The East Carolinian, September 24, 1998






Tuesday:
High: 76
Low: 54
Wednesday:
High: 83
Low: 56
Check out TEC's website at:
www.tec.ecu.edu
Carolinian
Gatorade
among many
corporate
sponsors of
Pirate athletics
Sports. (Hgt'ID
THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 24 .1998 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 10
Godfrey elected Senior Class president
Drastic increase in
voters from last year
Senior Class Vice President Leslie Brewer hands out stickers to Angela Lewis shortly before polls closed.
PHOTO BY STEVE 10SEY
Steve' LoseV
NEWS EDITOR
Pam Godfrey was elected
president of the Senior Class
Wednesday night in an election
which brought far more people
to the polls than in previous
years.
"I'm ecstatic over the 825
people SGA Election Chair
Cliff Webster said. "I'm going to
guess we had not more than 100
last year. It came off really
smooth
Godfrey received 67 percent of
the vote, soundly defeating Mark
Thigpen. The race was initially
between Godfrey, Thigpen, and
Chris McCain. However, McCain
County seeks damages after crash
Student sued after
hitting patrol car
V. A K O I. I x i: JK II
s I AFt �l 111)
Pitt County is seeking damages
from the insurance company of an
ECU student to cover the cost of
damages incurred to a Pitt County
Sheriffs Department vehicle dur-
ing a traffic accident last year.
On October 2, 1997, Lt. Ronald
Wayne Smith pulled left out of the
Krispy Kreme onto East 10th
Street. According to witnesses, he
then cut to the left around traffic
stopped at a red light. Smith
stopped at the intersection of
Program
battles
illiteracy
Workshops train
volunteer teachers
Cotanche Street and 10th with all
emergency lights activated and
slowly proceeded ahead when his
vehicle collided with the vehicle
of East Carolina University stu
dent Valerie Springle.
In the accident report, Smith
maintained that he sounded the
air horn while he was stopped. As
he passed through the intersec-
tion he was struck by Springle, 23.
Springle stated in the accident
report that she did not see
Smith's car until just before the
crash.
Smith was transported to Pitt
County Memorial and treated for
swelling dnd bruising, then
released. Springle and three of the
four passengers in her vehicle com-
plained of minor injuries but did
not seek medical attention.
"The police.re.portand
investigation does find that
she (Springle) is at fault.
We are seeking through her
insurance company damages
to the sheriffs vehicle
Janis Gallagher
Staff ailomev lot Pill Counly
Springle was charged with fail-
ure to stop for police. Under
General Statute 20-157 emergency
and police vehicles are permitted
to pass through red lights and stop
signs provided that they exercise
due caution.
In August, Pitt County filed suit
against Springle for failing to keep
a proper lookout and yield the right
of way.
"We have filed suit against
her said Janis Gallagher, staff
attorney for Pitt County. "The
police report and investigation
does find that she (Springle) is at
fault. We are seeking through her
insurance company damages to the
sheriffs vehicle
"I am not able to answer any
questions at this time, until I
review the case said Jerry Allan,
Springle's lawyer, of Walker,
Barwick, Clark, and Allan of
Goldsboro, NC.
Messages left at Springle's
home were not returned.
Career Day offers opportunities
Moil AMR I) IH'SSI
STAFF WRITER
Student volunteers plan to attend
i workshop today held by the
Literacy Volunteers of America to
provide them with the teaching
skills needed to help the illiterate
learn to read.
The workshop is held several
times a year and is intended to
help volunteers tutor people with
literacy problems. The organiza-
tion is set up to help adults in read-
ing and writing.
. "What we do is teach adults to
SEE WORKSHOP. PAGE 2
75 organizations
recruit employees
Rachael Hip don
STAFF WRITER
The General Classroom Building
teemed with eager recruitment
officers from 75 organizations and
businesses for the 1998 Career
Day. Students were given the
opportunity to mingle and create
contacts with businesses ranging
from Golden Corral to BB&T that
will benefit them upon graduation.
"Students go to school to
atlvance themselves said Bob
Morphet, representative for the
Center for Counseling and Student
Development. "We need Career
Day for students to learn what
options are available and what qual-
ifications they need to be success-
ful
The atmosphere was casual and
relaxed, making it easy for the stu-
dents to ask questions in an
informal setting.
"It is a learning experience for
the students as well as the compa-
nies said Debra Baker, Associate
Director of Computer Technology'
" is a nice chance to spark
interest and to get your name
out. We talk to so many stu-
dents that we hope they will
come back and hear more later
Nicole Manley
Slate Faim's Reciuitineni Representative
in Career Services.
"This is a good way for potential
graduates to get an idea of the mar-
ketplace for jobs said Leigh Ann
LeClair, a representative for
Professional Programs. "They can
also get a better look at non-tradi-
tional companies, different job
opportunities that are available
"I found out about companies I
didn't even know existed until
today said Rashawn Deans, an
Information Processing major. "I
also learned a lot about interview
dates that will help when I gradu-
ate
The wide array of representa-
tives help the students learn about
the little known positions that are
available with both larger corpora-
tions and smaller'businesses.
"It is a nice chance to spark
interest and to get your name out
said Nicole Manley, State Farm's
Recruitment Representative. "We
talk to so many students that we
hope they will come back and hear
more later
Career Day is the place to
establish contact with future
employers and to learn about the
screening processes. It is also a way
to put a name to a face for future
reference.
"For seniors it is definitely a
benefit to see what jobs ate on the
market said Jody Gore, coordina-
tor of ECU Ambassadors' alumni
relations. Organizers agreed that
the day was prosperous for both
students and businesses alike.
was disqualified when he failed to
turn in his expense report on time.
Leslie Brewer won the Senior
Class vice presidency with a 69.9
percent lead over Michael Papera.
Banners for the Senior Class candidates
PHOTO BY STEVE 10SEY
"We really wanted to challenge
the issues on whether or not seniors
would be able to walk at com-
mencement if they had hours left
over Godfrey said. "We also ran
on the senior gift. We want to do
something spectacular. Leslie and I
want to do something exciting, like
a mural
Godfrey
also men-
tioned the
experience
she and
Brewer had
and singled
out theit work
with the
National
Speech
Impairment
Association
and Gamma
Beta Phi.
hang on the mall. "We
worked hard
the past three
weeks Btewer said. "I'm glad it's
over with.
An incident that marred the
SEE SGA. PAGE 4
Wilentz named
outstanding teacher
Dr. Gay Wilentz teaches World Literature with Belizian student Carla Becker.
PHOTO BY STEVE 10SEY
Professor demonstrates
passion for literature
Rachael Hiooon
S T A K F WRITER
Dr. Gay Wilentz, a professor in the
English department, has been
awarded the Outstanding Teacher
Award by the South Atlantic
Association of Departments of
English (SAADE).
"The award is a great'distinc-
tion said Sarah Davis, vice presi-
dent and president-elect of the
SAADE. "She has been invited to
speak at the annual South Atlantic
Modern Language Association
(SAMLA) conference in Atlanta in
November
The SAADE is comprised of
English department chairs from all
over the Eastern United States.
In order to compete for this
award, a professor must be nomi-
nated by his or her department
chair and then write an essay
explaining his or her philosophy of
teaching. Wilentz is one of four
English professors to win the
award this year and is the first from
ECU to receive this recognition.
"I feel strongly that teaching is a
cooperative experience Wilentz
said. "We work together as a group
to investigate issues in an atmos-
phere of respect
Wilentz was named the
Distinguished Professor of
Teaching for 95-96 by the
University of North Carolina and
also won the departmental award
for teaching. Wilentz has been a
finalist for the university award for
teaching six times, but has not
won.
"Some people see me as the
Susan Lucci of ECU Wilentz
said, referring to the soap opera
actress who, despite her many
nominations, has not won an
Emmy yet.
Wilentz has been a member of
the English department for twelve
years and enjoys teaching multi-
cultural works in order to share
voices in literature that are not
often heard.
"I enjoy the interaction in the
office and in the classroom
Wilentz said. "Sharing my love of
reading and my relationships with
my students are the best parts
Many of Wilentz's students
share her passion for learning about
other cultures.
"She has a unique teaching
style in that she brings the culture
to you through the book graduate
student Shau-Ann Longsworth
said. "She also allows you to
explore the differences and simi-
larities between your culture and
the one you're studying
I






Thuridty, S�
2 Thandiy, Siptimtm 24, 1898
The East Carolinian
news
briefs
Survey Research Lab
helps gather traffic data
Popular Duke bonfires
under new regulation
DURHAM (AP) Impromptu bon-
fires after key Duke University
basketball games may be no more.
Instead, students may be allowed
to plan the celebrations after cer-
tain games.
A proposal being discussed by
administrators and student leaders
calls for the Duke Student
Government to prepare for the
popular bonfires by obtaining a fire
permit.
Previous bonfires have been
started spontaneously by groups of
students, provoking confrontations
between students and campus
police.
All of Miller quints
arrive home
RALEIGH (AP) All of the
Miller quintuplets have finally
arrived home.
Three of the quintuplets still
hospitalized since birth left Wake
Medical Center in Raleigh on
Wednesday with their parents,
Nancy and Kent Miller of Wake
Forest.
Grace, Ellie and Martin join the
other two babies-Emery and
Maggie-already deemed healthy
enough in the past few weeks to go
home.
Information needed for
planning
Steve Losey
NEWS EDITOR
Clinton declares
islands in emergency
NEW YORK (AP) President
Clinton declared an emergency
Monday in the U.S. Virgin Islands
and ordered federal aid for local
recovery work in areas struck by
Hurricane Georges.
Senate kills minimum
wage increase
WASHINGTON (AP) The U.S.
Senate rejected on Tuesday a $1
election-year increase in the
federal minimum wage pushed by
Democrats.
By a 55-44 vote, senators
accepted a motion to kill the pro-
posal, which would have raised
the minimum wage earned by
some 12 million Americans to
$6.15 on Jan. 1,2000.
State Dept. sends
food to North Korea
WASHINGTON (AP) The State
Department has announced plans
to deliver 300,000 tons of food to
North Korea by the end of the year
despite concerns over its military
activities.
The announcement came
Monday as the administration was
preparing to deliver the final ship-
ment of a 200,000-ton food com-
mitment made last February.
Clinton holds review
of economic crisis
President Clinton said today he
Understood that the government
6f new Japanese Prime Minister
Keizo Obuchi can only do what is
politically possible" to deal with
a spreading global economic crisis.
- The two leaders, in New York
for opening sessions of the U.N.
General Assembly, held what
Obuchi called a candid review of
the current global crisis and
Japan's efforts to deal with the sit-
uation by jump-starting its ailing
economy and handling a serious
banking crisis.
The ECU Survey Research Lab
and the Greenville Metropolitan
Planning Organization (MPO) will
be distributing travel surveys to
study the traffic patterns in
Greenville, Winterville, and the
surrounding areas.
The information will be used to
assist in future construction of roads
and neighborhoods to improve the
traffic in Greenville.
"The survey is designed to allow
the Greenville metropolitan area to
better plan for traffic so we can
avoid traffic problems said Ken
Wilson, director of the Survey
Research Lab.
