The East Carolinian, September 22, 1998








Tuesday:
High: 84
Low: 73
Wednesday:
High: 74
Low: 66
� 1
Check out TEC's website at:
www.t0c.ecu.edu
Carolinian
Men's tennis
team hosts
Pirate
Invitational
Sports, pip 8
TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 22 .1998 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 09
Freshman GPAs below
reports rape in
Garrett Hall
Incident occurred in
room of acquaintance
S t B V E L O S E Y
NEWS EDITOR
An 19-year-old freshman reported
being raped in Garrett Hall last
Sunday.
The rape reportedly occurred
between 6:30 and 7 p.m. in the
room of an acquaintance. The vic-
tim reported the incident to the
ECU Police Department at 1 a.m.
She was taken to the Pitt
Memorial Hospital emergency
room, where a rape kit was admin-
istered.
Police are now interviewing the
woman's acquaintance as well as
two other men who were in the
room that night.
"We're not sure who was pre-
sent during what said Tom
Younce, Assistant Director of the
ECHPD.
Younce confirmed that alcohol
was present in the room, but said
that police are not sure what role
alcohol played in the alleged rape.
At the emergency room, the
woman was tested for blood-alco-
hol levels and other types of drugs.
"We're waiting for the lab
results to come back Younce said.
Nobody has been charged yet in
the case. After the ECU Police
have finished investigating, the
case will be presented to the
Assistant District Attorney's office,
who will make a decision on what
charges to bring against anybody in
the case.
Younce was not surprised that
there was a six-hour gap between
the alleged rape and the report of
the incident.
"I don't know why she waited,
but that's not uncommon in these
cases Younce said.
The alleged rape is the first to
occur at ECU since the February
.ise
i is that admi
lan they hav
iany people applying to
�)ls administrators had to
dents to consider tor admission. 1 he uni-
versities are looking for higher SAT scores,
The alleged rape occured in Garrett Hall.
PHOTD BY STtVf L0SEY
rape of a Cotten Hall resident.
Recently, ECU and the Pitt
County Crime Stoppers have
offered a $2500 reward for any
information in the Cotten Hall
case. According to Younce, there
are no new developments in that
investigation.
Manny Amaro, director of
University Housing Services, said
that his department is "telling stu-
dents to lock their doors, don't
get drunk, and don't go into
strange rooms" to avoid potentially
risky situations.
iverageGPAof2.89.Tt dent
1995. In 19 that figure drop
slight! hut in 1997 the GPA was up
again to 2.94. After four years, the average GPi
GPA went up five-hundredths of a point, arid
jpped slightly to
!PA for NC State
ling a
s well.
s average
� up to 2.8
2.76,
I hard, because
of grade
�,aid Don
' Undergraduate
rprise me
Board of Governors declines
to hear DeMarco appeal
Career Day offers
job opportunities
Former professor
claims discrimination
Steve Losey
news editor
The Board of Governors (BOG) has
declined to hear an appeal from for-
mer professor Sal DeMarco.
The BOG's decision, which was
announced September 11, supports
the Board of Trustee's (BOT)
upholding of Chancellor Richard
Eakin's dismissal of DeMarco.
DeMarco, who was a tenured
speech-pathology professor, was
officially fired in April for allegedly
using profanities during faculty
meetings, ridiculing other profes-
sors, arranging appointments for
clients after he was ordered not to,
and intimidating his col-
leagues.
DeMarco was notified
last May of Eakin's inten-
tions to end his employ-
ment. DeMarco then
requested that a due
process hearing be held
in open session to review
the accusations against
him. The hearing com-
mittee, which was com-
posed of faculty mem- Fit
bers, met from June 1997
to March 1998. The committee
found that DeMarco's actions did
not constitute misconduct and rec-
ommended he be reinstated as a
tenured faculty member.
Eakin overruled the commit-
tee's decision and fired DeMarco.
Sal DeMarco
"This process has been unfair
from the get go DeMarco said. "I
wasn't surprised
In the BOG decision,
G. Irvin Aldridge, Chair
of the Committee on
Personnel and Tenure,
wrote, "The question
presented to this com-
mittee is whether Dr.
DeMarco has identified
alleged violations of
specified provisions of
the Code of The
iotq University of North
Carolina that warrant
review on appeal. We find no
allegations that warrant further con-
sideration or attention by the Board
of Governors
"We believe the system broke
down somewhere said Al
McSurely, DeMarco's attorney.
McSurely said that DeMarco's
only course is to file a suit claiming
he was discriminated against
because of his Multiple Sclerosis.
McSurely also noted that the Code
does not list discrimination against
the disabled among illegal actions.
University Attorney Ben Irons
said that he and Eakin had no com-
ment on the BOG decision.
On September 1, an appeals ref-
eree from the Employment
Securities Commission (ESC) met
with DeMarco, Eakin, and their
attorneys to decide whether
DeMarco should receive unem-
ployment checks. The matter will
be discussed further when they
reconvene on October 20.
"It's all been a pack of lies
DeMarco said. "The main thing
that's so unfair is that Eakin's been
unchallenged
A student learns about future options for employment at the 1996 Career Day.
COURTESY OF ECU NEWS BUREAU
Students can make
valuable contacts
Debbie N e h w i r t ii
STAFF WRITER
Students will have the opportunity
to meet with corporations and find
out about future employment
opportunities tomorrow at the
School of Business and Career
Services annual Career Day.
Career Day will be held in the
General Classroom Building from
8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m but students
are encouraged to attend early.
Students can use Career Day as
an opportunity to look for a future
job. Dr. Jim Westmoreland, the
director of Career Services, says
there is something at Career Day
for everyone and students should
talk to as many potential employ-
ers as possible.
There will be 80 organizations
and companies at Career Day this
year. Even though it is co-spon-
SEE CAREER. PAGE 2
Faculty, students sound off on scandal
Political scientists
debate issue
Jennifer Mason
staff writer
People across the nation have had
no shortage of opinions regarding
the Lewinsky scandal, and stu-
dents and faculty at ECU are just as
vocal as anyone else.
"I think that for the good of the
nation we need to get closure as
soon as possible said Richard C.
Kearney, chair of the Political
Science Department. "If that
comes through a congressional rep-
rimand, so be it. But if an impeach-
ment plays out, we'te in for a long
and tedious media event. Or
media-driven event
Some hold the view that Clinton
was not the only one in the wrong.
They also believe that the public
should forget about it and let the
government concentrate on more
important things.
"What Clinton did was wrong,
but so was everyone else, including
Kenneth Starr ' and the
Independent Counsel said Dr.
Clement Handron, professor of
psychology. "It has become a polit-
ical battle. Let's let Washington do
what we elected them to do
Starr has atttactcd a large
amount of criticism for the way he
has behaved during the investiga-
tion.
"I think it's a salacious attempt
to embarrass the President and the
Presidency, by a non-elected offi-
cial, who's gone wild without any
restraint political science profes-
sor Lawrence Hough said.
Some people think President
Clinton should be impeached
immediately.
"The Ptcsident broke the law,
period political science majot
Kyle Minor said. "He told the
American public a bold-faced lie.
The man is undeserving of the
presidency and should be removed
SEE STARR. PAGE 3
I
1





