The East Carolinian, September 8, 1998






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TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 8 ,1998 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 05
Reward offered in February's Cotten Hall rape
Investigation continues,
no suspects, no leads
Steve i.oskv
F S KIMTOR
The Chancellor's office is offering
a $25(H) reward for information in
the February rape of a Gotten Hall
resident. Crime Stoppers of Pitt
County later announced they will
also pay up to $25(K) for informa-
tion.
In February, at the beginning of
Sexual Assault Awareness Week, a
21-year old resident of Cotten Hall
was allegedly raped in her room by
a stranger. It is not known how the
alleged rapist gained entrance to
the residence hall.
The Sunday after the rape, the
victims possessions were found at
the corner of 4th and Jarvis.
The victim is reportedly recov-
ering well, according to Tom
Younce, Assistant Director of the
ECU Police Department.
Since the crime occurred, police
have interviewed over 250 people
looking for leads in the case. There
still have not been any sus-
pects in the case.
"We've run into a stone
wall Younce said.
The State Bureau of
Investigation (SBI) and the
Federal Bureau of
Investigation (FBI) offered
assistance in the investiga-
tion. The SBI's Crime
Scene Unit searched the
victim's room for six hours,
looking for fibers, hair, fin-
gerprints and body fluid,
with the intent of perform-
ing DNA tests on any evi-
dence.
Students were stunned February when a student
was raped in her Cotten Residence Hall room.
PHOTO BV KIM MCCUMBER
"DNA tests have not been
completed yet said Detective
Michael Jordan. "We're still
working on that
The investigation slowed
down over the summer, but
now that school is back in ses-
sion, police officials are hoping
to come closer to a break in the
case. The police hope the
reward will spur a new lead to
follow. Last Sunday and
Monday, Crime Stoppers ran a
segment on the case on its tele-
vision show. Anyone with infor-
mation in the case can call the
ECUPD at 328-6787, Crime
Stoppers at 758-7777, or leave
information at the ECUPD web
site.
"We're hoping someone could
come forward with information that
could help us solve the case
Younce said.
The information can be left
anonymously, so people with wor-
ries about coming forward may do
so without being identified. When
callers leave a message on the
Crime Stoppers phone line, they
receive an identification number
that they will use to collect
any reward.
Repairs drive
heat from
Brewster
Many classes cut
short last week
Second Lady visits campus
Tipper Gore Visits Child
Devel
Shannon Meek
sknioh u hiter
Some students literally sweated over
their grades during an air conditioning
failure in the Brewster building last week.
According to Dr. George Harrell, of
ECO Facility Service, the cause of the air
conditioning problem was due to a
burned out motor. Harrell called the
problem, "a complete failure
"It took wo days to fix it Harrell
said.
Air conditioning was eventually
restored to Brewster on Thursday morn-
ing.
For professors and students still trying
to catch up from the days missed after
Hurricane Bonnie, the air conditioning
problem became another set back.
Professors said learning conditions were
severely compromised due to August
temperatures upwards of 90 degrees
Fahrenheit.
"It was awful for our faculty trying to
teach said Donna Evans,
Administration Assistant in the
Anthropology Department said. "Some
SEE BREWSTER. PAGE 3

Tipper Gore, wife of Vice President Al
Gore visited the ECU campus last
Thursday. Gore observed ECU's Child
Development Lab and was present at
the round table discussion held that day.
The discussion, held in the auditori-
um of ECU's nursing building, focused
on child care and child development in
the United States today. Among the lis-
teners of the discussion were some of
Greenville's community leaders such as
representatives from East Carolina
Vocational Center and Cornerstone
Christian Church Day Care. US
Representative Eva Clayton (D-NC)
accompanied Tipper Gore in her visit to
ECU.
Gore is generally known for her pro-
motion of mental health and child
development causes. In Congress,
Clayton is a staunch supporter of school
safety and child development. They
found a common ground in their respec-
tive causes.
The round table discussion started
with Chancellor Eakin welcoming
everyone to the event and thanking
Gore and Clayton for coming.
"67 percent of working families have
children under the age of 6, therefore
there is an imminent need for child care
The Second Lady showed her dedication to children's issues Thursday when she visited ECU.
PHOTO DESIGN BV BRIAN WILLIAMS
and early child development in the US
today Clayton said.
Gore offered her support of Clayton,
who is running for the Democratic nom-
ination for North Carolina's
Representative seat in Congress.
"We appreciate, Eva, your leadership
in the field of child care in Congress and
emphasis on education and the value of
teachers in our society Gore said.
"The family as a whole must be looked
at and valued in this country
The word value was reiterated many
times during the conference by both
Gore and Clayton.
"We read a lot about school safety
and value and to advocate safety, Eva's
iniatives have to be supported Gore
said.
The discussion lasted about 30 min-
utes. After the round table discussion,
Gore and Clayton left for Raleigh for
another conference.
Upper deck
ready for
home opener
The expansion to the stadium will seat 8.000.
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMBER
Half of seats in new
addition sold
Staff Report
After delays and much speculation as to the
date of completion, the long awaited upper
deck expansion of Dowdy-Ficklen stadium
will be opening on Saturday for the first
home game of the season against UT-
Chattanooga.
According to the ticket office, at capacity,
the stadium can now accommodate 43,000
people. There are 8,000 seats in the new
addition, approximately half of which have
been sold. The ticket office also reports that
SEE DECK. PAGE 3
King, Queen of Hall
competition wraps
Scott, Greene, Ay cock
dubbed winners
Shannon Meek
SENIOR WRITER
Scott, Greene and Aycock Residence
Halls reigned supreme in this year's
King and Queen of the Halls competi-
tion.
The King and Queen of the Halls
competition culminated in front of
Mendenhall last week as approximately
2,700 students competed in the wacky
games part of the festivities.
The King and Queen of the Halls, a
collaborative event between
Recreation Services and University
Housing, is a competition between
campus residence halls involving 17
events in which individual mem-
bers from each hall compete. The
events include such things as The
Flipper Race, Tricycle Relay Race,
Bucket Ball, and the World's Largest
Slip and Slide contest.
"The King and Queen of the Halls is
a tremendous tradition for ECU said
Todd King of Recreational Services. "It
also sets the tone and spirit for all the res-
idents on campus
The halls are judged on three differ-
ent criteria. The first criteria for compe-
tition is the percentage of residence in
attendance, the second criteria is the
number of points each hall accumulates
Maritime history students
leave for Bermuda
Students participate in the annual King end Queen of
the Halls competition in front of Mendenhall.
PHOTO BV KIM MCCUMBER
when they successfully complete an
activity and the last criteria is the scores
during the Tug of War contest.
This year Scott Hall was named King
of the Residence Halls and Greene Hall
was named Queen. Aycock, a coed hall,
was given the Scepter award.
There are also individual prizes given
during King and Queen of the Halls. For
example the male and female who slide
SEE QUEEN. PACE 3
Nautical research
premise for trip
William L f. L i e v e r
STAFF WRITER
It's a hard life for maritime
history students who left last
week to spend several weeks
studying in Bermuda, but
somebody's got to do it.
Maritime history students
have left to study underwater
archaeology in Bermuda, an
experience for which they
receive course credit.
Assistant Professor, Gordon
Watts, will be leading them
on the documentation of the
Hunter Galley, a Bermuda
sloop.
The Bermuda Maritime
Museum has provided the
students with a place to stay,
air compressors, and a dive
tank. The facility also has a
keep pond where boats can
be stored safely.
Graduate student Chris
Southerly is doing his thesis
paper on the Hunter Galley.
"This is the first boat that
can be said to be a Bermuda
made sloop because it is made
of Bermuda cedar, which
makes it stronger and more
durable Southerly said. "We
are going to map the area by
using photographs and video
tapes. In addition to the regu-
lar documentation we will
make a photo-mosaic, which
are overlying photographs of
the entire area. We will try to
find out details such as struc-
turally how they put it
together, which basically
shows us the techniques the
Bermuda builders used that
made their boats so unique
According to ECU mar-
itime archaeologist Frank
Cantelas, the research team
has published journals of their
findings from previous years.
The field school in past years
have documented shipwrecks
SEE BERMUDA. PAGE I





I
2 Timdty, S.pUwb.r 8. 1988
news
Th� Ent Carolinian
ROTC members receive
awards in ceremony
Academies, fitness
mognized
Steve Losev
news editor
Members of ECU's Reserve
Officers Training Corps (ROTC)
were presented awards for their
achievements in academics and
physical fitness at 3 p.m. last
Wednesday.
The awards ceremony is held at
the beginning of every semester. It
recognizes accomplishments over
the course of the previous semes-
ter. Lt. Col. Michael Loftin pre-
sented the awards to the recipients.
"Before he handed out the
awards, he Lt. Col. Loftin had
words of encouragement for all of
us Cadet Taneil Green said. "As
he handed each person their
award, he said things like, 'Keep it
up, I'm sure you'll get another one
for the same thing next year
Four ROTC members received
Cadet Fitness Ribbons for scoring
280 and above on the Army
Physical Fitness Test (APFT).
Cadet Jason Gibbs scored 284,
Cadet Mary Collins scored 289,
and Cadet Latrice Clark scored
283. Green added the Army
Physical Fitness Badge to her
Cadet Fitness Ribbon with score of
295.
Cadets must score at least 265 to
make the requirements. Cadet
Latissa Bryant increased her
APFT score by 142 points.
Cadets Todd Deca, Maria
Gilstrap, Murphy Knox, Trisha
ROTC members stand at attention during a ceremony. Several ROTC cadets were
recognized Wednesday for outstanding achievements in academics and fitness.
PHOTO BY THISH4 JONES
Archino, Collins, Michael Poe,
Heath Hawkes, Chris Douglas,
Bradley Kirkwood, Roderick
Stevenson, Clark, Karen Everett,
Aaron O'Keef, Kenneth Parker
and David Parks earned the
ROTC 4.0 Academic Ribbon.
"It's difficult trying to stay on
top in ROTC along with all your
other classes Douglas said.
Three days a week, ROTC
cadets rise early for their 6 a.m.
physical training. Staying in shape
is important for when cadets go to
basic camp prior to their junior
year. ROTC cadets also have to
know basic military knowledge
and history.
Cadets Deca, Knox, and Parker
were recognized for maintaining
cumulative GPAs of 3.5-4.0.
Cadets Poe, Dawn Lee, Collins,
and Cheryl Flores also were noted
for earning GPAs of 3.2-3.4.
Cadets Matthew Malone and
O'Keef were recognized for their
completion of the ROTC Basic
Camp at Fort Knox, Kentucky.
O'Keefs performance at Fort
Knox earned him a $2000 scholar-
ship.
Cadets Joseph Vaccaro and
Stephen Koehler were promoted
to Second Lieutenant this sum-
mer. Vaccaro is to report to Signal
Corps and Koehler is to work for
Military Intelligence.
Staff Sergeant (SFG) Chris
Howard was also promoted to
Master Sergeant.
Cadets Collins, Hawkes, Jason
Dickey, Yvette Campbell, Oskar
Bercedoni, Poe, Jose Bercedoni,
and Jennifer St. Clair completed
Advanced Camp '98. Anyone com-
pleting Advanced Camp is eligible
to skip their sophomore ROTC
classes and go straight to junior
classes.
Bermuda
continued from page 1
dating to the 17th century such as
the Old Spaniard and the
Stonewall. They have also docu-
mented an 18th century British
collier, a French frigate sunk in
1838 named the L'Herminie and
the Mary Celestia and the Nola,
two Confederate blockade run-
ners sunk during the Civil War.
"We have worked on many
different kinds of vessels or ship
wrecks over the years Cantelas
said. "A ship that was actually
headed to Jamestown called the
Sea Venture, we worked on a few
years ago. And later ships, like the
colonial stuff. There are even Civil
War wrecks in Bermuda. There
are really a number of Civil War
wrecks over there, such as block-
ade runners
Graduate student Sarah
Milsted is currently doing her the-
sis on a nearby composite ship
wreck.
"A composite ship is a ship with
iron frames and wooden planking,
Maritime history students conduct research on centuries-old shipwrecks.
PHOTO COURTESY OF FRANK CANTELAS
and most of them would have
been sheeted with copper
Milsted said. "These types of
ships would have been used
because the iron ships had a prob-
lem with fouling. Most of these
composite boats were built in the
middle to late 19th century.
Another type of ship I will be
studying is a composite clipper
ship called the 'Cutty Sark made
famous by its picture on beer bot-
tles
According to Stem to Stern, the
maritime history newsletter, the
class included graduate students
Jeff Enright, Richard Fontenez,
Ryan Harris, Suzanne Pavelle, Fil
Ronca, Chris Southerly, and Jenna
Watts.
Rush
Alpha Phi Omega
Co-Ed National Service Fraternity
Invites you to attend
Informational Meetinqs:
When: Tuesday �Si Wednesday,
September 8th & 9th at 7:30pm
Where: Mendenhall Student Center
Tuesday Room 221
Wednesday Room 14
more information please contact
Christine Kursay 355-3452
Write a, Letter to tk EMtor
Got something to say? Need
somewhere to say it? Bring your letter to the ,
located on the 2nd floor of The Student Publications Building
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3 Tueidiy, S
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the farthest
Largest Slip
dinner Certi
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shirts were giv
such as studer
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everyone seei
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and participan
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professors let
students felt 1
to faint
Many prof
short during tl
day.
"My classc:
the whole tir
Professor Fran
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Every Tu
For more
or if you r
call Kim i
3m@broa