The survey will also study how
growth and development affect
traffic.
The Survey Research Lab will
be sending out letters to 2,000 ran-
dom households in the Greenville
metropolitan area explaining what
the survey will be and what they
hope to learn. Each household will
then receive a phone call to find out
basic information, such as size of
the family and number of cars. The
surveys will be completely anony-
mous. Each household will be
assigned a coded identification
number.
The households will then
receive a travel diary, which they
will use to record their travels for
one single day. The surveys will be
spread over 42 different days.
"We will get an idea of the trips
people make said Ron
Svejkovsky, Transportation
Planner for the MPO.
The Survey Research Lab is
attempting to include all demo-
graphics in this survey. College stu-
dents will be represented in the
survey, with one exception. Their
surveys will only cover off campus
travel.
"There are different types of
trips for different people
Svejkovsky said. "We will study
college students, poor people, mid-
dle-class people, and rich people
Svejkovsky said that they will be
studying the percentage of people
who make crosstown trips and how
long those trips are.
The information will be com-
pletely gathered by Thanksgiving.
The Survey Research Lab will do
the preliminary analysis and then
let the MPO take over the final
analysis.
The finalized data will be incor-
porated into the city's planning
within a month.
"It will go into the planning
process by January I Wilson said.
Wilson mentioned that there is
now a generic national model of
traffic flow used by North Carolina,
but this would provide a much
more accurate and reliable basis to
plan future developments.
'This is the first time this has
been done east of 1-95 said
Svejkovsky.
"They (the MPO) are really
excited about getting this
information Wilson said.
SUfc? I x3
September 21, 1998
At 11:16 a.m a staff member
reported receiving a harassing
phone call at an office in the
Malene Irons Building.
A student reported the larceny of
his license plate at 12:08 p.m. from
his vehicle parked on Dowell Way,
east of Fletcher Hall. The license
plate was recovered a few hours
after it was reported stolen.
A staff member reported a male fol-
lowing a female employee in Joyner
Library at 3:30 p.m. The male was
identified as a non-student and
banned from Joyner Library.
An officer responded to a report of a
subject smoking marijuana east of
Slay Hall at 9:35 p.m. The officer
observed three students at that
location and upon approaching the
subjects, one of them swallowed a
cigarette. The officer smelled a
strong odor of marijuana at that
location. The three students were
issued campus appearance tickets.
Three non-students were banned
from campus after they threatened
two students on the east side of
Gotten Hall.
September 22, 1998
A staff member reported the larce-
ny of a telephone from the base-
ment of Joyner Library at 3:14 p.m.
Three students were issued state
citations at 4:30 p.m. for possession
of marijuana in Slay Hall.
At 11:49 p.m. a student was issued a
campus appearance ticket for carry-
ing a concealed weapon after he
was observed placing a large knife
in his pants pocket.
September 23, 1998
A student was severely beaten on
College Hill Drive at 1:16 am by
two unknown males. The victim
was transported to the hospital by
Greenville Rescue.
1:38 am - Possession with Intent to
Sell and Deliver Marijuana - A stu-
dent was arrested for possession of
marijuana with the intent to sell or
distribute. The arrest resulted after
the investigation into an assault that
occurred fifteen minutes earlier on
College Hill Drive. Mr. McNeill's
vehicle matched the description the
vehicle of the suspects in the
assault case. A quantity of marijua-
na and cash were seized from the
vehicle.
uneib
Session held on
studying in Belize
A presentation on opportunities
for summer study in Belize was
given in Jenkins Art Building Sept.
17. Dr. Gay Wilentz, a professor in
the English Department, spoke to
students on the benefits of learning
in a foreign country.
Several works of an from Belize
were also on display. Students
interested in studying in Belize can
call Dr. Wilentz at 328-6678 for
more information.
Faculty offers advice
on posting on-line
Faculty members offered advice
on placing course materials on the
Internet and building webpages
on Sept. 17. The program was
aimed at faculty members, but
there were also students and staff
present. The talks were co-spon-
sored by the Division of
Continuing Studies and the ECU
Computing and Information
Systems.
Leadership conference
held on innovation
'The Circle of Innovation a
campus leadership conference, was
held Sept. 23 in the Mendenhall
Great Room. The conference,
which was based on Tom Peters'
business ideas and bcstselling
book, The Circle of Innovation,
helps students develop their lead-
ership skills
Workshop
continued from page I
read and write said Toni Blood,
executive director of the
Greenville Chapter of Literacy
Volunteers of America. "We do that
through tutoring
The workshop begins today and
continues Monday, September 28,
Thursday, October 1, and Monday,
October 5. Each class is from 7:00-
9:30 p.m.
Many Greenville residents and
ECU students volunteer at the
center. Todd Norman, an ECU
student, volunteers there on a reg-
ular basis.
"I volunteer once a week for
about an hour Norman said
"Almost everyone volunteering at
the center does the same
The tutors at Literacy
Volunteers are all unpaid. Partial
funding comes from the United
Way and donations from the com-
munity also help the organization
to run.
"On occasion we pay for some of
the supplies out of our pockets
Norman said.
All the students that come in to
be tutored come under their own
free will. Television and radio
advertisements promote the cen-
ter. Statistics show that 1 in 5 peo-
ple in Pitt County has a literacy
problem.
"We are below the literacy aver-
age for America, so the organization
is important for the community
Norman said. "Each person deter-
mines his or her own goals and the
tutor facilitates those goals
Any students that are interested
in volunteering their time should
call the Literacy Volunteers of
America at (252) 353-6578.
UNIVERSITY
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The Kennedy Centor IMAGINATION CELEBRATION on Tour Presents . .
Hake of a Ponrf)'�nc)e Hofdim
Saturday, September 26, 1998
2:00 p.m Wright Auditorium,
East Carolina University
Sine-rear old Peter and hi Younger
brother, Piidae, are brought t" B
in this' hilarious adaptation at Judy
EMurhe's no-claSfiii novel
Available on subscription now. Individual tickets
available September 3, 1998. Advance tickets $9
public, $8 ECU facultystaff, 55 ECU student
youth. Door tickets available 1:00 p.m. day of
show. All tickets $9 at the door.
ECU Central Ticket Office, Monday-Friday. 8:30 "�"�-
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speech-impaired access 252-328-4736
Oklahoma State includes
activities on transcript
STILLWATER, Okla. (AP)
Oklahoma State University senior
Mahlon Hunt is just as proud of
serving as president of the student
union activities board as he is of his
3.46 grade point average.
Thanks to OSU's new student
activity transcripts, Hunt will be
able to showcase his extracurricular
activities for prospective employers
and demonstrate that he did more
at school than study.
"Employers might take a 3.0
student who has been involved in
many activities, clubs and leader-
ship roles over a 4.0 student who
did nothing said Kent Sampson,
OSU's director of campus life.
The student activity transcripts
similar to those used at
the University of Nebraska
complement a student's academic
transcript and resume while high-
lighting participation in campus
organizations and community ser-
vice projects.
"These transcripts can acknowl-
edge and reinforce the hours of ser-
vice and leadership that a student
puts in over four or five years
Sampson said.
"The transcript reflects the fact
that the whole student is being
developed at OSU, not just acade-
mics graduate student Vernccia
Harlien said.
"Employers like the idea,
because it shows more about the
student than just the standard aca-
demic transcript
The activity transcript "is a
stamp of approval from the univer-
sity, focusing on the differences
that students can make outside of
the classroom said Hunt, 22, an
agricultural communications major
from Chickasha. v
"OSU really gives students the
opportunities for leadership and
service Hunt said.
Sampson said students request-
ed the activity transcripts, which
are on parchment paper with the
official OSU seal. About 2,000
OSU students are expected to get
activity transcripts this year.
Students can apply for student
activity transcripts and use univer-
sity computers to compose the doc-
ument. For accuracy and truthful-
ness, university advisers help docu-
ment a student's participation in
recognized extracurricular activities.
Jones lawyers dispute
claim of "bogus" lawsuit
WASHINGTON (AP) � Paula
Jones' lawyers on Tuesday disput-
ed President Clinton's assertion
that her lawsuit was "bogus call-
ing the statement an effort to
"rationalize his inexcusable behav-
ior
Donovan Campbell, one of the
lawyers, also scoffed at Clinton's
explanation for denying "sexual
relations" with Monica Lewinsky.
"Apparently, Mr. Clinton, a
trained lawyer and past law profes-
sor, is one of the few human beings
in this country incapable of under-
standing the definition of sexual
relations Campbell said in a
statement. "Criminal defendants
are sent to jail every week in this
country based on that definition
which came directly from the
United States criminal code,
Campbell said.
Clinton made his comments
Aug. 17 to a grand jury. A video-
tape of the testimony was aired
nationwide on Monday. In those
comments, Clinton accused Mrs.
Jones lawyers of trying to set him up
"I deplored what they were
doing Clinton said. "I deplored
the innocent people they were ter-
rorizing and traumatizing. This
was a bogus lawsuit
Campbell responded, "We
believe that Mr. Clinton made
his attacks to rationalize his
inexcusable behavior
Mrs. Jones, a former Arkansas
state employee, has alleged that
then-Gov. Clinton propositioned
her in a Little Rock hotel room in
1991. She filed a sexual harassment
lawsuit against Clinton in 1994.
The case was dismissed earlier this
year, but not before allegations that
Clinton lied in the lawsuit and
tried to urge Ms. Lewinsky to lie
reached Independent Counsel
Kenneth Starr and prompted a full
criminal inquiry.
Clinton also said that his testi-
mony in the Jones case was truth-
ful, but that he was not forthcom-
ing with information that the Jones
team could use against him.
Campbell said Clinton's testi-
mony was not lawyerly handiwork,
but rather full of falsehoods.
"He did not artfully dodge inex-
act questions Campbell said.
"He falsely responded to precise
inquiries
Campbell also defended the
legitimacy of his client's case, say-
ing it is on appeal and was not dis-
missed because of any lack of evi-
dence against Clinton.
"The trial court assumed the
truth of Mrs. Jones' account, and
then ruled that what Mr. Clinton
did was not 'severe' or
"outrageous Campbell said.






4 Thundiy, September 24, 1998
news
The East Carolinian
SGA
continued from page 1
election was the vandalism of the
banners of both candidates. Both
Thigpen and Godfrey's banners
were torn down by unknown people.
"Could have been drunks com-
ing from downtown Webster said.
"I have no clue
Thigpen was in class when the
ballots were counted and was not
available for comment.
he sixteen slots available for
Day Representatives were filled by
the sixteen candidates.
"i had some concerns about the
Pepsi donation to ECU said Day
Representative Robert Shoffncr.
