The East Carolinian, September 10, 1998






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THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 10,1998 VOLUME 74. ISSUE 06
Charges of sexual assault against
member of Sigma Phi Epsilon dropped
Insufficient evidence cited by
Pitt County DA's office
S T K V F. L OS E V
NEWS EDITOR
Charges of sexual assault against a member
of Sigma Phi Epsilon were dropped due to
a lack of evidence in the case.
"There was insufficient evidence to
support prosecution Assistant District
Attorney Lxe Allen said.
The alleged rape supposedly happened
shortly after midnight on Feb. 1. A 21-year
old woman claimed she was woken around
1:50 a.m. by two men in the Sigma Phi
Epsilon back house. According to her
statement, they told her to put on her
pantyhose and leave. When she found her
underwear in her purse, she filed an accu-
sation with the police. The suspect in the
case was an acquaintance of the woman.
"The results are something we always
anticipated said Joe Donlevy, acting
president of Sigma Phi Epsilon. "It was
only a matter of waiting for the State
Bureau of Investigation to come back
with the rape kit
Allen declined to comment on the
results of the rape kit.
Donlevy said that the suspect in the
case is looking into pressing charges of libel
against the woman.
According to Allen, the woman will not
be charged with filing a false report of rape.
"Based on what I know from the
Greenville Police Department, she was not
"We weren V worried about the
charges. We were just worried about
our reputation being tarnished
Joe Donlevy
Acting piesidem of Sigma Phi Epsilon
untruthful in her statements to the police
Allen said.
Donlevy called the incident a "witch
hunt" against fraternities.
"We weren't wor-
ried about the
charges Donlevy
said. "We were just
worried about our rep-
utation being tar-
nished
Donlevy said that
he hoped this incident
would keep others
from fabricating
charges.
"It's unfortunate
that all people seem to
remember is the
charges and not the
fact that those charges
were proven false
said Donlevy.
victim claimed she was assaulted after a Sig Ep party.
FILE PKOTD
SGA election
nominations closed
Nominations total 47,
expense reports due
William I. f. I.ikvkr
STAFF WRITER
The SGA closed nominations for the leg-
islative positions on Tuesday. There
were 47 nominations in all for the differ-
ent positions. The nominations included
hall representatives, day officers, and
class officials.
There was a meeting on Wednesday
which all nominees had to attend con-
cerning campaign rules and procedures.
The nominees have to turn in an
expense report and a list of all campaign
workers by Sept. 21 at 5 p.m. to be eligi-
ble for the electionsThe nominees can
campaign by handing out fliers or giving
speeches to certain campus groups.
Elections are September 23 and the loca-
tions which a student may vote are at
Mendenhall, the library, the Wright
place, and Todd dining hall.
"In this election we are going by the
book said Cliff Webster, elections
chair. "James Kaltenschnee and I are
going to be watching closely to see that
this is the smoothest election that this
student body has ever seen
After the election takes place, the
SGA executive council will meet once a
week to discuss the issues concerning
our campus. The legislative officers will
be in charge of delegating money to cer-
tain on-campus groups, and to make res-
olutions that will benefit the campus.
"I am excited that so many students
have decided to get involved said SGA
president Eric Rivenbark. "These stu-
dent leaders should be a model for other
students to follow According to Millie
Murphrey.SGA secretary, in previous
years not as many students have applied
for the elections as they have this year.
The SGA is an organization that is based
on student's opinions and without cer-
tain legislative positions being filled the
organization is left at a disadvantage.
"We had a bigger turnout this year
than previous years said Murphrey. "I
think that is because there was a booth
on campus that accepted applications
j�r Class
6fnt Candidates
Name
Mark Thicpen
2ge
23
Major
CdrnirdasticrE, putiic
relations aiuaLcatirn
Horetown
Vashirgrxn, N.C.
Beriare
S&Err Class Secretary
Treasure jfcpsrriatirrs
COrmittee
Name
Ram Godfrey
Aje
A New View
21
Major
Speech language
Rathdcg
.HfiSne.t.QWQ
ElizteEhCiry, N.C.
.Bjstoe
Chair of Saxfert Welfare
Gtnmittee
IFC vice
president
elected
Joe Donlevy to take office
immediately
Cool weather brings relief Wednesday to students relaxing at the newly constructed
sonic Plaza.
PHOTO BY PAT IRFLAN
Math department offering
placement tests to high schools
Name
Chris M�ain
ge
22
Major
Ir&nnatiai Itoaessirrj
Hanetown
SizOty, n�
BfjeriaxE
Vfce Ecesiifet: af ft
Vag�& Pen.
Students may now have
time to improve
Debbie N e u w i r t ii
STAFF WRITER
North Carolina high school students
can now get an idea of how they will
do in college math, thanks to a new
test administered by ECU's math
department. The test is called the
North Carolina Math Placing Test
(NCMPT), and is much like the
PSAT. The NCMPT is given for
preparation of college math courses,
and is almost identical to the place-
ment test given at college orientation.
The NCMPT was given to 27,400
high school students at 206 different
schools last year. The math depart-
ment scores the tests and mails the
results individually to the students.
The results are a warning to the stu-
dent about where they will place in
college math. If the test score is low, it
is very likely that the student will be
in remedial math upon entering col-
lege.
SEE MATH. PAGE 2
William L f. L i f. V E r
staff writer
Joe Donlevy was elected executive
vice president of the Interfraternity
Council (IFC) Tuesday. The election
was a run off between Chuck Sawyer,
Jeff Yurfest, and Joe Donlevy.
According to Micah Retziaff, IFC
president, the new executive vice pres-
ident will be in charge of all external
matters and serves as a public relations
man for the IFC. One of his duties will
be to coordinate the outside speakers
to lecture fraternities on risk manage-
ment and other pressing concerns.
Donlevy will be taking office immedi-
ately.
"I am happy to have a dedicated
person like Joe to be executive vice
president Retziaff said.
"Furthermore Joe has been a loyal del-
egate and I feel confident in the work
he will do for IFC
He is the chairman of the judicial
board which appoints the members to
the board. He is working close with
administrative vice president Chris
McCain with the rush infractions. The
executive vice president investigates
rush violations yearly and must be
objective to all fraternities on campus.
"This position is a very important
position to the IFC because it handles
certain judicial matters said Dean
Ron Speier, IFC advisor.
Donlevy is the acting president of
the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity. He
has been an active part of IFC for three
years.
"I am extremely honored to be
elected to the executive vice presiden-
tial position Donlevy said. "I am for-
tunate enough to be joining the IFC
executive council at a point in time
when the greek system is running very
smoothly. I look forward to facilitating
continuous improvement for the
remainder of my term
i





2 Thursd�y. Stptambir 10. 1998
TTHeTs
news
3 Thursday, Si
The East Carolinian
across
the state
Fires at two North
Carolina abortion clinics
Arson fires within minutes of each
other damaged two abortion clinics
in North Carolina early Tuesday.
Volunteer firefighters respond-
ed to a blaze at about 1:10 a.m. at
the Carolina Women's Clinic, just
outside Fayetteville city limits.
Hurricane Earl runs
out of gas
The remnants of Hurricane Earl
lurched through northeastern
North Carolina, packing little
punch as it left the state Friday.
Intermittent showers fell
in northeastern counties but
produced no flooding.
Washington worries about
Clinton's leadership
WASHINGTON (AP) - Awaiting
the independent prosecutor's
report that can only add to
President Bill Clinton's troubles,
Washington worries whether scan-
dal has undermined the president's
authority to the point of rendering
him ineffective and the country
rudderless.
Clinton's summit with Russian
President Boris Yeltsin did nothing
to relieve that concern; it was
shrugged off as empty diplomacy
between two weakened heads of
state.
Foreign travel is often the last
refuge of lame-duck presidents,
but Clinton's trip to Russia and
Ireland did not allow him to escape
the impact of his confession of mis-
behavior with ex-volunteer Monica
Lewinsky.
"Moral authority" is the term
that's come into use to question
whether a scandal-hobbled presi-
dent, facing the prospect of even
more investigation, can effectively
lead.
The failure of Clinton's Aug. 17
speech admitting to inappropriate
behavior "has reverberated all
through the system and I think the
president has completely lost
momentum says Colin Campbell,
director of the Public Policy
Institute at Georgetown
University. "I lis capacity to deploy
moral suasion is going to be greatly
diminished
Senate Republican Leader
Trent Lott said Saturday that
Clinton had "eroded the moral
dimension of the presidency" and
pledged that Congress would step
into the vacuum.
Clinton and the Republican-
dominated Congress are approach-
ing a spending showdown that
could close down the government
as it did in 1995 and 19. All of
Clinton's legislative agenda,
including his demand that
Congress fix the national pension
system called Social Security, is in
jeopardy.
A hint of what awaits Clinton
came abroad. Twice, once in the
company of Yeltsin, once with Irish
Prime Minister Bertie Ahern at his
SEE CLINTON. PAGE 3
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Forbes urges
impeachment hearing
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) -
President Bill Clinton's ability to
lead the nation has been "fatally
undermined" and Congress should
quickly launch impeachment hear-
ings, publishing magnate and
potential presidential candidate
Steve Forbes said Tuesday.
Quality time in Wright Circle
Terry Chavez and his son Barron enjoy the cool weather Wednesday with a stroll around the fountain.
PHOTO BY PAT IREIAN
Mandela to visit US,
Canada
CAPE TOWN, South Africa (AP) -
Nelson Mandela will meet with
President Clinton, address the I 'nited
Nations and receive a Congressional
Medal of Honor during a visit to the
United States beginning next week.
The South African president also
will visit Ginada during the Trip, part of
a series of farewells to world leaders
ahead of his retirement from politics
next year, the South African Press
Association slid.
Math
continued (mm page I
"The idea of the test is that stu-
dents will get concerned during
high school and motivated early
about their math skills Robert
Bernhardt, chair of the ECU math
department said. The goal of this
test is to reduce the amount of stu-
dents coming into college and tak-
ing remedial math, resulting in stu-
dents graduating earlier. The
North Carolina Legislative system
is pushing for all students to get out
of college in four years because it
costs about $6,000 a year to keep a
student in a state school.
"It is a great cost savings to the
University Legislative system if
students don't have to take remedi-
al math Bernhardt said.
The test has been given
statewide for the last year. It costs
the Legislative system $7.00 per
student to take the test, but it is
free for students. The students
that have scores of less than 17 out
of iZ correct answers are warned to
do something about it before they
get to college,
"Students that participate in the
test are much less likely to place
into remedial math than students
that don't Bernhardt said.
The test is low-key and is
optional. It does not count toward
anything, and does not replace the
college entry math test. Most stu-
dents are encouraged to take it to
rate their math skills. The place-
ment test is almost exactly like the
practice test, and both are Algebra
tests. Students are also encouraged
to take math every year in high
school so they have a solid back-
ground.
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3 Thursday, September 10, 1
998
The East Carolinian
arolinian
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Clinton attorney asks for advance
copy of Starr's report to congress
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WASHINGTON (AP) - President
Bill Clinton's lawyers are asking
prosecutor Kenneth Starr for a one-
week advance peek at his report to
Congress on Monica Lewinsky, so
the president's defenders can file
their own reply. The report is
expected in the next two weeks,
Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott
says.
"We expect it this week or
next Lott told reporters Tuesday
during a briefing on the Senate
floor, after discussing the matter
with House Speaker Newt
Gingrich.
He added, however, that Starr
and his staff have not given law-
makers a date for the report. "We
don't know for sure Lott said.
Clinton's attorneys, meanwhile,
are concerned the report will be
one-sided and include extensive
conclusions and legal analysis
instead of simply a listing of facts
gathered in the seven-month
investigation into the president's
affair with the former White House
intern.
"Elemental fairness dictates
that we be allowed to respond to
any 'report' you send to the House
simultaneously with its transmis-
sion Clinton lawyer David
Kendall wrote Starr on Monday.
"I request that you (afford us
one week to submit a written
reply Kendall added.
Lott suggested Clinton's
lawyers have made the request to
stall any inquiry on Capitol Hill.
"I wouldn't be surprised if they
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go to court to try to block it Lott
said.
The president's lawyers want to
produce their own point-by-point
response to any Starr document,
including their own analysis of the
facts. They also want to include
more favorable evidence gathered
by Clinton's legal team.