2 Tmidiy, St�t�wfcir 22. 1998
Kramer
to speak
at Wright
Inspiration for
Seinfeld character
kings show to campus
SUSANNE MlLENKEVICH
STAFF WRITER
Kenny Kramer, the model for
Seinfeld's Cosmo Kramer, will
appear tonight as host of Kramer's
Reality Road Show at 8:00 in
Wright Auditorium.
"For Seinfeld fans, it's stories
behind stories Kramer said.
Kramer's Reality Road Show
offers additional insight into
Seinfeld with a 90 minute behind
the scenes tour. The show includes
stories and a look at the characters
and sets of Seinfeld.
Kramer happened to live across
the hall from Larry David, a come-
dy writer, when Jerry Seinfeld
asked David to help him create a
television show.
"Larry came up with the show
and became George Costanza
Kramer said. "I became Kramer
Kramer decided to get every
SEE KRAMER. PAGE 3
Career
continued from page I
sored by the School of Business,
there will be opportunities for a
variety of interests, including law,
biology and communications.
Campbell University, Marriot
Lodging, Nations Bank, Office
Depot, Sprint, State Farm, USAir,
Wachovia and Xerox are a few of
the companies that will be avail-
able to meet and talk with stu-
dents. They will be answering
questions and distributing infor-
mation about their companies.
Students might want to ask poten-
tial employers for a description of
their organizations and what posi-
tions they have available.
"I encourage all students to
attend and ask various employers
about employment opportuni-
ties Westmoreland said. "An
insurance company may have a job
opening for someone with a psy-
chology or journalism degree. Ask
questions and gather information.
If nothing else, you may become
more accurately informed about
career opportunities
Students are encouraged to
dress up, but it is not expected or
required. Breaks between classes
offer ideal times for students with
busy schedules to talk with repre-
sentatives from companies.
"Career Day is a way to let stu-
dents know the importance of
starting to look for a job early on
Westmoreland said. "Meeting
these people so they can feel com-
fortable when it comes interview
time is a good idea
Westmoreland recommended
that seniors and graduate students
attend Career Day and "connect"
with Career Services.
The East Carolinian regrets any
inconvenience caused by errors in
the Thursday, Sept 7th edition.
�Voting for homecoming can-
didates begins Sept 29 and ends
Oct. 1, not during hafftime of the
football game, as was incorrectly
reported. In addition, the names
fisted as members of the enter-
tainment committee should have
been attributed to the homecom-
ing committee.
�Free pizza and drinks will be
available Sept 28 only for stu-
dents at the Franklin Graham
Crusade's Student Night on die
grassy area between Mingcs and
news
Tht Eitt Carolinian
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it Eitt Carolinian
tance
3 Tutidty, September 22, 1998
news
The Eitt Carolinian
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Kramer
continued horn page 2
inute.
spent.
cent he could out of his notoriety.
"I shamelessly cashed in on it
(being the model for Kramer)
Kramer said. "OriginaJJy I created a
CD-ROM program called Kramer's
New York
However, when Kramer brought
the CD-ROM to distributors they
did not think it would sell well.
"I was trying to think of a kind
of 'Seinfeld Reality Check' when I
looked out over 42nd Street and
saw a tour bus Kramer said.
"Then the idea came to me
He began the show in January
1996, and since then it has
become internationally known,
selling out almost every week-
end in New York City.
Alyson Bucolo, chair of the
Student Union lecture commit-
tee, said Kramer's show was
voted on last semester by the
program board when Don
Whittcn, special events chair,
brought the idea to the table.
"It will be a really good
show Bucolo said. "People
won't be disappointed at all
Student tickets are $3.00 in
advance and all tickets at the
door are $8.00.
Kenny Kranw and actor Michael Richards.
PHOTO COURTESY OF STUD!NT UNION
" thinkthatfor the good of the nation we need to get closure as soon as
possible. If that comes through a Congressional reprimand, so be it. But
if an impeachment plays out, ve're in for a long and tedious media
event. Or media-driven event
Or. Richard C. Kearney
Ctiair of PoBtica) Science Department
" think it's a salacious attempt to embarrass the President and the
Presidency by a non-elected official who's gone wild without any
restraint
Dr. Lawrence Hough
Ptefassw of Political Science
"My best guess is he's not going to be impeached and will be censured. I
think a lot of what will happen has to do with public opinion
Dr. Scott Frisch
Prafessot of Political Science
Starr
continued fiom page I
from office immediately
For some, impeachment does
not appear to be an immediate
threat to Clinton.
"My best guess is he's not going
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to be impeached and will be cen-
sured. I think a lot of what will hap-
pen has to do with public opinion
political science professor Scott
Frisch said.
Another common opinion is that
the report should never have been
released to the public.
"Clinton is disgusting psy-
chology major Stephanie Jones
said. "There were things in that
report that no one needed to know.
I really didn't want or need to
know about the cigar incident.
That was just too much
Others express feelings of
resentment at Clinton's actions.
"I don't understand why more
people aren't outraged by this
said a political science professor
who asked not to be identified.
"Bill Clincon is one of the most
powerful men in the free world. He
controls the strongest military and
basically the greatest country in
history. I am not so angry about the
affair, I am angry about the lies, and
I'm angry about the attention our
nation has placed on this rather
than the more important things.
Let's get our nation back on track
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AMV L.RoYSTER Cdiiof
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AMANDA AUSTIN FnuraEtfilor
MICCAH SMITH FotinliinhMdEdilor
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Chris KNotts Sunhna
Jason Feather Phots Editor
STEPHANIE WHITLOCK Ad Design
JANET RESPESS Advertising Manage;
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Cufrtnwi Student PubtKttons BsssUmg. ECU. GftenviHe. ?7BSB4353 Fw mlwmmon. cut 9t9.378 6366
OUNICW
When your home on the sofa with a bag of Lays potato chips and a six pack of beer watching
the coverage of an impending d ragout impeachment battle between two men who have taken
politics to a new low, who do you root for?
Choosing between two evils seems to be the country's dilemma in the coming showdown
between President Clinton and Ken Starr. Both sides have done things that have made
members of both parties shake their heads in disgust, and the worst is yet to come.
Impeachment proceedings could be right around the corner, and the nation could be in the
most uncomfortable situation it has seen in years.
In one corner, Clinton checks in with heavy weight scandal. His behavior has embarrassed
the nation in the eyes of the world. Clinton made every effort to squeeze his way out of this
mess, and has no doubt brought shame to the office of the presidency. The tearful admissions
Clinton first gave sounded more like a man cornered in the final round than a man who
maturely admits his mistakes. Now Clinton's repentant speeches come across as too little, too
late. Though the country and the economy is doing well, a leader who loses the faith of his
people places the country on shaky ground. No matter how you feel about the relevancy of
Clinton's private life, or how you feel about any possible motivations he may have had to lie to
protect his family, most everyone can agree that this scandal has brought an unwanted taint to
our nation as a whole. Clinton may have done the dirty deed, but the means by which the
scandal was uncovered is another matter altogether.
In the other corner we have Starr, a real piece of work. During an investigation that has taken
over four years and cost an estimated $40 million, this is the first substantial charge he has been
able to produce. Keep in mind that he was originally appointed to look into Whitewater.
.Somewhere between then and now, Starr started poking around into the Lewinsky matter.
The motivation for digging around and moving from one scandal to the next seems obviously
politically motivated. Since he began subpoenaing everybody in Washington except the
president's cat, Socks, Starr has redefined chutzpa. He has gone so far as to subpoena people
who wrote unfavorable articles about him. It seems as if some of his actions were solely for
intimidation purposes, though he would no doubt deny that.
Who do we distrust more, a president who keeps the economy going and foreign affairs
relatively in check, yet lies bold-faced about his sex life, or a special prosecutor with unlimited
restriction, whose tactics are reminiscent ofMcCarthyism? TEC feels the issue is not black and
white, but rather muddled by two men, neither of whom we like much. With the release
yesterday of Clinton's grand jury testimony, the more interesting question will be how much
coverage are we willing to watch. Could it be after the over exposure of O.J. and Jon Benet that
America has finally decided to get off the sofa and turn off the fight?
OPINION
Christopher
C0PPEDGE
Columnist
Reluctant wrestling fan confesses
OPINION
Columnist
Steve
KLEINSCHMIT
Mud slinging reaches new level
know that wrestling caters
more to an adult following
now. The programs come on
at night now rather than
Saturday mornings. I can see
next week's Raw having a TV
MA rating.
After living in denial for almost a
year, I finally accepted that I am a
wrestling fan. It started a couple
years ago when the New World
Order was formed. Ocassionally I
would watch as the NWO would
jump in the ring and brawl at the
end of a match. I thought it was
funny how one Wrestler Sting
would enter and beat every NWO
member out of the ring. I never
watched wrestling consistently
until earlier this year. Last
semester my friends watched
wrestling every Monday night, and
you could hear WCW Nitro or
WWF Raw playing on every TV on
the floor. I didn't realize how I was
being sucked into wrestling.
Before long 1 knew almost every
wrestlers name and move. I had
become a fan, ordering pizza and
watching wrestling like I once did
for football. I always thought
wrestling was stupid, but now I
enjoy it.
Even though I am a wrestling
fan, I have seen some things that I
don't like about the programs,
especially Raw. For those that
don't know, Raw is a two hour live
wrestling program. Last week Raw
exhibited an evening gown match
that was not suitable for network
TV. The match was between two
women, Jacyin and Sable. In order
to win this match you must tear
your opponents gown off. During
the match Sable was able to tear
Jacylns' gown. The gown stayed on
around her waist, so the match
continued. As the two continued to
wrestle Jacylns' breasts became
exposed. Jacyin struggled to cover
herself, but Sable was relentless in
her attack. Finally the gown was
ripped from Jacyin and the match
ended. As I said before Raw is a
live program on Network TV, so
viewers saw everything. After
Sable won, she decided to take her
own gown off before leaving the
ring.
Now for as long as I can
remember wrestling has been a
kids sport. When I was seven I
watched Hulk Hogan and Andre
the Giant wrestle. Wrestling came
on TV every Saturday morning. I
know kids still watch wrestling
because I see them in the stands
and wearing the t-shirts. Last
Monday might have been suitable
for me and my friends, but not for
kids who watch. I know that
wrestling caters more to an adult
following now. The programs come
on at night now rather than
Saturday mornings. I can see next
week's Raw having a TV MA
rating. The following program
contains violence, brief nudity,
adult language and adult content,
viewer discretion is advised.
They've taken wrestling away for
the kids.
Nitro is tamer than Raw. Nitro
does have some bad language
every now and then, but they seem
to police themselves well. I know
only of one nudity incident when
one of the Nitro Dancers' breast
popped out of her outfit. For the
most part WCW is pretty clean.
The WWF has always been
watched by kids. The language
being used on Raw continues to
get worse as well as the adult
themes. This year a new wrestler
was introduced, Val Venus. His
story is, he is a porn star turned
wrestler. As they hyped Val up they
would show clips of him,
supposedly on the set of his latest
movie. He always had women in
bikinis, sometimes not fully in the
bikini, hanging over or under him
as he spoke. This is wrestling on
the USA Network, not Cinemax at
midnight.
The WWF Champion, Stone
Cold Steve Austin, usually comes
out and tells wrestlers and the !
owner to go to hell. After that he j
gives them the finger and proceeds
to kick their butts. Sure I enjoy
this�I think its hilarious, but I
don't think kids should be exposed
to it all the time. I love all the trash
talking that Steve Austin uses, but
for Network it becomes excessive.
Maybe they should keep most of
the adult themes for the pay-per-
views. I would hate to see a TV
MA or parental warning before
wrestling comes on Monday night.
The way it looks now kids won't be
able to watch wrestling in the
future. I guess wrestling is for
adults now "and that is the bottom
line, cause Stone Cold said so
The candidates deserve an
opportunity to serve their
university and it's students. I
wouldn7 vote for someone
who would resort to theft,
terror and vandalism to push
fair agendas. That sounds too
mud like the Klan.
So now it's on. I was going to write
this week on how everyone should
exercise their right to vote on
Wednesday for the SGA elections.
But now I have heard of people
who have been stealing election
banners on the mall and on the
Hill, and throwing bricks through
windows that have banners on
them. I don't know who is
responsible for these acts of
stupidity, but the only reasonable
explanation is that it would be the
cronies of some candidate who
wants to be elected. So here is my
opinion of who ever did this.
First, your candidate is probably
worthless anyway. He or she didn't
have enough preparation or
initiative to actually go meet the
students, and is making a sad
attempt at keeping the opponents'
names from being known. And you
probably know that ECU students
are apathetic enough about their
involvement in the SGA elections
process that they can probably
round up a couple of their best
friends to vote for their candidate
and win.
Secondly, your candidate would
be one of those people who really
just want a resume builder. He or
she could probably care less about
the plight of the freshman living in
the un-airconditioned dorms, the
upperclassmen who struggle to
find parking everyday, or who
performs at Barefoot this
year. The person would be a
human paperweight.
Finally, I doubt that your stupid
tricks would work anyway. I have
met almost all of the candidates,
and their achievements and
commitment speak for themselves.
This isn't like high school where
the head cheerleader and the
captain of the football team always
win the elections, and nothing
ever happened.
This is important. Our SGA is
entrusted with funding the student
organizations to which so many of
us belong. That goes 'for everyone
from the Investment Club to the
Lacrosse team, and everyone in
between. The candidates deserve
an opportunity to serve their
university and it's students. I
wouldn't vote for someone who
would resort to theft, terror and
vandalism to push their agendas.
That sounds too much like the Klan.
OPINION
SULLIVAN
Columnist
Professor's crime understandable
What Cerutti did by forging
a prescription was wrong
and obviously a crime. But
when analyzing the
situation, his action must be
taken into perspective and
put into the context of his
life, his motives, and his
intended purpose with
the drug.
Write, a, Letterto the. Editor
Got something to say? Need somewhere to say it?
Bring your letter to the eastcarolinian , located on the
2nd floor of The Student Publications Building
Steven M. Cerutti, an ECU
foreign language professor, has
recently been charged with
obtaining a controlled substance
by fraud. Basically, he forged a
prescription for hydrocodone.
Cerutti s charge translates to a class
I felony.
Hydrocodone is a pain killer and
class III narcotic because of its
tendency to be highly addictive. It
is meant to be prescribed only on a
temporary basis in order to relieve
excruciating pain. Hydrocodone is
akin to pain killers such as
percocet and darvicet, but differs
because unlike percocet and
darvicet, hydrocodone most often
produces very adverse side effects
such as drowsiness, constipation
and extreme nausea. So it is
definitely not the typical pain
killer-of-choice that the
Hollywood crowd (or college
crowd) uses.
What Cerutti did by forging a
prescription was wrong and
obviously a crime. But when
. analyzing the situation, his action
must be taken into perspective
and put into the context of his life,
his motives, and his intended
purpose with the drug. In short,
Cerutti's actions should not be
simplistically viewed. He was not
trying to purchase heroin nor did
he commit an armed robbery. It is
reasonable to conclude that
Cerutti must have been in
excruciating pain if he was
compelled to keep taking a drug
that while relieving his pain, also
produced unwanted side effects
(such as nausea, etc.). Unless in
the situation, it is impossible for us
to empathize and difficult to
understand pain and the
psychology of addiction�
especially if that addiction
alleviates the pain.
I am not one that encourages
people to dodge responsibility or
redirect blame to others, but when
I researched the drug and spoke
with pharmacists it became
apparent that the patient is not in
full control of his medication. It is
very much the doctor's
responsibility to administer the
drug wisely and monitor the
patient carefully. Cerutti's action
didn't just "pop out of nowhere
There were probably some signals
and warnings of a problem�and
that is what he has�a problem.
He is not some drug-crazed
criminal in need of intense
reprimanding and probing. He is a
human being that happens to be a
professor who needs his
colleagues' and students' support,
encouragement, and
understanding. Cerutti does not
need to be crucified for a very
understandable mistake. (His mug
shot on the front of Thursday's
paper surely didn't help matters
either).
There has already been a
comparison drawn between
Clinton and Cerutti. I guess this is
because both did something
questionable pertaining to their
private lives. There are four
reasons that this is utterly
ridiculous. 1) Cerutti is not a
repeated offender. 2) Cerutti is not
lying to everyone. 3) Cerutti is riot
using his position to obstruct
justice 4) Cerutti is not the leader
of the free world, therefore, the
standards are a tad bit different.
Cerutti has an outstanding track
record at ECU because of his
renovation and rejuvenation of his
department and his excellent
rapport with students. A man with
his consistent accomplishment
and performance could not be an
incompetent drug addict. Sure, he
made a mistake, but in the course
of a lifetime who hasn't?
13-
WED
23





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5 Timdiy, September 22. 1998
comics
ALCOHOL 101
Welcome to Alcohol 101. You're at a party, meeting new
friends, learning a little about some of them and discovering
that each has brought a people-plus alcohol decision to be
made. Your host is a lava lamp named Norm (full name:
Positive Norm); one part conscience, one part attitude. His
mission in life is to get you to learn about stuff you think
you already know. Make a wrong choice and see what
happens. Not pretty. Then make a responsible decision
(most times, it's amazingly easy). Before you know what hit
you- you have learned a ton about how to take care of
yourself, and your friends.
Check it out!
Located at:
Health Promotion & Weil-Being 210 Whichard
Joyner Library Media & Resources Center
Campus Computer Labs
Mendenhall Student Center
BrewsterD214
Austin 208
White Hall
Ulmstead Hall
Aycock Hall
Let's Go
Krogering!
Caffeine Free Pie! Pepsi, Mountain Pew;
Diet Pepsi or
Pepsi Cola
2-Liter
E
ir-iJHH! W3
Swiss Rolls, Fudge Rounds or
Little Debbie
Oatmeal Pies
13-16.2-oz.
Doritos
Tortilla Chips
7.5-9-oz.
Pepperoni, Sausage or Peluxe
Mama Rosa's
Medium Pizzas
16-oz.
In The PeliPastry Shoppe
Emmbers Gourmet Roast Beef orr
Sahlen's
Smokehouse Ham
Pound
4
Kroger
Mini-Peeled
Carrots
Mb. ,
BtwOH&gtiOH&
Regular or Pun Size
Armour
Hot Pogs
Mb. Pkg.
BiwOw-yetOM
FREE?
WED 23THUR 24FRI 25SAT 26
Items & Prices Good Through September 26,1998 In
Greenville. Copyright 1998 Kroger Mid-Atlantic. We
reserve the right to limit quantities. None sold to
dealers.
1S8
TheEatl Carolinian
Four Seats Left
1WkH0J ITHINICWE auvARE
3Usr �w� in A am cm op-chess
X W�N 5vRSlM fi-CO would PlAM
Chess! onus a otMUN&e of the
BE EMEN RQAffTELV WweWlHINC
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Jason Latour
Life on Tuesday
Chris Knotts
France
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WHATWVbWiTH
Rafael Santos
5 f fg x. SAAmt-
SkkBtu a i� Mr
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Across
1 maryland
2 carcinogenic "Sweet N
3 � Mother should I trust the?"
9 "cooT or, a unit ottadiation
10 need th's toDuy t?eer
it nifty little lizard
13 Italian an patrons "de "
15 coniferous tree
16 humans of past
19 -Hey1" or. "you"
22 Bomaiis
Down
i prefix "bad"
4 Darwin's of the Species
5 Darth
6 sacred place of sleep
7 dnnk this only at ECU
8 Dig movie
12 allotted amount
13 she's friendly Jane"
14 You killed ! You BASTARDS
17 singer Rose
18 urgent
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21 Shakespeare's King
artoonists
artoonists
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GT YOUR STRIP PUBLISHED
GREAT RESUME BUILDER
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR FALL CARTOONISTS.
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I
I