"From what 1 heard, sixty percent
went to sports, and I don't think
that's the right thing to do. Only
about one in ten students benefit
from it
Qr aElection
oLjiL Results
Senior Class PresidentSenior
a GodfreySecretaryTreasurerFleming
Michael McNallyRepresentative Overcon Harper
Senior Class
Vice PresidentGraduate President
Leslie BrewerBrian BilliardGreene Representative Laura Benfield
Junior Class PresidentDay Student
Jessica DowdyRepresentatives
Andrew BatesJones Representative
Ade GallowavTamishs Burden
Junior Class Vice PresidentMelissa Godwin
Steve Marasco
Chuck SawyerMark MorganScott Representative
David OverbyDavid Bucci
Michael Papera
SophomoreJames Price
Class PresidentMustafa RashidTyler Representative
i Robert SmithThomas Scott RespcssTiffany Lee
1 kDerick Salkowitz
Shana Sexton
Sophomore ClassRobert SchoffncrUmstead
Vice PresidentDavid SturmRepresentative
Rashanna W;addclRashanna Waddcll Pat WixtedAngela demons
-�Freshman White Representative
' Class PresidentAycockChristopher Williams
Erin AldermanRepresentative Steve Carmichacl
-� Freshman Class
Vice PresidentBelk Representative
Tyler BetzTyler Betz
Watch for TEC's
latest publication
� Entertainment Magazine of The East
t Carolinian m M
pwmmkaut
Cb miws
bcoiirmws
NEW FOR YOU THIS YEAR!
REGISTRATION
MEETING
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5PM MSC244
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
328-6387
5 Thundav. Sep
For most
school and
emotionally
Everybod'
studies to th
alcohol in ch
did before.
A few stu
their free tin
Most volu
to help othei
them. Volui
organization:
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most charitie
or two hour:
change a pei
By voluni
graduation,
communicat
take anothe
fortunate.
WeatTE
others, but ;
better becau
OPJIMK
Honey
Upon selecti
little Billy
first mudt
barrage of
parting tic
letters from
stuffed in his
much a
contai,
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healthy eating
glance througl
do you sec? P
jar of mustard,
that just c
birthday. Ope
most likely
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Trust me, it's j
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Brinj
2n





Carolinian
5 Thutida. September 24 1998
opi n ion
Th. PI r.r-lini.l
eastcarolinian
AMV L.ROYSTER ill
HEATHER BURGESS Managing Ednoi
STEVE LOSKV News Ednoi
AMANDA Al'STIN features tdiior
MICCAH SMITH fauntainhead Editor
Tracy M. Laubach Spore Ednoi
M.KI() SCIIERHAUFER Assisiwi Spoils Hum
CHRIS KNOTTS Silllllluslraior
STEPHANIE WH1TLOCK Ail Design Manager
JANET RESPESS Advertising Manager
BOBBY TUCIiLF. Webmaster
Serwnrj the (CU comrmjnitY sinca 192t. lira East Carolinian publishet 11.000 cdp�s eveff lursrjar and Ihursday. the lead ednorial to each adrtion is It
opinion ol the Editorial Board The Etast Carolinian welcomes lerters to the editor, limited in M words, which ma be edited lor derenct or brrmity The East
Carolinian reserves the ncjhi m erhr or reiecr letters lor publicanon Ah letters most be seined tellers should be addressed to Opinion edrtor .the Eesl
Carolinian, Student Pubkattons BuiMinfl. ECU. Greenvibe. 286B4353. Enr inlormanon. can 919 328.6366
oumew
For most of us, college is a time for -finding out what life is about. Many people come to
school and quickly discover that watching TV and drinking beer leave them feeling
emotionally empty.
Everybody has different ways of dealing with that feeling. Some pour themselves into their
studies to the point of neglecting all other parts of their lives. Others drown themselves with
alcohol in clubs downtown. Quite often, people find themselves feeling just as empty as they
did before.
A few students, however, find more fulfilling ways to spend their college days. They use
their free time to volunteer for organizations around Greenville.
Most volunteer organizations are in dire need of people willing to donate a small bit of time
to help other people. They provide necessary functions for people who sometimes can't afford
them. Volunteers do things such as set up blood drives, raise money for charitable
organizations, and educate people.
Many feel that they don't have enough time to give to volunteer organizations. Actually,
most charities will take whatever time a person has available to give. Many work as little as one
or two hours a week. That may not sound like a lot, but that little chunk of time can help
change a person's life.
By volunteering one's time, a student can gain valuable experience that will help after
graduation. Volunteers learn how to work well with other people and develop their
communication skills. It also provides excellent material for resumes. Many employers will
take another look at people who take time out of their busy schedule to assist the less
fortunate.
We at TEC feel that by helping other people, people not only work to improve the lives of
others, but actually help themselves too. The knowledge that the community is a little bit
better because of one persons work helps that person get a little more rest at night.
OPINION
Columnist
Britt
Honeycutt
Waitresses get tired of Ramen too
Upon selecting a restaurant,
little Billy Beer Belly will
first muddle through the
barrage of phone numbers,
parking tickets, and angry
letters from Columbia House
stuffed in his wallet to see how
much actual cash is
contained within.
Ahhh, college life- the bane of
healthy eating habits. Take a quick
glance through your fridge. What
do you see? Probably four beers, a
jar of mustard, and a carton of milk
that just celebrated it's first
birthday. Open up the cabinet. It
most likely contains a case of
Ramen noodles, two bowls and a
coffee cup ewww, don't look too
closely at the coffee cup.
Ok, so where are you going to
get that life sustaining nourishment
that your body requires?
Apparently not at your house, and
I'd advise against sneaking into
your neighbor's pad to borrow grub.
Trust me, it's just a bad idea.
So the average college student
of medium intelligence chooses eat
out. I do it almost daily, but that
stems from my incapacitating fear
of grocery stores and dishwashers,
so perhaps I am not a good
example. We will instead use the
typical drooling college stereotype
that we all know and love.
Upon selecting a restaurant,
little Billy Beer Belly will first
muddle through the barrage of
phone numbers, parking tickets,
and angry letters from Columbia
House stuffed in his wallet to see
how much actual cash is contained
within. This will be the deciding
factor between I HOP, Waffle
House, or the alley behind the Elbo
as his eatery of choice.
If he comes up with eight dollars
and change and knows from his
photographic memory of menus
that the Country Fried Steak and
Kggs at HOP is'$7.39, should Billy
eat at IIIOP? No, my friends. Billy
should carry his broke ass to the
Waffle House, where country fried
steak and eggs is $5.99, and he can
leave Flo a two dollar tip.
However, this logic does not
normally apply. Waiters don't like
us. They see us coming and hide.
We are usually drunk anytime after
dark, and broke anytime after the
student loan money runs out
(usually the week after it's
received.) We make a mess and
don't give them any money to clean
it up. What bastards!
This results in a generalization
of all college students. I have held
at least half a dozen jobs in food
service, and granted, I know that
college kids can leave you butt
loads of money. But mostly they
don't.
Waiters aren't there because
they really, really love slinging hash
and cleaning up after nasty little
kids. This is not their career of
choice. They are most likely
working their way through school,
or working part time somewhere
else, or trying to move on to
something better. And they don't
really like you at all. They just
smile so you'll leave the dollars.
Can you imagine being in a
profession that requires you to suck
up to people, heed their every call,
submit to their every whim, just for
your daily bread? It sucks. And the
saddest part is that it is terribly hard
to find a job where you can make as
much money in as short a time as
waiting tables. That is not counting
that fat $2.15 an hour you're raking
in.
So humor them. Leave the
dollars. They need them just as
badly as you needed that chili
cheeseburger that they so lovingly
brought to your table, without
dropping it, and then went back to
get you ketchup for your fries, and
then went back to get you some
more Dr. Pepper, and then went
back to get you some mayo,
because you are so freaking hard to
satisfy. If you can't afford to leave a
tip, then for god's sake stay home,
wash your coffee cup, and make
some Ramen noodles.
Or at least hope that I'm not
your waiter.
Editor
Got something to say? Need somewhere to say it?
Bring your letter to the eastcarolinian , located on the
2nd floor of The Student Publications Building
OPINION
Ryan
KENNEMUR
Columnist
Don't take loved ones for granted
By the time I hung up, my
face was virtually streaked
with tears, and I was greeted
by the loving arms of my
girlfriend. A select few
moments ran through my
mind as I lay there holding
back the tears that make me
feel like less of a man.
How can things happen the way
they do? lust this morning, I woke
up so that I could go see my
girlfriend sing at church, and
everything was cool. Afterwards,
she and I came back to my room to
watch a movie and, once again,
everything was cool. Then, I
called my mom to wish her a happy
birthday (it being her birthday and
all), and she proceeds to tell me
what she got with the money my
brother and I gave her, and as
usual, everything was cool.
But then she tells me that my
Great Aunt Louise passed away on
Saturday. After that, everything
she said was blocked out by my
thoughts. I somehow got through
the conversation and ended it with
my most sincere "Happy Birthday"
message, but all I could think
about was the news of my aunt.
This woman was wonderful.
Every time I saw her, she was in a
good mood. She always had a kind
word.
By the time I hung up, my face
was virtually streaked with tears,
and I was greeted by the loving
arms of my girlfriend. A select few
moments ran through my mind as I
lay there holding back the tears
that make me feel like less of a
man. I remembered the
Thanksgiving at the Holiday Inn
in Roanoke Rapids, and Christmas
at my cousins, and the time she,
my mother, my grandmother, and I
went to see my cousin in a musical.
It was only a few months ago, and
it is just so strange to believe that
its all over now.
The thing that makes me feel
bad is the fact that she had been in
the hospital right here in
Greenville, and I had never gotten
up there to see her. That brings
me to the actual opinion pan of my
opinion column.
We seem to have too much
going on nowadays. Not all, but a
lot of us, have come to college and
all but abandoned our life back
home. All we have to keep us
informed are letters and the
occasional phone call. We come to
ECU feeling like we are in the real
world, and sometimes we forget
that there's a real world back home,
too. If someone you care about is
sick or ill, you should take that
time to go see him or her. People
need other people to survive. We
cant afford to get so caught up with
our own deadlines that we forget
about the people that helped us
along the way.
I have to live with the fact that
my aunt may have died not
knowing that I cared about her, and
its too late to change it. Well, its
not too late to start thinking about
others. If you care about someonjji
and they don't know about it, tawr!
them aside one day and just tefl-
them. Tomorrow may be too late.
Id be willing to bet that someone
wishes they had confessed
something to the two teenage boys-
that were killed in an automobile
accident in Wilson last Friday.
Maybe some day, when my time
is up, I will be able to tell her how
I feel. Until then, I can just take a
few minutes every now and again
and pray. I can tell God, just as 1
told you, what a wonderful woman
He is getting. I keep thinking
about her when I am not occupied
with something. I can feel the
tears welling up as I type. Regret
has a funny way of staying with
youdon't let it get you, too. I can
hardly read the screen.
For Louise Threewitts: Rest in
Peace. We miss you already.
OPINION
Columnist
Steve
KLEINSCHMIT
Women, look out for each other
The thing that troubles me the
most about sexual assault
and rape is that the young
woman is somebody's
daughter. Some loving fathers
little girl. Somebody's fiance
or girlfriend. And for many
of us, it could be our sister.