Kendall also argued that Starr's
submission to Congress should be
limited to a presentation of the evi-
dence without reaching conclu-
sions.
"Nothing in the law) authorizes
your office to prepare a 'report' to
the House that purports to summa-
rize and analyze evidence
Kendall added.
Kendall stated that "you have
had unlimited resources at your
command and no practical restric-
tion on your power to investigate
every aspect of the president's life
for the pust four,and one half
years
Several Democratic congress-
men said Starr should accommo-
date the president's request.
"It's not only the fairest way,
but the best way to find the truth
Rep. John Dingell said on CNN's
"Larry King Live" program when
asked Monday night whether
Clinton should be allowed to
review Starr's report in advance
and respond.
Rep. Jim Moran, who during the
weekend said he fully expects
impeachment proceedings to grow
out of the Lewinsky investigation,
said allowing Clinton's lawyers to
review and comment on any Starr
report was "an appropriate, profes-
sional courtesy" that should be
afforded the president.
Some of the president's political
advisers have argued for weeks that
Clinton's legal team should prepare
a separate report countering the
special prosecutor's findings in the
obstruction of justice and perjury
investigation of Clinton's affair
with Ms. Lewinsky.
A second, more favorable report
would provide Clinton's
Democratic allies on Capitol Hill
with ammunition to argue against
starting impeachment proceedings
as well as influence public percep-
tions, some advisers maintain.
House Democrats also have
complained that the Republican
leadership will shut them out of
any planning on how to handle
Starr's report when it is sent to
Capitol Hill. With the House
returning from its August recess
this week, planning for the expect-
ed Starr report was at the top of
House leaders' agenda.
I louse Speaker Newt Gingrich
and Minority Leader Dick
Gephardt were scheduled to meet
Wednesday to discuss the proce-
dures for handling any Starr report.
College trend to increase
alcohol-awareness efforts
LAWRENCE, Kan. (AP) - Keiley
Keirsey cringes when she hears
students at the University of
Kansas talk about how her best
friend, Lisa Roescl, was killed by a
drunken driver last spring.
Rosel, 19, had also been drink-
ing. The Overland Park freshman
was hit by a sport-utility vehicle as
she was crossing a street. The 18-
year-old driver had been drinking
at a different bar.
Students at a community task
force meeting on alcohol at the
University of Kansas said they did
not think Rosel's death was any-
one's fault.
"It was an accident waiting to
happen one of the students told
task force members Monday. "It's
a bad street. The cars just go flying
down it
Keirsey disagrees.
"IThings like this don't just
happen said Keirsey, 19, a sopho-
more from Overland Park.
Everyone has choices, she said.
"I would love to stand on a big
podium and yell out, 'You are not
invincible You may not lose your
life, but a part of me is gone now
she said.
To reduce alcohol-related
deaths of college students and curb
student drinking, the University of
Kansas, the University of Missouri-
Columbia and other schools
throughout the country have
formed community task forces on
alcohol. They want to change the
culture on campuses so that alcohol
is no longer the social glue that
brings students together.
"As we start this school year,
people are thinking about what
happened last year said Ed
Hammond, president of Fort Hays
Slate University in Kansas and a
national leader on campus alcohol
issues.
Two fraternity pledges died,
one at Massachusetts Institute of
Technology and another at
Louisiana State University, and
five other students died last year at
colleges and universities in
Virginia, said Sheldon Steinbach,
general counsel for the American
Council on Education.
The University of Missouri cre-
ated its task force six months ago.
Members want bar owners to stop
offering pitchers of beer for a
penny and other such specials.
Vice Chancellor Charles Schroeder
said.
"The point is, what are we
encouraging there?" Schroeder
said. "Are we encouraging nice
social conversation, or are we
encouraging abuse of alcohol?"
The task force also supports the
creation of more residential learn-
ing communities, where students
with similar academic interests live
together. There students are more
likely to find common ground
without relying on alcohol, task
force members said.
The University of Kansas' task
force expects to present its recom-
mendations in mid-December.
Included could be tougher penal-
ties for those who violate the law,
said Provost David Shulenburger,
task force chairman.
Neither Kansas State University
nor the University of Missouri-
Kansas City formed task forces but
both have ongoing alcohol efforts.
"K-State has taken reasonable,
prudent steps in the past to deal
with these things that other places
are. just now getting involved
with said Bill Arck, director of the
school's alcohol and drug abuse
program.
Bars offer free, nonalcoholic
drinks to designated drivers, he
said, and some living communities
such as fraternities offer safe rides
home.
In July, Kansas implemented
stricter penalties for bars that serve
underage drinkers.
Each fall, the Kansas Alcohol
Beverage Control Division sends
undercover agents to bars to check
whether under-age drinkers are
being served, On the average, 34
percent of the agents are served
throughout the state, a spokes-
woman for the state Department of
Revenue said. The goal is to
reduce that percentage to 10, the
spokeswoman said.
Students in Lawrence said last
weekend they had noticed bars
were tightening up.
"I just think they are cracking
down too much said Jennifer
Schumm, who was attending a
house party. "As bad as it sounds,
bars are where the action is and
where all the friends go
Graduate student Anne
McS'hane, 23, who was sipping a
beet at Louise's, said she wished
the new task force the best in its
efforts to reduce alcohol consump-
tion.
"It's going to be a hard thing to
stop she said.
Clinton
continued from 2
side, he had to address questions
about the adequacy of his Aug. 17
Lewinsky speech to the nation.
"I'm worried, I'm not pan-
icked says a foreign policy
expert, Casimir Yost, as he surveys
the potential foreign crises that
could confront a weakened presi-
dent in his final two years. They
range from the financial emer-
gency spreading from Asia toward
Latin America - and possibly over-
lapping the United States - to the
political weakness of Russia and
the nuclear intentions of North
Korea.
Overseas, says Yost, director of
the Georgetown University
Institute for the Study of
Diplomacy, "most people cannot
comprehend what we are doing to
ourselves
Former Sen. Warren Rudman,
who investigated the Iran-Contra
affair and chaired the .Senate ethics
committee, said he sees little inter-
national peril arising from having a
weakened Clinton in office for the
next 2 IZ years.
"Having watched the way the
system works, I don't have any
doubt that people of both parties
would put all this aside if there is a
genuine threat to the national
security Rudman said.
"The bottom line is that any
president who faces a Congress
controlled by the other party and is
in the last two years of his presi-
dency has problems anyway he
added.
Last week's explosion of
Democratic dismay with Clinton
may be only a taste of What awaits
with the report by independent
prosecutor Kenneth Starr, expect-
ed soon.
Even if it adds no new dimen-
sions to the sexual scandal, laving
out all Starr has learned in months
of investigation is likclv to cause
more Democrats to cut their ties
from Clinton, further isolating him.
To use a Watergate-era term, he
could be left twisting slowly in the
wind.
To add to his troubles. Attorney
General Janet Reno, under intense
Republican scrutiny, is reconsider-
ing whether to seek another inde-
pendent prosecutor to look at
Clinton's role in raising money for
his 19 reelection.
� �
� , , , , � � ,





4 Thundiy. Siptimtur 10, 1998
news
Trta East Carolinian
crime
w V- v? I C?
September 7
A man was arrested Monday at
2:30 am for driving while under
the influence after being stopped
for an improper left turn north of
Christenbury. He registered a .05
on the Intoxilyzer and was
released on a $300. secured bond.
Three non-students were banned
from campus after violating the
skateboard policy. The three fled
the courtyard area at Joyner
Library when approached by an
officer.
A non-student was apprehended
by two ECU officers on Tenth
Street at 11:28 p.m. near
Rocksprings Road after he broke
into a vehicle at the Alpha Phi
Sorority House near Tenth Street
and College Hill Drive. The sus-
pect was turned over to Greenville
Police who charged him with two
felonies. The suspect was banned
from campus.
September 8
A non-student was arrested at 1:52
a.m. after he was stopped on
Founders Drive for running the
red light at Fifth and Founders
Drive and his license was found to
be revoked.
At 9:31 a.m a staff member
reported the larceny of a computer
from a room in Joyner Library.
A man was stopped at 4:42 p.m. on
College Hill Drive for a seatbelt
violation. The man was arrested
for driving with a revoked license
and possession of marijuana. The
man's vehicle was impounded and
he was banned from campus.
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and a home cooked meal?
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'OS N
Every Tuesday 6-8pm
For more information
or if you need a ride
call Kim at 752-8758
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located at the corner of Elm and 14th Street.
For a good time call
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328.6004
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nV
5 Thursday
The scoi
ECU's big
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Pirate spirit
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� 5 Thursday. Senlambnr 1D lABr)
opinion
Th� E.it Carnliniin
j the 1 � � I
eastcarohnian
AMV L.ROVSTER Editor
Heather burgess Manetjingem
STEVE I.OSEV News Editor
Amanda Austin featuresEditor
lli i Ml SMITH fountainlteatlEditot
TRACY LAUBACH Sport!Editot
CHRIS KNOTTS Stalllllusmtor
JASON FEATHER Photo Manager
STEPHANIE WHITI.UCK Ad Design Manager
JANET RESPESS Advertising Manager
BOBBY TUOOLE rVebmasur
Serving the ECU comrflunti, since 19ft the Eel Csrotinian publishes II 000 copies every tuesdsv and Ihuisday the lead editorial In iKh edinon is the
opinion ot she E rtitwial Bond Ihe lest Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor limned to M words, which may be edited In decency oi bievily the East
Carolinian reserves ihe iighi lo edit ui icieci tellers lot publication Ah letters must be svjnefl leneis should be addressed lo: Opinion editor .Ihe East
Caioliman. Srudem PuOlicanons Building, ECU Greenmlh. Z85B4333 for mloimanon. call 9193206366.
oumew
The scores are in and seems like every time you turn around someone is talking about
ECU's big loss to Virginia Tech this past Saturday. But, it's not so bad and it's not the end of
the world by far. The start of football season appears to be a huge disappoint in the name of
Pirate spirit and morale. But, keep in mind that this is just the beginning and our enormous
38-3 butt whoopin' was just the first game.
The way we see it here at TEC is that many fans are beginning to give up. They see a dead
end road and no escape. And the fact of the matter is if you do give up, there is no hope. I mean
really what is a team a without their onlookers.
ECU is lined up to play many more games and will have many more opportunities to reverse
the effects of this past weekends loss.
What is most important in times like this, is that the students, faculty, staff and alumni stay
tuned to our football team, keep up with their progress and keep cheering them on. Wouldn't
you hate it if your shoulder to lean on left you standing alone just when you needed it the most.
Well guys, our team needs us now.
The first home game takes place this weekend against Tennessee and it is your duty as a
Pirate to make sure you're at the game. Not only should you be at the game, but we want you
�to stand up, scream and shout. Of course, if you really want to go all out you can paint your face
purple and carry a banner around that says in huge purple and gold letters, "We love you
pirates But, in general, let the team knowyou are there and that you are still behind them.
This season Pirate fans can look forward to a slew of intense and exciting games against
Tennessee, Ohio, the Army, Alabama, Southern Mississippi, Houston , Cincinnati, Louisville
)and Memphis. At all of these games, minus the far far away games, pirate fans should be there
With bells on.
For the sake of emphasis and repetition let us say again, when the going gets tough the
tough get going and they don't run away with their tail between their legs. You know who you
are. You're a pirate. Now stand up and cheer.
OPINION
Marvelle
Sulivan
Columnist
Trivial skateboard laws needless
Sowe have rapes in the
dorms and murders on the
street and ECU is worried
about injuries due to
skateboarding?!
The brilliant people ar Parking and
Transportation have added, yet
another ordinance to their long list
of "abominable" offenses. This
ordinance prevents skateboarders
and skaters from performing "trick
skatery" on campus grounds.
Sowe have rapes in the dorms
and murders on the street and
ECU is worried about injuries due
to skateboarding?! This ordinance
is a waste of the paper it is written
on. The objective of the whole
ordeal is just unclear therefore the
actions being taken are needless.
First of all, the chances of getting
injured by a skateboarder is about
as great as getting struck by
lightning. Secondly, the students
who have time to voice such
frivolous complaints need to direct
their energy towards getting a life
(one that would keep them busy
and less anal retentive).
