECU, which exceeded their
quota for that year. Their goal for
this year was to collect 300 pints of
blood.
According to Cadet Sarah
Spence, due to Hurricane Bonnie
the Red Cross has had to cancel
many of its blood drives, and as a
result the need for blood in Eastern
North Carolina has soared. The
Patterson offers her arm in Tuesdays drive.
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMBER
Red Cross has raised the quota to
150 pints per day for the blood dri-
ves at ECU this year.
According to Charge Nurse
Margery Henson, the goals for dif-
ferent organizations' blood drives
are determined by the location and
population of the area it occupies.
The most important factors in
determining the goals of each
blood drive are the publicity raised
and the enthusiasm of the sponsor-
ing group. Each pint of blood col-
SEE BL000. PAGE I
I
Kt'





1
Thundiy, Oclobtr 1, 1998
news
Th Etit Carolinian
Parents to arrive in Greenville JSsi
continued from page I
Higi turnout
expected for events
Caroline Jordan
staff whiter
ECU will host Parents'
Weekend this Friday and
Saturday. Parents and stu-
dents alike will be able to go
to a variety of activities
including a picnic, a Beatles
tribute, and the football
game against Army.
"We've had more regis-
tered this year than ever
said Dean of Students Ron
Speier. "2800 tickets were
sold for the football game
and we expect 3500-4000 at
.the picnic
Speier said that Parents'
Weekend was started around
-twelve years ago.
"When I first came here,
we had a parents game, but
only the parents of football
players were honored
Speier said. "It seemed logical to
celebrate the parents of all stu-
t dents
According to the Parents'
Weekend Committee, parents can
register Friday from 3-5 p.m. at the
Mendenhall Student Center.
Following a pool party at the
! Student Recreation Center at 6
i p.m parents can choose between
i either the film Titanic or
I "Yesterday-A Tribute to the
Beades
"More parents will probably
; attend the Beatles tribute, since we
�did send out flyers on that with the
I Parents' Weekend information
i said Laura Sweet, associate dean of
i students.
Saturday will also begin with
I registration at Mendenhall from 9-
i 11:30 a.m. The Parents Association
i meeting will be held at 9 a.m. in
'Hendrix Theatre. According to
Affirmative
p
action audit

i
I postponed
Department of Labor
i to reschedule date
m SUSANNE MlLENKEVICH
STAFF WRITER
$ routine audit of ECU's affirma-
tive action policies by the US
J)epartment of Labor has been
postponed due to a reassignment
Sf the department's priorities.
i The review was scheduled to
segin Monday, September 28.
The rescheduled date has not
r
been finalized.
'm "This is a routine audit, not
Initiated because of complaints or
Identified because of problems on
tampus said Dr. Dorothy
Spencer, Equal Employment
Opportunity (EEO) advisory
board chair.
J The Labor Department will
Jpok at EEO policies concerning
jgay equity, recruitment and
attention practices, and profes-
sional development of the staff as
well as the improvement of
women and minorities.
r "This is not a fault-finding
mission Spencer said. "This will
Jkelp to figure out how to make
JPCU better with constructive,
positive change
T In the past four years ECU's
faculty has experienced an
increase in the number of women
and minorities on its staff. From
3994 to 1998 the number of
women has risen from 34.1 per-
il
SEE AUDIT. PACE 3

ents' Weekend
Friday, Oct. 2
errt registration in Mendenhall
y at trie Student Recreation Center
Fjlrn-Titanic
esterday: A Tribute to the Beades
Saturday Oct. 3
Parent registration in Mendenhall
Brents Association meeting in Hendrix Theater
Chancellors reception
i house tor residence halls, fraternities, and sororities
Ledonk Wright Center will display African and student art
Picnic at Williams Arena
ECU-Army game
Information courtesy of Parents Weekend Committee
Sweet, all parents are members and
are invited to attend.
"The Parents Association is an
active parents council Speier said.
"They raise money for the student
life programs. They're similar to an
executive council
Speier said that the association
was started about nine years ago.
Following the Parent
Association Meeting will be the
Chancellor's Reception from 9:30-
10:30 a.m. in the Multi-Purpose
Room, hosted by Chancellor and
Mrs. Richard Eakin. During the
continental breakfast, the president
of the Parents Council, represent-
ing the ECU Parents Association,
will present a gift to the chancellor
on behalf of the Association.
Beginning at 10:30 a.m open
houses will be held for residence
halls and several fraternities and
sororities.
The Ledonia Wright African-
American Cultural Center will also
be open at 10:30 for refreshments
and gallery tours.
"Student art as well as African
artifacts will be on display at the
Ledonia Wright Center Sweet
said.
Preceding the ECU-Army foot-
ball game will be a picnic held in
Williams Arena at Minges from 1-3
p.m. Students can pre-purchase dis-
counted tickets with cash or by
using Advantage Account funds at
any Dining Services facility.
"2200 tickets have been sold,
and we expect more Sweet said.
The final event of the weekend
will be the ECU-Army football
game, which begins at 3:30 p.m.
"2800 tickets have been pur-
chased as of Thursday by parents
for the football game Speier said.
DC COMICS ARE JUST
PART OF THE
EXCITEMENT
AT:
NOSTALGIA NEWSSTAND
919 Dickinson Avenue
Greenville, NC 27834
1-252-758-6909
GetP�e�"Ced�t
tanyi
eyebrow,
oarcartHa9e'
navel:25
We will be At any
competitor's advertised
prices!
Large selection of imported
And domestic jewelry!
�We do ok"
exotic piercings
� We specialize in tattooing and
body piercing only
� We are Greenville's only health
deportment inspected studio
� We have been it business over 8
years wild 15 years experience
Tuesday ThuRsday: -9 p.m FridAy: 1-10 p.m Saturday: 12-10 p.m.
CALL US! 756-0600
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
TATTOOING BY AWARD WINNING ARTISTS!
From downtown, go straight down Dickinson Avenue
Extension, located at 4685 US Hwy. 13, Greenville.
ILVER
"A Touch Of Class"
756-6278
"Skylar'
TUESDAY:
S�lngeie oVight
� WEDNESDAY:
� u4mateuA Alight �
Sft�BuMBt
THURSDAY:
Counthj &
AAieste flight
V r
Located 5 miles West of
Greenville on 264 Alt
(Behind Aladdin Services 6r Limo)
i
� FRI. & SAT:
� Sifoe QuMet
I �xotic Daneats


� Doors open: 7:30 pm
� Stage Time: 9:00 pm

lectcd can help up to three people
get; better.
"You've got to have blood to
live Hcnson said. "People that
have surgery have to have it.
People that have car accidents, gun
shot wounds or whatever
Blood donators are rewarded
with candy and cookies to help
raise their blood sugar level. Many
participants give blood because
they know someone who has need-
ed blood before and are happy they
can help others.
"I am O positive and it is hard to
find. I give blood because I know if
I ever needed it I would want it to
be there said Danoa Marvin,
blood donor and ECU student.
Freshman Joseph Croon gave
blood for his second time
Wednesday.
"I donated blood because I
wanted to help somebody Croon
said.
George Threewitts, assistant
director of the ECU News Bureau,
has given blood so many times he
has lost count.
"I've been trying to give regu-
larly over the past 10 years
Threewitts said. "Probably longer
than that. I feel like it is something
I could do to help people
DEEP XANANA BLACKOUT
IT'S OUR 5 YEAR ANNIVERSARY MONTH
COOL LINE 752.5855
easarcfcs
LISTEN TO WZMB
91.3
THE ONLY REAL
"NEW MUSIC"
RADIO IN
GREENVILLE.
SUNDAYS ARE OPEN MIC NIGHTS
TONIGHT
THE COUNTDOWN QUARTET
PIMPS. PROSTITUTES. COPS. ROBBERS.
THE OCCASIONAL CATHOLIC GIRL ATTIRE REQUIRED
BURGEON
Mitt TROUT
PROUD (&ffi&) SPONSORS ffe
Stadium
continued from page 1
displace the weight of the stage
and the equipment Davis said.
When Festival '98 had ended,
the grass on the field was left
brown.
"It hadn't had sunlight in five
or six days said Henry VanSant,
associate director of the Athletics
Department. "We have people
working on it now and we'll proba-
bly spray it with some jireen dye
According to Davis, the Porta
Floor cost the Franklin Graham
Organization $26,000. Use of the
stadium lights cost $42 per hour.
D�POT
NORTH CAROLINA'S FINEST
Cosfiwnes
2803 SOUTH EVANS ST.
GREENVILLE, NC 27834
252-756-7903
10 DISCOUNT
WITH STUDENT ID
3 Thuttdav,
?M
� � � � � i
Ca�??e
AHUNCTO
BLVD.
1 7S6WX
OPEN 7 DAYS
EXTENDED H
mtM
Monday - Friday
8:00-6:00
Saturday
8:00-5:00
Senscience
Presents
Not just anyone
Then again, not n
exceptionally sm,
Candidates School i
or not you're a It
If yoi
All ages - All hair types
Come join our Senscience Show featuring Chris Anders & Jerry Jackson, our Senscience
Reformatex Team! They will reform your frizzy hair, unmanageable, & naturally curly hair
that desires a more fashionable curl! Also featuring haircutting and styling!
UPDATE YOUR LOOK!
LOCATION- Hilton (Greenville)
207 SW Greenville Blvd.
Greenville, NC 27834
252-355-5000
Maggie Brown (Greenville Room)
October 4, 1998 2:00 - 3:00
October 5, 1998
1-800-242-9283 ext. 4336
C

LAD I
THl
CONTACT-
MODEL CALL-
SHOW DATE-
INFORMATION-
Senscience
Bring this coupon and receive
$50 and Services compb'mentary
LOCATE
BRII
A I





3 Thur�day. October I, 1998
Em! Carolinian
news
Thi East Carolinian
OUT
N TO WZMB
91.3
ONLY REAL
W MUSIC"
ADIO IN
EENVILLE.
HTSH!
IARTET
ROBBERS.
RE REQUIRED
�N
UT
r
FINEST
nes
kNS ST.
! 27834
13
IT
'ID
day
SATURDAY MGHT HAiLOWEN
FEATURING A CAST OF HUNDREDS OF COSTUMES
COSTUMES WIGS
ACCESSORIES MAKE-UP
PARTY GOODS MASKS
we will order
your special order!
FOR THE HOTTEST LICENSES
sSisr des,cns in costumej
Audit
continued from page 2
I f You've Got What It Takes
To Be A Leader In Our Company
This Could Be YourOffice.
Aor ust anyone can be responsible lor territory like this
Then again, not just anyone can be one of us But if you're
exceptionally smart, tough and determined, then Officer
Candidates School lOCSI will be the place you can prove whether
or not you're a leader of Marines It's a career that's filled- The Few. The Proud.
Marines
N
m
with unlimited opportunities, pride and honor ll you want
a career that's a world apart from the ordinary, see if you've
got what it takes to lead in this company Tq-leam more
about the challenges of being a Manne, call i -800-MARINIS
or contact us on the Internet at httpllwww Marines com
MARINE
If you want the challenge, call Capt Reed at (800) 270-9874-1815
or meet on campus on Oct. 14, 28 & Nov. 17.
cent to 36 percent. However, the
number of minorities has increased
from 92 to 102, but they still com-
prise only 8.6 percent of the staff at
ECU.
"ECU is committed to action
programs and is working toward
improvement in all areas said Dr.
Gary Moore, EEO officer. "But we
have not increased at the rate
we've hoped for
The EEO office was estab-
lished to maintain and promote
fairness, equity, and tolerance
throughout the university commu-
nity.
The office has an active adviso-
ry board that represents the inter-
ests of the staff, faculty, and stu-
dents. The advisory board studies
and researches issues that affect
the ECU community and advises
the EEO office of what actions
should be taken.
"I am proud that this is a proac-
tive office that is taking an active
role in addressing issues that are
important to the staff, faculty, and
students Moore said.
College refuses to
sanction gay, lesbian
student group
LIBERTY, Mo. (AP) - Insistence
by the president of William Jewell
College that the religious-based
school will not sanction a student
gay and lesbian group is seen as
hypocritical by some students.
Those students told college
administrators last spring they
were interested in making a formal
proposal for such an organization.
But President Christian
Sizemore said this summer the
school with Southern Baptist roots
would not "provide recognition,
endorsement or funds" for a gay
and lesbian student club.
"To do so would be contrary to
our mission and purposes, which
are deeply rooted in Baptist tradi-
tions Sizemore said in "Word &
Way a weekly publication of the
Missouri Baptist Convention.
"Our goal as a college commu-
nity is to uphold the standards of
free inquiry, fairness and under-
standing Sizemore said later in a
news release. "Our students can-
not and should not be artificially
"To do so would be contrary
to our mission and purposes,
which are deeply rooted in
Baptist traditions
Christian Sizemore
President of William Jewell College
isolated from people or ideas
But, he continued, "tolerating
debate or discussion about a con-
troversial issue of this nature does
not imply endorsement of
SEE SANCTION. PAGE 4
Professor
Eating &
Tropical Thursday
featuring SCOTT MUELLER
OCT.1
SI.75
CORONA, KEI) STRIPE,
16oz MAI TAIS
acapui.co coolers W 355-2946
HAH AM A MAMAS jf Located in Winn-Dixie Market Place on corner of
COOL FOOD (Srccnvillc Blvd. & Arlington Blvd.
LIVE
ENTERTAINMENT
9PM-12
NO COVER
NFL SUNDAY TICKET.
(Watch your game here.)
The best MONDAY NIGHT
FOOTBALL Party in town.
science
irly hair
I I" MWWL II lf p A R E N T S WEEKEND PRESENTS
CLUB VENUS LtttprHav
THE LEGENDARY COLLEGE NIGHT lfWl L Wl UCI W"
EVERY TUESDAY NIGHT M W mm
4Kta
XL-tlB,