I, first, and foremost, would like to
apologize on the behalf of all the
gentlemen at ECU for whatever
poor excuse of a "man" that
committed the rape at Garrett Hall
this past Sunday. Out of all crimes
that are be committed, I feel that
rape and sexual assault are the
most detestable, and would very
much like to see the criminal be
punished in a very inhumane
fashion, such as a nice public
flogging, or the removal of several
fingers with a nice dull, rusty
kitchen knife. i
The thing that troubles me the
most about sexual assault and rape
is that the young woman is
somebody's daughter. Some loving
father's little girl. Somebody's
fiance or girlfriend. And for many
of us, it could be our sister.
I care for my little sister Lauren
more than anything in the world.
She wants to grow up and be like
me, and come to ECU in two more
years. With all the recent assaults
on women in the dorms in the past
year, I don't think that I can, in
good conscience, recommend
campus living to her. The same
brochure that is sent out to all
students each year that exonerates
the environment of diversity of
dorm living tells nothing of the
closeted thieves, vandals, violent
drunks and sexual offenders that
could live just a floor above or
below her. And if anything
happened to her, don't think that I
wouldn't be above getting
extremely violent with the
accused. I like what Duke
University is doing. They have a
special building, open 24 hours a
day for women to call or go to if
they need an escort, a place to
sleep, or a place to sober up. But
since we don't have it yet at ECU,
I can only recommend that you
ladies follow a couple of guidelines
to keep yourself safe. Don't play
drinking games. But if you must,
make sure it's with people you
trust. Many guys can drink twice
the amount of alcohol as you, and
still only have a mild buzz. Also, go
to parties with a couple of your
friends. That's why I admire
sororities so much. The ladies
always look out for one another.
Finally, don't be afraid to have guy
friends. Men, by nature, are not
bad. There's just that small
percentage of idiots that would do
a great service to humanity by
removing themselves from the
gene pool.
"Even when you have women in newsrooms, I don't really think they are part of an
environment that really welcomes their raising different voices
Geneva Overholser
Journalist





6 Thmid�y. Stptarnbir 24, 1998
comics
Thi Eitt Carolina.
Four Seats Left
y� eootiAV, Don't �
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STAFF W
And you think yoi
Imagine what it's I
a career, paying the
a family and on top
college. That is ex
adult students are
ECU this year.
These students
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counterparts. Fort
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for the first or
have quite a balan
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The East Carolinian
Broadening
yournonzons �
Discendo linguamperegrinam,portae patent plurimae
(By learning a foreign language, many doors are opened)�Latin
Nicholas Kai.apos
staff writer
Today's world has become a cultural
melting pot. In America, English is quickly
becoming a second language and many jobs
are moving more towards multi-lingual
employees.
"We are far behind other countries in
language development said French pro-
fessor Martin Schwarz. "One reason is
demographics and another is that for years,
the United States was an isolationist. Today
in our global village, companies look more
for multi-lingual people
Demographics are a big disadvantage for
language development in America.
Europeans have a distinct advantage in that
in a few minutes, they can go to a country
where they will be totally immersed in
another language.
"Total immersion is the best way to learn
a new language said Spanish professor
Heiga Hill. "My son spent four semesters in
college taking German, but didn't become
fluent until he went to Germany with the
ISEP program
Though immersion in a language is a fac-
tor, age is yet another problem that may
impede the learning process.
"To truly master a language, you should
start before the age of ten Schwarz said.
"It is around this age that the vocal cord sets
and once it sets you will probably have an
accent in any language that you learn
Hill believes that in America we wait to
long to begin teaching a foreign language.
"In America we start to teach a language
way too late Hill said. "European and
Asian schools start children in languages
while they're still in elementary school
During the early stage of development a
child is able to learn more than one lan-
guage at a much faster rate.
"Students at the college age can still
learn languages, but they need to study
harder Hill said.
Both Hill and Schwarz agree that learn-
ing a foreign language is essential to have a
liberal arts education,
"The language is essential to a liberal
SEE TEACHIN6. PAGE 8
of leaning
a foreign
Language:
�Higher Education
(Masters, PhD)
�More job opportuni-
ties available
�Better understanding
of
different cultures
�Better understanding
of world and politics
�Faster advancement in
career
�Ability to read what is
happening in other
cultures
�Better understanding
of what other countries
are doing in research
and
sciences
�Cultural diversity
Many non-traditional students must
balance career, school, family everyday
Fair prepares many
for life after college
2,800 adult students
enrolled for fall
w Phillip Gilfu8
(
I' STAFF WRITER
And you think you have it tough.
Imagine what it's like dealing with
a career, paying the bills, managing
a family and on top of that, going to
college. That is exactly what 2800
adult students are having to do at
ECU this year.
These students often have dif-
ferent needs than their younger
counterparts. Forget about "Back
to School" starring Rodney
Dangerfield, adults going to college
for the first or second time
have quite a balancing act to per-
form. The ECU Adult Student
Service Center tries to make that
transition easy.
"We try to get the necessary
information out to them
said Shelly Myers, director of
Adult Services.
Currently Adult Services is in a
period of adjustment. Myers, who
has been the director for a few
weeks, still feels that they can
address any troubles that the adult
student has.
From information on support
groups to child care, to places
where the students can meet with
fellow adults, the service center is
there for those who need it.
"One concern that is prevalent
is the need to meet with students
their own age Myers said.
"Usually Mendenhall Student
Center is a great place to meet fel-
low adult students. There is the
Adult Student Association on
campus which is a great organiza-
tion out there
There arc certain conceptions
held about adult students. For
instance, it is thought that they
like to sit in the front of the class-
Various majors
wanted in many fields
Non-traditional students often find themselves balancing jobs, families and school work,
while trying to experience life as a college student.
PHOTO BV KIM MCCUMBER
room and try to be the "professor's
pet Christine Lowenstein, an
adult student, feels that those
SEE NON-TRADITIONAL PAGE 9
House moms create home away from home
Acting as surrogate
mother not easy job
Nina M. Drv
SENIOR WRITE
Sorority members get the best of
both worlds; the independence that
all students strive for when they
leave home to attend college, and
the cozy atmosphere mothers have
somehow teamed to create and per-
fect for any situation. Sororities
have house advisors, better known
as house mothers, that know just
how to create the home away from
home environment.
Most women hear about this
kind of job from their daughters
who were either involved in sorori-
ties or have friends in them,
through word of mouth or through
advertisements in the newspaper.
Those who are interested set up an
interview with the sorority's presi-
dent for the job.
"We look for someone who is
responsible and can basically be our
surrogate mother while we're at
school said Carrie Rogers, presi-
dent of Zeta Tau Alpha.
Once the house chooses a per-
son to become the house advisor,
besides taking care of the house,
she also becomes the surrogate
mother to all the sorority residents.
"If something happens to one of
the girls, it's like it is happening
to your own child said Lara
Lee, house mother at Alpha Delta
Pi for 11 years. "You get so close
to them, it makes you sad to see
them graduate
In return, the ladies of the soror-
ity try to show their love and appre-
ciation for their house mothers.
"We love Myrtle Rogers said.
"She does so much for us�she's a
very hard working lady
"The girls do so much for me
said Myrtle Latimer, Zeta Tau
Alpha house mother for the last five
years. "I talk to the girls
every morning. It makes me feel
so special
Although being a house mother
has its rewards, it is not an easy
task. Many responsibilities go along
with the job, such as purchasing the
groceries, maintaining the house�
if anything is not working properly,
she must call the repair people.
The house mother must also work
closely with the maid and the cook,
making sure their jobs run smooth-
ly, and basically hold all things
together.
"My main responsibility is to
make sure everything is taken care
of and running smoothly at the
house said Joan El-Khatib, Alpha
Omicron Pi house mother for the
last six and a half years.
"My main objective is to
keep them happy and well fed
Latimer said.
Usually, house mothers live in
the sorority house in their own mini
apartment with living room, bed-
room and bathroom free of charge.
"You do not have to worry about
bills while living in the house El-
Khatib said.
"We have a lot of safety devices
that I probably couldn't have if I
were at home Latimer said. "I
feel very safe here
All in all, these women love
what they do and like the environ-
ment they are in.
"I like working with these girls
SEE MOTHERS. PAGE I
Erin Ai.dekman
staff writer
If you are preparing to graduate and
looking for a job and you didn't
attend career day, you may have
missed a very valuable opportunity.
On Wednesday September 23rd
the annual Career Day was held.
Now I know many of you are
wondering how that concerns you.
Career Day, according to Dr.
Jim Westmoreland, Director of
Career Services, "introduces orga-
nizations and businesses that will
come to campus for interviews dur-
ing the fall andor spring
semesters
The event is for the whole uni-
versity and was created so that stu-
dents could learn about the many
possibilities for employment and
graduate schools.
Westmoreland believes that
anyone who is interested in his or
her career or career possibilities will
benefit from the event because it is
the perfect opportunity to meet
and greet employers from around
the area.
You may not have expected to
see many of the businesses that
were there. Representatives from
corporations and organizations
such as Burlington Industries,
Aerotek, Campbell University Law
School, Nations Bank and other
unexpected business attended the
event.
Still wondering what you may-
have missed? Westmoreland
believes that attending Career Day
and meeting the representatives
from various businesses will
increase your networking and may
help in your future employment
search. Think that none of the
businesses would have anything to
do with your major?
Westmoreland points out that
by introducing yourself to the rep-
resentatives and speaking with
them you may come to realize that
many of the businesses you
believed had nothing to do with
your career just might surprise you.
Many of the businesses that
attend Career Day arc large corpo-
rations that employ people from a
broad range of majors.
For instance, a communications
major may not see the need to
speak with a retail company, but
the organization may have a need
for a public relations specialist or a
person with writing skills.
Trish Haney and Angela Goins,
representatives from John Hancock
Mutual Life both agreed that they
were very impressed with the stu-
dents they had met at Career Day.
Haney explained that their hope
in attending the event was, "to
bring December graduates into the
Raleigh office for interviews and
interest them in sales with John
Hancock
Hanely went on to say that
while they arc only looking to hire
strictly sales and marketing posi-
tions, they are interested in hiring
people from all backgrounds with
various degrees.
Novant I lealth, a health care
organization with two large hospi-
tals located in Winston Salem and
Charlotte was also at the event.
Representative Kim Cardwell
was there to answer any questions
and advised rhat students shouldn't
be too quick to assume that busi-
nesses at Career Day have nothing
to offer a student with their degree.
"Make sure you talk to and ask.
we hire people for housekeeping,
dietary, and management
Cardwell said.
By asking the right questions
you may be surprised to find that
many businesses arc linking to hire
graduates with various degrees and
majors. '
Westmoreland advises that to
make an even better impression on
a company you may be interested
in, write a thank you letter to the
representative you spoke with.






8 Thursday. Siptimbir 24. 1998
Teaching
continued from page 7
arts education Schwarz said.
"There is no replacement for read-
ing a book in its original language
because some things just don't
translate. You can't claim to be
well educated if you know nothing
about cultures other than your
own. Language is the primary
form of expression for a culture and
is thereby irreplaceable
Schwarz also pointed out that to
obtain a doctorate at many colleges,
you must be able to read and trans-
late in at least two languages other
than your own.
features
The Eitt Carolinian 9 Thursday,
Schwarz feels that in order to
retain the knowledge of a second
language a person must continue
to practice.