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news
The Em Carolinian
Queen
continued from page I
the farthest during the World's
Largest Slip and Slide both got
dinner Certificates to Darryl's
restaurant. Commemorative Tee
shirts were given for odd categories
such as students born in January.
"There was a huge turnout and
everyone seemed to be enjoying
themselves said ECU student
and participant Scott Gassel.
Deck
continued from page 1
13,000 season tickets have already
been sold and that many people
who usually buy season tickets
have changed their seats to those in
upper deck.
"We are excited to be playing a
game in our expanded stadium
said Norm Reilly, director of the
Sports Information Department. "I
know our fans will come out and
support the team. We traditionally
have drawn good crowds for our
home openers
ECU student Bill Edwards said,
"If we get a lot of people out at the
new stadium that would be a defi-
nite plus
In addition to the regular half-
time show, there will be a ceremo-
ny to commemorate the upper
deck expansion before the game
begins.
"There will be a short pre-game
ceremony to commemorate the
upper deck expansion Reilly said.
The first home game comes
after the Pirate's season opener loss
to Virginia Tech.
Gingrich, Gephardt to meet
on handling of Stan report
Brewster
continued from page t
professors let classes out early and
students felt like they were going
to faint
Many professors cut class time
short during the hottest part of the
day.
"My classes have not been kept
the whole time said Associate
Professor Frank Murphy of the phi-
losophy department. "I let them go
early. It makes people sleepy. It
was hard to pay attention "Before
air conditioning the buildings were
designed differently said Charles
Ewen, Associate Professor in the
anthropology department.
"Brewster has small windows but at
least we could open them
The faculty as well as the stu-
dents said the heat was affecting not
only their physical environment, but
their ability to think as well.
"The excessive effects of heat
can lead to first heat exhaustion,
and secondly heat stroke, and you
can eventually die from it said
Registered Nurse Janet Forrest.
"Also, If they are in a building
where it is hot and sweaty and go to
a cold one, they can catch a cold.
Remember, in summer time how
your mom used to tell you not to
stand in front of the air conditioner
after you had been playing outside.
It is the same idea
WASHINGTON (AP) - The
House's senior Republican and
Democratic leaders will meet after
Labor Day to discuss how to han-
dle an independent counsel's
report anticipated to outline allega-
tions of impeachable offenses by
President Clinton.
The meeting, requested by House
Democratic Leader Dick
Gephardt of Missouri in a tele-
phone conversation Friday with
Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-GA),
would be the first between the two
on the issue. Meanwhile, the Rules
Committee released a proposed
House procedure for dealing with
an impeachment probe.
All told, the events were a sure sign
that Congress could become preoc-
cupied by Independent Counsel
Kenneth Starr's report on Clinton's
relationship with former intern
Monica Lewinsky and other mat-
ters Starr investigated.
"All of us might be so distracted
and consumed by this issue that we
fail to pay proper attention to other
very serious issues that are emerg-
ing in the world said Sen. Max
Cleland (D-GA).
Senate Majority Leader Trent
Lott (R-MS), sounded a similar
note today in the Republican
Party's weekly radio address, say-
ing that in the current unsettled
economic and foreign policy envi-
ronment, "it is especially impor-
tant that Congress exercise leader-
ship in the weeks ahead
"We are determined to maintain,
and justify, your confidence, no
matter what else may happen in
other branches of government he
added.
Starr has not said when his report
might be forthcoming, but
Democrats want a plan in place
that protects both parties and
decides such matters as staff allot-
ment.
"Mr. Gephardt had a productive
phone call with the speaker
Gephardt spokesman Erik Smith
said "In his conversation, the speaker
pledged that Democrats would be
partners in the decision-making
process and agreed to a meeting on
Wednesday to oudine procedures for
dealing with a report to Congress
He quoted Gephardt as adding, "If
this process must begin, it is among
the most serious responsibilities
Congress will undertake and it must
be conducted in a truly
1 bipartisan manner
,tu Aty Are you looking a place for fellowship, friendship
in o j i �u j�
and a home cooked meal?
Presbyterian Campus Ministry at ECU
Every Tuesday 6-8pm
For more information
or if you need a ride
call Kim at 752-8758
3m@broadcast.net
Then ECU's Presbyterian Campus Ministry is the
place for YOU! Join us at the First Presbyterian Church
located at the corner of Elm and 14th Street
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4 TundiY, Stmimlni 8. 1338
opinion
Tutidiv. Sigi
Th� flit C�rnlini.1
eastcarolinian
AMV L.ROYSTER Editor
HEATHER BURGESS ManagingEdilm
STEVE LOSEY NewsEditof
Amanda Austin FntumEiiiioi
MlCCAH SMITH Assisianl lilesiyla Edinx
TRACY LAUBACH SponsEdliot
CHRIS KNOTTS Stall lllusnioi
STEPHANIE WHITLOCK Ad Design Manager
JANET RESPESS AdvamsingManager
BOBBY TVOOL1 Wabmasiac
Serving tin ECU community unci I9Hi. me EM Carolinian pubWiaa II 000 copies mar tumoay and Thursday, tha laad ediroital hi each edition n that
camion ol ihe Editorial 8oaid Tha East Carolinian welcomes leneo to the edilw limited lo 250. words, which may be edited lot decoder in brevity lira East
Caiohman iesei�es tha nohl to adit or lejea letters lor puDksrwn Alt lanars must be Mjned letters should be addressed to: Opinion editor. the Easi
Carohmen. Sruoani Pucwcanons Boikhrro. ECU. Gieemnaa. ??8SM3b3. For inlormenon. call 919 378 6366
oumsw
TEC would like you to take part in a little experiment. Our hypothesis is that college Joe
and college Sally have changed with the information age and that while primitive versions of
feiem still exist Tthey-�e. neither great in number or well respected by their peers. In order to
�test this we ask: What issues do you care about and how do you show it?
The computer technology that accompanied our generation's adolescent development has
"Suped up more than just the speed of business. The very notion of time itself is changing in
our society, as commercials blip by faster and faster and cyber speed increases daily. People get
2jmore done faster, even on the lazy idyllic college campus. Today, increasing numbers of
students hold at least one job and can tell you exactly what the national deficit is or the rate
(the rain forrest is being depleted. Why? We read a quick poll in U.S.A. Today or picked it up
-surfing on the net.
We have an entirely different reality and live in a much changed world from any
generation before us. We may not take to the streets locking arms in protest as our parents did,
.ibut TEC believes there are plenty of young men and women who care passionately about a
J.wide range of issues. On the staff of TEC, a wide variety of majors and interest groups are
��represented. Looking across the editorial board table, we see a group of highly motivated,
hyper-involved students. Many of our room mates and friends are equally involved in on-
r-campus and off-campus groups. We think, perhaps a little hopefully, that the number of
students who go to basket weaving in the morning and have never, ever missed an episode of
The Young and The Restless is shrinking.
� This editorial is an open call to our readership to write us (Student Publications Building
Second Floor) and e-mail (www.tec.ecu.edu) us, telling exactly what it is you care about and
'how you act on it. We want to know how you feel about being labeled slackers and how fair
you think that label is. We plan to write features on some of you and publish your opinions on
this page.
We know College Joe and College Sally are still out there, but at the very least we think they
: are rushing from keg to keg faster while their circle of friends and aquaintences shrinks. The
computer age has not only perfected the apathetic slacker that has come to stigmatize our
�generation, it has also produced a generation of young men and women who think and act so
;fast that when they find an issue they care about � watch out. They'll leave you in their
�icyberdust.
L.ETTER
to the editor
Sonic plaza no substitute for nature
I'm sure everyone's sick of
hearing about the PepsiCoke
decision, but I'm still upset about
it. Besides the fact that I personally
prefer Coca-Cola to Pepsi, I still
can't believe that ECU would limit
their student's choices.
College is supposed to provide
new experiences and
opportunities, and ECU is
discriminating against those who
prefer Coke. I know you're
probably thinking, "Geez, it's just
soda but perhaps this is only the
beginning. Perhaps one day you'll
walk into the library and find the
periodical section reduced to Time
and The Daily Reflector back
issues. Who cares about the
students who prefer Newsweek
and the Wall Street Journal right?
ECU's decision in favor of Pepsi
breaks my heart. Not only will I
never be able to enjoy an ice cold
Coke at the Wright Place anymore,
but now I have less respect for this
school and their judgemnent. Do
they not believe that variety is the
spice of life? Perhaps the trustees
felt that it would be oday since the
majority of ECU students (I'm just
guessing here since no formal
surveys were taken) like Pepsi.
But, more than likely, they
probably just care about the $7
million and all the new accesories
they can put in Minges with the
money.
It seems to me that ECU has
compromised its standards to gain a
little short-term economic profit.
Well, let me just say this: when all
the Coke fans who would rather
die of thirst before drinking Pepsi
quit buying at the Wright Place, I
just hope ECU realizes what
they've done.
Mimosa Mallcrnec
Junior
Art major
OPINION
Ryan
Kennumur
Columnist
Men really are as bad as you think
What is harder? Convincing
a group of scientists that
your idea for an artificial
atmosphere will provide the
earth with 10 billion more
years of existence
orconvincing everyone in
the room that your penis is
12 inches long?
Howdy readers!
Fourfiveokay, you're all
here. Recently, a vast array of
complaints about the male
population has risen from the
mouths of the female student body.
For starters, many girls feel that
males (see also: guys, men) have a
real problem with communication.
Next, it was brought to my
attention that males (see also:
bastards, playahz, liars) are not
good at understanding the needs of
a woman. Finally, it was said that
males (see above) are bad liars.
In defense for my fellow man, I
will say this. We are not that
terrible at lying.
What is harder? Convincing a
group of scientists that your idea
for an artificial atmosphere will
provide the earth with 10
billion more years of
existenceorconvincing
everyone in the room that your
penis is 12 inches long? I think we
all know the answer to that. (Hint:
its the second one).
While were on the subject of the
hard topic of penises, or "peni let
me shed some light on the subject.
Guys, remember when we were
kids and everyone around us had
bikes? Well, my generation of 8
year olds suffered from a major case
of bike envy, especially to Tom
Floyd, the neighborhood kid that
owned a GT Diamondback, the
king of the two-wheeled, pedal-
action vehicles.
Then, I grew up and got a
drivers license and, all of a sudden,
bike envy had been replaced with
car envy. At that point, I was
driving a Jeep Wagoneer with wood
paneling on the sides. As you
would suspect, it was hardly the
"honey wagon" that I would've
hoped for. In the end, I blew up
the engine of the Wagoneer,
perhaps on purpose. Then, I got
my Camaro and I was just pleased
as punch.
I was set from that point, until I
got to college and I was confronted
with a brand new envyyou
guessed it. It was at a party when I
finally learned the difference
between a guy and a man. A guy
will tell you that his penis is very
large. A man will not only tell you,
but also show you, but not until
after a series of unraveling and un-
taping.
Back to the subject in
handerat hand. About the
understanding of the woman's
needs, all I can tell you is this.
Women must realize that men,
even though we have technological
abilities out the wazoo, our
sensitive abilities are on the same
chart as a nectarine. Males are not
yet evolved from the hunting prey,
eating with our hands, drawing on
walls idealism that we were born
with. In most cases, if you were to
bring up something about your
needs to a man, he would look you
in the eye and say, very
convincingly and lovinglyhuh?"
Finally, the communication
thing has always hindered
malefemale relationships.
Recorded history tells us that even
in the time of Anthony and
Cleopatra there was turmoil, as
shown in this exchange
Cleopatra: Marcus, there is a
snake in my room and I want you
to come kill it.
Anthony: It will still be there
when the game is over, won't it?
Snake: CHOMP!
Cleopatra:
AAAOOEEEEEE
Anthony: Tell me about it!
Ground rule double, my asp!
So you see, women and men arc-
very different, not just in body
style, but in logic. In essence,
gender will always be a mystery
regarding how people think and
feel. Maybe, in some far off day,
we will figure out that the whole
thing is pointless, and that we
should stop worrying about it and
just love each other, and the world
will be a better place. Oh, and
mine is about 10 inches longjust
trust me on this one.
And I honor the man who is willing to sink Half his present repute for the freedom to think, and
, when he has thought, be his cause strong or weak, will risk t' other half for the freedom to speak
James Russell Lowell
pool, critic
Write, & Letter
Got something to say? Need
somewhere to say it? Bring your
letter to the eastcarolinian, located
on the 2nd floor of The Student
Publications Building
-4
TEC wou
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Caianian. Sludtnt PuNrtilierii BuiWiiiq ECU. Giwnvidr 77B&B43S3 En iflformmwi. cid 919 328 6366
oumew
TEC would like you to take part in a little experiment. Our hypothesis is that college Joe
and college Sally have changed with the information age and that while primitive versions of
them still exist they are neither great in number or well respected by their peers. In order to
test this we ask: What issues do you care about and how do you show it?
The computer technology that accompanied our generation's adolescent development has
� suped up more than just the speed of business. The very notion of time itself is changing in
our society, as commercials blip by faster and faster and cyber speed increases daily. People get
more done faster, even on the lazy idyllic college campus. Today, increasing numbers of
students hold at least one job and can tell you exactly what the national deficit is or the rate
the rain forrest is being depleted. Why? We read a quick poll in U.S.A. Today or picked it up
surfing on the net.
We have an entirely different reality and live in a much changed world from any
generation before us. We may not take to the streets locking arms in protest as our parents did,
but TEC believes there are plenty of young men and women who care passionately about a
wide range of issues. On the staff of TEC, a wide variety of majors and interest groups are
represented. Looking across the editorial board table, we see a group of highly motivated,
hyper-involved students. Many of our room mates and friends are equally involved in on-
campus and off-campus groups. We think, perhaps a little hopefully, that the number of
students who go to basket weaving in the morning and have never, ever missed an episode of
The Young and The Restless is shrinking.
This editorial is an open call to our readership to write us (Student Publications Building
Second Floor) and e-mail (www.tec.ecu.edu) us, telling exactly what it is you care about and
how you act on it. We want to know how you feel about being labeled slackers and how fair
you think that label is. We plan to write features on some of you and publish your opinions on
this page.
We know College Joe and College Sally are still out there, but at the very least we think they
are rushing from keg to keg faster while their circle of friends and aquaintences shrinks. The
computer age has not only perfected the apathetic slacker that has come to stigmatize our
generation, it has also produced a generation ofyoung men and women who think and act so
fast that when they find an issue they care about � watch out. They'll leave you in their
cyberdust.
LETTER
to the editor
Sonic plaza no substitute for nature
I'm sure everyone's sick of
hearing about the PepsiCoke
decision, but I'm still upset about
it. Besides the fact that I personally
prefer Coca-Cola to Pepsi, 1 still
can't believe that ECU would limit
their student's choices.
College is supposed to provide
new experiences and
opportunities, and ECU is
discriminating against those who
prefer Coke. 1 know you're
probably thinking, "Geez, it's just
soda but perhaps this is only the
beginning. Perhaps one day you'll
walk into the library and find the
periodical section reduced to Time
and The Daily Reflector back
issues. Who cares about the
students who prefer Newsweek
and the Wall Street Journal right?
ECU's decision in favor of Pepsi
breaks my heart. Not only will I
never be able to enjoy an ice cold
Coke at the Wright Place anymore,
but now I have less respect for this
school and their judgemnent. Do
they not believe that variety is the
spice of life? Perhaps the trustees
felt that it would be oday since the
majority of ECU students (I'm just
guessing here since no formal
surveys were taken) like Pepsi.
But, more than likely, they
probably just care about the $7
million and all the new accesorics
they can put in Minges with the
money.
It seems to me that ECU has
compromised its standards to gain a
little short-term economic profit.
Well, let me just say this: when all
the Coke fans who would rather
die of thirst before drinking Pepsi
quit buying at the Wright Place, I
just hope ECU realizes what
they've done.
Mimosa Mallcrnee
Junior
Art major
to ww
&�
OPINION
Ryan
Kennumur
Columnist
Men really are as bad as you think
What is harder? Convincing
a group of scientists that
your idea for an artificial
atmosphere will provide the
earth with 10 billion more
years of existence
orconvincing everyone in
the room that your penis is
12 inches long?
Howdy readers!
Fourfiveokay, you're all
here. Recently, a vast array of
complaints about the male
population has risen from the
mouths of the female student body.
For starters, many girls feel that
males (see also: guys, men) have a
real problem with communication.
Next, it was brought to my
attention that males (see also:
bastards, playahz, liars) are not
good at understanding the needs of
a woman. Finally, it was said that
males (see above) are bad liars.
In defense for my fellow man, I
will say this. We are not that
terrible at lying.
What is harder? Convincing a
group of scientists that your idea
for an artificial atmosphere will
provide the earth with 10
billion more years of
existenceorconvincing
everyone in the room that your
penis is 12 inches long? 1 think we
all know the answer to that. (Hint:
its the second one).
While were on the subject of the
hard topic of penises, or "peni let
me shed some light on the subject.
Guys, remember when we were
kids and everyone around us had
bikes? Well, my generation of 8
year olds suffered from a major case
of bike en"y, especially to Tom
Floyd, the neighborhood kid that
owned a GT Diamondback, the
king of the two-wheeled, pedal-
action vehicles.
Then 1 grew up and got a
drivers license and, all of a sudden,
bike envy had been replaced with
car envy. At that point, I was
driving a Jeep Wagoneer with wood
paneling on the sides. As you
would suspect, it was hardly the
"honey wagon" that I would've
hoped for. In the end, I blew up
the engine of the Wagoneer,
perhaps on purpose. Then, I got
my Camaro and I was just pleased
as punch.
I was set from that point, until I
got to college and I was confronted
with a brand new envyyou
guessed it. It was at a party when I
finally learned the difference
between a guy and a man. A guy
will tell you that his penis is very
large. A man will not only tell you,
but also show you, but not until
after a series of unraveling and un-
taping.
Back to the
handerat hand.
subject in
About the
understanding of the woman's
needs, all I can tell you is this.
Women must realize that men,
even though we have technological
abilities, out the wazoo, our
sensitive abilities are on the same
chart as a nectarine. Males are not
yet evolved from the hunting prey,
eating with our hands, drawing on
walls idealism that we were born
with. In most cases, if you were to
bring up something about your
needs to a man, he would look you
in the eye and say, very
convincingly and lovinglyhuh?"
Finally, the communication
thing has always hindered
malefemale relationships.
Recorded history tells us that even
in the time of Anthony and
Cleopatra there was turmoil, as
shown in this exchange
Cleopatra: Marcus, there is a
snake in my room and I want you
to come kill it.
Anthony: It will still be there
when the game is over, won't it?
Snake: CHOMP!
Cleopatra:
AAAOOEEEEEE
Anthony: Tell me about it!
Ground rule double, my asp!
So you see, women and men are
very different, not just in body
style, but in logic. In essence,
gender will always be a mystery
regarding how people think and
feel. Maybe, in some far off day,
we will figure out that the whole
thing is pointless, and that we
should stop worrying about it and
just love each other, and the world
will be a better place. Oh, and
mine is about 10 inches longjust
trust me on this one.
And 1 honor the man who is willing to sink Half his present repute for the freedom to think, and
when he has thought, be his cause strong or aseak, will risk t' other half for the freedom to speak
James Russell Lowell
poet, ciiiic
Write cu Letter
to th& Editor
iP
v
Got something to say? Need
somewhere to sav it? Bring your
letter to the easfearolinian located
on the 2nd floor of The Student
Publications Building
I
���-��





I
; 6 Tuesday. September 8, IS
features
The Eait Carolinian
dents rendezvous in
d r tcct A
13 students, 2 professors
make trip across world
Nina M. Dry
SENIOR WRITER
This is a true story of 13 students and two
professors, privileged enough to go to a
foreign land, to see what happens when
people don't speak their language and
start gettingok, so it's not The Real
World, but it's a wonderful opportunity a
handful of students experienced this
summer.
There was talk of a trip to Russia going
around in the Communications depart-
ment early February. Andrew Phibbs, a
senior at ECU, said that professors began
passing around flyers and posting them j
throughout the Erwin Building.
"Dr. Festus Eribo put a lot of work
and effort into this trip said Danielle
Pscherer, an ECU senior. "He corre-
sponded with St. Petersburg everyday
"Dr. Eribo put his research on hold for
about six months to plan for this trip
Phibbs said. "He sent us information
either by phone or e-mail throughout the
summer. He put 120 percent into this
trip
On Friday, June 26, the students and
professors, Dr. Festus Eribo and Alma
Corley, left for Russia arriving there on
Sunday at 4 a.m.
"I flew from Raleigh to Dulles Airport
in Washington, D.C Pscherer said.
"From there, we flew on Aeroflot, a
Russian airline straight to Moscow, and
then from Moscow to St. Petersburg
Upon arriving at St. Petersburg, they
moved into their new home sweet home
for the next few weeks.
"We stayed in an apartment type
place Pscherer said. "There were other
St. Petersburg residents who lived
there also
For the first two
weeks, the
kids
ittended
St. Petersburg
State University, taking
the intensive study journalistic
courses. International Communications
and International Public Relations.
Pscherer said their classes were taught in
Russian so St. Petersburg University
hired a translator for them.
"We had a different lecturer each
day Pscherer said. "I thought it was
very interesting way to teach classes
For those two weeks they all went to
school six days a week from 10 a.m. until
2 p.m.
"We even went to
school on July 4 Phibbs
said. "It was alright
because we received cred-
it for the classes
After classes, the stu-
dents decided to check
out the scenery in St.
Petersburg. Even though
none of them spoke
Russian, it did not dis-
courage them in their
excursions.
"Wc did a lot of sign
language Pscherer said.
"If wc pointed they knew what we want-
ed. After awhile we began picking up a
few Russian words like 'thank you,
please, and how much?
"Seven of us went around the area by
ourselves Phibbs said. "Wc didn't
know the language, but the people were
helpful and we didn't have problems
Some of the places they visited were
the National Press Institute, the Itar-Tass
which is the Russian equivalent of the
Associated
Press, and the
Hermitage, the
largest museum
in the world.
"If you look
at everything in
the museum for
exactly two
minutes, it
would take you
11 years to go
through the
church in downtown
Petersburg sits across the street from i
PHOTO BY AMY I ROYSTER
One of Catherine's palaces lies 40 miles from
St. Petersburg.
whole thing Phibbs said.
There were things that were quite
similar to the States such as McDonalds,
Pepsi, Nike, Benneton and even the
music.
"They listen to American music
there Pscherer said. "There were some
Russian stations too, but they're really
into American techno music
Their modes of transportation consist
of taxis, buses, and the metro (what we
would call a sub-
way). With over 4
million people living
in St. Petersburg, it
was just like any
other metropolitan
city.
"Every morning
we took the bus to
school and they
were so crowded
Pscherer said. "We
had to watch out for
each other to make sure all 13 of us got on
the bus
Of course there were things that we do
not have in the states such as Borsche, a
type of beet soup which is big over in
Russia, water with or without gas, and the
drinking or smoking prohibitions.
"There are no age limits to who can
smoke and drink here Phibbs said.
On their last night before heading
back to the States, they flew to Moscow,
visited some more sites, and stayed at the
Marriott Hotel. All in all, the students
had a fabulous time that they will not
soon forget.
"I would love for other students to get
the opportunity to go Phibbs said. "We
all had a great time, got to know each
other really well, and I would definitely
do it again if I could
"If it wasn't for all the hard work of Dr.
Eribo, we would not have have such a
great time Pscherer said. "It was a
wonderful experience
PHOTO BY AMY L BOYSTER
50 r
Capital:
Moscow
popuiatioirloscow
I48,543,000i9,
Official Language:
Russian ?
Religion: KUSSIEII
Christian
(Russian Orthodox)
(Russian Orthodox)
u 30 r
8
1U ,3.8
Manufacturing
IranspoTtatKm
Services
Trade
Main Industries
Main Nationalities
Headache pain most often
caused by everyday stess factors
45 million Americans
suffer from pain
Erin Alderman
STAFF WRITER
Do you suffer from the occasional
headache pain or a constant
pounding in your head that makes
you unpleasant to be around?
Headache suffers you're not
alone. Every year over 45 million
Americans suffer from reoccurring
headaches and 16 to 18 million
experience migraine pain. There
arc even whole chat rooms and on
line support groups dedicated
solely to persons suffering from
headaches.
Where is all this pain coming
from? The main cause of many
headaches is stress, which can be
affected by depression, anxiety and
other emotional factors.
Dr. deBeck, a neurologist at stu-
dent health, believes that many of
these headaches can be avoided
and recommends seeing a doctor
for a sure diagnosis and then setting
up an appointment at the counsel-
ing center on campus for counsel-
ing, where you can learn better
Junior communications major Jon Godwin understands well the everyday stresses that
can lead to headaches.
PHOTO BY JASON FEATHER
time management skills.
Some other common triggers
that may bring on headaches are;
certain foods, changes in the weath-
er, a change in sleep patterns or the
use of alcohol and heavy smoking.
A common headache felt by
many college students is the ever
dreaded morning after, hangover
headache. This of course can be
avoided by not drinking.
Headaches can be divided into
two main groups: primary and sec-
ondary.
Primary headaches, which make
up about 90 of all headaches,
include tension - type migraines
and cluster headaches. Secondary
headaches which are pretty uncom-
mon in college age students occur
as a result of a serious medical con-
dition such as a bacterial infection,
like in meningitis, a head injury or
it may be the sign of cerebral hem-
orrhaging.
Do most of your headaches
SEE HEADACHE ON PAGE 2
Headache
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9-I read forX. Jav i get a headache when
long periods. Is there
something I can do to prevent ir?
ATechnically it is
not the carc straining,
but the lSSQiround them.
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Faculty, alumni net
working important
Erin Alderman
staff writer
The next millennium. Sound
scary? Even more scary when you
think about having to find a job in
this Jetson's futuristic nightmare?
As computers take over a lot of the
menial labor jobs man used to do, a
high school and a college degree
will become a must. Along with this
a degree, future employers will also
be looking for computer and tech-
nology skills.
But wait, before you run out and
change your major to something in
the computer field you might want
to finish reading this article.
According to Dr. Jim
Westmoreland, Director of Career
Services, students should still
choose a career where their talents
and interests best fit.
"If a person has a passion in their
career fiald, they will find a way to
use their skills Westmoreland
said.
Westmoreland believes that in
order to be ready for the next mil-
lennium students in every major
need to increase their computer
skills and take advantage of the net
working available through faculty
and alumni here at ECU. By talk-
ing to and being introduced to
employers in the job market you
have a lot better chance of making
connections in your field of study
and this will help you later as you
enter your field of interest.
Many of the core curriculum
classes available at ECU are also
helping students prepare-for the
next millennium. Everything from
English to your Health course is
preparing you for your future by
enhancing your speech and think-
ing skills. Liberal arts also provide a
great opportunity for students to
think and speak on their feet- All
these skills learned in the core cur-
riculum combine to form the best
ground work for future skills to
grow from.
"There's a lot of work to be
done Westmoreland said.
He believes that all the majors at
ECU are preparing students to fill
fields where employees are need-
ed. The skills obtained in each
field are different�so different tal-
ents can be enhanced.
As the population grows and life
SEE CAREER ON PAGE 2. i
Technology experience j
crucial in new millennium
7 T�tidiy, 8l�t
Heai
continued
occur after a mil
a really long dai
can most likely
tension hcadach
mon form; of
affects close to 7
tion.Tension hes
terized By a see
both sides of the
mally be treated
er such as aspifii
If your hea
severe you may
migraine pain.
a lot less comi
12ofthepopu
Of migraines
four are female
mally occur only
head and most a
nausea andor a
and sound. Mi
normally occasic
more than once
migraine pain s
from patient ti
treatment for t
often times hard
If the head
quently there at
taken daily to re
cy and severity
agents can alsc
women migrain
surprised to km
control pills may
Ca
continued
expectancy
Westmoreland I
will demand grs
ical and related
To be prepai






7 T��ldiy, Saalambar g, 1998
fnatures
The Eilt Carolinian
Headache
continued from page 1
occur after a mind boggling test or
a really long day? Your headaches
can most likely be classified as a
tension headache, the most com-
mon form of headache, which
affects close to 75 of the popula-
tion.Tension headaches are charac-
terized By a steady ache affecting
both sides of the head and can nor-
mally be treated with a pain reliev-
er such as aspirin.
If your headaches are more
severe you may be suffering from
migraine pain. Migraines, although
a lot less common, affect about
12 of the population.
Of migraine suffers three out of
four are females. Migraines nor-
mally occur only on one side of the
head and most are accompanied by
nausea andor a sensitivity to light
and sound. Migraine attacks are
normally'occasional but can occur
more than once a week. Because
migraine pain and triggers differ
from patient to patient finding
treatment for migraine suffers is
often times hard.
If the headaches occur fre-
quently there are pills that can be
taken daily to reduce the frequen-
cy and severity and pain relieving
agents can also be used. Some
women migraine suffers may be
surprised to know that their birth
control pills may be the culprit and
by simply quitting them and find-
ing another method of birth control
they can treat their headaches.
A third type of primary
headaches that affect only about
one percent of the population are
cluster headaches.
Of the suffers, 85 are male.
Cluster headaches occur in groups
that may last a week or up to a
month. Each attack is brief, lasting
only about an hour or two, but
extremely painful. The pain is nor-
mally centered around one eye,
which may become inflamed or
watery. A history of heavy drinking
or smoking is often associated with
cluster headaches.
Not sure if you should see a doc-
tor?
deBeck warns that, "the severi-
ty, presence of a fever, previous
headache history or a family history
of migraines may be warning
signs that your headache could be
something more serious.
deBeck recommends that you
contact a doctor at once if you suf-
fer from any of the following condi-
tions: you have a stiff neck andor
fever; your headache is accompa-
nied by shortness of breath; you are
dizzy, or have slurred speech; your
headache occurs after a head injury
or is triggered by exertion, cough-
ing, bending or sexual activity.
If you have any questions or
concerns about your headaches
deBeck warns against self diagnos-
ing and recommends seeing a doc-
tor as soon as possible for a proper
diagnosis.
Pirates
on c4-a4-
the street
"What do you think of At foreign
language requirement?"
SPECIAL
MAIL BOXES ETC.
Career
continued from page 1
expectancy increases
Westmoreland feels that the future
will demand graduates in the med-
ical and related professions.
To be prepared for the next mil-
lennium Westmoreland recom-
mends utilizing the resources stu-
dents have available to them.
One of these being co-op and
internship programs. These pro-
grams allow students to work in
their field of interest or a related
field and gain experience and on
the job training.
So, before you do something
drastic like change your major a
Ginny
DuFresne
CDFR
Senior
"I fed that a
foreign lan-
guage require-
ment Is
important
Ben
Rodriguez
Art Educ.
lunior
"It should
be up to
the student
to take a
language
Deborah
Calmon
Hosp. Manag.
junior
"I think it
should be
required to
take at least a
year
week before graduation or have a
complete nervous breakdown,
make sure you check out what your
school and major have to offer.
You can also contact someone at
Career Services about upcoming
events like Career Day, where you
can meet possible future employers
and have the opportunity to speak
with them and find out what they
are looking for in future employees.
During September
8.5x11, Black and White
Limit 100 per Person
704 Greenville Blvd Suite 400
Greenville. NC 27858
(Next to Moovies)
Phone 321-6021
Fax 321-6026
Attention
Members!
Golden Key National
Honors Society Meeting
Tuesday September 8
at 5:30 PM in GC Room 1003
Food will bo Provided
All seniors & Juniors with a GPA off
3.5 or better are welcome to attend
Welcome Back
Members of
Omnicron Delta
Kappa
You are Cordially invited to attend the
Fall Welcome Reception
Tuesday, September 15,1998
5:00PM - 6:00 PM
Sweethearts, Todd Dining Hall
Please call Student Leadership
Development Programs
(328-4796) even if you are unable to
attend, so that we may update our
ODK mailing list
Student allaate Special
Tailgate with
WALMART
ALWAYS LOW PRICES. ALWAYS WAL-MART.
mgap
At the First Home Game
to do Is Present your student ID al
r Wal-Mart SuperCenter to receive:
oca-Cola products for $1.98
mt studentfaculty ID)
itJi a 2-Liter Coke product for $4.2!
ssent studentfaculty ID)
ith a 2-Liter Coke product for $25.76
present studentfaculty ID)