LADIES GET IN FREE W COLLEGE ID OR MEMBERSHIP
ONLY $3 FOR GUYS W COLLEGE ID.
TUESDAY OCT. 6th @ CLUB VENUS
THE IADIES OF VENUS BIKINI CONTEST
STARTS AT wpm
$300 FIRST PRIZE
$150 SECOND PRIZE
$50 THIRD PRIZE
SPONSORED BY
new rock
� � I Tm vv X N R
: V
LOCATED IN GREENVILLE ACROSS THE GREENE ST. BRIDGE
CALL 757-2789 FOR MORE DETAILS
BRING THIS AD IN AND RECEIVE
A FREE MEMBERSHIP
The Fab Four is back - sort of - and ready to take you on a
magical mystery tour of the legendary group's repertoire of hits.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1998
8PM WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
Advance Student Tickets $7
Tickets at the Door $15
S. RUDOLPH ALEXANDER
PERFORMING ARTS SERIES
THERE'S NOTHING LIKE THE VIEW
CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE HOURS Monday - Friday 8:30am to 6:00pm
252.328.4788 or 1.800.ECU.ARTS; Deafspeech impaired access
252.328.4736 Student discount tickets will be available with ECU One Card
at the Central Ticket Office until 6pm on the day of the event, providing
tickets remain. All tickets at the door are full-price.
fl
I
I
I
I





4 Tlwriiv. Oct�b�r 1, 1998
news
The East Carolinian
Sanction
continued Irom page 3
homosexuality or homosexual
lifestyles
Student advocates of such a
group derided the decision.
"It didn't surprise me, but it
does disappoint me said junior
Laura Bryan. "They preach
Christian values and unconditional
love and acceptance. Basically, I
think they are being hypocritical
Last spring, several students
approached Gary Phelps, the dean
of, student affairs, about establish-
ing a group for gays and lesbians.
Piielps leads a faculty-student com-
mittee that recognizes student
ctyibs.
But the groups did not make a
formal proposal last year.
Students are free to discuss the
topic and organize an independent
group, said college spokesman
Raymond Jones.
Despite that freedom, Bryan
said, Jewell's hands-off policy isn't
comforting. She fears reprisals
against any gay and lesbian group
operating without college sanction.
Mark Cadd, director of Jewell's
Center for Academic Diversity,
organized two symposiums about
homosexuality last year. He later
offered to be a staff adviser for a gay
and lesbian group.
Cadd said the recent decision
was disappointing at the liberal arts
institution. Funding concerns, he
said, could be the administration's
prime motivation. Jewell receives
about $1 million a year from the
Missouri Baptist Convention.
"Money is what matters at this
college and any other Cadd said.
In response, Jones said "the
president and the trustees do what
they feel is in the best interests of
the institution
He would not comment further.
GREAT
PRICES ON
SILVER
aviaitv
atalog
Connection
Division of UJBJE.
210 E. 5th St.
758-8612
M-S 10-6
Sun 1 - 5
TUNE IN TO OUR VERY OWN BOR SMITH & CLYDE WELLONS
THE VOICES OF
PIRATE FOOTBALL
The College FIV1
LOOK FOR OUR LIVE REMOTE
ON THE TAILGATING FIELD
1998
PURPLE PRIDE
THROUGH THE YEARS
RETRO 70'S, 80'S & 90'S
VOTING OIMLIIME AT THESE LOCATIONS
YOU CAN VOTE FROM THE COMFORT OF
YOUR OWN HOME, OR GO TO ANY OF
THESE SITES ON CAMPUS:
AYCOCK RESIDENT HALL
WHITE RESIDENT HALL
UMSTEAD RESIDENT HALL
HUMAN ENVIRONMENTAL
NURSING
BELK ALLIED HEALTH
MINGES
SPORTS MEDICINE
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
AUSTIN COMPUTER LAB
I
T
TUESDAY
CHECK LABS FOR HOURS
WATCH FOR RESULTS IN THE EAST
CAROLINIAN IN TUES. OCT. 6
8AM
THRU
OCT.1,
4PM
A
i
URL: http:WWW.HOMECOMING.ECU.EDU
5 Baatoj
People ol
the time th
and sometir
but few peo
letters to frc
you informe
The Stud
you, the stu
and which
represented
Students oft
new Pirate 1
the Board of
you want to
SGA offices
Better yet
show up at �
at 5 p.m. Yoi
waive some
going on and
will also serv
Occasion;
public and tl
LETTI
Instead of foe-
President Clinti
Congress needs
the serious bus
of U.S. citizens.
During the com
will vote on whe
the U.S. Arrrn
Americas at Ft.
The United St
terrorist training
School of th(
decades the SO
and murder tai
i
Got!
Bring
2nd





.5 Tl.ur.div Octoh.r i lafli;
opinion
The Ft Carnllnieii
t the I � �
eastcaroliman
AMY L.ROYSTKR Editor
HEATHER BURGESS ManagingEdiloi
STEVE LOSEV NewsEdilw
AMANDA AUSTIN Fealum Editor
Jason Feather PhotaEditor
Tracy m. i.albach sports hum
Mario Scherhaufer AssiatantSponsEditor
CHRIS ICNOI'TS Stall Illustrator
STEPHANIE WIIIT1.0CK Ad Design Msnoger
JANET RESPESS Advertising Manager
BRIAN WILLIAMS layout Manager
Bobbv TUOOLE Webmaster
Servino. the ECU rommumiy since !9ft the last Carolinian publishes 11.000 copies every luosrjay and Itiuitdat the teed editoria! in each edition�the
opinion ol the f dtioiielBoon) the last Caiolmian welcomes letters 10 the eduoi. limned to ffl woids. amdi mar be ethled fo' decency w Oievity Ihe last
Caiolin,an leseivei Ihe uohi io edu oi ceiact lelteis loi publtcanon AH letters must be srjned laneis should be addiessed io: Opinion editor, the last
Caiotiman, Student Pubucalions Building, ECU. Gieenvine. 278b84353 Fm inlmmaiion. call 919 328.6366.
iSttjttjsiojrTwJorwHa.
oumew
People often complain about decisions made by politicians. It's nothing new. But most of
the time those are the same people who do not vote, do not participate in political activities,
and sometimes don't even know who their elected officials are. Everyone likes to complain,
but few people take it upon themselves to become informed. While the executive council sent
letters to freshmen trying to get them involved and is working on their website to help keep
you informed, it's generally not a good idea to rely on politicians to tell us everything.
The Student Government Association is a political body and is the only representative for
you, the student, in important decisions. If you wonder what is done with your student fees
and which clubs will get how much money, go and make an appointment with your
representative at the SGA and tell them that you want to talk to them about your concerns.
Students often feel that their voice is limited, especially in regard to recent decisions about a
new Pirate logo and the deal with Pepsi. Because the SGA President, Eric Rivenbark sits on
the Board of Trustees of this university, he is often the student's only voice in such matters. If
you want to make sure he and other representatives know how you feel then call them at the
SGA offices at 328-4726.
Better yet, if you are upset with SGA decisions or don't even know what SGA does, then
show up at SGA meetings and watch them in action. They meet once a week in Mendenhall
at 5 p.m. You can sit back and watch or, if you have something to say, ask a representative to
waive some of his or her time to you. If you go yourself then you will know exactly what is
going on and if the decisions that are made are really in your best interest. As an observer, you
will also serve an important funtion in that you can help keep SGA in check.
Occasionally the SGA has a closed session, but usually their meetings are open to the
public and they actually encourage you to come.
I
LsETTER
to the Editor
Terrorist training camp should shut down
Instead of focusing endlessly on
President Clinton's sexual activity,
Congress needs to pay attention to
the serious business and concerns
of U.S. citizens.
During the coming week, Congress
will vote on whether or not to close
the U.S. Army's School of the
Americas at Ft. Benning, Ga.
The United States runs its own
terrorist training camp called the
School of the Americas. For
decades the SOA has taught torture
and murder tactics to the Latin
American military. Its graduates are
responsible for the torture, murder
and disappearance of tens of
thousands of innocent people,
including many American citizens.
Unfortunately, these violations are
not just things of the past. Among
the SOA's biggest clients today arc
Mexico and Columbia. In 1997 and
1998, in both Columbia and
Mexico, officers trained at the
School of the Americas have been
implicated in massacres and
paramilitary activity.
Let us call members of Congress to
task. Ask them to pay attention to
the serious business at hand. Urge
them to support the Torres
Amendment , to the Foreign
Operations Appropriations Bill to
close the School of the Americas.
Until the School of the Americas is
shut down, the U.S. lacks the moral
authority to preach human rights to
other nations.
Dcnise Krebs
tk& Editor
Got something to say? Need somewhere to say it?
Bring your letter to the eastcarolinian , located on the
2nd floor of The Student Publications Building
OPINION
Columnist
Stephen
KLEINSCHMIT
Starr's sleazy tactics abominable
couldn't tell if he was
running an unbiased
investigation or writing the
plot for a sleazy porn movie.
Is it that Ken Starr is
trying to become some kind of
celebrity by ripping away the
sanctity of the Executive
Office, and pushing his own
agenda- possibly a book deal?
I cannot believe all the things that
people arc doing to the President. I
don't feel that we, as a nation are
treating this man with as much
respect as we give a guest on Jerry
Springer. I am a Republican, and I
don't agree with some of his views
on gun control, abortion and the
military. But I don't base my
opinion on my political views, just
human decency. I don't think
anybody in the world should have
to endure as much pain and
suffering as this man has at the
hands of the American press.
First of all, I think that
committing perjury is a serious
crime, and is probably
impeachable. But that doesn't
mean I think that Ken Starr should
have asked all those perverted
questions on the Grand Jury tapes.
I couldn't tell if he was running an
unbiased investigation or writing
the plot for a sleazy porn movie. Is
it that Ken is trying to become
some kind of celebrity by ripping
away the sanctity of the Executive
Office, and pushing his own
agenda- possibly a book deal?
Now the President can't get
anything done. The President has
to worry so much about himself, he
can't run the country properly. He
can't even think about national
defense, increasing student loans
and grants, or improving low
income housing. He's too busy
getting prank calls from Swisher
Sweets, asking him to endorse
their new cigars. And if we lift the
trade ban, will they send some nice
ones from Cuba?
Also, good old Bill looks like his
health is failing. That man has had
so much worry that he must age
twenty years every five months.
Every time I see him on TV, he
reminds me more and more of Tom
Hanks in the movie Philadelphia. I
don't see how he keeps going.
I think the whole plot is a
conspiracy. I think that the only
reason this whole Lewinsky thing
ever happened is because she
would make money off it. Sure,
she'll probably get some cash. But
now she is the laughing stock of
the entire nation and the entire
world. And nobody could pay me
enough to put up with that.
I
ea-
se-
OPINION
Britt
HONEYCUTT
Columnist
Poor, poor kitty faces the knife
Conformity for the good of
the whole is a bitch. But
sometimes it's a necessity. I'm
really not sure whether Pepe's
balls constitute a true breech
in my morals. I know that I
already feel pretty darn
guilty about it, and I'm not
sure if I'll be able to look
him in the eye again.
This morning I was faced with the
hardest decision of my adult life.
The alarm went off at seven, but I
lay in bed pondering the fate of my
best friend's testicles for at least
fifteen minutes.
My cat had an appointment to
be neutered.
What's a loving guardian to do?
Everything I've read and everyone
I talk to says that the only choice is
to cut 'em off. The theory is that
neutering a cat discourages him
from spraying your house full of
stinky kitty pee and from running
away in search of a mate. If you're
going to keep a cat in the house, he
must be neutered.
Ok, but do I have the right to
take away his balls? Personally, I
would be extremely upset if
someone came by, put me to sleep,
then permanently eliminated my
sex drive. That's the only reason I
wake up in the mornings at all-
well, that and I have to go to the
bathroom teally bad. Is it my place
to take away something that he was
obviously born with and would
really miss were it suddenly gone?
It's just not natural.
I asked the vet a million
questions- will he receive
anesthesia? Will his personality
change? Will he hate me? How
much does will it cost? But that
didn't help me in my quest for the
right thing to do. How could I
knowingly put my cat under the
knife for a procedure that is
unnecessary and is only done for
the owner's convenience?
Then there's the Bob Barker
argument. If I don't help control
the pet population, they will run
rampant, just like we humans have;
and see how much damage that has
caused? So many cats get put to
sleep every day. I would hate for
my Pepe's offspring to be among
those unwanted kittens.
When it comes down to it, I
either have to do what is deemed
right by society, and what is for the
good of society, or I have to go with
my heart and leave my little man's
boys in their rightful place. It
always comes to that. So I guess I
have to pick my battles.
Conformity for the good of the
whole is a bitch. But sometimes it's
a necessity. I'm really not sure
whether Pepe's balls constitute a
true breech in my morals. I know
that I already feel pretty darn guilty
about it, and I'm not sure if I'll be
able to look him in the eye again. I
have a feeling that my loving kitty
will know that I am responsible for
his sudden change in body mass. I
do know, however, that he will not
cause any illegitimate pregnancies,
there will be no love children or
teenage cat mothers, and there will
not be six more hungry mouths to
feed in the kitty ghetto because of
my cat.
Anyway, I pick him up at four. I
hope that he can find it in his heart
to someday forgive me.
"Last words are for fools who haven't said enough
Karl Marx
philosopher