"The best way not to forget is to
stay practiced Schwarz said.
Schwarz suggests doing things
like watching foreign news and
movies, reading foreign magazines,
books and newspapers, all of which
can be a great help, and to try
using the internet to increase your
skills and stay up to date.
Schwarz and Hill agreed that
there are not as many students
passing foreign languages as there
should be, but that it was from
their lack of interest and bad study
habits. Students should study the
language everyday so that it is
always fresh in their minds.
Remember before just random-
ly choosing a language, you should
find one that you want to learn or
that you think that you have a
chance to use more regularly.
There are a number of jobs in the
area for multi-lingual people.
"Many companies that come
from overseas have to hire a certain
number of Americans for their
operations, but they need bilingual
people Hill said.
Check with the language depart-
ment on the third floor of the
General Classroom Building
for job opportunities for
multi-lingual students.
Mothers
continued from page 7
El-Khatib said. "It keeps
me young
'The whole job is enjoyable
Lee said. "I love being involved
with the girls' lives
Even though the majority of
sororities have the luxury of having
a mother away from home, fraterni-
ties do not. These women think it
would be a great idea for fraternities
to have house mothers.
"I think it would be nice if they
had someone to make them home.
cooked meals Latimer said.
"I don't know why fraternities
do not have house mothers, but I
think the boys would appreciate
having one Lee said.
Contrary to these women's
beliefs, some of the guys in frater-
nities are quite content with their
current situation and see no need
for change.
"I think frats do well enough
without house mothers said
Josh Nail, house manager at
Kappa Sigma.
"It's good to have the option of
having house mothers, but it should
not be forced said John Mcriac,
Vice President of Tau Kappa
Epsilon. "Not having a house
motherj gives young guys the
opportunity to obtain some leader-
ship experience before they go out
into the real world
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The East Carolinian

9 Thursday, September, 24 1998
features
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Using radar-like forensic equip-
ment, investigators spent their
holiday weekend combing
through a trash-ridden home
where they earlier pulled eight
corpses.
It's possible, police say, there
are more bodies hidden in or
around the home of Kendall
Francois, who is suspected in the
murders.So far, police have
released the names of seven of the
eight women found.
Most of the women had been
reported missing over the last two
years and had histories of prostitu-
tion and drug use.
On Sunday, police identified
one of the bodies as Mary Hcaley
Giaccone, a 29-year-old Pough-
keepsie woman. She was last seen
in February 1997.
The other six victims are
Catina Newmaster, 25; Catherine
Marsh, 29; Gina Barrone, 29;
Wendy Meyers, 30; Sandra
French, 51; and Audrey Pugliesc,
34.
According to police, finding
Pugliese's body was a huge
surprise.
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10 Student Discount With Proper I.D.
Non-traditional
continued from page 7
stereotypes were true for certain
reasons.
"I think that I'm more active in
the classroom than other stu-
dents Lowenstcin said. "I'm get-
ting an undergraduate degree
because I'm changing careers, so I
have a vested interest in doing well
in class
Adults students have many sac-
rifices to make in their lives.
Whether they arc watching their
finances or managing their time, it
is tough.
"You can't go out to eat all the
time anymore said Troy Martin,
a second-year adult student. "I
know many people that have bills
to pay and kids to take care of. It's
hard to balance it all
As far as interacting with
younger students, there does not
seem to be any problem. Most
adult students are seen as "experi-
enced" by their younger peers.
"I have a lot of students come
up and ask me questions about dif-
ferent things Martin said. "I've
already been through a lot and can
usually give them good advice
One thing that varies among the
adults is their experiences in get-
ting back into the "school mode
Some find it difficult to study and
cram, while others quickly adapt to
the world of pop-quizzes and
research papers.
But for all these students, the
benefits definitely outweigh the
disadvantages.
"It's fun here Lowenstcin
said. "I'm enjoying my time
at campus
"Everyone is friendly here, I
haven't had any bad experiences
yet in my two years at ECU
Martin said.
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��n
10 Thursday. September 24, 1998
sports
u by
range of sponsors
Traci Hairr
senior writer
Where exactly does ECU receive money to
fund its athletic program and related special
activities? An immense amount is con-
tributed by local companies that are willing to
sponsor either a team or event in exchange
for an opportunity to advertise their business-
es. One example of this marketing
technique complies with associated
sponsorships of football games.
"We are of course indebted to our spon-
sors said Henry VanSant, associate athletics
director. "We've been real pleased with the
business community's response to supporting
our athletic budget and program
So that ECU does not appear opportunis-
tic, and too readily accepting of monetary
donations, it's important to consider the pack-
age deal that the sponsoring businesses are
offered. Included are passes for VIP tent
parking, where refreshments are provided,
and tickets to the game. They are also identi-
fied as the sponsor or co-sponsor on t.v. and
radio advertisements and arc recognized by
their company banners displayed throughout
Football Special
Events and Game
Sponsors�1998
Sept 12 UTC
-Pirate Club Weekend
Game Sponsors - Gatorade,Golden Corral
Oct3 Army
-Parent's Weekend
Game Sponsor - US Cellular
Ocfc 10 UAB
-Homecoming
Game Sponsors - Pizza Hut, US Airways
Oct. 31 Houston
-Hall of FameLetterwinners Weekend
Game Sponsors - Blue Cross Blue Shield
of North Carolina, Taco Bell
Nov. 14 Louisville
-Band DayAcademic Success
Game Sponsors - Sprint, Winn Dixie
Source: Sports Marketing Department
the stadium, usually at the entrances. Plus,
they're allowed to present scoreboard mes-
sages and PA announcements, and the front
cover of the program is printed with their
logo. Frequently the companies have the
opportunity to distribute items such as hand-
held fans, with promotional advertisements,
after being approved through the athletic
department.
"Greenville is really growing and is full of
SEE SPONSORS PAGE 11
1. 360 Communication
2. Andy's
3.ArmyROTC
4. BB&T
5. BCBSNC
6. Belk
7. Bojangles
8. Coeco
9. East Carolina Bank jflEN
10. Eastern Carolina Toyota II Wf
11. Eastern Outdoor
12. First Citizens Bank
TACO
BELL
13. first Union
14. Gatorade
15. Golden Corral
16. Harris Teeter
17. Hilton Inn
18. Ikon
19. ITG Travel
20. Kentucky Fried Chicken
21. McDonald's
22. Multimedia Cable
23. Pelican Bldg. Ctr.
24. Penske
f
25. Pepsi
26. Pizza Hut
27. Sprint
28. Taco Bell
29. Textiiease
SO. Trade Oil Co.
l.UBE
te. US Airways
13. US Cellular
34. Winn Dixie
: Sports Marketing Department
Runners finish
third in Raleigh
Men compete atN.C.
State Invitational
S I 1.1' II I. S S: I! R MM
UMIIH U Rl I V H
The men's cross country team
competed in the N.C State
Wolfpack Invitational this week-
end. The Pirates finished third
behind national powers N.C.
State and South Florida.
"lb finish third with teams
like N.G, State, which is in the
top ten, and South Florida, who's
in the top twenty-five, is good.
They also beat some of the teams
that beat them last year, like UNC-
Charlotte and UNO-Wilmington.
So that's a good beginning head
coach I .eonard Klepack said.
The Pirates were led by junior
Justin England who followed up
last week's first place run by finish-
ing fourth overall with a time of
24:10. Sophomore Stuart Will was
not far behind, finishing sixth over-
all with a time of 24:22.
"Justin England ran one of his
best races. He set a school record
for that course. Stuart Will also fin-
ished in the top ten Klepack said.
Sophomore Steve Arnold and
Junior Brian Beil finished 18th and
21st respectively. On a day of
strong team performances, the
most promising results were those
put in by ECU's three freshmen.
Jason Trant placed 24th and was
followed by fellow freshmen Craig
ECU's results from the
Wolfpack Invitational
4. Justin England24:10
6. Stuart Will24:22
18. Steve Arnold25:12
21. Brian Beil25:26
24. Jason Trant25:34
31. Craig Littlefield25:53
32. Justin Poretti26:04
35. David Baton26:24
37. Ryan Bennett

The new, 52,000 square feet, $10 million strength and conditioning center will be
loacted between Dowdy Ficklen Stadium and Williams arena.
FILE PHOTO
Plans continue for athletic
facility construction
The East Carolinian
Littlefield and Justin Poretti, who
finished 31st and 32nd.
"We ran a good team race
Klepack said. "Arnold, Beil, Trant
and Littlefield finished in the top
thirty, so it was a good showing. We
were very pleased with the way our
youngsters performed
Regardless of their respectable
performance, the new coach con-
tinues to sec areas where there is
room for improvement.
"We're trying to get them to run
closer. They need to run as a pack.
We need our three, four, five, six,
seven and eight runners to run clos-
er together Klepack said.
Next on the schedule, the
Pirates will next host the Overton's
Cross-Country Invitational. This
tournament will- be held this
Saturday at Lake Kristi in
Greenville.
to
support training center
Toni) Tallmadge
S I AFK WRITER
The ECU Pirate Club is in the
process of raising $10 million dol-
lars through the "Kickoff to
Victory" campaign, designed to
build the new sports strength &
conditioning center for the student-
athletes on campus. This new com-
plex will be arranged between
Dowdy-Ficklen stadium and
Williams Arena. The new building
will be 52,000 square feet with two
floors. The first floor will be 22,000
square feet for strength & condi-
tioning. The second floor will have
a banquet hall and terrace from
which Pirate Club members can
watch football games. The banquet
hall will double as a study hall dur-
ing the week for the student-ath-
letes.
"This new complex will be one
of the largest in the nation. This
should allow us to attract the top
student-athletes we can athletics
director Mike Hamrick said. "We
are excited with what this will do
for the campus and the communi-
ty"
"All of the student-athletes will
be able to achieve their full poten-
tial and goals in life head football
coach Steve Logan said. "In 1990,
we had about 85 student-athletes
using about 6,000 square feet for
strength & conditioning.We will
now have over 400 student-athletes
using 22,000 square feet
SEE FACILITY. PAGE 12
Open weekend
to benefit football
Pirates use weekend to
prepare for Army
Jim P h e l p s
SENIOR WRITER
Pirate football will take a break this
weekend, at least from game time.
This weekend is open for the team
and will provide time to prepare for
the Army game, scheduled for
October 3.
"We are using this time to pre-
pare for the wishbone head coach
Steve Logan said. "This comes at a
good time because it is a real diffi-
cult thing to prepare for and it gives
us an extra week to get lined up
right
The strategy that has worked
for he Pirates so far this season is
the option on offense which has
reinvigorated their running game.
"We struggled so badly last year
running the ball that we've gone
back to a two-back set. The option
is doing good for us Logan said.
The Pirates have been at 150
yards a game for all three games,
which has continued to be their
goal.
On defense, the Pirates have
gone back to a basic fundamental
defense set with very little pres-
sure.
"We're trying to bend and not
break, and we've been doing that
Logan said.
The players that have stood out
the most so far this season are those
making up the defensive front.
There has been a big improvement
in the performance by this group.