This brings me back to the
point of inefficiency. This
ordinance is indicative of the
pettiness that perpetuates these
types of campus regulations.
Students are here to prepare for a
career and adulthood (ideally).
Therefore, trivial rules, similar to
the new skateboarding ordinance
just impedes the already
complicated process of scholastic
achievement�which should be
priority for all those concerning this
university. ECU need to focus
their time, money, and effort on our
education (or a parking deck which
would reduce the oh so dreaded
and monstrous skateboarding) �
not making up silly rules regarding
our modes of transportation.
More often than not, ECU is not
plagued with things quite as
ridiculous as skateboarding rules,
but upon its occurrence the
madness must cease and desist at
some point. Administration
pettiness will ruin campus morale
which will greatly reduce the
effectiveness of any new codes on
this campus.
OPINION
Stephen
Kleinschmit
Columnist
Home run does not make hero
Mark McGwire is a guy who
takes a legal steroid called
Androstenene and hits a
piece of leather with a piece
of wood over a wall. When
you look at the facts, it really
sounds trivial. Heck, as a
kid, I looked up to Michael
Jordan. But all he does is
put a piece of leather through
a steel ring.
Webster defines a hero as Hero (n)-
a mythological or legendary figure
often of divine descent endowed
with great strength or ability. Or as
a person that shows great courage.
Mark McGwire is none of these
things, yet at the press conference
Monday night after he tied Roger
Marris' home run record, a reporter
asked if he considered himself a
hero. And his reply was yes.
A hero? Let's look at the facts.
Mark McGwire is a guy who takes
a legal steroid called Androstenene
and hits a piece of leather with a
piece of wood over a wall. When
you look at the facts, it really
sounds trivial. Heck, as a kid, I
looked up to Michael Jordan. But
all he does is put a piece of leather
through a steel ring. Negotiated
world peace? No. Saved kittens
from a burning building? No. But
putting leather into a steel ring
yes, that he does. And he makes
more money from Nike then all
4,500 of the factory workers in
Malaysia that make his ridiculous
looking Air Jordans.
Why do we look up to these
guys as leaders? Because they are
entertainment. But then again
Andrew Dice Clay, Howard Stern
and Monday Nitro are
entertainment, but would you
want your kids to grow up to be any
of these losers? No. Do we really
consider Hulk Hogan and the
NWO as people we should try to
emulate? Doubtful.
So, who do I consider as a hero?
The minutemen who fought for
our independence. People like
volunteer fireman and rescue
squads that selflessly sacrifice
themselves for others for little or no
compensation. There is a term that
describes what these people do. It's
called jumping on the grenade.
This term comes from the military,
when during a war, someone would
lob a grenade at a platoon, and one
person would jump on it, saving
the whole platoon, and sacrificing
themselves. Real heroes do the
same thing today. They selflessly
sacrifice their time, money, and
sometimes their lives to save
someone else. These are the real
heroes Mr. McGwire. You think too
highly of yourself.
OPINION
Britt
Honeycutt
Columnist
Average citizen at city's mercy
Those are the kind of people
that make up are ruling
body. They aren 't here for us.
They are here to scratch each
others backs and make as
much money off of
the common people as
is humanly possible.
So be careful.
There comes a point in everyone's
life when we have a little run in
with bureaucracy. It's usually not
pretty, but we learn from the
experience that our government is
enormous, erroneous, and
completely unchangeable by
mortal man. I had mine last
Tuesday.
Ladies and gentlemen, do
whatever you can to avoid getting a
parking ticket in Greenville- even
if it means going to the city hall and
memorizing every aspect of the
city code. Keep in mind however,
that no matter how well you know
that code and followed that code in
your parking attempt, it can always
be overridden by the judgment call
of a small, angry little man who
shall from hereafter be referred to
as Stephen Q. Irkell, since that is
who he most resembles.
There lurks a conspiracy in our
midst. The city of Greenville has
muddled its rules and ordinances
such that there is no way that
ordinary citizens can live their lives
without being targeted for
something at least once. Don't
bother with an appeal. The
magistrate is not on your side. If
you don't have to pay for your
ticket (no matter how wrongly it
was issued), then there is no money
for his raise.
But you feel that you must do
something to appease the injustice
evoked against you by forces that
are much larger than you- forces
that come in the shape of officer
Stephen Q. Irkell. So you journey
across the Tar River (yeah, I didn't
know there was anything over
there but the Two Step either) into
a desolate wasteland and pull up
into the yard of the prison with
passers-by looking on as if they
know that you are there to pick up
drunk Uncle Ernie again and walk
through the cold metal doors of the
magistrate's office into a room full
of people who were towed out of
their own yards and await your fate.
You wait. Stephen Q. comes in,
chats with Mr. Magistrate about
the wife and kids for about ten
minutes, they make a date for golf
later in the week, and then he pulls
out his Big Black Book of the city-
ordinances. It begins. The people
who were towed out of their own
driveways step into the office.
They emerge two minutes later-
appeal denied. "What?" you may
ask. "It's illegal to park in your own
driveway?" It is when Officer Irkell
in his souped- up Lark Three
Wheeled Scooter decides it is.
It's your turn. You have come
prepared. You did your research at
City Hall. You have looked at the
traffic maps and seen that the sign
that was the bane of your parking
job is not listed on them. You have
found the ordinance that states that
a sign which cannot be seen by any
living person is illegitimate. The
magistrate hears the first two
minutes of your testimony, then
leaves the room for a cup of coffee.
You are left in the tiny room with a
smirking Irkell staring at you like
he's about to bust out with "nanny-
nanny-bob-boo The magistrate
comes back. Your appeal is denied.
The magistrate and Steve shake
hands, pat each other on the back,
confirm that golf date, and
everyone leaves. But not before he
gives you a sly little wink which
says that he is the head monkey
here, and that if he ever sees your
car again, it's getting towed.
Because he can.
Those are the kind of people
that make up are ruling body. They
aren't here for us. They are here to
scratch each other's backs and
make as much money off of the
common people as is humanly
possible. So be careful. And if you
happen by a short little smirking
man in a three wheeled scooter and
no one is looking, you will be doing
humankind a favor to stuff his little
butt in a trash can.
And I honor the man who is willing to sink Half his present repute for the freedom to think, and
, when he has thought, be his cause strong or weak, will riskother half for the freedom to speak
James Russell Lowell
poet, critic
Write, a. Letter
to tk& Editor
Got something to say? Need
somewhere to say it? Bring your
letter to the eastcarolinian, located
on the 2nd floor of The Student
Publications Building
I





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Life on Tuesday
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PHOTO BY KIN





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7 Thursday, September 10, 1998
features
The East Carolinian
Ideas of courtship, romance fade with technology boom
Nicholas K a l a p o s
STAFF WRITER
With the increase in popularity of Internet com-
munication and the downward pricing trend of
personal computers, more people are on-line
than ever before. Many of these people are
expecting to find love, but if not careful you
may find yourself in all the wrong places.
The Internet offers a wide variety of
services to people of all shapes and sizes.
One of which is gaining appeal despite
the publicized dangers is the all inviting
chat room.
the phone lines and into your computers and
they don't know anything that you chose not to
tell them said Gina Daw, a sophomore at
ECU.
The problem is that many people can get
information about you on the Net without your
knowledge. Profiles, such as those used on
America Online can provide a wealth of infor-
mation about the user.
According to a computer programmer named
Joe in Washington, D.C you should be very
careful about what you put on the Net and
should never
put out any-
thing that you
wouldn't want
someone else
phone lines and into your computers to find out
"People can V come through the
Chat Rooms can be a great place to
meet new people from all over the and they don't know anything that
world, but they have also become a
breeding ground for individuals with a
dangerous intent. Several years back a
young boy was levered out of the state
by a man with such intent, but luckily
the police and the FBI were able to find
them before it was too late.
The Internet does offer great appeal for
many because of its animosity and apparent
safety, but this also is what makes it so danger-
ous. It seems safe. "People can't come through
you chose not to tell them
about.
Someone
who knows
what they arc-
doing can easi-
ly learn things
like where you
live, what kind
of car you drive, etc with only a small amount of
information. Joe, who is a very conscious indi-
vidual; did not want his last name printed for
similar reasons.
Internet stalking is very easy. All you really
Gina Daw
sophomore
need to do is sit in a chat
room and listen. After a
while you can get a feel for a
person and tailor a character
that would appeal to them.
It's always a good idea to I
send private messages if you I
don't know someone in your I
chat room. This will keep
the message from being
printed for all in the chat
room to see.
When asked about meeting
people on the Net versus in per- I
son, Michael Ruff, a junior at"
EGl I said: It's easier to meet peo-
ple of common interest on the Net, I
but you have to be a little more cau-
tious, where as in person you can get
a better feel for them.
In Japan the dating game has gotten so
strange that: Bandai, the company that
brought us the Tamagotchi virtual pet, has a
new style that the owner programs with the
basic character traits and when it gets near a
similar profile, it beeps.
What happened to the old-fashioned
courtship? Is this the end for the perfumed let-
ter and rose, just because you care? Technology
seems to be taking over not only the workplace,
but also the social realm.
Professor of Classics makes most
out of classroom experience for all
Ceruttiteaches each
class as if his last
Amanda A us tin
FEATURES EDITOR.
Nina M. Dry
SENIOR WRITER
To know that you are the innovator
of a field that is on the rise is an
incredible feeling, a feeling most
people have never experienced.
However, for Steven Cerutti being
the innovator of the classics pro-
gram here at ECU is just one of the
many notches under his belt.
It was in 1992 that Cerutti came
to ECU as the only classicist. He
began his career at ECU with the
introduction of a new class, Greek
and Latin for Vocabulary Building,
a course which has proven its
popularity among students. No
matter how many sections are
opened each semester, they always
fill up immediately.
During the 1994-95 school year,
Cerutti took a leave of absence to
teach with Stanford University in
their archeology department locat-
ed in Rome. Stanford has a program
available where students have the
option to study abroad. He was
hired to teach these students and to
take them to different archaeologi-
cal sites in Rome such as the
Coliseum and the Circus Maximus.
"I was teaching the city IN the
actual city Cerutti said.
More students arc becoming
interested in Classics and today
there are five professors teaching
courses, including the recipient
of the Whichard Distinguished
Professorship, Dr. (lharles Fantazzi,
a Harvard graduate and
classical scholar.
According to Cerutti, Fantazzi is
so impressed by the good things
Inhalant, nitrous oxide, making
comeback on college campuses
Hallucination one of
many side effects
Dr. Steven Cerutti was the first classicist at ECU and innovator of the Classics Dept.
PHOTO BV KIM MCCUMBtR
Cerutti teaching Women in Antiquity
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMBER
When Cerutti returned to ECU,
he brought back approximately
3,000 slides of Rome which he uses
to teach several of his courses.
Introducing a program, similar to
that of Stanford University, at ECU
is an idea that continues to flourish
in Cerutti's mind.
"That would be one of my
dreams Cerutti said. "It would be
such a life changing experience
for students
In addition, Cerutti would like
to develop more courses like his
City of Rome course and create
courses that would focus on Greek
Art, Roman Painting and Great
Figures from Ancient History.
The Department of Classics has
taken a tremendous step forward
since Cerutti's arrival in 1992.
that are happening at ECU that he
has expressed an interest to stay.
"It says a lot for ECU, in partic-
ular the Classics department, when
a scholar of the caliber of Charles
Fantazzi wants to stay and teach in
our program Cerutti said.
Fantazzi is not the only person
impressed with the department.
Cerutti estimates that 8 out of 10
students who take one of his cours-
es will continue to take classes
within the field of classics.
Cerutti's current course load
includes Greek and Latin for
Vocabulary building, the Ancient
City of Rome, Women in Classical
Antiquity and Upper level directed
readings in Greek and Latin, a
SEE CERUTTI. PAGE 10
I'll 11.1.1 P 0 III is
s I I I' U � II I K
Imagine yourself at a Friday night
party. There is drinking going on
and everyone is talking and relax-
ing. As you walk through the room,
you see some guys in the back tak-
ing five dollars from a girl and lead-
ing her into a room. All yon can see-
in the back room is what looks like
an air tank, which the girl is using to
fill up a balloon. She then takes the
balloon, puts the end of it to her
mouth, and starts inhaling. What
you are seeing is the comeback of
an old drug on campus. Its name:
Nitrous oxide.