6 ThufiJty, Qctobti 1. 1998
Four Seats Left
comics
Tht Ent Ciroliniin
�,�! ��� OUT
Jason Latour
w VISABB By SflraflSr
Harris Teeter
xbur Neighborhood Food Market
www.harristeeter.com

DONT
FORGET
TO GET YOUR
TURKEY
COUPON
Thompson White
t, or Red Seedless
7 Thursday,
New sl
u
Is that guy
(girl actuall
map? Why
the same t-
world of fre
A new
batch of fres
means a wh
know what
funny noist
the library.
I 2 are quickly
"There i
bility once
Stephen St
f f have to foro
but the fn
Germain sai
This hop
I to a clear ct
I think is the
Freedom.
"There is
anything in
Michael Ma
means there
study or go
more respon:
j, j Of course
j downtown C
' combination.
,j j "I don't i
my fresh mer
major. "But I
a about my gra
just want to j.
Current cc
students get
responsible.
now may tii
student later.
The transi
college classc
11 ence. Pop qui
projects can
i
s
Sor
can
Some say
Jind, thou
BE A CARTOONIST
GIT YOUR STRIP PUBUSHED
GREAT RESUME BUILDER
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR FALL CARTOONISTS.
APPLY IN PERSON AT THE OFFICES OF
east'carolinian
in the Student Publications Building
2 liter
Mt Dew, Pepsi or
DietRspsi
Nina
senio
;m
Candle lit dinn
�Jbses, boxes of
hoonlit walks�
5Jpame a few of v
typical romantic
. . Back in the d
for guys and gi
these rituals c
as time passed
more career orie;
Ward Cleaver
role models.
if romance an
put on the back I
j It's now 1998
qampus with we
dents receiving
don to prepare us
As college studen
ten about roman
perception do
have on this tot
that everyone's o
but since I am
interview the mi
we'll just have tc
ions of our fellow
What exactly
sider romance to 1
j "Romance is s'
�ff of their feet
in ECU senior
romance is going i
Prices Effective Through October 6 1998:





MNVBHmHHmPIHI
Tht E�tt Cirollnisn
DONT
PORGET
D GET YOUR
TURKEY
COUPON
AThite
f � 7 Thursday.
October 1. 1998
features
i
f
Tht Eait Carolinian
It s A Whole New Generation
New students make transition to college life
lb.
n Hunter
Phillip Gilfus
staff whitbr
h
I Is that guy using the crosswalk? Is that
girl actually looking at the campus
map? Why are all those kids wearing
the same t-shirt? Welcome to the wild
world of freshmen!
A new semester means another
batch of freshmen entering ECU. That
means a whole lot of people who do not
know what to do, where to go, or why
funny noises are being emitted from
the library. But like all students, they
T iare quickly adapting to life at ECU.
"There is definitely more responsi-
bility once you get to college said
Stephen St. Germain, freshman. "I
have to force myself to clean my room,
but the freedom is worth it St.
I Germain said.
d This hopeful class of 2002 has come
I to a clear consensus about what they
jj think is the best thing about college:
Freedom.
"There is no one to force you to do
anything in college said freshman
Michael Mascarenas. "Of course that
means there is no one to tell you to
study or go to class, you have to be
more responsible Mascarenas said.
jjj Of course freedom and the call of
j downtown Greenville can be quite a
r combination.
Some classes involve working for two
hours outside the classroom on pro-
jects, and that does not include the
time for homework and studying. For
freshmen who are currently
struggling, they may find their classes
changing soon.
"One difference between now and
my freshmen year is that my classes are
more intensified and more specific
said Daniel Foust, pysch. major. "Of
course my classes are more interesting
now than they were before
"My classes weren't as big as I
2BJ&307ct
Freschetta
OZ6tl PUSS Si i ! don't even remember much of
r. my freshmen year said one business
major. "But I remember worrying more
8 about my grades than I do now, now I
just want to graduate
Current college trends show that as
students get older, they become more
responsible. A "wild" freshman
now may turn out to be � a serious
student later.
The transition from high school to
college classes can also be an experi-
1 ence. Pop quizzes, research papers, and
projects can be a daily occurrence.
With
VIC
Ctad
Teeter Ultra
am Liquid
Detergent
"There is definite-
ly more responsi-
bility once you get
to college. I have
to force myself to
thought they would be, I have one or
two classes that have forty students,
but most of them are small
Mascarenas said.
The expenses that
come with college mean
that many students must
look for a job. Whether
getting a job on or
off-campus, it can be
a struggle to balance
working and study-
ing. Of course, all stu-
dents want to find time
for social lives as well. Time manage-
ment can leave many students with a
dilemma. It is advised to most fresh-
men that they should avoid getting
heavily involved into campus life
until they feel they can handle their
current workload.
"To me it seems that the transition
between the senior year of high school
to the freshmen year of college is the
same as the transition between my
junior and senior year of high school
Mascarenas said.
"For me, I had a bit of a culture
shock once I got to ECU. I was so used
to the people at my high school Foust
said. "But the toughest thing that I had
to adjust to was getting used to
communal showers
Most Freshmen Have
�Known only two presidents (Bush and Clinton)
�Known only one Pope
�Always microwaved their meals
�Always been online
�Never seen an 8 track
�Missed out on the age of Charlie's Angels and The Dukes of Hazard
�Viewed the Gulf War as WWII
�Wondered, Iran Contra??

A
Some students believe romance
can be found during college years
I
I
10 oa
s Teeter
Pretzels
Some say love easy to
-Jind, thougfi sex easier
Nina M. D r v
SENIOR WRITER
ssior
With
7 VIC
Card
otareonly.
IStamf
I
1
j
' Candle lit dinners, long stemmed
�Jbses, boxes of candy, love letters,
.moonlit walks�these are just to
5Pame a few of what are considered
typical romantic gestures.
� . Back in the day, it was the norm
for guys and girls to go through
these rituals of courtship. But
as time passed, people became
more career oriented and June and
Ward Cleaver were no longer
role models. It seemed as
if romance and courtship was
put on the back burner.
j It's now 1998, and we are on a
qampus with well over 17,000 stu-
dents receiving our higher educa-
tion to prepare us for the real world.
As college students, have we forgot-
ten about romance? What kind of
perception do college students
have on this topic? Now I know
that everyone's opinion is different
but since I am not equipped to
interview the mass student body,
we'll just have to accept the opin-
ions of our fellow peers.
What exactly do students con-
sider romance to be?
j "Romance is sweeping someone
�ff of their feet said Aaron Spivey,
an ECU senior. "The key to
romance is going out of your way to
make someone
happy or surpris-
ing them�and
you don't mind
doing it
"Romance is
a very special
thingsaid
Jenny Inlow, an
ECU senior.
"When you find
it, be happy.
Enjoy it with
your partner
Many stu-
dents were able
to define the
word. Sure, it's
not like we
haven't seen at
one point that
Sunday night
drama that just
oozes in the
romance
department.
But does it still exist-
it in everyday life?
Some people believe it's alive
and kicking.
"Romance definitely exists
said Jeanette Jackson, an ECU
junior. "My boyfriend will send me
flowers for no reason, he'll take me
out to nice restaurants, and most of
all, he'll listen to me and is
quite patient
"Romance does exist Inlow
said. "Since my boyfriend isn't in
Greenville, when we do get to see
each other, we enjoy each other's
company. There's no time for
petty fights
There are some who believe it
exists, but you really have to
search for it.
"True romance is very hard to
Variety of new eateries available to
fit any students' college budget
Population increase
kings new restaurants
Erin A i, iv. r m a n
STAFF WRITER
Many people stand beside their views that love can be found at
school and maintained.
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMBER
can we find
find anymore said Maggi Beam,
an ECU sophomore. "If you do
find it you are lucky
"To have true romance you've
got to have love first said Lissa
Griffin, an ECU junior. "It's possi-
ble to find true love on campus,
but I've heard finding sex is a
lot easier
"Love and romance docs exist,
but it's hard to find said David
Stout, an ECU freshman. "For peo-
ple trying to find true love, it's hard.
But for those looking for raw sex all
the time, it's easy. Love is being
perfectly happy with just being
with your girlfriend or boyfriend
Then there are those who
believe romance went out with
eight tracks and Beta tapes.
SEE ROMANCE. PAGE I
Recently, you may have noticed an
increase in new businesses opening
in the Greenville area. According
tojohn Chaffey, the executive
director of the Pitt County
Development Committee, a lot of
the development is due to the ever
increasing population growth
Greenville is seeing. .
Part of this growth of course
being from students, but new com-
panies have also brought a lot of
growth to
the area.
Chic-
Filet is
meeting
greater
c os u m e r
demands by
opening up
their third
restaurant in
Greenville.
The new
Chic- Filet,
opening on
Evans
Street near
the univer-
sity Com-
mons, will
have the same menu as the other
much loved Chic - Filets.
I he restaurant chain which spe-
cializes in chicken sandwiches and
salads offers a variety of choices
sush as, a Chic - Filet sandwich,
chicken strips and a char grilled
chicken sandwich. Their prices
range around the same as other fast
food restaurants and fit nicely into
the average college students
budget, with prices ranging from
around $2.3S to $5.00. If your look-
ing for inexpensive, fast and some-
thing a little healthier than
the usual fast food Chic- Filet is
a great choice.
One of Greenville's newest
additions. Schlotzsky's Deli,
opened lasr may and since has been
named the number one
Schlotzsky's east of the Mississippi.
The restaurant, part of a 800
restaurant chain, offers many non
traditional sandwich choices and
salads and pizzas. The restaurant
also offers 8" Sourdough Crust
Pizzas, Salads, Local Favorites, like
a Corned Beef Reuben, and a Kid's
Menu. Schlotzsky's is reasonably
priced offering anything from a
home style cup of soup for $1.49 or
the Original for $2.99 to a large
Original, which comes on an eight
inch bun for $8.49. Schlotzsky's is a
great choice if you're looking for a
deli sandwich with a twist, it's not
your usual ham and cheese.
If you are looking for traditional,
the International House of
Pancakes, most commonly referred
to as IIIOP, is getting ready to cel-
ebrate a year in Greenville
September 15. The restaurant
which offers a sit down family-
friendly atmosphere is open 24
hours a day and offers a Breakfast
menu all day and a lunch and din-
ner menu as well. The restaurant's
breakfast menu contains every-
SEE EATERIES. PAGE I
1
A variety of eateries have recently opened in the Greenville area that provide different food for student's
ILLUSTRATION BY BRIAN WILLIAMS