"They are playing like they
should have been playing all of last
year Logan said. "They played
good as sophomores and then
tailed off as juniors, and we've got a
recommitment and they are play-
ing really well up front
This time is not being used to
make changes to the line-up.
Against Virginia Tech, 62 team
members were played, 64 against
Chattanooga, and 54 against Ohio.
"We're playing almost two-deep
everywhere, some places three-
deep, so the line-up thing is not an
issue. We're playing a lot of peo-
ple Logan said.
The quarterback situation will
remain the same all season.
Whoever looks the best will go to
the upcoming games, as Logan is
not looking for a starting quarter-
back.
"We've got three kids that have
played so far this season, and
before the season is over all three
will playit's whoever's hot goes
Logan said.
The coaching staff is moving
players around as is the case of
Bobby Weaver, who played a little
at the halfback position against
Ohio. Weaver is one of the fastest
players on the team.
"We're just getting our best ath-
letes on the field Logan said.
The Pirates have suffered no
injuries so far this season. Because
they have been blessed with this
good fortune, they can focus on
their mission: using this free week
to prepare for the wishbone offense
and conference opponent Army.
Women's soccer
defeats VCU, 5-1
Team picks up first
conference win of year
Mario Sch erhaufer
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
The ECU women's soccer team
swept over Virginia
Commonwealth in its second con-
ference game of the season, win-
ning 5-1 on Tuesday afternoon.
Although they wete only up 2-1
at halftime, the Lady Pirates out-
shot the Rams 25-2. The win
leaves the Pirates 5-2 overall this
season, and 1-1 in the Colonial
Athletic Association, while the
Rams fall to 2-4 on the season and
0-2 in the CAA.
"After a difficult and disap-
pointing loss to George Mason last
week, I was concerned about our
mentality and our ability to
rebound head coach Neil
Roberts said.
"They (George Mason) brought
us back to earth but it was good
that it happened so early in the
season goalkeeper Amy Horton
said.
Stephanie Wrass was the first to
trick VCU's off-side trap when she
picked up a lohg pass from Erin
Cann and scored in the 24th
minute.
Nevertheless, VCU stuck to its
off-side trap tactic throughout the
entire game. Receiving long passes
over the heads of VCU's defense,
the Pirates' strikers were allowed
many chances for more goals.
"We knew about VCU's off-side
trap but we felt comfortable about
it and adjusted to it very well,
especially in the second half when
we got more out of our chances to
score Roberts said.
Without facing any serious chal-
lenge before, ECU keeper Horton
had to reach behind her to get the
Amanda Duffy battles for the ball with
her opponent on Tuesday.
PHOTO BY PAT IERLAN
ball out of the net, when Rebecca
Ruth rocketed the ball over
Morton's hands into the goal for the
tie at 32:10.
The tie was broken one minute
later when Shana Woodward
scored off a penalty kick to give
ECU the 2-1 halftime lead.
Amanda Duffy was fouled inside
the box and the referee did not
hesitate to call the foul.
"From my point of view, I
couldn't tell if she (VCU's keeper)
hit her (Duffy), but I take the PK
Roberts said.
Early in the second half, Kim
Sandhoff, ECU's most productive
scorer at this point in the season,
added both a goal and an assist to '�
the game. Freshman Tara
Carpenter scored the goal-of-the-
day when she saw the keeper out
of the goal and shot the ball above
her extended arms into the net.
Abi Temple added a goal after
receiving a long pass from ECU's
defense, for a Pirate victory, 5-1.
Besides ECU's offensive play-
ing style, Wrass was outstanding in
the Pirates midfield and junior Jill
Davis' defensive job was consid- !
ered "the anchor for a good game"
by keeper Horton.
SEE SOCCER, PAGE 11
EA!
asiiraSfcSiip
W.
,





1 Thunday, Saptarobtr 24, 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
Carolinian
tball
big improvement
:c by this group,
laying like they
playing all of last
i. "They played
nores and then
s, and we've got a
id they are play-
front
or being used to
to the line-up.
Tech, 62 team
layed, 64 against
54 against Ohio,
almost two-deep
ic places three-
jp thing is not an
ing a lot of peo-
ck situation will
ne all season,
e best will go to
ncs, as Logan is
starting quarter-
;e kids that have
lis season, and
is over all three
:ver's hot goes
staff is moving
is the case of
10 played a little
position against
nc of the fastest
n.
ing our best ath-
Logan said,
ive suffered no
season. Because
lessed with this
y can focus on
a; this free week
'ish bone offense
xnent Armv.
er
5-1
for the ball with
i Tuesday.
ERLAN
�vhen Rebecca
ic ball over
:he goal for the
:n one minute
a Woodward
kick to give
jlftime lead.
fouled inside
feree did not
ail.
,t of view, I
'CU's keeper)
take the PK
ind half, Kim
ist productive
n the season,
id an assist to
hman Tara '
e goal-of-the-
le keeper out
:he ball above
into the net.
a goal after
; from ECU's
victory, 5-1.
Tensive play-
mtstanding in
ind junior Jill
i was consid- "
i good game"
GE11
Soccer
continued (torn page 10
"Considering we have never
;aten them (VCU) before, I'm
very pleased with the way ve
played today Davis said. "I knew
we could beat them but I didn't
expect such a result
"The whole team did an excel-
lent job of keeping the ball in the
offense. I rarely had any chance to
prove myself today Horton said.
The Lady Pirates will take a
break before traveling to the
University of Richmond to contin-
ue CAA play on Sept. 30, at 7 p.m.
"It's going to be a very difficult
game. The team is my personal
rival Davis said. "But this year I
think we are going to beat them
Golfers bring home second place
iGRACIAS!
We'd like to Thank You for Voting us
BEST PLACE FOR FUN!
BEST WAIT STAFF!
1 BEST ALL AROUND BAR!
BEST MIXED DRINKS! �
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n
Team competes at
Hoya tournament
Stephen Schkam m
senior whiter
The ECU golf team headed to
Leesville, Va. this weekend to
compete in the Georgetown Hoya
Invitational. The Pirates went to
the tournament as one of the tour-
nament favorites, thus they expect-
ed a strong showing. They finished
second to host school Georgetown.
"I was disappointed that we did-
n't win it. I thought we were the
best team there head coach
Kevin Williams said.
Though they didn't
leave as champions, the
Pirates still performed
well individually and as
a team. ECU was paced
by junior Marc Miller
and freshman Frank
Adams. Both Miller and
Adams shot 73 on
Saturday and 70 on
Sunday to finish with a
1-under-par 143 and a
tie for seventh place.
"I played pretty well. I had to
battle the first day. I made some
putts that made the difference
Adams said.
Fellow freshman M. Chad
Webb shot a 71 on Saturday and a
73 on Sunday to finish with a even-
par 144 and in thirteenth place.
Webb's accomplishment is made
EClGolfw k
FROM THF,fl60RGCTOWI�HOYAliUVrTflAL
MarcMinejr 7J-7Q-143 -I
Frank Adar 73-70143 -I
M. ChadVbb 71-73-144 E
Shane Jfobfnson 74-74-148 4
StepHR Satterly 75-75-150 6
Source: Sportt Information Department
more impressive by the fact that
this was his first collegiate tourna-
ment.
ECU's Shane Robinson and
Stephen Satterly finished tied for
22nd place and 33rd place respec-
tively.
"I was pleased with the way we
SEE 601F. PAGE 12
Sponsors
continued from page 10
several chain restaurants and com-
panies willing to support ECU ath-
letics said Angie Wellman, sports
marketing director. "Sometimes
we go out and solicit their support
and use the resources we have
through having contact with these
companies, and other times enthu-
siastic Pirate fans come to us wish-
ing to donate
Though the sponsors are
acknowledged during the football
games, it is not directly to this team
or program that the money is
admitted. Instead, all donations
enter a general fund and are appor-
tioned throughout the entire ath-
letic department.
Because the continuously grow-
ing athletic program and its fund-
ing needs are so dispersed, numer-
ous and new sponsors are always
appreciated.
Gordons Golf & Shi
207 E. ARLINGTON BLVD 756-1003
ANNUAL
nClAIAII SKI JACKETS S7&-S100
o I Lib WALK Sat sept 26 ski suits sioo
Sit I I� ' SKI SWEATERS � S25-S50
M L L7AM-7PM GOLF SHIRl
"We're constantly looking for
increased sponsorships VanSant
said. "We may never reach any
maximum number, but we are still
grateful to the sponsors who
already support us
Support is certainly the key idea
when considering sponsorships, so
all of ECU should value this
foundation on which our
athletic events, that we find so
entertaining and so full of
energy.are built upon.
FAMOUS LABI I
JEANS
HAVE ARRIVED!
f
GOLI CLUBS AS LOW-
LADY'S 6 MEN'S SUMMER APPAREl SS S10
SKI BOOTS & BINDINGS AS LOW AS S20
TURTLENECKS -S5-S10
SNOWBOARDS AS LOW AS S180
SNOWBOARD BOOTS S7r.fi UP
HEADBANDS & HATS AS LOW AS SI
TSHIRTS b SWEATSHIRTS AS LOW AS S10
MANY ITEMS AS LOW AS 25c-50c
atalog
Connection
Division ol UJBVE.
Ill) 1. 5th St. l-s in -
'58-8612 Sun I - :
Faal like you'va bm
bad livin
Counting the diyf
to
m break out?
EASTBR00K & VILLAGE GREEN AFTS,
oar eet you free & eave you $$$$$
Move into a 2- or 3-bedroom in Got. or Nov
PAY 12 SECURITY DEPOSiTH!
Join us on Fri Sept 25th from 12 - 5 for our
2ND ANNUAL BL00DM0WLE BLOW-OUT!
Food, fun & a live radio remote with 103,71
Look for the Red Cross bus at E&itbrookl
23Off Your Entire Dinner Check At DarrylV
Just show your ECU student ID at Darryl's
across from campus and get a 25 discount
on your entire dinner check. Try our famous
Saucy Barbecued Fbrk Ribs,
Award Winning Fajttas, New
Wood-Fire Grilled Steaks, Fresh
Vegetable Pasta, Roadside
Chicken Sandwich, Steak and Cheese
Sandwich. Spicy Buffalo Wings, or any of our
Delicious Desserts It's all specially priced for
ECU students. So stop by tonight
and enjoy East Carolina's favorite
place for food and fun!
�Does not Indude Alcoholic Beverages
Discount good only on Dinner Menu
800 East 10th Street � 752-1907






12 Thuraday. SepUmbir 24, 1888
Facility
continued from page 10
The banquet hall, will be about
8,000 square feet, will have capac-
ity of approximately 500 people.
The banquet hall will be used by a
variety of organizations.
The Pirate Club is one of many
campus organizations anxiously
awaiting the construction and
opening of the new facility.
"This gives the student-athlete
and the Pirate Club great expecta-
tions down the road said execu-
tive Pirate Club director Dennis
Young. "We currently have over $4
million donated for the new com-
plex. We plan to start building next
fall and construction should take
about a year and a half
sports
The East Carolinian
Weltoro
f3to
mj'Ai Men's Hair Styling Shoppe
tjL7 Barber & Style
2800 E. 10th St.
Eascgate Shopping Center
Across From Highway Patrol
Behind stain Glass
Mon Fri. 9-4
Walk-ins Anytime
752-3318
Say Pirates
& Get Hair
Cut for $7
Every time.