�M

6Tuidiy, September 22. 1998
features
The East Carolinian
All the sleepy people
Stress, tension, anxiety
may cause sleeplessness
Erin a l o k r m a n
STAFF WRITER
One hundred and one,
one hundred and two
are counting sheep not
helping you get to sleep
anymore?
Well, maybe you
should try one of the other
not so popular methods
that some people swear
by. Ever try wiggling
your toes? According to
reflexology the feet are the master control
panel for your entire body and by wiggling
both feet 12 times together you'll stimu-
late and in turn relax your entire body.
Another interesting idea is to face sleep-
ing north. This aligns your body with the
electromagnetic field of the earth and
brings your own energies into harmony
with that of the Earth's.
James Hundley, a lab technician at Pitt
Memorial Hospital, said that there are
many different causes that could be keep-
ing you awake at night Stress, tension
and anxiety are major factors that play into
most insomnia cases.
If stress is affecting your sleep pat-
terns, Dr. Nancy Badger at Student
Health, recommends taking a stress man-
agement workshop available Wednesday
afternoons that will explore the causes
and the effects of stress and teach useful
coping skills.
"Clearing your mind before bed and
relaxing your body through muscle
stretches (may also help you get a better
night's sleep) Badger said.
One serious cause of being unable to
sleep is a condition known as obstructive
sleep apnea. This condition occurs when
tissues in the upper air way collapse du ing
sleep, preventing the person from breath-
ing for up to two minutes, and the suffer-
er must wake up for air.
The constant awakening and falling
back to sleep causes an unrcstful slumber
and may leave the person constantly
feeling tired.
Narcolepsy, a genetic disease, is a seri-
ous condition that normally occurs around
adolescence and causes the sufferer to
feel tired and in turn sleep aloe
Hundley explains that unlike most
people who go through four stages before
reaching Rapid Eye Movement (REM)
the narcolepsy sufferer goes straight from
stage one to REM causing a disturbance
in their sleep.
A lack of sleep can have many disas-
trous side effects on the mind and body.
"In order to think clearly you must
have a certain amount of sleep that
varies from person to person and
maintain a consistent sleep cycle
Badger said.
A lack of sleep may also disrupt
concentration, increase the time
it takes for your
body to react to
stimuli, make you
irritable and make
you more likely to
overreact in situa-
tions.
One serious side
effect Hundley has
seen is when people
go out for prom
night, for example,
and stay up all night and
drink and will come into the hospital hav-
ing a seizure. The alcohol works with the
sleeplessness and may cause a seizure.
Hundley would not recommend taking
a sleeping aid because many of the
over the counter drugs available are not
"clean" and could lead to a dependency
to the drug.
For a short term treatment Hundley
says that you should see yout doctor who
can prescribe a much safer drug that won't
lead to a dependency or have negative
side effects.
Prevention
-Go to bed at the same time
each day
-Get up at the same time each
day
-Get regular exercise each day
-Keep the temperature in your
bedroom comfortable
-Keep the bedroom dark enough
-Use bed only for sleep
-Take medicines only as directed
-When you go to bed, relax you
muscles, beginning with your
feet and working your way up to
your head
-Don't exercise just before going
to bed
-Don't engage in stimulating
activity just before bed
-Don't use alcohol to help you
sleep
-Don't take another persons
sleeping pills
MTV's Real World, Road Rules'
people search now underway
10 minute audition
tapes due Sept. 10
Nina M. D r v
senior writer
i Imagine yourself living in a house,
rent free, with six complete strangers
! having your life filmed for all the
! world to see. Or how about you and
'� five people participating in death
.defying missions while living and
Riding around in a Winnebago. Well,
;this could be your life if you arc one
;of the lucky 13 people chosen to be
ion MTV's docudrama hits, Real
;World and Road Rules. Yes, it's that
!time again where MTV execs open
the floor to all those interested in
itrying out for the eighth season of
Jboth shows.
"i This season's Real World will be
!peld in Honolulu, Hawaii where the
Ieven cast members will be manag-
ing a coffee houseperformance
'Jpace nearby. Meanwhile, Road
Joules is doing something a little dif-
ferent this season.
; "Road Rules has entered into an
agreement with the University of
i Pittsburgh in their Semester at Sea
i program said Drew Hoegl, casting
i supervisor for The Real World and
� Road Rules. "The six cast members
will be taking classes and their
"homework" will be their missions
they complete
The first stop for the cast on
board the S.S. Universe Explorer
will be Venezuela. Other countries
on the tentative itinerary include
Brazil, South Africa, India, China,
Vietnam and Japan.
J To participate to be in this sea-
son's Road Rules all applicants must
be between the ages of 18 and 24,
currently enrolled full time at a col-
lege or university, and must have
"completed one full semester of cred-
it with at least a 2.75 cumulative
GPA. Another good
thing is all the courses
taken while participat-
ing at the Semester at
Sea will be able to
transfer to a student's
current records.
All those who are
interested in trying out
for either show should
send in a ten minute
video about them-
selves explaining why
they should be consid-
ered for the series.
"We look for peo-
ple with strong person-
alities and point of
views Hoegl said.
"We want people
who are not afraid to
state
their opinions
Besides sending
tapes, you can also
become a potential
cast member � by
attending an open call
where you actually
speak with MTV
representatives. Open
calls will
be held in Colorado, Maryland, New
York, Illinois, California,
and Hawaii.
"Between the open calls and
taped we receive, we look at about
15,000 applicants Hoegl said.
Out of the 15,000, only 50-100
make it into the keep pile. Those
people are then interviewed by tele-
phone or interviewed by the MTV
representatives. Those who make
the best impressions are selected to
go to the semi finals. The selection
process continues until there are 25-
30 finalists. From that group, 13
people are chosen to either be on
Road Rules or The Real World.
All tapes must be turned in by
September 27,1998 with your name,
age, address, and phone number
printed on it to :
Real WorldRoad Rules 8
6007 Sepulveda Boulevard
Van Nuys, Ca 91411
College students' bodies often
in distress from lack of nutrition
The newest group from The Real World poses for a shot.
PHOTO COURTESY OF REAL WORLD HOMEPAGE
If you prefer one series over the
other, please indicate that in your
tape. All tapes will be kept
by MTV.
Being on the show is not to be
looked at as this being a way to make
your big break into show biz.
Hoegl said that cast members of
either show get recognized all over
the world, but out of eight seasons,
only two people actually went on to
a career in entertainment. He said
either show is not the best way to get
into the entertainment industry.
The best thing to get out of being on
the show in the learning experiences
you getout of it
"It's a life-changing experience
for those who get the opportunity
to be on the show Hoegl said.
"Living with five to six other
people isn't always easy to deal
with, but it's a great exper-
ience nonetheless
Eating rigfit, exemse
essential to health
I'm 11.1. ii Gil pus
STAFF WRITER
What did you have for lunch
today? Was it a salad, a sandwich,
and water? Or was it three slices
of pizza, a handful of cookies, and
two glasses of Pepsi? And how
many hours of sleep did you get
last night? Chances are that none
of us .are following the strict
health guidelines that we know
we should.
Statistics show that once stu-
dents arrive at college, they stop
taking good care of themselves.
And that combined with the stress
from midterms and the changes in
semesters results in a body in dis-
tress. But it only takes some sub-
tle changes in order to keep fit
and ensure a healthy future.
Nutrition is usually the first
thing students neglect at college.
Since students no longer have
dear, old mom around to serve a
balanced meal and remind them
to eat their vegetables, students
do not think about maintaining a
balanced diet.
Freshman Mark Melvin eats a meal purchased from a dining location in Mendenhall.
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMBER
But, it is necessary to balance
our meals for ourselves.
Remember the food pyramid
from health class? That is what we
should be using when choosing
what to eat.
This is not to say that
Domino's has to become a thing
of the past, but it does mean that
moderation must be exercised.
In an ECU Nutrition Survey
done by campus nutritionist,
Laura Hartung, more than half of
students reported that they were
eating healthy, and twelve per-
cent of students said they were
vegetarians. The results from
Freshman Michael Reese eats a meal purchased at a dining location in Mendenhall.
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMBER
this poll show that a pattern
is emerging.
"People are more concerned
about their health now than they
were in the past said Donna
Walsh, director of the Office of
Student Well-Being ami
Preventive Services. "More peo-
ple are watching what they eat
and exercising more
The Nutrition Survey also
reported that 64 of males and
54 of females exercise on a reg-
ular basis.
Most ECU students take
advantage of the Rec Center
on campus. The center offers
everything from a track, basket-
ball courts to a pool. The Rec
Center also has personal trainers,
for those who are not sure-
how to start an effective
exercise program.
With everyday pressures,
though, most students feel that
they do not have time for exer-
cise. The combination of school,
work, and social time is often
times too much.
"It's important to find a bal-
ance for ourselves Walsh said.
"Students will usually focus on
their intellectual, cateer and social
development and forget about
their health, both mental and
physical





7 Tutidiy, Sipttmbtr 22. 199
The East Carolinian
tion
netime
time each
each day
e in your
i
ark enough
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as directed
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ith your
way up to
3fore going
Lilating
i
ielp you
)rsons
ften
ition
n in Mendenhall
at a pattern
re concerned
iow than they
said Donna
the Office of
icing and
. "More pco-
hat they eat
Survey also
of males and
cise on a res-
idents take
Rec Center
:enter offers
rack, basket-
ol. The Rec
onal trainers,
e not sure
n effective
pressures,
nts feel that
me for exer-
on of school,
me is often
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Walsh said.
Ily focus on
:er and social
orget about
mental and
features
Til Eait Carolinian
covering the
at
Spukrman climbingto
top of burglars list
MIAMI (AP) � He wore shorts
and sandals to work, had a keen eye
for quality and armed himself with
little more than the upper-body
strength he developed as a former
Army paratrooper.
Nicknamed Spiderman, he
climbed luxury high-rise condo-
miniums in search of jewels, cash,
credit cards and the occasional lap-
top computer. Investigators said he
is responsible for 133 burglaries.
Police believe they have
their man.
Derrick James, 33, was arrested
and charged with one Spiderman
Watch for TECs
latest publication
A
fcti 6 Entwtainmnt Maguins of Hit Em Ciroliniin
wkamiidt
Matt Damon
Doai his
thing in
Rounders
Movie Review
burglary and is being held without
bond for breaking into the ritzy
Bristol Towers on Miami's
Brickcll Avenue. Investigators are
working to tie him to dozens of
other burglaries.
James appeared in court late
last week with a goatee and
shaved head, his muscular arms
and trim, 6-foot-plus frame
cloaked in a red jail-issue jump-
suit. Prosecutors won a request to
keep him in jiil until trial Nov. 9
after disclosing that an unidenti-
fied Miami jeweler said he paid
James $800,000 for jewels
worth 10 times that amount.
The man said his supplier told
him he scaled high rises and bur-
glarized homes to get the jewels,
assistant statewide prosecutor
Kathleen George said.
James used his agility and
incredible upper-body strength to
climb quickly, moving up from
one balcony to the next many
times without being noticed,
investigators said. He'd climb
down the same way, carrying jew-
els with him, they said.
"One slip and he would have
been history said Miami-Dade
Police Sgt. John Petri. "But he had
the strength to do what he did and
he did it very well
�f�teM wsietn h ttwrvlKCV
csptriaax abroad in a diary forma.
ojcrtts
tirfW
U
l haven't a clue where in the paper (his article will be placed, but
I'm guessing that the music section is only a page or two away.
Another thing I'm clueless about is what music is popular in
America right now, and that's not just because I'm in another
country -1 don't really pay alt that much attention to the American
music scene, no matter where I'm at. However, I'm pretty sure
that I would have heard something about a group called Mr. Big if
I were in America right how, if they were half as popular as they
are here in Japan.
Mr, Big. I'd never even heard of them before 1 came here, but
just about everyone here who likes American music seems to
know about them. The Spice Girls, Hanson and Orecn Day are all
really big hits here too figures. But as much as these bands are
popular, a lot of people haven't heard about the bands that actual-
ly were popular back a coupjeiyears ago, Live, Hootie and the
Blowfish, Phlsh, the Dave Matthews Band: very few of the bands
that made it onto G-105 in the nineties were known to any of my
friends,
l�;s weird how bands make it over here. The Cranberries are
big, but not Counting Crows, for example. Classics like Erie
Clapton, pop stars tike Michael Jackson and Madonna, eighties
stars like Bon Jovi - a good sampling of everything seems to be
popular. Yes, even disco.
Some of the more modern stuff seems to be gaining in popu-
larity, though. Ben Folds Five, a North Carolina band recently
headlined at the Fuji Rock Festival '98 in Tokyo,akmg with
Garbage, Sonic Youth and tons of other bands I can't remember
right off the top of my head.
Oh, but let's back up here. Why am I talking about American
music when I'm in Japan? Truth be told, a lot of people I know are
realty big tans about
American music. Do peo-
ple here everi understand
the lyrics? I'm not sure I
even: Understand the
words to most of the
songs, so it probably does-
n'tmatter so long as it
sounds cool.
In America. I suppose the
grunge movement is pretty popu-
lar stilt in America, but in japan
well, if you watch MTV Japan, it's
really big here too. I'm kind curi-
ous how MTV stays on (he air still,
actually, because no one I know
actually listens to the musk they
play on MTV Japan. Lots of
Japanese bands emulate American
music, and it's usually these that
end up on MTV Japan. For exam-
ple, a band called Scanch has made
a living on producing parodies of
Queen and other classic bands;
they're so close, in fact, that if it
wasn't for the later lyrics being
Japanese, I though that it actually
was Queen. Most bands are a bit
more subtle about it, though, like
B'z, whose music sounds a little
too close to Acrosmith. But then
there is bands which expand on
(he concept and make the music
truly original, like L'Arc-en-Ciel
which takes" all kinds of American
influences and makes It sound
even cooler.
Most people I know, though,
listen to a kind of music called "J-
pop" which has almost nothing to
do with anything t ever heard on
American radio. J-pop tends to
have a clear, easy-to-undefstand
vocals, usually mixed with synthe-
sized instrumental support, though
there's always exceptions of
course.
got the attitude
get the took.
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I
I
I
8 Timdiy, Sepumbtt 22, 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
Pirate football rallies to beat Ohio, 21-14
Team picks up
second victory of year
Travis Barki.ki
SENIOR UKI I in
Travis Oarden played a big role on
the Pirate side of the field this
weekend, with two sacks and
recovering two fourth quarter fum-
bles as ECU rallied to beat the
Ohio Bobcats on Saturday, 21-14.
Sophomore quarterback Bobby
Weaver was responsible for all
three Pirate touchdowns, running
for one score and throwing for two
more. For the game, Weaver com-
pleted 11 of 16 passes for 103 yards
with no interceptions.
Weaver's touchdown run got the
Pirates on the board early, ending a
12 play, 80 yard opening drive. The
touchdown was the first of
Weaver's collegiate career.
"It felt great Weaver said.
"There's always a little bit of pres-
sure until you get the ball into the
end zone
Darden was the hero for an
ECU defense that bent but never
broke against Ohio's relentless
triple option offense. The Bobcats
gained 307 total yards, 297 on the
ground, but failed to
score an offensive
touchdown. Ohio
attempted only three
passes, completing just
one for 10 yards. ECU
kept the Bobcats out of
the end zone in the first
half, holding them to
three field goal
attempts. Ohio convert-
ed two of the three, and
trailed at halftime 7-6.
Ohio took the lead in
the third quarter after
ECU freshman quarter-
back David Garrard was
stripped of the ball by
Ohio's Leigh Barbour.
Linebacker Rahim
Slaise recovered at the
ECU three yard line,
and ran it in for a touch-
down. Ohio added a two point con-
version run to make the score 14-7.
Head coach Steve Logan said
both Weaver and Garrard arc still
learning the game and will learn to
throw the ball away, instead of tak-
ing big losses on sacks.
"One of the hardest parts to
master at quarterback is learning
how to throw the ball away Logan
said. "I think with time, you will
see them do better with that
ECU tied the game on Weaver's
first touchdown pass, a 27 yard
Quarterback David Garrard started the second half for
the Pirates for the first time this season.
PHOTO BY PAT IERLAN
strike to senior tight end Buck,
Collins. After Darden's second
Fumble recovery, ECU needed only
three plays to put the ball into the
end zone. Troy Smith's 13 yard
touchdown catch came with just
1:46 left in the game, and proved to
be the game winning score.
Ohio tried to mount a comeback
on their final drive but quarterback
Matt Price had one pass batted
down and was sacked by Darden
and company three times.
Junior linebacker Jeff Kerr led
the Pirates with 13 tackles. Senior
Rod Colcman added 11 tackles,
three for losses.
Logan called the game a defen-
sive win, but said there is room to
improve before the Pirates play
conference opponent Army,
another triple option team, in two
weeks.
"We've got a base to operate
from but we've somfe technique
work to do Logan said. "We still
have people missing assignments.
I'm hoping we'll be better after
two weeks in a row
Saturday's game saw Weaver
make his debut at the halfback
position, taking a pitch from
Garrard on a reverse in the second
quarter. It marked the first time
that both Garrard and Weaver
have been on the field together.
Halfback might not be the only
new position for Weaver. The
coaching staff plans to use his
blazing speed on special teams as
well.
"I started catching some kick-
offs and punts in practice last
week Weaver said. "We'll just
see where it goes
ECU's next game will be at
home Oct. 3, where the Pirates
hope to pick up their third win
on the season against Army.
Rushing Att Yds
Jamie Wilson 6 3 4
Leonard Henry 6 2 8
Marcellus Harris .3
Bobby Weaver 12 12
Receiving Rec
Troy Smith 7
Jamie Wilson 3
Marcellus Harris
0
Buck Collins 1
Yds
70
20
27
IB
TD
1
0
11
Passing
Com
Att Yds
TD
ECUOhio
First Downs1820
Third Down Conversions7-15
4-14
Net Yards236307
Net Rushing Yards84297
Net Passing Yards15210
Comp-Att-Int15-23-0
1-3-0
Women's soccer program
earns national recognition
Team ranks tenth in
Coaches Association poll
Tracy H air r
SENIOR WRITER
The ECU women's soccer team, after
opening its season 4-0, has recently
earned merit for its achievements.
Several polls that included the National
Soccer Coaches Association of America,
conducted in the Southeast Region and
released on Sept. 14, ranked the Pirates
number 10.
In addition, the All-Tournament team
has recognized junior goalkeeper Amy
I lorton and sophomores Kim Sandhoff
and Erin Cann for their individual accom-
plishments. I lorton's playing career at
this point has set goals against the average
of 0.83, and Sandhoff, in the Delaware
Women's Soccer Classic last week, scored
off' three assists from (jnn.
The NCAA women's soccer statistics
were also released for the first time on
Sept. 15, and granted ECU, national
recognition by placing the Pitates in 19th
position for scoring offense with an aver-
age of 3.8 goals per game.
Regardless of this talent at stake, in
the first Colonial Athletic Association
game the team was defeated by the
George Mason Patriots 7-1. Sandhoff cap-
tured one goal, sent in off a pass from
freshman Amanda Duffy, but the defense
failed to prevent George Mason's eventu-
al and dramatic victory.
"In life I think it's good to be hum-
bled, and we certainly were humbled in
this game head coach Neil Roberts
said. "We had a great tournament in
Delaware, but we just didn't execute
against the opponent like we should
have, and quite frankly George Mason
did
The Pirates' overall record now stands
at 4-2 on the season and 0-1 in the CAA.
"We're in good shape now that George
Mason put it to us Roberts said. "We've
got seven more conference games plus
other season games as well, so I think our
players arc worked up for them now
The Lady Pirates are scheduled to
host competitor Virginia Commonwealth
today at 4 p.m where they will look to
pick up yet another victory and work their
way even higher in the polls.
Basketball Magic in Minges
Men's tennis sees victory
at home court tournament
Robyn Douglass Rodgers is one of only three women in the country who can spin up to ten basketballs
at one time. Rogers performed Saturday at the 3-on-3 tournament held at Minges Coliseum.
PH0T0 BY PAT IERLAN
ECU hosts Pirate
Invitational
Ian K. Swank
STAFF WRITES
The ECU men's tennis team opened the
1998 season at the Pirate Invitational on a
strong note, winning all but a single
match, over the weekend.
Under first-year head coach Tom
Morris, the Pirates responded well in the
tournament whose opponents included
Barton, Campbell, Mt. Olive, and UNC-
Wilmjngton.
Returning five of seven from last sea-
son, the Pirates looked to some familiar
faces for support in their season opener.
Seniors Roope Kalajo, who split time
at the top two positions last season, and
veteran Kenny Kirby paced a balanced
attack for the Pirates. Kalajo won his first
two matches, defeating Jay Davis of Mt.
Olive 6-4, 6-1 and Todd Weinstein of
UNCW 6-2, 6-2, before coming up short
against Barton's All-American Troy
Robinson 6-4, 7-6,(7-2).
Kirby showed similar style,
also winning against his first two
opponents with impressive victo-
ries over Kyle Matthews of Mt.
Olive 6-0, 6-0, Paul Cruess of
UNCW 6-1, 6-1.
In other singles competition
seniors Stephen Siebenbrunner,
Derek Slate, and sophomore
Oliver Thalen all put forth solid
contributions, remaining unde-
feated for the tournament.
In doubles action, the No. 1
duo of Kalajo and Kirby showed
their experience by staging a
comeback to win 8-6 after trail-
ing 5-6 to Barton's Dominic
Laflamme and Robinson.
Pirate sophomore Micheal
Huez and Siebenbrunner swept
their three matches in the No. 2
flight, managing only to lose a
total of three games in the match.
"We got into a great rythum Huez
said. "Coach Morris enforces condition-
ing and discipline to get us prepared for
each match, and it shows
ECU finished the tournament with 26
wins, accumulating 17 in singles and nine
Shannon to remain on
injured list this season
Former Pirate to sit out entire
rookie season
Roope Kalajo and his partner, Kenny Kirby won the No. 1
singles match with an 8-6 comeback after trailing 5-6.
PHOTO �1 PAT IERLAN
in doubles competition.
UNCW had a total of 13 wins, fol-
lowed by Barton with seven and Mt.
Olive with five.
The Pirates return to action again on
Oct. 2-4 at the N.C. State Invitational.
Jim P h b i. p s
SENIOR WRITER
ECU's all-time touchdown reception
leader and third round draft pick by
the Miami Dolphins, Larry Shannon,
has been out of commission for a knee
injury.
Suffering the injury during a team
practice session before the regular sea-
son began, Shannon has remained on
the Dolphins' injured reserve list and will
be out for the entire season.
Shannon has been working with the
Dolphins' trainers in order to rehabilitate his
knee for a successful comeback in the near
future.
"Larry is doing an excellent job with his
rehabilitation. He is seven weeks into the
process and should be jogging within the next
month said Ryan Vermillion, Miami
Dolphins director of rehabilitation.
Shannon has impressed the Dolphins' staff
with his attitude and hard work.
"Larry is really a great kid and has come in
with a tremendous attitude and worked hard at
rehabilitating his knee Vermillion said.
The Miami Dolphins
start their first mini-camp in
April where they expect
Shannon to be ready to par-
ticipate and be a big contrib-
utor to the team.
Shannon finished his four
year career as a Pirate with a
total of 21 receptions and
was the most recent ECU I
football player to be selected
in the NFL draft.
During his senior season at
ECU, Shannon suffered an
ankle injury that kept him out
of action for the Pirates for several games.
In the past. Shannon has proven to be a
tough competitor and seems to always over-
come these physical obstacles. The Miami
Dolphins arc looking forward to having him
participate and contribute much to their orga-
nization come April.
Larry Shannon
FILE PHOTO
9 Tuudiy
M.
Teamb
victory
Mario
sei
After droppir
this season, t
team is back
defeated Col
as part of
RichmondNi
On Friday,
to register the
son when st
Nick Errato
Army-Cadets
half after bei
half.
According
Will Wiberg,
much better I
the second li
Saturday's gar
"Our bigge
was that we (
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said.
According
needed to chi
putting Wyat
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and will be ou
well as Denoo
ankle injury. A
to the injury
against Colgate
ECU's deft
Colgate game.
1
i
?