8 Thursday. Oetobir 1. 1998
features
The East Carolinian
Romance
continued from page 7
Xhivalry is dead said Julie
Wilson, an ECU junior. "The gold-
en days of love and courtship
arc over
" "Romance is a front said
Kiersten Hanscn, an ECU junior.
"Guys have alterior motives to
their romantic antics
Romance and relationships are
big issues that college students
face. That is why there are people
students can talk to about such
things at the Center for Counseling
and Student Development in the
Wright building.
Dr. Nancy Badger, a counselor
at the center, said that they talk to
students about starting relation-
ships, maintaining relationships,
and when relationships break up.
"In the beginning of a relation-
ship, it should be based on things
the two people have in common
instead of 'that person looks
good Badger said. "The best
way to meet people is through
friends, different organizations,
cct You should see each other in
other settings besides the bars
arid clubs
As far as maintaining a healthy
relationship goes, Badger said the
key is communication. No one is a
mind reader, so you have to tell
your partner what you want and
need. In the same respect you've
got to be a good listener also.
"Balance is the key word in this
situation Badger said. "People
need to give each other room for
the relationship to grow
If the relationship reaches the
end of its path, the counseling cen-
ter is there to help you.
"We help the person grieve the
loss of the relationship Badger
said. "We help them understand
why it ended and resolve issues
"Three o'clock is always too late or too early for anything
you want to do
Jean-Paul Sarte
"Its better to have a permanent income than to be fasci-
nating
Oscar Wilde
"Logic is in the eye of the logician
Gloria Stcinman
"In the end, everything is a gag
Charlie Chaplin
"I love Mickey Mouse more than any woman I have ever
known
Walt Disney
ON SALE NOW!
beep boui fcecoris
Mvsic Harvest
k Ceeknior, of local Ho$it
(DM
JQflfELflflTIIPPEfJ
lOBf X ' FIAT WO JETS � 110 tITMO
ClGAt STOW iNtliNS � MiC v nous J
HONOt iHOHQ TliirVrs � HJuiHG BifoS
LONG STEM UISIES � ALMPTUIU
tf. UENFV � DOT JHurII LlttrtJ � LillHIM
Nan jlstj � uiNNj � Glow founts
TlffKiftiTT � JilOl nuiIY
KKCCalUKf
Pas e xocr mn
TO fr iXKKOUKCrr J00KI
SAT-OCT 10
nNNK pavilion at
WALNUT CREEK
AMPHITHEATRE -
www.walnufcreelc.com
as
W.HtCHT'S, SCHOOL KIDS RfCOROS, PEACHES, WILLIE'S RECORDS
CHARGE IV PHONE: 919-834-4000,9)0-223-2900,336-852-1100,334-722-6400,704-522-6500
www.lictatmoittr.com
All Mk subpl to onv�iian�handling chorga. Dotti 1 support octi subject to rinngt wilkout notice.
MODELS WANTED!
-ISO-
(INNOVATIVE STYLING OPTIONS)
MODEL NEEDED FOR A HAIR SHOW ON
OCTOBER 5, 1998
FOR CUTS, COLORS, & PERMS
'FREE PRODUCTS
'HAIR SERVICES BY TOP
NATIONAL STYLISTS.
'$50 A DAY
rv

FOR MORE DETAILS, PLEASE CALL 1-800-242-9283 EXT. 7758
EARN $$$
You can earn money while contributing to the future of medicine. We need
healthy individuals to participate in medically-supervised research studies to help
evaluate new medications. YOU may be eligible. You have to meet certain criteria
to qualify for a study, including our free medical exam and screening tests.
See below for our current study opportunities-
To soe if yon qualify or fi
or for more information about these and other studies, please call:
PPD PHARAAACO
I-800-PPD-CRU2 (1-800-773-2782)
Visit our website for more study info.
httpVwww.c itysearch.comrduppdpharmaco
Current Study Opportunities
COMPENSATION
REQUIREMENTS
�I09B
Check In:
1016 7:00p.m.
1023 7:00p.m.
Check Out: Up tO $850
1018 11:00a.m.
1025 11:00a.m.
Healthy Males & Females
Ages 18-55
Outpatient Visits: 1018,1019,1020, 1025,1026,1027
108
Check In:
109 7:00p.m.
1016 7:00p.m.
Checkout: Up tO $850
1011 11:00a.m.
1018 11:00a.m.
Healthy Males & Females
Ages 18-55
Outpatient Visits: 1011, 1012, 1013, 1018, 1019, 1020
17?
Cf
heck In:
109 7:00p.m.
1016 7:00p.m.
1023 7:00p.m.
1030 7:00p.m.
Checkout: Up tOI 200
1011 10:00a.m.
1018 10:00a.m.
1025 10:00a.m.
I ll 10:00a.m.
Healthy, Non-smoking
Males & Females Ages 18-45
118
Call for Study dates and times
Up to $700
TZ1
Check In:
1121 6:00a.m.
125 6:00a.m.
Check Out: Up tO $600
Healthy, Non-smoking
Males & Females Ages 18-40
1122 9:00a.m.
126 9:00a.m.
PPD PHARMACO i
E-mail us at RTP - Clinics @ rtp.ppdi.com
Non-smoking Males
Ages 18-45
Outpatient Visits: 1123,1124,1125, 127,128,129
�IHJJI.llJII.1fJlll.IMf-miJJLJ:H
Official
Supermarket
Of The Pirates.
Winn-Dixie
Marketplace
�� Thursd
thing fran
and pork
Pepsi, Diet
Pepsi, Or
ML Dew
2 liter bottles
limit 4 with additional order!
Cheerios
Cereal
15 oz. box
Stouffer's
Lasagna
96 oz. size
START!
Angel Soft
Bath Tissue
4 roll package
"IheUndefeo
Plate to He
Musk in Gree
-GreenvSle
T Uptown Gn
?209 E. 5
7tec(i en
Tailgate
Dinner
Special
Includes: 12 pc. Fried
Chicken. 1 lb. Potato
Salad, 1 lb. Cole Slaw,
12 Dinner Rolls
Winn-Dixie
Phone Card
30 minutes Prepaid
$097
$1.50
H1-BAL1
$1.50
BOTTLE
BEER
Prices good Wednesday, Sept.
30, thru Tuesday Oct. 6, 1998. �
Effective In Our N.C. Locations
$232
MasterCard
�Copyright 1998. Winn-Dixie Raleigh. Inc. Quantity Rights Reserved, www.winndixie.
com
$1
$1 WIN!
IADIE
? special guc
One Step B






East Carolinian
9Th
ursday, October 1, It
Eateries
coniinued from page 7
features
thing from pancakes to omelettes
and pork chops & eggs. Breakfast
prices range from 3.39 for Ten
Silver Dollar Pancakes to 7.99 for
their T-Bone Steak & Eggs. The
lunch and dinner menu offers appe-
tizers, sandwiches, hamburgers full
meals including spaghetti, steak
and chicken and desserts. The
Tk� East Carolinian
I
1
SCORF
prices on the lunch and dinner
menu range from 3.19 for a grilled
cheese to 10.99 for T-Bone Steak &
Shrimp. While their prices are rea-
sonable for a sit down dinner, you
might want to consider waiting till
your parents come to town to dine
GREAT
SELECTION
OF
y
pnnection
Division ol UJ3JE.
210 E. 5th St. M-S10-I
758-8612 Sun 1-5
here, if you're on a tight budget
IHOP is looking into offering 10
off to students with their ID one
night a week in the future.
As the population continue to
grow and new businesses come to
the Greenville Area offering more
employment opportunities we can
look forward to seeing an even larg-
er increase in new restaurants and
shopping areas.
Recently US Cellular estab-
lished Greenville as headquarters
for Eastern North Carolina and
parts of South Carolina which easi-
ly created nearly 100 new jobs.
Wachovia Sales Finance, a process-
ing center for auto loans in a five
state area created 250 jobs recently.
This great influx of people in turn
has spawned a greater demand for
more, newer and expanded busi-
nesses.
630-pound
pumpkin stops traffic
at produce stand
ffe1
i1
pa
' PlilfPICflSlSfNISlNfflifiWIflllSIIS
ALOflNE .IICHARSandAMVHFCKERLING PRnoucnofj A NiGHI AT IHE fiOXBURV
WJlRHBEtL GHHSKArrAN OANHEDAYA rJOUYSHANNON HICHAHDGRIECO
IMMMttVUlHIIMID' MIlBill' ' ' IlL lk
STARTS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2!
01 IHCAGiMFWT � no PASSES OB DI5C0UHT TICKETS ACCEPTED
CABMIKE
CARMIKE12
1685 E. Fret TowtRd.
1252)353-968
The EnterSoft Network
1-888-276-4ESN
INTERNET
ECU Student Special
$I 8.95iMonth
Available at:
The little Computer Co.
Located at 106 Trade St. off Memorial Dr.
(behind Outback Steakhouse)
Unlimited Access � 100 Digital, 100 56K � No Busies
252-355-9105
ENOLA, Pa. (AP) � A 630-pound
pumpkin is stopping traffic on
Carlisle Pike as motorists pause to
look at the giant gourd on display
at the Al Retherford and Sons
Farm Market
"This is the biggest one we've
ever had said Allen Retherford
Jr after the pumpkin � said to be
one of the 20 largest grown in the
nation�went on display
Wednesday at the market in
Hampden Township, Cumberland
County.
It's become tradition for the
family to bring in a huge pumpkin
each year to be used as pan of the
market's colorful seasonal display.
Six men were needed to get this
one from the back of a pickup
truck to a sturdy table outside the
market's main entrance.
"We didn't even pick it up. It's
hard because there's just no place
to grab onto Retherford said.
He said the pumpkin came
from a farm in Virginia that special-
izes in growing
the huge produce, but he
declined to be more specific.
The largest pumpkin on record
weighed more than 1,000 pounds,
he said. To get them to maximum
size, growers often "baby them
by keeping weeds, diseases, and
bugs away, and by giving the plant
the water and fertilizer it needs,
Vorodi said.
College freshman
walks 140 miles to
campus
MANCHESTER, N.H. (AP) �
You know how some old-timers
like to go on and on about how
easy we young 'uns have it?
When they're done lambasting
us for our pampered, cushy
lifestyle, the conversation always
seems to get around to how they
had to trudge five miles to school
every morning. Well, they'd better
not try and run that jive by Seamus
Griesbach any more. He just
walked 140 miles to school.
"I don't know where the idea,
came from said Seamus, a fresh
man at St Ansclm College who.
arrived on campus last week after,
an eight-day, seven-night hike
from his home in Lisbon Falls
Maine. "Maybe it was in some,
deep, dark cranny in the back of
my skull, but I had the time, and I
figured it would be kind of an,
adventure
The adventure also included his
14-ycar-old brother, Leon, their,
dog, Belle and all of the necessary,
provisions.
"We both had hiking packs
Seamus said, "and sleeping bags
and a two-man tent We had a cou
pie of changes of clothes, lots of
extra socks, and I carried about two
gallons of trail mix and Leon had
two gallons of dog food
"We'd walk till about 6:00 at
night" he said, "then we'd knock
on a door and ask the people if we
could sleep in their yards.
www.affic-iiightclub.com
"The Undefeated Beit
Place to Hear Live
Musk in Greenville
-Greenv3le Times
?
?
?
? llpro'
209 E. 5th St.
7tev etcerct-M.ee � StA- St
own Greenville
ATTIC
NC's legendary Nightclub,
Voted �I at CCU and
Top 100 College Bart in
Ml Nation by Playboy
magazine October 1997
com
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
Mike Corrado Band S& I
752-7303
Free Food!
Door frlz.es
new rock.
51.50
HI-BALLS
$1.50
BOTTLED
BEER
m YOUR PARENTS A TK SHIRT-
Pon't tell thew it didn't
cost you a dime!
STALL42I X
?
?
?
In the new
PheanixRoom
jwmmm
$2 32oz DRAFT
sun tribe
In the new
PheonixRoom
SATURDAY
I
Far Too Jones g 1
1 $2 32oz draft special guest - Shades of Grey Egg ?
EVERY TUESDAY
FrCC Parents Weekend Tee shirt to
the first $00 parents in oar store!
$1 DOMESTICS JTUDIO
$1 WINE BY THE GLASS fl IGIIT
UDIESFRKADM, D�00 fflUIIO UY
OCT. 9TH
homecoming
weekend .
? special guests -SMO
? One Step Beyond
cms OMUL
?
?
?
Chairmen
of the Board
www.livewireonIine.com
616 S. COTANCHE STREET � UPTOWN GREENVIUE
758-2616 www.ubeinc.com
MON - FRI 9-6
SAT 10-5
FOOTBALL SAT 9-8