Come to Wal-Mart SuperCenter for all your tailgate needs.
Always everyday low prices
Wal-MartYour Tailgate Headquarters
Offer good Sept. 8-Sept. 13,1998. Wal-Mart SuperCenter Greenville, NC Only.
1
MtatatM
i . -�
��L�J





8 Tuttdiy, Stpttmbir 8. 1998
features
The Em Carolinian
covering the
Three-year-old drives off in
grandmother's car
HYANNIS, Mass. (AP) � Three-
year-old Adam Wood's driving
debut was marked by squealing
tires, swerving around a tree and
then plowing into a van. Not bad for
his age.
The tot escaped without injury,
arrest or even a bad mark on his dri-
ving record.
"Sometimes we don't
give kids enough credit
Fire Capt. Dean
Melanson told the Cape
Cod Times. "They
watch things and see
how they work and apply
the knowledge. You've
got to watch them all the time
The toddler got into his grand-
mother's Isuzu Trooper on
Tuesday, apparently put the key in
the ignition, started the engine,
shifted into "drive" and gunned it.
Damage to both vehicles was
moderate, authorities said.
John James, who lives next door
to Adam's grandmother, said he was
cleaning his basement when he
heard what he thought was a neigh-
bor trying to fix a boat engine.
Then he heard the screech of
tires and a crash.
When he approached the vehi-
cle, its engine was still running, and
Adam was in the back seat trying to
get out,
"When I first saw him, he
jumped back into the driver's seat
said James.
"I think he was trying to put the
car into reverse
James got the boy out of the car
and took the keys.
"He wasn't crying or anything.
He looked like he was just
shocked James said.
Man who killed ex-wife to
protect her from aliens
pleads guilty
ELIZABETH, New Jersey (AP) �
A man who said he fatally stabbed
his ex-wife
to protect her from aliens pleaded
guilty to manslaughter.
Brett Steingraber believed
extraterrestrials were about to take
over the planet, and killed his ex-
wife, Suraia Sadi, to save her from
the pain of the alien takeover, pros-
ecutors said.
He could receive as much as 40
years in prison when sentenced in
November.
Sadi, 36, was stabbed 12 times in
the chest in March 19, at her ex-
husband's Rosclle Park apartment.
Steingraber, 39, later drove
around with his three sons until
crashing his car in Westchester
County, New York. The car acci-
dent was an attempt to spare him-
self and his children from the pain
of an alien .takeover as well, prose-
cutor William Kolano said.
Steingraber spent two years at a
psychiatric hospital before being
declared competent for trial. He
pleaded guilty Tuesday to aggravat-
ed manslaughter and child endan-
germent.
Police arrest man for biting
off chunk of nose
AMSTERDAM, Netherlands (AP)
� Dutch police Wednesday arrest-
ed a 54-ycar-old
man for biting'off a chunk of anoth-
er man's nose in an argument last
month.
The officers also found the
chunk of nose in the arrested man's
freezer.
The suspect told police he had
kept the 2-by-2.5-centimeter (0.8-
by-1-inch) piece of nose, which was
frozen in a glass of milk, to prove he
did not use a knife in the Aug. 14
attack in an Amsterdam cafe,
according to a police statement.
Police thawed out the piece of
nose but said there was no longer
any chance of grafting it back on to
the victim's face. The suspect,
whose name was not released, was
expected to be charged with aggra-
vated assault.
at
9 Tutiday, Sip
Pir
a
Season
t
Lessons That
A Lifetime-
TRAINING
Put that college degree to use by enrolling into the Air Force Officer
Training School. Upon successful completion of the Officer Training
School, you will become a commissioned Air Force officer with
earned respect and benefits like - great starting pay. medical and
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AIM HIGH opportunities. For more on how to qualify
and get your career soaring with the
Air Force Officer Training School, call
1-80CM23-USAR or visit our website at
www.airforee.com www.airforce.com
Communications Majors
The ECU Athletic Department's Media Relations Office is
seeking to hire enthusiastic student assistants for the currant
academic year, preferably freshmen and sophomores.
It's a great opportunity to gam valuable experience In the
field of communications. If interested, call the media
relations office at 328-4522 to set up an appointment
ladies wlio are in.teres
a service sorority to come out for rush.
SEPT. 14 -16 7pm
SEPT. 14 - Great Rooms 2 & 3, MendenhaU
SEPT. 15 - Multipurpose Room, MendenhaU
SEPT. 16 - Great Rooms 2 & 3, MendenhaU
Questions:
KeUy 328-7323
Mandy 752-7105
Great
Prices
Silver
Jewelry!
atalog
pnnection
D.v,sionOf ��Til,
210 E. 5th St. 758-8612
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PECIAl
MAIL BOXES ETC.
During September
8.5x11, Black and White
Limit 100 per Person
704 Grennuiile Blvd Suite 400
Greenville. NC 27858
(Next to Moovies)
Phone 321-6021
Fax 321-6026
11 s Smooth And Sexy.
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IUUJUV. BoantCtmm Swgnt
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1-800-553-2772
-� The 1998 sea;
ECU football
hands of Virgir
The Hokie
fourth consecu
ECU squan
. I field goals and
I punt on the P
I plete a pass, bt
) took over deep
8 took a 3-0 lead
j back. Halfback
wide open Lai
' out of bounds.
jj "You can't r
football coach
Tech. We had
; goal opportuni
news is that w
concerned if tl
As the game
down the Pirat
"Late in th
much, again, b
on offense L
that situation,
not because of
After a slow
ly against a toi
Spo
Pmmoti
pump u
Jim
SENI
Purple here, (
can escape it
home of the E
School spiri
versity and the
ing departmen
efforts lead to:
Sports mark
the interest ir
making peopk
pus events tha
"We pass oi
pus and make
than a game,
Director of M
get the reporte
and excited al
the field and tl
Many resou
duce the poste
that ECU stu
surrounded b
day.
The mark
sometimes d
lYCv Partne
availabkJ
Mario S
SENIC
iCU's recreatk
program is offer
sessions for hall
This progran
students and n
xnter can take
.onal training p:
ible and reason
"Two people
vith one perso
heir fitness goa
According to
'






it last Carolinian
also found the
he arrested man's
Jd police he had
-centimeter (0.8-
f nose, which was
milk, to prove he
e in the Aug. 14
msterdam cafe,
:e statement,
out the piece of
e was no longer
:ing it back on to
. The suspect,
�ot released, was
irged with aggra-
Questions:
;elly 328-7323
andy 752-7105
9 Tunday. September 8. 1998
sports
ThtEastl
Pirate football drops fourth
consecutive Tech battle
Season football opener marked with
disappointing 38-3 loss
Travis Barklky
senior writer
The 1998 season opener didn't quite go as planned for the
ECU football team, as they suffered a 38-3 pounding at the
hands of Virginia Tech, Saturday in Blacksburg, Va.
The Hokies rushed for 222 yards and beat ECU for the
fourth consecutive time.
ECU squandered several scoring opportunities, missing two
field goals and failing to convert on several "trick" plays. A fake
punt on the Pirate's first possession saw Andrew Bayes com-
plete a pass, but it fell short of the first down marker and Tech
took over deep in Pirate territory. Tech's drive stalled but they
took a 3-0 lead on Shayne Graham's field goal and never looked
back. Halfback Marcellus Harris' attempted an option pass to a
wide open LaMont Chappell, but threw the overthrew the ball
out of bounds.
"You can't not capitalize on your opportunities ECU head
football coach Steve Logan said. "Especially against Virginia
Tech. We had three touchdown opportunities and three field
goal opportunities and came away with three points. The good
news is that we had the opportunity. I would be much more
concerned if there had been no opportunity
As the game went on, Tech's balanced offensive attack wore
down the Pirate defense.
"Late in the game our defense was on the field way too
much, again, because we didn't capitalize on our opportunities
on offense Logan said. "Eventually defenses wear down in
that situation, and our defense got a little bit worn down. It's
not because of conditioning
After a slow start, ECU moved the ball somewhat effective-
ly against a tough Tech defense, using a new option running
m .i"y'
Many ECU fans traveled to Blacksburg to watch the Pirates take the field
for the first time this season at Virginia Tech.
PHOTO BY TRAVIS BARKLEI
attack. For the game, ECU gained 303 yards, 135 of which
were on the ground. This was a dramatic improvement over
last season, when the Pirates were 111th out of 112 division one
schools in rushing yards.
True to his word, Logan played two quarterbacks against
Tech, sophomore Bobby Weaver and redshirt freshman David
Garrard. Both played nearly an equal amount of time with
Weaver starting the first and second halves, with Garrard com-
ing in relief.
Both QB's showed a variety of skills in their first real oppor-
tunity at playing time.
Weaver used his speed to rush for 33 yards on just four car-
ries. Garrard showed outstanding arm strength and an ability
to avoid oncoming pass rushers.
"For my first time out, I think I did pretty good Garrard
said.
Garrard said that he would like to improve on his red zone
performance.
"I had Jamie Wilson open in the end zone and the ball just
sailed on me Garrard said. "I got so excited when 1 threw it
because he was so wide open
SEE FOOTBALL PAGE 11
FoptbiCQ
9-J3u -
SCORE338
FIRST DOWNS162' t
Rushing Passing Penalty Rushing Yards Attempts Average Passing Yards Att-Comp-Int Total Offense8 7 1 135 37 3.6 168 26-13-0 30313 7 1 222L J 47 4.7 121 15-10-0 343
Time of Possession27:3332:27
SOURCE: ECU SPORTS INFORMATION
Individual Game Stats
RUSHINGAteYdsAvg
Wilson19824.3
Weaver4338.3
ChappellI1616.0
PASSINGAttCmpYds
Garrard179153
WeaverII3II
BayesII4
RECEIVINGNo.YdsAvg
Chappell410025.0
Wilson33712.3
Smith3299.7
SOURCE: ECU SPORTS INFORMATION
Sports marketing department spreads purple and gold
Promotional posters
pump up ECU spirit
Jim Piiklps
SENIOR WRITER
Purple here, Gold there. No one
can escape it in Greenville, the
home of the ECU Pirates.
School spirit is huge at this uni-
versity and the ECU sports market-
ing department sees to it that there
efforts lead to success.
Sports marketing helps promote
the interest in ECU athletics by
making people aware of the cam-
pus events that are happening.
"We pass out flyers around cam-
pus and make it more of an event
than a game Angie Wellman,
Director of Marketing said. "We
get the reporters and fans involved
and excited about the players on
the field and the court
Many resources are used to pro-
duce the posters and merchandise
that ECU students and fans are
surrounded by on campus every
day.
The marketing department
sometimes designs the posters
themselves, but also works with
different printers and outside
agencies for design works. Each
year a theme is decided on by the
department to be featured on
posters and brochures. The theme
for this year is "New Look, Same
Attitude
Deciding on which student
athlete are put on the posters and
brochures is actually a complex
process.
"We look at different athletes
that have excelled on the field and
in the classroom and have partici-
pated in community work
Wellman said.
The cost of making promotion-
al posters and brochures depends
on things like the printers and-
designers working on it, how
many need to be ordered, what
pictures are needed, and if it is
done internally or by an outside
agency.
The time it takes to make this
marketing items depends on sev-
eral factors.
"It depends on how many
times it is sent back for changes,
the person designing it, etc
Wellman said. "It is a project-by
project basis
The media guides for each sport
are designed by the Sports
Pirate fans go all out to show the entire country what school spirit is all about at ECU. These students painted themselves
purple and gold with hopes of getting their faces on ESPN2.
PHOTO COURTESY OF JAY COCHRAN
Information Department and the
same criteria goes for the athletes
that are featured on those as well.
The unveiling of the new ECU
logos has created a consistency for
the marketing department.
"Nothing was consistent, we
wanted to update our series with all
SEE SPIRIT. PAGE 11
Rec. services offers personal training packages
Partner training
available for half price
Mario S r: ii B r h a v f e r
SENIOR WRITER
iCU's recreational services fitness
program is offering partner training
sessions for half price.
This program's advantage is that
.tudents and members of the rec.
:cnter can take advantage of per-
,onal training packages at an afford-
ible and reasonable cost.
"Two people can work together
vith one personal trainer to reach
heir fitness goals Brown said.
According to Brown, 16 people
Personal trainer Todd Hobgood assists Shawn Conley
in the weight room at the Student Rec. Canter.
PHOTO BY PAT IBELAN
are enrolled for the program for this
fall, but the numbers usually fluc-
tuate throughout the beginning of a
new semester.
"We always have a higher enroll-
ment in the spring semester.
because everybody wants
to get in shape for springy
break Brown said.
A personal training
program offers personal
ized assistance to safehj
and effectively reach fitj
ness goals. According
Brown, the main reasor
to work with a trainer ar
insecurity, how to use the
equipment safely and
lack of motivation fa
working out alone.
"In my sophomore yea
at high school, when I first started
lifting, I started with a trainer
learn how to use the equipment
properly without getting hurt
junior Shawn McKenna said.
Even if you are experienced in
Personal Training Packages
1 session$20
2 sessions$36
4 sessions$64
8 sessions$112
12 sessions$144
16 sessions$160
A fitness assessment and nutrition analysis are
included in packages 8, 12 and 16.
Source: ECU I Jepaitment of Recreational Services
the weight room, a personal trainer
can help establish reasonable goals
and exercise technique.
SEE TRAINING PAGE 11
Open your
eyes to all I
sports, fans -
Tracy Hairr
senior writer
It's a diverse world we live in, so
why do the two games of football
and basketball never cease to end
the channel surfing, own the bold
newspaper headlines, and even,
to some degree, determine an
athlete's significance?
One of the leading justifica-
tions is their unlimited amount of
action on the field or court respec-
tively, at one time and throughout
the entire game.
With this dense level of ten-
sion that results from encompass-
ing rules and different athletic
personalities, and coupled with an
ordinary person's daily stress, fans
almost always find a way to pat-
tern their schedules to the times
football and basketball games are
normally played.
What exactly causes this?
There's evidently a connection
with these sports and television
coverage, but the real roots of this
passionate support are derived
from spectators' attempts to get
involved in street and backyard
games, either from mere boredom
or while hanging out with friends.
Additionally, materials for these
sports arc accessible�you need a
football or basketball, and for the
latter, a goal, but if you don't have
your own, there's usually a public
one nearby.
This is where a genuine com-
parison can be made between
whether or not the circumstances
for these sports and others such as
volleyball, tennis and swimming
are influenced by the mentioned
characteristics.
To consider the first one
described, these other sports have
a tendency to appear repetitious
and almost boring unless the fan
is a natural advocate of the activi-
ty from personal experience or
knowing people who participate
in them. So as not to sound flip-
pant and underestimate the skill
that's required for these sports,
there is indeed a respectable level
of attention they deserve, but
unless one has a volleyball net,
tennis court or swimming pool
close at hand, these activities are
not as pursued as the reigning two
that have stadiums, coliseums
and couches full of enthusiastic
fans.
Granted, there do exist the
more sophisticated treatments of
minor sports, for lack of a better
description, like the World Cup,
for example, that arouses as many
supporters as do the bowl games
and NBA finals. And to refrain
from traversing sensitive ground,
it should be safe to acknowledge
these sports as simply more spe-
cific in attracting fans, but they
are just as commendable for their
demonstrations of rhythm and
endurance without the intrusion
of a time clock (excluding soccer,
of course).
Relating all of this to ECU, itjs
worth the students' time and
effort to realize the athletic
department does generate
money for more purposes than
those pertaining to football and
basketball. To the athletes
involved in other sports, it's more
than an avocation when they
practice so diligently before com-
peting.
So, with all due respect to the
Pirates, all the Pirates who repre-
sent us against other schools, let's
show a bit more appreciation for
the multiple forms of talent pre-
sent at ECU, and remember
SEE EDITORIAL PAGE 11






