The East Carolinian, September 3, 1998






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When the cyberdust clears, check
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THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 3 ,1998 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 04
ESC hears DeMarco case for first time Math
DeMarco camp speaks
of loaded employee file
IK
Sweat beads surfaced on the fore-
heads of everyone present at a hear-
ing Tuesday when an appeals refer-
ee from the Employment
Securities Commission
(ESC) listened to reasons
both why and why
not tenured professor
Dr. Sal DeMarco should
receive unemployment
checks.
As if the castigations
and mordantly posed
questions weren't already
enough to heat the ESC
boardroom, the malfunc-
tion in the air condition-
ing unit - and the thought of recon-
vening at a later date � was.
DeMarco and his attorney, Alan
McSurcly, met with Dr. Richard
Eakin, chancellor of ECU, for the
first time Tuesday since DeMarco's
termination in April of 1998. Both
Eakin and Dr. Ralph Scott, were
subpoenaed by DeMarco's attorney
Dr. Richard Eakin
UNIVERSITY CHANCELLOR
in an effort to determine whether
DeMarco was fired for "profanity
and shoving colleagues" or a
secret "loaded-employee file
Eakin spoke first, saying he
had warned DeMarco of alleged
misconduct as early as June of
1994, and told him that any fur-
ther alleged misconduct would
result in more serious actions.
After alleged information that
DeMarco had reportedly contin-
ued to be disruptive on
two different accounts
in faculty meetings,
Eakin said he was
forced to take action.
"His behavior
continued to be
unprofessional and
that led to action on
my part. I then con-
tacted DeMarco
about my discharge
decision, listing four
specifications (of
why he was being fired Eakin
said.
When Eakin appointed a due
process, committee to investigate
the complaints, the committee con-
cluded that their wasn't enough
evidence to fire DeMarco. Eakin,
having the official final say, over-
ruled their conclusion.
Assistant to the Attorney General Sylvia Thibaut and Attorney Alan McSurely talk about the DeMarco case wtih an ESC referee.
PHOTO BY TK JONES
In a last minute decision,
Assistant to the Attorny General
Sylvia Thibaut, attorney for Eakin,
had university attdrheiy Ben Irons
telephone Dr. Richard Shrine,
Allied Health Sciences professor, to
appear as an additional witness.
McSurely questioned the
method of Eakin's grounds for fir-
ing DeMarco since Eakin had no
first-hand evidence of any miscon-
duct from DeMarco, but only sec-
ond-hand information, and further
SEE CASE. PAGE 3
New skate policy adopted on campus
Violators of ordinance
receive state citation
DEBS! E N Kl WIRTI1
S r UK RITKR
ECU recently adopted a new Parking and
Traffic ordinance concerning skateboarding
and in-line skating on campus. 'The policy is
in effect to protect the safety of pedestrians,
as well as people skateboarding and in-line
skating.
The policy states that students can use
skateboards and skates as a mode of trans-
portation to and from classes but places lim-
itations on other uses. Skateboards and
skates are not allowed in campus buildings or
in the streets of campus.
And recreational use of these devices has
been abolished from university grounds.
According to the ordinance, trick riding or
trick skating is prohibited with tricks defined
as jumping, skidding, and intentionally leav-
ing the ground.
A student skateboards on sidewalks adjacent to the university.
FILE PHOTO
Although skateboards and skates will be
allowed on sidewalks and in parking lots,
other areas of campus such as curbs and
handrails will constitute a breech of the ordi-
nance.
Students using skateboards and skates
must yield the right-of-way to
anyone else walking on campus
or people using wheelchairs.
Failing to observe the new
ordinance will have conse-
quences for offenders. If a stu-
dent is caught performing tricks
or violating the policy, they will
be issued a state citation by the
city of Greenville and it will cost
up to $25.
The policy is attempting to
prevent trick skating because it
can be dangerous to pedestrians.
Leslie Craigle, the Director of
Marketing, believes the policy
will be used properly.
"This policy is looking for
people to use common sense and
to protect themselves Craigle
said.
The policy was created by Parking and
'Transportation, and will be enforced by ECU
police officers. Many students were com-
plaining about the skating on campus, and
felt it was hazardous to them thus prompting
the need for the ordinance.
Lt. Dail of the ECU Police Department
feels the new regulation will be enforced
effectively.
"We are not trying to stop students from
riding skateboards or skates as long as they do
it in a responsible way Dail said.
Jason Richardson, an ECU student, feels
as long as skaters watch where they are going,
the policy should work fine.
"Maybe they should put a passage espe-
cially for skaters so they have less of a chance
running into people Richardson said.
Many students will be and have been
affected by this already. Jason Hopkins, ECU
student, feels some people need to skate to
and from campus as a means of transporta-
tion.
"It sounds good, especially if it is really
crowded on campus Hopkins said. Some
students that know about the policy do not
think they will be impacted by it.
"I think it would effect me more if I skat-
ed, but 1 don't, so I don't think I will be
affected as much Beck said.
Until this policy, Greenville has had no
city wide ordinance restricting the use of
skates and skateboards.
scores
lacking
U.S. seniors rank
second to last
TK Jones
NEWS EDITOR
As if it weren't enough to worry
about funding and violence,
schools can now add to the list:
how to raise academic standards.
With U.S. twelfth graders plac-
ing 19th out of 21 in math (beating
Cyprus and South Africa) and 16th
out of 21 in science, and advanced
students placing dead last in
physics at the Third International
Mathematics and Science Study
earlier in the year, the results sent
shock waves home to the
Department of Education, hasten-
ing officials to voice a solution to
our lagging behind other devel-
oped nations.
In order to raise scores, states
are advised to "ensure that teach-
ers are prepared" and that they are
"skilled in the best ways of teach-
ing mathematics according to a
June DOE newsletter.
Twenty-eight percent of high-
school math teachers and 18 per-
cent of high-school science teach-
ers did not major or minor in math
or science, according to U.S.
Secretary of Education Richard W.
Riley.
"If we're to continue to be glob-
al competitors in the new knowl-
edge economy, we'll need a steady
and competent pool of employees.
Right now, the low performance of
those in the pipeline for those
future jobs has troubling implica-
tions for our future Riley said.
More than 20 million American
twelfth graders are unequipt with
primary math skills. At the same
time, university enrollment is on
the rise and so are remedial cours-
es. Across the nation approximate-
ly 30 percent of incoming fresh-
men enroll in remedial courses. At
ECU, remedial course numbers
are rising at the same pace as the
number of students unable to pass
freshman litmus standards.
Currently, over 1100 students
fill the 38 sections of remedial
SEE MATH. PAGE 2
Jarvis Residence Hall receives new make over
Oldest hall will take one
year to renovate
D K � B 1 K N E I W I K T
STAKE' WHITER
Facilities Services is in the process of reno-
vating Jarvis Hall, the oldest residence hall
and building on campus.
Facilities Services is systematically ren-
ovating all the older residence halls on
campus. They can't afford to take on more
than one project at a time, and Jarvis Hall
has top priority.
The reason for the renovation is the
building's age and structural condition.
The first wing was built in 1909, the same
year the hall first opened its doors, and nat-
ural wear and tear has made renovating a
must.
Contracts for the renovation have not
been issued as of now, but will be within
the next month. Estimates for the building
overhaul have reached over $4 million.
Manny Amaro, Director of University
Housing Services, is working on the Jarvis
Hall project, "The new building will be
completely renovated inside and out and will
have a whole new addition to it Amaro said.
Once the renovation starts, it will take a
full 12 months to complete. Currently, a
fence surrounds Jarvis Hall, due to the
removal of asbestos from the building.s
exterior. A contractor will be brought in to
commence the major renovations following
the asbestos removal phase.
Opening of the refurbished residence
hall is projected for January 2000. The
building will include double rooms and air
conditioning, with individual thermostat
controls in each room. There will be acces-
sibility for the handicapped and a large
social room where the previous courtyard
was located. This will also serve as the
buildings main entrance.
Dr. George Harrel, Assistant
Vice Chancellor for
Administration and Finance,
says the master plan was
designed by ECU Housing
Services
"Jarvis Hall was very old and
didn't have many modern quali-
ties about it Harrel said.
Housing Services has devel-
oped a 15 year plan to renovate
all of the older residence halls.
Besides the current renovation,
they also have 300 other active
projects in progress campus wide.
Jarvis Hall's renovation will be a one year process.
PHOTO BY J�S0N FEATHER
HliiiMiMH
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2 Hwirtty, SQttMb�f 3, 1888
Surge in enrollment numbers
expected for UNC-system
I
Lack of space leaves
little room for growth
Joseph Elder
STAFF WHITE!
A predicted enrollment surge with-
in NC's 16 public university sys-
tem could add 42,323 students by
2006 according to estimates made
by the UNC General
Administration.
Four of the systems largest uni-
versities, East Carolina, NC State,
UNC-Chapel Hill and UNC-
Charlotte, would absorb 55 percent
of the system wide student
increase, the same percentage of
students that the schools currently
support
The states three largest univer-
sities foresee such growth as prob-
lematic, but UNCC welcomes the
influx of students.
ECU's most desperate problem,
lack of space to expand its campus
facilities.
"We're fairly landlocked, which
means we are fairly locked to our
existing facilities said Bob
Thompson, ECU director of plan-
ning and institutional research.
UNC-CH faces similar chal-
lenges with lack of space.
Expecting the wave of students to
jump the enrollment more than
6,000 students some Chapel Hill
officials worry that the boom could
paralyze the town.
Although N.C. State has fewer
concerns about space, officials
there question the quality of educa-
tion the university could offer to
over 35,000 students.
But despite having the physical
space for expansion, UNCC must
tackle the issue of finding addition-
al money for new campus facilities.
Funding for new buildings is
essential for UNCC's plans for
rapid growth, which has the least
facilities space per student
throughout the N.C. university sys-
tem.
Expansion at ECU would mean
a number of other issues would
need addressing. With growth in
student population, the demand on
current faculty and staff becomes
maximized requiring additional
university employees.
Ronald Speier, ECU Dean of
Students, has experienced the uni-
versities response to past growth
spurts raising the student popula-
tion from 12,500 to 17,500.
"With growth in student popula-
tion there is a similar expansion in
faculty and staff Speier said.
Speier is also confident that the
quality of services offered ECU
students will keep pace with the
growth.
"The university has been com-
mitted, to the quality of student ser-
Students of Greek
ancestry hold reunion
Greek origin finds
roots in Greenville
Debbie Neuwirth
staff writer
Eleftheria Mantzooka-Syson of
Greece is organizing and bringing
together people of the local Greek
community.
This is the first local effort to
unite people of Greek ancestry
who live in Greenville and sur-
rounding communities. The clos-
est and only Greek Orthodox
Church in N.C. is located in
Raleigh, and while this reunion
serves a religious purpose, it also
aims at bringing people together to
celebrate their Greek culture.
'The purpose is to share the
language and culture and to wel-
come Greeks coming here from
overseas Syson said.
After getting to know each
other, Syson intends to discover
how many other Greeks actually
live in Greenville. So far, she has
contacted 90 Greek families in
Greenville,
Wilson, Kinston,
Winterville, New
Bern,
Jacksonville, and
Morchead City.
Greenville will
function as the
center for the
organization.
The Holy
Trinity Greek
Orthodox Church,
located in Raleigh,
is the only cultural
organization for
Greeks in eastern
N.C. The Church
currently has
between 300 and
400 members.
Syson's efforts
attempt to create a
welcoming, warm
place where other
Greeks can turn
for fellowship and
cultural sharing.
This will give
children and adults a church and
community they can feel comfort-
able in.
Syson perceives an importance
Eleftheria Mantzooka-Syson and Christina Christou, of Greece,
are working to plan a party for people of Greek ancestry.
PHOTO BV STEVE LOSEY
to teach Greek at the university
level, and though ECU has a
SEE GREEK. PAGE 4
SGA gears up for election
Nominees to register
by Nov. 8
William LeLiever
staff writer
The SGA will hold annual elec-
tions for executive positions this
September. The positions that will
be voted on range from senior class
president to residence hall repre-
Math
continued from page 4
math classes at ECU.
"What this country is having to
do is import our math talent to run
our industries said Dr. Robert
Bernhardt, chair of the
Mathematics Department
"Blaming teachers can only be
taken so far, then you have to ques-
tion the attitudes of the students
Each year nearly 50 percent of
the incoming freshmen fail the
math placement test The test is
designed to test students' knowl-
Nominees for these positions
are required to register by Nov. 8.