Nitrous oxide is a cheap, easily
available, fast acting, and dangerous
drug. According to the Office of
I Icalth Promotion and Weil-Being,
nitrous is classified as an "inhalant
its effects include disorientation, a
floating sensation, giddiness, and.
sometimes, hallucinations. Com-
monly referred to as "laughing gas
this gas can usually be found at your
local dentist or in some everyday
household products. One of the
characteristics of nitrous oxide is its
instantaneous effects, however they
only I last a matter of minutes.
Nitrous oxide is taken by filling a
balloon with nitrous oxide and
inhaling the gas, much like one
would take a puff of helium to
make your voice sound funny. A
person may also inhale it in its cap-
sule form.
However, the problem is that,
like inhaling helium, nitrous oxide-
use may seem fun and harmless.
But that is not the case. There are at
least one hundred deaths reported
from nitrous oxide use in the U.S.
every year. Short term dangers
include fainting, nausea, vomiting,
occasional vision andor hearing
loss, and increased heart rate.
People who use nitrous on a more
than occasional basis can expect
heart problems, decreased immuni-
ty, bowel obstruction, damage to
blood cells, or death.
"People don't know much about
nitrous oxide because it isn't talked
about said Donna
Walsh, director of I lealth
Promotion and Well-
Being. "Just because this
isn't a serious' drug,
doesn't mean deaths
don't occur
Many people have
died from only inhaling
this gas only once. This
seemingly innocent drug
can cause "sudden
death this occurs when
someone who has a heart
condition, which may be
completely untraeeablc,
inhales the gas. They will
die because nitrous oxide
is not oxygen, so when it
is inhaled,
the lungs, blood, and heart have to
work harder to keep your oxygen
supply normal.
Most people do not only use
nitrous once. Since its effects last
only a short time, people will use it
again and again to get that "quick
fix And with each use, a person's
risk for serious harm increases.
Nitrous is not found on the dirty
streets of an urban city, but usually
at your local parry. Unfortunately,
alcohol use combined with nitrous
oxide can be a lethal combination.
With the impaired judgment that
comes with alcohol, a person is
more likely to suffer from nitrous's
dangers. Some people have been
known to vomit, pass out, swallow
their own vomit, and die. Nitrous
oxide is also available in the form of
small canisters called "whip-its
which are used in whip cream cans.
These canisters can be purchased,
legally and cheap at head shops
throughout the nation. There arc
also some mail-order magazines
wherein these canisters can be pur-
chased.
Physiological effects
NITROUS OXIDE
sof I
Dieorientation
Fixated vision
Throbbing op pulsating auditory
hallucinations
Pulsating visual hallucinations
Increased pain threshold
Oeeper mental connections
SOURCE: WORLD WIDE WEB
"This stuff is out there and any-
one can get it easily Walsh said.
"People need to know its dangers
The larger tanks of nitrous are
always obtained illegally. They afp
stolen from different offices and
industries (including dentists,
dairies, and auto-racing centers) and
diverted into the black market. The
people who steal and distribute
nitrous are more dangerous then
they seem. Nitrous oxide is an anes-
SEE NITROUS PAGE S





8 Thursday. Stpttmbir 10, 1998
features
The East Carolinian
9 Thursday
covering the
offbeat
Strangers at the alter
SYDNEY, Australia (AP) �
Groom Glenn Emerton watched
wide-eyed as wife-to-be Leif
Bunyan walked towards him in her
ice blue dress. She had that wed-
ding day glow, but he couldn't
have known. He had never seen
her before.
"God, she's beautiful
Emerton declared to no-one in
particular.
Emerton, 24, and Bunyan, 22,
were introduced at the altar in front
of 350 people Friday courtesy of a
seven-week promotion for a local
radio station.
The only contact between them
before they exchanged vows, at
the commitment ceremony per-
formed by a celebrant, was when
Emerton popped the question on
the telephone.
The proposal and ceremony
went live to air on 2Day FM, but
there was one significant setback
for the promotion. Under
Australian law, marriages have to
be registered a month in advance
except in special circumstances.
"That is a little disappointing
but we knew it would probably be
the case said station spokes-
woman Michelle Christison.
"They had a commitment cere-
mony today and have planned a
private ceremony with their fami-
lies to sign the marriage certificate
after they come back from their
honeymoon
The radio station paid for the
wedding, a one-week honeymoon
in Paris and urged listeners to send
the couple some wedding pre-
sents. After that they're on
their own.
The promotion was launched
with the attitude that it was getting
impossible for young Sydneysiders
to meet available members of the
opposite sex. In Sydney the com-
mon refrain from frustrated
females is that the young men are
"either married or gay
Emerton and Bunyan were
found after several hundred listen-
ers applied to be considered for the
wedding. The men's short list was
cut to five and the women's nine.
The shortlisted candidates who
missed out were also present at
Friday's ceremony.
The lucky pair kissed enthusi-
astically and seemed pretty
Physicist says he'll clone
himself with wife's help
BOSTON (AP) A Chicago physi-
cist who provoked controversy ear-
lier this year by announcing plans to
clone humans has announced that
the first person he will try to copy
will be himself.
Richard Seed said his wife,
Gloria, has agreed to carry an
embryo that would be created by
combining the nucleus of one of
Seed's cells with a donor egg,
according to The Boston Globe.
Seed would not reveal his wife's
age, but described her as "post-
menopausal
Since cloning carries the risk of
still births or abnormal fetuses,
there are clearly risks associated
with the present technology, the
69-year-old Seed said Saturday
while speaking at a Boston meeting
Woman told she's dead
twice by social security
CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP)
� On June 21, Social Security
officials told Rosie Nelson
she was dead. She showed up
in person� alive and well � to
prove otherwise.
Eight days later, Social
Security killed Mrs. Nelson
again.
"I've been hyperventilating.
It's just being told you are
dead two times Mrs. Nelson
said Tuesday.
Mrs. Nelson, 64, who has col-
lected Social Security disability
benefits since a 1981 back
injury, was notified last month
by letter that she died June 21.
Her benefits were cut off, but
quickly restored after the mis-
take was corrected. On Monday,
Mrs. Nelson's bank forwarded to
her another letter from Social
Security officials in Birmingham,
Ala. This letter said she died
June 29.
Donna Lappert, Mrs.
Nelson's daughter, said she
found out about her mother's
second declared death when a
bank administrator remember-
ing news stories about the first
incident called and asked if
Mrs. Nelson was really dead
this time.
"(Social Security officials)
said nothing like this could be
done again. They said it was
taken care of Lappert said.
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EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY LITERARY & ARTS MAGAZINE
literary
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CERAMICS
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fictionMETAL DESIGN
non-fictionPAINTING
poetryPHOTOGRAPHY
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Friday, September 25, 1 - 5:00pm
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limit three per student - ECU students only
For more information, submission guidlines
and entry forms, call 328-6502.






The East Carolinian
9 Thursday, September 10, 1998
features
The East Carolinian
Shop Now
Best
Selection!
atalog
connection
Division of U.B.E.
Nitrous
continued from page 7
210 E. 5th St.
758-8612
M-S 10-b
Sun 1-5
thcsia, people spend years and
years of school studying the area of
anesthesia, so you can be sure that
the guy in the back room offering
"a hit" is not an expert in giving
you the gas.
Nitrous oxide can be an entry
drug for the "harder" drugs. People
who are just experimenting or who
are just looking for a good time will
use nitrous and may move on to
other drugs.
This "quick fix" can be the road
to a "quick death
Do'n!L�ver,
Try to Ij
orpc
fn
(grr� whippits,
tg gas at anyone tlfcrjl result in
Auvsitkt Milts ii a weily column critten bj sttxral ECU
�"&��!? ehmidmt Mr aptmm abroad in a liarj format.
'NTOWN
ENVILLE
-1666
GREAT BOOKS at
GREAT PRICES!
Friends of Sheppard Memorial Library
USED BOOK SALE
Friday, Sept. 18, 9 a.m8 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 19, 9 a.m6 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 20, 1-5 p.m.
(Bag Day�SS per grocery bag of books)
Willis Bldg 1st & Reade Sts.
Straiwgas mask to your face. �du pass oi
"ill not get oxygen,
yourself in a roorrfe jsJajK car or refrigerati
� an open tank of nltrcwoxide
� A
Star up and do it
Use �Vge tank wtjfut a regulator or which ist
strapped down
Use homemadeltTtrous oxide, unless youji
chemist
Allow yourself toloju uip enumeration
SOURCE: WORLD WIDE WEB
Scatdet
"where the sun never sets"
& New Facility
HighPressure
SunalGerman Beds
1414Charles Md, Suite C
Harris Teeter Shopping Center
252-754-2300
September Special
Unlimited Tanning $34.00
10 Sessions (plus Ifree) $35.00
1 Session $3.75 students
1Session$4,25 wn-sMents
"Well done is better than well said
Benjamin Franklin
"Hell is paved with good Samaritans
William M. Holden
"Never mistake motion for action
Ernest Hemingway
"Some editors are are failed writers, but so are
most writers
T.S. Eliot
"Always do right�this will gratify some and
astonish the rest
Mark twain'
4
"Sanity is madness put to good uses. �
George Santayana
"A pint of sweat, saves a gallon of blood
General George S. Patton
By the time you read this, the news of Clinton and Lewinsky
should hopefully be old news to Americans, after being daily
bombarded with more and more details of the affair. Is the
American media really so starved for stories that they have to
add fuel to such an insignificant fire? Well, apparently they're
not the only ones starved for stories because the Japanese
media, and perhaps the rest of the world, is just dying to know
as well.
The foreign student section graciously provides our dorm
with the current newspapers: the Mainchi Shimbun (literally,
Daily Paper, there is an original name) and the Japanese Times.
Luckily, the latter is in English, so I can at least read news. In
any case, just imagine that this English-Language Japan Times
was the local News & Observer, because that's basically what it
is, and they basically get the stories from the same place.
Of course, the Japanese papers have Japanese news in them
too. I mean, what is the point of a paper that can't tell you what's
going on down the street or what the weather is going to be like
tomorrow? But it's weird sometimes, because a lot of newspa-
pers have ads for companies spread out all across Japan. Most of
the ads arc for places you can't even get to in a couple hours'
drive, like Tokyo or Nagoya for example. I suppose it's kinda
like watching WGN and seeing ads for Chicago businesses-only,
um different.
Come to think of it, almost all the Japanese magazines I've
picked up so far are chock full of information. I can pick up just
about any magazine here and find that most, if not all of the
magazine, is informatioa The empty space that American mag-
azines find such a premium is not prized here. There are simply
so many products to buy here that information becomes the sole
factor in determining which to buy and ad writers here know
this, so they pull all the facts they can in the ads, instead of sim-
ply trying to get buyers to go to their local dealers.
I suppose that the key in Japanese magazines is to get peo-
ple as informed as possible. For example, trying to find a movie
theater here is pretty easy if you know the city, but hard if you
are just a tourist So all of the newspapers list the addresses and
telephone numbers of all the movie theaters. Okay, so the News
and Observer does that too, but do they list it for every theater
in the country?
SEf LETTER. PAGE 10
ding
5 only
dlines
ACTIVITIES APPLICATION FOR:
FLOAT
HOUSEHALli
KINGQUEEN CANDIDATE
YOU MUST FILE AN APPLICATION BY:
FRIDAY
SEPT. Tl,
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5 pm
ROOM 109
MENDENHALL
STUDENT CENTER
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AMI ��HE lVnMf2 TUIC VEADI
ONLINE If If 1 vmM H Id YEAK!





mm
10 Trmr�d�v, Sipumbir 10. 1998
Cerutti
continued from pagi 7
course in which Cerutti sits
with students and reads such nar-
ratives and poems as Euripides
or Plato in their original Greek or
Latin form.
These courses are open to all
students even if they have never
picked up a piece of work written
in its original Greek or Latin text.