? Tundiy, Sipumoar 22, 18S8
sports
Till Eatt Carolinian
Men s soccer gains confidence UFtAllt
with win at Nike Challenge
Team brings home 1-0
victory over Colgate
Mario S c: h k r h a i: f b h
SENIOR WRITER
After dropping four straight games
this season, the ECU men's soccer
team is back on track after they
defeated Colgate 1-0 on Saturday,
as part of the University of
RichmondNike Challenge Cup.
On Friday, the Pirates managed
to register their first goal of this sea-
son when sophomore midfielder
Nick Errato scored against the
Army-Cadets early in the second
half after being down 3-0 at the
half.
According to ECU Head Coach
Will Wiberg, the Pirates played a
much better second half and took
the second half momentum into
Saturday's game against Colgate.
"Our biggest problem on Friday
was that we didn't mark well and
our new system of playing did not
work out immediately Wiberg
said.
According to Wiberg, the team
needed to change its system after
putting Wyatt Panos and Brian
Denoo on their injured list, two
starting midfielders for the Pirates.
Panos broke two bones in his wrist
and will be out for quite a while as
well as Denoo, who is suffering an
ankle injury. A. J. Gray was added
to the injury list after the game
against Colgate.
ECU's defense dominated the
Colgate game. ECU was outshot by
game winner came from
ECU defender Brett
Waxer, who headed in a
free kick by junior Brian
Tylor.
"Our defense played
outstanding, especially
in the end of the Colgate
game, when they kept
rallying at our goal
ECU forward Scott
Pokorney said. "Our
backbone right now is
our defense with Sean
Hawley, Waxer, Ben
Brand, Bryan Lamartin,
and Matt DeStefano
ECU's biggest defen-
sive contribution for the
win was probably made
by freshman goalkeeper
DeStefano. He started
his first Collegiate game
for the Pirates with six
saves and with the team's
first shutout of the year.
DeStefano split time
in goal with junior Dino
Stambolitis on Friday's
game against Army. Each
keeper played one half
and had three saves.
"Mart's DeStefano
performance was out-
standing, especially at
the Saturday game,
when he had some strong saves
against Colgate Stambolitis said.
Center midfielder Waxer,
sweeper Sean Hawley, and
DeStefano made the All-
Tournament team, and additionally
Errato and Tylor both made great
contributions offensively on
Saturday.
The Pirates' main goal now is to
Scott
LaFevers attempts to steal the ball from his opponent during a recent soccer match.
PHOTO Br PAT IERUN
"The way we played Colgate is
how we expected to play this sea-
son and we hope to continue to play
that well Stambolitis said.
The Pirates will be in action on
Saturday, Sept. 26 at 2 p.m when
they travel to James Madison for its
first conference game of the sea-
son.
"We know now that we can
basically beat anybody because we
gained our confidence back
Pokorney said.
According to Wiberg, the team
deserved the victory, because they
came so close so many times
throughout the season.
"We kept believing in ourselves
and all the hard work finally paid
of Wiberg said.
"The Undefeated Best
Music in OrnH.Tiw,
-Greenville Times
vvArVW.crttic-nightclub.com
ATTIC
Taxes could be raised
in support of E Center
construction
WEST VALLEY CITY, Utah
(AP) The "E" in the E Center
could stand for exceed as in
exceeding expectations.
Critics said the city could not
build the $58 million, 10,500-seat
arena without raising taxes. But
income for the first year is even bet-
ter than forecast, with a projected
$413,580 revenue surplus.
By its first birthday on Tuesday
the arena will have seen 300,000
hockey fans crowd inside, 17 con-
certs roll through, as well as profes-
sional wrestling, ice shows, high
school graduations and a Polynesian
festival.
"We provided an opportunity for
everyone in the valley to come to
the E Center says Kevin Bruder,
general manager of Centennial
Management, which runs the facili-
ty-
A concert promotion trade maga-
zine listed the E Center as eighth in
the country in the top 10 U.S. con-
cert venues with a capacity of
10,001 to 15,000.
E Center-goers drank 30,000 gal-
lons of soda and ate 20,000 pounds
of hot dogs and 60,000 pretzels,
according to the city's Community
and Government Relations Office.
"We're pleased with our first
year's learning experience says
Councilman Russ Brooks. "We
understand you have to go through
heartache and changes for improve-
ment. It's only going to get better
The arena has already vitalized
West Valley City's new downtown,
attracting the $8 million Hale
Center Theatre, six inns, a handful
of restaurants and an entertainment
complex with movies theaters,
miniature golf and in-line skating to
a formerly barren plot of land.
The seeds for the center were
sown in 1995, when city leaders
approached the then-Denver
Grizzlies hockey team about mov-
ing to Utah. Based on the Grizzlies
commitment, the city persuaded
Olympic organizers to spend $7
million to build an Olympic hockey
venue.
With that money, $34 million
from a lease-revenue bond, a $7
million Redevelopment Agency
bond for a parking lot, a $5 million
loan from the city, and a $7 million
bond to serve until the Olympic
money comes through, the E
Center was built.
The city vowed to repay the
debt without raising property taxes
or taping the general city funds.
Instead planners hoped to use E
Center-related rent and parking
fees, along with ticket, sales and
hotel-room taxes.
The center's main tenant, the
Utah Grizzlies, are delighted with
their new home.
"When you lease a house and
have a landlord and then you buy
your own home, it's like comparing
apples and oranges says Grizzlies
President Tim Mouscr. "We see
equity now, revenues. This is our
bat and ball
The Grizzlies lost money while
renting the Delta Center in the
team's first two years in Utah, and
Mouscr said it could still take a few
years to compensate for those losses.
In its first year the center has
earned more than $1.3 million, con-
siderably more than the projected
$940,600.
That is a pleasant surprise to city
Finance Director Russell
Sanderson, who said the city
expected a shortfall in the first few
years while the center got up and
running.
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10 Tuesday. September 22, 1998
classifieds
The East Carolinian
FOR RENT
FOR SALE
HELP WANTED
GREEK PERSONALS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
FULLY FURNISHED fairly inexpen-
sive two bedroom, 2.5 bath two
story apartment on ECU bus line,
open in Nov. Call 758-8249 ASAP.
ECU AREA two and three bedroom
houses. All with central heat and
some type of AC. Two with fenced
yards. Pets OK. Yard work included.
830-9502
WILDWOOD VILLA, washerdryer,
dishwasher, 3 story. Call 752-8900
or 252-332-6783. Very affordable
and spacious.
WANTED: SOMEONE to sublease
an efficiency apartment in Ringgold
Towers ASAP. Fully furnished,
$288mo. For more info, call 931-
9097.
WILSON ACRES Apartments. Avail-
able in September. 3 bedroom, 1
12 baths, water, sewer, and cable
included. Also includes draperies,
ceiling fans, appliances, and wash-
erdryer connections. Energy effi-
cient, heat pump and thermopane
windows. $700. Call 752-0277.
THREE OR Four bedroom, two bath,
spacious home block from campus
and downtown. Available November
1st. No pets. Great opportunity. 355-
5655 or 355-6416.
CONDO FOR rent - 4 bedrooms, 2
12 baths, newly refurbished, dish-
washer, washerdryer hook-up. Con-
tact Libby 752-1899 (day) 561-2203
pager (night).
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
three bedroom house outside of
town. $200 month plus 13 of utili-
ties. Call 413-0974 for details.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. Townhouse
behind Carolina East Mall $300, in-
cludes rent, utilities, phone. Mature
female student or graduate student.
353-4273.
ROOMMATE NEEDED prefer fe-
male to share 3 bedroom house, lo-
cated 1 block from Rec center. Big
room, $175 plus 13 utilities. Please
call 931-9015 ask for KatyStepha-
nie.
ROOMMATE NEEDED - available
right now, downtown apartment,
must see to appreciate,
$237.50month. Call 757-0812.
RESPONSIBLE ROOMMATE want-
ed 4 nice 3 BR duplex. Fenced in
backyard, wd, central heatair, dish-
washer. Close to campus and down-
town! Call Steve or Brad @ 830-6921
SEEKING FEMALE graduate or up-
perclassmen to share nice 2 BR 2
bath apt. 12 rentand 12 utilities.
Please cali for more info, 439-0230.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 2 bedroom apartment off 1st
Street, $187.50 plus 12 electric,
12 phone, free water, sewer, basic
cable. Smokers OK. WD connec-
tions. 757-9640.
ROOMMATES WANTED to share a
spacious 5 bedroom furnished
house across from Art Building, right
next to downtown on 5th Street.
Fenced in backyard, wd, central
heatair, two full baths, etc. Rent is
$185 a month (no deposit needed)
plus a portion of utilityphonecable.
If interested, please call @ 830-4768.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP. $183
plus 13 everything, close to ECU,
WD, no dogs. Call SamAnnie. 758-
3274.
MF ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share 2 bedroom apt. off campus.
Nice apt. $195 month 12 utilities.
Call Steph at 321-7298.
FOR SALE
GOLF CLUBS for sale: King Cobra II
copies, like new, $200 OBO; King
Cobra driver $120 OBO. Call Moore
at 758-9473
MX-6 1993 Spoiler, power sunroof.
4 cylinder automatic, white, excel-
lent condition. $7,500. 355-2852.
AAAA EARLY Specials! Panama
City! Room with kitchen $1291 In-
cludes 7 free parties! Daytona149!
New Hotspot-South Beach1291 Co-
coa Beach $149! springbreaktrav
el.com 1-800-678-6386
IMMACULATE 1987 Mazda pickup
with camper top, AC, five speed, CD.
Gold colored, 100-K miles. Very nice
throughout! $3995 OBO. Call Rusty
� 355-3620
MONGOOSE HILLTOPPER SX
mountain bike. 1 year old, excellent
condition, paid $689.00. sell for
$350.00. 355-6161.
Dapper
Dan's
Retro and Vintage Clothing,
Handmade Silver
Jewelry k More.
417 Evans St. Mall 752-1750
Dim ii from (iilihics h.uk (lour
MUST GET rid of matching couch
and chair. Off white with taupe
stripe, good condition, $200. Call
Ashley.or Anna 561-7367.
MICROSOFT OFFICE 97 CD, full
version, includes: Word. Excel, Pow-
erPoint, Access, Outlook. New and
still in wrapper. Only $100. Call
Richard at 758-8842.
ONE YEAR old wood dinner table
with four matching chairs. $100.
Call 439-0323.
FOOSBALL TABLE for sale, excel-
lent condition, two years old. $275
or best offer. Contact Colin @ 830-
0436,
AAAA! EARLY Spring Break Spe-
cials! Bahamas Party Cruise! 6 days
$279! Includes most meals! Awe-
some beaches, nightlife! Departs
from Florida! 1998 BBB AwardWin-
ner! springbreaktravel.com 1-800-
678-6386
AAAA! SPRING Break Travel was
1 of 6 small businesses in the US
recognized by Better Business Bu-
reaus for outstanding ethics in the
marketplace! springbreaktravel.com
1-800-678-6386
AAAA1 EARLY Specials! Cancun
& Jamaica! 7 nights air and hotel
from $399! Includes free food,
drinks, parties! 1998 Better Business
Bureau AwardWinner! springbreak-
travel.com 1-800-678-6386
LARGE CAPACITY washer and dry-
er for sale. Slightly used, 3 weeks
old. $600 negotiable. 757-9640.
SERVICES
NAIL SERVICES - acrylics $35 set.
fills $20, manicures $10. Licensed
manicurist. Abracadabra Nails, con-
veniently located near campus. Call
757-9640 for an appointment.
HELP WANTED
LIVE RECORDS Hottest Independ-
ent Label and Recording Studio and
Record Store coming soon! 4th and
Evans St.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
0919)496-2114
MATH AND Science tutoring avail-
able. Don't go through college not
understanding your courses. Call
551-1063 and ask for Maurice.
BABYSITTER NEEDED - Christian
sitter needed for nine year old. After
school assistance with homework,
etc. University area. For more info,
call 752-9151.
PERFECT PART-TIME job for a
teacher. Positive environment offer-
ing individualized instruction. Possi-
ble hours Monday-Thursday (3:30-
8:30) Certification required. Send re-
sume or pick up application at Syl-
van Learning Center, 2428 S. Charles
Blvd Greenville. NC 27858.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT - Fishing
industry. Excellent student earnings
& benefits potential (up to
$2.850mo. RoomBoard). All
skill levels. Don't pay outrageous
agency fees! Ask us how! 517-336-
4171 ext. A53621
KIND, PATIENT and loving sitter
needed for Monday through Thurs-
day (1PM to 6PM) to care for three
boys, ages 6. 4 and 1. Must enjoy
playing with and reading to children.
Please call 355-7238.
THE WINTERVILLE Recreation is
looking for Soccer CoachesRefer-
ees. If you are interested in coaching
as well as refereeing soccer games
for ages 6-8 and 9-12, then contact
Jay Johnson at 756-2221, ext. 6.
PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR needed
to provide individualized instruction