10 Thundiy, Octohtr 1. 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
Conference action set to begin wih Army
ARM who to watch
Ittly Wllllans 49
Senior HB 6-1 201
Kinston, N.C.
31 carries 214 yds (6.9) 1TD
Jtluyfitff t
Senior QB 6-2 192
Missouri CHy, Texas
42 carries 203 yds (4.8)
10-20 passing 155 yds
lei ilefcarisen 1
Senior SE 5-8 166
Portsmouth, VA.
8 Catches 86 yds (10.8)
32 yds per kick return
Source: Army Madia Guide
Pirates prepare for first
C-USA game of year
Travis Barkley
senior writer
ECU will kick off its second season in
Conference USA when it faces Army in
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium on Saturday.
Army comes into the game with a 1-
2 record after losing 27-15 at Rutgers
last week. The Cadets' only win of the
season came at the expense of
Cincinnati, giving them a share of the
conference lead with Tulane.
Army's wishbone will be the second
triple option style of offense that ECU
has faced in as many games. Ohio's
triple option, which the Pirates encoun-
tered on Sept. 19, is virtually identical
to Army's. While Ohio only attempted
three passes, head coach Steve Logan
said that Army will look to throw the
ball a bit more than the Bobcats did.
"What they like to do is throw it
about 15 times, complete nine or ten of
them, two of them for touchdowns with
post route type throws over the safety's
head Logan said. "They're very
adept at pulling off the line of scrim-
mage and hitting the post route back
behind the safety's head with the split
end. That's the big difference
between Army and Ohio: Army can
and will throw the football
"Hopefully having played a wish-
bone, an open date, and another wish-
bone coming to town, I'm hoping that
we can line up right and be more com-
fortable with what we're trying to get
done on defense Logan said.
Senior safety Kelvin Suggs said that
having played Ohio is an advantage for
the Pirates.
"We got a chance to see where we
made mistakes at and what we can
improve on Suggs said. "I think the
Ohio game is really going to give us
an edge
Suggs will have an extra incentive to
play well on Saturday; local bragging
rights. Army running back Bobby
Williams was a high school teammate of
Suggs' at Kinston. Suggs said that he
and Williams engaged in some
friendly trash-talking this sum-
mer. Williams and Suggs met
on the field when ECU trav-
eled to Army in 1995, but both
were freshmen, and neither
one saw much playing time.
"This year we're both start-
ing, so it should be interest-
ing Suggs said. "I told him
we'll find out what happens
come game time
While Suggs is looking for-
ward to playing against
Williams, he says he won't get
caught up in personal battles.
"I'm going to go out and
play the kind of football I'm
used to playing and he'll proba-
bly do the same thing Suggs
said. "Hopefully I'll get to talk
to him after the game
On offense, ECU used the
week off to fine-tune its
Roderick Coleman was as a preseason first-team All-
Conference USA selection for 1998.
PHOTO COURTESY OF CONFERENCE USA MEDIA GUIDi
passing game.
"We're trying to get a little bit more
rhythm and orchestration to our passing
game Logan said. "Its got some rough
edges on it I'd like to see us eliminate
ECU's passing game will be key
against an Army defense ranked third
Pirates in the Pros
ECU athletes make the most of their talents in theprus
Jim Phelps
senior whiter
ECU has never had to wonder if
it's players were going to play pro-
fessional football. The Pirates have
seen an abundance of players go to
the NFL draft and some other
players use their talents in other
leagues like the CFL and WLAF.
At least one ECU player has been
selected in 19 of the last 22 NFL
drafts, including an all-time ECU
high of eight in 1984. In the 1990's,
17 players have been selected.
It all begins in the 1960s with a
player named Thomas Michel who
played running back for the Pirates
from 1960-1963. In 1964 he took
his talents to the NFL, playing for
the Minnesota Vikings, and
became the first Pirate running
back to play in the NFL. Then
from 1967-1968 he played for the
Washington Redskins, and the
New Orleans Saints. He also
played a little bit of semi-pro with
the Anapolis Sailors.
"Professional football is differ-
ent from college football in that it is
a lot bigger and a lot faster and
everyone is good Michel said.
"There is no mediocre ball players
in pro ball
Mr. Michel, while at ECU aver-
aged 5.7 yards per carry and led the
1963 team in rushing, scoring, and
total offense and helped the team
to a 27-6 win over Northeastern in
the 1963 Eastern Bowl in
Allentown, PA, earning outstand-
ing back honors. His most memo-
rable moment in college ball was
when ECU beat Wake Forest in
1963 at the stadium dedication
game. In the pro's the most memo-
rable moment was making the
team with the Vikings.
Michel left his senior year to
play for the Vikings and then
returned to finish school in 1970. In
1978 he was inducted into the
ECU Hall of Fame.
"That was a great honor, some
of the ones that had already been
inducted before me I had played
withand these guys were great
athletes Michel said. "Things
you get sometimes they can't take
away and that's one of them
Now Mr. Michel resides here in
Greenville and works for the Post
Office which he has been doing for
28 years.
Now to the 1970's where a play-
er named Carlester Crumpler who
is now a academic counselor here at
ECU and works on the Pirate
Sports Network. He played run-
ning back for the program from
1971-1973. After his senior year he
was drafted by the Buffalo Bills in
1974 and saw action as leading
rusher during the preseason. He
played for the Bills for a year and
then was traded to the Washington
Redskins where he was unable to
play because of a failed physical
and his career ended in 1977.
"My career actually ended very
quickly due to injuriesso I never
got myself established in the
league Crumpler said.
Professional football is different
from college ball in that it is a busi-
ness.
"It's strictly a businessyou are
competing for a job now, not just a
position on a team Crumpler
said. "You've got dreams you are
trying to fulfill, and while you may
be rooting for the other guy to do
well, you are also trying to pursue a
position on a team that may be
your livelihood for the next four to
five years
While at ECU, Crumpler held
many records. In rushing he had
2889 yards total, in carries he had
658, and in scoring 222 points with
37 touchdowns. All of these were
ECU and Southern Conference
records.
In the 1980's the Pirates saw an
outstanding fullback in the form of
Earnest Byner. He played for the
school's program from 1980-1983.
He finished his career with 2,049
rushing yards on 378 carries averag-
ing 5.4 yards a carry. In 1984 he
was selected in the 10th round by
the then Cleveland Browns and
played in the NFL for 14 seasons.
During these 14 years he played for
Browns, the Redskins and
Baltimore Ravens.
His best season was in 1990
when he finished fourth in the
league with 1219 yards rushing and
earned a spot in the first Pro Bowl.
In 1991 he was named to his sec-
ond straight Pro Bowl. Also in 1991
he rushed for 1048 yards and
ranked fifth in the NFL. He fin-
�GJcnn Bass-1960
Buffalo Bills
?Wayne Lineberry-1968
Buffalo Bills
�Dave Bumgarner-1964
Toronto Rifles
�Mike Brewington-1979
BostonPortland Breakers
�Sam Harrel-1979
Houston Gamblers
�Eddie Hicks-1978
New York Giants
�Danny Kepley-1974
Edmonton Eskimos
�Kenny Moore-1974
Ottawa Rough Riders
�Bobby Myrick-1975 Ottawa Rough Riders
; 'Reggie Pinkney-1976 Indianapolis Cote
�Harold Randplph-1977 Montreal AiJoucttes
�Les Strayhonvl972 Dallas Cowboys
�Carl Sunimerell-1973 New York Giants
�ZackValentine-1978 Philadelphia Eagles
Edmonton Eskimos
�Emic Logan-1988 Jackson
�Terry Long-1983 Pittsburgh Steelers
�Grant Lowe-1989 Washington Redskins
�Brian McPhatter-1989
Raleigh-Durham Skyhawks (WLAF)
�Billy MicheI-1988 Denver Broncos
�Ricky Nichols-1984 Indianapolis Colts
�Jeff Pegues-1983 Cleveland Browns
�Toorie Robbins-1981 Green Bay Packers
�John Robertson-1983 Philadelphia Eagles
�Junior Robinson-1989 Sacramenro Gold Miners
�Jody Schulz-1982 Philadelphia Eagles
�Anthony Simpson-1987 Tampa Bay Buccaneers
�James Singletary-1988 Indianapolis Colts
�VrinsonSrnith-1987 Chicago Bears
�HalStephens-1983 Detroit Lions
�Theo Sutton-1980 Winnipeg Blue Bombers
�Anthony Thompson-1989
London Monarchs WLAF)
?Norwood Vann-1983 Los Angeles Rams
�Kevin Walker-1985 Tampa Bay Buccaneers
�Henry Williams-1984
Philadelphia Eagles, Edmonton Eskimos
�Walter Wilson-1989 Baltimore
in C-USA.
"On the snap of the football all 11
defenders commit in kamikaze fashion
to the ball Logan said. "They don't
have what I would say is one outstand-
ing player but the 11 young men that
play with a collective
passion make them a very
effective defense
Senior center Danny Moore
says that Army's defense isn't the
biggest, but it is very good.
SEE FOOTBALL. PAGE 11
Men's
soccer
struggles
Team plagued by
growing injured list
!�
�Calvin Adams-i 984
Calvary Stampedeis
�Stefan Adarns-1984
Sacramento Surge
(WLAF)
�Mike Applewhite-1989
Arizona Cardinals
?Tony Bakcr-1983
Frankfort Galaxy
(WLAF)
?Harold Blue-1981
Arizona Wranglers
�Reggie Branch-1984
Washington Redskins
�Tony Collins"
�George Crump-1981 New England Patriots
�Ellis Dillahunt-1987 NYNJ Knights (WLAF
�Mike Grant-1983 Memphis Showboats
�Steve Hamilton-1983 Detroit Lions
�Clint Han ew York Giants
?Mike Hav. !rv SramivWc
?Jefraiake-fwT
Cincinnati Bengals
�WillieBrookins-i994
Charlotte Panthers
?Bernard Carter-1993
Green Bay Packers
?Marcus Crandell-1996
Edmonton Eskimos (CFL)
�Carlester Crumpler,
1993 Seattle S
?David Daniels-199!
Pittsburgh Steelers
-it
?Jerry Dillon-1992 �-
Sacramento Gold Miners (CFL)
?Luke Fisher-1991 Shreveport Pirates (CFL)
?Mitchell Galloway-J995 Buffalo Bills
�Dan Gonzalez-1997 Dallas Cowboys
?Chris Hall-1991 Dallas Cowboys
?Dwight Henry-1995 San Francisco 49ers
�John Jer1991 Detroit Lions
; ?Dion johnson-1991 Houston Oilers
?Robert Jones-1991 Miami Dolphins
�George Koonce-1990 Green Bay Packers
?Chad Ma�uvl990 Miami Dolphins
?Emmanuel McDaniel-1995 Carolina Panthers
�Reggie McKinney-1991 Miami Dolph
?Charles Miics-19
Sacramento Gold Miners (CFL)
�Tom Scott-1992 Cincinatti Bengals
�Walter Scott-1995 Green Bay Packers
SEE PROS. PAGE tt
Holding a 14 overall record, the men's
soccer team is looking to improve.
Mario Scherhu i i i
assistant si'or is h) i kir
While the women's soccer program
had one of its best season starts with
a current record of 5-2 (1-1), the
men's team struggled in most of its
matches so far due to strong oppo-
nent teams and a steadily growing
injury list.
The Pirates are facing a tbiigh
schedule, playing numerous ranked
teams this year. The team lost its
Colonial Athletic Association opener
6-1 at James Madison University,
currently ranked 16th in the nation,
on Saturday afternoon.
"It's difficult enough to play a
top-20 team on the road head
coach Will Wiberg said. "However,
missing three starters who are your
top scorers presents an even greater
challenge
The ECU men's soccer team (1-
4, 0-1) is already playing without
top-scoring midfielders Wyatt
Panos, one of last years' All-CAA
second team nominees, and Brian
Denoo.
Wiberg continues to see his team
plagued by injuries. Scott Pokorney
went down with a leg injury in the
game against James Madison. With
SEE SOCCER. PAGE 11
11 Thuridi
Com
Amcria
fashion!
Vv
nialion
in vest m
OC4HI90 ,1m ln-JMir. 1
ramiKv(In, fi .in weighted
CUFStMk
SurlUi
NumhtioliKm
PttMAccounts
.t ft4a.i
s ft41,
10 Vt�4671
' 'Their rop linnet ire bj
IWH, 1,ph:i Aiuluu.il St
IfiuiiuiKxul Service. 11� m
mutt mii.I miirtcv