Pirate Special
Wijoo
Haircut
Golf
continued from page ll
played. This was the First time in
as far as I can remember that five
guys shot 75 or better. That is the
type of consistency that we need to
get this program to the next level
Williams said.
Putting was one of the coach's
main concerns at the tournament,
however.
"We didn't putt very well. We
had a 291 on the first day and I
thought that was high. We struck
the bail well, we just didn't take
advantage Williams said.
The Georgetown Hoya
Invitational is unique, in that a
team must bring six players instead
of the usual five. The sixth men
play each other in the Gerry Kenny-
Sixth Man Classic. ECU's repre-
sentative, Scott Campbell, fin-
ished second with a six-over-par
150.
"If you count our sixth man, we
blew out Georgetown Williams
said.
The Pirates return to the links
on October 12th for the Mocs Fall
Invitational in Chattanooga, Tenn.
Receive haircuts,
Wzxrcoior &: perms
FREE
needed: models, no experience necessary, if chosen,
receive free services & products from nationally
known hairstylists & products from nationally known
hairstylists at major trade show to be held:
Date: Sunday October 4th
Model Call: 5:30 PM
Location: Hilton Inn - Greenville, NC
Address: 207 SW Greenville Blvd.
Show: Monday, October 5th 9:00AM - 4:00 PM
(must be present at model call to participate in show)
Call 752-617S for more details
Ask For Vebra
Official
Supermarket
Of The Pirates.
winn� dixie
America's Supermarket
Coke, Diet
Coke or
Sprite
12 pk.12 oz. cans
$137
COMING SOON TO THEATRES EVERYWHERE

Prices good Wednesday, Sept.
23, thru Tuesday Sept. 29, 1998
Effective In Our N.C. Locations
�Copyright 1098. Winn-Dixie Raleigh. Inc. Quantity Rights Reserved, www.winndixie.
com
HREE OR F
acious hor
nd downtov
St. No pets.
655 or 355-
CU AREA 1
ouses. All
ome type o)
ards. Pets C
30-9502
VILSON AC
ble in Sept
2 baths, w
lcluded. Ah
:eiling fans,
srdryer con
;ient, heat p
windows. $7(
rVILDWOOD
lishwasher, :
ir 252-332-e
ind spacious
WANTED: S
jn efficiency
Towers AS
5288mo. Fo
3097.
3 BEDROOM
ng distance f
r, large back
large livingro
2879.
RINGGC
Now Tal
1 bedroo
Efficieru
CALL
IFULLY FURNI
Isive two bed
Istory apartme
�open in Nov. (
�PRIVATE RO(
distance fron
(15'x15'). Priva
Iroom. Washer
iMike @ 752-2E
R00MM
ROOMMATE
two bedroom,
in Tar River. M
or grad studem
month plus 1:
Wanted ASAP.
SEEKING FEN
perclassmen tc
bath apt. 12
Please call for
ROOMMATES
spacious 5
house across fr
next to down!
Fenced in bai
heatair, two fi
$185 a month
plus a portion c
If interested, pli
MF ROOM
share 2 bedroc
Nice apt. $195
Call Steph at 3:
ROOMMATE
right now, do
must see
$237.50month
FEMALE ROO
share 2 bedroc
Street, $187.5C
12 phone, frei
cable. Smokers
tions. 757-964C
ROOMMATE Ik
plus 13 every
WD, no dogs. (
3274.
MONGOOSE
mountain bike,
condition, paid
$350.00. 355-6
AAAAI EARL
cials! Bahamas
$279! Includes
some beaches,
from Florida! 1�
ner! springbrea
678-6386
MUST GET rid
and chair. Off
stripe, good cc
Ashley or Anna
FOR SALE: Bi
wcar carrier. N(
tion. Asking $1C
at 754-2572.
LEA
sky;
CAROLINA





mmim
)1SC0
Ahoy!
kies
: Blue Bag
6ET ONE
ENU
;os
ETONE
VISA
- �:z�-
faster Card
�� 11
inndixie.ccm :
FOR SALE
4REE OR Four bedroom, two bath,
pacious home block from campus
downtown. Available November
1st. No pets. Great opportunity. 355-
655 or 355-6416.
CU AREA two and t! ree bedroom
louses. All with central heat and
iome type of AC. Two with fenced
lards. Pets OK. Yard work included.
30-9502
VILSON ACRES Apartments. Avail-
ble in September. 3 bedroom, 1
2 baths, water, sewer, and cable
ncluded. Also includes draperies,
eiling fans, appliances, and wash-
rdryer connections. Energy effi-
ient, heat pump and thermopane
windows. $700. Call 752-0277.
VILDWOOD VILLA, washerdryer,
jishwasher, 3 story. Call 752-8900
if 252-332-6783. Very affordable
nd spacious.
WANTED: SOMEONE to sublease
n efficiency apartment in Ringgold
Towers ASAP. Fully furnished,
t288mo. For more info, call 931-
9097.
3 BEDROOM house available, walk
ng distance from ECU. Washerdry-
r, large backyard. 3 bedrooms and
arge livingroom. Call Mike @ 752-
2879
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
FULLY FURNISHED fairly inexpen-
sive two bedroom, 2 5 bath two
story apartment on ECU bus line,
open in Nov. Call 758-8249 ASAP.
PRIVATE ROOM available, walking
distance from ECU. Large room
(15x15). Private phone linecable in
room. Washerdryer in house. Call
Mike @ 752-2879.
ROOMMATE WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED to share
two bedroom, two bath townhouse
in Tar River. Mature, upperclassman
or grad student preferred. $282.50 a
month plus 12 electric, 12 phone.
Wanted ASAP. 329-7083.
SEEKING FEMALE graduate or up-
perclassmen to share nice 2 BR 2
bath apt. 12 rent and 12 utilities.
Please call for more info, 439-0230.
ROOMMATES WANTED to share a
spacious 5 bedroom furnished
house across from Art Building, right
next to downtown on 5th Street.
Fenced in backyard, wd, central
heatair, two full baths, etc. Rent is
$185 a month (no deposit needed)
plus a portion of utilityphonecable.
If interested, please call @ 830-4768.
MF ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share 2 bedroom apt. off campus.
Nice apt. $195 month 12 utilities.
Call Steph at 321-7298.
ROOMMATE NEEDED - available
right now, downtown apartment,
must see to appreciate,
$237.50month. Call 757-0812.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 2 bedroom apartment off 1st
Street, $187.50 plus 12 electric,
12 phone, free water, sewer, basic
cable. Smokers OK. WD connec-
tions. 757-9640.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP, $183
plus 13 everything, close to ECU,
WD, no dogs. Call SamAnnie, 758-
3274.
GOLF CLUBS for sale: King Cobra II
copies, like new. $200 OBO; King
Cobra driver $120 OBO. Call Moore
at 758-9473.
AAAA EARLY Specials! Panama
City! Room with kitchen $129! In-
cludes 7 free parties! Daytona $149!
New Hotspot-South Beach $129! Co-
coa Beach $149! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
LARGE CAPACITY washer and dry-
er for sale. Slightly used, 3 weeks
old. $600 negotiable. 757-9640.
MX-6 1993 Spoiler, power sunroof,
4 cylinder automatic, white, excel-
lent condition. $7,500. 355-2852.
ONE YEAR old wood dinner table
with four matching chairs, $100.
Call 439-0323.
AAAA! EARLY Specials! Cancun
& Jamaica! 7 nights air and hotel
from $399! Includes free food,
drinks, parties! 1998 Better Business
Bureau AwardWinner! springbreak-
travel.com 1-800-678-6386
IMMACULATE 1987 Mazda pickup
with camper top, AC, five speed, CD.
Gold colored. 100-K miles. Very nice
throughout! $3995 OBO. Call Rusty
9 355-3620.
Dapper
Dan's
Retro and Vintage Clothing,
Handmade Silver
Jewelry k More.
417 Evans St. Mall 7521750
AAAAI SPRING Break Travel was
1 of 6 small businesses in the US
recognized by Better Business Bu-
reaus for outstanding ethics in the
marketplace! springbreaktravel.com
1-800-678-6386
MOVIE POSTERS for sale: latest
movies and banners available. E-mail
me at Posters2go@aol.com. Over
800 titles to choose from!
LIVE RECORDS Hottest Independ-
ent Label and Recording Studio and
Record Store coming soon! 4th and
Evans St.
SERVICES
FOR SALE
MONGOOSE HILLTOPPER SX
mountain bike, 1 year old. excellent
condition, paid $689.00, sell for
$350.00. 355-6161.
AAAAI EARLY Spring Break Spe-
cials! Bahamas Party Cruise! 6 days
$279! Includes most meals! Awe-
some beaches, nightlife! Departs
from Florida! 1998 BBB AwardWin-
ner! springbreaktravel.com 1-800-
678-6386
MUST GET rid of matching couch
and chair. Off white with taupe
stripe, good condition, $200. Call
Ashley or Anna 561-7367
NAIL SERVICES - acrylics $35 set.
fills $20, manicures $10. Licensed
manicurist. Abracadabra Nails, con-
veniently located near campus. Call
757-9640 for an appointment.
HELP WANTED
PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR needed
to provide individualized instruction
in a positive learning environment.
Possible hours Monday-Thursday
(3:30-8:30). Individual must be com-
petent in the areas of literature and
SATcollege prep. Pick up applica-
tion at Sylvan Learning Center, 2428
S. Charles Blvd Greenville, NC
KIND SITTER Needed for two girls.
ages 5 and 6, Monday-Friday 2:25-
5:30p.m. Pick-up, reading and play-
ing with children. Piano knowledge a
plus. 756-5533 after 6p.m.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT - Fishing
industry. Excellent student earnings
& benefits potential (up to
$2,850mo. RoomBoard). All
skill levels. Don't pay outrageous
agency fees! Ask us how! 517-336-
4171 ext. A53621
Advertise in the classifieds.
IT WORKS!
classifieds
HELP WANTED
CRUISE SHIP Employment - Work-
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(wtips & benefits). World Travel!
Land-Tour jobs up to $5,000-
$7,000summer. Ask us how! 517-
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PERFECT PART-TIME job for a
teacher. Positive environment offer-
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8:30) Certification required. Send re-
sume or pick up application at Syl-
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Blvd Greenville, NC 27858.
ABSOLUTE SPRING Break "Take
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"Limited Offer 1-800-426-
7710www.sunsplashtours.com
PART-TIME CLERICAL. Parttime
data entry clerk needed for AM and
early PM hours. Close to campus.
Contact Kay Tripp at 757-2131.
NOW HIRING exotic dancers, sing-
ing telegrams, and adult entertain-
ers. You must be at least 18 yrs
drug free, own transportation and
phone. Up to$ 1,500 weekly. Call
758-2737.