The positions on executive
council will be able to vote and par-
ticipate in decisions concerning
SGA.
"It is a great opopurtunity for
students to make a difference
said Eric Rivenbark, SGA presi-
dent. "We (SGA) are one of the
privileged organizations that get to
make a lot of decisions and policies
that effect our school
"It is easy to see yourself (on
SGA) making a difference
The position of Senior class
edge of the basic, high school alge-
bra.
Math 1065, the first-level math
course after remedial math, has the
largest failure rate of any other uni-
versity course.
"The odd thing is, they've (stu-
dents) had the same thing taught to
them three rimes; once in high
school, once in a remedial course
and again in this early math course
(1065). They are learning it long
enough to get through the course
but they're not realizing how
important it is to, retain it
Bernhardt said.
Bernhardt equates most of the
decline in teaching with the
president has more responsibilities
than just voting in the executive
council. The president also is
responsible for speaking at gradua-
tion as well as picking the senior
gift.
. "The senior class president
leaves a lasting impression on all
the students on graduation day
said Leslie Pulley, SGA vice presi-
dent. "It is important to choose a
leader that is going to give gradu-
ates encouragement and inspira-
tion for the future
bureuocracy that governs them.
The number of students choosing
math as a major - less than 1 per-
cent at ECU - are are more likely
to chose other fields than teaching.
A 20-year trend shows that of
those certified to teach math, one-
third never enter a classroom. Of
the remaining two-thirds who do,
one-third of them have stopped
teaching after five years.
"A former student of mine with
her masters in math is a teacher at
a local high school. She is being
forced to coach cheerleading. This
is just one example of how the
bureaucracy drives them nuts
Bernhardt said.
vices and will continue to do so
he said.
But university growth and popu-
lation increase does not necessarily
mean that attcrfding ECU will be
more expensive.
"There is no direct relationship
between the increase in student
population and the cost of tuition
Thompson said. But he added that
that does not mean that tuition in
the future would not increase.
There are two major causes for
the expected surge, more people
going to college and more high
school graduates. These new stu-
dents arc the children of the baby
boomers who converged on univer-
sity campuses during the 1960s.
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� 19





itt Carolinian
tcc t9SB
Thunday, Stpumbir 3, 1998
news
CASE
continued (rom page 1
accused ECU officials of loading
warnings of reprimand into a sepa-
rate employee file, allegedly
jjnknown to DeMarco until he was
fired.
"If Mrs. Thibaut is putting on
this witness who is supposed tc
convince you of his reasons for dis-
missing my client for reasons of
what he has read, I don't think this
evidence is sufficient said
McSurely.
When Shrine arrived and was
introduced as a witness, McSurely
objected to "surprise witnesses
"We were mislead from the
beginning of the hearing when the
university stated it would be repre-
sented by one witness (Eakin)
McSurely said.
Appeals Referee Tammy
Jenkins said if it was an issue, it
could be appealed. When it was
agreed upon to let Shrine proceed.
Shrine began to read from a pre-
pared document he had composed
in '94 after an alleged disturbance
from DeMarco during a faculty
meeting.
When Shrine was accused of
editorializing the text by McSurely,
Shrine was then asked by Jenkins
to proceed from memory and refer
to the text only when memory
failed to supply any relevant infor-
mation.
The hearing will resume at a
later date when McSurely has an
opportunity to present questions to
Shrine.
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Vice
President
elections
begin
Hoftieimersaysheis
following dream
William LeLiever
STAFF WRITER
The Inter Fraternity Council
(IFC) will hold an election for the
position of executive vice presi- '
dent on Sept. 9. The position
became vacant when Adam
Hofheimer, former vice presi- .
dent, did not return to school.
The executive vice president
is responsible for the judicial mat-
ters of IFC. The vice president is
responsible for appointing the
judicial board which hears and
rules on cases brought up in IFC.
The IFC hears cases from its 17
fraternities throughout the year.
"It is important to have a vice
president to deal with miscom-
munication that often puts frater-
nities at a disadvantage said
Chris McCain, IFC executive
council. "We have to have some-
one as the facilitator and a judicial
board to make the decisions
The individuals nominated for
the position are, Jeff Yurfest,
Chuck Sawyer, Mustafah Rashid,
and Joe Donlevy. The nomina-
tions have not officially closed
and new nominations can be
made on Sept. 9 prior to the elec-
tion.
"In the spring we lost one of.
the best executive vice presidents '
the IFC has ever had. I am excit-
ed that another man of equal tal-
ent and wisdom will be taking
Adams position said Micah
Redsloth, president of IFC.
Hofheimer did,provide 3 note
to IFC indicating why he did not
return.
"I have decided to follow my
dreams, I am now on staff for
Congressman Bob Goodlatte as
he runs for reelection to the
United States House of
Representatives Hofheimer
said. "I have always liked the
political process and politician.
This was a great opportunity for
me. I am not one to say I am sorry,
so I won't
The new executive vice presi-
dent will assume the post imme-
diately following the Sept. 9 elec-
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4 Thurtdiy, Siptimb� 3, 1988
news
Thi East Carolinian
Senate report says no
evidence of nerve gas
WASHINGTON (AP) � There is
insufficient evidence to say
whether nerve gas caused illnesses
among Persian Gulf War veterans, a
Senate report concludes.
Despite the finding, some law-
makers said chemical weapons
could still be a factor behind ail-
ments that remain undiagnosed
seven years later.
The report Tuesday blamed the
mystery on poor Pentagon record-
keeping of possible unconventional
weapons attacks in the 1991 con-
flict and a lack of medical informa-
tion on troops before, during and
after the war.
But in general, the committee's
final report on the subject, pre-
pared over the past year, backs the
military's long-held assertion that
chemical weapons haven't been
linked to veterans' ailments.
"There is insufficient evidence
��t this time to prove or disprove
"that there was an actual low level
exposure of any troops to chemical
weapon nerve agents or that any of
the health effects some veterans
arc experiencing were caused by
such exposure the report says.
Instead, the report agrees with
Pentagon findings that no single
cause has been determined for
complaints ranging from chronic
fatigue to memory loss. Besides
chemical weapons, other possible
causes included exposure to pesti-
cides, smoke from oil well fires and
other toxins.
"Some questions Gulf War vet-
erans have about their health may
never be answered the Senate
Veterans' Affairs Committee report
concluded.
Pennsylvania Sen. Arlen
Specter, Republican chairman of
the committee, said the findings
showed the Pentagon remains
"unprepared for the problems of
chemical and biological warfare and
what may occur as a result of terror-
ism
As for veterans' health com-
plaints. Specter said, "My judg-
ment is tha't nerve gas is a con-
tributing factor to Gulf War ill-
ness
Specter and Sen. Jay
Rockefeller of West Virginia, rank-
ing Democrat on the committee,
are promoting legislation that
would require the Pentagon to
improve troop readiness for uncon-
ventional warfare and require the
government to provide medical
care to all Gulf War veterans who
complain of maladies that may or
may not be war related.
"There should be a presump-
tion that if you come back with an
undiagnosed illness from the
Persian Gulf War that you will be
able to be compensated and cared
for Rockefeller said.
Now, claims are often denied by
the Department of Veterans'
Affairs when illnesses aren't easily
categorized or treated, the senators
said.
Of 700,000 soldiers sent to the
Gulf, 20,000 have undiagnosed
complaints and 60,000 have suf-
fered illnesses that may or may not
be from the war, said Matt Puglisi,
a spokesman for the American
Legion.
"This report, in not finding a
link between chemical weapons
and the illnesses, only points out
there's a lack of evidence Puglisi
said. "It doesn't mean people
aren't sick
Judge to release Clinton's deposition in Paula
Jones case, may consider further sanctions
LITTLE ROCK, Arkansas (AP)
� Citing President Bill Clinton's
misleading statements about
Monica Lewinsky, a federal judge
said she will make public a deposi-
tion containing Clinton's now-infa-
mous denial of "sexual relations"
with Lewinsky.
In a footnote to her ruling, the
judge also suggested she may con-
sider sanctions against Clinton for
being less than forthcoming about
his relationship with the former
White House intern.
U.S. District Judge Susan
Webber Wright ruled that
Clinton's deposition will be
released as part of the previously
secret files in Paula Jones' now-dis-
missed sexual harassment lawsuit.
Much of Clinton's deposition
has already been made public
through excerpts released in earlier
court filings. Even so, Clinton's
lawyers had sought to block its
release, claiming among other
things that it would taint the
prospects of a fair trial should Mrs.
Jones' now-dismissed lawsuit be
reinstated upon appeal.
Wright rejected that argument
and said she would begin releasing
documents Sept. 28, barring an
appeal of Tuesday's decision.
"Although the President does
object, his deposition has largely
been made public and has been the
subject of intense scrutiny in the
wake of his public admission that
he was "misleading' with regard to
his relationship with Monica
Lewinsky Wright wrote.
Clinton acknowledged Aug. 17
before a federal grand jury and
Greek
continued from page 2
Classical Greek program, she
desires a program in Modern Greek
as well.
An Athens, Greece native, Syson
came to ECU to pursue her masters
degree in Maritime History and
Nautical Archaeology.
"It has been two to three years
that people here in Greenville have
been working on having a Greek
community she said.
Christina Christou, a Biomedical
and Physics student at ECU, also
works with "Syson to organize the
local Greek community.
"We are trying to get the Greek
community together since we are
away from our own background
Christou said. "If you are from a dif-
ferent culture and already have peo-
ple from your culture together, you
can understand each other better
Frank Cantelas, a professor in
Maritime History is also of Greek
heritage.
"I think in eastern N.C. there are
not many cultural events, and this is
a good idea Cantelas said. Though
the department may take him out of
town, he will attend the event if at
all possible.
The festivities are set for
Saturday, September 12 at
Christine's in the Hilton.
Invitations include a buffet with
Greek food and wine and will have
a live four member orchestra from
Kentucky that will perform Greek
music. The festival is entitled "The
First Hellinic Night
"We want Greeks to know who
we are and, especially, to respond in
the event Syson said.
again in a nationally televised
address that he had an inappro-
priate relationship with Ms.
Lewinsky.
In a Jan. 17 deposition in Mrs.
Jones' case, Clinton said: "I have
never had sexual relations with
Monica Lewinsky
In a one-sentence footnote,
Wright said she "has concerns
about the nature of the president's
January 17, 1998, deposition" but
makes no findings at this time
regarding whether the president
may be in contempt
Clinton's lawyer's for Mrs.
Jones' lawsuit, Robert Bennett,
could not be reached for comment.
Wright gave lawyers until Sept. 15
to file a notice of appeal about her
decision, in which case she said she
would delay releasing the previous-
ly secret proceedings.
A dozen media organizations,
including The Associated Press,
asked that thecase file be unsealed.
Wright initially rejected their
request, but a federal appeals panel
ordered her to reconsider after she
dismissed the sexual harassment
lawsuit April 1.
Wright said June 30 that she
would unseal the documents but
delayed doing so after attorneys for
Clinton and Mrs. Jones objected.
Mrs. Jones' lawyers later switched
positions and urged the judge
make the record public.
Wright ruled Tuesday that the
videotaped copy of Clinton's depo-
sition would remain under seal, as
well as any discovery materials that
were not filed with the court.
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sider after she
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: 30 that she
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later switched
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Thursday Sttntetmbar 3 199B
opinion
Th. F.it Cimliniin
the 1 � �
eastcarolinian
AMY L.ROVSTEB HilB
Heather Burgess ManagingEdiw
IK Jones News Editor
AMANDA AUSTIN Features Editor
MICCAH SMITH Assistant Lifestyle Editor
TRACV LAUBACII Sports Editor
STEVE I.OSEY AssistantSuonsEdnoi
Chris KNOTTS Stall Illustrator
STEPHANIE WHITI.OCK Ad Design Manager
JANET RESPESS AdvenisingManager
BOBBY TUOGLE Webmaster
Serving the ECU community since 19ft the East Carolinian publishes 11.000 copies every Tuesday ami Ihuiutay the lisp ePilonel in each edition is the
opinion ol the Editorial Bond lite East Carolinian welcomes tellers 10 the editor limited 10 750 wmds which may be edited fm decency oi bievity the Eesl
Caiohnien reserves (he nghl to eflil oi reject tetters for publication Alt tenets must be signed, tellers should be addressed to Opinion ednoi .the East
Caiolimen. Student Publications Building. ECU. Gieeflville. 7785B4353 tor inlormeiion. call 919 378.6366
ouwiew
Math�the dreaded requirement. The mere mention of the word is enough to weaken the
knees of any freshman. Some take the ostrich approach-they stick their heads in the sand and
wait a few semesters, hoping it will go away.
The only problem is, it won't.
The fact is, every semester you wait to take those courses hurts you even more. Whatever
nuggets of mathematical information you retained from high school are gradually disappearing.
(How fast depends on your beer intake.)
Before you whine about how bad and boring your high school teachers were, remember that
it doesn't matter here at college. However little you might have remembered can't hurt. Maybe
you had one teacher that didn't put you to sleep and actually taught you a few things.
The latest math scores show the United States lurking at the very bottom of the barrel. For
such an advanced country, this is a huge embarrasment, and it shows in the rising number of
remedial math courses being offered at ECU.
Every year, more than 50 percent of incoming freshmen fail the math placement test.
Nationwide, over 30 percent of incoming freshmen take remedial courses. Math 1065 is the
most failed course on campus. Many people go through it two or three times before they get a
passing grade.
This is something students, and especially freshmen, need to work harder on. Spend a little
more time with those math books before you hit downtown, and you'll get everything over
with quicker. A little less time watching Melrose Place or wrestling will do wonders for your
test scores.
Rather than waiting for the right time to take the required math course, students need to
bite the bullet and get it over with. Yeah, we know how boring it is. We've been there
ourselves. But the bottom line is, students need to take them sooner or later. Suck it up. It's
not that bad. And actually, once you've got it over with, it'll be a big load off your shoulders.
OPINION
Marvelle
Sullivan
Columnist
Should we be Russia's savior
Throwing money at them
and taking pictures with
their leaders is irresponsible
and an inefficient use of our
governments resources.
Well, once again, a black cloud is
looming over our economy. The
stock market has taken the
inevitable and predicted plunge. It
is a nervous, but not quite a
desperate situationyet. The
downfall is a reaction and a
reflection of the international
situation that has surfaced over the
past few months. Basically, Russia
is about to collapse, not to mention
the Pacific Rim.
To remedy the situation, and to
maybe receive a few P.R. points,
Bill Clinton has traveled to Russia
in hopes of saving their country
from a virtual political and
economic meltdown. The Russian
government really does need help,
but are we the ones to fulfill that
role? Russia needs to form a
government that is going to work
for them. Our previous "aid"
obviously did not bring about
prosperity to the Russian people.
The American government's
attitude of omniscient savior, while
admittedly well-intentioned, has to
be quite sickening to people all
around the world. I am sure Russia
appreciates our love and support,
etc but at the same time they
most assuredly realize that Slick
Willy is of no help to them, even
symbolically. He represents to all
around the world the epitome of
American foreign policy and
leadership�hypocritical.
At the same time, though, we
can't let Russia completely go
under for one purely selfish
reason�it is going to hurt us also.
Even though the total Russian
economy is smaller than the total
Dutch economy, the collapse of a
former super power just doesn't
make the stock market want to
bounce back.
So, what should we 'do? We do
have some minor responsibility to
give Russia a hand, but this
responsibility is of the same
amount and weight as any other
strong country. It makes no
economic sense to give financial aid
to Russia. That would be like
giving candy to a baby�it would
be appreciated but in the short and
long run the gift would be meaning
less and unbeneficial. The United
States should subsidize the U.S.
business investments in Russia, but
then only with guarantees that the
Russian government maintain a
semblance of law and order and
integrate ah enforceable, moderate
tax policy.
That seems to be a reasonable
action on our part. If Russia does
indeed collapse, we did what we
could without losing insane
amounts of money. If they survive,
they learned how to do it
themselves and maybe this time
the system will stick and work for
them. America cannot go to
countries and correct everything
without some instruction andor
performance based ultimatum.
Throwing money at them and
taking pictures with their leaders is
irresponsible and an inefficient use
of our government's resources.
HBSHHW
mmtusuu
OPINION
Columnist
Christopher
Coppedge
Bonnie coverage, nice change
Clinton addressed the nation
and apologized admitting his
wrongdoings. Afterward his
approval ratiang dropped
slightly. It dropped due to the
fact he made his speech in the
middle of Monday Night
FootballShut up and put
football back on. Fm glad to
see something else on the news,
even a hurricane.
As strange as it may sound,
Hurricane Bonnie was quite
refreshing. Living in North
Carolina since I was born, I have
experienced the power and
destruction of hurricanes. Two
years ago, Hurricane Fran was nice
enough to wrap an aluminum shed
around my Blazer. Despite this, I
found Bonnie refreshing for the
media attention it received.
Finally, something other than
President Clinton and Monica
Lewinsky was on TV.
There has been so much media
attention around these two it
makes me sick. Can news stories
be so scarce that the media must
pry into the Presidents' sex life?
Somewhere there has to be
something important to report. For
approximately seven months the
trial almost monopolized
television. Both the trial and
reports of the trial were a waste of
time and money, because who
really cared?
Clinton addressed the nation
and apologized admitting his
wrongdoings. Afterward his
approval ratiang dropped slightly.
It dropped due to the fact he made
his speech in the middle of
Monday Night Football. This
caused many people to miss the
second half. True, it was only a pre-
season game, but it was football.
Honestly, who cares what Monica
and Bill did, if it doesn't directly
affect me. I'm not condoning his
actions, but enough already.
What does affect me is the
constant coverage on every
channel. I haven't bee this upset
since O.J. Simpson, and he's back
to tell his story. Somebody make it
stop!
I hold Linda Tripp responsible
for this scandal. I feel like beating
her with a baseball bat until I can't
move my arms. I'd also love to
smack analysts with a bat too.
Clinton's apology took around five
to ten minutes. The analysts took
another hour to say the same thing
the President did.
Shut up and put football back
on. I'm glad to see something else
on the news, even a hurricane.
Lb I IbR
to the editor
Sonic plaza no substitute for nature
I would like to make a few
comments about the sonic plaza.
First of all, I woulk like to point
out that the loud mating calls of
cicadas and other insects were
ringing through the trees on the
mall long before the sonic plaza,
the new library, and the campus
were constructed. Therefore, the
artifical sounds of the sonic plaza
may at first seem a bit redundant.
However, I think that I have
figured out why it was installed.
The university is in the process of
transforming the natural landscape
of the campus into a concrete and
brick wasteland. Fields of grass and
stands of hardwoods have been
uprooted to make room for
walkways and parking lots. Once
the transformation is complete,
insects, birds, and other anmimals
that live in these dwindling niches
will be forced to adapt, move on, or
die. Anticipating their dispersal,
the university decided to pipe in
"natural" sounds. Isn't it
interesting that much of this
transformation has taken place
during the summer months when
there are fewer students around to
protest?
Matt Curry
Graduate Student
Department of Anthropology
" is difficult to get the news from poems, yet men die miserably every day
for lack of what is found there
Williams Carlos Williams
Write a. Letter
to the. Editor
Got something to say? Need
somewhere to say it? Bring your
letter to the eastcarolinian, located
on the 2nd floor of The Student
Publications Building





6 Thursday. September 3.1998
comics
The East Carolina
Life on Tuesday
Chris Knotts
Harris Teeter
bur Neighborhood Food Mai-Vet
www.harristeeter.com
Sale Starts Wednesday, September 2,1995
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The East Carotin!
�a
y3
7 Thursday, September 3, 1998
features
The East Carolinian
Ignorance about sexually transmitted diseases still commonplace
)rnia
fatural
ream
tcana
Oo-�-Uj�-
rinks
Current rate, one in
four students infected
Card
nor
Nicholas Kalapos
staff whiter
For thousands of years, sexually.
transmitted infections have
plagued our world.
According to Heather Zophy,
MA ED, the Director of Health
Education and Student Health
Services: Many people, especially
college students, tend to lack com-
munication with their partners.
This lack of communication she
says is a major factor in the spread
of S'lTs (sexually transmitted
infections).
Increasingly, society has become
more open toward various aspects
of sexuality. I Infortunatcly, health
educators say that even in the 90's
they are finding that this openness
is is still accompanied by ignorance.
On today's college campuses
it's not uncommon for sexual part-
ners to know little or nothing about
the past of their partners. I low
many times are phases like, 'I don't
even know your last name?' or, 'So,
where are you from?' asked.
A common misconception that
people have is that the only way to
get an infection is through the act of
intercourse. STI's can be trans-
Ideas about relationships and sex have vastly changed in the 90s and many couples lack communication about their sexual pasts.
ferreel by the simple act of kissing
or fondling. Diseases like genital
warts (IIPV) and genital herpes
(I1SV), which are two of the most
commonly contracted STI's, can be
transmitted by simply having skin-
to-skin contact with an infected
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMBEB
person.
This does not mean that other
forms of STI's can't be transmitted
through physical contact, but they
generally requite open sores for
transference.
The best way to avoid getting an
STI is of course through absti-
nence. I lealth educators that on
college campuses today it is unreal-
istic to think that sexual activities
will not take place.
The best way to reduce the risk
of catching an STI is the latex eon-
HIV screening, counseling made
convenient at Student Health Services
State lab returns
results in two weeks
Nina M. Dry
SENIOR Mllil
Cost and inconvenience are no
longer excuses to refrain from hav-
ing an HIV test.
This fall, Student Health
Services (SMS) has begun giving
free HIV screening which specifi-
cally looks for HIV antibodies.
"The Student Health Center is
an outreach HIV screening site
for the Pitt County Public Health
Center for college students said
" think it's a great idea that
Student Health is giving free
HIV testing to students "
Wayne Richardson
Junior
Jolene Jernigan, director of
Clinical Operation.
According to Jernigan, SI IS has
been trying to get this service pro-
vided for students for the last five
years.
"It was hard to do when we were
working with budgeted money
from the statcJernigan said.
The screening process is simple.
According to the director of Health
Education, Heather Zophy stu-
dents should call the SHS to make
the appointment with one of the
health care providers.
"All of our health care providers
at SHS are capable of administering
the HIV test Zophy said.
Before the testing actually
occurs, SHS provides pretest coun-
seling for their patients. According
to Jernigan, the health care provider
gives the patient a pamphlet con-
taining the pros and cons of an HIV
screening. Once the patient
decides to go through with the pro-
cedure, they are asked to fill out a
consent form. Once the test is com-
pleted the patient is given a num-
ber which they will use to receive
their results.
"We provide confidentiality to
all of our patients Jernigan said.
Zophy said SI IS encourages
patients to make a follow up
appointment the same day they go
in for testing.
"Students should make their fol-
low up appointment with the same
health care provider who adminis-
tered the rest to ensure continuity
Zophy said.
In approximately two weeks, the
results arc brought back from state-
labs. If tests are positive, SI IS have
procedures they go through with
the patients.
"A counselor from the Pitt
County Public I lealth (Center and a
SI IS provider will be there to talk
to the patient Jernigan said.
Jernigan said they would go
through options with the patient
such as who to tell, where to go
from there, and mental and emo-
tional counseling.
"Our goal is to support our
patients emotionally in any way we
can Jernigan said. "Since we are
local and convenient, we try to find
the help
they need and support them
ECU students are also very sup-
portive of the new addition to SHS.
"I think it's a great idea that
Student Health is giving free 11IX"
testing to students junior Wayne
Richardson said.
"It's a great idea because
it eliminates many excuses that
ate made foe not getting tested
said Kicrsten Hansen, a third
year student.
HIV is a virus that is transmitted
through bodily fluids, whether it's
through sexual intercourse, drug
use, or from mother to child. You
can not get it from handshakes,
hugs, kissing, or using such things
like dishes and rcstrooms after an
infected person.
"The best way to prevent trans-
mitting the disease is through absti-
nenceZophy said. "Abstaining
from the use of drugs or sexual
intercourse is the only foolproof
way to prevent it
According to Zophy, if someone
chooses to engage in sex, it would
be best for you and your partner to
be in a mutual monogamous rela-
tionship and to always use a latex
condom.
Ways
HIV
IS
Transmitted
�Having unprotected sex-vaginal, anal or oral
with an infected person
�Using or being stuck with a syringe that has been
used by or administered to an infected person
�Giving birth-Women with HIV infection can pass
the virus to their babies during pregnancy or child-
birth. In some cases even from breast feeding.
�Receiving Blood-The risk of infections through
blood transfusions has been practically eliminated
since 1985 when careful and widespread screening
and testing of the blood became standard practice.
Nurse Gina Bery is one of many nurses at Student Health that are trained to test for HIV
and counsel all students.
PHOTO BY KIM MCCUMBEB
STD
FACTS
�There are Currently more than 20 STD's identified
with millions infected every year
�STD's are caused by bacteria, protozoa, fungi,
parasitic insects and viruses
�STO's can damage the body, even if the symptoms
of the disease are mild
�Damage by STD's include infertility, liver disease,
cancer and many others
�Individuals with STD's are at risk for HIV infection
because sore, rashes and blisters provide a way for
HIV to enter the body
dom. Although some people are
allergic to latex, health educators
say most people have an aversion to
condoms rather than an allergy.
People who do experience a reac-
tion after using latex condoms
should contact Student Health
Services for information on other
safe options.
The number of students report-
ing STI's has increased dramatical-
ly in just a few short years.
"When I graduated from ECU in
1988 the number of students on
campus having an STI was about 1
in 6 Zophy said; "Today ECU has
an STI rate of one in four which is
holding with the national average
and is also very close to becoming
one in three. This is only based on
the students we have tested or
whom have informed us. Many
may not report their condition to
the school
With these startling numbers it'i
hard to believe that our society in
general is not more careful on averj
age. ;
ECU offers testing for all STI's;
Some tests are free, but others'
require a nominal fee. The most
expensive test is a $29 test for gen-
ital herpes (HSV).
ECU also offers seminars about
STI's and counseling for those
with STI's or any other related
problems.
The counseling center is located
on the third floor of the Wright
building in room 316 and Student
Health Services is located on
ECU's main campus. Any student
who would like to be tested for
STIs is encouraged to contact
Student Health Services at 328-
6841 to set up an appointment.
Carmike 12 brings
comfort to theater goers
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Many students and residents are enjoying the comfort of the new 12 screen theater.
PHOTO BY JASON FtATHfR
Stadium seating,
THXsound
Erin Ai.okrman
STAFF ll'HTtl
Tired of the same old reruns you
have already seen twice anyway?
Low on funds and ideas?
Sometimes living in Oreenville
you find yourself bored with the
same old thing time and time
again. But now many students and
residents can enjoy movies in
Carmike Theaters new 12 screen
complex.
The new theater, located on
East Fire Tower Road, opened
Aug. 5.
Opening night was complete
with crowds of people who may or
may not have realized their money
was being donated to local chari-
ties. All proceeds from the first
two night's ticket sales were
donated to the Pitt County United
Way and the Children's Miracle
Network.
The decision to sponsor Pitt
County United Way came from the
support of workers at the HOT
FM.
"We were told we would receive
monies from the box office, " said
Kimberly Roche, director of the
Pitt County United Way. "We were
to receive ticket sales from the
evening and both the 7 and 9:00
shows sold out
Roche was not certain if there
would be another sponsored event
with the theater.
Roche said that the initial pur-
pose for the chariry event was to get
the cqmmunity together and out to
see the new theater.
The theater which offers twelve
screens has four stadium seated
auditoriums. Bob Johnson, the
manager of the Carmike Theater,
said that all the houses arc in stereo
and four of the houses are
equipped with THX, a standard
that offers the best sound quality.
According to Phillip Smitely,
assistant vice president, the new
theater should be enjoyable for all.
Carmike 12 Theater is fully
handicap accessible and if you're
SEE THEATRE. PAGE I





I
I
i
M Thursday. Stpttmbtr 3. 1998
features
The Eatt Carolinian
9 Thifay, Sa
covering the
ofbeat
. �
" Racine bakery reports
theft of 2,400 kringles
jtACINE, Wis. (AP) � Police are
qn the lookout for somebody with
one big sweet tooth and 2,400
kringles, a light and flaky O-shaped
pastry that is a favorite at local bak-
eries.
"I don't know whether we
should be checking hospitals for
someone with a huge bellyache, or
visiting coffee shops to see who's
drinking mass quantities of coffee
said police Lt. Al Luther.
On Thursday, Charles Palmer-
Ball, owner of Lehmann's Baker,
reported the loss of 200 cases of the
pastry, which was brought to
Racine by Danish immigrants.
Each case had about a dozen
kringles�a total value of about
$8,160, Sgt. Jerry Baldukas said
Saturday.
Inventory records show that the
thefts began sometime in July from
a storage area in the back of the
store, now kept locked, Luther
said. Most people in this city along
Lake Michigan in southeastern
Wisconsin satisfy their kringle crav-
ing legally, at about $3.99 for a sin-
gle-flavored kringle and $4.89 for a
double flavor.
"Assorted flavors were stolen, so
we can't just keep a lookout for
blueberry or raspberry stains
Luther said.
Hailstorm sparks rumors
that world ending
HANOI, Vietnam (AP) The first
hailstorm in memory caused serious
damage in a southern Vietnamese
village and sparked rumors that it
was a harbinger of doomsday.
The chief of the provincial
Weather Forecast Station was
forced to visit Hiep Thanh, in the
Mekong Delta province of Bac
Lieu, and appear on local television
to explain that it was a natural phe-
nomenon, an official of the forecast
station said.
The hail destroyed 11 thatched
homes and damaged 19 others. All
of the village's vegetable gardens
were damaged, as were other crops.
Typhoon Linda, the worst storm to
hit the Mekong Delta in a century,
caused more than600 million in
damage last year.
Mathematician solves
400-year-old riddle
ANN ARBOR, Michigan (AP) A
U.S. mathematician has spent 10
years and three gigabytes of com-
puter space figuring out what every
17-year-old grocery clerk already
knows: The best way to stack fruit
is in a pyramid.
Thomas Hales, a professor at
University of Michigan, used com-
puters and an equation with 150
variables to conclude that when
stacking spherical objects, the fruit-
stand arrangement is the most effi-
cient use of space.
Stacking spherical objects
directly on top of one another in a
cubic configuration uses just over
half of the cube's space. Stacking
them in a pyramid, with the objects
resting off-center in the cracks
between spheres, fills 74 percent of
the overall space.
"The problem seemed simple to
me said Hales, 40. "But the more
I studied the problem, the more I
saw the complexities
Of course, oranges and grape-
fruits are stacked in pyramids in the
grocery store not because it's an
efficient use of space, but because
it keeps them from rolling onto the
floor.
"Victory goes to the player who makes the
next-to-last mistake
Chessmaster Savielly Grigorievitch Tartakower
"I find that the harder I work, the more luck I
seem to have
Thomas Jefferson
"Do or do not. There is no 'try
Yoda (The Empire Strikes Back)
you think you can, or that you can't, you
are usually right
Henry FOrd
When you have to kill a man, it costs
nothing to be polite
Sir Winston Churchill
2800 E. h St.
Eastgate hopping
Behind Sin GE
Mon
WUk-tiuiyttme
752-331H
i
"It is unbecoming for young men to utter maxim
Aristotle
Reality is merely an illusion, atbt
persistent one
Albert Einstein

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OffiolTrainir
offiqt in jusl
comfete me
IM HIG
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9 Thirty, Stpttmbtr 3, 1998
Ellt Carolinian
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features
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3
Student
Gowrnment
Association
Stop
complaining
about campus
issues & do
something
about them.
Register now
for student
legislative
positions.
Positions Available:
Dorm Student Representative
Day (off Campus) Student representatives
Class officers
.
Qualifications:
iMust have a 2.0 GPA, be a full time student and be in good
standing with the university
Register in the SGA office - Room 255 Mendenhall Student
Center between the hours of 8:00 AM and 5:00 PM before
September 8,1998.
Candidates Mandatory meeting will be held on Wed.
September 9, 1998. Time and Location to be announced.
Elections Date: Wed September 23,1998
Make A Difference, Join SGA.
more room and comfort, instead of
the standard elbow fight with your
unfortunate counterpart seated next
to you. In addition every arm rest is
furnished with a cup holder.
The 12 screen theater is large
enough to offer a variety of movies
for every taste and interest.
As a result of the opening of the
new theater, the old theater previ-
ously located at the Plaza Mall has
shut down.
Adult tickets arc $6.00 and chil-
dren $4.00. For more information or
movie dates and times call 353-4988
or visit their web page at www.local-
movies.com.
Pirates
on
the
AmmlkMiksutitmiaUianwrimntjsmmttEClJ
idrmklmgdarapmMBa&maitMadurjfiirmat.
acrtts
tirfW
y
oueer
What do you think of the sonic
plaza, now completed?
PB
Jason Apaliski
ArtEduc.
Freshman
"I think the
effects are an
interesting touch to the
plaza
Shawn
Hessee
ArtComm
Sophomore
"When you
are really
bored I think the sounds
can be pretty entertaining
Denise Krebs
Pre-med
Freshman
"It makes cam-
pus original, but
there could be better uses
with the money
Way back when I was till a senior in high school, loo of people
would ask me where I was going to college. Whenever I told
them ECU, they would usually respond with the common nick-
names, EZ-U or with some remark about ECU'S reputation as a
"party college While the situation has changed a bit in recent
years and such remarks by no means reflect the entire school
population, a good deal of my friends at ECU spend a good deal
of their time partying.
In the three years I had been at ECU, I'd only been to a sin-
gle party. Since I've been to Japan, I can't even count the num-
ber I've been to; it's so much more social here. One might think
that with the reputation of Japan as a perpetually busy nation,
that they'd never stop to have fun�quite the opposite.
According to one of the newspapers I read a while back, the
average Japanese drinks a good deal more than their American
counterpart. While I'm not usually one to trust what I read, I've
seen a lot of evidence to support this.
So far I've been out with people I'd never have expected to
even like drinking. My Japanese teacher, for example, or the
president of the university here. I'd never had thought these
people would even get out of the classroom. Another one of our
Japanese teachers even came to the bar where one of my class-
mates worked. I mean, I'd expected to find good drinking bud-
dies among my peers, but my teachers?
I suppose that one of the reasons is that Osaka and Tokyo
have what might be the most efficient public transportation sys-
tem ever known. Public trains run until 11:00 or 12:00 at night
(depending on where you need to go) and cabs run all night.
And not only that, you don't even need to call cabs in the city�
they are always driving around the streets. So, at least here in
Osaka, you don't need to figure out who the designated driver
of the night is going to be,
because most people our age
don't even have cars here. There
is just no need (for cars).
Also, in Japan, the legal drink-
ing age is 20, and most of the time
they don't even check your ID. My nineteen-year-old friend
only got blocked out of a bar once here. Another reason might
be that bars are usually open here until five or six in the morn-
ing and the 24-hour restaurants nearby are plentiful too. There's
SEE UTTER. PAGE �
23Off Your Entire Dinner Check At Danyl's
Just show your ECU student ID at Darryt's
across from campus and get a 25 discount
on your entire dinner check. Try our famous
Saucy Barbecued Ibrk Ribs,
Award Winning Fajitas, New
Wood-Fire Grilled Steaks, Fresh
Vegetable Pasta, Roadside
Cliicken Sandwich, Steak and Cheese
Sandwich, Spicy Buffalo Wings, or any of our
Delicious Desserts. It's all specially priced for
ECU students. So stop by tonight
and enjoy East Carolina's favorite
place for food and fun!
�Does rex Indude Alcoholic Bewrags
Dbcourn good only on Brret Menu
800 East 10th Street � 752-1907
I
I
I





I
I
10 Thuudiy, Stptimbir 3. 1998
features
Letter
continued from pagi 10
usually a pretty big share of the
homeless hanging around the
vicinities of the bars in the bigger
cities, but that is to be expected.
However, I suppose that the
biggest reason for so much of this
"social interchange" (as the politi-
cally correct might prefer) is that in
Japan, the bond between friends is
much stronger. Not only that, the
teacher-student bonds arc much
stronger too. In some cases, the
teachers are often expected to
show their students a good time
outside of class. At least in my
experience, you might never ever
see your teachers outside of class
back in America, but even in the
second-busiest city in Japan we
still managed to spot one of our
Japanese teachers (we have four,
and this is yet a different one from
the others mentioned above)
stumbling home in the morning.
Every so often, it still strikes me
as odd that people I barely know
arc asking me if I want to join them
at such-and-such a place at such-
and-such a time. But, then I
remember I'm halfway across the
world and people here are a lot dif-
ferent. I haven't actually been
scared of anyone since I came here.
I think you could probably count
last years homicides in Japan with-
out going over a dozen. The only
fight I've heard about since I've
been here involved shoving and
not even a single punch was
thrown. The society's just so much
different here, so much different
that it's actually safe to sleep on
the streets here.
In fact, me and my friends did
that once, too, but that's another
story. Let's just say that Mondays,
Tuesdays and Wednesdays arc just
as slow in Japan as they are on
Fifth Street.
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1 1 Tuesday, S
Pitt
ckcoi
With the
against tl
Chattanoog
time once a
For the I
tive year, th
Pirate Clul
closely with
ty to promo
it by fillinfj
Ficklen S
fans dresser,
game day. '
tion set a
10,000 "pai
tee-shirts tr
selling 6,0
year and 7,(
Lindy C
Pitt County
community
shirt for $5.
"Our bip
we could se
could affon
"We want t
not just a ui
Don Ed
Exchange, i
who has dcr
support for
mote sales,
a booth in
Foo
rev(
Pirates to
S
S I
ISSl.S 1 (
The last timt
Tech I lokies,
enough to free'
Gonzalez, last y
able to conne
where the llok
collected 591 ya
Pirates are hopii
spark a fire of tf
Last year's g;
still fresh in the
"I remember
senior free safe
remember a rrm
scored for a toi
that sticks out fl
mentions Virgin
play. They just
ran the ball
Suggs feels tl
will be just the
rushing game.
"Our front se
area, and should
"It'll solve that
Senior cente
bered the crowc
game making it
"The guys i
some great fans
really loud, mal
audibles. They
much like we d
lot of pride in wl
Perhaps the
season is in th
Gonzalez's grad
open for three
Tinnin, sophom
redshirt freshma
and Weaver bot
previously, mak
didatcs are hung
1
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MttMMMI
mm





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1-7
11 Tuesday, September 3, 1998
sports
The Eait Cerolinim
Response
Pitt County Pirate Club
decorates Dowdy-Fkklen
Tracy M. Lai bach
SPORT S kDITUR
With the football team's first home game
against the University of Tennessee-
Chattanooga coming up on September 12, it is
time once again to paint this town purple.
For the third consecu-
tive year, the Pitt County
Pirate Club is working
closely with the universi-
ty to promote school spir-
it by filling the Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium with
fans dressed in purple on
game day. The organiza-
tion set a goal to sell
10,000 "paint it purple"
tee-shirts this year, aftet
selling 6,000 the first
year and 7,000 the next.
Lindy Daughtry, a board member of the
Pitt County Pirate Club, encourages the entire
community to get involved buy purchasing a
shirt for $5.
"Our biggest goal was to find an item that
we could sell for $5 so that every single person
could afford to participate Daughtry said.
"We want this to be a community project and
not just a university project
Don Edwards, owner of University Book
Exchange, is one of many Greenville citizens
who has demonstrated an enormous amount of
support for the paint it purple event. To pro-
mote sales, he has allowed Daughtry to set up
a booth in his store to sell the shirts. Walter
4

� If
What dm tin Paint it
I'topic campaign do for
die university and the
athletic dejuu tnu -nt?
�MM Ml :
Lindy Daughtry
PHOTO BY MABC CRIPPEN
Lindy Daughtry, board member of the Pitt County Pirate club, joins her friends and family in helping dress Dowdy
Ficklen Stadium in purple and gold.
PHOTO COURTESY OF I INtlY DAUGHTRY
'You can paint
Williams of Trademart is another who has
helped to make the event a success by not only
selling the shirts in
his stores, but
stocking them as
well.
Where did this
idea come from?
After attending a
Tennessee foot-
ball game with thou-
sands of fans dressed in
orange several years ago, members of the Pitt
County Pirate Club realized that spirit and
support does make a big difference come game
Jeff Charles
Oitecwr ol Eleciionic Media
day and decided to use announcer Jeff Charles'
"you can paint this one pur-
ple" theme for a tee-shirt.
Pirate Club executive
director Dennis Young
said that the program cre-
ates community aware-
ness of spirit.
"The shirts allow fans to
wear on the outside the pur-
ple pride that is on the
inside Young said. "Our mis-
sion is to raise money and support for Pirate
athletics
SEE PURPLE. PAGE 3
Football team looks for
revenge in Blacksburg
Who's HOT on the Hokies?
Pirates to open season this
Saturday
S i kv E Los i: v
ASSIST.T SPORTS EDITOR
'The last time ECU played the Virginia
'Tech Hokies, Blacksburg, VA was cold
enough to freeze the Pirate offense. Dan
Gonzalez, last year's quarterback, was only
able to connect for two touchdowns,
where the Hokies scored five times and
collected 591 yards. This time around, the
Pirates are hoping to turn the heat up and
spa;k a fire of their own.
Last year's game against the Hokies is
still fresh in the senior player's minds.
"I remember them pounding the ball
senior free safety Kelvin Suggs said. "I
remember a missed tackle I had that they
scored for a touchdown. That's the play
that sticks out most. Every time someone
mentions Virginia 'Tech, 1 think about that
play. 'They just ran the ball, ran the ball,
ran the ball
Suggs feels that the Pirate's front seven
will be just the thing to stop the Hokies
rushing game.
"Our front seven is the best around this
area, and should be the best Suggs said.
"It'll solve that problem
Senior center Danny Moore remem-
bered the crowd at the last Virginia Tech
game making it hard to hear.
"The guys up at Virginia Tech got
some great fans Moore said. "Fans are
really loud, makes it tough to hear the
audiblcs. 'They got a tradition up there,
much like we do here. Those guys take a
lot of pride in what they do
Perhaps the biggest change from last
season is in the quarterback's position.
Gonzalez's graduation left the position
open for three players, senior Ernest
Tinnin, sophomore Bobby Weaver, and
redshirt freshman David Garrard. Tinnin
and Weaver both saw little playing time
previously, making each of the three can-
didates are hungry for the job. Moore does
I
not expect the quarterback rotation to
affect the team in any way.
"We've got one blocking team for all
three quarterbacks Moore said. "That's
the way vc look at it. All three are capable
of getting the job done. We go out there
and block our man so all three of those
guys can make the right plays and we'll be
in good shape
As of Monday's press conference, head
coach Steve Logan had not decided which
of the three quarterbacks will start this
Saturday, but expects to rotate the position
frequently.
"Before it's over, I know that two of
them will play Logan said. "Maybe
three. Everyone can choose how much
they want to read into the starts, but it's
not going to be that meaningful, because
I'm going to find out just as you find out.
Whoever is playing well will play
Logan acknowledged the Hokies
advantage over the Pirates in field goal
kicking.
"Their (Virginia lech's field goal kick-
er was 19 for 23 last year. Very bluntly, we
don't have that capability. We couldn't
make 19 out of 23 on air. The field goal
thing concerns me greatly, it really does. It
just has been a little bit of a thorn in our
side. If they get the ball to the 40-yard
line, they've got three points. When we
get to the 40-yard line, we've got at least
one more first down to make before we
can kick it
Logan said that one of Virginia 'Tech's
kickers hit a 53-yard field goal in a scrim-
mage.
"If the field goal kicker has such a
reach, the defense would have much more
stress Logan said. "The red zone would
be lengthened, and keeping the Hokies
downfield would be much more impor-
tant
Moore felt that junior fullback Damon
Davis, sophomore fullback Jamie Wilson,
and freshman fullback Leonard Henry
will produce many rushing yards for the
Pirates. Henry is coming off an injury (a
pulled quadricep) but is reportedly play-
ing very well.
SEE HOME. PAGE 13
Al Clark
Quarterback
Senior
Second season as starter s
Set a new Big East record for lowest interception percentage (1.56)
Only three passes out of 192 were intercepted
Under Clark, the Hokies had their second 4-ftstart in 16 seas
Derek Smith
Offensive Tackle
Senior
Named to second team preseason All-Big East team in '97 by The
Sporting News &.V ,� � sfc
Started in Gator Bowl against UNC
Set a Hokie offensive tackle record vvfth a clean lift of 321 pounds
Had a 376 pound push jerk
John Engelberger
Defensive Tackle
Junior
Had 12 sacks during spring competition
Preseason All-Big East pick by Football News and Athlon Sports
Set school record for defensive ends with 371 pound push press
Jamel SmifP
Linebacker
Had at least six tackles in �rtiery game
Started every game in '97
Had 11 tackles against Boston College and 12 against West Virginia
Played season high 66 snaps against West Virginia
Jimmy Kibble
Punter
Junior
Left-tooted
Finished tenth among Division 1-A punters
Averages 45.1 yards per punt
Led Big East in punting
Totaled 2255 yards in '97 with 50 punts
Had a 75 yard punt against Pittsburgh
Lamont Pegues
Tailback
Senior
All American in high school
Played in all 11 games as backup in 97
Transferred from Clemson
Ran 40-yard dash in 4.37
Teams
thankful
for Pepsi
Athletics to receive $4
million from deal
Stephen Schramm
siakii u k l l i: K
Over the summer, ECU signed a
contract with Pepsi to make the
soda giant ECU's exclusive soft
drink provider, a deal with will
stock the university's pockets
with 7.1 million dollars over ten
years. 'The athletic department
stands to receive 4 million dollars
from the deal.
The department already has
plans for how the money will be
used. At this time, the a plan has
been divised to split the money
between two separate projects.
"A portion of the money will
go to a new strength and condi-
tioning facility with an academic
area ECU athletic director Mike
Hamrick said.
The money for the facility will
not come from the Pepsi contract
alone. The Pepsi money will be
added to financial resources that
have come it from a fund raising
campaign rhat has just begun.
The facility which will be used
mainly for Pirate football practices
and training, is in the early plan-
ning phases. The department has
yet to finalize a decide for a
design.
"We hope to start the facility
within the next year Hamrick
said.
'The remainder of the money
will go in an endowment for ath-
SEE PEPSI. PAGE 13
Marching Pirates put
on show of ECU pride
Inn H.m rk
SENIOR VV k I T E R
Essential to the athletic depart-
ment and its endless attempts to
provoke ECl; spirit are a number
of different components ranging
from the athletes, fans, souvenirs,
and the Marching Pirates, the
band at the heart of Pirate pride
Comprised of 189 members,
each a full-time student, the band
engages its crowd and offers more
than listening pleasure.
"As the largest student organi-
zation on campus, one of our roles
at football games is to not only pro-
vide entertainment for the ECU
fans, but keep up the energy and
noise levels in the stadium Chris
Knighten, director of the ECU
Marching Pirates said. "We
encourage everyone attending the
game to join in as many songs and
cheers to support the Pirates
Along with its significant place
in the stands, the band is sched-
uled to make several other perfor-
mances this year including two
high school marching band festi-
vals.
This will be a great outreach
tool for the university, the school
of music and the band for a very
good recruitment for the future
Knighten said.
For the third consecutive year,
SEE MARCHING PAGE 14
l
I





12 T�rity. Saittmbir 3, 1998
sports
The Ettt Carolinian
Soccer starts on promising note
Men scrimmage for
first two wins of season
Mario Scherhaufek
SENIOR WRITER
Two conclusions were drawn by the
Pirates head men's soccer coach
Will Wiberg after his team took on
Methodist and Barton for scrim-
mage meetings.
"Every player had the opportu-
nity to show their skills, and they
also had to learn how to pace them-
selves when they were not only
fighting against the opponent
teams but also against the heat and
humidity out at the fields Wiberg
said.
According to Wiberg, the team
was taught another lesson about the
importance of fitness, especially
under extreme heat conditions.
The heat index of 115 degrees was
probably tougher to beat than
Methodist College, who was
defeated easily by a score of 6-1 on
Aug. 25.
ECU outshot Methodist 25-3,
including a pair of goals by A. J.
Gray and one goal each from Robby
Schwartz, Sean Hawley, Nick
Errato and Garland Gill. While
ECU's defense had an easy after-
noon, the offense was attacking the
Methodist goal constantly, both by
its wings and through the middle.
"There are still a lot of areas to
Marching
continued from page 11
Charlotte. Some of the Marching
Pirates' recent NFL appearances
include halftime performances for
the Panthers and the Washington
Redskins at RFK Stadium in
Washington, DC.
With a diverse group of mem-
bers coming from 11 different
states, the marching band attracts
numerous music majors who
intend on pursuing band directing
careers. However, more th�n half
of the band actually concentrates
in separate academic fields.
Receiving only one hour of
credit, the band rehearses six
hours each week, and are current-
ly preparing three halftime
shows: Seventies and Eighties
Retro Show, Earth, Wind and Fire
Show, and a surprising Halloween
Show.
"We basically feel that we have
a big part and make the crowd a
part of the game junior Miles
Edmundson, an fourth-year band
member said . "We are definitely
a central part, of school spirit as
well as the football team
improve on, especially our finishing
skills Wiberg said.
While the Pirates entered half-
time with a disappointing 1-0 lead,
they erupted offensively in the sec-
ond half, scoring their second goal
at the 46:19 mark.
Junior defender Hawley headed
the ball into the net off a throw-in
from fellow junior midfielder Brian
Denoo. ECU then netted four
more goals in the last 30 minutes of
the half.
Wiberg, who has directed ECU's
men's soccer program for the past
four seasons, was pleased with his
squads first efforts of the season.
"We played smarter in the sec-
ond half and did the things we
wanted to, and the score indicated
that Wiberg said.
The team completed their pre-
season period on Sunday with a 3-2
win over the Bulldogs of Barton
College.
The Bulldogs got off to an early
lead in the game, scoring in the
11th minute. Both teams remained
scoreless through the rest of the
first half as Barton's 1-0 lead held
strong despite being outshot 9-4 by
the Pirates.
Similarly to their Methodist
game, however, the Pirates explod-
ed offensively during the second
half, recording three goals in 11
minutes. The first Pirate goal came
at the 69:00 mark when senior
Wyatt Panos scored from 17 yards
out off a pass from Gray. Just one
minute later, sophomore Greg
Uphold
your 1 st
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Hoffman grabbed a goal in transi-
tion off passes from Gray and junior
Danny Vitalc. The Pirates scored
one more time in the 80th minute
SEE SOCCER. PACE 14
after Panos headed a throw-in from
Denoo to give sophomore Scott
Pokorncy a clear shot to the goal.
"In both games we gave up a
goal in the last minute of the game,
which simply must not happen
anymore Wiberg said.
Outstanding in both games was
that the Pirates made one goal each
game by finishing after a long
throw-in from Denoo.
"He Denoo always had that
ability to throw the ball very far,
and it's nice to have such a 'special
weapon' on the team Wiberg said.
According to Denoo, it's all
about technique.
"I try to get my body weight
behind the ball Denoo said.
"More important right now is that
we are all ready and fired up to play.
All we have to do is to keep our
focus until the last minute of the
game is over
The Pirates first home game at
Bunting Field is Sept. 10 at 4 p.m.
against Virginia Tech.
"The team would appreciate a
big crowd on Wednesday after-
noon. We want to invite everybody
to come out and cheer for us
Wiberg said.
If You Think Carrying ABriefcasi
IS WHAT ITS ALL ABOUT,
13 Tuttdiy, Sat
N
�Writin
Requii
�Miniir
;
SEE IF YOU HAVE WHAT IT
Takes To Carry This.
it's touah work to become a leader in the corporate world it's even tougher to be a leader
m our company It takes strength, wisdom and determination These aren't easy characteristics
to develop But if you're willing to try, then Officer Candidates School (OC5) MMJfma
is you, chance to perfect these skills and become an Otinei �J Wynnes See ifUtlUKS
if you've got what it takes to carry the title United Sum Marine Office, mmnmtmSSm
www.Marines.com
M A R I N r O F F I C I R
If you want the challenge, call Capt Reed at (800) 270-9874-1815 or
meet him on campus on Sept 23, Oct 14, 28 & Nov 17.
(Career Fair Sept 23)

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�tt Carolinian
a leader
cteristids
ines
13 Tuttriiy, Sipumbir 3, 1988
sports
Tht East Carolinian
News Writer
POSITION
815 or
�Writing Experience
Required
�Minimum GPA 2.0
�Must be able to meet
weekly deadlines
THURSDAY ONLY
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Purple
continued from page 11
The Pitt County Pirate Club is
one of 31 chapters that range from
Washington D.C. to Atlanta.
Through fund raisers, banquets,
social events and adding new
members, the organization is able
to donate money to the East
Carolina Educational Foundation
Pepsi
continued from page 11
letic scholarships.
"It's new money in the fund but
not a new endowment. The money
will go to student athletes
Hamrick said.
In addition to the strength and
conditioning facility and (he
endowment, money coming from
Hokie
continued from page 11
"I'm looking for big things out
of all of them Moore said. "All
three of them arc great backs
The Pirates have become
accustomed to playing in tempera-
tures topping 90 degrees, a factor
for athletic scholarships.
According to Daughtry, another
goal is to sell shirts to employees of
all Greenville banks, restaurants
and other organizations that deal
with the public on a regular basis.
"We are trying to create an
awareness for the upcoming game,
which is something that everyone
should take part in Daughtry
said. "We need to support the uni-
versity because without it,
Greenville would not be
the Pepsi deal will pay for conces-
sion upgrades in campus athletic
facilities.
Reaction from staff members
within the athletic department has
been overwhelmingly positive.
"I am drinking Diet Pepsi right
now head women's track coach
Charles "Choo" Justice said. "It's
really good and it helps the univer-
sity and the athletic department.
Anytime you can go out and get
money like that it's good because
that will not be a problem in
Blacksburg, where cooler tempera-
tures are a given.
"It could not, and cannot, get
any hotter and humid than what
we've been dealing with these past
four, five, six days Logan said.
"It's been tough, it's been really,
really tough. What we've been
dealing with has been extraordi-
Greenville. It is nice for us to be
able to give back to university
Shirts can be purchased at
U.B.E. and Trademart and will sold
up until September 12, granted
they are not sold out by then.
"We will be selling the shirts
until there are no more left to sell
and in the past, we have not had
any left on game day Daughtry
said. "Our purpose is to have
everyone come to the game
already dressed in purple
the company gets something out of
it and the school gets something
too
Athletic staff members are not
the only people on campus who are
pleased with deal. The athletes are
grateful that money is being invest-
ed in their program as well.
"I feel that it's all good because
the money is benefiting the athlet-
ic department that I am a part of
sophomore track team member
Britt Cox said.
nary. We've had a minimal amount
of cramping and we've had one
incident of heat exhaustion that was
not pleasant at all. We've been scn-
sitive to it It's delicate. You got to
be sensitive to it, because it's a situ-
ation you've got to deal with when
it's 90 percent humidity and
degrees. I know it can't be as bad
as what we've been dealing with
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
LOCATION: 953 E. 10TH ST. (BOTTOM OF COLLEGE HILL AT EAST END Of CAMPUS)
Inquiry classes - Confirmation Classes
First Communion Classes - Spirituality Classes
Begins: Thursday, September 3 at 730pm
Place:The Newman Center, 953 E10th Street
(2 bouses from the Fletcher Music Building)
FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL US 757-1991
Fr. Paul Vaetti Chaplain & Campus Minister
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209 E. 5tfi St.
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in the Student Publications Building






14 Timdiy, Siptimb.r 3. 1998
sports
Thi East Carolinian
Women's soccer shuts out High Point, 3-0
I
Lady Pirates gain
convincing victory
Tracy M. Laubach
SPORTS KDITOH
The Lady Pirate soccer team began
their 1998 regular season on a strong
note, shutting out High Point
University 3-0 at Tuesday's game.
Neither team was able to post a
score for the majority of the first half
until ECU"s Shana Woodward con-
nected a pass to junior Jennifer
Reiley in the 30th minute for the
first point of the game and the sea-
son.
Battling not only the Panthers
but the fierce weather conditions as
well, the Pirates waited indoor at
the half for a 30 minute delay due to
lightening. The players returned
outside to a puddled field and were
forced to change their style of play
due to the access water.
"We had to play a lot of high
balls and air balls because of the
water on the field head coach Neil
Roberts said. "When it's dry, we
play a short, controlled passing
game, so we had to change our style
of play in the second half
Nevertheless, ECU defense
came out strong in the second peri-
od with goals from freshman
Amanda Duffy and sophomore Kim
Sandhoff, who scored at the 52cd
and 71st minute respectively.
Goalkeeper Amy Horton posted
a game shutout against High Point,
as the Panthers had only three shot
attempts during the game com-
pared to ECU's 26.
"Every time we win a game we
learn a lot about ourselves and we
gain a lot of confidence Roberts
said. "A shutout is a completely
convincing victory, and aside from
that, we created some really good
goal chances
The team is scheduled to take
on Davidson College this Saturday
at 1 p.m. for their second home
game of the season. The last time
the two teams met, the Pirates
brought home a 2-1 victory.
"Davidson will be our toughest
opponent at this point in the sea-
son Roberts said. "I expect it to be
a great competitive game
UrtfUk
TYSON. IN FENDER-
BENDER. RESTRAINED
BY OWN BODYGUARDS
GAITHERSBURG, Maryland
(AP) Mike Tyson was involved in
a minor auto accident and had to
be restrained by his own body-
guards from fighting the driver of
the other car, police said.
The former heavyweight cham-
pion complained of chest pains
after Monday's accident, described
by police as minor in this
Washington, D.C suburb. No one
was arrested.
Tyson was a passenger in the
Mercedes convertible driven by,
his wife, Monica Turner, who!
apparendy struck the car in front of
hers, said Derek Baliles, a
spokesman for the Montgomery
County police.
Tyson got out of the car and
"appeared to want to fight the
other driver said Baliles. "He was
restrained by his wife and mem-
bers of his security detail who were
traveling in a second car
The other driver was not identi-
fied.
Because passers-by called to
report the incident, police stopped
Tyson a short time later, he said.
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REMODELED 2 Bedroom apts with
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On site Management & Maintenance.
Call 931-0790 8-4 MonFri
Attention
Sigma Gamma Rho �
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on Sept 3 at 7:00PM
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USE SMOKE ALARMS
Install smoke alarms on every level of
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htp:www.Mfa.ftmo.gov
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ft MMM Information contact me Cent MM Otttce. MendentW 5Wen, Center, tot Carol. UnMn OreenvWe. MC 27838 -4333; � cat 232 328 4788. tot. tree at 1 800 CCU . ARTS, or TDD 232 328 - 4736. 830 �. 6 pm, rttncay - rrty.
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15 Thursday, Sip
$386 A MOI
plex. fifteen
Quiet country
6418 or (day
2329 or (N) 7
ROOM FOR
of parking , c
all bills pair
(703)868-111'
LARGE BRIG
room availabl
ent in home
Silver line Chii
ing plant stop
No smoking
utilities indue
752-5644.
ECU AREA t
houses. All v
some type of
yards. Pets Ol
830-9502
NEED SOME'
in a 3 bdr. api
ed in rent, $
bills. Call 321-
FOR RENT: t
bath with livin
phone, cable
$375 per moi
male student
pets. 919-497-1
sage.
WALK TO El
$295month. I
wood Apts 12
758-6596.
2 bedroom:
floors, central I
ity and down
$395month; i
$375month. C
RINGGOI
NowTakii
1 bedroom
Efficiency
call:
I hMt
��
ROOMM
SEEKING FEM
uperclassmen.
share 2 BR, 2
South Haven. Cf
info.
FEMALE ROOK
bedroom one
fenced shaded
mal lover prefe
month, 12 bills
MF ROOMM
share 2 bedroo
Nice apt. $195
ties. Call Steph I
FEMALE ROOI
share 2 bet
$187.50 plus 1:
Call Jessica at
ASAPI
ONE FIOOMMA
female ASAP in
ment. Two block
downtown. Call
Gretchen or Wes
ROOMMATE ft
male to share 3
cated 1 block fr
room. $175 plus
call 931-9015 ask
ROOMMATE Nl
downtown apart
month, needed A
WANTED: ROC
month, plus 13
block form camp
FOR SALE: Sect
queen size sleept
OBO. Also quec
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LIKE NEW MOI
sale - Gary Fisher
OBO. Trek 850 $2
call 931-0487
1892 FORD Tl
cruise, AC, aut
bag, runs great
$2195. 756-7887
LARGE MINI-FRI
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ter. Buy nowl Cc
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FOR SALE Dob(
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$300. Ask for Can






he East Carolinian
mm
tiblc driven by,
:a TAirncr, whol
the car in front of
rek Baliles, a
lie Montgomery
of the car and
nt to fight the
Baliles. "He was
wife and mcm-
i detail who were
nd car
:r was not identi-
:rs-by called to
t, police stopped
: later, he said.
rFarm
E ALARMS
s on every level of
arteries monthly.
es Fire Administration
Btgenty Monogemenf Agency
www.vsfa.ftmo.gov
ter
le to sreet
dlines
15 Thursday. September 3. 1998
The East Carolinian
FOR RENT
$385 A MONTH. Two bedroom du-
plex, fifteen minutes from campus.
Quiet country setting. (W) (day)321-
6418 or (day) 551-781- or (N) 321-
2329 or (N) 756-2456.
ROOM FOR rent, walk to ECU. lots
of parking , own bath and entrance,
all bills paid $285. Call Rizz O
(703)868-1119
LARGE BRIGHT Furnished AC quiet
room available to female grad stud-
ent in home of author near campus.
Silver line China 10ECU Harris print-
ing plant stop on 10th St. No pets.
No smoking. Share facilities. $275 all
utilities included except telephone
752-5644.
ECU AREA two and three bedroom
houses. All with central heat and
some type of AC. Two with fenced
yards. Pets OK. Yard work included.
830-9502
IBM THINKPAD computer memory
8MB hard drive 540MB processor In-
tel DX4-75MHZ still has warranty.
Call 762-2246
LAPTOP COMPUTER - TOSHIBA
Satellite T2100 CS notebook is per-
fect for students! Intel 486-DX2 50-
MHz, 343 hard drive. Active Matrix,
carrying case, MS Word software in-
cluded. Call 353-01381 $365 OBO.
DOUBLE FUTON $100 OBO. 25"
color TV with universal remote125
OBO. HP computer 60 MHz Pentium
processor 16MB Ram with 14" moni-
tor and color printer. $350. 353-1438
TOWNHOUSE FOR sale by owner.
Williamsburg Manor. 2 BR. 1 12
BA, appliances included. $38,500.
Call 355-2546.
COOL OFFI Kickin' AC window unit
for sale. $220. Call Jackie. 758-8647.
HELP WANTED
NEED SOMEONE to sublease 1 bdr.
in a 3 bdr. apt. Water, sewer includ-
ed in rent. $225 month plus 13
bills. Call 321-1240 if interested.
FOR RENT: unfurnished 1 BR 1
bath with living area 8- kitchen, local
phone, cable & parking provided.
$375 per month with deposit. Fe-
male student only-no smokers & no
pets. 919-497-0809 and leave mes-
sage.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$295month. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apts 125 Avery St. Greenville.
758-6596.
2 BEDROOMS, 1 bath, hardwood
floors, central heatair, near Univers-
ity and downtown. Washerdryer,
$395month; without washerdryer
$375month. Call Vicki. 757-0502.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
SEEKING FEMALE Grad student or
uperclassmen. Prefer nonsmoker to
share 2 BR, 2 bath apt. located at
South Haven. Call 439-0230 for more
info.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed. Two
bedroom one bath duplex with
fenced shaded yard. Neat, dogani-
mal lover prefer non-smoker. $200
month, 12 bills. 758-7525.
MF ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share 2 bedroom apt. off campus.
Nice apt. $195 month 6 12 utili-
ties. Call Steph at 321-7298.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom apartment,
$187.50 plus 12 phone and utilities.
Call Jessica at 757-9640. Needed
ASAPI
ONE ROOMMATE needed male or
female ASAP in a 3 bedroom apart-
ment. Two blocks from campus and
downtown. Call 758-7245, ask for
Gretchen or Wesley.
ROOMMATE NEEDED prefer fe-
male to share 3 bedroom house, lo-
cated 1 block from Rec center. Big
room. $175 plus 13 utilities. Please
call 931-9015 ask for KatyStephanie.
ROOMMATE NEEDED - beautiful
downtown apartment. $237.50 per
month, needed ASAP. Call 757-0812.
TEEN CENTER SupervisorPart-
time. The Greenville Recreation &
Parks Department is seeking a highly
motivated individual to plan Teen Ac-
tivities at the Teen Center. Individual
willing to work effectively with youth
thirteen years of age and up. Must
also possess computer skills. Willing
to work Friday and some Saturday
nights. Salary: $8.00 per hour. Posi-
tion open until filled. Apply at City
Hall, Human Resources Department,
201 West Fifth Street. PO Box 7207,
Greenville. NC 27858.
EXPERIENCED BABYSITTER want-
ed to care for my two girls after
school in Mondays and Wednesdays
from 2:30-5:00. Own transportation
required. Call 756-0941.
GREENHOUSE PRESCHOOL needs
full-time 8- part-time teachers to
work Monday-Friday 2:45-6:00. Call
355-2404 for information. Great ex-
perience for CDFR or ELEM majors.
ACCT. MANAGERSFULL-TIME
Seeking motivated and energetic in-
dividuals, communication skills, lift-
ing, and professionalism are re-
quired. Advancement opportunities
and benefits. Mail or fax resumes to
Mr. Show at 353-4329 or 2400 S.
Memorial Blvd 27834. EOE
HEALTH EDUCATION, EXERCISE.
Nutrition. Recreation, Nursing, and
other majors: HealthQuest Horizons
has student positions to assist with
wellness program research, wellness
assessments, health risk appraisals,
and clerical. Full-time, part-time and
internship opportunities. Stipend pay.
Call 816-5632.
DELIVERY PERSON needed. Apply
in person at Mattress Plus. 606 E. Ar-
lington Blvd. Mature, responsible,
clean-cut need only apply. No phone
calls please.
PART-TIME JOBS AVAILABLE.
Joan's Fashions, a local Women's
Clothing Store, is now filling part-
time positions. Employees are need-
ed for Saturdays andor weekdays
between 10AM and 6PM. The posi-
tions are for between 7 and 20 hours
per week, depending on your sched-
ule and on business needs. The jobs
are within walking distance of the
university and the hours are flexible.
Pay is commensurate with your ex-
perience and job performance and is
supplemented by an employee dis-
count. Apply in person to Store Man-
ager, Joan's Fashions, 423 S. Evans
Street, Greenville (on the Downtown
Mall).
SEIZED CARS FROM $175. Porsch-
es, Cadillacs, Chevys. BMWs, Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps, 4WDs. Your area.
Toll free 1-800-218-9000, ext. A-
3726.
FOUND! GREEN parrot on cam-
pus on 81S. Call 328-6296.
BOOK WANTED: USED 3228 Stat
Math book needed ASAP! I will give
you morethan the bookstores. Call
Sophie at 329-0264.
FREE CASH GRANTS! College
scholarships. Business. Medical bills.
Never repay. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000, ext. G-3726.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(919)496-224
COMMUNITY BIBLE study, a wom-
en's interdenominational Bible study,
needs several sitters for patient, lov-
ing care for children under four on
Tuesdays and Thursdays 9 AM-
11:45AM. Experience needed, refer-
ences requested. Call 756-9394.
CHRISTIAN NURSERY
WORKERS NEEDED
SUNDAY MORNINGS
9:15 - 12:15 .
Additional Hours available.
Jarvcj Memorial United Methodist Church
510 S.Washington St.
Apply at church office.
Office hours - 8am � 12 noon,
and 1:30-5:00pm.
THE PIRATE Club seeks a responsi-
ble, self-motivated individual to fill a
permanent part-time receptionist po-
sition. Responsibilities include greet-
ing of visitors, answering of incom-
ing phone calls, opening and sorting
of mail and other duties as assigned.
Hours are Monday-Friday 12noon to
4PM. Please call v3284546 for fur-
ther information.
AFTERNOON CARE for three (ages
10.7.5) 3:15 until 4:30 or 5:30 M-Th
(some Fridays). Safe auto, exc. driv-
ing record, exp. with children, out-
standing references, take home or to
activities, assist with homework, etc.
Leave message, Janet. 353-3998.
PART-TIME JOB POSITIONS avail-
able. Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department
Fall Youth Soccer Coaches. The
Greenville Recreation & Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting for 12 to 16 part-
time youth soccer coaches for the fall
youth soccer program. Applicants
must possess some knowledge of
the soccer skills and have the ability
and patience to work with youth. Ap-
plicants must be able to coach young
people ages 5-15, in soccer funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3PM until
7PM with some night and weekend
coaching. Flexible with hours accor-
ding to class schedules. This pro-
gram will run from September to mid
November. Salary rates start at $5.15
per hour. For more information,
please call Ben James or Michael
Daly at 329-4550 after 2PM.
LOW BACK pain sufferers: Pnue
Back Research Center is conducting
a research project involving non-sur-
gical methods for low back relief. We
need 75 volunteers to participate in
this exciting study and treatment pro-
gram. There is no or little cost to
those participating volunteers. Call 1-
888-222-0107 for information.
GREEK PERSONALS
J
WANTED: ROOMMATE $180 a
month, plus 13 power, phone. One
block form campus. 752-5886
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Sectional couch, beige,
queen size sleeper. Asking $200.00
OBO. Also queen size waterbed.
bookcase headboard. Asking $75.00
OBO. Moving. Must Sell. Call 321-
3637.
LIKE NEW MOUNTAIN bikes for
sale - Gary Fisher Tassajara $250.00
OBO. Trek 850 $250.00 OBO. Please
call 931-0487
1992 FORD TEMPO automatic,
cruise. AC. automatic doors, air
bag. runs great. 99,000 miles.
$2195. 756-7887
LARGE MINI-FRIDGE for sale. $80
or best offer. Only used one semes-
ter. Buy now! Call Sophie at 329-
0264. Great condition!
FOR SALE Doberman pups with
shots. 95 lbs. sire, 70 lbs dame.
$300. Ask for Cameron. 752-2204.
i
STAFF ONE Event Services is cur-
rently hiring for area concerts and
sporting events which include NCSU
and ECU football and basketball.
Must be 18 years old; retirees wel-
come to apply; call 919-856-0800.
SCHOOLKIDS RECORDS a region-
al independent music retailer, is seek-
ing music knowledgeable individuals
to fill positions ranging from entry
level to management in Greenville.
Please send resume to: 113-B Wood-
winds Industrial Dr Cary. NC 27511;
Fax: 919-460-8848; Email:
mphillOmindspring.com
EARN WHILE YOU learn, up
to$1,000.00 wk. Day and night
shifts. Claan, secure working at-
mosphere. Playmates Adult En-
tertainment. 252-747-7686 for in-
terview.
WANTED: EXPERIENCED student
telemarketers. Evening hours 56-
9PM. $9.00hour incentives. Must
be a people-person! Call Andy at
756-8160.
PLAYSCHOOL ASSISTANT. The
Greenville Recreation &� Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting for a playschool in-
structor. Individual will work with
children three and four years of age
from 9 - 11:45 AM on Thursdays and
Fridays. September 17-December 12.
Individual must enjoy working with
children, have previous preschool
work experience and knowledge of
First Aid. Salary: $5.25 per hour. Po-
sition open until filled. Apply at City
Hall, Human Resources Department.
201 West Fifth Street. PO Box 7207.
Greenville. NC 27868.
I .
KIND, PATIENT and loving sitter
needed for Monday through Thurs-
day (1PM to 6PM) to care for three
boys, ages 6, 4 and 1. Must enjoy
playing with and reading to children.
Please call 355-7238.
TUTORS NEEDED; Interested in tu-
toring for the Office of Student Devel-
opment-Athletics? If so, please join us
in Room 236-B, Ward Sports Medi-
cine Building at 5:30 PM on Wednes-
day, August 31, 1998. You will be
paid for your time. Undergraduates
will be paid six dollars an hour and
graduate students will be paid seven
dollars per hour. If you have any
questions, contact Isha Williams at
328-4691.
WASH PUB help wanted, part-time
attendant. Apply 10AM-12 Noon M-
F, 752-5222.
LOOKING FOR A PART-TIME job?
The ECU Telefund is hiring students
for the Fall semester to contact alum-
ni for the ECU Annual Fund Drive.
$5.50 per hour. Make your own
schedule. If interested, call 328-4212,
M-TH between the hours of 3-6PM
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL LOOK-
ING for student manager. Position
starts immediately thru May 4th. Will
work weekends. For more informa-
tion and application call 328-4590.
ask for Randy Rueth.
SEEKING RESPONSIBLE reliable
student to pick up my child from his
school and keep in my home from
2:30 to 6PM Monday thru Friday.
Please call Donna Walker at 758-
9240 after 6PM.
KARATE INSTRUCTOR: recreation
company seeks part-time help. Class-
es held on Friday evening at the Jay-
cee Park auditorium. Must like work-
ing with children. Great $. 1-888-621-
8977.
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA Omi-
cron Pi and everyone else on a suc-
cessful rush. Love, the sisters and
new members of Alpha Omicron Pi
TAU KAPPA EPSILON. the burgers
were good your wieners were bet-
ter by the way, thanks for the let-
ters! Bonsai
HAPPY BELATED birthdays to Gina
Larson. Coleen McCool and Tina Jus-
tice. Love, everyone from Alpha Omi-
cron Pi
GOOD LUCK to all the fraternity
guys during rush. Love, your Greek
sisters of Alpha Omicron Pi
ALPHA-OMICRON Pi wants to tell
Pi Kappa Phi that we had an awe-
some time partying with you guys
Friday night
CONGRATULATIONS TO the new
member officers: President, Amy
Moore; Vice President, Melissa Berg-
er; Scholarship, Michelle Ross; Treas-
urer, Jennifer Johnson; Secretary.
Alayna Willhite; Social chair, Libby
Jenkins; Panhellenic Delegate. Sta-
cey Tratter; Panhellenic Representa-
tive, April Honeycutt; Philanthropy.
Lynn Ford; Historian. Wendy Hunt
Scrapbook. Becci Gift; Sisters' Party.
Ivey Walters: Fundraisers. Jessica
Thomas; Gamma Representative,
Melissa Wallace. The sisters are
proud of you all!
TAU KAPPA Epsilon . thank you for
the social last Thursday! Hope we
can get together again soon! Love.
Alpha Delta Pi
TO THE sisters of Epsilon Sigma Al-
pha, welcome back. We look forward
to a great rush and an even better se-
mester! We love you!
ALPHA OMICRON Pi wants to give
a Special Thanks to Phi Kappa Tau
for our new girls bid night. We had a
blast!
THANK YOU Delta Chi for making
our new girls' Pref Night one they
will never forget, sincere thanks from
Alpha Omicron Pi
THE SISTERS of Alpha Phi would
like to thank the brothers of Phi Kap-
pa Tau for showing our new mem-
bers a great pref party. We had a
blast!
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA we had a
great time as usual at Pref Night!
Thank you for everything. Love, the
Alpha Delta Pi sisters
CONGRATULATIONS ON your pin-
ning: Liane Bailey. Missy Bennett.
Mandy Chance, Annie & Sadie Cox.
Jessica Dowdy. Shannon Gould. Mel-
issa Hoover. Robin Kozel, Ashley La-
wrentz, Kristine Lindsay, Stacey Mc-
Cuen. Jessie McDaniel. Allison Mc-
Coni. Kristen Meyer. Kelly Napier,
Shannon Ortiz, Lindsay Reed, Tiffany
Stowe. Cole Taylor. Danielle Williams,
Ashley Wright. Love, your sisters of
Alpha Omicron Pi
ANNOUNCEMENTS
OTHER
GOV'T. FORECLOSED HOMES
from pennies on $1. Delinquent tax.
repo's. REO's. Your area. Toll Free 1-
800-218-9000 ext. H-3726 for cur-
rent listings.
BECOMING A successful student-
test taking workshop: Tuesday 11AM-
12Noon. The Center for Counseling
and Student Development is offering
this workshop on September 8th. If
you are interested in this program,
contact the center at 328-6661.
CATCH THE WAVE Register now
for "Aqua Fitness for Faculty 8- Staff"
at the SRC. Aqua Aerobics is de-
signed as a creative alternative to tra-
ditional aerobics with many of the
same great benefits of cardio and
strength training workouts! Session I
runs now through Oct. 16. No swim-
ming skills required. Call Rec Servic-
es at 328-6387 for further details!
LETS GET ya started! The Adven-
ture Program will be hosting an hour
long backpacking session. Septem-
ber 7th. Learn all you would want to
know about equipment, food, and
planning your next outdoor adven-
ture. Member cost is $0, it's Free
Dont miss out! Call the Adventure
ProgrammingDept. of Recreational
Services @ 3284387. '
NEED A noon-time alternative to
fast-food lunches? Join Exercise
Wisely, the mid-day aerobics class
designed especially for the busy
schedules of ECU Faculty & Staff.
Register now at the SRC Main Office
for Session I.
YOGA AT the SRC! Back by popular
demand, registration for Yoga is open
now through Sept. 4. Two sessions
(class times) to choose from, but hur-
ry .classes fill quickly! Call Dept. of
Recreational Services 9 328-6387
for details.
GO FOR the gold Aerobics passes
on sale now at the SRC Main Office.
Semester Passes (Gold) specially
priced at $35 and good for all class-
es through Dec. 18. Session passes
(White) and Drop-Ins (Purple) also
available. Call 328-6387 for details.
VOLLEYBALL PREVIEWREGIS-
TRATION meeting: anyone interest-
ed in playing intramural volleyball
must attend the registration meeting
on Tues Sept. 8 at 5PM in the Men-
denhall Student Center social room.
Men's. Women's, and Co-Rec will be
offered.
THE NEWMAN Catholic Student
Center announces the formation of
Inquiry, Confirmation. First Commun-
ion, Spirituality Classes on Thursday
Sept. 3, 7:30PM. For more informa-
tion call Father Paul. 757-1991. The
Center's location: 953 East 10th St
2 houses from Fletcher Music Build-
ing.
GIVE US TIME
TO REPAY
YOUR LOAN.
After just three years in
the Army, your college loan
could be a thing of the past
Under the Army's Loan
Repayment program, each
year you serve on active
duty reduces your indebt-
edness by one-third or
$1,500, whichever amount
is greater, up to a $65,000
limit.
This offer applies to
Perkins Loans, Stafford
Loans and certain other
federally insured loans
which are not in default
And this is just the first of
many benefits the Army
will give you. Get the
whole story from your
Army Recruiter.
756-9695
ARMY.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE:
www.goarmy.com
KING ft- QUEEN of the Halls: it's time
to battle Who will be this years
king and queen of the haU? To find
out. come be a part of the annual
king and queen of the halls special
event held in the brickyard in front of
Mendenhal! on Wed. Sept. 2 from 4-
6PM.
VOLLEYBALL OFFICIALS meeting:
anyone interested in being a volley-
ball official for intramurals must at-
tend the meeting on Wad. Sept. 2 at
9PM in the Student Recreation Cen-
ter Classroom 202. Yes. it is a job
where you can make some extra
cash! Some knowledge of the sport
or any experience is requested.
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: Thursday 3:30-5PM. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop on September 3rd. If
you are interested in this program,
contact the center at 328-6661.
WANT TO learn the basics of white
water kayaking? Here's your chance
to get wet and wild, starting Septem-
ber 11-12. Don't get caught paying
full price with those other commer-
cial outfitter. Learn the skills it takes
to become an accomplished kayaker.
Register by September 4th, 5PM.
Member cost is $40. For further in-
formation call Adventure Program-
mingDept. of Recreational Services
� 328-6387.
ENHANCE YOUR climbing skills
There will be a day trip to the pinna-
cle of Pilot Mountain, Sept. 13th.
This trip is great for beginners and
those wanting to test their limits. Be
sure to hurry, registration deadline is
September 6th. Member cost is $25.
Any questions? Call the Adventure
ProgrammingDept. of Recreational
Services 9 328-6387.
PERSPECTIVES, FALL 1998. Wed.
Sept. 9. 12:30-1:30PM Brody 2W-50
- "The Trusted Doctor Rosamond
Rhodes. Ph.D. Associate Professor of
Medical Education, Director-Bioethics
Education. Mt. Sinai School of Medi-
cine. Mon. Sept. 28 12:30-1:30PM
Brody 2W-50 "Addressing Patients;
Spirituality" Dana E. King. M.D. Dept
of Family Medicine, ECU School of
Medicine. Co-sponsored by Dept. of
Medical Humanities, ECU School of
Medicine & The Bioethics Center,
University Health Systems of Eastern
Carolina. The public is invited to at-
tend. For further information, call1
816-2361.
FRIDAY AFTERNOON getaway!
Kayaking day trip to Shackleford
Banks, NC scheduled for Sept. 11.
One of the nation's last islands still
populated with wild ponies! Register
by Sept. 8. Member cost $25. Call
Adventure ProgrammingDept. of
Recreational Services 9 328-6387
for further info!
CHOOSE TO lose! unwanted pounds
loading you down in an already over-
loaded semester? Maybe you've al-
ready achieved the figure you want
and need some pointers on how to
keep it that way. The Department of
Recreational Services has the work-
shop for you! The program features
instruction on everything from
healthy eating (recipes included!) to
exercise tips and a fitness assess-
ment! Registration deadline is Sept.
11. Stop by the SRC Office to sign up.
GREENVILLE REC ft PARKS Fall
Tennis Programs. Adult- Beginner:
MonWed 6-7PM 99-1019.
TueTh 7-8PM 910-1020. Interme-
diate: MonWed 7-8PM 99-1019.
TueTh 6-7PM 910-1020. Morn-
ing-Beginner: MonWed 9-10AM
99-1019. Morning-Intermediate:
MonWed 10-11AM 91O1020.
Thursday Playday, TH, 9:16-11:30AM
910-1029. Youth-Novice I 6-7
years MW 5-5:45PM 99-1019.
Novice II 8-9 years TTh 5-5:45PM
910-1020. Afterschool I 10-13
years MW 4-5PM 99-1019. After-
school II 14-18 years TTh 4-5PM
910-1020.
WWW
tec.
ecu.
edu
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Sept. 8 - Oct.13 Tues. 5:15-6:30pm SRC 238
Yoga 11
Sept. 9 - Oct.14 Wed. 4:00-5:15pm SRC 238
Choose to lose
Sept. 14 - Sept. 25 MTh7-8pm SRC Classroom
Freshman Focus 1
Sep.16 7-9pm SRC Classroom
Bike Maintenance Class
Sep.17 6-7pm SRC Brickyard
Freshman Focus 2
Sep.22 7-9pm SRC Classroom
Intramurals
VolleyballPreview (M,W,CR) Reg.Mtg.
Sept. 8 9pm SRC 202
Ultimate Frisbee Reg. Mtg.
Sept. 15 5pm MSC Social Room
Tennis Singles Entry Deadline
Sept. 15 5pm SRC 128
Super Ball Doubles Golf Entry Deadline
Sept. 22 9pm SRC 128
Adventures
Sea Kayaking Cape Lookout - 4x
Sept. 5-7 Trip Adventure Center
Intro. Backpacking - Clinic - lx
Sept. 7 7pm Adventure Center
Advanced Climbing Session - 3x
Sept. 8 - Oct.13 Tues. 7-8pm Adventure Center
Quick Start Kayaking -4x
Sept. 11-12 Clinic SRC Pool
Sea Kayaking Sbackleford Banks - 2x
Sept. 11 Day Trip Adventure Center
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Climbing Pilot Mountain - 4x
Sept. 13 Day Trip Adventure Center
Try Scuba - 2x
Sept. 14 7pm-10pm SRC Pool
Sea Kayaking Tar River - 2x
Sept. 17 Day Trip Adventure Center
Kayaking Roll Clinic -2x
Sept. 21 7pm - 9pm SRC Pool
ARISE
Aqua exerciseSwim Lessons Reg.
Sept. 8-14 8 am-6 pm SRC Office
Climbing Wall Workshop
Sept. 9 7-9pm Climbing Wall
Wheelchair Basketball Practice
Sept. 12 11 a.m. - noon SRC Forum
Adapted Water Ski Clinic
TBA 10 am-4 pm TBA
Aqua exercise & Swim Lessons
Sept. 14 6:30-7:30 pm SRC Pool
Weights and Cardio Workout
Sept. 19 11am-12:30pm SRC Fitness Area
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 3, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 03, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1286
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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