HHH
arolinian
n first-team All-
r 1998.
�EDIA GUIDi
fcwtball all II
mika.e fashion
I. "They don't
; one outstand-
:wng men that
collective
them a very
Danny Moore
fense isn't the
y good.
1GE1I
i's
Zl
I, the men's
improve.
I 1- I R
HI I OH
er program
i starts with
(1-1), the
most of its
rong oppo-
ly growing
ig a tough
)us ranked
im lost its
ion opener
University,
the nation,
to play a
ad head
'However,
0 are your
en greater
r team (1-
? without
1 Wyatt
All-CAA
ind Brian
: his team
Pokorney
iry in the
ion. With
wmm
mm
mmm
��i
J AniEtEnlKUinmin!M.Bm.olTh.E�ltC�olmi.n " WT f V V �� W N " "� f �� W V
11 Thursday, October 1, 1998
sports
The Eait Carolinian
BWN De Terre
Presents
All ages - All hair types
Come join our Bain De Terre Make -over Show featuring Mark Putnam, North
American Hairderesser Finalist! Mark will enhance your natural beauty with the latest
fashion! Alsofeaturingjulie Anders whos passion for Client Satisfaction is garaunteed.
UPDATE YOUR LOOK
LOCATION-
CO NTACT-
Hilton (Greenville)
207 SW Greenville Blvd.
Greenville, NC 27834
252-355-5000
Maggie Brown (Greenville Room)
MODEL CALL- October 4, 1998 2:00 - 4:00
SHOW DATE- October 5, 1998
INFORMATION-1-800-242-9283 ext. 4336
�Bain De Terre
I Bring this coupon and receive
I $50 and Services complimentary

�Morningstar ratings for
the CREF Global Equities Account,
CREF Equity Index Account,
and CREF Growth Account
AAA
-S&P and Moody's
rating for TWA"
'�America's
�op Pension Fund
-Money Magazine, January 1993
�William Ravdin, TIAA-CREF Participant
HIGH MAKKS FROM
MORNINGSTAR, S&P, MOODY'S,
MONEY MAGAZINE AND BILL.
We lake a lot of pride in gaining high marks
from the major rating services. But the fact
is, vere equally proud of the ratings we get every-
day from our participants. Because at TIAA-CREF,
ensuring the financial futures of the education and
research community is something that goes beyond
stars and numbers.
We became the world's largest retirement orga-
nization by offering people a wide range of sound
investments, a commitment to superior service, and
operating expenses that are among the lowest in the
insurance and mutual fund industries
With TIAA-CREF,you'II get the right choices-
and the dedication �to helpyou achieve a lifetime
o( financial goals. The leading experts agree.
So does Bill.
Find out how TIAA-CREF can helpyou build a
comfortable, financially secure tomorrow.
Visit our Web site at www.tiaa-cref.org or call
us at I 80Q 842-2776.
Ensuring the future
for those who shape it.
�rt4ndlh�ncxtJ2Sn:
"JOrtCt M.inimgMjr. tnt , uh .Il.tWfl MixmnpMVit jn iiufcpcntknl rvKC that ratemutual fundiand tanjblc annuities I In tup l(rl liiriilm jnimrimcMCircgin 1
four sun Mnmm&Mar propTKtan ration rtlleci hiWuntal mkadjuued pcilnrmancv and arc tubjett to (hanateevcrv month Thrv are calculated (mm the atCCHini'i three . lii
OCCHDfW i�i ItraMin bill return with appropriate fee adjustment, and a nikfactor (hat reflect 1 performance hdow'WI da J (.ill .ciutih 1 In .ncr.il! Mir ntinp referred i iIxm- an M.muMii's published
rj(iit((s,�In, hjic weighted ateraKof it three , live , and icn-VMr ranng lor penodt ending Juk 31, IS��8 The separate unpublished iralinpt ti� each id the penodt are
CUP fcttk A���iCUF GUW1 Bfdtte AcammtCUIVh7lad� AteMMCUF Qnwtfc AmmMCUF iMd UutM ArcoutCUF fetid CMn Actmt
surfU.niStar (UnrigSi j 1 Rating,Var RilingStar Ratingmii Rji�m
Number til IfcimrtfK kqurtvNumber of International rqumNumber tif DsmtK tajumNumber ol Domestic hsumNumher nt" Hit J liKumeNumber of IitnevK bqufls
hrMAccount RatedAccounts KitedAccount 1 RatedAccounts RatedAccount! Rued.Accounts Rated
.tVea.42,1204459S2,120SM2047IV42. IM
S Year41.M3S23SNANA44741.33
10 Year4671NANANANANA
fcs
�M�e 11 ratings are had on TIM' cictptwrulfina 'Rated on at wit under management "Si��nf)rrf C Ffr'i Imuianu Rmi�n Anmtou.
IWH, 1 Ippei Analitical Services Inc , Ltfftr-lhntnr't AnaMud �. 1998 iQuirtcrh1 CRK1 certificate and imerettt in the TIAA Real lJ�tc Account are distributed b TIM-OEf Individual and
limituiiimal Service, hw more complete infiirmaiMmi. including chains andeinenn call I SO0 M2 2733, emenvim SSlW, I'm thiRt 1 and I tAA Real Y.Mate Account protpcautet. Read them emfulit before
Football
continued from page 10
"The guys aren't real big, but
they're real aggressive Moore
said. "They're all over the field and
they're well conditioned. This is
going to be one of those 'teams
when it comes down to the fourth
quarter they'll be just as condi-
tioned as we are, so its going to
come down to who wants it more
The 1995 ECUArmy game was
the only time the schools have met.
ECU won that game 31-25. While
the Pirates have changed their look
and offense a bit since the last time
these schools played, not much is
different at Army this time around.
"They've changed very, very lit-
tle on either side of the ball since
'95 Logan said. "VVc did some
good things in '95 against their
wishbone. We also did some things,
looking back on it, that we saw
where it got us in a lot of trouble
m mmm
w�mm
Jamie Wilson
Bobby Weaver
Leonard Henry
David Garrard
BobbyWeaver
Troy Smith
LaMont Chapped
Jamie Wilson
40:
23
10
160 0
68 1
51 0
42-23-2
30-19-0
4.2
3.0
5.1
mm
383
126
m
2.
2
15
8
8
227 15.1
179 22.4
70 8.8
The key to stopping Army, or ing the clock away or it will be a
any option team, is to keep the ball
away from the players.
"You've got to score early
Logan said. "You cannot let these
guys get ahead of you and start tak-
short football game
A record crowd of over 40,000 is
expected for the game. Kickoff is
set for 3:30 p.m.
Soccer
continued from page 10
A.J. Gray, who is suspected to have
a torn knee ligament from the
match against Colgate, and Scott
LaFevers, who is suffering from a
bad ankle, the injury list has grown
to five players.
"If we can get some injured
players back and don't allow the
opponent to score early on us, we
should be able to get back into our
game soon Wiberg said. "Two
positive aspects from the JMU
match were our second half show-
ing and the performance of Brett
Waxer, who scored in two consecu-
tive games since I moved him up
into midfield
The women's team, on the other
hand, is looking forward to the
Holiday Inn Express Tournament
at Stony Brook, N.Y. this weekend.
"The key to our success this
season are the kids I recruited in
1996, who are juniors now and
developed very well in their
game women's soccer coach Neil
Roberts said. "Our strength is that
we don't have one single superstar
but that the team is very solid all
over the field
According to Roberts, the Lady
Pirates are facing a very challeng-
ing schedule for the rest of the sea-
son.
"Seven out of our remaining ten
matches are conference games, and
wc are definitely looking on
improving our conference record
this season Roberts said.
The Lady Pirates' next home
game will be on Oct. 7 at 4 p.m.
against UNC-VVilmington, while
the men's team will host Campbell
on Oct. 6 at 4 p.m.
fPITt
coiiftiY AIL NEXT WEEK J
EA D LARGEST MIDWAY EAST OF RALEIGH
�� J V HWY 264 E.
nWVT 404 t.
1Tw ULkSi&LfcUCoSuiUl 'l us �" fe v'1 at www.skantech.compittcountyfair -�M
FINEST STUDENT
HOUSING AVAILABLE
DON'T MAKE THE MISTAKE
OF NOT DISCUSSING THIS
WITH YOUR PARENTS
SEE THEM NOW
NEW CONDOMINIUMS
FOR SALE
(SPECIAL FINANCING AVAILABLE)
OR RENT
3 BEDROOMS
3 BATHROOMS
3 WALK-IN CLOSETS
NEAR CAMPUS
1ST ST.

3to s -Jm
4TH ST.
5TH ST.
10TH ST.

UNIT PLAN
322 BROWNLEA DR.
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-440-5378
I
I