MAKE EASY money! Go on Spring
Break for Free! USA Spring Break off-
ers Cancun, Bahamas, Jamaica, and
Florida packages and is currently ac-
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sales representatives. Call 1-888-
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AFTERNOON WORK M-F 2PM-
5PM $5HR to babysit two children
ages 8 and 10. Call Janet or Steve
Porter for details, 756-8523 or 551-
1494.
PI
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INCOME-OVER
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It you're over 17 and Qualify,
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Than think about ua.
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This offer applies to
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( DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS
FOR SALE: Barracuda Mtn. bike
wcar carrier. New tires, great condi-
tion. Asking $100 OBO. Call Brandi
at 754-2572.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(919)496-22X4
We Need Timbtriand boots
and ahoes! Good Jean.
ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER TIMBERLAND
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POLO EDDIE BAUER
AND OTHER NAME BRAND MEN'S CLOTHING
SHIRTS, PANTS, JEANS, SWEATS, JACKETS, SHOES, ETC.
WE ALSO BUY AND SELL:
GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
QUICK, EASY, HELPFUL
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
414 S. EVANS (UP THE STREET FROM CUBBIES)
752-3866
TUESDAY - SATURDAY, 9:00 - 5:00
(DRIVE TO THE BACK DOOR BEHIND PARK THEATRE)
ONE OF THE FAVORITE STUDENT STORES FOR YEARS
(IF YOU ARE SELLING, ID IS REQUIRED)
CONGRATULATIONS TO Pi Delta
rush chairs Ashley Dix and Shelly
McCutheon on a great fall rush and
open bid night! Also, thanks to sis-
ter Carrie Barrett for all her hard
work and dedication towards rush.
You guys did an awesome job. Love,
your sisters
THANKS TO all the members of Pi
Delta who participated in Sunday's
car wash. Your dedication to this ev-
ent was much appreciated
CONGRATULATIONS TO Jeanna
Taylor on being the Jr. Panhellenic
President. You will do a great job.
Love, the sisters and new members
of Zeta Tau Alpha.
THE BROTHERS of Pi Kappa Alpha,
thanks for showing us a great time
at Pref. Hope we can have another
wild get-together soon. Love, the sis-
ters and new members of Alpha Xi
Delta
WAY TO go. Pi Delta new member
Tori Johnson on being voted into the
secretary position for Jr. Panhellenic.
We know you will do a super job!
Love, the sisters
THE SISTERS of Alpha Xi Delta
would like to thank everyone who at-
tended our hazing forum. Your sup-
port was very appreciated.
YOU'VE HAD Many clues from your
Big Sis. tonight is a night you don't
want to miss, it will be an adventure
the whole night through, you'll get a
big sister and a new family, too. No
matter what happens, she'll always
be there for you, Zeta Baby, she'll al-
ways care. Love, the big sisters of
Zeta Tau Alpha
WE ARE glad to have the sisters of
Chi Omega and Pi Delta as our sister
sororities for this semester. We look
forward to getting together. Love,
the sisters and new members of Al-
pha Xi Delta
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA Phi
team members on your victories in
flag football and volleyball! The sis-
ters are proud of you. Keep up the
good work!
ALPHA XI Delta and Chi Omega:
We are really glad to have you guys
as our sister sororities this semester!
Love, the sisters and new members
of Pi Delta
PI DELTA would like to congratulate
sister Terrell Floyd on being selected
as one of this year's North Carolina
debutantes. We hope you had a
wonderful time at the Debutante
Ball in Raleigh. Thank you for the
beautiful roses you brought back for
us. We are very proud of you! Love,
your sisters
ALPHA XI Delta big sisters would
like to thank their little sisters for an
awesome time on Friday. We love
you guys!
PI DELTA, thanks for the flowers
and the card. We are looking for-
ward to spending time with you this
semester. Love, the sisters and new
members of Alpha Xi Delta
THANKS THETA Chi for a terrific
time Friday! We had a blast! Love,
the sisters and new members of Al-
pha Omicron Pi!
ZETA TAU Alpha would like to
thank the Rugby Team for a great so-
cial last Thursday. Can't wait to do it
again.
TO THE brothers of Delta Chi, the
Friday night social was sizzlin Next
time we will come prepared with our
fire extinguishers! Love, the sisters of
Alpha Phi I
ZETA TAU Alpha appreciates the
hard work and dedication of the
School of Business. Thank you for
everything you do.
ZETA TAU Alpha hopes all our
crushes had a great time Saturday.
It's not love, it's not lust, settle down
boys, it's just a crush.
D. J. FOR HIRE
NYC O.J. READY TO
HYPE UP YOUR PARTY
For all functions & campus
organizations
Call J.Arthur @ 252-412-0971
The East Carolinian
GREEK PERSONALS
EARN WHILE YOU learn, up to
$1,000.00 wk. Day and night
shifts. Claan, secure working at-
mosphere. Playmates Adult En-
tertainment. 252-747-7686 for in-
terview.
ANDY'S NOW hiring at all three lo-
cations: Cotanche St 10th Street
Plaza Mall. Apply within. Monday
thru Thursday three to five. No
phone calls please.
ARE YOU Thinking about rushing? If
so Alpha Omicron Pi would like to
extend an open invitation for dinner
on Sept. 30th. For more information
please call 757-0769 and ask for Kim
or Tina.
GREEK PERSONALS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
BEST OF Luck Sigma Sigma Sigma
on your golf tournament this wee-
kend. We hope you guys do well!
Love, the sisters and new members
of Pi Delta
CHAPTER RETREAT was a great
success, the ropes course was fun
and the bonding was super. Can't
wait till next year. Love. Zeta Tau Al-
pha
ANNOUNCEMENTS
OTHER
ONUNE AUCTION. Visit NC s first
on-line auction at mem-
ber.xoom.comeastauction and get
the best deals on electronics, com-
puters, furniture, and even cars!
GOV'T. FORECLOSED HOMES
from pennies on $1. Delinquent tax,
repo's. REO's. Your area. Toll Free 1-
800-218-9000 ext. H-3726 for cur-
rent listings.
SPRING BREAK - Plan Now! Can-
cun, Jamaica, Mazatlan. & S. Padre.
Early bird savings until Oct. 31st.
America's best prices & packages.
Campus sales reps wanted. Earn
free trips cash. 1.800.SURFS.UP
www.studentexpress.com
FREE CASH GRANTS! College
scholarships. Business. Medical
bills. Never repay. Toll free 1-800-
218-9000, ext. G-3726.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175. Porsch-
es, Cadillacs. Chevys, BMWs, Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps, 4WDs. Your
area. Toll free 1-800-218-9000, ext.
A-3726.
SPRING BREAK 99! Cancun' Nas-
sau ' Jamaica 'Mazatlan ' Acapulco
' Bahamas Cruise Florida' Florida '
South Padre. Travel Free and make
lots of Cash! Top reps are offered
full-time staff jobs. Lowest price
Guaranteed. Call now for details!
www.classtravel.com 800838-6411
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
Workshop: Wednesday 11:00-12:00.
The Center for Counseling and Stud-
ent Development is offering the fol-
lowing workshop on September
30th. If you are interested in this
workshop, contact the Center at
328-6661.
STRESS MANAGEMENT work-
shop: Wednesday 3:30-4:30. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop on September 30th. If
you are interested in this workshop,
contact the Center at 328-6661.
ALCOHOL Substance Intervention
Program (A-SIP): Thursday 3:30-5
PM. The Center for Counseling and
Student Development is offering the
following workshop on October 1st.
This workshop will assist you in ex-
ploring more about substance use
whether for personal choices or gen-
eral interest. An open, non-judgmen-
tal approach is utilized to encourage
healthy decision-making in regard to
substance abuse.
WIFFLEBALL REGISTRATION
Meeting: It's new with intramurals
this year, so obviously no experience
is needed Just make sure that you
attend the registration meeting on
Tues. Sept. 29th in MSC Room 244
at 5 p.m. Men's. Women's and Co-
rec teams are welcome.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDEDII The Bone
Marrow Foundation, Inc a nonprofit
organization established to assist pa-
tients and families financially, is look-
ing for volunteers to help with fund-
raisers, advertising, mailing, etc. If
you are a devoted, hard working in-
dividual who is interested in doing
something for a worthwhile cause,
please give us a call, Marlene Ander-
son, 756-7297 or 328-6401. You
could help make a difference1
PERSPECTIVES, FALL 1898. Wed
Sept. 9, 12:30-1:30PM Brody 2W-
50 - "The Trusted Doctor Rosa-
mond Rhodes, Ph.D. Associate Pro-
fessor of Medical Education, Direc-
tor-Bioethics Education, Mt. Sinai
School of Medicine. Mon. Sept. 28
12:30-1:30PM Brody 2W-50 . "Ad
dressing Patients; Spirituality" Dana
E. King, M.D. Dept of Family Medi-
cine. ECU School of Medicine. Co-
sponsored by Dept. of Medical Hu-
manities, ECU School of Medicine &
The Bioethics Center, University
Health Systems of Eastern Carolina.
The public is invited to attend. For
further information, call 816-2361.
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION Work-
shop: Tuesday 11:00-12:00. The Cen-
ter for Counseling and Student De-
velopment is offering the following
workshop on September 29th. If you
are interested in this workshop, con-
tact the Center at 328-6661.
COMMUNICATING AND Resolving
Conflict: Thursday 11:00-12:00. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop on October 1st. If you
are interested in this workshop, con-
tact the Center at 328-6661.
STUDY SKILLS Workshop: Tuesday
11:00-12:00. The Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development is of-
fering the following workshop on
September 29th. If you are interest-
ed in this workshop, contact the
Center at 328-6661.
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: Thursday 3:30-5PM. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop on September 24th. If
you are interested in this workshop,
contact the Center at 328-6661.
ADULT SWIM: Beginning lessons
personalized to help meet individual
goals. Classes at the SRC on Tues. &
Thurs. nights at 7 p.m. Registration
ends 928. Call 328-6387 for details.
HANG GLIDE at Kitty Hawk. NCI!
Learn from the pros as you fly over
the dunes at Jockey's Ridge State
Park. Oct. 4th. This is a classic North
Carolina experience. Register by
Sept. 26th. Member cost is $80. For
further information, call Adventure
ProgrammingDept. of Recreational
Services @ 328-6387.
The East Carolinian classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE$4.00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional words 5C each
STUDENT LINE AD RATE $2.00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional words 5C each
Must present a valid ECU ID. to qualify. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to refuse fhis rate for any ad deemed to be non-
student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE .$1.00
add to above tine rate for either
bold or ALL CAPS type.
All classified ads placed by individuals or campus groups
must be prepaid. Classified ads placed by a business must be pre-
paid unless credit has been established.
Cancelled ads can be removed from the paper if
notification is made before the deadline, but no cash refunds are
given.
The Personals section of the classifieds is intended for non-
commercial communication placed by individuals or campus
groups. Business ads will not be placed in this section.
All Personals are subject to editing for indecent or
inflammatory language as determined by the editors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADUNE
4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue
We reserve the right to change a deadline for holidays
or as necessitated by other considerations.





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Title
The East Carolinian, September 24, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 24, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1292
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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