in a positive learning environment.
Possible hours Monday-Thursday
(3:30-8:30). Individual must be com-
petent in the areas of literature and
SATcollege prep. Pick up applica-
tion at Sylvan Learning Center, 2428
S. Charles Blvd Greenville. NC
EARN WHILE YOU learn, up to
$1,000.00 wk. Day and night
shifts. Clean, secure working at-
mosphere. Playmates Adult En-
tertainment. 252-747-7686 for in-
terview.
CRUISE SHIP Employment - Work-
ers earn up to $2.000month
(wtips & benefits). World Travel!
Land-Tour jobs up to $5,000-
$7,000summer. Ask us how! 517-
336-4235 Ext. C53621
NOW HIRING exotic dancers, sing-
ing telegrams, and adult entertain-
ers. You must be at least 18 yrs
drug free, own transportation and
phone. Up to$ 1,500 weekly. Call
758-2737. ,
KIND SITTER Needed for two girls,
ages 5 and 6. Monday-Friday 2:25-
5:30p.m. Pick-up, reading and play-
ing with children. Piano knowledge a
plus. 756-5533 after 6p.m.
$1250 FUNDRAISER credit card
fundraiser for student organizations.
You've seen other groups doings it,
now it's your turn. One week is all it
takes. No gimmicks, no tricks, no ob-
ligation. Call for information today. 1-
800-932-0528 x 65. www.ocmcon-
cepts.com
ABSOLUTE SPRING Break "Take
2" 2 Free Trips on Only 15 Sales
andEarn $$$$. Jamaica, Cancun,
Bahamas, Florida, Padre! lowest Pric-
es! Free Meals, Parties & Drinks.
"Limited Offer 1-800-426-
7710www.sunsplashtours.com
AFTERNOON WORK M-F 2PM-
5PM $5HR to babysit two children
ages 8 and 10 Call Janet or Steve
Porter for details, 756-8523 or 551-
1494
GREEK PERSONALS
GREAT JOB flag football team.
Keep up the good work. Love, the
sisters and new members of Alpha
Xi Delta
CONGRATULATIONS TO Audra
Kennedy for winning 2nd place in
the bikini contest last Thursday!
Love, your Delta Zeta sisters
THE SISTERS of Pi Delta wish to
welcome our newest members:
Myra Barnes, Tammy Burleett, Crys-
tal Cross, Heather Geotz, Mindy
Hines, Tori Johnson, Kristen Lee,
Lindsey Mapes, Laura McCollum,
Angela Ridings, Jennifer Rich, and
Kristin Scroggin. Good luck Xi
Pledge Class! We love you, the sis-
ters.
TO THE brothers of Tau Kappa Epsi-
lon: What can we say? The social
Thursday was awesome! Your togas
were great and they were even bet-
ter after the mudslides. We loved
your outfits under the togas! you
guys always know how to show us
the best time! We love you, the sis-
ters and new members of Pi Delta
CONGRATULATIONS TO the new
members of Delta Zeta: Sara Boyd,
Karen Cobun, Betsy Funke, Mary
Beth Hancock, Jessica Harris. Elaine
Hinton, Chrissy Holt, Colleen How-
ard, Heather Keith, Amanda Jordan,
Chrissy Mims. Whitney Owens, Jen-
nifer Roberson. Jenny Simmons, Eliz-
abeth Tempie, Jessica Tipsord, Alli-
son Turnbaugh, and Kathleen Wick-
ersty. We love you guys!
TO THE Pi Delta new members: you
guys did a super job searching for
clues last Wednesday night. Remem-
ber that unity is always the key!
Love, the sisters.
KAPPA ALPHA - We had a wonder-
ful time at our social! Can't wait to
do it again. Love, the sisters and new
members of Alpha Omicron Pi!
DELTA ZETA would like to recog-
nize the School of Business for their
outstanding dedication and contribu-
tion to East Carolina
PI DELTA would like to thank sisters
Anne Lucas and Rachel Kirk for the
use of their apartment for sorority
activities during the past month. We
just can't get enough of Player's
Club! Love, your sisters
WAY TO go Pi Delta new members,
on the terrific banner you made for
the first home football game, it
looked great! Love, the sisters
ALPHA XI Delta, we had a blast at
the volleyball game. Good luck the
rest of the season! Love, the sisters
and new members of Alpha Omicron
Pi!
UNDSAY MUELLER, CarIa M Jen-
nifer Marks, Andrea Sinko, and Dia-
na Kimmel, we hope you have a ter-
rific week! Love, your Gamma Sigma
Sigma big sisters
GAMMA SIGMA Sigma big sisters:
Thanks for the cookout and the
cards. You guys are the best! We
love you! The Pledges of Gamma Sig-
ma Sigma
SIGMA PHI Epsilon. Pi Kappa Phi.
and Chi Omega, we had a great time
at the social last Thursday! Thanks
for everything. Love, Alpha Delta Pi
ZETA, THANKS for adopting us as
your Fraternity of the Week. Sincere-
ly, from the Assistant to the Assistant
of the Vice Chair of Delta Sigma Phi.
CONGRATULATIONS TO the Al-
pha Xi Delta volleyball team for their
win over Alpha Omicron Pi. Love, sis-
ters and new members of Alpha Xi
Delta
TO THE brothers of Kappa Sigma:
Anything for money, you said was
the game, which eventually led to
fortune and fame. Pink undies and a
sax. that was quite a show, many,
many kisses and sucking a toe. The
prize was a crown at the end of the
night, thanks for a good time, you
guys party right. Let's do it again
soon. Love, the sisters and new
members of Delta Zeta
ALPHA DELTA PI- We are so glad
you are our sister sorority! Can't wait
to get together. Love, the sisters and
new members of Alpha Omicron Pi!
TO THE brothers of Pi Lambda Phi:
This is a little late, but thank you so
much for hosting our Pref Night. You
showed us a great time as usual! We
really loved those Hawaiian shirts!
You guys are great Love, the sisters
and new members of Pi Delta
JENNIFER MARKS, tomorrow
marks a very special day for you! Be
sure to make your 18th birthday one
that you'll always remember, and
look for a "special delivery Happy
Birthday! Love, your Gamma Sigma
Sigma big sister
ALPHA DELTA Pi congratulations
on winning your flag football game
against Zeta Tau Alpha. You are off
to a great start. Keep up the good
work!
PHI KAPPA TAU. thank you for the
social Thursday night. We had a
blast! Can't wait till next time! Love,
the sisters and new members of Sig-
ma Sigma Sigma
PERSONALS
THANK YOU to the girls in Village
Green Apartments for finding my
cat. Rhapsody. I appreciate everyone
who called or kept a look our for her.
OTHER
FREE CASH GRANTSI College
scholarships. Business. Medical
bills. Never repay. Toll free 1-800-
218-9000, ext. G-3726.
SPRING BREAK - Plan Now! Can-
cun. Jamaica, Mazatlan, & S. Padre.
Early bird savings until Oct. 31st.
America's best prices & packages.
Campus sales reps wanted. Earn
free trips cash. 1.800.SURFS.UP
www.studentexpress.com
SPRING BREAK 99! Cancun Nas-
sau ' Jamaica "Mazatlan Acapulco
Bahamas Cruise ' Florida' Florida
South Padre. Travel Free and make
lots of Cash! Top reps are offered
full-time staff jobs. Lowest price
Guaranteed. Call now for details!
www.classtravel.com 800838-6411
GOV'T. FORECLOSED HOMES
from pennies on $1. Delinquent tax,
repo's. REO's. Your area. Toll Free 1-
800-218-9000 ext. H-3726 for cur-
rent listings.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175. Porsch-
es, Cadillacs. Chevys, BMWs, Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps. 4WDs. Your
area. Toll free 1-800-218-9000. ext.
A-3726.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
TEST YOURSELF There will be a
two day climbing trip to Linville
Gorge, North Caroline, October 2-4.
Challenge the unrivaled beauty of
this gorge with multi pitch and top
rope climbing. Prior experience in
(indooroutdoor) climbing is recom-
mended. Registration deadline is
September 25th, 5p.m. Member
cost is $59. For further information,
contact Adventure Program-
mingDept. of Recreational Services
@ 328-6387.
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION Work-
shop Tuesday 11 A.M. The Center
for Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering the following work-
shop on September 22nd. If you are
interested in this program, contact
the Center at 328-6661.
ONE DAY Left! Get your free ticket
for The Circle of Innovation at the
Central Ticket Office. It's Free, so you
would be silly not to go. Only 90
Free student tickets available.
STRESS MANAGEMENT work-
shop: Wednesday 3:30-4:30. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop on September 23rd. If
you are interested in this workshop,
contact the Center at 328-6661.
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION Work-
shop: Wednesday 11:00-12:00. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop on September 23rd. If
you are interested in this workshop,
contact the Center at 328-6661.
ATTENTION! ADULT STUDENT
Association. The ASA will be having
their 1st meeting on September 22,
1998 from 4 p.m 5:15 p.m. at Men-
denhall Student Center Room 212.
Call the A.S.A Office for more infor-
mation, 328-6882. (This association
is for All adult students age 24 and
older.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED The Bone
Marrow Foundation, Inc a nonprofit
organization established to assist pa-
tients and families financially, is look-
ing for volunteers to help with fund-
raisers, advertising, mailing, etc. If
you are a devoted, hard working in-
dividual who is interested in doing
something for a worthwhile cause,
please give us a call, Marlene Ander-
son, 756-7297 or 328-6401. You
could help make a difference
HANG GLIDE at Kitty Hawk. NCI!
Learn from the pros as you fly over
the dunes at Jockey's Ridge State
Park, Oct. 4th. This is a classic North
Carolina experience. Register by
Sept. 26th. Member cost is $80. For
further information, call Adventure
ProgrammingDept. of Recreational
Services @ 328-6387.
GOLDEN KEY National Honor So-
ciety will meet today in GCB Room
1003 at 5:30. Please join us.
WIFFLEBALL REGISTRATION
Meeting: It's new with intramurals
this year, so obviously no experience
is needed Just make sure that you
attend the registration meeting on
Tues. Sept. 29th in MSC Room 244
at 5 p.m. Men's, Women's and Co-
rec teams are welcome.
ADULT SWIM: Beginning lessons
personalized to help meet individual
goals. Classes at the SRC on Tues. 8
Thurs. nights at 7 p.m. Registration
ends 928. Call 328-6387 for details.
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
Workshop: Wednesday 11:00-12:00.
The Center for Counseling and Stud-
ent Development is offering the fol-
lowing workshop on September
23rd. If you are interested in this
workshop, contact the Center at
328-6661.
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS MINIS-
TRY meets each Tuesday 6-8 p.m. at
First Presbyterian on the corner of
14th & Elm Streets. Join us for din-
ner and a program. For info, or a ride
call Kim @ 752-8758 or 3m�broad-
cast.net.
ASK-A-TRAINER: Recreational Serv-
ices Personal Training Staff will be
available for a Free Question & An-
swer session Sept. 29 at 5:30 in the
SRC classroom. Come separate fact
from fiction, and get some free help-
ful hints on improving your workouts!
LEARN MAP and compass basics!
On Oct. 6th, an hour long class will
be held to introduce you the the
world of back-country travel. Learn
USGS maps and symbols in con-
junction with a compass. Register by
Sept. 30th. Member cost is $5. Call
Adventure ProgrammingDept. of
Recreational Services @ 328-6387.
FRESHMAN FOCUS: It's back! Last
chance for all the students new to
ECU to get free into Recreational
Services and the SRC! Class is Free,
with give-aways and coupons to se-
lected participants. Sept. 22 � 7
p.m. at the SRC classroom.
STUDY SKILLS Workshop: Tuesday
11:00-12:00. The Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development is of-
fering the following workshop on
September 22nd. If you are interest-
ed in this workshop, contact the
Center at 328-6661.
Busy optometric practice needs individual
to do clerical duties and patient recall,
Monday through Friday from late afternoon to
early evening hours. Duties also include chart purging
and record storage. Candidate must have excellent verbal
and telephone skills. Send resume or apply in person to:
-� . . �. OD 2573 Stantonsburg Road
DocforsVisionCenter pa Greenviiie, nc 27858
Attn. Robin Humphries
(252)752-2171
The East Carolinian classifieds
.$4.00
.$2.00
OPEN LINE AD RATE . .
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 5f each
STUDENT LINE AD RATE
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 5t each
Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to refuse fhis rate for any ad deemed to be
non-student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE .$1.00
add to above line rate for either
bold or ALL CAPS type.
All classified ads placed by individuals or campus
groups must be prepaid. Classified ads placed by a business
must be prepaid unless credit has been established.
Cancelled ads can be removed from the paper if
notification is made before the deadline, but no cash refunds
are given.
The Personals section of the classifieds is intended for
non-commercial communication placed by individuals or
campus groups. Business ads will not be placed in this sec-
tion.
All Personals are subject to editing for indecent or
inflammatory language as determined by the editors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADUNE
4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue





BHH
The East Carolinian
EMENTS
REGISTRATION
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ition meeting on
MSC Room 244
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TRAINING
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asday 6-8 p.m. at
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For info, or a ride
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29 at 5:30 in the
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is @ 328-6387.
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The Kramer Reality Road Show!
Kenny Kramer, the manic inspiration behind Seinfeld's
"Cosmo Kramer takes you on a hysterical multi-media
voyage through what's actual, what's factual, and what's
fantasy in the Seinfeld universe

� � i � � �
� �
� �
8:00 p.m. Tuesday,
September 22,1998
Wright Auditorium
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
Advanced ECU student ticket: $3
AD other advanced tickets: $6
All tickets at the doon $8
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union
Special Events and Lecture Committees

For additional information contact the Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Center, East Carolina University, Greenville NC
27858 -4353; or call 252 328 - 4788, toll free at 1 800 ECU - ARTS, or TDD 252 328 - 4736, 8:30 am - 6 pm, Monday - Friday.
Individuals who require accommodations under ADA should contact the Department for Disability Support Services at 252 328 - 4802 (voicaTOD) fbrty-aight hour prior to the start of the






I
I
How to
Throw a Party!
Going to social events and having fun is a big part of college life. Often, the
fondest remembrances of college are the times you spend with your friends
and the activities you do together. Having parties with friends is a downright
time-honored tradition. Celebrations and parties enhance our relationships
with others and also give us an opportunity to meet new people.
The serving of beer, wine, and other alcoholic beverages is traditionally tied to
celebrations in our culture. For most individuals, the responsible consumption
of alcohol is something learned so that we may enhance the social event
without experiencing harm. Hosts of parties play a key role in ensuring that
the experience is a positive one for all guests and in reducing the risk of harm.
To assist in responsible hospitality (and minimize the potential for harmful and
related legal risks) the following suggestions are offered:
Offer alternative, creative non-alcoholic beverages for guests who choose to
abstain from beer, wine, or spirits.
Create a theme and fun activities. Do not make drinking the focus of the
event. Do not allow drinking games.
Discourage intoxication. Limit guests to one drink per bar visit and
discourage "self- service Avoid a punch bowl that can be tampered with and
spiked with alcohol or illicit drugs. Do not serve alcohol to intoxicated guests.
Have sober monitors available to monitor the guests and offer assistance.
Make special arrangements for underage guests. Require proof of age for
access to alcohol and provide plenty of alternative beverages.
Provide safe transportation home after the party as needed.
Provide food to both complement the celebrations theme and to slow the
absorption of alcohol.
If you have any questions about strategies to host a safer event, or would like
more information on this subject, contact The Center for Counseling and
Student Development at 328-6661.
The Secret Epidemic
The symptoms of the epidemic are quite diverse. Memories can vary from
vague recollections of something that makes you uncomfortable to intrusive,
recurrent, and disturbing memories of sexual abuse from a specific individual.
Self-esteem can feel damaged with feelings of shame or guilt being prominent.
Fears of intimacy, difficulties with vulnerability, persistent anger, or even
themes of promiscuity may make loving relationships next to impossible.
Depression, mood swings, eating disorders, and many other psychological
difficulties are also commonly found in people with sexual abuse histories.
The list of examples or characteristics of symptoms of sexual abuse is a long
one. But what people in this epidemic most often share is the experience of
knowing something that feels too bad or shameful to be told to others.
So what do you do if you're one of the people affected by this epidemic?
You find the courage to tell someonea close friend, a roommate, a lover, a
parentor someone you feel you can trust. And you let the healing begin.
You might also want to get some professional help. Sometimes the issues are
too complex to get through on your own. One option is to consider participating
in a group where other people struggling with similar issues are able to offer
support and understanding within a safe and confidential setting.
This Fall, Student Health and the Center for Counseling and Student
Development are offering a support group for students who have been sexually
abused. If you would like further information, please call 328-6795 or 328-6661.
As campus Mb runs along each day, photogra-
phers wtti be out and about to capture us, the
students, at our best If you can identity yoursett
In any of our pictures, present yourself to MSC
109 (Student Leadership) and point "you" out to
the staff there. Rewards wfH be on hand for your
efforts, so keep a close eye on these pictures!
Joe Student's Campus
Safety Tips
Even though ECU is a relatively safe campus, following these tips can help you to avoid potential problems:
Always lock the door to your room, even if you will only be gone for a minute.
Use the peephole and do not open your door to any suspicious looking individual.
Do not let strangers into the residence halls. Residents will have keys to enter the building.
Do not walk alone at night.
Know the locations of blue light emergency phones.
If you choose to drink alcohol, drink in moderation. This will help you to avoid situations in
which you might be injured or assaulted.
Do not operate a car, bicycle, skateboard, or in-line skates under the influence of alcohol.
Keep car doors locked and check on your car periodically throughout the week.
Bicycles should be registered with the ECU Police and secured using a bar lock.
Do not leave textbooks unattended, even to save a table, or while you run to greet someone.
Avoid using headphones while jogging. Remain alert to traffic and others around you.
Be aware of your surroundings while using an ATM.
For additional tips and services, contact the ECU Police at 328-6787.
There was this party and you had way too
much to drink and messed up; big time.
You'd give anything to start over. Okay!
hit start over!
Sound strange? Well, with Alcohol 101, a new state-of-the-art interactive CD-ROM program, you
can start over. Alcohol 101 uses interactive video, audio, graphics, and text to explore key issues
often associated with alcohol misuse including unwantedunplanned sex, alcohol overdose, and
drunk driving.
When you start the program, you go to the Party and meet Norm, the talking lava lamp. He
guides you first to the "Virtual Bar" where you can select drinks and the speed you'll drink them
(sip, drink or slam). You can see how your BAC (blood alcohol content) changes related to how
much you drink and how quickly you drink them. You can also check how the same amount of
alcohol affects your "friends" at the party.
Besides learning how alcohol affects you physiologically and psychologically, you also can interact
with others at the party and deal with real life situations associated with drunk driving, unsafe sex,
and alcohol overdose. Visiting the Reality Wall, the Rave Room, or answering Norm's 20 ques-
tions can keep any one busy at this party. But the hope is that you will learn something that will
help you or a friend the next time they have to make choices.
Want to go to the party? Just visit any of the locations listed below, and tell
them you want to party with Norm. For further information, contact the office
of Health Promotion and Well-Being, 210 Whichard, 328-6793.
Meet Norm at:
Health Promotion and Well-Being, 210 Whichard
or the Computer Labs in:
Mendenhall Student Center;
Brewster,
Residence Halls;
Austin.
I





�I
Arts & Entertainment Magazine of The East
�ast Carolinian m m
vwiMmmd.
Wednesday, September 231998
Christopher Salerno
Staff Writer
Calling all jazz lovers: it's time to start the annual tradition of the Jazz at
Night series beginning Friday night, September 25, at Mendenhall
Student Center. For those not familiar with the Jazz at Night series, it's a
monthly event featuring the rising talent from the ECU School of
Music.
Fans of Jazz at Night who recall last year's candle lit atmosphere won't
be disappointed. The Great Room in Mendenhall will once again be
transformed into a sparkling version of Hernando's Hideaway, complete
with buffet-style refreshments and white tablecloths.
Newcomers will enjoy the unique opportunity to enjoy top-notch jazz
performances in a classy on-campus setting.
Students from Carroll Dashiell's Jazz Ensemble A, who have recendy
returned from a successful New York tour, will showcase their talent
onstage in the form of several combos. You can expect other perfor-
mances from members of the Jazz Bones group, the Contemporary
Ensemble and other combos, as well as several featured vocalists.
Faculty member Bob Mintzer will be the featured performer in
November.
Dashiell, director of Jazz Studies at the School of Music, is enthusiastic
about the new performance season.
"We're going to feature different groups and we're going to try to give
some of the new students opportunities to perform Well mix it up
quite a bit
See Jan. continued on page 5
t Night
An evening to remember
Band Review
Movie Review
Celebrity Skin
almost rocks
nice try, Courtney!
Come on over
and have a
pickle during
Mayherry Days
CD Review
MMskiult
fountainhead � 2nd Floor Student Publications Building Greenville. NC 27858 � Phone 328-6366 � Fax 328-6558 � Advertising 328-2000 � www.fountainhead
ecu.edu