"I want to make the language
(Greek and Latin) as accessible as
possible Cerutti said. "Classics
shouldn't be exclusive or elitist. It
should be made accessible to as
many people as want to take it. By
the end of the second semester of
Ancient Greek, a student with no
prior experience with the lan-
guage will be able to read the
Greek new testament
Many students who have taken
Cerutti's courses have expressed a
deep appreciation for his style of
teaching and in a few cases these
students have made the decision
to pursue possible careers in the
field of Classics.
"Cerutti effectively teaches his
courses said Mike Underwood,
an ECU junior. "He makes Latin
and Greek interesting
"I was so enthralled by
Cerutti's Ancient City of Rome
course that I decided to change
my major said Kiersten Hansen,
ECU junior.
Cerutti takes his job very seri-
ously. He teaches each class as if
it were his last, as if it were his last
chance to change the lives of his
students and he couldn't imagine
doing anything else or doing it
anywhere else.
"It's a marvelous feeling to
actually reach the kids with some-
thing they would have no access
to if it weren't for the fact that
there is Classics here at ECU
Cerutti said.
Cerutti sticks to the philosophy
that if you're happier on Friday
afternoon than you were on
Monday morning, what you are
doing is a job. Cerutti said he is
happier on Monday morning.
"If I'm enjoying myself and
I learning something while I'm
teaching, then I know the stu-
dents will be doing the same
Cerutti said.
Though the outcome of
Cerutti's career is admirable, he
didn't start off with a clear mind
set of what he was going to do
with his life. Upon graduation
from high school, the Manhattan
native began working for his
brother and attending classes on a
pan-time basis.
"My brother was in the film
business and I worked with him
for two or three years and took
some night courses at NYU on the
side Cerutti said.
It wasn't long before Cerutti
realized he wanted to broaden his
horizons and go to school full time.
He wanted to attend a university
in a college town environment �
something that wasn't right in the
center of a major metropolitan city
like NYU.
After serious contemplation, he
decided to attend the University
of Iowa and major in English. But,
it wasn't long before he realized
he did not have a niche
for English.
Looking back, Cerutti realizes
that he was a "very uninspired
English major
As with mast bachelor of art
degrees, Cerutti knew he would
have to take a foreign language.
After four attempts to pass French
I in high school fell through, he
knew that French was not going to
be an option in college. Cerutti
instead chose to take Latin and it
turned out he loved the language
and from there he decided to
do a double major in English
and Classics.
"Until I got into Classics, I was-
n't aware of my own intellect
Cerutti said. "It was an intellectu-
al awakening for me
When the time for graduation
from the University of Iowa rolled
around Cerutti began looking into
graduate schools and one in partic-
ular caught his eye.
"Duke University offered me a
full teaching fellowship for five
years Cerutti said. "I went there
and got my PhD in Classics
After completing his PhD,
Cerutti began his vocational
search and came across ECU. The
university was looking for some-
one to develop a Classical Studies
program. At the time, Latin
was taught by French
and Spanish teachers with little
to no seminar training. The uni-
versity wanted a complete
classics program and knew that
the were moving entirely in the
wrong direction.
Although there were other job
offers, Cerutti would have started
off in large departments that were
already well established. The
thought of creating something
new appealed to him much more.
"Anybody can go into a pro-
gram that is already established
Cerutti said. " but to create some-
thing where there was nothing is
features
The East Carolinian
pretty pictures.
Okay, a lot more pretty pic-
tures, too. Going along with giving
you as much information as possi-
ble, if a photo has been taken of
the subject, it's going to end up in
the magazine or newspaper. The
editors are determined to make
sure you know as much about the
subject as possible.
But anyways, yeah, no matter
where in the world you are you'll
be able to pick up a paper and find
stuff about the Lewinsky stuff.
Letter
continued Irom page 9
Great
Prices
Silver
Jewelry!
Catalog
pnnection
Division O! roijTy
Jill 1. 5th St. 758-8612
MS KM) Sun. 1-5
Dancewear Specialty Shop
� Dance Supplies of all
types for guys & girls
� Sports Bras & Shorts
� Activewear
Mon-Fri 10-6
Sat 10-5
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644 ARLINGTON BLVD. � GREENVILLE � (252) 756-6670
Another thing about Japanese
literature is the tendency to stray
away from conjectural BS and
head more for the real meat of the
story. Most news articles here are
short; they just go long enough to
tell the facts without bothering to
interrupt them. Even the enter-
tainment magazines clip short the
gossip columns-you might find a
four page article once on someone
or something really popular, but
then you're in the middle of
a periodical feature with some-
thing useful. Just say the facts,
one might say, along with a few
E5Hn
CDCrTAI
LOCATION:
(BOTTOM
CAMPUS)
MAIL BOXES ETC.
During September
8.5x11, Black and White
Limit 100 per Person
704 Greenville Blvd Suite 400
Greenville, NC 27858
(Next to WIoovips)
Phono 321-G021
Fax 321-6026
Inquiry classes - Confirmation Classes
First Communion Classes - Spirituality Classes
Begins: Thursday, September 10 at 7:30pm
Place:The Newman Center, 953 E. 10th Street
(2 houses from the Fletcher Music Buildmo)
FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL US 757-1991
Fr. Paul Vaeth Chaplain & Campus Minister
I Thursda
Fc
Questfi
shown a
The Pirate fo
first game oft
I against the
Chattanooga.
PTC head
� ing Samford a
KCUhasf
33-7 Pirate vi
: 11)72 season.
Even thou
�ECU head c
I have a lot of t:
"They are
f.they've got D
one player tl
Logan said.
Southeastern
State, ACC, Ai
. ball players. I
common sci
(lhattanooga p
play their very
because they'l
"We've cen
I jget a victory
jLogan said. "
�and we haver
Logan said. "V
IIS
The Mocs
their first win
coach Buddy
return for l!T(
When asked at
indicated that
'attack, throwin
"Looking at
what I consider
150 yards runii
I .ogan said. "S(
now. It's going
UTC is led
I lampton, a pla
of former Piratt
I lampton is mc
the scrambling
who the Pirate:
will look to get
Ru
at
Season op
needft
S T E P
The ECU vv
opened its sea
J Coastal Camlir
f Beach, SC. The
progress they hi
son and get som
f rest of the year.
The Lady Pii
with 93 points h
Carolina, South
UNC- Wilmingti
The two mo;
day were turne
' layes and sophr
had the fastest t
finishers, blister
course in 11:06.
"Abrial Haye
race head wc
�ach Charles "(
knew she would
Testa's time c
seventeenth. T
made more impr
she battled tendi
summer, which 1
time she could sp
Junior Robin
race, finishing 20t
"We had a fifr
kids ran well, the
a goo�J race. We





LTD.
Thursday, September 10, 1998
soorts
The East Carolinian
Football prepares for
home opener
Quest for first victory to be
shown against Chattanooga
Travis Barki. kv
SKMDH WHITER
The Pirate football team will look to win its'
first game of the season at home on Saturday
, against the University of Tennessee-
Chattanooga.
PTC heads into the game at 1-0, defeat-
f ing Samford at home 23-13 on Sept, 3.
ECU has faced UTC just once before, a
33-7 Pirate victory in Greenville during the
: 1972 season.
Even though the Mocs are a 1-AA team,
jECU head coach Steve Logan says they
S have a lot of talent.
"They are a 1-AA football program, but
Rthey've got Division 1 player after Division
Pone player that have transferred down
� Logan said. "They have a lot of
Southeastern Conference transfers, Florida
State, ACC, Auburn, a lot of really good foot-
ball players. I've told our kids that I think
common sense would tell us that
Chattanooga probably will come in here and
play their very best football game this week
because they'll have something to prove
"We've certainly got to play our best and
)get a victory under our belt, hopefully
jLogan said. "Right now they've won one
and wc haven't, so they're ahead of us
Logan said. "We've got our work cut out for
IIS
The Mocs are coming off a 7-4 season,
their first winning campaign under head
coach Buddy Green. Seventeen starters
return for UTC, including seven on offense.
When asked about the UTC offense, Logan
indicated that the Mocs use a balanced
attack, throwing and running almost equally.
"Looking at their stats they were at that
what I consider to be magic marks, they had
150 yards running and 250 yards throwing
Logan said. "So they're operating good right
now. It's going to be a challenge
UTC is led by senior quarterback Brian
I lampton, a player Logan says reminds him
of former Pirate quarterback Dan Gonzalez.
I lampton is more of a pocket passer, unlike
the scrambling Al Clark of Virginia Tech,
who the Pirates faced last week. I lampton
j will look to get the ball to wideout Stefpon
I
Runners pi
at Coastal
Hawkins. Last year, Hawkins caught 45
passes for 885 yards and 6 touchdowns.
On defense, the Mocs will look to outside
linebacker Ed Jones to pressure the young
Pirate quarterbacks. When asked to describe
Jones, Logan cited his versatility and ath-
leticism.
"He's kind of a Morris Foreman type
guy Logan said. "He's very athletic, he can
rush or drop (into coverage). He's just a real-
ly good athlete, that makes plays
Saturday's game will mark the first game
that the upper deck will be opened. It will
also mark the first home game for many
young players like freshman quarterback
David Garrard, who saw his first college
football action last week against the Hokies.
"I'm excited. Jt's my first time playing in
the stadium here for the home crowd
Garrard said. "I'm just real excited
The game against UTC was scheduled
after University of Kentucky officials said
they would not come to Greenville this
year, and bought out of the game.
"We were looking forward to Kentucky
coming in sophomore running back Jamie
Wilson said. "They sold us out, but it'll be
all right
Wilson and the rest of the Pirates will be
looking for their first win on Saturday. Game
time is set for 4 p.m.
CONFERENCE USA
UPDATE
w -op JzJkm w
he Tea
Priate Club provides
support for ECU athletics
This Week's Games
Chattanooga at ECU f
Louisville at Utah
Miami (Ohio) at Army
Miami (Fla.) at Cincinnati
Minnesota at Houston
Miss. State at Memphis
Northwestern St. at Southern Miss
Last Week's Games
Virginia Tech 38, ECU 3
Tulane S2. Cincinnati 34
California 14, Houston 10
Ole Miss 30, Memphis 10
, Kentucky68, Louisville 34
Penn State 34. Southern Miss 6
SOURCE: CUSA MEDIA RELATIONS
ace fourth
Carolina
S T K v e L 0 S K Y
NEWS EDITOR
Each time Pirate fans swarm into Minges
Coliseum, Dowdy-Ficklcn Stadium, or
Harrington Field, they are cheering for
their players on the field. Every home
run, touchdown, or slam dunk brings
louder roars from the crowd.
What most ECU students don't realize
is that these teams probably wouldn't
exist without the support of the Pirate
Club.
The Pirate Club is an organization
dedicated to boosting school spirit and
raising money to fund athletic scholar-
ships for ECU players. They raise 63 per-
cent of scholarship monev for all sports at
ECU.
The Pirate Club now totals 6100 mem-
bers, including 125 students. Pirate Club
directors have set a goal to raise the stu-
dent participation rate to 2(H) this year.
Graduate members of the Pirate Club
live in North Carolina, Virginia,
Washington, D.C South Carolina and
Georgia.
"Our goal is to get 1(),(KH) members by
the year 2000 Mark Wharton, assistant
director of the Pirate Club said. "That
way, we'll be able to pay 100 percent of
scholarship money
36 years ago, the Buccaneer Club, the
Pirate Club, and the Century Club were
Pirate Club President Walt Williams and Executive Director Dennis Young present a check for student
athlete scholarships to Chancellor Richard Eakin and Athletic Director Mike Hamrick.
PHOTO COURTESY OF MARK WHARTON
formed. The Buccaneer Club raised bas-
ketball money, the Century Club raised
football money, and the Pirate Club raised
money for all the non-revenue sports. In
1972, all three organizations merged
under the name Pirate Club. Today, every
sport receives money from the Pirate
Club.
Members join to show support for the
athletic teams and donate what they can
afford to make things a little easier for the
athletes. They get certain benefits
according to the level of their donation.
The most basic level is Crew, which costs
$75 per year. Students can obtain a Crew
membership with all the benefits for $25
per year.
The discounted student memberships
actually cost the Pirate Club $103 per stu-
dent, but their goal is to build support and
hope they keep their membership after
graduation.