12 Thundiy, Oclobar 1. 1898
sport
s
The East Carolinian
Pros
continued from page 10
ished his career with 56 rushing
touchdowns and 15 receiving
touchdowns. He now works in the
! front office of the Baltimore
Ravens. He currently ranks Uth
on ECU's all-time rushing list. He
did not miss a game the final nine
years of his career.
Finally, in the 1990's ECU saw a
tremendous running back with the
name, Jerris McPhail. He began
his career with the Pirates in 1995,
replacing record-setter Junior
Smith. He ran the 40-yard dash in
4.37 and has a 37.5 inch vertical
jump, the best-ever for an ECU
running back. His senior year he
led the team in rushing with 910
yards and five touchdowns. He
rushed for a career best of 209
yards. He finished his senior sea-
son with 38 receptions for 342 yards
and two touchdown catches.
His total rushing yards is 1409
with 288 carries and seven touch-
downs. In receiving he had 83 with
752 yards.
"He was one of the very best
running backs I've ever had an
opportunity to coach in the stand-
point of being able block, run, and
catch, he could do all three head
coach Steve Logan said. "He was
so multi-dimensional and we used
him his sophomore and junior year
to complement Junior
SmithJerris gave you every-
thing
When McPhail graduated it was
very hard to replace him.
"We had become accustomed to
all of those talents Logan said.
McPhail was drafted in 19 by
the Miami Dolphins and played for
them for about three years and is
now playing for the Detroit Lions.
Throughout the decades, ECU
has produced great talent in the
sport of football and will continue
to do so far into the future.
t the 1 � �
eastcarohnian
AUTO SALESSERVICE DIRECTORY
QUALITY SERVICE AT A FAIR
PRICE - OIL CHANGES,
BATTERIES. NC INSPECTIONS
KADS AUTOMOTIVE
3205 E. 10th Street
758-5237
Hours: 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. M-F; 8
a.m. - 1 p.m. Sat.
THIRD GENERATION PIRATES
SUPPORTING ECU THROUGH
SHARED VISIONS-BOTH
ACADEMIC & ATHLETIC
BROWN & WOOD
PONTIACCADILLAC
GMCJEEP
329 Greenville Blvd. SW
355-6080
Hours: 8:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. M-F
For information about being included in
our Auto Directory call 328-6366.
TOTAL QUALITY SERVICE
STEVE BRILEY S AUTO-
MOTIVE SERVICE CEN-
TER
3142-A Moseley Drive
752-5043
Hours: 7:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. M-F
ELTORO
Men's Hair Styling Shoppe
Barber & Style
2800 E. 10th St.
Eastgate Shopping Center
Across From Highway Patrol
Behind Stain Glass
Mon Frl. 9-6
walk-ins Anytime
752-3318
Say Pirates
& Get Hair
Cut for $7
Every time.
Pirate Special
$7.00
Haircut
ONWOOD
Greenville, North Carolina
STUDENT 18 HOLE GOLF RATES
Student Rates begin after 12:30pm
on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays.
(Full time students only)
Call up to 2 days in advance for tee times.
No metal spikes, no jeans, and no t-shirts.
To receive the student rate you MUST present
a valid student ID at time of registration.
$20.00
Cart and Greenfee per round
252-752-6659
You drank.
You danced.
You had se)
tYlissinj
Sorr1 �
?
Free Pregnancy Tests
Call Carolina Pregnancy Center 757-0003
209-B South Evans Street (downtown near Courthouse)
Greenville's
Best Kept Secret
1,2 & 3
Bedroom
Apartment
Homes
'fwqI Hwiina opportunity'
' Stats of the art Fitness Canter.
� Pool, tannU & volleyball
' Clot to campus.
I Washers A dryers available
� Great locationl
CALL TODAYUI
355-2198
1510 Bridle Circle
MENU:
Chicago Style Hot Docs
(hi kef)
Chicago Style Dog $1.59
Southern Style Dog SI .45
Chili Cheese Dog SI .59
Plain Hot Dog S.99
Chicago Style Sandwiches
Italian Beef Sandwich S3.99
Bar-B-Que Beef S2.99
Italian Sausage Beef 13.50
Combo Beef & Sausage S5.25
Italian Meatball Sandwich $3.50
Polish Beef Sausage $2.79
Hamburger $1.99
Cheeseburger $2.25
Gyro on Pita $3.99
Grilled Breast Fillet $2.99
Grilled Cheese $1.50
Cljicago tt)le
lg(
325 ARLINGTON BLVD. 355-0008
HOURS: THURS. - MON. 10:30AM - 12AM
TUES. - WED. 10:30AM - 10PM
For All Home
Football
Games we
will be at
Harrington
Field for all
your tail gat-
ing needs! .
See you there!
Buy 1 Regular Style
Hot Dog
Get ONE FREE
Value 1159
$1.00 OFF
Any Specialty
Sandwich
$1.99
Hot Dog
& Fries
Mark A.Ward
ATTORNEY AT
? DWI, Traffic, and Felony Defense
� Assistant Public Defender 1988-1993
� Private practice since June 1993
� Has Represented Thousand of individuals
in District and Superior Criminal Courts
� Member - Pitt County Criminal Defense Bar
� ECU Class of 84, Campbell Law Class of'87
� 24 hour message service
� Visa and Mastercard welcome
752-7529
LAW
Downtown Greenville
EUk One of the BEST
things about
Parem
Sport Pad
$1.00 Bud
$1.00 Natural
$1.25 Mixed Drinks
LADIES FREE � LADIES SHOOT POOL FREE FROM 8-12
GUYS IN FREE W ECU ID � CHECK OUT THE HOOCH GIRLS
Sharhys
LADIES LOCK UP 10-12 � LADIES ONLY (MALE REVIEW)
USE SHARKY'S ALLEY ENTRANCE
:Y
X
A

east �
hEMn
UNIVEKPII
Splash
.25$ Draft
$1.00 Bud
$1.00 Natural Light
KARAOKE GONG SHOW 10-12 - $50 FIRST PRIZE � GUY'S
IN FREE WECU ID - USE 5TH ST. ENTRANCE
Upper Deck
J .250 Draft
$1.00 Bud
$1.00 Natural Light
SINK THE 8- BALL ON THE BREAK CONTEST
$100 FIRST I

airreguiar price
Purple or Gold Apparel.
Pick up student football tickets
through Thursday, 9 am - 7 pm at the Store!
Student Stores
Where your dollars support scholars!
Hours: Monday - Friday: 7:30 am � 7:00 pm � Saturday: 9:00 am - 3:00 pm
Wright Building � 328-6731 � www.studentstores.ecu.edu
Ronald E. Dowcfy
MOVING S
'�ture and ap
��52-8608.
Sale runs 9.29.98
aus purchases