CD Review
Hole
Celebrity Skin
Ryan Kennemur
Staff Writer
6 out of 10
Courtney Love is a woman on a mis-
sion, and that mission is simply to be
liked. It has been ever since
Hollywood got a hold of her a couple
of years ago, back when she por-
trayed Larry Hynf's junkie wife,
Althea, in The People Vs. Larry
FhntWhat a stretch you may be
saying to yourself. I know I am.
At any rate, the movie got good
reviews and suddenly the world
started to take notice. Not only was
this woman the widow of grunge-
rock pioneer, Kurt Cobain, but also a
woman of great talent and indeed in
need of an overhaul. Hollywood, in
turn, took her under its wing and
transformed her from screeching
banshee to soaring butterfly.
This brings us to her band, Hole. The
first major label debut album, enti-
tled Live Through This, was critically
acclaimed, although uneven at
times. The year was 1995, just about
the time the whole grunge thing was
coming to an end, and girl bands
like L7 and Babes in Toyland where
dropping out of the public eye.
Zooming ahead three years laterup
pops that Courtney Love band again,
alive and welIor at least alive. The
new Hole album, Celebrity Skin is a
complete flip-flop from anything
else she has ever done. The lyric
quality is still there, as evidenced in
the title trackOh make me
overI'm all I want to beA walking
studyIn demonology These lyrics
could suggest that not only is she
being changed by the public opinion,
but indeed she may be loving every
minute of it.
But the biggest change is that Love
has ditched her signature growling
voice, the thing that made her so
appealing to the grunge set and such
a darling of the critics. Instead, she
now has a voice like any other girl
singer. This album suggests that she
has abandoned the old singing off-
key formula. The only things sepa-
rating her from the likes of Natalie
Imbruglia are her occasional biting
lyrics (probably because some songs
were co-written with Billy Corgan of
Smashing Pumpkins) and the
riffraff guitar of Eric Erlandson. The
guitar work, though very overpro-
duced- sounding, does wonders for
Love's voice.
This album is pretty good for the
most part, so long as you can get
past the fact that Love and Co. are
obviously playing to the masses. Id
be willing to bet that every cent that
Love receives from this new album
will go towards that new Gucci dress
she's been eying. If you're just get-
ting into Hole, I suggest you go out
and listen to the earlier albums first,
then form your own opinion. My
own is that Courtney love is playing
the music that her husband worked
so hard to tear down. Rest In Peace,
Kurt
Km Ei. hinmtmtnuattMuml I
mdcmkmct
Amy LRoyster Editor in Chief
Heather Burgess Managing Editor
Miccah Smith Editor
Stephanie Whitlock Dtngner
Brian Williams Layout Manager
Janet Respcss AAwliiing Managar
Bobby TuggJcWioma�6t
Swing the ECU community urea B2S. rht East CafaJrnwi puMrthei
11.000 copies (my tosdsy and Thursday 7.000 copies of the
Founiamheed. our new arts and een�mnertt megaime, vt pub
lofted every Wednesday. The lead editorial m each ednjon oi the East
Caiolirwn is the opinion of (he ditwul Board. The East Catohntin
welcomes letters to the editor, htruted to SO wotds. which may be
tdiiBd for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves if right to
edit or resect letters lor publication. AS loners must be snned. I liters
should be addressed to: Opinion editor .The East Carountin, Student
Publications Building. ECU. Greerwihe. 778&M353 For information,
call Bt8.37fl.6368
2 VVednesday, September 23,1998
P
Band Review
Ditchdiggers serve up punk
with collards on the side
Caleb Rose
Assistant Editor
If you weren't there, all missed one
hell of a show! Last Saturday a group
of Hoboken fellas calling themselves
the Ditchdiggers wandered into
Greenville, stumbled into the Corner
Pub adjacent to Alfredo's Pizza and
delivered an outstanding set of the
best Georgia cow-punk available.
Lefs go over this term cow-punk.
Imagine Social Distortion meets Hank
Williams Sr. and spawns this fusion of
hick-a-fied chitlins and cornbread
country along with raucous tattooed
punk rock, otherwise known as the
Ditchdiggers.
Before showtime, the band was
casually sitting in the dub as their
thoughts meandered about the lives
they were about to change that very
night They were overjoyed when the
press (me) arrived and soon the con-
versation turned to
music which is what the
night was all about any-
way.
A crowd slowly
poured into the Corner
Pub, and the
Ditchdiggers took the
stage. It was somewhat
thrilling to see the band
dressed up in matching
outfits of red shirts
(with an embroidered Ditchdigger
logo, mind you) and black slacks.
Their reasoning for this, according to
singer Chris Gray, is, "Man, these days,
See Ditchdiggers. continued on page 5
Its Your Place
To navel to the Big Apple
No plans for Thanksgiving break? How about taking
a bite out of the Big Apple. The ECU Student Union
sponsors an annual pilgrimage to New York City. For
more information, call the Central Ticket Office at
3284788
7& Go for the Gold
OCTOBER 1, 1998 AT 8 P.M. AT WRIGHT
AUDITORIUM
You'll sing a sad tune if you miss this performance.
1997 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition
Gold Medalist Jon Nakamatsu lets his fingers cas-
cade across the keys for this first class performance
that's sura to please. Student tickets are $7 in
advance at the Central Ticket Office, $15 at the door.
Presented by the S. Rudolph Performing Arts Series.
To Chew on This
T00AY AT NOON IN MENDENHALL
UNDERGROUND
"Dog Training" presented by Drake Parker.
Gourmet desserts and beverages will be served.
FREE admission.
To Have a Flashback
OCTOBER 7 AT 8 P.M. AT HENDRIX THEATRE
Catch this exciting, multimedia trip through the '80s
with Barry Drake.one of rock music's foremost his-
toriansAdvance tickets are FREE at the Central
Ticket Office with your ECU One Cerd.
lb Catch a Free Filch
SEPTEMBER 24-26 AT 8 P.M. AT HENDRIX
THEATRE - SUNDAY MATINEE AT 3 P.M.
Where in Greenville can you see a FREE blockbuster
movie AND bring a guest? Right here in Mendenhall
Student Center, of coursel This week's show: Fear
and loathing in Las Vegas (R) starring Johnny Depp.
To Celebrate with a Movie
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23 AT 8 P.M. AT
HENDRIX THEATRE
Take a mid-week break to check out the Student
Union's Sundance Theatre This Wednesday's
Movie: Las Misarablas (PG-13) starring Liam
Neeson, Claire Danes, Uma Thurman and Geoffrey
Rush.
To Roll A Few
Knock some pins down at Outer Limitz bowling alley
in the basement of Mendenhell Student Center.
Here's what's going on this week:
GLOW-BALL THEME NIGHTS-Come to Outer Limitz
bowling center at Mendenhall Student Center every
Friday from 7-11 p.m. for exciting theme nights for
just $2 per game. Shoe rental is free. Bring e CD. or
dress the part. This week's theme: RAVE ATTACK.
ALL-U-CAN BOWL-Unlimited bowling every 2nd and
4th Saturday of each month from 8-11 p.m. at the
bowling center for just $8.25 (includes shoe rental).
Come hungry for free pizza and drinks from 8-9 p.m.
David
Staff
"You'v
know
Rogers
Gambl
Round
story b
named
Damoi
ceedst
ings to
KGB is
gambli
ofsuch
Cession
his moi





1
MovkReview
Matt Damon does his thing in Rounders
David Moone
Staff Writer
"You've got to know when to hold'em,
know when to fbld'em" as Kenny
Rogers tells us in his song "The
GamblerThis is a major theme in
Rounders, directed by John Dahl. The
story begins with a young law student
named Mike Mcdermot (Matt
Damon) teaching us poker as he pro-
ceeds to lose his tuition and all his sav-
ings to Teddy "KGB" (John Malkovich).
KGB is the head of an underground
gambling club which is part of a ring
of such clubs frequented by these pro-
fessional card players. After losing all
his money to KGB, Mike quits gam-
bling and, thanks to his girlfriend's
persuasiveness, avoid cards altogether.
The girlfriend is well-played by new-
comer Gretchen Mol, who I think we
will be seeing a lot of in the future.
She even gets angry when he helps his
professor win a card game, impressing
a judge who offers him a summer
internship. He just couldn't resist the
impulse to gamble, which sets the
stage for the events after his best
friend Les Murphy's release from
prison. Murphy (Edward Norton), who
is affectionately called Worm, has used
his time perfecting his ability to cheat
at cards. Mike however, prefers the
straight game, and his big dream
is to win the World Series poker
game in Vegas.
Worm proceeds to drag Mike back
into gambling, causing him to lose his
girlfriend and drop out of law school.
Mike is a typical character for Damon.
He's a smart kid stuck in the middle of
the road, gradually pulled more and
more into the darker side of things.
Worm suckers Mike into covering his
gambling debts, then when they can't
be paid he takes off.
Mike is now in debt to KGB who wants
money or blood. So destiny gets
dragged into the story to cover the
morality issue of making a living by
gambling. As Mike saysIfs immoral
to let a sucker keep his money?
See Movie, continued on page 5
"I'll see your bet and raise you my girlfriend
Photo courtesy of www.miramax.com
become a member.
Launch your
organization
into cyberspace.
WWW.
clubhouse
u.
u
Wednesday, September 23. B98 3





-�Jhir"WiMMfci�,
MW
weekly top hits
15. Bis "Girl Star'
14.Jude"YouMama
You"
13. Squirrel Nut
Zippers "Suits Are
Picking Up the Bill"
12. Brian Setter
Orchestra "The Dirty
11. The Why Store
"Montague"
10. Seven Mary
Three "Over Your
Shoulder"
9. Cracker "The
Good Life"
8. Elliott Smith
"Waltz 2"
7. Bic Runga "Sway"
6. Wes Cunningham
"So it Goes"
5.Uz Phair
"Polyester Bride"
4.Beastie Boys
"Body Movin"
3. Cake "Never
There"
2.Tori Amos
"Jackie's Strength'
1. Hole "Celebrity
Skin"
' 4 Wednesday, September 23,1998
Festival'98
preview
Nina M. Dry
StaffWriter
Clear your evening calendars,
folks, because on September
27 through the 29th, Festival
'98 is coming to Dowdy
Ficklen Stadium. The Festival
will feature guest speaker
Franklin Graham, son of the
renowned world evangelist
Billy Graham.
"(Graham) is a highly respected
person in our country and interna-
tionally as well said Heather
Mickschutz, Festival '98 University
chairperson. "Students will not want
to miss the opportunity to hear his
speech
Many individuals in Greenville
have put a hand in bringing this fes-
tival here. It began with a local busi-
nessman named John Grier, who had
a plan for this festival in mind for
three years.
"Grier contacted the Billy
Graham Evangelistic Association
(BGEA)said Thomas Holtsdaw,
senior pastor at the Jarvis Memorial
United Methodist Church. "In a mat-
ter of two weeks, a representative
from BGEA came to Greenville
The representative explained the
procedures that had to be taken for
Greenville to be considered as a festi-
val site. Greenville residents were
eager to get involved.
"Many churches and businesses
wrote letters to Franklin Graham to
request bringing the festival here
Mickschutz said.
277 cities applied for the right to
host Festival '98. Only nine appli-
cants made the cut, Greenville being
one of them.
"We were really blessed to be one
of the nine cities involved in the fes-
tivities Holtsdaw said.
We're very excited about it said
Scott Wilkinson, a campus minister
at the United Methodist Campus
Ministry. "We're hoping that some
kids who go will become interested
in some ministries here on campus
In addition to Franklin Grahams
messages, there will be plenty of
entertainment on all three nights.
The Dennis Agajanian Band and
the Praise Band will be performing
on all three nights. Ricky Skaggs, a
well-known mainstream country
See Preview, continued on page 7
g
horoscopes
ARIES:
(March 21-April 20)
Your intentions and thoughts are
focused on your relationships,
whether romantic, business-related
or marriage. Any partnership
desires you presently have will flour-
ish and remain stable for quite some
time. Any new business opportunity
will flourish.
TAURUS:
(April 21-May 21)
A new love, or perhaps an ongoing
relationship will finally turn in the
direction you want it to. The need to
be part of a couple is strong right
now. You would be wise to tone
down any urges to overdo or
overindulge. Be cautious concerning
transportation and travel.
GEMINI:
(May 22-June 21)
You find it very easy to attract or
pursue romance this week But do
avoid any showdowns with loved
ones, you can't expect to have every-
thing go exactly the way you would
like it to. All money making activi-
ties are successful and you should
see an increase in your earnings.
CANCER:
(June 22-July 23)
The assertive and dynamic qualities
of your personality will shine this
week, along with any romantic
notions. It is a volatile time for you
with emotions running in every dif-
ferent direction, so proceed with
extra caution. Job advancement is
almost certain.
LEO:
(July 24-August 23)
A bit of upbeat financial news will
keep you going strong for at least the
rest of the year. Behind the scenes
influences may be able to ease your
way up the success ladder. There
seems to be a certain amount of
stress and strain in an important
relationship.
VIRGO:
(August 24 - September 23)
A fairly conservative type of invest-
ment will prove worth it's while this
week Don't take too much for grant-
ed, even though your social life is an
absolute whirlwind. Your approach
to work and achievement is effort,
attention to detail, patience and
good luck
LIBRA:
(September 24 - October 23)
Now is a time for opportunity and
expansion for you. Just remember
that good fortune is not going to
come knocking at your door, you
have to make yourself accessible,
and be aware of the potential all
around you. Don't overdo,
overindulge or overspend!
SCORPIO:
(October 24 - November 22)
You are due for a good time this
week, so enjoy what you deserve.
Your love life is moving along nicely
at this time, don't let your active
imagination ruin it for you. A nice
financial bonanza is possible. There
seems to be an influential person
helping you out behind the scenes.
SAGITTARIUS:
(November 23 - December 21)
Finding yourself in a social whirl-
wind will make you available for any
possible romantic interests. Try to
avoid immediate intanglement with
a romantic prospect. Your health
prospects are excellent this week
Take extra precautions when travel-
ing or in transportation.
CAPRICORN:
(December 22 - January 20)
It's a lively week for your social
agenda and you will have a fair
share of the popularity. Challenges
may occur in a business relation-
ship, so be prepared to cope diplo-
matically. Don't be too quick to act
on rumors or too slow to get a move
on when needed.
AQUARIUS:
(January 21 - February 19)
You have a lot of positive energy that
can be put to good use in building
up your physical resources or work-
related activities. Be especially care-
ful to avoid accidents whether at
home or in the workplace. Be cau-
tious of any romantic involvements
with strangers.
PISCES:
(February 20-March 20)
There seems to be a few minor haz-
ards connected with a much too
rambunctious social agenda. It may
be time to redo your looks in some
way. Avoid clashing with your mate
or partner, your temper may cloud a
relatively simple issue.
IF THIS WEEK IS YOUR BIRTH-
DAY: You should be smiling a lot in
the months ahead. Your cup runneth
over in the love department.
Impulsiveness may look like you
aren't thinking clearly, but the real
truth is that once you make such a
decision, you stick with it.
Horoscope by Miss Anna