"I like to have the students in the
Pirate Club so that they feel more a part
of the university Lindy Daughtry, the
organizer of the Paint It Purple spirit-rais-
ing event, said. Daughtry and her hus-
band lid have been members of the
SEE CLUB. PAGE 12
Directors of
the Pirate Club
Dennis Yqyng
Executive DrWtor
Mark Hessert
Associate Director
Mark Wharton
Assistant Director
Matt Maloney
Assistant Director
Information Courtesy (if Mark Wharton
Benefits of the Pirate Club
CreW ($75) Crew members get'20"iss3esof the Pirate's Chest, the offi-
cial Pirate Cib magazine, a membership card that allows thern access,to
Pirate Club buildings, such as an entrance to rooms under Minges
Coliseum, where Pirate Club members have preeame functions.
Swashbuckler ($150) AH o( the above, plus their name in athletic
programs passed out at games.
Buccaneer ($300Ali of the above and semi-privafe parking on game
day. Parking is first-come-first-serve in the lot by Harrington field.
Sktlll and CrOSSboneS ($500) A Skull and Crossbones mem-
bership gets all of the above including a numbered parking space on game
day.
Season opener prove teams
need for unity, depth
Si 1: I'M i-n Sen ram m
SIM OH V HIT I R
The ECU women's cross country team
j opened its season last weekend at the
! Coastal Carolina Invitational in Myrtle
Beach, SC. The Pirates looked to gauge the
progress they had made during the offsea-
! son and get some results to build on for the
rest of the year.
The Lady Pirates finished fourth overall
with 93 points behind host school, Coastal
Carolina, South Carolina and arch rival
UNC- Wilmington.
The two most impressive times of the
day were turned in by freshman, Abrial
Hayes and sophomore, Becky Testa. Hayes
had the fastest time among the Pirate
finishers, blistering the 3,000 meter
course in 11:06.
"Abrial Hayes had an outstanding
race head women's cross country
roach Charles "Choo" Justice said. "I
knew she would run well
Testa's time of 11:26 placed her at
seventeenth. Testa's performance is
made more impressive by the fact that
she battled tendinitis in her knee this
summer, which limited the amount of
time she could spend training.
Junior Robin Bates also ran a good
race, finishing 20th with a time of 11:54.
"We had a fifty-fifty race. Part of the
kids ran well, the other part didn't have
a goo�J race. We don't have very good
depth, so for us to be successful all of the
kids have got to put it all together. But these
meets are just to show us where we are right
now Justice said.
This weekend the Pirates will travel to
Lumberton, NC to compete in at UNC-
Pembroke. Justice looks to fill some of the
We don V have very good depth, so
for us to be successful all of the kids
have got to put it all together.
Charles "Choo" Justice
Head women's cmss counuy
Shay Hayes accepts coaching position
Former Lady Pirate takes
athletic talent to bench
Stephen Schramm
SENIOR R IT K R
gaps shown in last weekend's meet.
"I think the big thing will be to get the
team running closer to their potential men-
tally Justice said.
cross coutwry results
who
Abrial Hayes
Becky Testa
Robin Bates
Kerri Hartling
Erin Cottos
Fran Laltie
Amanda Redfarcf
Karen Fleenar
SOURCE:
Shay Hayes gained her experience as an
ECU basketball player, as she was tested
during four years of CAA action.
She dealt with bittersweet suc-
cess and heartbreaking injury.
Now Hayes takes her hard-
earned knowledge of the game
from the court to the bench. This
fall she will coach women' volley-
ball and basketball at Karmville
Central High School.
The lessons Hayes learned
during her time as a Pirate ath-
lete will stay with her as .a
coach.
"It taught me a lot. It helped
me grow as a person. It taught me that
with all of the ups and downs, you have
to keep going no matter what I laves
said.
Hayes dealt with her fair share of ups
and downs as a Pirate. Throughout her
career she dealt with several injuries,
none of which was more painful than the
back surgery that forced her to redshirt
her junior year. She could only watch as
her teammates made a remarkable run to
the conference championship game
before being defeated by national power-
Shay
FILE
house Old Dominion.
'I was injured and didn't play, but mak-
ing it that far in the championship was one
of the best things to happen to the team. It
was an excellent experience Hayes said.
Hayes played under the now departed,
Anne Donovan, and her predecessor, Rosie
Thompson. Hayes hopes that playing
under these coaches will help her coaching
style.
"When I was at ECU I went through
two coaches. Seeing how they
coached and both of their styles
will help me decide what I
like Hayes said.
After graduating from ECU
in 1998, coaching high school
sports was just one of many pos-
sible choices.
"It was kind of a sudden
decision. I had a job offer back
home and I had a couple of
options like graduate school
Hayes said. "There was an
opening at Farmville and it
looked like a good opportunity, so
I took it
Farmville's girl's basketball
team is coming off of one of their
best years.
"It's a very good team Hayes
said.
Coaching is something Hayes
has always been interested in
pursuing.
"It keeps me in the game. It
Hayes
PHOTO
Former Lady Pirate Shay Hayes has accepted a
position with Farmville Central High School.
SEE HAVES. PAGE 14
SHAE HAYES' College Career Stats
yarRirtBi&rCSaeRiBtrdsIerC&B
1993-945151
1994-956046
2365-965445
1996-97JteftirteRftirtd
1997-93 �8D59
SOURCE: SPORTS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT





mmm
� 12 Thursday, September 10, 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
Pirates not to meet Wolfpack in '98
Rivals scheduled to
meet again next season
Jim I'iiki.ps
VIMOB U K I I K R
Pirates, Wolfpack, Pirates,
Wolfpack! It's usually about which
school has the stronger team and
who will prevail this year, but not
this season.
Ever since the N.C. State ECU
football rivalry was reinstated, many
believed that the tradition would
continue every year thereafter.
However, the Pirates and the
Wolpack are not scheduled to meet
this year, which leads to the ques-
tion, why?
"Two years ago we agreed with
N.C. State to play four games
Mike Hamrick, ECU athletic direc-
tor said. "The first game would be
in 19 in Charlotte. The next
game would be in 1997 in Raleigh
and we played that game, and then
we would play again in 1999 in
Greenville. We have another game
scheduled to play in Charlotte in
2004
The Pirates hope to play N.C.
State on more of a regular basis, as
the ECU athletic department is
currently discussing the possibility
of scheduling additional games for
the two rivals to meet.
ECU is attempting to move up
in the rankings with the football
"big boys" by scheduling games
with major, higher ranked teams.
This year's schedule includes teams
such as Alabama and Virginia Tech,
but the years to come are expected
to be challenging for Pirate football,
with teams like UNC and Duke
listed on future schedules.
"We've got UNC scheduled
there in 2001 and back here in
2003 Hamrick said. "We also play-
Duke here next year
Many students are unhappy that
they won't be able to see the two
rivals meet this season, however
ECU and N.C. State will lock horns
again next year, and the rumble will
be on once again!
mm
Golfers bring home 12th place
Robinson, Miller
leaders in tournament
Tracy Haikr
SBNIOD WKITKK
ECU GOLF INDIVIDUAL SCORES
17(t) Shane RoWnson 72-73-75-220 4
17(t) Marc Miller 73-73-74-220
4
The ECU golf team competed for
the first time this season in the G.
GunbyJordan Invitational last
weekend. After their three-round
total of a 45-over par 909, combined
with a team score of 303 by the
tournament's end, ECU was posi-
tioned in 12th place.
"Shane Robinson and Mart-
Miller played real well this week
Head Coach Kevin Williams said.
"I was really pleased with their per-
formance
The tournament included three
1�-� i. . ' . i
Shane Robinson
FILE PHOTO
56(t) Daniel Griffie 77-76-75-231 15
60 Frank Adams. Ill 33-00-76-239 23
rounds of competition 75 Brian Crawford 02-05-79-246 30
against 14 other schools, ,M
during which Robinson
and Miller both shot a
four-over par 220, and earned them-
selves part of a six-way tie for 17th
place.
"1 think the tournament was
hosted really well Robinson said.
"There were a lot of good teams,
but ECU didn't meet up to its full
vl
Attention
Gammm &et� Phi
Members
Mandatory Meeting
SEPT. 10, 1993 5pm
MendeVthmaOmtytfZoomo 1&2
All interested students are invited to attend!
Prc-Gamc SIDEWALK
i SALE TODAY!
SOURCE. SPOHTS INFORMATION
potential. For the last two years,
we've had a hard time finding five
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Regardless of any difficulties,
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SEE GOLF, PAGE 14
2
Ronald E. Dowdy
Wr w
Support student-run media
castcarolinian
To receive TEC,
check the subscription desired,
complete your name, address,
and send in a check or money
order to: circulation dept.
J First class mail$40
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ECU
LI Second class mail$110.00
0��" Greenville, NC 27-858
"
Student Stores
Where your dollars support scholars!
Hours: Monday � Friday: 7:30 am - 7:00 pm � Saturday: 9:00 am � 3:00 pm
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i off PurpleGold Sale runs 9 8 98 � 912.98 Not valid with any other offer, on previous purchases, or special orders.
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The East Carolinian
13 Thursday. September 10. 1998
spoils
The Eatt Carolinian
Club
continued Irom page
2800 E. 10th St.
Eastgatc Shopping Center
Across From Highway Patrol
Behind Stain Glass
Mon Frl. 9-6
Walk-tns Anytime
752-3318
EL TORO
Exclusive Men's Hair Styling Shoppe
Est 1968 - Specializes in AmericanEuropean cuts
pirate; spbciau
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BODY PIERCING
'A CRAI IX
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All prices include autociaved sterilized jewelry. Autoclaving jewelry and utensils i9 the
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Come to the only Health Dept. Inspected Studio in the Greenville area, and we are
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TATTOOING BY AWARD WINNING ARTIST
For More Information Call: 756-0600
Located At: 4685 US HWY 13 Greenville
(From Downtown - Straight Down Dickinson Ave.)
Pirate Club for 28 years.
Pirate Club members get prior-
ity seating for football games. The
quality of the seats depends on
how many points a member has.
Members receive points according
to the size of their contribution
and how long they have been
members of the Pirate Club.
The highest priority for the
Pirate Club is raising money for
their Kickoff-to-Victory campaign.
The Kickoff-to-Victory campaign
was established for the benefit of
the 52,000 square foot strength and
conditioning facility that will cost
$10.5 million. The campaign is
added to the organization's annual
campaign of raising $2.2 million in
scholarship money, which they
have already met.
The Pirate Club has several
upcoming events. This Friday, the
Pirate Club members and ECU fans gather on Beale Street at the 1995 Liberty
PHOTO COURTStY OF MARK WHART0N
annual Pirate Club auction will be
held in Williams Arena in Minges
Coliseum. Vacations, jewelry and
many other items will be auc-
tioned off to raise money for the
Pirate Club. Live entertainment
will be offered. Last year, the auc-
tion raised $140,000.
The Friday before Halloween
this year, the Pirate Club will hold
the Hall of Fame Weekend.
F'ormer letterwinners will return to
ECU and will be recognized in a
ceremony hosted by the Pirate
Club.
For more information about
joining the Pirate Club or any
of their scheduled events,
call 328-4540.
(1
TO 3E ANNOUNCED
COOL LINE 752.5855
casarcfcs
LISTEN TO WZMB
91.3
THE ONLY REAL
"NEW MUSIC"
RADIO IN
GREENVILLE.
Lessons That
Will Last
A Lifetime.
McGwire I
slams
record
ST. LOUIS (AP) St. Louis
erupted into cheer, laughter and
tears Tuesday night as they
watched Mark McGwire knock
his 62nd home run into the
stands, breaking Roger Maris
1961 home run record of 61
homers in a season.
Fireworks exploded as the ball
dropped just over left field wall
where no fans could reach it
immediately. As McGwire round-
ed bases, people in stands, out-
side the stadium and in front of
television sets began screaming
and high-fiving each other.
"I knew it, I knew it. This is
amazing yelled Mike Pankratz
as he watched the game at
Maggie O'Briens, a downtown St.
Louis bar. "This is absolutely
incredible. I just knew it would
happea"
"It's hard to put into words
Mitch Waks of St. Louis said he
watched from the stands. "It's
SEE MCGWIRE. PAGE 14
SUNDAYS ARE OPEN MIC NIGHTS
THURS
COLORING
LESSON
PICK
OF THE
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Chapel Hill, NC
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Communications Majors
Hie ECU Athletic Department's Media Relations Office is
seeking to hire enthusiastic student assistants for the current
academic year, preferably freshmen and sophomores.
It's a great opportunity to gain valuable experience in the
field of communications. If interested, can the media
relations office at 328-4522 to set up an appointment
frfiAUieresl
a service sorority to come out for rush.
SEPT. 14 -16 7pm
SEPT. 14 - Great Rooms 2 & 3, Mendenhall
SEPT. 15 - Multipurpose Room, Mendenhall
SEPT. 16 - Great Rooms 2 & 3, Mendenhall
Questions:
Kelly 328-7323
Mandy 752-7105
I
IRONWOOD
Greenville, North Carolina 252752-6659
STUDENT 18 HOLE GOLF RATES
Student Rates begin after 12:30pm
on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays.
(Full time students only)
Call up to 2 days in advance for tee times.
No metal spikes, no jeans, and no t-shirts.
To receive the student rate you MUST present
a valid student ID at time of registration.
$20.00
Cart and Greenfee per round
I





MMi
14 Thursday, September 10, 1998
McGwire
continued Irnm gage 13
amazing. It's remarkable. It's only
the third time in this century that
something like this has happened.
I'll remember it forever
The home run couldn't have
come at a better time, as the St.
Louis Cardinals finish up a five-
game homestand and head to
Cincinnati for a three-game series.
"We were in town for work what
a better place to be right now said
Rich Romano, a New Jersey native
who was watching the game at
MacGuires bar across the street
from the stadium. "This place is
crazy. The crowds are crazy. It's
incredible to be here now
Other fans who couldn't get
tickets watched the game from
televisions outside Busch Stadium.
"We had the best of both
worlds said Theresa Kirchmer
who came to the ballpark with her
family arid friends. "We could
watch the game from here and be a
part of the excitement outside.
That man, McGwire, is amazing.
Wow Kirchmer shouted as cars
honked their horns innings after
McGwire's home run.
But the fervor started earlier in
the day. With Sammy Sosa, who has
58 homers, and the Chicago Cubs
in town, baseball mania was
inescapable.
"It's a madhouse here a cashier
at the Cardinals' Team Store said as
she answered a telephone from a
customer wanting McGwire mer-
chandise Tuesday afternoon.
With the game sold out, the long
sports
The East Carolinian
St. Louis exploded on Tuesday night as Mark McGwire slammed homerun 62 to beat the
previous record of 61, held by Roger Maris.
lines at Busch Stadium's ticket
counters had been replaced by
scalper and fans holding signs that
read "I need two tickets
Scalpers were out as early as 8:30
a.m. trying to get the highest dollar,
asking as much as $500 for bleacher
seats.
"Oh, I can't afford that Tom
Green of Salem, III said as he held
out two fingers. "I could pay $150
though
Others who had tickets came
out to the stadium early for the
adrenaline rush the stadium seems
to emit lately.
"It's amazing out here said
John Dorhauer of Lebanon, Mo.
"There is so much excitement.
There are so many people
Dorhauer, sporting a reds
Cardinals sweater, arrived with his
son at the stadium at 10 a.m. They
positioned themselves in front of
the players entrance and waited,
hoping to get autographs.
Dorhauer's son, 12-year-old Adam,
wore a Cardinals T-shirt and a base-
ball hat and was reading ESPN
magazine, which featured
McGwire on the cover.
"I've got a lot of memories at
this stadium Dorhauer said. "My
favorites were Bob Gibson and Lou
Brock. Of course, McGwire is now
a favorite of everyone's
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BRANDS
WITH
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SllllI �I hi tin- lir- M'Vl fmii
atalog
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210 E. 5th St. 758-8612
Mon-N.it 10-6 Sun 1-5
Hayes
continued Irom page
Golf
connniieil limn page
there was still recognizable
achievement that included Miller
posting a team high of 74 Sunday
afternoon.
"I was really pleased with the
way I played Miller said. "But the
team overall really needs to get our
scores down and play more consis-
tently
While these two juniors cap-
tured the leading plays and record-
ed the better scores, other mem-
bers lacked a uniform method of
contributing to the team's effort,
"1 was very disappointed that
we didn't get any support
Williams said. "It's very similar to
last year in that we'll have a couple
of guys play well and then we just
don't get any support from three or
four other guys, so that's why we
finished where we did
Next on the golfer's schedule is
the Georgetown Iloya Invitational
from September 19-20 at the
Landsdowne Resort in Leesburg,
Virginia.
The assistance of a freshman,
Chad Webb, is expected to benefit
the team's performance.
"Chad's a good player Miller
said. "Me couldn't play last week-
end, but I think he's going to do a
good job once he has the opportu-
nity
With the continual attempts at
improvement, the golf team will
hopefully gain advantages through
working together in their next com-
petition.
"This is the best team we've had
since I've been coaching here, and
I'm excited about that Williams
said. "I do believe they'll get every-
thing going for our next tournament
win
to
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Call Carolina Pregnancy Center 757-0003
209-B South Evans Street (downtown near Courthouse)
keeps me working with young kids
and I can help them reach their
potential and get to where I once
was Hayes said.
The thought of coaching on the
college level is something that
I layes has yet to consider seriously.
"Since this is my first year
coaching, I don't know if this is
going to be my thing. I think I will
need a couple of years to see if I'd
like to coach college Hayes said.
"Maybe I will like where I'm at
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For more information call 1-800-MARINES, or contact
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If you want the challenge, call Capt Reed at (800) 270-9874-1815 or
meet him on campus on Sept 23, Oct 14,28 & Nov 17.
(Career Fair Sept 23)
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ent in home i
Silver line (
printing planl
pets. No sm
$275 all utilit
ephone. 752-
NEED SOME
in a 3 bdr. ap
ed in rent, i
bills. Call 321
WALK TO I
$295month.
wood Apts
villa. 758-659
RINGGC
NowTal
1 bedrooi
Efficient:
CALL
2 BEDROOM
tops). Quiet a
ings. Minutes
it required. P
quire deposit
messagegral
WANTED: R
month, plus 1
block form cai
R0OMM
ROOMMATE
male to share
cated 1 block
room, $175 pit
call 931-9015
nie.
ONE ROOMM
2 bedroom d
ECU. $175 f
month. Needi
9335.
MF ROOMI
share 2 bedro
Nice apt. $19!
ties. Call Steph
FEMALE ROC
share 2 b
$187.50 plus
ties. Call Jessie
edASAP!
WASHERS AP
' Hotpoint X-larg
ery and setup,
today 236-509;
The EC
app
R
for
Applicatk
office
The dea
For infor





RJPWJPPHI
as) Carolinian
fhinj-
757-0003
(house)
Thursday. September 10. 1998
FOR RENT
ig that could lead to
what it takes to be a
ith a spectacular view.
�MARINES, or contact
w.Marines.com
4-1815 or
17.
Y'S,
LL.
est in the
:hoices�
lifetime
:e.
hi build a
5 or call
� nd the nort 22.5 ncdvt
er ivcregc annul) return in
art Momingsur'i pubUshrd
ECU AREA two and three bedroom
houses. All with central heat and
some type of AC. Two with fenced
yards. Pets OK. Yard work included.
830-9502
3 BEDROOM house available imme-
diately 2 blocks from ECU. Washer,
dryer, large backyard, large living-
room. Cable in each room, private
phnna lines. Cal Mike. 762-2879.
PRIVATE ROOM available, only 2
blocks from ECU. Large room, pri-
vate phone line, cable, washer dryer,
$195 per month plus utilities. Call
Mike, 752-2879.
I LARGE BRIGHT Furnished AC quiet
room available to female grad stud-
ent in home of author near campus.
Silver line China 10ECU Harris
printing plant stop on 10th St. No
pets. No smoking. Share facilities.
$275 all utilities included except tel-
ephone. 752-5644
HEED SOMEONE to sublease 1 bdr.
in a 3 bdr. apt. Water, sewer includ-
ed in rent, $225 month plus 13
bills. Call 321-1240 if interested.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$295month. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apts 125 Avery St. Green-
ville. 758-6696.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
2 BEDROOM. 2 BATH APT. (Tree-
tops). Quiet and peaceful surround-
ings. Minutes from shopping. Depos-
it required. Pets welcomed but re-
quire deposit. 746-3682, leave a
message or after 6 PM 363-8334.
WANTED: ROOMMATE $180 a
month, plus 13 power, phone. One
block form campus. 762-6886
ROOMMATE WANTED
ROOMMATE NEEDED prefer fe-
male to share 3 bedroom house, lo-
cated 1 block from Rec center. Big
'room, $175 plus 13 utilities. Please
call 931-9015 ask for KatyStepha-
nie
ONE ROOMMATE needed to share
2 bedroom duplex. 1 block from
ECU. $175 plus 12 bills each
month. Needed ASAP. Call 757-
9335.
MF ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share 2 bedroom apt. off campus.
Nice apt. $195 month 6 12 utili-
ties. Call Steph at 321-7298.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom apartment,
$187.50 plus 12 phone and utili-
ties. Call Jessica at 757-9640. Need-
ed ASAP!
FOR SALE
WASHERS AND dryers, brand new
' Hotpoint X-large capacity. Free deliv-
ery and setup. $40 per month. Call
today 236-5097.
Dapper
Dan's
HELP WANTED
Ketro ami vintage Clothin
I landmadc Silver
Jcwcln & More
-1I7 Evans St. Mall 75. I75G
TUTORS NEEDED: Interested in tu-
toring for the Office of Student De-
velopment-Athletics? If so. please
join us in Room 236-B, Ward Sports
Medicine Building at 5:30 PM on
Thursday, September 10. 1998. You
will be paid for your time. Under-
graduates will be paid six dollars an
hour and graduate students will be
paid seven dollars per hour. If you
have any questions, contact Isha Wil-
liams at 328-4691
PART-TIME JOB POSITIONS avail-
able. Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department Fall Youth Soccer
Coaches. The Greenville Recreation
8 Parks Department is recruiting for
12 to 16 p. Mime youth soccer
coaches for the fall youth soccer pro-
gram. Applicants must possess
some knowledge of the soccer skills
and have the ability and patience to
work with youth. Applicants must be
able to coach young people ages 5-
15, in soccer fundamentals. Hours
are from 3PM until 7PM with some
night and weekend coaching. Flexi-
ble with hours according to class
schedules. This program will run
from September to mid November.
Salary rates start at $5.15 per hour.
For more information, please call
Ben James or Michael Daly at 329-
4660 after 2PM
PART-TIME JOBS AVAILABLE.
Joan's Fashions, a local Women's
Clothing Store, is now filling part-
time positions. Employees are need-
ed for Saturdays andor weekdays
between 10AM and 6PM. The posi-
tions are for between 7 and 20
hours per week, depending on your
schedule and on business needs.
The jobs are within walking distance
of the university and the hours are
flexible. Pay is commensurate with
your experience and job perfor-
mance and is supplemented by an
employee discount. Apply in person
to Store Manager, Joan's Fashions,
423 S. Evans Street, Greenville (on
the Downtown Mall).
LOOKING FOR A PART-TIME job?
The ECU Telefund is hiring students
for the Fall semester to contact
alumni for the ECU Annual Fund
Drive. $5.50 per hour. Make your
own schedule. If interested, call 328-
4212, M-TH between the hours of 3-
6PM
LOOKING FOR A PART-TIME job?
The ECU Telefund is hiring students
for the Fall semester to contact
alumni for the ECU Annual Fund
Drive. $5.50 per hour. Make your
own schedule. If interested, call 328-
4212. M-TH between the hours of 3-
6PM
�VUlMilw
lumber of Domflk Equxy
Account Kjrc.l
42,130
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riAA-CREF Indjndud tnd
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The ECU Student Media Board invites
applications for the position of
DAY STUDENT
REPRESENTATIVE
for the 1998-99 academic year.
Applications are available from the Media Board
office on the second floor of the Student
Publications Building.
The deadline for submitting an application is
Wednesday, Sept. 16 at 4 p.m.
For information, call the Media Board office at
328-6009.
classifieds
DOUBLE FUTON $100 OBO. 25'
color TV with universal remote125
OBO. HP computer 60 MHz Pentium
processor 16MB Ram with 14' moni-
tor and color printer, $350. 353-
1438
TWO TWELVE inch Rockford
speakers with a Pioneer power amp.
for $400. Call 758-9640 after 6 PM.
LARGE DORM refrigerator $85.
Call Joanna at 321-5570 after 5 p.m.
Monday thru Friday.
WORD PROCESSOR for sale. Uke
new. only one year old. Does every-
thing a computer does) Also has mo-
dem capabilities! $225. Call 353-
8963 if interested.
LAPTOP COMPUTER and printer -
Toshiba Satellite T2100 CS notebook
and Canon printer is perfect for stud-
ents! Intel 486-0X2 50-MHz. 343
hard drive, carrying case. MS Word
software included. Call 353-01381
$396 OBO.
MOVIE POSTERS for sale: latest
movies and banners available. E-mail
me at Posters2goOaol.com. Over
800 titles to choose froml
EARN WHILE YOU learn, up to
$1,000.00 wk. Day and night
shifts. Clean, secure working at-
mosphere. Playmates AduH En-
tertainment. 282-747-7886 for in-
terview.
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL LOOK-
ING for student manager. Position
starts immediately thru May 4th.
Will work weekends. For more infor-
mation and application call 328-
4590. ask for Randy Rueth.
DJ'S WANTED: must know variety
of music: current top 40, dance, al-
ternative, ' techno & � classic party
tunes. Call 752-4660.
SCHOOLKIDS RECORDS a region-
al independent music retailer, is
seeking music knowledgeable indi-
viduals to fill positions ranging from
entry level to management in Green-
ville. Please send resume to: 113-B
Woodwinds Industrial Dr Cary, NC
27511: Fax: 919-460-8848: Email:
mphillCmindspring .com
STUDENT TO clean house near
campus, $10 an hour. 4 hours every
other week. Hours can accom-
modate your class schedule. Atti-
tude more important than experi-
ence. Call 752-9406 through Friday
September 11. After 911 e-mail
lbannerOacpub.duke.edu or leave
message at 919-942-6673.
KARATE INSTRUCTOR: recreation
company seeks part-time help.
Classes held on Friday evening at
the Jaycee Park auditorium. Must
like working with children. Great $.
1-888-621-8977.
KIND, PATIENT and loving sitter
needed for Monday through Thurs-
day (1 PM to 6PM) to care for three
boys, ages 6. 4 and 1. Must enjoy
playing with and reading to children.
Please call 355-7238.
SCHOOLKIDS RECORDS a region-
al independent music retailer, is
seeking music knowledgeable indi-
viduals to fill positions ranging from
entry level to management in Green-
ville. Please send resume to: 113-B
Woodwinds Industrial Dr Cary. NC
27511: Fax: 919-460-8848; Email:
mphillOmindspring .com
VAN'S HARDWARE has opening
for a person with sales experience
and hardware knowledge. Lifting is
involved. Must be personable and
serious about working. Morning
hours preferably, however, hours are
flexible. Serious inquiries only. See
Van or Cynthia Everett at 1300 N.
Greene St M-F 8 to 5:30. Saturday
8 to 3. Phone 758-2420.
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY: steak
cook with experience. 18-22 hrs.
wkly weekends a must. Apply in
person at Riverside Steak Bar, 2301
Stantonsburg Rd,
$1250 FUNDRAISER credit card
fundraiser for student organizations.
You've seen other groups doing it,
now it's your turn. One week is all it
takes. No gimmicks, no tricks, no ob-
ligation. Call for information today. 1-
800-932-0528 x 65. www.ocmcon-
cepts.com
GREEK PERSONALS
CONGRATULATIONS CARA for
getting the lead in the musical.
Break a leg. Love, your Zeta sisters
and new members.
THE SISTERS of Zeta Tau Alpha, we
are very excited you are our sister so-
rority. Have a wonderful week! Love,
your sister sorority - Alpha Phi
THANK YOU Delta Zeta for helping
us out on bid night. We had a great
time. Love, the brothers of Delta Chi
SERVICES
ABSOLUTE SPRING Break Take
2" 2 Free Trips on Only 15 Sales
andEarn $$$$. Jamaica, Cancun.
Bahamas. Florida. Padre! lowest Pric-
es! Free Meals, Parties & Drinks.
"Limited Offer 1-800-426-
7710www.sunspl ashtours.com
SEIZED CARS FROM $175. Porsch-
es, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMWs. Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps. 4WDs Your
area. Toll free 1-800-218-9000, ext.
A-3726.
FREE CASH GRANTSI College
scholarships. Business. Medical
bills. Never repay. Toll free 1-800-
218-9000, ext. G-3726.
AS SEEN ON
TONITE SHOW
WITH JAY LENO
Amazing New
"One Day Diet
Hottest diet in the
90's! Free Info (24hrs)
1-800-793-9300x285
GOV'T. FORECLOSED HOMES
from pennies on $1. Delinquent tax,
repo's. REO's. Your area. Toll Free 1-
800-218-9000 ext. H-3726 for cur-
rent listings.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(919)496-3X4
ITS PARTY TIME!
Semaj Entertainment specializing in
Mix tapes. Music production and mobile
Wing with the latest Hip-Hop, Top 40,
R&B, Techno, and Reggae.
All functions & campus organizations!
Call J.Arthur @ 252-412-0971
ADVERTISE IN THE
CLASSIFIEDS.
Th East Csrolinitn
THANK YOU Alpha Delta Pi for let-
ting us hold Rush at your house. You
helped us have the best Rush ever.
Love,Jhe brothersjof Delta Chi
THE BROTHERS of Sigma Nu
would like towelcome its newest
members, the Beta Alpha Class: Tra-
vis Calton. Mike Brooks, Ross Tho-
mas, Billy Horlacher, Larry Gupton.
Jr Nick Chapman, Paul Clifton,
Chris Evans, Gary Pellock. Matt
Richards, Lacy Wall. Ill, Eric Roche-
vot. Joe Tsicocris, Ryan O'Hara, Dan
Blalock, Joe Bullock. Cale Phillips.
Get Sum.
ZETA TAU, Alpha would like to con-
gratulate all the fraternities on a
great rush. We can't wait to meet
your new guvs.
THE SISTERS of Alpha Phi would
like to thank Theta Chi for keeping
us a part of the Bid Day tradition!
Congratulations to the new mem-
bers! Love always, the sisters of Al-
pha Phi
AMANDA, WE are so proud of your
hard work getting rush together. We
love you. Zeta Tau Alpha
CONGRATULATIONS LINDSEY
for your Phi Kappa Tau lavalier to
Bryan. Love, your Zeta sisters and
new members,
ANNOUNCEMENTS
FRESHMAN FOCUS: Let the De-
partment of Recreational Services
help to make the transition a bit eas-
ier on you. This special workshop is
designed for all Freshmen andor
transfer student who are just settling
in. Free in the SRC Classroom Sept.
16 � 7PM- Free Prizes
ALCOHOL AND Substance Inter-
vention Program (A-SIP): Thursday
3:30-5 PM. The Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development is of-
fering a workshop to assist you in ex-
ploring more about substance use
on September 10th. An open, non-
judgmental approach is used to en-
courage healthy decision-making
and to answer questions regarding
substance use. If you are interested
in this program, contact the center
at 328-6661.
COME "ROLL" with us! On Septem-
ber 21st, the Adventure Program will
be hosting a Kayak Roll Clinic. Sign
up, get wet. and learn the basics of
kayaking and the "Eskimo Roll Be
sure to register by Sept. 19th. 5PM.
Member cost is $5. Come out and
see what everyone is talking about!
For further info, call Adventure Pro-
grammingDept. of Recreational
Services at 328-6387.
LEARN TO spa kayak right in your
home towfSill The Adventure Pro-
gram will be leaving September 17th
on a 4 mile expedition down Tar Riv-
er. Don't miss this opportunity to
learn the basics of kayaking and to
see what the river has to offer. Reg-
istration deadline is Sept. 14th, 5PM.
Member cost is $5. Any questions?
Call Adventure ProgrammingDept.
of Recreational Services at 328-
6387.
SCUBA ANYONE? The Student Re-
creation Center will be hosting an
hour long instructional class Sep-
tember 14th. They will cover all you
need to know about scuba diving
and give you a chance to get your
feet wet. Be sure to register by Sep-
tember 7th. Member cost is $15. For
further information contact the Ad-
venture ProgrammingDept. of Re-
creational Services at 328-6387.
THE ECU POETRY Forum is a poet-
ry workshop that meets on the first
and third Wednesday evenings in
the Mendenhall Student Center at 8
p.m. and is open to the public. Dues
are $5 a year for students. $10 for
faculty or members of the Greenville
community. The meetings this Fall
will be on September 16. October 7
and 21. November 4 and 18, and De-
cember 2. Those planning to attend
and would like critical feedback are
asked to bring 8 to 10 copies of the
poem to be workshopped.
MALE DIVERS wanted. If you like
to flip and twist and want to be a
varsity athlete see Jon Rose at the
Minges Pool or call 328-0010.
BECOMING A successful student-
Test Anxiety Workshop: Monday
3:30-600. The Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development is of-
fering the following workshop on
September 14th. If you are interest-
ed in this program, contact the cen-
ter at 328-6661.
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: Thursday 3:30-5PM. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop on September 10th. If
you are interested in this program.
contact the center at 328-6661.
CONTRA DANCEI Sat Sept 12.
7-11PM. Dance to live, old-time mu-
sic by a string band. Contradition.
Free beginner's lesson 7-7:30; dance
begins at 7:30. Students $3; others
$5 or $6. Willis Building. 1st and
Reade Sts. ECU Folk 8 Country
Dancers, call 328-0237 or 830-5403.
Come alone or bring a friend!
BECOMING A successful student-
Test Anxiety Workshop: Tuesday
11 00-12:00. The Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development is of-
fering the following workshop on
September 15th. If you are interest-
ed in this program, contact the cen-
ter at328j6661
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION Work-
shop Tuesday 11:00-12:00. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop on September 15th. If
you are interested in this program,
contact the center at 328-6661.
GIVE US TIME
TO REPAY
YOUR LOAN.
After just three years in
the Army, your college loan
could be a thing of the past
Under the Army's Loan
Repayment program, each
year you serve on active
duty reduces your indebt-
edness by one-third or
$1,500, whichever amount
is greater, up to a $65,000
limit
This offer applies to
Perkins Loans, Stafford
Loans and certain other
federally insured loans
which are not in default
And this is just the first of
many benefits the Army
will give you. Get the
whole story from your
Army Recruiter.
7569695
ARMY.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE:
www.goarmy.com
CLASSIFIED RATES
OPEN UNE AD RATE $4.00
lor 25 or fewer wordsadditional words St each
STUDENT UNE AD RATE $2.00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional words S� each
Must present a valid ECU ID. to qualify. The East Carolinian reserves
the right to refuse fhis rate for any ad deemed to be non-student or
business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE $1.00
add to above line rate for either BOLD or ALL CAPS type.
All classified ads placed by individuals or campus groups must be
prepaid. Classified ads placed by a business must be prepaid unless
credit has been established.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADUNE
4 p.m. FRIDAYfor the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAYfor the following THURSDAY'S issue
just browsing?
been here?
www.tec.ecu
i





1
"JURIES
1998 BELKECU
FOOTBALL PEP RALLY
IT THE PLAZA MALL
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11
6:00 P.M. - 7:30 P.M.
th
THE RALLY WILL BE HELD ON THE SOUTHWEST PARKING
LOT OF THE PLAZA MALL - BEHIND BELK
Come out and show your support for
Belk and Pirate football as ECU hosts
UT - Chattanooga in the home opener.
� Giveaways
ECU Cheerleaders
ECU Dance Team
Surprise Guests
Live radio remotes
DON'T FORGET THE GRAND PRIZE
DRAWING - TWO (2) TICKETS TO
THE ECU VS. NC STATE
GAME IN 1999.
THE PLAZA MAIL
GREENVILLE, NTC
Belk of Greenville at The Plaza






Vol. 10
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Erykah Badu: Live
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Capitol)21438
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Parental Advisory-Contains explicit lyrics
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the BMG logo is a trademark of JBTjJVmOLm.
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�1998 BMG Direct Ml Til
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 10, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 10, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1288
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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