10 Tuudty, Stpttwbir 8. 1998
sports
Tht Eut Carolinian
Olympic interest falls
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) On the
eve of the first large-scale effort to
provide details about the 2002
Winter Games, a new poll raises
the question: Does anyone care?
A copyright poll published in
Sunday's Deseret News found that
58 percent of Utah residents
polled said they don't feel at all a
part of the Games. About half said
they don't want to.
Sixty-nine percent said they
don't know enough about plans,
and a majority said Olympic orga-
nizers are not doing what they can
to involve the public.
Salt Lake Organizing
Committee officials say they've
done the best they can.especially
given limited financial resources.
On Tuesday, Olympic organiz-
ers, Gov. Mike Leavitt and other
state and local government leaders
are sponsoring an "Olympic
Forum" at the Salt Palace to dis-
cuss plans with the hundreds of
invited community, business and
religious leaders. The public is also
invited.
Ken Bullock, a SLOC Board of
Editorial
continued from page 9
every athlete benefits from school
spirited fans.
Trustee member and executive
director of the Utah League of
Cities and Towns, a sponsor of the
forum, said Utah can still rally
behind the Games, but organizers
must be more forthcoming with
information.
"We've lost two or three years
of opportunities to teach people
about the Olympics more impor-
tandy what it means to them
Bullock said. "I would still be very
optimistic people will come out
and we'll put on a great face
SLOC chief executive officer
Frank Joklik agrees with Bullock,
and hopes Tuesday's meeting
gives the public the information it
wants. "We've got to clearly give
information, but at the same time
we need to get a bit of a better
view of public concerns about the
quality and the type of information
they're getting Joklik said.
The poll of 407 Utah residents
was conducted for the Deseret
News by Dan Jones & Associates
in August and has a 5 percent mar-
gin of error.
Aside from the potential vio-
lence that's prevalent in football
and basketball, there is much to be
enjoyed from observing more
relaxed yet equally intense,
competitive sports.
V
ELTORO
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Fi
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Attention
Gamma Beta Phi
Members
� ' mm mum
Mandatory Meeting
SEPtflO, 1993 5pm
MorutmhtwH &mst Rooms 1&2
All interested students are invited to attend!
The Best Checking
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Unlike other "student accounts the benefits don't expire
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Although
some playing
of Dan Gonz
start. Weaver
relaxed at th
half, but said
vous either h;
"I was a b
wasn't too n
the first half
He says th
quarterbacks
thing extra to
Tr
All The Bank You'll Ever Need
Checkers
"A lot of s
sure if they nc
want to knov
correct Brow
to get pushed
tions to maint;
sistency in th
All trainers
health and
Greenville Boulevard across from The Plaza Mall
e Plaza Mall
News Writer
(iam i
POSITION
�Writing Experience
Required
�Minimum GPA 2.0
�Must be able to meet
weekly deadlines
Think,
erefore
i iMac!
Think
Fast!
Okay, you're here, now
how to make the best of
your time at ECU. One
way is to get the best
computer, and dollar
value, you can.
That's where we come in
YOUR CHOICE!
Introducing,
the revolutionary iMac.
Apple redefines
personal computing, again.
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iMac, we're not waiting for y2k.
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The Eitt Carolinian
Styling Shoppe
anEuropean cuts
RATE SPECIAL
(7.00
Haircut
Jare Products
11 Tundiy, September 8, 1998
sports
The Eatt Carolinian
Football
continued from page 9
Although Bobby Weaver got
some playing time last year in relief
of Dan Gonzalez, this was his first
start. Weaver seemed to be more
relaxed at the start of the second
half, but said he wasn't really ner-
vous either half.
"I was a bit little less nervous, I
wasn't too nervous at the start of
the first half Weaver said.
He says that the combination of
quarterbacks gives teams some-
thing extra to prepare for.
Training
continued from page 9
Plaza Mall
"A lot of students are not even
sure if they need a trainer, they just
want to know if their training is
correct Brown said. "Others need
to get pushed within proper limita-
tions to maintain some kind of con-
sistency in their training habit
All trainers at the rec. center are
health and fitness majors.
"We have a lot of areas that they
(other teams) have to prepare for
Weaver said. "The passing game,
running game and all sorts of areas
and they've got to be ready for
everything
Despite losing by such a lop
sided score, Logan said there were
some positive signs in .last
Saturday's game.
"We ran the ball very well
Saturday, against a really good
defense Logan said. "I was tick-
led with the way we handled the
football, there were no turnovers. A
lot of very, very, positive things
happened in that football game that
as a coach and a team we can build
According to Brown, they all have
to participate in a five-month train-
ing program for physical exercise
and biomechanics prior to being
ready to work with clients.
Although Brown highly recom-
mends her trainers to get certified,
she said that it is not required.
"Our trainers have, to be able to
handle all sorts of different clients,
that's why we are so concerned
with their practical experience
Brown said.
Logan said that several areas
need to addressed, most notably
special teams. One field goal
attempt was blocked and another
was blocked.
"It was just a situation where the
kids did not get off on the snap and
got the kick blocked Logan said.
"I can't tell you how hard we've
worked on the field goal unit this
year. It's been a priority beyond pri-
ority
On the second field goal miss,
Bayes suffered a pulled groin. As a
result, Brantley Rivers will be han-
dling all of the place kicking duties.
Rivers made his only attempt, a 30
Spirit
continued from page 9
new marks Lee Workman, direc-
tor of licensing said. "It is the next
step for our program
ECU has 260 manufacturers
who are licensed to produce mer-
chandise with the ECU logo dis-
played on it. Companies that want
yarder at the start of the third quar-
ter for ECU's only points of the day.
The injury to Bayes will not
effect his punting ability.
"We punted for a 49 yard aver-
age, we protected the punter beau-
tifully, we covered the punts beau-
tifully Logan said. "The special
teams overall it was ok, particularly
though we do need to address the
field goal unit
The Pirates will take the field
for the second time this season in
from of a home crowd this Saturday
against UT-Chattanooga. The last
time the two teams met was in 1972
for 33-7 Pirate victory. Game time is
set for 4 p.m.
to produce ECU marks on mer-
chandise have to get permission
and approval from Workman.
ECU now has six logos for its
series, including Pee Dec the
Pirate who will remain the offical
mascot for the Pirates.
"ECU athletics is the "front
porch" of ECU and we take very
seriously the responsibility to make
a good image for the school
Workman said. "We want people to
be proud to be a part of ECU
WfT
SDSTIFF.WLIHH
ALL OVER AGAIN,
��si
Gamma big ma Sigma
PALL K( SI I 1998
Gamma Sigma Sigma
National Service Sorority
Fall Rush
September 8,9, & 10
Mendenhall Underground
7:00 PM
For more Information Contact:
Terese � 758-7819
orwww.angelfire.comncgamma sig
mtftm
10 Student Discount With Proper I.D.
FINES
Carolina East Mall
Memorial Drive, Highway 11
, now
best of
. One
best
illar
come in.
2Mb of
jitional
lemory
1998
Dl IDDI LB DaDlaaTE
RETRO 7CS, SOS & 90"S
APPLICATION DEADLINE
great
i
and
ir of
r
:nt stores
on
H
com
ACTIVITIES APPLICATION FOR:
�FLOAT
HOUSEHALL
KINGQUEEN CANDIDATE
YOU MUST FILE AN APPLICATION BY:
t
FRIDAY
SEPT. 11,
1998
5 pm
ROOM 109
MENDENHALL
STUDENT CENTER
A
I
I
ONLINE VOTING THIS YEAR!





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Carolina East Mall and The Plaza
I
For a good time call
328.6004
Look for our weekly ad in
the fmmtainMead or call
the ECU Student Union
Hotline at 252.328.6004,
or visit our website at
www.ecu.edustudent union.
to (MHntfnlomiaaoritsntjct OK Central IMiMO 27838-4355; � call 252 528 � 4788. ton fr� at 1 800 ecu � AM3. or TOD 232 328 - 4756. 8:50am � 6pm, Monday - rnday
rndMdu�to�rr�r�quk��fxorr
13 Tuudiy, S
$385 AMOI
plex, fifteen
Quiet country
6418 or (day
2329 or(N) 7
WALK TO I
$295month.
wood Apts
ville. 758-659
2 BEDROOM
floors, central
jty and dow
$395month;
$375month.
RINGGC
NowTal
1 bedrooi
Efficient.
CALL
ROOM FOR
of parking . o
all bills paid
(703)868-1119
WASHERS A
Hotpoint X-lar;
ery and setup
today 236-50S
ECU AREA tv
houses. All v
some type of,
yards. Pets OK
830-9502
2 BEDROOM
tops). Quiet ai
ings. Minutes I
it required. Pc
quire deposit
message or afi
3 BR. House
er. wd hooku
yard, 2 sunpc
bus transports
more info. Ava
LARGE BRIGI
room available
ent in home ol
Silver line Cl
printing plant
pets. No smol
$275 all utilitie
ephone. 752-51
NEED SOMEO
in a 3 bdr. apt.
ed in rent, $2
bills. Call 321-1
ROOMM,
ONE ROOMM,
female ASAP ir
ment. Two bloc
downtown. Cal
Gretchen or We
MF ROOMN
share 2 bedroc
Nice apt. $195
ties. Call Steph
FEMALE ROOI
share 2 bei
$187.50 plus 1
ties. Call Jessicc
ed ASAP!
ROOMMATE I
male to share 3
cated 1 block fi
room. $175 plus
call 931-9015 a
nie.
WANTED: ROI
month, plus 13
block form camr.
;
LAPTOP COMI
Satellite T2100 (
feet for students!
MHz, 343 hard c
carrying case. Mi
eluded. Call 353-
DOUBLE FUTOI
color TV with uni
OBO. HP computi
processor 16MB I
tor and color p
1438
TWO TWELVE
speakers with a P
wmonitor and HI
Wlor primer $350
tent condition, wi
Call 551-9119.





13 Tuiidty, S�pt�mbir 8, 1988
FOR RENT
$385 A MONTH. Two bedroom du-
plex, fifteen minutes from campus.
Quiet country setting. (W) (day)321-
6418 or (day) 551-781- or (N) 321-
2329 or (N) 756-2456.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$295month. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apts 125 Avery St. Green-
ville. 758-6596.
2 BEDROOMS, 1 bath, hardwood
floors, central heatair. near Univers-
ity and downtown. Washerdryer,
$395month; without washerdryer
$375month. Call Vicki. 7570502.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
WORD PROCESSOR for sale. Like
new, only one year old. Does every-
thing a computer doesl Also has mo-
dem capabilities! $225. Call 353-
8953 if interested.
UKE NEW MOUNTAIN bikes for
sale - Gary Fisher Tassajara $250.00
OBO. Trek 850 $250.00 OBO. Please
call 931-0487
LAPTOP COMPUTER and printer -
Toshiba Satellite T2100 CS notebook
and Canon printer is perfect for stud-
ents! Intel 486-DX2 50-MHz. 343
hard drive, carrying case, MS Word
software included. Call 353-01381
$395 OBO.
1992 FORD TEMPO automatic,
cruise. AC, automatic doors, air
bag. runs great, 99.000 miles.
$2195. 756-7887
HELP WANTED
CHRISTIAN NURSERY
WORKERS NEEDED
SUNDAY MORNINGS
9:15 - 12:15
Additional Horn available.
Jarvis Manorial Unfed M.lhodi.1 Church
510 S. Wa.hinglon St.
Apply at church office.
Office houra - 8am � 12 noon,
and 1:30 -5:00pm.
ROOM FOR rent, walk to ECU. lots
of parking . own bath and entrance,
all bills paid $285. Call Rizz O
(703)868-1119
WASHERS AND dryers, brand new
Hotpoint X-large capacity. Free deliv-
ery and setup. $40 per month. Call
today 236-5097.
ECU AREA two and three bedroom
houses. All with central heat and
some type of AC. Two with fenced
yards. Pets OK. Yard work included.
830-9502
2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH APT. (Tree-
tops). Quiet and peaceful surround-
ings. Minutes from shopping. Depos-
it required. Pets welcomed but re-
quire deposit. 746-3682, leave a
message or after 6 PM 353-8334.
3 BR. House. 2 full baths, dishwash-
er, wd hookup, loft, fenced in back-
yard, 2 sunporches, pets OK. ECU
bus transportation. Call 329-0937 for
more info. Available ASAP.
LARGE BRIGHT Furnished AC quiet
room available to female grad stud-
ent in home of author near campus.
Silver line China 10ECU Harris
printing plant stop on 10th St. No
pets. No smoking. Share facilities.
$275 all utilities included except tel-
ephone. 752-5644.
NEED SOMEONE to sublease 1 bdr.
in a 3 bdr. apt. Water, sewer includ-
ed in rent, $225 month plus 13
bills. Call 321-1240 if interested.
ROOMMATE WANTED
ONE ROOMMATE needed male or
female ASAP in a 3 bedroom apart-
ment. Two blocks from campus and
downtown. Call 758-7245, ask for
Gretchen or Wesley.
MF ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share 2 bedroom' apt. off campus.
Nice apt. $195 month 6 12 utili-
ties. Call Steph at 321-7298.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom apartment.
$187.50 plus 12 phone and utili-
ties. Call Jessica at 757-9640. Need-
ed ASAP!
ROOMMATE NEEDED prefer fe-
male to share 3 bedroom house, lo-
cated 1 block from Rec center. Big
room, $175 plus 13 utilities. Please
call 931-9015 ask for KatyStepha-
nie.
WANTED: ROOMMATE $180 a
month, plus 13 power, phone. One
block form campus. 752-5886
FOR SALE
LAPTOP COMPUTER - TOSHIBA
Satellite T2100 CS notebook is per-
fect for students! Intel 486-DX2 50-
MHz, 343 hard drive. Active Matrix,
carrying case, MS Word software in-
cluded. Call 353-01381 $365 OBO.
DOUBLE FUTON $100 OBO. 25'
color TV with universal remote125
OBO. HP computer 60 MHz Pentium
processor 16MB Ram with 14" moni-
tor and color printer, $350. 353-
1438
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY: steak
cook with experience. 18-22 hrs.
wkly weekends a must. Apply in
person at Riverside Steak Bar, 2301
Stantonsburg Rd.
STAFF ONE Event Services is cur-
rently hiring for area concerts and
sporting events which include NCSU
and ECU football and basketball.
Must be 18 years old; retirees wel-
come to apply; call 919-856-0800.
LOOKING FOR A PART-TIME job?
The ECU Telefund is hiring students
for the Fall semester to contact
alumni for the ECU Annual Fund
Drive. $5.50 per hour. Make your
own schedule. If interested, call 328-
4212, M-TH between the hours of 3-
6PM
SCHOOLKIDS RECORDS a region-
al independent music retailer, is
seeking music knowledgeable indi-
viduals to fill positions ranging from
entry level to management in Green-
ville. Please send resume to: 113-B
Woodwinds Industrial Dr Cary. NC
27511; Fax: 919-460-8848; Email:
mphillSmindspring .com
THE PIRATE Club seeks a responsi-
ble, self-motivated individual to fill a
permanent part-time receptionist po-
sition. Responsibilities include greet-
ing of visitors, answering of incom-
ing phone calls, opening and sorting
of mail and other duties as assigned.
Hours are Monday-Friday 12noon to
4PM. Please call 328-4546 for fur-
ther information.
PART-TIME JOB POSITIONS avail-
able. Greenville Recreation 6 Parks
Department
Fall Youth Soccer Coaches. The
Greenville Recreation & Parks De-
partment is recruiting for 12 to 16
part-time youth soccer coaches for
the fall youth soccer program. Ap-
plicants must possess some knowl-
. edge of the soccer skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 5-15, in
soccer fundamentals. Hours are
from 3PM until 7PM with some
night and weekend coaching. Flexi-
ble with hours according to class
schedules. This program will run
from September to mid November.
Salary rates start at $5.15 per hour.
For more information, please call
Ben James or Michael Daly at 329-
4550 after 2PM.
SCHOOLKIDS RECORDS a region-
al independent music retailer, is
seeking music knowledgeable indi-
viduals to fill positions ranging from
entry level to management in Green-
ville. Please send resume to: 113-B
Woodwinds industrial Dr Cary. NC
27511; Fax: 919-460-8848; Email:
mphiliemindspring .com
PERSONALS
FEAR NOT the New Mamal Thanks,
Carolyn, for the great trip to Wiscon-
sin. ECU Ambassadors really do
have the best looking Advisor in
SAASFI Love, Justin, Jody, Laurie,
Jennifer
GREEK PERSONALS
SIGMA PHI EPSILON Thanks for
an awesome PrefBid night last Fri-
day. We had a great time. Can't wait
until next time. Love. Sigma Sigma
Sigma
TWO TWELVE inch Rockford
speakers with a Pioneer power amp.
for $400 Tall 7fifUQfi40 aftar S PM
I )appcr
Dan's
lrn iii.I ini.i�i-( liitliit
II.in.II, Silu-i
li-vw li , lon
R SALE: Mac 2SI computer
wmonitor and HP600 Desk Writer
Wlor printer $350 total OBO. Excel-
lent condition, will sell separately.
Call 551-9119.
KARATE INSTRUCTOR: recreation
company seeks part-time help.
Classes held on Friday evening at
the Jaycoe Park auditorium. Must
like working with children. Great $.
1-888-621-8977.
EARN WHILE YOU learn, up
toSI.OOO.OO wk. Day and night
shifts. Clean, secure working at-
mosphere. Playmates Adult En-
tertainment. 252-747-7686 for in-
terview.
EXPERIENCED COOK and wait
staff wanted. Apply in person after
4PM at Lupton's Almost Famous
Seafood Restaurant. No phone calls.
TUTORS NEEDED: Interested in tu-
toring for the Office of Student De-
velopment-Athletics? If so. please
join us in Room 236-B, Ward Sports
Medicine Building at 5:30 PM on
Thursday, September 10. 1998. You
will be paid for your time. Under-
graduates will be paid six dollars an
hour and graduate students will be
paid seven dollars per hour. If you
have any questions, contact Isha Wil-
liams at 328-4691.
WASH PUB help wanted, part-time
attendant. Apply 10AM-12 Noon M-
F. 752-5222.
SIGMA SIGMA Sigma would like to
congratulate our new pledge class!
Susan Chesson, Page Clark. Nicole
Cobb, Cammie Cole, Amanda
Crumpton, Emily Dehart. Molly Earn-
hardt. Courtney Evans. Lindsay Gai-
ney. April Herring. Ashley Holbrook.
Liz Joseph. Mindy Murray. Michelle
Page, Katie Rutter, Amy Short. Sarah
Stone. Christy Taylor. Wendi Ward.
Nan Winters, Erica Wyatt. and Nina
Kragnes. We love you guys!
THANK YOU Alpha Xi Delta for let-
ting us hold Rush at your house. You
helped us to have the best rush ever.
Love, the brothers of Sigma Alpha
Epsilon
EPSILON SIGMA Alpha sisters,
thanks to those who helped with
making Rush projects a success. We
hope everyone has a great week.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
C919)496-X4
Tfct East CsreMaa;
KIND, PATIENT and loving sitter
needed for Monday through Thurs-
day (1PM to 6PM) to care for three
boys, ages 6, 4 and 1. Must enjoy
playing with and reading to children.
Please call 355-7238.
61260 FUNDRAISER credit card
fundraiser for student organizations.
You've seen other groups doing it.
now it's your turn. One week is all it
takes. No gimmicks, no tricks, no ob-
ligation. Call for information today. 1-
800-932-0528 x 65. www.bcmcon-
cepts.com
ACCT. MANAGERSFULL-TIME.
Seeking motivated and energetic in-
dividuals, communication skills, lift-
ing, and professionalism are re-
quired. Advancement opportunities
and benefits. Mail or fax resumes to
Mr. Show at 363-4329 or 2400 S.
Memorial Blvd 27834. EOE
PART-TIME JOBS AVAILABLE
Joan's Fashions, a local Women's
Clothing Store, is now filling part-
time positions. Employees are need-
ed for Saturdays andor weekdays
between 10AM and 6PM. The posi-
tions are for between 7 and 20
hours per week, depending on your
schedule and on business needs.
The jobs are within walking distance
of the university and the hours are
flexible. Pay is commensurate with
your experience and job perfor-
mance and is supplemented by an
employee discount. Apply in person
to Store Manager. Joan's Fashions.
423 S. Evans Street. Greenville (on
the Downtown Mall).
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL LOOK-
ING for student manager. Position
starts immediately thru May 4th.
Will work weekends. For more infor-
mation and application call 328-
4590. ask for Randy Rueth
LOOKING FOR A PART-TIME job?
The ECU Telefund is hiring students
for the Fall semester to contact
alumni for the ECU Annual Fund
Drive. $5.50 per hour. Make your
own schedule. If interested, call 328-
4212, M-TH between the hours of 3-
6PM
OTHER
LOW BACK pain sufferers: Pnue
Back Research Center is conducting
a research project involving non-sur-
gical methods for low back relief.
We need 76 volunteers to participate
in this exciting study and treatment
program. There is no or little cost to
those participating volunteers. Call
1-888-222-0107 for information.
GOV'T. FORECLOSED HOMES
from pennies on $1. Delinquent tax.
repo's. REO's. Your area. Toll Free 1-
800-218-9000 ext. H-3726 for cur-
rent listings.
FOUND! GREEN parrot on cam-
pus on 819. Call 328-6286.
RING FOUND on campus. Call 413-
6136.
'DIET MAGIC fast weight loss and
total nutrition program. Monthly sup-
ply replaces two meals daily. This is
the guaranteed real deal folks. 830-
2313.
SERVICES
FREE CASH GRANTS! College
scholarships. Business. Medical
bills. Never repay. Toll free 1-800-
218-9000, ext. G-3726.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175. Porsch-
es. Cadillacs. Chevys. BMWs. Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps. 4WDs. Your
area. Toll free 1-800-218-9000. ext.
A-3726.
AS SEEN ON
TONITE SHOW
WITH JAY LENO
Amazing New
"One Day Diet
Hottest diet in the
90's! Free Info (24hrs)
1-800-793-9300x285
ANNOUNCEMENTS
STRESS MANAGEMENT work-
shop: Wednesday 3:30-4:30. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop on September 9th. If
you are interested in this program,
contact the center at 328-6661.
LEARN TO sea kayak right in your
home townlll The Adventure Pro-
gram will be leaving September 17th
on a 4 mile expedition down Tar Riv-
er. Don't miss this opportunity to
learn the basics of kayaking and to
see what the river has to offer. Reg-
istration deadline is Sept. 14th, 5PM.
Member cost is $6. Call Adventure
ProgrammingDept. of Recreational
Services at 328-6387.
MALE DIVERS wanted. If you like
to flip and twist and want to be a
varsity athlete see Jon Rose at the
Minges Pool or call 328-0010.
GREENVILLE REC ft PARKS Fall
Tennis Programs. Adult- Beginner
MonWed 6-7PM 99-1019.
TueTh 7-8PM 910-1020. Interme-
diate: MonWed 7-8PM 99-1019.
TueTh 6-7PM 910-1020. Morn-
ing-Beginner: MonWed 9-10AM .
99-1019. Morning-Intermediate:
MonWed 10-11AM 910-1020.
Thursday Playday. TH. 9:16-11:30AM
910-1029. Youth-Novice I 6-7
years MW 5-545PM 99-1019.
Novice II 8-9 years TTh 5-6:45PM
910-1020. Afterschool I 10-13
years MW 4-5PM 99-1019. After-
school II 1418 years TTh 4-5PM
910-1020. Jr. High Girls Team 11-
14 years MTWTH 4-5:30 831-
1022
CONTRA DANCEI Sat Sept 12,
7-11 PM. Dance to live, old-time mu-
sic by a string band. Contradition.
Free beginner's lesson 7-7:30: dance
begins at 7:30. Students $3: others
$5 or $6. Willis Building, 1st and
Reade Sts. ECU Folk & Country
Dancers, call 328-0237 or 830-6403.
Come alone or bring a friend!
COME'ROLL" with us! On Septem-
ber 21st, the Adventure Program will
be hosting a Kayak Roll Clinic. Sign
up. get wet, and learn the basics of
kayaking and the 'Eskimo Roll. Be
sure to register by Sept. 19th. 5PM.
Member cost is $5. Come out and
see what everyone is talking about!
For further info, call Adventure Pro-
grammingDept. of Recreational
Services at 328-6387.
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: Thursday 3:30-5PM. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop on September 3rd. If
you are interested in this program,
contact the center at 328-6661.
SCUBA ANYONE? The Student Re-
creation Center will be hosting an
hour long instructional class Sep-
tember 14th. They will cover all you
need to know about scuba diving
and give you a chance to get your
feet wet. Be sure to register by Sep-
tember 7th. Member cost is $15. For
further information contact the Ad-
venture ProgrammingDept. of Re-
creational Services at 328-6387.
FRESHMAN FOCUS: Let the D
partmem of Recreational Sarvioatr!
help to make the transition a bit eas-
ier on you. This special workshop m.
designed for all Freshmen andor
transfer student who ant just settling
in. Free in the SRC Classroom Sept
16 6 7PM. Free Prizes
CHOOSE TO Lose! Unwanted
pounds loading you down? Maybe
you've already achieved the figure
you want and need some pointers on'
how to keep it that way. Either way
as part of the Fall '98 Lifestyle En
hancement Series. Recreational:
Services has the workshop tar you!
The program features instruction on
everything from healthy eating
(recipes included!) to exercise tips
and a fitness assessment! The dass '
meets two evenings a weak at the;
Student Recreation Center, and cost;
to members is only $40. Registration j
deadline is Sept. 11. Contact the!
SRC Main Office � 3286387 tor fur
ther information.
BECOMING A successful student
test taking workshop: Tuesday 11
AM-12 Noon. The Center for Coun
seling end Student Development ia
offering the following workshop on'
September 8th. If you are interested �
in this program, contact the center'
at 328-6661.
ALCOHOL AND Substance Inter-J
verroon Program (A-SIP): Thursday.
3:30-5 PM. The Center for Counsel
ing and Student Development is of-
fering a workshop to assist you in an- �
ploring more about substance use)!
on September 10th. An open, non- �
judgmental approach is used to en- �
courage healthy decision-making '
and to answer questions regarding j
substance use. If you are i
in this program, contact the i
at 328-6661.
6
VOLLEYBALL PREVIEWREGIS-�
TRATION meeting: anyone interest
ed in playing intramural volleyball ;
must attend the registration meeting
on Tues Sept. 8 at 6PM in the Mon-
denhall Student Center social room.
Men's, Women's, and Co-Rec will be
offered.
COME OUT AND meet the brothers
of Phi Sigma Pi! Join us at our infor-
mational smoker on September 8,
1998 at 6 PM in GC 1031. For more
info contact Tina Lewis at 758-7784.
Must have a minimum 3.30 GPA and
32-96 credit hours.
LAST DAY To register for Yogal
Don't miss out on one of Recreation-
al Services' most popular features! .
See the SRC Main Office todayf
Advertise in
The East Carolinian clas
sifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE$4.00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional words 50 each
STUDENT LINE AD RATE$2.00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional words 50 each
Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify. The East Carolinian reserves the right to refuse
fhis rate for any ad deemed to be non-student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE$1.00
add to above line rate tor either BOLD or ALL CAPS type.
All classified ads placed by individuals or campus groups must be
prepaid. Classified ads placed by a business must be prepaid unless
credit has been established.
Cancelled ads can be removed from the paper if notification is
made before the deadline, but no cash refunds are given. No proofs or
tearsheets are available.
The Personate section of the classifieds is intended for
non-commercial communication placed by individuals or campus groups.
Business ads will not be placed in this section.
All Personals are subject to editing for indecent or inflammatory
language as determined by the editors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue
We reserve the right to change a deadline for holidays
or as necessitated by other considerations.
I






I
I
61WfPKty QLMti tf WHAT HAppCNlNC, WITH TMf PlVlflON Of JTUPfNT Lift
Everybody's
DoiiT It!
So here you are, away from all of your old friends. Want to know how to
become a big fish in a little pond? The answer is simple - get involved.
The best way to manage your time is to be involved with campus organi-
zations of some sort. There are all kinds of things to do at ECU and no
reason why you should miss out. Here are some hints to get you started:
� Student Leadership and Development Programs can get you in touch
with more than 250 student clubs and organizations. And if this isn't
enough, they also provide a wide array of leadership workshops that are
not only educational, they're fun. Stop in to 109 Mendenhall Student
Center to check them out.
� The Student Recreation Center and Mendenhall Student Center keep
the west end of campus hopping with concerts, movies, lectures, intramu-
rals and exciting programs of all types. Pick up a Recreational Services
Program Guide or stop buy the information desk at either building to stay
on top of the action.
� The Ledonia Wright African American Cultural Center offers many pro-
grams for the entire campus community, Their programs include cook-
outs, theatre presentations, and leadership training. To get involved you
may call the Ledonia Wright African American Cultural Center at 328-
1680 to obtain a program and activity calendar.
� Alternative Spring Break (ASB) gives students the opportunity to use
their spring break to benefit society. Students perform short term pro-
jects for community agencies and learn about issues such as literacy,
poverty, racism, hunger, homelessness and the environment. ASB is a
good way to meet new friends, share experiences, have fun, and help oth-
ers. For further information you may contact Jeff Novak at 328-6144 or
novakj@mail.ecu.edu.
� The Student Government Association is the official representative gov-
erning body for ECU students. You can have a voice in student issues by
voting for officers andor running for office in the upcoming election on
Sept. 23. To learn more about how you can be involved you can call the
SGA office at 328-4726, visit the SGA
office at Room 255 Mendenhall Student
Center, or visit their web site:
http:www.sga.ecu.edu.
� Every residence hall has a Hall
Council and there is also a Residence
Hall Association. These programs are
designed to get you involved, let you
share ideas, and develop your lender-
ship skills. To find out how to join,
contact your Hall Coordinator or call the
RHA office at 328-1679.
� Resident Advisers are trained student leaders hired to build one-on-one
relationships with each member of their community. RA's are compensat-
ed for their time but must meet certain criteria. Students interested in
this challenging, yet rewarding experience are encouraged to apply. You
may get more information from your current RA, or speak with a hall
coordinator.
� New friends are out there, waiting for you to meet them. Come out of
your room and into the fun!
He runs along each day, photographers w be out and about
to capture us, the students, at our best If you can identify yourself n any
of our pictures, present yourself to MSC109 (Student Leadership) and
potot"you" out to the staff there. Rewards wfl be on hand for your
i keep a close eye on those pictures!
Joe Student Gets A Clue
I'm lucky to be back. After getting arrested last semester and failing two classes, I
thought it would be Taco Bell for me. Luckily, Dad and ECU agreed to give me one more
chance. So this year, I'm going to turn over a new leaf. I have to if I want to graduate in
May, and with my little sister Joanne coming to ECU as a first-year student, I have to set a
good example.
I think I'll start off by getting some resume filler. When my older sister, Jane, gradu-
ated she had all kinds of stuff to put on her resume; clubs, awards, officer positions; and she
got a job right away. So I want to get involved in some groups that can help me out. Of
course, it wouldn't hurt if they were a lot of fun, too! Dad thinks that if I get involved I
might just stay out of trouble for a semester.
So I have decided to take my sister Joanne to this thing called Get A Clue On Life.
It takes place on Wright Plaza on Wednesday, September 23 from 10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. All
the student clubs set up tables and you can pick up information or sign up to join. Maybe I
can find a group of guys like me that I can join. A lot of student service offices are there too,
and some give away cool stuff. I'll definitely stop at some of those tables. They even have
prizes like a color TV that you can win just for stopping by the tables! If my sister wins that,
maybe I can convince her to let me use it in my apartment.
Now that I have a clue, it's great to be back - look out ECU! (Sorry Dad)
Mystery Water
Wilderness Weekend
The first few weeks of college life can be hugely overwhelming, exciting, and frustrat-
ing. The Office of Orientation and the First-Year Experience knows all about how you
are feeling. That is why we have planned a fabulous surprise for the first 30 students
who are quick enough to take advantage of it-the Mystery Water Wilderness Weekend.
The Mystery WWW will take you away to a relaxing secret location for water, wilderness,
and fun. The trip is a little unusual because you don't know where you are going, so how
daring are you? But we will tell you what you will be doing: sea-kayaking, hiking, sleeping
out under the stars, and meeting and making new friends. The brave trip-goers from last
year still talk about the blast they had.
The trip is scheduled for September 19 and 20, 1998 (and don't worry, there is no football
game planned that weekend). The cost is $15, which covers transportation, food, equipment
rental, and lodging. To reserve a spot today, stop by the Office of Orientation in 214
Whichard Building or call 328-4173 for more information.
mBKmwjm
tet A Clue On W
Break?
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� W Hill III W AiaftNitatti '
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Division of"
Student Life
Cnr.tAy �rnirfg
Students
For individual Success!






Arts & Entertainment Magazine of The East Carolinian I
vwiMnkmd.
Wednesday, September 9,1998
Marilyn
Manson
ditches the
non-profitable
Satanist gig
for a stint as
space-boy
Another movie
about the
decadent'70s
Your Weekly Gossip Fix
Movie Review
Shannon Meek
Senior Writer
It is a perfect scene for a bizarre dream.
The pieces are scattered about the room with no order or destiny. The room has
a blue glow, a soft vibrating glow. There are black shreds of tire rubber like material
strung about the room in no particular order. In certain places statues stand, ropes
wrap around themselves like thick vines, large silver balls fill tiny plastic cups.
There is an off-key balance which sings hauntingh in the back of the room.
The person who said art must be experienced had to be talking about Juan
Logan. His installation, Ginned, which was created exclusively for The Wellington B.
Gray Art Gallery, speaks of the loss of culture and individuality in America.
Gil Leebrick, director of the Gray Art Gallery, said of Logan's piece, "A very
unique and important experience Juan Logan created Ginned, (cotton gin),
meaning to take away. To take what is perceived as impurities out
Logan has been described in a pamphlet as "a prolific worker in the fields of
visual encounters of meaningfiilness During his lecture on Sept l.JLogan
explained how his choices of objects and symbols deeply expressed his emotional
ties and connections.
The pieces that he showed during his lecture had similar objects and
connections that ran through them. One of them was a mask which Juan used to
express the changing of one face to the next, the change which humanity ironically
mistakes for enlightenment. Ginned is no different. Leebrick explained, "Ginned
deals with ethnic issues. It deals with a c� r j
See Ginned, continued on page 2
Gi J
liillCU
The heart of American culture revealed
Counting Crows'
latest offering is a
live two disc set
CD Review
master graces
Wright
Auditorium
wkkrick
fountainhead � 2nd Floor Student Pubhcations Building Greenville, NC 27858 � Phone 328366� Fax 328558 � Aflvertising328-2000.www.fount.inhead.ecu.edu





MwieReview
"54"takesahard
look at disco
z
Photo courtesy of
www.miramax.com
Christopher Salerno
Beginning Writer
"Hey, is that Dirk Diggler
over there at the bar?"
"Over there? No, that's Ron
Jeremy?
"No, I see Ron Jeremy. I mean the
other guy?
"Oh, the other guy, that's Shane 0'
Shea
"Who?"
In the tradition of the promiscu-
ous prodigal son of disco theme,
Mark Christopher brings you 54, the
tale of one decadent disco club's rise
and fall on the selective streets of
late 70's New York City.
Shane ff Shea is a working-class
Jersey boy who find himself hand-
picked to enter the dub, called
Studio 54, by dub owner Steve
Rubell. Every night a mob forms
outside the dub and Rubell picks
interesting people from the street to
entertain and mix with the A-list
crowd inside. Of course 0"Shea has
to take off his shirt at the door, but
once he gets in the sky's the limit It's
too bad this innocent boy gets tan-
gled up in sex, drugs and disco.
By now you might be asking,
what is this Studio 54 place all
about and where might I find such
a place? Well, you can't.
Why? Because when you mix
celebrities, hard drugs, mysterious
basements, girls leading goats,
babies descending from the ceiling,
Andy Warhol, open fornication and,
of course, disco, with bare-chested
bartenders, embezzling dub-own-
ers and an appearance by Ron
Jeremy, ifs then that you run into
trouble.
This film ran into a few troubles
of its own by way of some shoddy
writing and guns that never went
off. O.K here we are, now what do
we do? The real-life answer is easy:
disco dance.
On the screen the situation is a bit
more demanding. The lack of any
true arc in the film didn't help its
cause very much. On the plus side
we get to see Mike Myers (as Steve
Rubell), breaking type with a char-
acter that borders on dramatic.
While Myers just might have
saved the film with his performance,
at times it was like a strung-out seg-
ment of "Coffee Talk which was
equally entertaining.
Other performances worth not-
ing were by Salma Hayek as Anita
and Neve Campbell as Julie Black,
who led us to believe they both
would end up falling for the young
Shane ff Shea.
Shane and Julie come to a great
realization at the end of the film:
"Let's face it, we're Jersey?
At that point the two decide to be
See Movie, continued on page 4
Amy L.Royster Editor in Chief
Heather Burgess Managing Editor
Miccah Smith Editor
.Stephanie Whklodt Ongrwr
Brian Williams Layout Manager
fanet Rcspess Mortising Manager
BortyTbggkWabrnwtar
Serong. (he ECU commomtf jmet B25, At F.antatarin pufcfeta
ll.(KMcop�ewykjesiodIrw.jdiT.7.rjfXcop�o(iri�
Founumheaii our rww arts end anwmmm maganw. an pub-
luhad �n MrJaesday. Tht leu) editorial n tad) edition u( the East
Carolinian is the opinion of (he Editorial Board. Tha Easi Carolinian
wetonw tatters to the editor. hmu�f rj ftO worth, which mar be
titled lor decency or brevity The tan CaroKniin reserves the right io
erji or reject letters for publication. All lews must be ironed, leitiri
should be addressed to: Opinion editor .Tht En Carolinian. Studenr
PuHcatunt Building. ECU. Green. 7B5B43N. For nformanon.
tan 98.328.6386.
2 VVedriesriav, Seqtamnter S, 1938
Band Review
Dave Brubeck brings his own
special jazz sound to Wright
Nina M. Dry
StaffWriter
This Friday, September 11, ECU pre-
sents the Dave Brubeck Quartet to
the Wright Auditorium at 8 p.m for
your listening pleasure.
Dave Brubeck, a 77 year old
California native, has been a major
influence on jazz music since thelate
1940s. This pianist and composer
has maintained his popularity
through his energy, rich tones, and a
variety of changing musical styles.
Brubeck began his study of
composition in 1946 with the
famous French composer, Darius
Milhaud, who taught at Mills
College. Brubeck, along with other
Mill College students, founded the
Brubeck, 77, gets his groove on.
Photo cogrtny of MSC mutating
experimental Jazz Workshop
Ensemble which recorded as the
Dave Brubeck Octet in 1949.
In 1951,Brubeck formed the
Dave Brubeck Quartet with such
names like Cal Tjader, Paul
Desmond, and Bill Smith. Seven
years later the quartet released their
first jazz instrumental record that
sold a million copies. This record
contained the extremely popular
song "Take Five" that was notable for
its uncommon jazz rhythms.
As a composer, Brubeck has
written and recorded many pieces
such as two ballets, a musical, an
oratorio, four cantatas, a mass, works
for a jazz combo and orchestra, as
well as several solo piano pieces.
Now Brubeck is taking his smooth
sound to college campuses introduc-
ing new students to the sounds of jazz
and entertaining old fans.
"I think this a great opportunity
See Brubeck. continued on pege S
tl Hrf mcteti HiitPS RraciH WlR jfcl
It's your place
To See Kramer
Tuesday, September 22 at 8 p.m. at
Wright Auditorium
Kramer's virtual reality road show gives you
a behind-the-scenes look at the Seinfeld
sets, characters, and stories, tickets are sure
to go fast. Yada-yada-yada. students:
$3.00; all others: $6.00 All tickets at the
door will be $8.00.
To get jazzed
Friday, September 11 at 8 p.m. at
wright auditorium
jazz master Dave Bruebeck jams the night
away with a must-see one night perfor-
mance. Student tickets are $10 in advance
at the Central Ticket Office, $20 at the
door. Presented by the S. Rudolph
Alexander Performing Arts Series.
To Get A Clue
Wednesday, September 9, 1998 at 11
a.m. at wright plaza
Literally and figuratively. Face it: Starting a
new semester at school is tough enough
and sometimes you just need a way to sort
through the maze. We've got the perfect
opportunity. Come on down and see what
different clubs and organizations have to
offer you. Free stuff and give-aways, and
who knows, maybe you'll walk away with
more than a free cup.
To Spice Up Your Hump-Day
Wednesday, September 23 at 8 p.m.
at Hendrix Theatre
take a mid-week break to check out the stu-
dent Union's Sundance Theatre. This
Wednesday's Movie: Les Miserables starring
Uma Thurman and Claire Danes.
To Catch a Free Flick
September 10-12 at 8 p.m. Hendrix
Theatre New! sunday Matinee at 3
p.m.
where in greenville can you see a free block-
buster move and bring one guest? right
here in Mendenhall Student Center, of
course! This week's show: City of Angles
starring Nicholas Cage and Meg Ryan.
To Knock 'Em Down
Boost your monday form 1-6 p.m. with 50-
cent bowling at Outer Limitz (show rental
included.) Make Wednesday and Friday dis-
count days by rolling 10 frames for just $1
(shoe rental included) between 1-6 p.m.
Call 328-4740 for Outer Limitz hours.
To Rack 'Em Up
Find your inner pool shark at the
Mendenhall Student Center billiards center.
It only costs $2 to play for an hour. Call
328-4740 for hours in the billiards center.
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Band Review

Acoustic syndicate Peasanfs Cafe
Chris Salerno
Beginning Writer
Musical Question: What could Bob
Marley and the father of Bluegrass
music, Bill Monroe, possibly have in
common? No, it's not that they're
both dead. The answer is Acoustic
Syndicate and their far-reaching
sound had the joint jumpin'
Saturday night at Peasant's Cafe.
Seven years ago, brothers
Brian and Fitz McMurry, and Steve
McMurry, their cousin, teamed up to
form Acoustic Syndicate in the little
town of Shelby, North Carolina.
From there the band kept building
with the addition of guitarist Roger
Patgett and newest member Jay
Sanders on the upright bass.
Among the original family trio,
Steve covers the guitar work while
occasionally grabbing up the man-
dolin, and Brian handles the banjo.
Brother Fitz McMurry plays the per-
cussion on a tall set of conga drums,
positioned on stage left Together
they epitomize versatility.
These guys might be holding
bluegrass instruments, but they're
looking much further. In the tradi-
tion of mandolin legend David
(Dawg) Grisman, this band gets you
ready for a bluegrass or folk num-
ber, then they play a Latin, jazz
instrumental.
They'll revisit a lost Bob Marley
song like "Small Axe" or Dire Straits'
"Water of Love" and completely
make it their own. Speaking of their
own, these few cover songs, although
remarkable, were merely a taste of
the real Acoustic Syndicate.
Original songs like "Two Sons
"Better Place and "No Time" (all of
which can be found on their latest
CD), were filled with precise banjo
rolls that verged on lightning speed
at times.
Folks, Brian McMurry has big
ideas on the banjo. If you're lucky
enough to see him treat it like an
electric guitar, you'll know exactly
what I mean. At the same time,
cousin Steve had an acoustic attack
unlike any other i've seen, filling and
running with blistering solos.
Oh, did I mention the harmonies?
These guys sang bluegrass har-
monies that surely would have
moved the late, great Bill Monroe
himself. Seveji years may have well
been thirty, judging by the way they
played together, constantly feeding
off of each others' inspirations.
Currently, Acoustic Syndicate is
playing North Carolina area dubs
CD Review
Counting Crows
Across A Wire (Live in New York)
6 Out of 10
,
Caleb Rose
Staff Writer
If the words "Live in New York" are
induded in the title of a record, most
of us would picture some huge
venue with thousands of screaming
crazies gathered together in a mob
and grooving with a pict.
But then again, you could be one
who envisions going to a show and
actually listening to the music and
viewing the performance in a more
distinguished manner. For any mat-
ter, the Counting Crows latest live
double-disc effort Across A Wire
offers both scenarios and is surely
pleasing to all fanatics.
The Counting Crows are well
known for their live performances
because of their erratic nature and
sing-along tunes. On another note,
both of their albums were recorded
in a live setting at the recording stu-
dio (in which the liner notes reveal
that the band rented a house for
each album and transformed it into
a studio). Not much of the group's
existence has been spent off of the
road and thus it is not uncommon
that their third release is a live
recording
This album is handsomely dis-
played in that the first disc was
recorded for the VH-1 Storytellers
program, and the second is a loud
and raucous MTV 10 Spot perfor-
mance that would seem to satisfy
the "crazies" above.
Disc one opens with a casual
we want to cover you
Give us a tip or story idea and Call 63SI
appear in our next ad.
at 328-6366.





I
I
WfrlB
weekly top hits
15.MXPXTmOK,
You're OK"
14. Getaway Cruiser
"I'm Fine"
13. Julianna
Hatfield "Backseat"
12. Royal Crown
Revue "Contender"
11. Bis "Girl Star"
10. Cracker "The
Good Life"
9. Squirrel Nut
Zippers "Suits are
Picking Up the Bill
8. Tori Amos
"Jackie's Strength"
7. Grant Lee Buffalo
"Truly Truly"
6. Rancid "Hooligan"
5. Ani Difranco "32
Flavors"
4. Liz Phair
"Polyester Bride"
3. Brian Setzer
Orchestra "Jump,
Jive and Wail"
2. Beastie Boys
"Intergalactic"
1. Hole "Celebrity
Skin"
Video Review
Only thing scary about Halloween is
the $1.59 rental price
Miccah Smith
Fountain Editor
So there I was at the video store, try-
ing to decide what movie to review
that might possibly have social rele-
vance at this time.
For some reason I decided on the
original Halloween, partly because
Hollywood is celebrating its 20-year
anniversary with Halloween H20,
and partly because I felt that I could
in no way call myself a horror fan
(which I do) without ever having
seen the flick (which 1 hadn't).
Having now seen the film, I find it
hard to believe that this was the
shocker that offset a deluge of spin-
offs and sequels that included Friday
the 13th and Nightmare on Eim
Street.
With only five dead bodies and one
Watch where you point that thing!
Photo courtesy of
www.halloween.com
dead dog to its credit, Halbween was
hardly the bloodbath I had grown to
expect from a "horror classic espe-
cially one made only 20 years ago.
A young Jamie Lee Curtis stars as the
bookish, long-faced Laurie, a virginal
teen whose idea of fashion runs the
gamut from knee socks to granny
sweaters.
Dialogue among the group formed
by Laurie and her two teen-queen
friends, Annie and Linda, is painful
to listen to at best, unnecessary and
poorly-acted at worst. Any screen
presence Curtis developed later was
not present in this role at all, and the
characters never seemed to mesh or
to elicit any sympathy from me.
The characters all live in a neighbor-
hood that is slowly and secretly
being overtaken by huge looming
hedges, which serve to give the illu-
sion that the girls are always walking
. getting a tattoo of
a smart-alecky
Warner Bros, char-
acter dribbling a
basketball on your
shoulder
cheering wildly
for andor
developing a mild
obsession with
your favorite
WMBA star
4UU.lj.jli. CJnk0
through a dark, Alice-in-
Wbnderland sort of maze.
Yeah, there's a psycho killer named
Michael (Mike for short) too. I
shouldn't forget to write him in. After
murdering his sister on Halloween at
age six (precocious, ain't he?) he has
spent fifteen years in stony silence
behind the bars of the state loony
barn. Now, at the ripe old sexually
frustrated age on twenty-one, he
escapes and makes his way back to
his hometown to celebrate
Halloween again the old-fashioned
way! Yikes!
Meanwhile, back at the ranch, some
of those crazy girls are planning a
promiscuous evening at home for
that spooky night. I got a glimpse of
one of their boy-toys and believe me,
now I know that nothing a guy can
wear turns me on more than a pair
of tinted aviator-style glasses.
But the phones keep ringing! Even
Lori, whose date for the night con-
sists of babysitting a five-year-old
boy, is tormented by excessive
anonymous phone calls that have no
purpose other than to exasperate.If
Mike is doing all the calling, I can't
see how he'd have the time to kill
anybody!
Mike, he's real slow, but he's got a
mighty powerful grip when it comes
to strangulation.
By the end of the movie, I was prac-
tically screechingDie Valley Girl,
die and was not surprised when
she does. Naturally Lori and her little
charge escape ah awful fate at the
hands of Mike, no thanks to a flimsy
living-room door that he handily
punches through on the first try.
Mike also escapes death notwith-
standing a stab to his head, another
to his chest, six bullet wounds fired
at dose-range and a fall from a sec-
ond-story balcony. Naturally he dis-
appears after suffering these indigni-
ties so that he can recover to strike
again, yadda yadda yadda.
I know we're supposed to be chilled
to the marrow at the thought, but
all I'm thinkin' is, if he's that
hell-bent on being a jackass, more
power to him!





Brubek. continued from page 2
for Greenville, students and faculty
to see this jazz legend perform live
said Dr. Carroll Dashiell, director of
the Jazz studies program.
Over Brubeck's illustrious 60-
year career, he has received many
honors and awards such as a star on
the Hollywood Walk of Fame, the
American Eagle Award from the
National Music Council, and the BMI
Jazz Pioneer award. He was inducted
into the Jazz Institute Hall of Fame at
Rutgers University and into the
Pantheon of the Arts at the
University of the Pacific. In 1994
President Clinton presented Brubeck
with the National Medal of the Arts
and in 1996 he was honored with a
Lifetime Achievement Award on the
Grammy Awards show.
"Brubeck is the king of Jazz said
Carol Woodruff, Vice Chair of the
Performing Arts committee and
Marketing Director of the
Department of University Unions.
"He revolutionized jazz music in the
1950s. It's a real honor to bring him
here
This Friday, Brubeck will kick off
the 1998-99 S.Rudolph Alexander
Performing Arts Series, joined by his
son, bassist Chris Brubeck, alto saxo-
phonistflutist Bobby Militello and
drummer Randy Jones.
"I am so glad that the
Performing Arts Series is bringing
such diverse talent here to ECU
Dashiell said. "This is such a great
opportunity for the students
Tickets for this show are $20 for
the public,16 for the ECU faculty
and staff, $10 for ECU students and
youth, and there are a handful of
obstructed view seats that are $9.
"The obstructed view seats are
located behind the soundboard and
are priced at only $9 for anyone
Woodruff said.
Tickets purchased at the door are
$20, but there's a chance there won't
be any available at because as of 5
p.m. Tuesday, September 1, there
were only 58 tickets left. No need to
be discouraged, though, because
Wright Auditorium will allow the
sale of an extra 50 standing room
only seat tickets.
"We will sell special tickets that
say'we will seat you when we can
Woodruff said. "There's a very good
chance they'll get a seat
For any other ticket information
or inquiries, call the Central Ticket
Office at Mendenhall Student Center
at 328-4788.
Things to
Do
Ginned, continued from page 1
passage through time and space all
of it is contained in this blue atmos-
phere which African culture see as
protective
Many students that had experi-
enced the installment were struck by
Ginneds and complexities. Jenny
Love, Art Ed and Textiles major,
commentedI have never seen an
installment before It is really dif-
ferent because it is not contained in
a frame, you can walk in and out of
it. The viewer is irtvolved. Even the
title is an experienceLogan's piece
challenges the viewer to define
themselves in a society wherein it is
appropriate to deny one's heritage.
The Irish, the Africans, the British
who sailed or were dragged across
the oceans to be brought to a new
world, have all lost sight of their
ancestry. Logan works mourns this
concept. He tries to reexamine what
it means to be not only human but
American.
" The piece overall is about who
we are as Americans and what we
had to give up all those things that
we had to cast off It hearkens us
back to the roots that we have given
upsaid,Leebrick.
Logan's passionate and disturb-
ing installment not only sucks the
viewer in, but leaves us questioning
and yearning. Staring at the broken
fragments that lay scattered on the
floor underneath the warm protec-
tive light, it is easy to feel a desire for
placement in the world.
Band, continued from page 3
and venues about four nights a week.
"We'd like to make it all the way
out toCalifornia soonsaid gui-
tarmandolinist Steve McMurry.
Playing shows and venues like Merle
Fest, Acoustic Stage, and Black
Mountain Music Festival will surely
help their cause. They will, no doubt,
be well received.
Acoustic Syndicate has a recently
released, self-titled CD out under the
Little King record label. For more
information visit their web site at
Www.Acoustic Syndicatc.com. Be
sure to catch them the next time they
come through.
Crows, continued from page 3
Crow intro of singersongwriter
Adam Duritz and guitarist Dave
Bryson doing an acoustic duet of
"Round Here Following this mellow
offering, one by one, the remaining
band members grace the stage and
continue to jam on throughout the
evening.
The show produces an even dis-
play of tunes from their albums
August and Everything Afteii 1993),
as well as Recovering the
Satellites(l9). And it also harbors
altered versions of many of their hit
songs.
The accordion-driven"Mr.Jones"
is a fine example of an alteration in
that the song is slower and it is eerier
than its original predecessor.
As the disc progresses, the tempo
and noise level increase, but not to
the point of discomfort. After the
final track, there is a long intermis-
sion until a heavily brass-driven
untitled bonus track erupts to encore
the show.
Disc two immediately switches
gears as it opens with the screams of
what seems to be a large crowd who
say in one voice, "Lose the Java and
the Birkenstocks, VH-1, we are about
to throw down at the 10 Spot The
10 Spot is a live concert program on
MTVkind of an answer to VH-1 's
Storytellers show if you will.
Disc two is full of energy. The
crowd roars as the band begins the
first few notes of "Recovering the
Satellites" then immediately rolls
into "Angels of the Silences The
intensity keeps growing as the disc
merrily spins and then simmers
down with "Raining in Baltimore
"Round Here and "I'm Not
Sleeping After this short break, the
band launches back into "A Murder
of OneT"Long Decemberrand
doses with "Walkaways
This album is probably one of
the best quality live recordings
around due to today's technology
and the Counting Crows'knowledge
on how to properly record in a live
setting. There are downers, however.
For one thing, there are no stories
behind the music that was taped for
theVH-1 Storytellers program.
Secondly, there were a number of
songs that were doubles. Granted
one may have been acoustic and
another performed in full, but that
still does not justify paying for a two
disc set only to hear some of the
same songs on either disc.
These petty imperfections could
be considered a foul-up or a bless-
ing, but one thing is for sure, the
Counting Crows deserve much
respect from the music world and
Across A Wire is only going to gain
them more.
I
7 PVmtPpjBt Hi
May
: Hendrix Theater
t the Attic
Action Slacks, Sorry about Dresden
at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
Everything at Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro
10 Thursday
City of Angels at Hendrix Theater
Papa Luna, Milemarker at Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro
The Fuses, Ubangi Stomp, The
Scaries at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
11 Friday
City Angels at Hendrix Theater
Cravin' Melon at the Attic
Trailer Bride, The Meat Purveyors,
Grace Braun at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill
The Jumpstarts, Regatta 69 at
Cat's Cradle in Carrboro
12 Saturday
City of Angels at Hendrix Theater
Stayin' Alive at The Attic
Festus, Transistor 7 at Local 506
in Chapel Hill
Squatweiler, Poor Valentino, Grace
Braun, Tift Merritt at Cat's Cradle
in Carrboro
Allman Brothers, Sister Hazel at
the Walnut Creek Amphitheatre in
Raleigh
13 Sunday
City of Angels at Hendrix Theater
Groove Riders at Courtyard Tavern
The Peasant's at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill
14 Monday
Dave Spencer Group at bcal 506 in
Chapel Hill
8 Tuesday
God Speed You Black Emporer.
Spatula at Cat's Cradle in Carrboro
Fin Fang Foom, Cole, El Sucio at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill





I
� li
When you needed
information during
the hurricane, we
responded.
Updated information was available on The East Carolinian
web site continuously during the recent hurricane.
Depend on us to provide you with the information you
need if another hurricane hits.
Or even on those days when its sunny.
Point ybur browser to:
www.tec.ecu.edu


Title
The East Carolinian, September 8, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 08, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1287
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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