VideoRevkw
Rent the psycho-suspenseful Taxi Driver
Cristian Skinner
Staff Writer
Taxi Driver (1976), directed
by Martin Scorsese, holds a
camera's eye on the slow
deterioration of a man's
mind. From the loneliness
of isolation to the loneliness
of failed associations, social
and sexual, Taxi Driver rides
through the world of Travis
Bicklc (Robert DcNiro)
toward his lowest depravity
and his unreal heroism.
Without laboring about the min-
imalism of the title, Taxi Driver
begins and ends with Travis Bicklc.
The ex-marine, honorably dis-
charged in 73, applies with a New
York cab company to be a driver.
Travis drives through any part of the
�Pow
Photo courtesy of Travis 76: A Taxi Driver Page
city "anywhere.anytime They work
him at night, and his journal, which
he reads to the audience, shows a
deep disgust for the "animals that
come out at night
In his journal he writes,
"Someday a real rain will come and
wash all the scum
off the streets
Watching him
drive around, one
sees what he sees:
prostitutes,
pimps, addicts
and pushers, and
Travis'blank stare
never changes.
For over fifteen
minutes of the
movie, Travis
talks only during
his interview at the
cab company and, in
a journal, to the audience. The
monologues continue to outline his
need for a sense of belonging and a
need to "become a person, just like
other people
Enter Betsy (Cybill Shepherd)
who works in a Mary Tyler Moore
world at the campaign headquarters
of a presidential hopeful, Charles
Palantine. Travis thinks he's found
an angel, but after a failed second
date, a porn movie, and one failed
phone call, she won't talk to him.
Enter alienation. The dozens of
flowers returned by Betsy become a
rotting sore to himThe smell of
the flowers only made me sicker, the
headaches got worse. I think I got
stomach cancer? he mumbles. "I
guess I shouldn't complain though;
'You're only as healthy as you feel,
you're only As the previously
prevalent saxophone solos which
once accompanied the scenes cease
to play, Travis makes his final deci-
sion about Betsy: "She's just like the
rest of them
Now Mr. Scorcese starts showing
off. He plays the part of a taxi cus-
tomer who follows his wife to the
building where she is sleeping with
another man. Scorcese's character
fantasizes about how he will kill his
wife with a .44 Magnum. Later
Travis himself confesses to a cabbie
patriarch, WizardI just wanna' go
out and I really, uh, I just ah, got
some bad ideas
As he loses the rest of his grip on
society, Travis buys guns, starts a
military training regimen, and
begins staking out candidate
Palintine's public addresses. But
don't worry, the movie doesn't end
that easily. I haven't even mentioned
how the 13-year-old Jodie Foster
and the buff Harvey Keitel fit in.
She's a prostitute who is also the
See Taxi, continued on page 7
Oitchdiggers, continued from page 2
you gotta look cool
Heads turned as the opening song, a
non-album rocker called "Blue
Mama Cool started the night.
Although the crowd was small they
were extremely responsive to the
band and their unusual ways. There
was an immense amount of energy
erupting from the stage.
The second tune of the evening
called "Diamond Ring" gave the
crowd a taste of their album Cow
Patty Bingo. You may be wondering
what cow patty bingo is wonder
no more. Cow patty bingo is a game
in which you choose a bingo card
placed on a pasture and if a cow
"marks" your card with a patty, you
win. "Diamond Ring" is a humorous
love song pondering the crazy
things we do for love: "I'm goin'
down to the railroad trackcarve
your name into my back
The one point the Ditdidiggers want
to get across is that the bulk of their
music should be found humorous.
Songs about hog farmers, cheap
hotels, Holy Rollers and getting laid
Jazz, continued from page 1
While the Jazz at Night series is
a good chance for the young tal-
ent to be seen and heard, it also
benefits the older students as
well.
"It gives the older students a
chance to write and arrange
said senior trombonist and Jazz
Bones member Mitch Butler.
Butler has been doing Jazz at
Night at night since he was a
sophomore.
"It's especially big for the jazz
vocalists who don't have as
many opportunities as the oth-
ers Butler said.
Students can receive two free tick-
ets for the 8 p.m. performance in
advance at the Central Ticket
Office. Tickets for non-students,
also available in advance, are $2.50.
Tickets may also be purchased at
the door.
on the bed of a truck help to convey
the humor. One of the songs, called
"Grandpa is about a man who used
to drive his tractor to church until it
rolled over and killed him.
A handful of cover tunes were
played Saturday including Hank Srs
"You Win Again" (the cow-punk ver-
sion) and Jerry Reed's "East Bound
and Down which you should recall
as the theme song for Smokey and
the Bandit. A rowdy punk rock ver-
sion of the hymn "Amazing Grace"
was also blasphemed at one point
during the evening.
The only break the band took that
night was to hand out their tradi-
tional can of potted meat to the
lucky fan who is first in line to
receive it. A fan immediately
requested the potted meat and then
walked right up on stage and pro-
ceeded to put on his own show by
eating the prize in front of everyone.
Later on a rumor surfaced that the
fan was actually a vegetarian.
According to the Ditdidiggers, a
scene like that one has not hap-
pened until that very moment.
Another non-album tune that stood
out was "Mud Flap Cutie" probably
spawned from the mud flap orna-
ment (the sexy woman one, not
Yosemite Sam) that was attached to
drummer Mack Blauvelts cow-skin
upholstered drum kit.
"Mud Flap Cutie" is the perfect song
for a Peterbuilt commercial because
it has a driving bass line, sing-along
words and moreover is about a mud
flap ornament on a truck These
boys don't want for nothing.
The Ditchdiggers came equipped
with a song list containing 28 songs
that they could perform with ease.
Of those songs, they played 21 of
them straight through with no
breaks except for the potted meat
incident. After their set, they
impressed so many people that they
were encored back onto the stage for
two final songs. One of these songs,
by request, was a cover of Johnny
Cash's "Folsom Prison Blues And
finally they ended with the ever so
appropriate "One More Town" which
pretty much says it all for a traveling
band.
If it were not for WZMB, the
Ditchdiggers probably would not
have made it to Greenville for this
show. At the end of the night they
gave a hearty thank you to WZMB,
and Greenville for having them. The
fans probably benefited more from
the concert than the band did
because everybody was into the
music and apparently having a great
time which is what music should be
all about. Just remember the name
the Ditchdiggers and if you ever
want to have a corn-fed, paint peel-
in foot stompin, mule skinnin' hoe-
down, then all you have to do is
check them out
Movie, continued from page 3
The professor who has taken a lik-
ing to young Mike tells him that
though his own family had wanted
him to be a rabbi, his destiny was to
be a law professor, andthat Mike
must also find his own destiny. We
are led to believe that Mike's destiny
is to play poker. The professor lends
Mike the money needed to cover
most of the debt his friend has
left him holding.
Instead of paying KGB back, Mike
challenges him to a card game. The
movie leaves you wondering about
Mike's destiny, and whether or not
he will fulfill it Rounders does keep
you interested, and the acting is very
well done. John Malkovich pulls off
a great Russian accent, and Martin
Landau is wonderful as the
law professor.
Rounders is generally a well-done
flick that you might be able to take a
date to; Matt Damon plays the sort
of character he's good at, giving the
women in the audience something
to drool over while being intense
enough to keep the guys
interested too.
VVUwdwSeDlnteZlflBB 5





ODDITIES
BACON BREAKFASTS BANNED
NOBLESVILLE,Ind.(AP) ft wasn't
the fat that got bacon and eggs ban-
ished from the Hamilton County
Government and Judicial Center. It
was the scent.
"When you come in the front door,
it hits you in the morning. You walk
" in and it doesn't remind you of an
office building said Steve Holt, one
of two commissioners supporting
the ban on fried foods that passed
Monday in this suburban
Indianapolis county.
The ban stems from complaints
about the odor wafting from the
Janus Canteen & Deli in the center's
basement
There's no ventilation system in the
basement and the deli, which sells
mostly cold foods, wasn't designed
for greasy cooking, Holt said.
Commissioner Sharon dark agreed
with Holt.
"It's out of place. It's out of order
shesaidWecan'thave bacon waft-
ing out of here
FELINE LOVERS HAD FIVE
DOZEN DEAD CATS IN THEIR
HOUSESTERLING1Va.(AP) Doris
and John Stecker love their cats.
In fact, they love them enough to
keep five dozen mewling felines in
the house at once - not to mention
another 60 dead ones in cat coffins
and 30 more buried in the back
yard. Loudoun County animal con-
trol wardens searched Doris and
John Stecker's home last week and
found the cats.
But prosecutors said this was not a
case of intentional abuse. They
described the Steckers as feline-lov-
ing do-gooders who had too many
cats to handle properly.
"We don't believe for a second they
intended to make these cats unhap-
py? Assistant Commonwealth's
Attorney Karin Cather said. "But
with 60 cats in a one-story house
they were in over their heads
TRASH HAULER GETS DYING
WISH: A GARBAGE TRUCK IN HIS
FUNERAL
CLARKSTON, Michigan (AP) Ervin
Sievers' living was hauling trash, and
his dying wish was to have a garbage
truck in his funeral procession
To relatives, it was the ultimate
homage to the man who worked on
garbage trucks since he was 17.
"We did everything according to his
wishes said Easter Shagena,
Sievers'sister-in-law.
Sievers was 45 when he died Sunday
of brain cancer. On Wednesday,
fiends ami relatives gathered inside
a funeral home in darkston, north
of Detroit, as a green trash truck-
empty and polished up-rolled into
the lot, then pulled behind the hearse.
RUSHED MOM ARRESTED
AFTER SHE DRIVES ON
SIDEWALK
DURHAM, North Carolina (AP) A
woman in a rush to get her children
to school drove onto the sidewalk
and through people's yards to get
around a traffic jam, even dragging
an officer who got her hand caught
in a seat belt, police said.
The woman was stopped in traffic
backed up by an accident when she
drove off the road Tuesday morning
with two girls, 10 and 13, in the car.
CpL Lori Fansler, who was directing
traffic, said she ordered the driver to
stop and leaned into the car to talk
to the woman, who told the officer
she "didn't have freaking time for
this" and hit the gas. Fansler was
dragged about 10 feet (three meters).
Another officer chased the car down
a road at about 75 mph (120 kph)
before the woman pulled up at an
elementary school and tojd the girls
to get out Sarah C. Carr was charged
with assault with a deadly weapon
on a law officer, speeding to elude an
DRUNK CAMEL DRIVING
CHARGE THROWN OUT
COOBER PEDY, Australia (AP) A
man charged with drunken camel
driving had one charge thrown out
of court Wednesday on die grounds
that he had no way of controlling
the beast, drunk or sober.
Ricky Wilson Hall, 36, of Alke
Springs was originally charged with
two counts ofdrivingacamelwhile
under the influence of alcohol, as
well as assaulting a police officer,
resisting police and using offensive
The magistrate said he had no rea-
son to believe that Hall was any-
thing but a "hopeful passenger"
while he was on the camel's back
and holding on by the fur of its hump.
Hall pleaded guilty to the charge of
offensive language.
Maybeny Days craze
Aunt Miccah
Foumainhead Editor
Looking for some good dean fun
this weekend? The town of
Mayberry is back on the map again
courtesy of the Surry Arts Council.
The Ninth Annual Mayberry Days
celebration, located in Andy Griffith's
hometown of
Mount Airy, NC,
is a weekend-
long folk festival
dedicated to one
of America's
best-loved televi-
sion series ever.
With such events as the Chicken
Pickin and Bluegrass Dance, the
Little Miss Mayberry Pageant,
Colonel Tim's Talent Time and the
Bowling Tournament, as well as tons
of exhibits, merchandise and coun-
try cooking, just about anyone could
quite possibly be well-entertained
during the three-
day event,
which starts on
Thursday,
September 24
and ends on
WT5 Saturday.
You can also test
your killer skills in the Mayberry
trivia contest, pie-eating contest or
horseshoe contest. Try to stay out of
trouble during the annual parade,
but even if Barney Fife tries to arrest
you, don't worry. He can't run very
fast and he doesn't even keep his
pistol loaded.
Ml M(
cvVMr
PIRATE UNDERGROUND
For a good time call the
ECU Student Union Hotline
at 252.328.6004,
or visit our website at
www.ecu.edustudentunion.
Cbev
9N This
Lunchthne Lecture Series
WedneeJays at 12 noon in the
Mnvdcnh .11 Underground
FRH! Rrireahmenu and Dcuertt!
Drake)
ptember 23,
ken "Dog Training"
September 30,
th Knox: "Date Rape
Keith L
Prevention Techniques"
SwvW CituA UEMUUTi
Le Miserable
'TtJ��"
W AI NIGHT
uiv. Septfinher 2.1t
cS 1)111 ill tilt'
l�lrvWurt wr� raquk. .xrmodrttom ur
80'sRDck:
l�e Video M�
An oadtlng multimedia trip through the so with
�en Drake, one of nxk musics foremost historian.
�lOOem Wadnm October 7, m Honed.The.tr.
rMwrw ticket flM with KU One Carol
orT002S2a�-�7M, eaOam-Brlitaiaay-ffldayi
at 252 328 - 4802 (wtotTDD) forty-eight hour, prior to th i�M ot Ih. proown





Tin. continued from page 5
focus of one of Travis's obsessions.
He decides he will save her from the
life she's living and her strong, caring
pimp, Matthew (Keitel).
Scorcese keeps the movie quiet,
but it moves at taxi speed through
the streets. I thought this movie at
times darkly humorous sometimes
painfully real, but well worth your
pain and Travis Dorft expect any-
thing less than the stark reality of
tastes, smells, and textures, and don't
watch it before bedtime.
Preview, continued from page 4
singer, and his band will be per-
forming on the 27th. Reality Check,
an alternative band, and Crystal
Lewis are on the schedule for the
28th.
"Lewis is a contemporary
Christian performer who sings a
wide variety of music Mickshutz
said.
Another well-known country
singer, Paul Overstreet, and R&B
group Anointed, will perform on the
29th. All festivities will begin each
night at 7 p.m.
On September 28, there will be a
special program called Student
scene
leard

:�i I a�
I
S8,
e Rock,
p Gun,
lena"
Sufykny Palacios
Junior
Spanish
Night beginning at 5:15 p.m.
Xrystal Lewis and Reality Check
will perform and there will be free
pizza and Pepsi Mickschutz said.
No tickets need to be purchased
for this event because it's all free.
However, the Love in Action Project
will be collecting nonperishable
canned food items each night for
those who want to participate. All
food collected will be distributed
among the needy children and
adults in the Greenville area.
For more information on Festival
'98, please call the Festival "98 office
at 413-0925
"If you could take
three movies with you
onto a deserted island,
what would they bet
"What's the
point? There's
no electricity
or VCR.
Stuart Park
Junior
History
"fletch,
Tombstone,
Happy Gilmore
Ruuoll Gray
Sophomore
Undecided (Alcoholism)
Things to
!Do
September
23 Wednesday
Pirate Underground, MSC social room
Sundance Cinema: Les Miserables at Hendrix
Theater
Mike Mesmer "Eyes" at The Attic
Morris at The Cave in Chapel Hill
24 Thursday
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas at Hendrix Theater
Edwin Mccain at The Attic
Boogie Hug at Peasant's
The Last of the Great Sideshow Freaks at The Cave in Chapel Hill
25 Friday
Jazz at Night, MSC great room
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas at Hendrix Theater
Purple Schoolbus at The Attic
Dayroom at Peasant's
The Crow Flies at The Cave in Chapel Hill
26 Saturday
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas at Hendrix Theater
Emmrt Swimming at The Attic
Ergot at Peasant's
Sharkquest, Pistol Pete and Popgun Paul at The Cave in Chapel Hill
27 Sunday
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas at Hendrix Theater
Jennyanykind, Nine Minute Snooze at The Cave in
Chapel Hill
28 Monday
Reuben's Train at The Cave in Chapel Hill
29 Tuesday
Orange Whip at Peasant's
Studio 54 at The Attic
Free Radicals at The Cave in Chapel Hill





When you needed
information during
the hurricane, we
responded.
i
Updated information was available on The East Carolinian
web site continuously during the recent hurricane.
Depend on us to provide you with the information you
need if another hurricane hits.
Or even on those days when its stttmy.
Point your browser to: -
www.tec.ecu.edu


Title
The East Carolinian, September 22, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 22, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1291
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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