The East Carolinian
s
ret
CfFairlane
MiLkiUtlaBM
HO Bridle Circle
For All Home
Football
Games we
will be at
Harrington
Field for all
your tail gat
ing needs! .
See you there!
. 355-0008
0:30AM - 12AM
MM - 10PM
$1.99
Hot Dog
& Fries
LAW
mmmmmmmmKmmmmm
mmmamm
13 Thursday. October 1, 1998
FOR RENT
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$275month. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apts 125 Avery St. Green-
ville. 758-6596.
THREE OR Four bedroom, two bath,
spacious home block from campus
and downtown. Available November
1st. No pets. Great opportunity. 355-
5655 or 355-6416.
WANTED: SOMEONE to sublease a
one bedroom apt. in Ringgold Tow-
ers starting 1st October. Fully fur-
nished. Rent $367month. Call 757-
1346.
WILDWOOD VILLA, washerdryer,
dishwasher, 3 story. Call 752-8900
or 252-332-6783. Very affordable
and spacious.
FULLY FURNISHED fairly inexpen-
sive two bedroom. 2.5 bath two
story apartment on ECU bus line,
open in Nov. Call 758-8249 ASAP.
WANTED: SOMEONE to sublease
an efficiency apartment in Ringgold
Towers ASAP. Fully furnished.
$288mo. For more info, call 931-
9097.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
Two bedroom, one bath duplex with
; fenced, shaded yard. Neat, dogani-
mal lover, prefer non-smoker. $200
month. $200 deposit. 12 bills. 758-
! 7525.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share
two bedroom, two bath townhouse
in Tar River. Mature, upperclassman
or grad student preferred. $282.50 a
month plus 12 electric, 12 phone.
Wanted ASAP. 329-7083.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
-Jhare 2 bedroom apartment off 1st
Street, $187.50 plus 12 electric,
12 phone, free water, sewer, basic
'cable. Smokers OK. WD connec-
tions. 757-9640.
ROOMMATE NEEDED - available
right now, downtown apartment,
must see to appreciate.
$237.50month. Call 757-0812.
WANTED: FEMALE roommate to
share 2 bedroom, 1 12 bath,
�$175month 12 bills. Call 321-
�754.
r
FOR SALE
AAAA! EARLY Spring Break Spe-
cials! Bahamas Party Cruise! 6 days
$279! Includes most meals! Awe-
some beaches, nightlife! Departs
'from Florida! 1998 BBB AwardWin-
"�ier! springbreaktravel.com 1-800-
$78-6386
AAAA! EARLY Specials! Cancun
'�& Jamaica! 7 nights air and hotel
�from $399! Includes free food,
brinks, parties! 1998 Better Business
Bureau AwardWinner! springbreak-
ravel.com 1-800-678-6386
IMMACULATE 1987 Mazda pickup
�with camper top, AC, five speed, CD.
Sold colored, 100-K miles. Very nice
-throughout! $3995 0B0. Call Rusty
�$ 355-3620.
'�42" SPEAKERS and power amp for
� car stereo system. Sounds great
;3�ith lots of bass. Call 758-9640 af-
�Jer 5. $400 or best offer.
MOVING SALE: Household furni-
ture and appliances, other items,
��52-8608.
FOR SALE
CAR FOR sale: '94 Ford Taurus.
White with blue interior. V-6. Excel-
lent condition. Loaded with car
phone. $5,200. Call 756-9081.
AAAA EARLY Specials! Panama
City! Room with kitchen $129! In-
cludes 7 free parties! Daytona $149!
New Hotspot-South Beach129! Co-
coa Beach $149! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
LIVING ROOM Furniture. Mauve
patterned Colonial set in good con-
dition, 6pc. set including: sofa, love-
seat, recliner, end tables. As is, must
sell immediately. Call 353-5623 after
7p.m.
AAAAI SPRING Break Travel was
1 of 6 small businesses in the US
recognized by Better Business Bu-
reaus for outstanding ethics in the
marketplace! springbreaktravel.com
1-800-678-6386
LARGE CAPACITY washer and dry-
er for sale. Slightly used. 3 weeks
old. $600 negotiable. 757-9640.
MOVIE POSTERS for sale: latest
movies and banners available. E-mail
me at Posters2go@aol.com. Over
800 titles to choose from!
BLACK LAB puppies for sale. AKC
registered, championship blood
lines. 6 males left, going fast, $250.
756-2598 nights, 757-1265 days.
SERVICES
NAIL SERVICES - acrylics $35 set,
fills $20, manicures $10. Licensed
manicurist. Abracadabra Nails, con-
veniently located near campus. Call
757-9640 for an appointment.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(�I9)4�-2224
D.J. FOR HIRE
NYC 0.3. READY TO
HYPE UP YOUR PARTY
For all functions & campus
organizations
Call J.Arthur @ 252-412-0971
HELP WANTED
MODELS FOR photo study. Reputa-
ble amateur photographer seeking
slim young women for photo project.
Send note, photo (if available), and
phone for immediate reply. Paul
Hronjak. 3015-A Wynfall Lane. Wil-
son, NC 27893-9677.
CASHIER NEEDED, 25-30 hours a
week; afternoon hours and wee-
kends. Apply Hills Convenient Store,
Hwy. 43 South, 355-8355.
1 SPRING Break company is now
hiring motivated individuals to prom-
ote America's best Spring Break va-
cations. Sell trips, earn cash, go free!
1-800-234-7007 www.endlesssum-
mertours.com
STUDENT MANAGERS and Office
Assts. needed for positions with
ECU Campus Dining. Hospitality
majors are preferred, but will consid-
er students with food service experi-
ence. Stop by the Aramark Office in
Mendenhall Student Center to apply
and specify position applied for and
hours available. Great pay and bene-
fits. EOE
CRUISE SHIP Employment - Work-
ers earn up to $2,000month
(wtips & benefits). World Travel!
Land-Tour jobs up to $5,000-
$7,000summer. Ask us how! 517-
336-4235 Ext. C53621
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER TIMBERLAND
NAUTICA ABERCROMBIE
POLO EDDIE BAUER
AND OTHER NAME BRAND MEN'S CLOTHING
SHIRTS, PANTS, JEANS, SWEATS, JACKETS, SHOES, ETC.
WE ALSO BUY AND SELL:
GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also BioJsfin Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
QUICK, EASY, HELPFUL
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
414 S. EVANS (UP THE STREET FROM CUBBIES)
752-3866 �
TUESDAY - SATURDAY, 9:00 - 5:00
(DRIVE TO THE BACK DOOR BEHIND PARK THEATRE)
ONE OF THE FAVORITE STUDENT STORES FOR YEARS
(IF YOU ARE SELLING, ID IS REQUIRED)
classifieds
Th Eatt Carolinian
HELP WANTED
NOW HIRING exotic dancers, sing-
ing telegrams, and adult entertain-
ers. You must be at least 18 yrs
drug free, own transportation and
phone. Up to$ 1,500 weekly. Call
758-2737.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT - Fishing
industry. Excellent student earnings
& benefits potential (up to
$2.850mo. RoomBoard). All
skill levels. Don't pay outrageous
agency fees! Ask us how! 517-336-
4171 ext. A53621
CYPRESS LANDING. Now hiring
marketing assistants SunThur. 4
p.m9 p.m 20-22 hours weekly.
Great hourly wage plus bonus. Must
have strong communication skills,
like talking to people, customer serv-
ice oriented & team player Main
function will be telephoning custom-
ers. Call Craig Wheeler MonFri. to
schedule interviews, 975-8100.
COMMUNITY SCHOOLS & Re-
creation are looking soccer officials
to officiate youth recreation soccer
game on Saturdays. Anyone interest-
ed should call 830-4244.
ANDY'S NOW hiring at all three lo-
cations; Cotanche St 10th Street
Plaza Mall. Apply within, Monday
thru Thursday three to five. No
phone calls please.
EARN WHILE YOU learn, up to
$1,000.00 wk. Day and night
shifts. Clean, secure working at-
mosphere. Playmates Adult En-
tertainment. 252-747-7686 for in-
terview.
PART-TIME CLERICAL. Parttime
data entry clerk needed for AM and
early PM hours. Close to campus.
Contact Kay Tripp at 757-2131.
ABSOLUTE SPRING Break Take
2" 2 Free Trips on Only 15 Sales
andEarn $$$$. Jamaica. Cancun,
Bahamas. Florida. Padre! lowest Pric-
es! Free Meals. Parties & Drinks.
"Limited Offer 1-800-426-
7710www.sunsplashtours.com
MAKE EASY money! Go on Spring
Break for Free! USA Spring Break off-
ers Cancun, Bahamas, Jamaica, and
Florida packages and is currently ac-
cepting applications for campus
sales representatives. Call 1-888-
SPRINGBREAK.
PART-TIME Library Page-evenings
and weekends- 10 hours per week.
Shelving books, assisting librarians
as needed. Apply in person only 9
a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays in the Child-
ren's Library, Sheppard Memorial Li-
brary, 530 Evans Street, Greenville.
No phone calls.
1999 INTERNSHIPS! Attention un-
dergraduate business students. Now
interviewing on campus for manag-
ers across Virginia, North and South
Carolina for summer of 1999. Aver-
age earnings last summer $7,000.
Call Tuition Painters at (800) 393-
4521 or e-mail at tuipaint@bell-
south.net
SPRINGBREAK. CANCUN, Florida.
Jamaica, South Padre, Bahamas.
Etc Best hotels, parties, prices.
Book early and save Earn money
trips! Campus repsorganizations
wanted. Call Inter-Campus Programs
1-800-327-6013 222 www.icpt.com
SYLVAN LEARNING Center is seek-
ing a study buddy for a college stud-
ent taking accounting. We are look-
ing for a reliable person who is avail-
able immediately on MWF 12-2:30
and TTH 9-11:30. Please apply at
2428 S. Charles Blvd.
CASHIER TELLER needed imme-
diately. Work 6-20 hours per week.
Work on Thurs. andor Fri. only.
Must pass criminalcredit check.
Send resume to PO Box 493, Tar-
boro, NC 27886.
PERSONALS
LOSE WEIGHT while you sleep!
100 natural. Minister Mimms lost
30 pounds in 5 weeks. Dr. Hack-
worth lost 38 lbs. in 8 weeks. I lost
6 12 inches in 2 months. Call Cin-
dy at 919-736-7131.
GREEK PERSONALS
GOOD LUCK to Kelly Woodell in the
Miss Hawaiian Tropic Contest this
week! We are all cheering for you.
Love, your Delta Zeta sisters
CONGRATULATIONS TO Amanda
Laws on your Delta Sigma Phi lavali-
er from Tommy. Love, your Delta
Zeta sisters
THETA CHI, we had a blast with
ya'll last Thursday night. Hope to do
it again soon. Chi Omega
GREEK PERSONALS
SIGMA ALPHA Epsiion, the Chi
Omega girls had a blast partying the
night away. Thanks for a great time.
Chi Omega
LAMBDA CHI, thanks for showing
our new girls a wonderful time. Chi
Omega
KAPPA SIGMA, you always know
how to show us a good time. Let's
do it again soon. Love, the sisters
and new members of Alpha Xi Delta
EPSILON SIGMA Alpha welcomes
our pledges: Aaron, Lindsay, Brenn,
Patience, Colleen, Amber, Melissa,
Allison, LaGina, Brandy, Chrissy, Ju-
lie, Marisa, Kathy, Jenny, Ryann, Ash-
ley, Heather, Bobbi, Kelly, Kristina,
Tina, Nicole. Carmin, Abbe, Heather,
Beth, Renee, Melissa, Amanda, April,
Bethany. Alecia. Jennifer and Melis-
sa. We love you!
PHI TAU, Friday was a blast. You
can write on us anytime. Love, the
sisters and new members of Alpha
Xi Delta
PI KAPPA, we had an awesome
time Friday. We are looking forward
to doing it again soon. Chi Omega
OTHER
SPRING BREAK 99! Cancun' Nas-
sau " Jamaica 'Mazatlan ' Acapulco
' Bahamas Cruise Florida' Florida '
South Padre. Travel Free and make
lots of Cash! Top reps are offered
full-time staff jobs. Lowest price
Guaranteed. Call now for details!
www.classtravel.com 800838-6411
ONLINE AUCTION. Visit NC's first
on-line auction at mem-
ber.xoom.comeastauction and get
the best deals on electronics, com-
puters, furniture, and even cars!
SPRING BREAK - Plan Now! Can-
cun, Jamaica, Mazatlan. & S. Padre.
Early bird savings until Oct. 31st.
America's best prices & packages.
Campus sales reps wanted. Earn
free trips cash. 1.800.SURFS.UP
www.studentexpress.com
ANNOUNCEMENTS
B-GLAD Needs you! Bisexuals Gays
Lesbians and Allies for Diversity
meets every Wednesday @ 7:30
p.m. in GCB 3006. This week Sept.
30 we will be working on Homecom-
ing banner. So come meet new
friends and make a difference.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
THE ECU POETRY Forum is a poet-
ry workshop that meets on the first
and third Wednesday evenings in
the Mendenhall Student Center at 8
p.m. and is open to the public. Dues
are $5 a year for students, $10 for
faculty or members of the Greenville
community. The meetings this Fall
will be on September 16, October 7
and 21, November 4 and 18. and De-
cember 2. Those planning to attend
and would like critical feedback are
asked to bring 8 to 10 copies of the
poem to be workshopped.
HEY! GUESS what? We are voting
for homecoming King and Queen
On-Line this year! Go to your nearest
computer lab or the comfort of your
own home and vote for four king
and four queen candidates. Taking
place now through Thursday. Oct. 1,
1998 at 4 p.m.
FOOTBALL PUNT, Pass and Kick:
Yes, it's back The football punt,
pass and kick intramural event will
be held Wednesday. Sept. 30 at the
Blount Fields at 8 p.m. Anyone inter-
ested should be there or for further
info, call 328-6387.
COMMUNICATING AND Resolv-
ing Conflict: Thursday 11:00-12:00.
The Center for Counseling and Stud-
ent Development is offering the fol-
lowing workshop on October 1st. If
you are interested in this workshop,
contact the Center at 328-6661.
ALCOHOL Substance Intervention
Program (A-SIP): Thursday 3:30-5
PM. The Center for Counseling and
Student Development is offering the
following workshop on October 1st.
This workshop will assist you in ex-
ploring more about substance use
whether for personal choices or gen-
eral interest. An open, non-judgmen-
tal approach is utilized to encourage
healthy decision-making in regard to
substance abuse.
PLEASE JOIN us for the Seventh
Annual Tech Fair in Mendenhall Mul-
tipurpose Room on Tues. Oct 13
from 10AM-3PM Will include special
presentations in Mendenhall 244.
See display ad in Oct. 8 for details .
WIFFLEBALL REGISTRATION
meeting: it's new with intramurals
this year, so obviously no experience
is needed Just make sure that you
attend the registration meeting on
Tues Sept. 29th in MSC room 244
at 5 p.m. Men's, women's, and Co-
rec teams are welcome.
BIG CHURCH yard sale Saturday.
Oct. 3, 7-11a.m. St. Timothy's Epis-
copal Church. Cherry Oaks and 14th
Street Extension, off of Firetower.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
NORTH CAROLINA Zoo Expedi-
tion: Join us Oct. 11 as we explore
one of the East's best habitat zoos.
You'll see an array of animals from
North America as well as Africa.
Sign Up! Spaces are limited. Regis-
tration deadline is Oct. 4th. Member
cost is $15. For further information
call Adventure ProgrammingDept.
of Rec Services, 328-6387.
BECOMING A Successful Student-
Time Management Workshop:
Monday 11:00-12:00. The Center for
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering the following work-
shop on October 5th. If you are inter-
ested in this workshop, contact the
Center at 328-6661.
COME "ROLL" with us II! On Oct.
12. the adventure Program will be
hosting their second Kayak Roil Cli-
nic. Sign up. get wet. and learn the
basics of Kayaking and the "Eskimo
Roll Be sure to register by Oct. 9th.
Member cost is $5. For further info,
call Adventure ProgrammingDept.
of Rec Services. 328-6387.Call 328-
6387 for details.
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS MINIS-
TRY meets each Tuesday 6-8 p.m. at
First Presbyterian on the corner of
14th & Elm Streets. Join us for din-
ner and a program. For info, or a ride
call Kim � 752-8758 or 3m�broad-
cast.net.
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: Thursday 3:30-5PM. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop on October 1st. If you
are interested in this workshop, con-
tact the Center at 328-6661.
FRIENDSHIP, FELLOWSHIP &
Leadership ECU Circle K Club invites
you to attend their Monday night
meetings at 7 p.m. in the Menden-
hall Mufti Purpose Room
COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN Church
will be sponsoring a Yard Give Away.
Blood Drive and Adult Health Fair on
Saturday. October 3 at 1104 N.
Memorial Drive. Greenville, across
from the PittGreenville Airport. For
info, call 551-9143.
AIR HOCKEY Registration Deadline:
The new air hockey tournament is
right around the corner Anyone in-
terested in playing in the air hockey
tournament should register by Tues-
day, Oct. 6 at 5 p.m. in the SRC
main office, room 128. The tourna-
ment will be held on Wed Oct. 7th
at 8 p.m. in the MSC Billiards Room
Advertise in
The East Carolinian
classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE$4.00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional words 50 each
STUDENT LINE AD RATE$2.00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional words 50 each
Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify. The East Carolinian reserves the right to refuse
fhis rate for any ad deemed to be non-student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE$1.00
add to above line rate for either BOLD or ALL CAPS type.
All classified ads placed by individuals or campus groups must be
prepaid. Classified ads placed by a business must be prepaid unless
credit has been established.
Cancelled ads can be removed from the paper if notification is
made before the deadline, but no cash refunds are given. No proofs or
tearsheets are available.
The Personals section of the classifieds is intended for
non-commercial communication placed by individuals or campus groups.
Business ads will not be placed in this section.
All Personals are subject to editing for indecent or inflammatory
language as determined by the editors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue
We reserve the right to change a deadline for holidays
or as necessitated by other considerations.





��HI
HI
m�US-S
I
I
The first of October ot the REC
m
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
Climbing Linville Gorge
Tar River Expedition - ARISE
Hang Gliding - Kitty Hawk
3 Try Scuba
Intro, to Hap and Compass - Clinic
Air Hockey Reg. Headline
Air Hockey Tournament
Ab-Solutlons
Climbing Wall-ARISE
Soccer Officials Meeting
Wheelchair Basketball Game
Soccer Preview Reg. Meeting
North Carolina loo
Rafting Gauley, WV
Kayaking Roll Clinic
102-4 Trip
103 10 am-1 pm
104 Bay Trip
105 7pm-10pm
106 7pm
106 5pm
107 8pm
107 5:30-6:30pm
107 7-9 pm
100 5pm
1010 11 am-noon
1012 5pm
1011 Hay Trip
100-11 Trip
1012 7pm - Opm
Adventure Center
Meet at SRC
Adventure Center
SRC Pool
Adventure Center
SRC120
MSC
SRC Classroom
SRC
SRC 202
SRC Forum
MSC 244
Adventure Center
Adventure Center
SRC Pool
ALL FREE
Free Cookout
Burgers.Hotdogs MORF
Chips and Soda day TIL
SRC POOL
6:00pm
1 guest w
valid ID
Bring your
beach chair
or blanket
�lr oil0
POOL PARTY
OCT.
1998
UNIVERSITY
HOUSING
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
ECU STUDENT
UNION
4W
Bio
"Is the Son
spent on it'
An:
Bre
Sororitk
Ste
Greenville M;
proclaimed (
Cancer Awar
Saturday's Pi
Cancer Walk.
The walk
Carolina East
by several orp
"Mostpeopi
that's had brt
universal di
many peoj
person wi
Shan
Project mai
Breast Cane
the Americat
Gamma Sigma
Alpha, and tl
Nursing.
"Breast cam
important to w
ilies Jenkins
an outstandin
course, for all
think East Cart
Pla
stati
Artproft
committ
J A S O
ST
A pirate's impc
tower above the
Sports Medicine
sculpture endowi
The Pirate
introduced sever
sible models for
Saturday. Wori
"courage "lead
were mentionec
appearance. Jodi
the School of Ai
the statue. Holln
models as demc
iand to help gene
final statue.
"We're going
team to deterrr
pirate should hav
The platform
on will be apprc
high. The statue
life size and mac
mittee did not d
will look, but wai
to the statue.
The committi
get the technical!


Title
The East Carolinian, October 1, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 01, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1294
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy