The East Carolinian, September 1, 1998






Look for TEC's new
entertainment magazine
mst
Wednesdays this Fall
When the cyberdust dean, check
out TEC's new website at
www.tececuedu
Carolinian
TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 1.1998 VOLUME 74. ISSUE 03
Due to Humcane Bonnie,
the official add day for
schedule changes has been
changed to Tuesday, Sept. I.
Today is the last day to add
a class.
ECUPD only university force recognized
by Governor's Award for Excellence
Community policing on
campus recognized
Joseph Elder
staff writer
The East Carolina University
Police Department was one of eight
law enforcement agencies in North
Carolina and the only campus
police department presented with
the Governor's Award for
Excellence in Community
Oriented Policing at a ceremony
held Aug. 6 at the Governor's
Radison Inn, Research Triangle
Park.
Vice Chancellor for
Administration and Finance
Richard Brown, ECU Police Chief
Teresa Crocker, Assistant Chief
Grades
up in
dorms
Resident advisers
set example
Tom Younce, Sgt. LaF" ranee Davis,
and Officer Mark Downen
received a plaque oh behalf of the
university Police Department.
Along with the plaque, three street
signs recognizing the department
will be displayed on campus.
"An award of this type is not
possible without the support of the
university community Chief
Crocker said in response to win-
ning the award. "Our officers are
dedicated and committed to the
community policing philosophy,
and we are very proud to have
received this award she said.
The NC Governor's Crime
Commission with the NC
Community Oriented Policing
Liaison for the promotion of
Information, Networking and
Knowledge Project (NC Cop-Link)
sponsors the annual award. A selec-
tion committee composed of law
ECU Police Department recognized by Govenor for their outstanding performance.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE POLICE DEPARTMENT
enforcement and criminal justice
professionals from North Carolina,
South Carolina, Florida, Virginia,
and New York reviewed applica-
tions to determine the award recip-
ients.
According to Harvey McMurray
of NC Cop-Link, the application
process to be considered for the
award was "a rigorous test The
process included a lengthy applica-
tion highlighting the many pro-
grams developed for ECU and a
site visit where university students
were interviewed.
Other criteria include training of
officers in community policing
philosophies, letters of reference,
proof of citizen participation in
departmental efforts, mission and
value statements, hiring guidelines,
performance evaluation guidelines
and management structure.
"This award validates the strong
community policing programs
implemented by the EGU Police
Department over the last four
years. The award is also a recogni-
tion of the commitment this univer-
sity has to its students, faculty and
staff in providing top level police
services Chief Crocker said.
Community policing is defined
as a philosophy and strategy
whereby law enforcement and the
community share the responsibili-
ty to identify problems or concerns
in the community and actively
work together to develop a plan of
action to resolve those problems. It
is a proactive partnership between
law enforcement and the commu-
nity based on trust and coopera-
tion.
The ECU Police Department, a
full service police organization
consisting of 45 sworn officers, 30
student patrol officers, five
telecommunications officers and
three full-time support service per-
sonnel, received notification
on June 29 that it won the
award for colleges and universities
in North Carolina.
Joseph Elder
staff writer
ECU students living on campus
continued the upward trend in aca-
demic performance last spring
according to a release disclosing
Grade Point Average statistics for
all campus residence halls.
The overall GPA for residence
halls rose from 2.510 in the spring
1997 semester to 2.576 last spring.
This overall increase was accompa-
nied by 168 students making a 4.0
and 181 students falling between
3.75-3.99. Such numbers denote
an improved commitment to acad-
emics within the ECU residence
halls.
Emanuele Amaro, the director
of University Housing Services,
attributes the success and
improvement to the students.
"My personal belief is that stu-
dents in general are more
motivated to succeed
Amaro said.
Although student
motivation may be up,
there is a connection
between student and
campus living.
"Residence halls stu-
dents tend to have a con-
nection to the university
which I believe to be
important for a student's
success. . . if placed in an
environment that is posi-
tive, caring, and support-
ive being motivated to
succeed is that much eas-
ier Amaro said.
� This nurturing campus environ-
ment includes three in hall com-
puter labs, a Partners in Education
series where students learn about
Bail set at $1 million
in laundry mat killing
Jarvis Street Laundry Mat where scene of murder occurred Saturday, Aug. 22. Two aquaintances struggled before one
was beat to the point of death.The suspect was arrested and is detained on a $1 million dollar bond.
PHOTO BY JASON FEATHER
Victim badly beaten,
dead on arrival
Debbie Neiwikth
staff writer
The man in connection with the
killing of an employee of the Jarvis
Street Laundry Mat was charged with
murder. Bail was set at $1 million.
Three blocks from campus Aug.22,
Tyrone Larkins, 37, of 503 E. Second
St Apt. G, was attacked at the Jarvis
Street laundromat. Police responded
to a call 7:30 p.m.that a fight had bro-
ken out. By the time they arrived,
Larkins was badlv beaten and unre-
sponsive. Paramedics transported him
to Pitt County Memorial Hospital
where he was pronounced dead on
arrival. Medical examiners said
Larkins died from natural causes of
heart disease, but the examiner said it
was his opinion that the confrontation
led to his death.
Charged with the murder is 25-
year-old Charles Andrew Evans of
4968 Old Washington Road, Highway
264. Witnesses near the scene gave
police a description of the suspect and
his license plate number. Late
Saturday night police charged Evans
with the crime.
"Tyrone was liked by everyone in
the neighbor were the comments of
many of the local residents.
SEE KILLING PAGE 5
study skills and time management,
and plenty resident advisers serv-
ing as exemplary role models.
As students who lead other stu-
dents in a highly public and visible
position, resident advisers must
adhere to higher standards. The
GPA requirement for resident
advisers is 2.5 but exceeding that
Bonnie's blow not as threatening as expected
Student reactions vary
from scared to bored
A student enters Garrett Hall.
PHOTO BY JASON FEATHER
requirement has been the norm.
Resident advisers' spring 1998
GPA mean was 3.258, the highest
SEE GRADES PAGE 6
TK Jones
NEWS EDITOR
Jenny Simmons did homework and
hung out at her sorority during the
two days off from classes, brought
by Hurricane Bonnie. Carrie
Hewitt stayed glued to her televi-
sion, watching the pattern of
Bonnie and how much rain it was
dumping on the Carolina coast.
The difference in how students
spent time depended largely on
where they were from.
Simmons, a native of New Yotk,
saw the hurricane as exciting by
day and boring by night when the 8
p.m. curfew restricted her from
leaving her dorm.
"I spent most of my time at my
sorority house doing homework
and just hanging out said
Simmons. "Because of the curfew,
we weren't allowed out and things
got really boring and stressful after
8 p.m
Hewitt saw it as a threat to her
parents' home in Elizabeth City
and one of the "slowest hurricanes"
she had ever experienced.
"I have experienced other hurri-
canes but none were as slow and as
boring to watch as this one said
Hewitt. "It seems like it lingered
on forever
Fortunately for Hewitt she saw
the hurricane downsized from a
level three to a tropical storm, with
more damage caused by water than
by high winds.
By Friday morning parking lots
were drying out, stalled cars were
started and the Grounds
Department crew was combing
through the campus, removing
debris and fallen limbs. It was busi-
ness as usual. ECU escaped
unscathed. But
where were the
students?
Campus was
half empty
F'riday when
many off-cam-
pus students
assumed they
didn't have
classes after
reading on the
ECU web site,
and hearing on
local radio sta-
tions, that class-
es would be closed.
Apparently the confusion began
with the delay of Bonnie's arrival.
School officials prepared for the
worst: a hurricane whirling through
Greenville late Thursday after-
noon, interrupting power lines,
phone lines and blocking roads. To
keep students off the streets, offi-
cials piped information to students
of cancellations as soon as they
Fourth Street was
one of many roads flooded during Bonnie.
PHOTO BY HEATHEB BURGESS
heard of Bonnie's late arrival.
But when Bonnie's aftermath
was less than expected, retrieval of
those messages weren't as quick.
A decision when to resume
classes was made late Wednesday
and prerecorded on administrative
hot lines, while previous messages
posted on the TEC web site and
SEE BONNIE. PAGE S






2 Taatday, Siptimbir 1, 1998
news
Till Eatt Carolinian
I
Lower loan interest rates
approved by Congress
Students check on financial aid disbursements and inquire about loen application at Student Financial Aid Office.
PHOTO IV JASON FEATHER
Bigsavings
forbomwers
Debbie Neuwirth
staff writer
At the beginning of summer, inter-
est rates on new federal loans for
students will drop a full percentage
point. This is good news for stu-
dents because it will save any-
where from hundreds to thousands
of dollars over the long term.
"I am pleased that the adminis-
tration's proposed student rate has
been adopted, despite a strong lob-
bying effort by the banking indus-
try to block interest rate reduc-
tion U.S. Secretary of Education
Richard W.Riley said in a press
release.
Vice President Al Gore intro-
duced a plan for a scheduled loan
interest rate reduction back in
February and Congress recently
enacted the three-month measure
for a temporary low student rate.
This was adopted as part of the
Transportation Equity Act for the
21st century.
On June 9, President Clinton
signed it as a law. The new rate will
apply to Federal Family Education
loans and Stafford Loans.
The new rates will save on aver-
age for a four-year college student
with a $12,000 debt, a savings of
SEE LOAM. PAGE 4
File cabinet accidents prompt
office safety awareness
Accident numbers
cause concern
anoiijc�ica
Joseph Elder
staff writer
Don't laugh. A string of dangerous
file cabinet accidents in ECU
department offices has awakened
the need for increased attention to
a subject not often regarded as seri-
ous - office safety.
The most recent incident at the
School of Medicine, the third
mishap in four months, occurred a
month after the Office of
Environmental Health and Safety
posted an email announcement
regarding the accidents.
There have been a number of
accidents involving lateral file cab-
inets tipping over. Fortunately,
none have resulted in serious
injury but there are precautions
you should take to prevent future
incidents, the announcement said.
These precautions include lev-
eling cabinets before loading, load-
ing from the bottom up, storing
heavier items in bottom drawers,
and anchoring cabinets to the floor
or wall.
Employees should not open
more than one drawer at a time,
use drawers as shelves or steps or
leave the drawers open when not
being used.
Despite the three latest
mishaps causing minor contusions
and bruises, they have created
some real concerns for Phil Lewis,
the assistant director for
Environmental Health and Safety.
Topping the list of his concerns -
ensuring that employees use safe
practices in their work environ-
ment and maintain awareness of
potential office hazards.
"Safety in office areas is many
times overlooked because it is not
perceived as a hazardous working
environment. However, the office
environment is full of hazards that
Heather Burgess and Brian Williams sorting files in an office file cabinet
PHOTO BY JASON FEATHER
can result in injury.
"The key to preventing acci-
dents related to hazards found in
the office is to first identify those
hazards Lewis said.
Among those hazards are
improperly placed electrical cords,
items obstructing the means of
egress, moving or incorrectly lifting
heavy objects, standing on or lean-
ing back in chairs and poor work-
station design.
After identifying dangerous
objects, areas and practices,
"appropriate action must be taken
to eliminate those hazards or
reduce your risk through the use of
engineering and administrative
controls Lewis said.
According to the OSHA NC
guide 33 the layout of an office
should incorporate the principles
of work flow, considering safety
and health, efficiency, and conve-
nience. Such a layout should have
specific requirements for stairways,
exits, and doors since accidents
often occur in these areas.
All employees, including stu-
dent workers, should familiarize
themselves with proper work prac-
tices and follow all applicable safe-
ty guidelines. This includes being
aware of fellow employees activi-
ties and watching out for other
office workers.
When accidents occur at ECU,
employees should report them to
their supervisor and contact the
Office of Environmental Health
and Safety. Student workers
injured in campus offices should
notify their supervisor and seek
appropriate medical attention.
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I
4 Tmiiy, Stptimtur 1, 1988
news
Th� Eait Carolinian
Campus building signs
more helpful than not
New system
functional modern
Joseph Elder
staff whiter
With the new ECU sign system in
place complete with directories
and new building signs, getting
around campus should be a breeze.
The comprehensive signage
system makes identifying campus
buildings easier and newcomers
can use the map directories for
details on building locations. But
the signs, which cost between
$1100 and $1500, will not help if
you need to know what depart-
ments a particular building houses.
For some students, this does
not pose a problem. Joni Susette, a
sophomore at ECU, says that hav-
ing the signs is not necessary.
"The building name is enough
since the building name and room
Loan
continued from page 2
number are all that appear on the
schedule Susette said
While this may suffice for those
already familiar with campus and
for finding class meeting locations,
newcomers and those needing
specific departmental offices may
require information not posted on
the new signs.
"It would be easier if depart-
ment names were on the signs
said Melissa Parker, an ECU fresh-
man. "I was sent to departments
but no one told me what building
they were in
Though the signs may not
address every campus pedestrians
detailed needs, the new signs do
serve a valuable purpose and give
the university a more modem look
compared to the old wood signs.
"The new signs are designed
to be aesthetically pleasing,
durable and project a professional
image said Eugene Langford,
Facilities Services construction
and renovation design technician.
ECU's sign system seems to
fall in the middle of the road
when compared with the other
two major state universities in the
UNC system. North Carolina
State University signs display
both building names and depart-
mental names, but University of
North Carolina, Chapel Hill stu-
dents are lucky if they find a
building sign.
"Finding a building sign is hit
or misssaid Gordon Rutherford,
director of buildings and grounds
at UNC-CH. "They just expect
the students to know their way
around campus
If someone has difficulty find-
ing a particular department they
can find a campus phone directo-
ry to assist them or ask for direc-
tions within other university
departments.
The new building signs
replaced the old wood �igns
which lasted only two or three
years. Constant decay of the old
signs and frequent need for
replacement made them expen-
sive to maintain. The new
signs are expected to last 10 or
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
LOCATION: 953 E. 10TH ST. (BOTTOM OF COLLEGE HILL AT EAST END OF CAMPUS)
CHANGE OF DATE DUE TO HURRICANE BONNIE
11th Annual Back to School
OPEN HOUSE
& PIG PICKIIM'U
When: Wednesday, September 2,1998,4:OOpm-7:OOpm
FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL US 757-1991
MASS SCHEDULE:
Sun:11:30am and 8:30pm
Wed: 5:30pm
ALL MASSES ARE AT THE CENTER
5 TmiiUy, S
Fr. Paul Vaeth Chaplain & Campus Minister
mark in fiv
cumulative n
nine percent
� advisers mad
Kevin Par
in White hall
the good gr
leadership an
"He Tyr
extra mile for
Deal, an ECl
Street residen
cartoonists cartoonists cartoonists
cart
IcaH. NLtUfcU! Cartoonists
$650 in interest over a 10-year
repayment period.Graduate stu-
dents borrowing $60,000 would
save $3,200 in interest.
Riley urges Congress to act
quickly on this rate and make it
permanent. In a press release he
said, "Our goal is to preserve sav-
ings for borrowers striving to fur-
ther their education, while offering
lenders a reasonable return and
protecting taxpayers at the same
time Riley said. "We are com-
mitted to working for passage of a
reauthorization bill that broadens
educational opportunities for all
students and ensures that finances
are not a barrier to the realization
of their dreams
BE A CARTOONIST
GET YOUR STRIP PUBLISHED
GREAT RESUME BUILDER
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
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Th� Eait Carolinian
NTER
:ampus)
BONNIE
fiool
E
n
)Opm
1991
ER
Tmtd.y, September 1, 1998
news
Tbt East Carolinian
Grades
continued from page 1
mark in five semesters, with a
cumulative mean of 3.187. Eighty-
nine percent of all ECU resident
� advisers made over a 2.75.
Kevin Parks, a resident adviser
in White hall last spring, attributes
the good grades to two factors,
leadership and job security.
Killing
continued from page I
"He (Tyrone) would go the
extra mile for anyone said Steve
Deal, an ECU student and Jarvis
Street resident.
"Most RAs are already seeking
leadership positions, trying to be a
better overall person, more moti-
vated and want to make better
grades Parks said. "Also, if you
get a 2.49 you are gone just as fast
as they hired you
If the combination of universi-
ty programs, student dedication to
academics and positive role mod-
els continues to produce scholastic
performances of this kind, ECU's
quest for academic superiority will
be strengthened.
It is believed that Larkins and
Evans knew each other thought it
is not known at this time whether
alcohol was involved.
According to Assistant Police
Chief Tom Younce, most people
involved in assaults or homicides
usually have an excessive amount
of alcohol and know each other.
He advises students to keep exces-
Bonnie
continued from page )
with several radio stations failed to
update cancellation notices.
Because of the confusion, most
professors granted reprieves for
homework assignments and didn't
take role.
To rectify future confusion,
administrators are creating new pro-
cedures to get cancellations out to
students when unfavorable weather
conditions arise.
Layton Getsinger, vice chancel-
lor for administration and finance,
said that one of the things they're
going to do is ask the faculty to
attach to their syllabi a list of steps
for students to follow during
inclement weather conditions.
mists
mists
mists
mists
Uptown Greenville
209 E. 5th St.
NC'i Legendary Nightclub,
Voted 1 at ECU and
Top 100 Collage Bon In
the Nation by Playboy
magazine October 1997
?
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Big City Driven
In the new
Pheonix Room
Big City Drivers
In the raw
Pheonix Room
www.atHc-nightclub.com
"5dS 752-7303 t
I
Oil dedi BS.H?er:
$1.50
Busch Light
$1.5f ?
Hi Balls ?
Aug. 28
Missing Property - A resident of
Cotten Hall reported her ECU ID
holder missing. The holder was
lost between the Wright Place and
Austin Building.
Assist Rescue - A student injured
his ankle while playing basketball
at the Student Recreation Center.
Greenville Rescue transported the
student to PCMH.
Driving While Impaired - A non-
student was arrested for DWI
Charles Boulevard, just west of the
Minges parking lot. After submit-
ting to the Intoxilyzer test, the
magistrate found no probable cause
and released the subject.
Driving While Impaired & Driving
Left of Center - A non-student, of
Cherry Point, NC was arrested for
DWI and driving left of center on
Charles Boulevard west of the
Trevathan Building.
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
gglf Dickie Palmer
$1 ADM. W ECU ID BEFORE 9:30

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Let
Mited:
THE COLLEGE ACCOUNT
Aug. 26
Larceny - Three residents of Scott
Hall were stopped by a staff mem-
ber while attempting to bring a
construction sign into their room.
The sign was recovered by the staff
member.
Aug. 29
Driving While License Revoked -
A non-student, was arrested for
driving while license revoked after
he was stopped on Ormond Way
for driving without his headlights
Driving While Impaired - A non-
student, was arrested for DWI after
being stopped at Fifth and Reade
for driving on a sidewalk.
Aug. 30
Larceny - A non-student reported
the larceny of two vent shades and
a chrome centered cap from his
vehicle. He also reported damage
to the drivers side door and quarter
panel. The incident occurred
while he was parked in the Third
and Reade Streets parking lot.
Aug. 25
Larceny - A student reported the
larceny of her keys, sunglasses and
watch from a locker near the bas-
ketball court in the Recreation
Center.
Aug. 27
Damage to Coin Operated
Machine - An officer discovered
damage to a vending machine in
the basement of Aycock Hall.
Harassing Phone Calls - Residents
of a room in Fletcher Hall reported
receiving two threatening phone
calls.
Larceny - A resident of Jones Hall
reported the larceny of her bicycle
from east of Jones Hall.
Harassing Phone Calls - A resident
of Tyler Hall reported she has been
receiving harassing phone calls
since Aug.27.
Possession of Stolen Property -
Two students were issued campus
appearance tickets after a stop sign
was found in their vehicle parked
east of White Hall.
Driving While Impaired
Possession of a Switchblade - A
non-student was arrested for DWI
after being stopped at Fifth and
Reade Streets for driving a vehicle
with expired tags and an expired
inspection. The arrested regis-
tered a .07 AC on the Intoxilyzer
and the magistrate found no proba-
ble cause. A switchblade knife was
seized from a passenger in the
vehicle. Charges are pending on
the passenger for the weapon.
Attention
Sigma Gamma Rho
Interest Meeting
on Sept 3 at 7:00PM
Mendenhall Student Center
Rm248
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wmmmmmmtm
6 Th.r.div SinUmb.r 1 1998
opinion
The) Flit r.rnlj
eastcarolinian
AMI L.ROYSTEREdilot
HEATHER BURfiESS ManagingEdrlot
TX JONES NewsEdiior
AMANDA AUSTIN Features Ediiot
MICCAH SMITH Assislsmlilesivle Editor
TRACY LAUBACH Scorn Editor
STEVE I.OSEY Assistant Sports Editor
CHRIS KNOTTS SiaHIllustrator
STEPHANIE WHITLOCK Ad Design Manager
JANET RESPESS AdvertisingManaget
BOBBY TUGGI.E yVataijsw
Sewng the tCU commonny since 197b. the list Carolinian oublishes 11.000 copies evecy luesdsy and Thursday the teed eoiioriel in earii edilion is rhe
opinion or toe f dnwul Boaid the East Carolinian welcomes leners 10 the editor, limited to KG warts, which mey be edited for decency or brevity, the lest
Carolinian reserves the ivjhi to edit or leiect wjtters lo publication All leners musl be sejned Leners should be addressed 10: Opinion editor .The East
Ceiotmian, Srodent Pubiicaiions Building, FCU. Greemnhe. ?B5i4353. For information, cefl 8t9.3?0 6306
oumsw
Many of you can probably remember the time long ago when hearing about a murder or a rape that happened
three states away was enough to knock your socks off. It is time to wake up and smell the coffee, folks, because
believe it or not, those unbelievable stories have made their way to your local newspapers, to your community
and even to your backyard.
A resident of Cotten Hall was raped early in the spring semester last year, a story that was heard, talked about
and eventually forgotten. Many student homes were broken into over holidays and breaks from school, and most
recently on the list a man was beaten severely in the laundromat on Jarvis Street, which ultimately lead to his
death.
While there is no need to fear for your life from day to day, it is necessary that as students and residents of this
community, you are aware that there is a need to take precaution.
Mostpeople have the attitude that "things like that would never happen to them It is likely that those who
have suffered and faced crime right in the face thought the same thing themselves, proving once again that you
can never be too careful.
Don't assume that you will not be approached if you are walking through campus alone at night. Don't assume
that when you turn that corner, someone isn't waiting there for you. Don't assume that no one will turn your
doorknob with hopes of finding an unlocked room. Don't assume that safety is guaranteed, because these are
things that have happened in the past, and unfortunately, will more than likely happen again.
By being aware of the things that have happened and how they could have been prevented, you can save
yourself from being the next victim.
While the university has made an effort to provide more lighting and patrolling on campus, be aware that crime
does happen in places other than on ECU grounds. The ECU Police Department has developed a system to
better protect vacant homes over holidays and breaks. Take advantage of what they have to offer. Don't travel
alone at night, and if you have to, take advantage of the escort system offered by the university. Lock your doors,
and if you live in the residence halls, be especially careful about who you let come in behind you chances are
they have good intentions but is it really worth taking that chance?
OPINION
Columnist
Marvelle
Sullivan
We can't trust Bill anymore
How can anyone under
pressure of losing a job
perform that same job with
full competency? It isn't
humanly possible, and
Clinton has proven time and
time again that he is in no
way, shape, or form
super-human in the face
of temptation.
It is of no surprise to anyone that
Bill Clinton is presently caught in
one of the largest and most
complex predicaments of his
political career. Not only has this
predicament caused a media uproar
but it has also raised some very
important issues and questions
about the American political arena
and those politicians who dare to
enter.
The main Democratic spin
forges that since sex is not a crime
(between two consenting adults)
and that since a lack of basic morals
is neither a high crime nor a
misdemeanor, then we as
Americans should look the other
way and let the Clinton family work
this crisis out for themselves.
Besides, it's none of our business,
right?
Well, for arguments sake, let's
agree with this Democratic
reasoning. If we do intend to
overlook this scandal and wipe the
slate clean, we need to also
examine the ramifications of this
action for the present and for the
future.
There are many flaws that can
be cited right away with the
Democratic spin to this presidential
problem.
The law does not find marital
infidelity to be a crime, but the law
only touches the bare minimum of
right and wrong. Should our
president�the symbol and leader
of our country�only be held to a
bare minimum of right and wrong?
If so, should he have the power of
executive order, the command of
our military, the ability to make and
break treaties with foreign
countries? Clinton and any
president for that matter can not
have their cake and eat it too! He
can not be the most powerful man
in the world and then, when he
finds it convenient, claim he is like
you and me. He's not. Why?
Because HE constantly has access
to the trigger of our nuclear bombs
and we do not. If he wants to be
treated like any other infidel, then
he shouldn't have run for president.
It may be politically incorrect to
impose morals on anyone�even
the president. The fact he cheated
on his wife, perjured himself in a
court of law, and continually lied to
the American people (who voted
him into office) should not be what
is so disturbing. What is disturbing
is that Clinton has sent us a big red
flag. He has shown us through both
word and deed that he is neither
responsible nor is he reliable. What
he has done is indicative of his
future actions and of his present
logic and reasoning. This
transcends moral obligations within
his family. It is ignorant to believe
that he will be honest and
accountable in every area except
his personal life.
Clinton has obviously abused his
power. "Abuse of power" ushered
Nixon right out of the White
House. Even the Republicans
believed Nixon would not be able
to fully lead the country after such
intense scrutiny. For those who
feel that Clinton is doing a fine job
as president and thus should be
unscathed, consider the situation
abroad at the moment. Clinton
admits these events may have
never occurred had the foreign
leaders seen a strong country led by
a strong president. How can
anyone under pressure of losing a
job perform that same job with full
competency? It isn't humanly
possible, and Clinton has proven
time and time again that he is in no
way, shape, or form super-human in
the face of temptation.
Whether Clinton should be held
accountable for his morality�or
lack thereof is a hard call. The
public, press, and government
continue to rifle in ambiguity.
Moral lines are always gray and
subjective, so defining a moral
dimension to politics can get tricky.
A precedent needs to be set though
to insure the proper running of our
country now and for the future.
Write & Letter to tfu Editor

Got something to say? Need somewhere to
say it? Bring your letter to the eastcarolinian ,
located on the 2nd floor of The Student
n Publications Building
OPINION
Stephen
Kleinschmit
Columnist
Give brotherhood a chance
If you left your wallet at your
fraternity house, and came
back to get it, would it be
there? Yes, with every dollar
and credit card still in it.
That's the difference between
us and just anybody.
It's that happy time once again. For
those of you who are not familiar
with Rush, here is a basic
description. Fall Rush is a time at
the beginning of the semester
when sororities and fraternities
invite students to meet the sisters
and brothers of their respective
organizations in hope to find
worthy people to join them.
I ask you to put aside all that
you have heard about fraternities
and come out and rush. I know as a
freshman I came to ECU with all
sorts of preconceived notions about
fraternities which came mostly
from watching Animal House and
believing other people who had
their own opinions of the Greek
system. I decided to go out by
myself in the Spring and find what
was right for me. I found a great
bunch of guys everywhere I went,
but finally narrowed it down to my
current fraternity. The decision to
pledge is something that I never
regretted.
The bond of brotherhood is
something that transcends the
ages. When I told my grandfather
that I was going to school, he asked
me to look into fraternities. Even
though he was disappointed that
we don't have his fraternity at this
campus, he impressed upon me
the importance of brotherhood and
the well rounded man. He
graduated in 1939 and still keeps in
touch with his brothers almost 60
years later.
Sure, people like to make fun of
the Greeks because they don't
understand us. Since we are closed
societies, and won't let anyone
walk in and join, they think that we
are up to something mischievous.
The truth is that not all students
possess the same ideals of high
moral standards or conduct that
brings credit to ourselves and our
fraternity. It is these high
standards that bring us closer to
each other and develop trusX
between the members. If anybody
walked into your house and sat
down in your chair and said that he
was your brother, would yoii
believe him? No. If you left your
wallet at your fraternity house, and
came back to get it, would it be
there? Yes, with every dollar and
credit card still in it. That's the
difference between us and just
anybody.
You should find the people who
are most like you. If you are a
leader, look for the leaders. If you
like to travel, look for the
adventurous ones. If you want to
drink everyday, go to Alcoholics
Anonymous. The Greeks wouldn't
have survived this long if
fraternities were held together by
alcohol. Many fraternities have
been around for over 150 years.
Sure, we have fun like the rest of
ECU, but when the week begins
anew, it really is nice to have
friends who encourage you to leave
school with a degree.
OPINION
Britt
Honeycutt
Columnist
Library noises just plain scary
The point is that although
the Sonic Plaza is pretty
and new and slightly neat,
it is in no way
educationally, physically, or
emotionally beneficial to
anyone. What exactly
is its function?
Ahhh, school's back in session.
Your first walk through the campus
after a long summer's break should
be refreshing, a tinge nostalgic,
and only slightly bitter. I was,
however, scared poopless.
There seems to be something
strange afoot at the library, my
friends. I was innocently strolling
along on my way to GC when I was
suddenly attacked by a swarm of
cicadas from out of nowhere. Well,
I thought I was being attacked, so
I ran like hell swatting at my
backside and screaming like a
banshee that they were after me
and to call 911 because I was
allergic to their horrible, mangling
bites.
There were no cicadas. There
wasn't even a cricket to be seen
within ten feet of the entire
library- which I had ample
opportunity to investigate as I
searched for the books that I had
scattered in my flight. But there is
one hell of a sound system in that
there plaza.
Ok, I see the need to spend
money on certain things. Of
course, athletics bring in money for
the school, so funding them is
important (the fact that we then
spend the money earned on more
athletic funding can be ignored for
the sake of this argument.)
Building and maintaining the
classrooms that we receive the
education that we're paying out
the butt for is necessary and useful.
The Rec Center can even be
considered a good use of money, as
it gives us a place to exercise and
all that healthy crap- but I
probably shouldn't start talking
about the Rec Center, since I'm
sure that the thing about how
faculty-who did not pay for the
construction of the center as we
did with our tuition and fees- have
their own aerobics class that
students are not allowed in, which
during the summer was the only
one offered in the mornings. But
that's not the point.
The point is that although the
Sonic Plaza is pretty and new and
slightly neat, it is in no way
educationally, physically, or
emotionally beneficial to anyone.
What exactly is its function? Is it
there simply to impress
prospective students' parents? To
con the alumni into giving us more
money? I mean, a circle of TV
screens that aren't even functional
don't scream out "Come to TEC,
look how cool we are, give us more
money- it's an investment into the
future of our youth
You know, I could come up with
some better wastes of money than
that, if that's what the goal was.
How about we build a gigantic
sculpture out of platinum bars in
the center of the mall that depicts
a football player drinking a can of
Pepsi? It can be a tribute to the
people who own ECU.
Anyway, the damn thing scared
me again the other night on the
way home from my night class. I
had jungle flashbacks. My
roommates found me the next
morning hiding behind a bush
with mud streaked down my face
chanting about killing Piggy or
something- I don't really
remember any of it. But if you
haven't walked by there yet, don't
be afraid. Most of the noises aren't
real. Just thought I'd let you know,
"Knowledge will forever govern ignorance.
And a people who mean to be their own
governors must arm themselves with the power
knowledge gives
James Madison
4th U. President
The Di

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The Division of Student Life at East Carolina University
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I






I
I
8 Tuttday, September 1, 1998
features
The East Carolinian
Classical music paving way to higher education, scores
i m jj
Music imptwes
learning capabilities
N ICIIOI.AS K I II'IIS
r i f � k i 11 k
In the 5th century B.(). Plato said: "
Music is a more potent instrument
than any other for education, and chil-
dren should be taught music before
anything else Today science is prov-
ing the truth of his statement.
Dr. Gbrden Shaw is a physi-
cist at (he I niversity
of California at
Irvine and
together
u i t h
h i s
part-
ner I )r.
Prances
Rauscher a
psychologist cur-
rently with the
University of Wisconsin at
Oshkosh have been studying what
thev term the "Mozart effect
Through the use of computers
Shaw and Rauscher were able to gen-
crate a model to see what occurs in
the neural firing patterns of the brain.
When they took the pattern and fed it
into a musical synthesizer they found
something startling. The synthesizer
produced music and not simply one
style of music. They found several
varying styles such as Baroque, folk,
and a style similar in form to Middle
Eastern. This information led the two
scientists to believe our brains com-
municate in music.
In 1993, Shaw and Rauscher con-
ducted a survey that found college
students that listened to Mozart
Sonata in D Major for Two Pianos for
at least 10 minutes scored around
eight and a half points higher on
Spatial-temporal tests, thus conclud-
ing that listening to classical music
enhances spatial reasoning, the ability
to perceive the visual world accurate-
ly, to form mental images of physical
objects and to recognize variations in
objects.
Research on the "Mozart FTfect"
also suggests that listening to Mozart
significantly increased the IQ scotes
of both high school and college stu-
dents. The College Board has deter-
mined that students who listen to
Mozart scored 51 points higher on
verbal portions of the SAT and 39
points higher on math portions of the
SAT.
At ECU the Music Therapy
Department has been very interested
in these findings as well as the current
research that is taking place in this
Held.
Dr. Michellle ilairston, Chair of
the Music Education Department at
ECU explains that the Mozart Effect
Composed by Nicholas Kalapos, Staff Wrifer
has the biggest effect on young chil-
dren who show results in as little as
six week where as older children
(between the ages of 10-11) tend to
plateau quickly.
When asked if ECU was doing
any studies in this new field
Hairston replied: "Music Therapy
students are required to do
practicums for their majors
(Practical applications of theories)
Hairston said.
Some of these studies have
found a connection between music
and Alzheimers patients abilities to
temember their pasts.
When music is played that the
patient recalls from their past it can
cause the patient to regain their lost
memories for a short period of time
(generally as long as the music is
playing).
Students have also used music to
help children with learning disabili-
ties and behavioral problems.
Though only Mozart music has so
far been found to have a profound
effect on people, others have had
limited success with other from of
music. Though they generally start
with music that is familiar to the
child the researches branch off into
other forms of music to expand not
only the child's musical knowledge,
but to help the child in subjects and
areas the child is not as adept.
There are many researchers cur-
rently trying to debunk these theo-
ries as well as prove them. If you are
interested in finding out more about
this research or related topic there
are many book being published that
are available at your local libraries
and bookstores.
According to the "Mozart Effect" listening to classical
music regularly may enhance spatial reasoning, but results are most commonly seen in young children. Test
scores have been proven to increase dramatically after listening to the classical music.
SEE MUSIC. PAGE 9
Classical Studies scholar chosen for professorship
Fantazzi will offer
classes, public lectures
l. Dm
SF. MUH H HI I F. H
Dr. Charles E. Fantazzi, a classical
studies scholar of the University of
Windsor in Ontario. (lanada, is this
year's recipient of the Whielnnd
Distinguished Professorship.
The Whichard Distinguished
Professorship was endowed four
years ago by the Whichard family,
David .1. Whichard, former editor
and publisher of the Daily
Reflector for nearly 60 years and
wife. Virginia S. Whichard. The
funding brings professors from vir-
tually any place in the world that
are involved in the Humanities
field to teach here at EC! 1 and give
lectures, which are open to the stu-
dents, faculty, and Greenville resi-
dents.
"I was rather surprised even
though the interview led me to
believe I was a likely candidate
Fantazzi said. "I like the idea that
they were looking for a senior per-
son who had something to give to
the students as well as the younger
faculty members
The professor-
ship is a competi-
tive process. Each
year, a different
discipline from the
I Iumanities field is
given the opportu-
nity to apply for the
professorship. Dr.
Anthony Papalas,
history professor
and director of the
classical studies
program, said that
they look fot a pro-
fessor that is prefer-
ably retired, has
Charles E. Fantazzi, classical
studies scholar
PHOTO BY JASON FEATHER
written books and
is well known in
his field.
"We look for
someone who is
eminent so as to
bring prestige to
the University and
"the department he
teaches in
Papalas said.
"The person is
chosen based on
their accomplish-
ments in one's
field and on the
recommendations
of others in that
same fieldsaid Sherry Southard,
English professor here at E( X
All applications are reviewed
and then one professor is chosen to
do the professorship for one year.
Dr. Fantazzi is the fourth recipient.
Others who have received this pro-
fessorship are Roger I lornsby. a lit-
erary critic and Master Latinist
from the University of Iowa; Dr.
John I Post, a philosophy profes-
sor in metaphysics, logic, rational-
ism, and the value theory from
V'andcrbilt University; and Joe
Bellamy, a fiction writer, critic poet,
and an editor from St. Lawrence
University in New York.
Fantazzi was a Fulbright scholar
at the I diversity of Florence in
Italy in the early 1960s. In 1964,
Fantazzi received his doctorate in
comparative literature from
Harvard University. His publica-
tion credits include both articles
and books on classical authors,
Medieval thinkers, and
Renaissance humanists. He is cur-
rently working on an 85 volume
piece with a team of international
scholars called The Collected
Works of Eramus of Rotterdam by
the University of Toronto Press.
"Eramus was a very learned man
of the 16th century Fantazzi said.
SEE FANTAZZI. PAGE 9
Swedish atomic scientist advises on steps to winning Nobel Prize
1981 recipient of
Roentgen Prize
Erin A i. n i: i i
STIFI � Rll F.R
Amanda AUSTIN
FEATURES EDITOR
Atomic Physics and Noble Prizes
are his specialty and his ECU was
his prime target of interest,
Atomic physicist extraordinar,
Dr. Reinhold Schuch, was invited
to ECU to deliver two speeches
which were sponsored by the ECU
Department of Physics and Sigma
Xi science fraternity.
The first of the two speeches
gave participants an inside look at
the Noble Prize selection process,
entitled "How to Get the Nobel
Prize Schuch's second speech
described his own research on
atomic collisions and was entitled,
"Cold Collisions Between
Electrons and Ions
Schuch is a member of the
Royal Swedish Academy of
Sciences, a committee that selects
recipients of the Noble Prize, and is
also a professor and chairman of the
Department of Atomic Physics at
Stockholm University.
This native of Heidelberg, West
Germany is the 1987 recipient of
the Roentgen Prize. An award
Schuch won for his studies on high-
ly charged ions.
Schuch's career in physics
stemmed from his curiosity and
interest in understanding natural
phenomena.
Schuch's career has been a suc-
cessful one and he feels that the
most important thing he has
achieved is the influence he has
been able to have over the devel-
opments and the new direction his
field of expertise, atomic physics,
has taken and will continue to take
in the futute.
"In Europe, new machines have
been built in this field, which was a
good part of my initiative Schuch
said.
According to Schuch, these
machines contain rings that store
ions and simulate what is happen-
ing in extreme conditions in nature.
The machines, which total close to
$50 million, allow physicists to
study natural phenomenon that
would otherwise be impossible.
In Schuch's earlier days, before
Stockholm University, he was
employed at a national Laboratory,
Oak Ridge.
The offer to head the depart-
ment of Atomic Physics opened
the door to many new possibilities
and challenges for the scientist
including the requirement to learn
German. After mastering the
German language, Schuch went on
to tackle other languages such as
English and French. In conjunc-
tion with heading the department,
Schuch also teaches classes in
Quantum Physics, Atomic Physics,
Labs and Undergraduate level
courses.
Schuch feels that teaching
requires a professor to show stu-
dents "a fact of nature or discovery
which can awake their curiosity to
learn about it
Schuch also feels that as a pro-
Nobel
Facts
Alfred Nobel was born (ktober 21,1833 in Stockholr
Never married, though he did have a mistressv
named Sophie Hess I
Fluent in Swedish, Russian, French, F.r�lish,
and German by age I7ifi
Studied chemical engineering in Sweden, Genj
France, and the United St
Founded 90 laboratories in 20 countries
At time of death in 1 S, Nobel had 355 pat
fessor, interacting with students is said. "In Sweden there is a close
very important. relationship, students are not afraid
"(Student interaction is) very
important and relaxed Schuch SEE NOBEL. PAGE 9





9 Tuiisay. September 1, 1898
features
The EM Carolinian
ie East Carolinian
es
d classical
m. Test
Florence in
rOs. In 1964.
; doctorate in
iturc from
His publica-
both articles
ical authors,
ers, and
ts. He is cur-
! 85 volume
international
c Collected
Rotterdam by
into Press.
' learned man
Fantazzi said.
� � 9
nze
khol
rtglish,
re is a close
are not afraid
E9
covering the
two students scalded
in hot showers
DURHAM (AP) Workers
replaced a faulty valve in the
plumbing of one dormitory at
North Carolina Central University
after two students were scalded
while taking showers.
Freshman Jcrmeir Stroud suf-
fered burns Sunday, and Junior
Adrian Taylor suffered second-
degree bums Aug. 14 when water
in the shower of the same dormito-
ry reached almost 200 degrees.
Hot water in the dormitory was
shut off until a new $600 unit was
installed on Wednesday. Physical
plant workers also will inspect
devices in other campus dormito-
ries to prevent
another scalding.
Stroud, who was
burned on the
chest, required
medical attention
from paramedics.
The incident
happened when
another student flushed a nearby
toilet and drew all the cold water
from the showers, said Angela
Terry, vice chancellor for student
affairs.
Taylor, a member of NCCU's
football team, also was burned on
his chest.
Smokies set ozone
pollution record
GATLINBURG, Tenn. (AP)
Ozone pollution has reached record
levels in the
Great Smoky Mountains
National Park, officials said
Tuesday in issuing an advisory to
anyone with respiratory problems
or planning outdoor exercise.
Air monitoring stations recorded
the park's highest one-hour ozone
reading ever on Monday 124 parts
per billion at Cove Mountain.
That's three times natural ozone
levels.
The Smokies have experienced
25 days of unhealthy ozone levels
so far in 1998, tying a 1995 record.
The park on Monday measured
eight-hour ozone concentrations of
90 parts per billion at Clingsmans
Dome, 108 ppb at Cove Mountain
and 104 ppb at Look Rock. Federal
and state standards say anything
over 85 ppb is unhealthy.
Improving traffic flow
in America
SAN ANTONIO (AP) America's
highway traffic, up 30 percent over
the last decade, costs motorists 2
billion hours yearly in tie-ups, says
the Federal
Highway Administration. One
antidote is an advanced traffic man-
agement system called
TransGuide, which has reduced
accidents where it is in operation by
15 percent. It has also cut emer-
gency response time by 20 percent.
The system utilizes sensors, video
cameras and fiber optics to monitor
changes in traffic flows. It can
report current travel times for all
San Antonio highways and sug-
gest alternate routes, if necessary.
In 19,
Virtual image
technology to employ
200 in Lancaster
LANCASTER, S.C. (AP) Virtual
Image Technology has broken
ground on a new plant that is pro-
jected to employ 200 people who
will take data and documents and
transfer them to things like micro-
film and compact discs.
Construction of the $10 million,
94,000-square-foot plant is expect-
ed to be completed by next
February, the state Commerce
Department said Thursday. The
full number of 200 jobs is not
expected to be reached for five
years, the department said.
Numbers
If students are studying
f overseas this semester
through a university program.
1J students are visiting
�J ECU from another
country through an ECU program
8
students received the
Chancetor's scholarship
for Fail 1998.
16612
Nobel
continued from page 8
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted
Albert Einstein
"Give me chastity and continence, but not yet
Saint Augustine
"I do not feel obliged to believe that the same God who has endowed us with sense, reason, and
intellect has intended us to forgo their use
Galileo Galilei
"Give me a museum and I'll fill it
Pablo Picasso
I'm living so far beyond ray income that we may almost be said to be living apart.
E.E. Cummings
"Hie secret of success is to know something nobody else knows
Aristotle Onassis
"Forgive your enemies, but never forget their names
John F. Kennedy
Fantazzi
continued from page 8
"He was important in the fields of
education, philosophy, literature,
and theology, especially the study
of the Bible
Fantazzi said he was working on
Eramus' letters to important peo-
ple of the time such as kings,
popes, noblemen, and fellow schol-
ars.
"I began working on this piece
in 1979 Fantazzi said. "The ten-
tative date for its completion is
2025
It has been calculated that 30
volumes have already been
released at the rate of three vol-
umes per year.
As a member of ECU's classical
studies program this year, Fantazzi
to ask teachers questions
When asked what advice a man
with a lifetime of success and
achievements would give to
today's student, the answer was
simple.
"Keep your mind open for new
things, don't get attached to what
you learn in books and be curi-
ous Schuch said.
will teach seminars on the classical
tradition and its impact on modem
literature.
"This class was not offered before
I came here Fantazzi said.
Fantazzi will also present public
lectures on a variety of subjects, both
classical and modem.
"My lecture will be titled Eramus
and Christian Humanism Fantazzi
said. "It will be about Eramus' contri-
bution to education in the western
world" Fantazzi said.
Blessed
Beer
HALETHORPE, Md (AP)
The Rev. Leo J. Larrivee has
been asked to bless many things,
from religious articles to family
pets and new cars, but the latest
request was novel.
"You never know what you'll
be asked to do said the priest,
who added he "can't remember
the last time I bought a six
pack
Stephen Demczuk, president
of Baltimore-Washington Beer
Works, said he was looking for a
minister to bless his new brew,
The Raven, when he saw a
newspaper article about
Larrivee's parish. Demczuk gave
Larrivee a call, and the priest
agreed to bestow the blessing of
the brew.
Larrivee searched in vain in
"The Book of Blessings of the
Roman Ritual" for a beer bene-
diction, so he "just used a varia-
tion on the wine blessing
"I was able to do it without
saying the word, 'beer
Larrivee said. "I used 'fruit of
grains and hops
Larrivee stood before a tower-
ing steel tank of lager, his right
arm extended in a gesture of
supplication, and intoned the
prayer.
"Blessed are you Lord, God
of all creation Larrivee said, his
voice rising over the din of an
adjacent bottling machine at
Clipper City Brewery in
Halethorpe.
"You fill the hungry with
choicest food and you gladden
the hearts of the thirsty.
"Bless this fruit of grains and
SEE BUSSED BEER. PAGE IB
For a good time .
call328.6004 �
Look for our weekly ad in the Fountainhead or call
the ECU Student Union Hotline at 252.328.6004,
or visit our website at www.ecu.edustudent union.
B
B
B
B
Kramer.
The Kramer Reality Road Show!
Kenny Kramer, the manic inspiration behind Seinfeld'
"Cosmo Kramer takes you on a hysterical multi-media
voyage through what's actual, what's factual, and what's
fantasy in the Seinfeld universe
Tuesday, Seplrmbrr TL it MO pm in Wright Auditorium
Advanced Kl student tickets: S
Al other advanced rjckete$6 AD tickets a! the doon $8
WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBERAT 8 PM
FALLEN
THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 10 THROUGH
SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 12 AT 8PM
SUNDAY MATINEE AT 3 PM
CITY OF ANGELS
80'sPock
Music m
e video Age
An exciting multimedia trip through the SO'i with
Barry Drat, one of rock music's foremost historians.
8:00 pm Wednesday, October 7, in rtendri Theatre
Advance ticket FREE with ECU One Card!
For additional information contact the Central Ticket Omce, Mendenhall 5tudent Center, Cast Carolina University. Qieenville. MC 27858 -4555. or can 252 528 � 4788, toll free at 1 800 KU � ART5. or TOO 252 528 � 4756. 8 50 am � 6 pm, Monday � mday.
Individuals who require accommodations under ADA should contact the Department tor Disability Support Services at 252 328 - 4802 (voiceTDD) forty-eight hours prior to the start of the program





10 TiUMliy. Sipumbif 1, 1998
features
The Ent Ciroliniit
Tuesds)
Aavss tie Miles is verity mtumn scrim bj utrntt ECU
students dmuitlinji theirexpermm abmulin a tliary formal.
njyrts
iJtfW
to
Spa Philosophy
Brought Home
An experience" like this is definitely an eye opener, for differ-
ent reasons depending on where you are. In my case I am refer-
ring ID Costa Ricaand my name is Charlie Sigmon by the way.
This is my sophomore year, but not at ECU of course. I am major-
ing in international business and minoring in Spanish. The study
abroad experience is a requirement for my intended major. The
one thing that an abroad experience definitely does for a student
is make them appreciate their roots. A growth in character and
morality also come with that I think. The first requirement in
studying abroad is keeping an open mind. Who knows what to
expect when traveling to a new place, with a different way of life.
I f you aren't willing to accept the fact that the people and way of
life may be a little different, then the experience won't last long.
I came to Costa Rica on the 5th of July with nothing more than
a sheet of paper describing my family and my luggage of course. I
wasn't worried though, since this would be my 3rd trip down. I
knew that if my host family wasn't there to greet me, that all of my
friends would be. Sure enough my friends were there and I had no
problems. I got along great with my family right from the start and
we are still doing fine. I spent the entire month of July relaxing
since classes didn't start until the 3rd of August I spent time with
my friends and did a little traveling and basically rested up for the
start of school. When classes finally came around I was very rest-
less and nervous, wondering how I could handle classes in anoth-
er language- For all those taking macroeconomics this semester,
don't sweat it, just think of me as I take it in Spanish. I don't think
that economics is simple in English, much less Spanish. I am also
raking international relations, literature and Society of Latin
America, and the History of Latin America. With those four sub-
jects I stay pretty busy. It is really
much, to tell you the truth, but we'll
see how it goes. When learning sub-
jects in another language, it is diffi-
cult because there is an extra step in
the learning process. First you have
to understand the language and
then the material. This is why it takes double the time to study.
Which is why they don't recommend for foreign students to take
more than four classes a semester. I am not alone though, there are
other students from all over the world that are in my same posi-
tion.
For those who have never been here, I suppose I should
SEUETTER. PAGE 11
(AP) The Golden Door,
Escondido, Calif has been rated
the No. 1 spa in America by the
Zagat U.S. Hotel, Resort and Spa
Guide every year since the survey
began in 1988.
It is popular among affluent
movers and shakers, especially
Hollywood types.
At $5,000 per week, the term
"affluent" is highly relevant.
If you don't have $5,000 to shell
out for a week at the Golden Door,
armed with "The Golden Door
Cookbook" and Chef Michel
Stroot's recipes, you can eat like a
spa visitor.
Unfortunately, the book can't
cook for you, put on your socks,
give you a massage, do your laun-
dry, attend to your spiritual needs,
or provide any of the other extras
the spa offers.
But the book does have tips on
how to translate the spa philosophy
into your home life. As you cook
your way through the book, at least
a little of its health-giving advice
may rub off. Scattered through the
pages is information on Stroot's fat-
and calorie-cutting techniques, and
on healthful eating practices.
For instance, each day guests at
the spa take a predawn walk, fol-
lowed by a simple breakfast of
foods with clean, fresh flavors.
At the Door, breakfast is served
on a tray so guests can enjoy a quiet
time before they start the exercise
and beauty regimens of the day. A
walk and time for quiet at the
beginning of the day are practices
you can incorporate in your own
life.
Rancho La Puerta, the Golden
Door's parent spa in Baja
California, Mexico, was founded in
1940 by Edmond and Deborah
Szekely as a summer camp for a
select group of friends from around
the world.
This group of friends gathered
to study exercise, nutrition and
other principles of a sound, simple,
healthy way of life. They paid
$ 17.50 per week and gladly pitched
their own tents. There was no run-
ning water and no electricity; the
group was dedicated to eating
nutritiously and in harmony with
the earth with an organic, vegetari-
an lifestyle. There was a nearby
mountain to climb and a river for
swimming in.
The gardens were developed
and today most of the organic food
served at the resort is grown on the
premises. As the Ranch became
more sophisticated and as the ben-
efits of fitness became better
known, increasing numbers of
Hollywood types frequented the
spa.
& Street
Should then be Chancellor
Evaluations?
Mario
Scherhaufer
Communications
Senior
Chancellor
Evaluations?
yes
Mary Brinson
Biology
Sophomore
Chancellor
Evaluations?
no
Bryan Davis
Geography
Sophomore
Chancellor
Evaluations?
yes
!
EH
i imHH
' WE'VE GOT YOUR FAVORITE 1 DC COMICS AND MORE'
U -&8�if
J NOSTALGIA NEWSSTAND The Comic Book Store 919 Dickinson Avenue IP Greenville, NC 27834 (252)758-6909 1 �TM DC Comics C1994.
Blessed Beer
continued from page 9
hops. May all who drink of this gift
do so in moderation. May they one
day be invited to sit at your heav-
enly banquet forever and ever.
Amen
Great
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704 Greenville Blvd Suite 400
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(Next to Moovics)
Phone 321-6021
Fax 321-6026
Recreational Services Intramural Sports � presents
ttll VOUIYMU. tarn
Mandatory Registration Meeting
Tuesday, Sept. 8th
5:00 pm MSCSocial Room
Leagues for: Men, Women, Co-Rec
Divisions: Resident Halls, Independent,
Fraternity, Sorority
itSGamfhl
rjtj
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
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per m
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wffiRtt
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6:00
src:






11
Tuesday, September 1, 18
e East Caroliniai
J Beer
om page 9
drink of this gift
n. May they one
sit at your hejv-
ever and ever.
features
The East Carolinian
mg
n

87
I
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Exclusive Men's Hair Styling Shoppe
Barber & Style
2800 E. 10th St.
Eastgate Shopping Center
Across From Highway Patrc
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Walk-Ins Anytime
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for $7 Every time.
Regular $10
PIRATE SPECIAL
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continued from page 10
Feeling
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GMAT or
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We Can Help.
East Carolina University
School of Business
-1 Office of Professional Programs
UNA
l MVERsnrv 25232o-6377
Hurry, classes begin September 17
REMODELED 2 Bedroom apts with
� central heat ft air
� stove & refrigerator
� washer dryer hook up
� FREE BASIC CABLE
All ground floor on ECU bus line
convenient to school ft shopping,
nice neighborhood.
On site Management ft Maintenance.
Call 931-0790 8-4 MonFri
explain the acmospherc in which I
live. It is beautiful here with a very
tropical climate. It's very humid at
times and because this is the rainy
season, it rains all the time. It's
hard to keep a clean pair of shoes.
I have a volcano behind my house,
but it's not like it is in the back-
yard or anything. You can see it in
the distance. There is beautiful
vegetation everywhere, and it's
just a really neat place. Of course
with any tropical environment
comes large insects, snakes, or
what gave you. I have seen nasty
stuff I must say. Anyway, within
two to four hours in every direc-
tions is the ocean which is pure
paradise. I could go on all day but
you get the idea. Now the food is
one thing that I really enjoy, at
least some of it. I have had a few
bad experiences, but that comes
with entire experience. To be
honest, they eat some things here
that you couldn't even look at
when they were alive, like cow
tongue. I haven't tried it yet and
I'm not planning on it. We eat a lot
of rice here, you know, three meals
a day seven days a week. I mean
what do you eat if you get bored
with rice; more rice.
Like every country, this one
has its problems too. So far I have
been confronted with a gun, I have
seen people get beat up and
robbed in the street, and I have
seen the worst poverty of my life.
What do you expect, this is a third
world country. I think this trip is
the best thing that I could have
ever done. Now I can't take any-
thing for granted, but rather thank
the Lord God for what i do have. I
an having the time of my life but
of course it will be nice to see my
friends there at ECU and my fam-
ily again. I will be coming home
the first day of December, but will
be returning here in January for
another semester. I will start back
at ECU next fall. I suppose that I
will end here since you will be
hearing from me again '

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Meet the People
� Crystan-Lynn Lee
� Freshman
� Education major
� Age 18
� Hobby: Swimming

328-6387
Interested
The ECU Men's Lacrosse
Club team is looking for
new players. Join us at an
information and season
opening meeting.
September 2nd, 6:00pm at
the Student Recreation
Center.
For more information,
contact Recreational
Services at 328-6387
ECU Men's
Lacrosse Club
Interest meeting
September 2nd
6:00 pm
SRC Room 202
EOE
Sigma Phi Epsilon
m
Founded: Richmond, VA, in 1901
Fastest growing of the two largest Fraternities in the world.
one of the largest on campus.
Location: 505 E. Fifth Street, two blocb from downtown across the
stieet from campus. We have two houses and a party room
for band parties.
Academics: Balanced man scholarship.
Athletics: Chancellor's cup, 8 out of past 10 years.
I
I
RUSH
Sept. 1-3
For more information
call 561-7618
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
The house with the heart!





IskBIIII
sports
12 TmsaaV. SwUwRir 1. 1998�-�
Football program looks to build on the past
. . . defense couldn't find a way to stop victory and dug them out of their
Leam MAIS tO CleUdOb the Mountaineers running name, rut.
Tin tart CawWia
Team aims to develop
unityforl998
Steve Losey
assistant spoits editor
The 1997 football season began
with high hopes. Star seniors such
as quarterback Dan Gonzalez, split
end Larry Shannon, and running
back Scott Harley returned to the
team. It was the first season since
ECU joined Conference USA and
many felt the time was right for
ECU to take a step up in the foot-
ball world.
The season ended with several
players nursing injuries and, at 5-6,
the Pirate's first losing season since
1993.
All eyes were on Gonzalez after
he proved that he could more than
fill Marcus Crandell's shoes. He
started every game in 1997 and
earned a spot high in the ECU
record book. His 3868 passing yards
marked him fourth in the books
and his 56.7 career percentage is
the best ever posted by a Pirate
quarterback.
Shannon missed the first four
games of the season after spraining
his ankle and breaking his fibula
during preseason training. He
placed second in career reception
yards with 1714 and fourth in career
receptions with 101.
The season started off on the
wrong foot with a loss to the West
Virginia Mountaineers. WVU took
an early lead with a field goal, but
the Pirates came back with a touch-
down and a field goal. The Pirate
defense couldn't find a way to stop
the Mountaineers running game
They scored all three touchdowns
on the ground. In the second half,
the Mountaineers tied it at 10
before the Pirates scored another
touchdown. ECU was unable to
score any more points or stop the
Mountaineer's drives downfield,
and WVU took the opener 24-17.
The following game against
Wake Forest's Demon Deacons,
the home opener, looked as if it
would be more of the same. A
record crowd of 38,031 watched the
Deacons pull in 21 points before
the Pirates got on the board with
two touchdowns. After the half, the
Pirates only allowed the Deacons
three more points while showing
spectacular determination to regain
the game. The final score was ECU
25, WVU 24.
That was the last game the
Pirates won before a five game los-
ing streak crippled morale on the
team. It began against the South
Carolina Gamecocks, who handed
the Pirates their first home shutout
since 1984. The attendance had
grown by almost a thousand from
the week before, but the Pirates
were powerless to stop Gamecock
quarterback Anthony Wright's
passes. Two touchdown passes
were thrown in the first half and
three field goals were kicked in the
second, making the score 26-0.The
Pirates only had four yards on the
ground and 89 in the air.
The slide continued into the
next game at Syracuse, where the
Orangemen gave the Pirates the
second shutout in a row, scoring 56
points to ECU's 0. The Pirates
broke the shutout streak against
Southern Mississippi, but not the
Head football coach Steve Logan is hoping to lead his team to a winning season with
not only an intense physical training schedule but lessons in teamwork as well.
losing streak. The Golden Eagles
won 23-13.
The final game of the streak was
at Tulane, where the Green Wave
washed over the Pirates, 33-16.
Though it was a loss, it was the
most points the Pirates scored dur-
ing the streak.
On October 26, the homecom-
ing crowd witnessed a spectacular
turnaround in the Pirates' season.
Pirate defense held Memphis to a
single field goal in the first half.
When the last few seconds dropped
from the clock in the second quar-
ter, the Pirates had a healthy 20-3
lead. The Pirate's 32-10 victory
gave them their first ever C-USA
Athletics welcomes new
coaches aboard
Fresh faces look to help
Pirate teams to success
Tracy Hairr
senior writer
Along with structural growth,
improvement and continual
change, the athletic department has
included several additions to its
coaching staff. The new coaches
have several years of expe-
rience coaching at other
schools and are truly well-
seasoned.
"All the coaches added
are of high quality and
have good credentials
associate athletic director
Henry VanSant said.
"They should be good
assets to improvement of
die athletic program
Accepting the highest
number of new members
is the basketball depart-
ment. Dee Gibson left her
position as assistant at the
University of Nebraska
last season to replace
Anne Donovan as the
head women's basketball
coach. Gibson displayed
her impressive recruiting
ability when she filled two
assistant positions just
three days after her
acceptance.
; Jennifer Mitchell, a
former teammate of
Gibson's while at Wake
Forest, comes to ECU
after serving as an assis-
tant coach at Virginia
Commonwealth
University. There,
Gibson's duties of scout-
frg, recruiting and work-
ing with the post players
were similar to Todd Buchanan's
eludes prior to assuming one of the
assistant positions here.
"I am excited to be here at
feciJ Gibton said. "If I didn't
Leonard Klepack
MEN'S CROSS COUNTRY
Randy Rueth
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
anan
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
think we could win, I wouldn't be
here. I could've stayed at Nebraska
without the headache
These new members will each
be strengthening their successful
coaching histories as they plan for
the new year.
"I've put together a good staff
that's willing to work and I think
everybody's going to do a real good
job Gibson said.
In the basketball department,
two assistant coaches have joined
the men's team. Richard Morgan
left an assistant position at
Hampton University to come to
ECU. Morgan has
broad experience in
both coaching middle
and high school level
teams and playing pro-
fessionally. He spent
one season with the
CBA's Rockford
Lightning and another
year overseas in
Austria and the
Philippines.
Also joining the
men is Darren Savino,
who has spent the last
two years as an assis-
tant at St John's. Prior
to this position, Savino
also coached at a New
Jersey high school and
served as an adminis-
trative assistant at
Seton Hall one season.
Contributing this
year to the football
team are two new assis-
tant coaches, Dave
Huxtable and Steve
Shankweilcr. Huxtable
has been assigned to
working with the inside
linebackers. His colle-
giate coaching career
began back in 1982 at
Iowa State where he was
a graduate assistant.
Following this position,
Huxtable worked at
Independence C.C, Western
Kentucky and with the Pirates dur-
ing 1990-91.
In that same year, Steve
Shankweiler was a member of the
Barry Sanderson
MEN'S BASKETBALL
oson
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
football coaching staff as well.
This year he rejoins the Pirates as
the offensive line coach after leav-
ing his most recent position as
athletic director and head coach at
Griffen High
School in
Georgia.
The tennis
team is also
accepting a
new head
coach, Tom
Morris, who
has directed
the Barton
College tennis
program for
the last eight
years. Morris
enjoyed both
a successful
playing and
coaching
career at
Barton, being
a student-ath-
lete from
1976-79,
twice earning
All-America
recognition,
and while
coaching,
working with
eight Ail-
Americans
and eight con-
ference play-
ers-of-the-
year.
Finally for
the cross-country and track and
field departments, Matt Munson
comes from Columbia University
where he was assistant men's and
women's cross country and track
coach. Munson had the opportunity
to work with two of Kenya's ath-
letes and former Olympic team
members Charles Gitonga and
Erick Keter.
"This is actually an addition of a
position VanSant said. "The qual-
ity of this department has gotten
very good, so we hope this effort
will improve women's track
Leonard Klepack will fill the
head men's cross country coach

Jennifer Mitchell
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
Where did they
come from?
Dee Gibson
Head Women's Basketball
UNC-Charlotte
Todd Buchanan
Ass't Women's Basketball
Murray State
Jennifer Mitchell
Ass't Women's Basketball
Wake Forest University
Randy Rueth
Ass't Women's Basketball
University of Wisconsin
Dave Huxtable
Ass't Football
Eastern Illinois
Steve Shankweiler
Ass't Football
Davidson College
Tom Morris
Head Tennis
Barton College
Matt Munson
Ass't Women's Track
Bridewater College
Leonard Klepack
Head Men's Cross O
Brooklyn College
Richard Morga
Ass't Men's B
Univcrsitv
position. He has directed the men's
and women's cross country and
track programs at Columbia High
School for the last 25 years.
Along with head coaching
duties, Klepack will also become an
assistant for the men's track and
field, coaching the middle and long
distance runners.
SEE C0ACHI. PAGE 11
victory and dug them out of their
rut.
The next game looked as if the
last place Louisville Cardinals
could slap the Pirates down after
the first half, where they led 31-14.
But in the third quarter, Dwight
Henry intercepted a pass and ran it
98 yards for a touchdown. Three
touchdowns and one field goal
later, the Pirates had claimed their
second victory in a row with a sec-
ond half Cardinal shoutout. The
final score was 45-31.
The game at Houston set many
high marks for the season and sev-
eral players career records.
Gonzalez threw four touchdown
passes, his best ever, and Troy
Smith caught ten passes, a record
for him. Harley ran a season best
99 yards. The lead bounced back
and forth between the Pirates and
the Cougars before Gonzalez fired
a 50-yard shot to Smith for the
final touchdown, making the score
Pirates 28, Cougars 27.
ECU hosted Cincinnati for the
Pirates' final home game of 1997.
The Pirates struggled through the
rain to pull the lead back from the
Bearcats for a final score of 14-7,
Pirates.
Coming off of a four game win-
ning streak, the Pirates focused on
meeting N.C. State. The first half
saw only a single field goal from
the Pirates and nothing from the
Wolf Pack. State exploded in the
second half and scored 37 points,
leaving the Pirates behind with 24.
Pirates Head Coach Steve
Logan was frustrated with the lack
of team spirit the Pirates had in '97.
"We're going to do it the '98
SEE rOOTlAU PAGE 13
If
ootU�
Timelint
Sept 6
At West Virginia
WVU 24, ECU n
S�ptl3
Wake Forest
ECU25,WFU24
Sept 20
South Carolina
USC 24 ECU 0
Oct4
At Syracuse .
Syracuse 56, ECU 0
Octll
Southern Mississippi
USM23.ECU13
pet 18
At Tulane
Tulane 33, ECU 16
Get 25
Memphis
ECU 32, Memphis 10
Nov.l
At Louisville
ECU 45, Louisville 31
Nov. 8
At Houston
ECU 28, Houston
Nov. 13
Cincinnati
ECU 14, UC 7
Nov. 22
At NC State
NC State 37, ECU 24
Little leaguers
return home in fame
Community celebrates
Tar Heel prestige
TK Jones
NEWS EDITOR
Hurricane Bonnie did not dampen
the spirits of hometown pride for
the Tar Heel Little League team.
Instead, while residents kept one
eye on Bonnie's eye and the other
on the Little League World Series,
they planned a welcome-home
celebration for the No. 2 team in
the nation.
Police blocked intersections
Sunday evening and ferried a city
bus filled with 14 boys, ages 11
and 12 through Greenville to Elm
Street Park where anxious fans
awaited them.
"When I pulled up and saw the
people, I had to compose myself
Wayne Hardee, manager of the
Tar Heel team said. "The kids
were all excited, but I had to take
just a minute. I couldn't believe
what I saw. It was shoulder-to-
shoulder in people
The Elm Street park parking
lot was completely full . Late
arrivers had to seek parking along
the streets or walk.
This marks the first time since
1952 for a team from North
Carolina to make it as far as the
Little League World Scries.
"We kept telling the team all
along that it didn't matter if we
SEE LEAGUE PAGE �
Baseball's finest take
talent to the pros
Massimo, Colquittand
Rigsby continue careers
Mario Scherhaufer
senior writer
Athletes just out of college join
professional baseball teams with
dreams of fame and big bucks. But
the young player is not the only
one who will profit by being draft-
ed. The university he came from
will gain reputation and honor as
well.
ECU's baseball program has
always had a fine reputation of pro-
ducing top athletes. In 1993 out-
fielder Pat Watkins was taken as
the second pick of the Cincinnati
Reds in the Major League Baseball
draft The 32nd pick overall,
Watkins was a supplemental first
round pick for the Reds.
A native of Garner, N.C,
Watkins led the Pirates in batting
(.445), hit 19 home runs, drove in
57 runs and had 29 stolen bases.
With 29 extra base hits, Watkins
led the team with a .764 slugging
percentage.
Watkins' list of accolades for the
1993 season said it all. He was
named as the 1993 CAA Player- of-
the-Year, Baseball America first
team All-America, Mizuno second
team All-America and All-NCAA
Atlantic Regional. In addition,
Watkins was one of the 38 players
invited to the Team USA
Watkins' pick in the 1993 draft
was the highest ever for an ECU
baseball player. Previously, in 1973,
Tommy Torns was picked by the
Philadelphia Phillies in the fifth
round.
Watkins left school as a junior,
SEE IAJIIAU. PACE �
13 Tmidiy. S
season the
Logan said,
doesn't work
talking and tl
people havini
diat doesn't
field
Several pi
way about la:
mistic about t
"I think i
effort on evei
free safety Ke
had guys thai
own thing, ani
end of last '
going to be so
here. We nee
bad apples, a
pened over thi
ter, the sprin
We've come i
team, and th;
f
I
�aaiMia m wrnmmm
i in ��MUdsaHin.
In
th
' A,
pe
G
w
l
App
ECU Computer Store






f �rnliaJM
31
!4
me
mxious fans
and saw the
ose myself
ager of the
"The kids
had to take
dn't believe
shoulder-to-
iark parking
full . Late
arking along
t time since
rom North
is far as the
Series.
he team all
natter if we
ake
)S
mental first
Is.
rner, N.C
:s in batting
ins, drove in
itolen bases.
lies, Watkins
764 slugging
lades for the
all. He was
A Player- of-
merica first
r.uno second
I All-NCAA
n addition,
e 38 players
SA
e 1993 draft
for an ECU
jsly, in 1973,
:ked by the
in the fifth
as a junior,
ftt
mJ
13 futility, Stpltmbtr I. 1998
sports
Tht Ettt Carolinian
Football
continued from page 12
season the team way Coach
Logan said. "The individualism
doesn't work. The'posturing and
talking and those kinds of things,
people having their own agendas,
tjiat doesn't work on or off the
field
Several players feel the same
way about last year, but are opti-
mistic about the upcoming season.
"I think it was just a lack of
effort on everybody's part senior
free safety Kelvin Suggs said. "We
had guys that wanted to do their
own thing, and Coach told us at the
end of last year that there was
going to be some cleansing around
here. We needed to get rid of the
bad apples, and that's what hap-
pened over the course of the win-
ter, the spring, and the summer.
We've come together as one, as a
team, and that's going to help a
lot
With several key players from
'97 gone, the Pirates younger play-
ers are having to step up. Senior
Ernest Tinnin, sophomore Bobby
Weaver, and redthirt freshman
David 'Garrard are going to rotate in
and out of the quarterback posi-
tion.
"Everybody wants to know,
who's showing the most talent,
who's got the best chance senior
center Danny Moore said. "The
simple truth is, all three guys bring
a little something to the game.
David Garrard, he's a big strong
kid, he's got a great arm, he's able
to run the ball. Ernest Tinnin, he
can throw the ball, he runs the ball
well. Bobby Weaver's the second
fastest guy on the team, he makes
great plays back there. He can
scramble. He'll take off, and get a
thirty-yard gain for you. I don't
foresee anyone having an edge
over anyone else, and I think that's
what anyone on the team will tell
you
Frisbee teams anticipate
season of change
Competitiveathletic
opportunities offered
Jim Ph elps
senior writer
ECU Ultimate Frisbee is gearing
up for a new season. The men's and
women's teams have both been
successful in the past and are look-
ing for another excellent year.
To recruit new players, the
teams held a summer league to get
people to come out and experience
the sport
"The summer league was not as
successful as I had hoped because
recruiting was low Jeff Wilhelm,
president of the men's team said.
"The girls picked up a few new
players and we got a few fresh-
men
For the men's team, this will be
a season of rebuilding and prepar-
ing recruits for the most intense
part of the season, the spring com-
petition.
"It will be a learning process,
but a good year Wilhelm said.
"We have veterans that are gradu-
ate students coming back and we
will play younger people. I am
looking forward to a bright season,
the more competitive it is the bet-
ter the season will be
Fall is the club season, which
basically serves as a training camp
for the ultimate frisbee team.
Uli
got the attitude,
get the took.
10 Student Discount With Proper I.D.
Practices are less intense and play-
ers leam the basics of the game at
this time. In the spring, the team
prepares for real competitive play.
The practices are more intense as
the team plays more college tourna-
ments in sectional, regional, and
national competition, practicing
Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:30
to 7:00 p.m.
The men's ultimate frisbee
team has been to the nationals nine
out of the past ten years. They won
national championships in 1994
and 1995 and lost in the Final Four
to Stanford in 1997.
In a couple of weeks the team
will be heading to Charlotte to
compete in a tournament and on
Dec. 5 and 6 they will hold the 28th
annual Ultimax tournament at
ECU. During the Ultimax tourna-
ment,I2 women's teams and 25
men's teams compete at the new
SEE FRISBEE. PAGE !�
I OB by $tudent Rec Center
and IcavefSkphonc number
� m �
��:
Contact Jeff Wilhelm for
men's program w Candace
Voigt for women's program
m
Hftaround
Teams have
for approximately
Compete with universities
and clubs
Compete in sectionals and
(top two qualify for
championship)
Men qualified for nationals
in spring of lTOfitid woggfr
placed in regional in 199&P
Practice three times a week
on me new Blount Complex.
Source: Interview with
Assistant Director of Rec
Services, Gray Hodges.
FINE'S
The Ultimate Fashion Store
Carolina East Mall
Memorial Drive, Highway 11
ro
Want to be a friend to a child
in need? Want to see a young
kid smile because someone
shows they care? You can be
that someone! East Carolina
Friends, a mentoring program
for needy kids is having
interest meetings Tuesday
September 1 and Wednesday
September 2 at 6:00 PM in
Brewster B-306. The meeting
should only last an hour. We
are looking forward to seeing
you there.
Coaches
continued from page 12
"I'm real excited about work
ing with Bill Carson, one of the
most outstanding coaches in the
nation Klepack said. There'sH
also a great bunch of guys on the1
cross country team, and I'm antic
ipating a great season because of;
the talent pulls that are here I
Overall, there are numerous-v
new members suddenly a part of
the Pirate team, but due to their
tremendous amounts of expert
ence and enthusiasm, they should'
prove advantageous to their
respectable departments. b
I Think,
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PWSSIS
14 TmUiv, Sipttmiar 1, 1998
sports
Thi Ent Carolinian
15 Timdn
In
Intramurals serve
up volleyball action
Michael's
Flowers & Gift
Teams and leagues
currently being formed
The 1998 Intramural Volleyball
season will be served up with a reg-
istration meeting on Tuesday,
September 8 at 5:00 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Center,
Room 244. Registration for league
play will take place the following
day on Wednesday, September 9
from 10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. in 128
Student Recreation Center. Any
individuals interested in register-
ing a team should attend this meet-
ing. Those individuals who have
not yet joined a team but would
like to be recruited, should attend
as well for assistance in placement
on a team. Six players are needed
Frisbee
continued from page 13
Blount Complex.
The women's team is also look-
ing forward to the start of their sea-
son. They will have to compensate
for the players they lost to gradua-
tion. They hope to beat UNC-
Chapel Hill, N.C. State, and
Wilmington, who have consistently
proven to be the teams to beat in
the past.
The women's team practices
Mondays, Wednesdays, and
Sundays, but times have not been
set at this point.
"It's been really great, I love
playing said senior Candace
Voigt, team president.
Anyone interested in playing
to form a team and leagues will be
offered on a variety of playing
dates and times. Several divisions
of skill are available in order to
accommodate the diverse interests
of all participants.
Divisions offered will include
Fraternity Gold and Purple, Mens
Independent Gold and Purple,
Mens Residence Hall, Womens
Independent Gold and Purple,
Womens Residence Hall, Sorority,
and Co-Rec. Gold leagues are
designed for participants who have
experience in competitive play and
wish to participate at a higher level
of skill while Purple leagues are
more recreational in nature. All
teams will play a four game round-
robin regular season and may qual-
SEE INTRAMURAL PAGE IS
can come by the Student Rec
Center and leave their phone num-
ber. No experience is necessary,
but the participants need to be
physically fit.
"We prefer basketball, soccer,
and baseball players Wilhelm
said. "We work with players on
how to throw a frisbee, but running
is the main thing
The teams have been around
for approximately 26 years. They
compete against other universities
and clubs and go through section-
als and regionals, at which time the
top two qualify for the national
championship.
The Ultimate Frisbee program
is sponsored by ECU Student Rec
Services and Gray Hodges,
Assistant Director of Recreational
Services. For further information,
contact recreational services at 328-
6387.
Michael's Flowers and Gifts
is Relocating next to Belk
at 102 Carolina East Mall
439-0550
10 Discount
with Student ID
Buy any dozen,
get V2 dozen
glazed FREE!
Coupon good through Tuesday 9898
Jfutpyffieme
ify to advan
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sion and all-
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September 1
held in th
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300 E. 10th St.
Greenville
Open 24 hours
830-1525
Color Copies
Faxes
Laminating
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Notary
Passport Photos
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MAIL BOXES ETC.
704 Greenville Blvd. - Phone 321-6021
Suite 400 - Fax 321-6026
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15 Tuesday, September 1, 1998
East Carolinian
Intramural
continued from page 14
sports
Tha East Carolinian
en,
n
E!
198
1
ify to advance to a single elimina-
tion tournament within their divi-
sion and all-campus finals. Regular
season play will begin on Monday,
September 14 and all games will be
held in the Student Recreation
League
continued from page 12
won when we got there (to the
championship) because we got
there and that's all Brooke
Hardee, brother of player Justin
Hardee said. Justin was not able to
comment due to the fact that over
Center. The rules of USA
Volleyball will be in effect with
ECU Intramural Sports modifica-
tions.
Prior to the beginning of the reg-
ular season, teams will also have the
opportunity to test their skills in
competition in the Volleyball
Preview which will be held on
Thursday, September 10 and
Sunday, September 13. The
Preview provides the medium for
the course of the series, he along
with the majority of his teammates
developed a severe case of strep
throat.
Greenville finished second in
national competition, losing 5-2 to
Toms River, N.J in the U.S. cham-
pionship games.
The team from Toms River
went on to capture the world title.
While 28,300 watched from the
teams entering the regular season
to play shortened matches against
several opponents in one night
thereby allowing them to practice
under game conditions and refine
skills and strategies for upcoming
league play. Preview registration
will be available to a limited num-
ber of teams and will be conducted
at the same times as the normal vol-
leyball registration. Pool play times
will be available on either
stands during the U.S. champi-
onship, a spokesman for
ABCSports said it was a tremen-
dous hit for ESPN, receiving over a
million viewers.
As so as it stands, Tar Heel ball
will rest as the second best team in
the nation, the third best in the
world who knows what next year
could bring.
Thursday or Sunday.
The 1997 season featured partic-
ipation by only 47 teams and this
year even more teams arc expected
to be involved. Several rumors have
been floating around campus
regarding some of the teams that
will be participating. Joanna Ezzell
has been recruiting from all corners
of the campus to have the top co-
rec team. Meanwhile season ticket
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Baseball
continued from page 12
but he was not the cliched jock who
quit school for a pro career and
wound up penniless after his career
ended. Watkins held education
very highly. He was an
AthleticAcademic award winner at
Garner H.S honor roll student, and
North Carolina Scholar. However,
he did not hesitate to leave school
and he certainly did not regret it.
His teammates today are Barry
Larkin, Reggie Sanders, and Bret
Boone and his salary comes up to
$170,000 for 1998.
LAMINATING
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Fax 3216026
eagerly anticipating the prospects
of seeing Meghann Vitt, Renee
Larson, and Dana Long on the vol-
leyball courts. The mens division
appears wide open now that several
key players from the last several
years have graduated. In the frater-
nity division, the big question is
whether Thcta Chis Anthony
Whitley will be in school to return
for his 20th intramural volleyball
season. In other news, word has
ECU's latest outputs for
the major leagues were
Ryan Massimo, Jason
Colquitt and Randy
Rigsby. Colquitt went to
the Detroit Tigers in the
27th round, while Rigsby
was picked by the Florida
Marlins in the 32nd round.
Though he was not picked
in June's draft, Massimo
got his chance to play pro-
fessionally after all. The
Pirates' short stop for the
past two seasons signed a
free agent contract with the
Atlanta Braves.
Nevertheless, his summer
at the Braves' Rookie
League farm team, the
Danville Braves did not
turn out to be very success-
ful.
"The season came to a
very disappointing end
both for Massimo and for
the Braves Danville PR
manager Brent Bartemeyer
said. "We have not decided
at this point what will hap-
pen with Massimo for the
fall league
So, who will step into
Watkins footprints now?
Some point to John
Williamson, a sophomore
outfielder on the Pirates
baseball team this past season.
Similar to Watkins, the accolades
continue to roll in for Williamson, as
he has been named to the 1998
Freshman All-America Second
Team, announced late June by
Jason Colquitt
Fill PHOTO
reached the Student Recreation
Center that Vu Thunder Spike
Donie is working to adapt his bas-
ketball slam dunk into a spiking
technique on the volleyball court
For further information, please con-
tact Patrick Daniel or David
Gaskins at Recreational Services at
328-6387 or visit the Student
Recreation Center.
Baseball America.
A native of
Wilmington,
Williamson was previ-
ously named to the
1998 Louisville
Slugger Freshman All-
America First Team by
Collegiate Baseball.
He is the first freshman
in the history of the
ECU baseball program
to earn All-American
honors.
A 6-1 switch-hitter,
Williamson broke
almost every freshman
record at East Carolina
this past season.
Included in the new
marks were records for
batting average (.340),
home runs (13), hits
(66), runs (50), and
total bases (120).
Williamson also played
in 52 of the Pirates' 59
games last season and
paced the team with a
.619 slugging percent-
age and a .434 on-base
percentage. He tied
the single game-record
for doubles on two dif-
ferent occasions with
three in a game and
tied the then-school
record for hits in a contest with a 5-
5 performance against Radford.
So far it looks like Williamson is
on the right track to become a
future Pirate in Cooperstown.
Randy Rigsby
FILE PHOTO
Ryan Massimo
FILE PHOTO
'
.
HOMECOMING

PURPLE PRIDE
THROUGH THE
RETRO 7Q'S, 8Q'S & 9Q'S
� � �
APPLICATION DEADLINE
ACTIVITIES APPLICATION FOR:
�FLOAT �:iL! L
HOUSEHALL
KINGQUEEN CANDIDATE
YOU MUST FILE AN APPLICATION BY:
T
FRIDAY
SEPT.TI,
1998
5 pm
ROOM 109
MENDENHALL
STUDENT CENTER
i
ONLINE VOTING THIS YEAR!






17 faulty, Sept

IBM THINKPA
8MB hard drive
tel DX4-75MH
Calf 752-2246
TOWNHOUSE
Williamsburg t
BA, appliances
Call 365-2646.
FOB SALE: 1
Enduro $3,900
room condition.
8020 Dunlop
K&N aF & serv
COOL OFFI Kii
for sale. $220.
LAPTOP COH
Satellite T2100
feet for student
MHz. 343 hard
carrying case, I
eluded. Call 36:
DOUBLE FUTI
color TV with u
0B0. HP compi
processor 16ME
tor and color pri
LARGE MINI-F
or best offer. 0
ter. Buy now!
0264. Great cor
FUTON WFR
TV wremote
center $35; 18
wremote $90:
$60: 3-piece d
guitar wcase &
fish tank wacc
3534)835.
FOR SALE D(
shots, 95 lbs.
$300. Ask for C
1992 FORD
cruise. AC. a
bag. runs gre
$2195. 756-788
FOR SALE: Ei
washer, dryer.
Call 758-4796.
FOR SALE: So
queen size sleei
OBO Also qui
bookcase headb
OBO. Moving. I
3637.
LIKE NEW Ml
sale - Gary Fishe
OBO. Trek 850 5
call 931-0487
NEW 4.4 CU.
cellent condition
3500 word pri
Please call 252
OAKLEY E-W
moths old. Bouc
for $100.00. Cal
BEAUTIFUL. HI
14x76 2 bedroor
bile home with
pliances and 20(
ed. $9,500 or I
7235 or 328-676
Big Sun
10-7i
FOR RENT: un
bath with living i
phone, cable &
$375 per montl
male student on
pets. 919-497-08
sage.
LARGE BRIGHT
room available ti
ent in home of a
Silver line China
ing plant stop oi
No smoking. Sha
utilities included
752-5644.
NEED SOMEON
in a 3 bdr. apt. V
ed in rent, $22
bills. Call 321-124
2 BEDROOMS.
floors, central hei
ity and downto
$396month; wi
$376month. Cal
PRIVATE ROOM
distance from EC
vate phone lin
Waaherdryer in
752879.
WALK TO ECU
$29Smonth Avi
wood Apts 125 i
758-6596.





17 fetidly. September 1, 1898
Kvl
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null

FOR SALE
IBM THINKPAD computer memory
8MB hard drive 540MB processor In-
tel DX 4-75 MHz still has warranty.
Call 752-2246
TOWNHOUSE FOR sale by owner.
Williamsburg Manor. 2 BR, 1 12
BA, appliances included. $38,500.
Call 355-2546.
FOR SALE: 1998 DR350 Offon
Enduro $3,900. Electric start show-
room condition. Only 640 miles, new
8020 Dunlop 755 tires. Rear rack.
KErll aF 8 service manual. 757-2712.
COOL OFFI Kickin' AC window unit
for sale. $220. Call Jackie. 758-8647.
LAPTOP COMPUTER - TOSHIBA
Satellite T2100 CS notebook is per-
fect for students! Intel 486-0X2 50-
MHz, 343 hard drive. Active Matrix,
carrying case. MS Word software in-
cluded. Call 353-01381 $365 OBO.
DOUBLE FUTON $100 OBO. 25'
color TV with universal remote $125
OBO. HP computer 60 MHz Pentium
processor 16MB Ram with 14" moni-
tor and color printer. $350. 353-1438
LARGE MINI-FRIDGE for sale. $80
or best offer. Only used one semes-
ter. Buy nowl Call Sophie at 329-
0264. Great condition!
FUTON WFRAME $150; 19' color
TV wremote $150; entertainment
center $35: 18 speed ATB $75: VCR
wremote $90: video cassette player
$60: 3-piece dinette $50: acoustic
guitar wcase & acces. $150: 10 gal.
fish tank wacces. $15: call Jerome
353-0835.
FOR SALE Doberman pups with
shots, 95 lbs. sire. 70 lbs dame.
$300. Ask for Cameron. 752-2204.
1992 FORD TEMPO automatic,
cruise. AC, automatic doors, air
bag. runs great, 99,000 miles.
$2195. 756-7887
FOR SALE: Entertainment center,
washer, dryer. Excellent condition.
Call 758-4796.
FOR SALE: Sectional couch, beige,
queen size sleeper. Asking $200.00
OBO. Also queen size waterbed.
bookcase headboard. Asking $75.00
OBO. Moving. Must Sell. Call 321-
3637.
LIKE NEW MOUNTAIN bikes for
sale � Gary Fisher Tassajara $250.00
OBO. Trek 850 $250.00 OBO. Please
call 931-0487
NEW 4.4 CU. FT. refrigerator. Ex-
cellent condition. $150. Also Brother
3500 word processor. Very nice.
Please call 252-757-1797 after five.
OAKLEY E-WIRE shades, two
moths old. Bought for $130. Selling
for $100.00. Call 355-3183
BEAUTIFUL, HIGH QUALITY 1987
14x76 2 bedroom, 2 bath Fisher mo-
bile; home with 14x22 deck. All ap-
pliances and 200 amp service includ-
ed. $9,500 or best offer. Call 753-
7235 or 328-6765.
Dapper
Dan's
Big Summer Sale
10-75 OFF
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: unfurnished 1 BR 1
bath with living area & kitchen, local
phone, cable 8 parking provided.
$375 per month with deposit. Fe-
male student only-no smokers Er no
pets. 919-497-0809 and leave mes-
sage.
LARGE BRIGHT Furnished AC quiet
room available to female grad stud-
ent in home of author near campus.
Silver line China 10ECU Harris print-
ing plant stop on 10th St. No pets.
No smoking. Share facilities. $275 all
utilities included except telephone.
75Z-5644.
NEED SOMEONE to sublease 1 bdr.
in a 3 bdr. apt. Water, sewer includ-
ed in rent, $225 month plus 13
bills. Call 321-1240 if interested.
2 BEDROOMS, 1 bath, hardwood
floods, central heatair, near Univers-
ity ;and downtown. Washerdryer,
$396month; without washerdryer
$376month. Call Vicki, 757-0502.
PROATE ROOM available, walking
distance from ECU. Large room -Pri-
vate phone linecable in room.
Washerdryer in house. Call Mike 9
752i2879.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$29Smonth. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apts 125 Avery St. Greenville.
758.6596.
ROOMMATE WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed. Two
bedroom one bath duplex with
fenced shaded yard. Neat, dogani-
mal lover prefer non-smoker. $200
month, 12 bills. 758-7525.
ROOMMATE NEEDED prefer fe-
male to share 3 bedroom house, lo-
cated 1 block from Rec center. Big
room. $175 plus 13 utilities. Please
call 931-9015 ask for KatyStephanie
ONE ROOMMATE needed male or
female ASAP in a 3 bedroom apart-
ment. Two blocks from campus and
downtown. Call 758-7245. ask for
Gretchen or Wesley.
SEEKING FEMALE Grad student or
uperclassmen. Prefer nonsmoker to
share 2 BR. 2 bath apt. located at
South Haven. Call 439-0230 for more
info.
ROOMMATE NEEDED - beautiful
downtown apartment. $237.50 per
month, needed ASAP. Call 757-0812.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom apartment.
$187.50 plus 12 phone and utilities.
Call Jessica at 757-9640. Needed
ASAPI
MF ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share 2 bedroom apt. off campus.
Nice apt. $195 month 6 12 utili-
ties. Call Steph at 321-7298.
WANTED: ROOMMATE $180 a
month, plus 13 power, phone. One
block form campus. 752-5886
GRAD STUDENT OR mature, non-
smoker, share 2 BR with wdryer,
$220 utilities. Call 752-2844. Close
to ECU
HELP WANTED
EXPERIENCED BABYSITTER want-
ed to care for my two girls after
school in Mondays and Wednesdays
from 2:30-5:00. Own transportation
required. Call 756-0941.
ACCT. MANAGERSFULL-TIME.
Seeking motivated and energetic in-
dividuals, communication skills, lift-
ing, and professionalism are re-
quired. Advancement opportunities
and benefits. Mail or fax resumes to
Mr. Show at 353-4329 or 2400 S.
Memorial Blvd 27834. EOE
WANTED: EXPERIENCED student
telemarketers. Evening hours 56-
9PM. $9.00hour incentives. Must
be a people-person! Call Andy at
756-8160.
classifieds
$385 A MONTH. Two bedroom du-
plex, fifteen minutes from campus.
Quiet country setting. (W) (day)321-
6418 or (day) 561-781- or (N) 321-
2329 or (N) 756-2466.
ECU AREA two and three bedroom
houses. All with central heat and
some type of AC. Two with fenced
yards. Pets OK. Yard work included.
830-9502
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: unfurnished 1 BR 1
bath with living area 8- kitchen, local
phone, cable 8- parking provided.
$375 per month with deposit. Fe-
male student only-no smokers & no
pete. 919-497-0809 and leave mes-
sage.
LARGE BRIGHT Furnished AC quiet
room available to female grad stud-
ent in home of author near campus.
Silver line China 10ECU Harris print-
ing plant stop on 10th St. No pets.
No smoking. Share facilities. $276 all
utilities included except telephone.
752-5644.
NEED SOMEONE to sublease 1 bdr.
in a 3 bdr. apt. Water, sewer includ-
ed in rent. $225 month plus 13
bills. Call 321-1240 if interested.
2 BEDROOMS, 1 bath, hardwood
floors, central heatair. near Univers-
ity and downtown. Washerdryer,
$395month; without washerdryer
$375month. Call Vicki. 757-0502.
PRIVATE ROOM available, walking
distance from ECU. Large room -Pri-
vate phone linecable in room.
Washerdryer in house. Call Mike 0
752-2879.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$295month. Available now. Tangle-
wood Apts 125 Avery St. Greenville.
758-6596.
$385 A MONTH. Two bedroom du-
plex, fifteen minutes from campus.
Quiet country setting. (W) (day)321-
6418 or (day) 551-781- or (N) 321-
2329 or (N) 756-2456.
ECU AREA two and three bedroom
houses. All with central heat and
some type of AC. Two with fenced
yards. Pets OK. Yard work included.
830-9502
PART TIME jobs available. Joan's
Fashions, a local women's clothing
store, is now filling part-time posi-
tions. Employees are needed for
Saturdays andor weekends
between 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
The positions are for between 7 and
20 hours per week, depending on
your schedule and on business
needs. The jobs are within walking
distance of the university and the
hours are flexible. Pay is commensu-
rate with your experience and job
performance and is supplemented by
an employee discount. Apply in per-
son to Store Manager. Joan's
Fashions. 423 S. Evans Street.
Greenville (on the Downtown Mall).
CHRISTIAN NURSERY
WORKERS NEEDED
SUNDAY MORNINGS
9:15-12:15
Additional Hours availabla.
Jorvil Memorial United Momodist Church
510 S. Washington St.
Apply at church office.
Office noun - Sam � 12 noon,
and 1:30 -5:00pm.
flOUNTAIN BIKER seeking male"
age 19 or older, to accompany our 13
12 yr. old son at the Bicycle Post
mountain trail. Bicycle Post requires
adult to be with kids on trail. Will pay
appropriately for your supervision
and riding time. Call evenings: 752-
6372.
PART-TIME POSITIONS available.
The Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department is recruiting for 12 to 16
part-time youth soccer coaches for
the fall youth soccer program.
Applicants must possess some
knowledge of the soccer skills and
have the ability and patience to work
with youth. Applicants must be able
to coach young people ages 5-16, in
soccer fundamentals. Hours are from
3:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. with some
night and weekend coaching.
Flexible with hours according to
class schedules. This program will
run from September to mid
November. Salary rates start at $5.15
per hour. For more information,
please call Ben James or Michael
Daly at 329-4550 after 2:00 p.m.
GREENHOUSE PRESCHOOL needs
full-time & part-time teachers to
work Monday-Friday 2:45-6:00. Call
355-2404 for information. Great ex-
perience for CDFR or ELEM majors.
AFTERNOON CARE for three (ages
10.7,5) 3:15 until 4:30 or 5:30 M-Th
(some Fridays). Safe auto, exc. driv-
ing record, exp. with children, out-
standing references, take home or to
activities, assist with homework, etc.
Leave message. Janet. 353-3998.
LOCAL AD AGENCY is looking for
part-time office assistant. Candidate
should be neat in appearance and or-
ganized. Interest in marketing andor
advertising is helpful. Position could
qualify as an internship. For more in-
formation call Kitty at 355-8181.
TEEN CENTER SupervisorPart-
time. The Greenville Recreation &
Parks Department is seeking a highly
motivated individual to plan Teen Ac-
tivities at the Teen Center. Individual
willing to work effectively with youth
thirteen years of age and up. Must
also possess computer skills. Willing
to work Friday and some Saturday
nights. Salary: $8.00 per hour. Posi-
tion open until filled. Apply at City
Hall. Human Resources Department.
201 West Fifth Street. PO Box 7207.
Greenville. NC 27858.
PART-TIME BABYSITTER NEEDED
Wednesday and Thursday after
school. Must provide own transporta-
tion. Call 355-3476 after 4:30. Pro-
vide references please.
SCHOOLKIDS RECORDS a region-
al independent music retailer, is seek-
ing music knowledgeable individuals
to fill positions ranging from entry
level to management in Greenville.
Please send resume to: 113-B Wood-
winds Industrial Dr Cary. NC 27511;
Fax: 919-460-8848; Email:
mphill9mindspring.com
CHILDCARE AND Iguana sitter: Oc-
casional weekend evening sitter
needed (non-smoker with own trans-
portation) for 2 children, ages 9 and
13. two cats and one docile iguana.
Must also be available for overnight
care from 112-117 while parents
are out of town. $5 hourly and $225
for November time. Call evenings:
752-6372.
CHILD CARE WORKERS NEEDED.
Community Bible Study, a women's
interdenominational Bible study
needs several young women to work
with children four and under on Tues-
days 9-11:45 a.m. at First Pentecostal
Holiness Church at 204 Brinkley
Road, Greenville and on Thursdays 9-
11:45 a.m. at Christ Presbyterian
Church at 105 Tar Road, Winterville.
to provide patient, loving care and in-
struction to our youngest particip-
ants. Experience preferred, referenc-
es request, must be able to provide
own transportation and make a com-
mitment through December 10. Call
756-9394.
GREEK PERSONALS
CONGRATS TO Catherine Saunders
on her engagement to Perry. Love,
the sisters and new members of Al-
pha Xi Delta
SIGMA PHI EPSILON Thanks for
the pre downtown Thursday night,
we had a great time. Love the sisters
and new members of Sigma Sigma
Sigma.
PHI KAPPA Tau. thanks for a great
time at Patio Party this past Saturday.
We had a blast! Love. Zeta Tau Alpha
Tht East CirsBslsa
STAFF ONE Event Services is cur-
rently hiring for area concerts and
sporting events which include NCSU
and ECU football and basketball.
Must be 18 years old; retirees wel-
come to apply; call 919-856-0800.
SEEKING RESPONSIBLE reliable
student to pick up my child from his
school and keep in my home from
2:30 to 6PM Monday thru Friday.
Please call Donna Walker at 758-
9240 after 6PM.
COMMUNITY BIBLE study, a wom-
en's interdenominational Bible study,
needs several sitters for patient, lov-
ing care for children under four on
Tuesdays and Thursdays 9 AM-
11:45AM. Experience needed, refer-
ences requested. Call 756-9394.
KIND, PATIENT and loving sitter
needed for Monday through Thurs-
day (1PM to 6PM) to care for three
boys, ages 6, 4 and 1. Must enjoy
playing with and reading to children.
Please call 365-7238.
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL LOOK-
ING for student manager. Position
starts immediately thru May 4th. Will
work weekends. For more informa-
tion and application call 3284690.
ask for Randy Rueth.
EARN WHILE YOU learn, up
to $1,000.00 wk. Day ami night
shifts. Clean, secure working at-
mosphere. Playmates Adult En-
tertainment. 252-747-7886 for in-
terview.
DELIVERY PERSON needed. Apply
in person at Mattress Plus. 606 E. Ar-
lington Blvd. Mature, responsible.
clean-cut need only apply. No phone
calls please.
KARATE INSTRUCTOR: recreation
company seeks part-time help. Class-
es held on Friday evening at the Jay-
cee Park auditorium. Must like work-
ing with children. Great $. 1-888-621-
8977.
LOOKING FOR A PART-TIME job?
The ECU Telefund is hiring students
for the Fall semester to contact alum-
ni for the ECU Annual Fund Drive.
$5.50 per hour. Make your own
schedule. If interested, call 328-4212.
M-TH between the hours of 3-6PM
TUTORS NEEDED; Interested in tu-
toring for the Office of Student Devel-
opment-Athletics? If so. please join us
in Room 236-B, Ward Sports Medi-
cine Building at 5:30 PM on Wednes-
day. August 31, 1998. You will be
paid for your time. Undergraduates
will be paid six dollars an hour and
graduate students will be paid seven
dollars per hour. If you have any
questions, contact Isha Williams at
328-4691.
STUDENT VOLUNTEERS needed in
the Sports Marketing Office-Meeting
on Wed Sept. 2 at 7PM in Minges
Coliseum (SEC 202). Become an inte-
gral part of Pirate Athletics. For more
information call 328-4530.
PLAYSCHOOL ASSISTANT. The
Greenville Recreation & Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting for a playschool in-
structor. Individual will work with
children three and four years of age
from 9 - 11:45 AM on Thursdays and
Fridays. September 17-December 12.
Individual must enjoy working with
children, have previous preschool
work experience and knowledge of
First Aid. Salary: $5.25 per hour. Po-
sition open until filled. Apply at City
Hall. Human Resources Department.
201 West Fifth Street, PO Box 7207,
Greenville, NC 27858.
$1250 FUNDRAISER credit card
fundraiser for student organizations.
You've seen other groups doing it.
now it's your turn. One week is all it
takes. No gimmicks, no tricks, no ob-
ligation. Call for information today. 1-
800-932-0528 x 65. www.ocmcon-
cepte.com
HEALTH EDUCATION. EXERCISE.
Nutrition, Recreation. Nursing, and
other majors: HealthQuest Horizons
has student positions to assist with
wellness program research, wellness
assessments, health risk appraisals,
and clerical. Full-time, part-time and
internship opportunities. Stipend pay.
Call 816-5632.
CHILD CARE Housekeeping. 10-15
hoursweek; minimum wage. Begin-
ning ASAP. Must be available 2:30-
4:30 PM, Monday-Friday. Phone 353-
4239 after 6PM.
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA would like
to congratulate all the sororities on a
successful rush!
ZETA TAU ALPHA would like to
congratulate their new members:
Kristy Aro. Leigh Ann Atkins, Kristen
Buckner. Brandy Cain. Mandy Casey.
Anne Cooper, Tania Cruse, August
Dobbins. Melissa Forsha. Danielle
Gerhart, Erica Griswold, Sarah Haw-
ley. Susan Lowerre, Hawley Malony,
Tracy Markham, Susan Martin, Mi-
caela Moine. Marcie Petrocci. Leigh
Ann Riddle. Wendy Snyder, Jeanna
Taylor, and Ashley Waters. We love
you guys!
SIGMA SIGMA Sigma wishes good
luck to all the fraternities during rush!
TO THE brothers of Kappa Alpha as
always we had a wonderful time
with you. Thanks for making pref so
memorable! Love. Sisters & new
members of Delta Zeta
THANK YOU Kristen Trull for being
such a wonderful Rush Chair! We are
so proud of you! Love, your Alpha
Delta Pi sisters
SIGMA ALPHA Epsilon, thanks for
an awesome pref night last week.
Can't wait to get together again
soon! Love. Zeta Tau Alpha
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA Del-
ta Pi on your international awards.
We are so proud of you! Keep up the
great work! Loyally, your advisors
ALPHA DELTA PI would like to con-
gratulate the best pledge class of
19981! Gena Anderson, Adrianne
Gietz, Caryn Hines, Jennifer Jackson.
Snady Jenkins. Heather Keck. Ashley
Lane. Kelly Lundin, Katy MacNeiel,
Melissa Madsen, Sarah Mansfield,
Kelly McMurray, Kara Medlin. Lesley
Miller, Angie Mobley. Shanna Moore.
Amy Patton. Nicole Porter. Margaret
Roberts, Candyce Rumley. Liz Swirs-
ky. and Becky Williams. We love you.
You're the best
THE SISTERS of Alpha Phi would
like tocongratulate and welcome all
our new members: Melissa B Heath-
er. Martie. Mary, Amanda, Lynn. Re-
becca. Erica. April. Wendy. Libby.
Jennifer J. Jamie. Amy, Staci,
Michelle. Tracey. Kelley. Jessica. Mel-
issa W rvey, and Alayna.
PERSONALS
LADIES, FIND your love match
through astrology and the stars. Or-
der now and receive your free astro
gift. Visit my web site at
http:members.aol.comyour
web 123mistytate.html
SERVICES
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(919)49-S4
GREENVILLE REC ft PARKS Fall
Tennis Programs. Adult- Beginner
MonWed 6-7PM 99-1019.
TueTh 7-8PM 910-1020. Interme-
diate: MonWed 7-8PM 99-1019.
TueTh 6-7PM 910-1020. Morn-
ing-Beginner: MonWed 9-10AM
99-1019. Morning-Intermediate:
MonWed 10-11 AM 910-1020.
Thursday Playday. TH, 9:15-11:30AM
910-1029. Youth-Novice I 6-7
years MW 6-5:45PM 99-1019.
Novice II 8-9 years TTh 5-545PM
910-1020. Afterschool I 10-13
years MW 4-5PM 99-1019. After-
school II 14-18 years TTh 4-5PM
910-1020. Jr. High Girls Team 11-
14 years MTWTH 4-5:30 831-
1022
WORD PROCESSING AND DESK-
TOP publishing. 24 hour service
with pickup and delivery available.
Call 830-5559 for quotes on papers,
resumes, cover letters, flyers and
more.
ITS PARTY TIME!
Semaj Entertainment specializing in
Mix tapes. Music production and mobile
DJing with the latest Hip-Hop, Top 40,
R&B, Techno, and Reggae.
Call J.Arthur @ 252-412-0971
OTHER
FREE CASH GRANTSI College
scholarships. Business. Medical bills.
Never repay. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000. ext. G-3726.
BOOK WANTED: USED 3228 Stat
Math book needed ASAPI I will give
you morethan the bookstores. Call
Sophie at 329-0264.
GOOD EXTRA
INCOME-OVER
$18,000
V your over 17 and ouakfy.
the Army Reserve can teach
you a ski and pay you a good
part-time salary, framing is
usuaSy one weekend a month
and two weeks a year.
TlMM SOeHt R
TrMn tfitnfc ehoi us.
Cat. 756495
BEAR YOU CAN BE
ARMY RESERVE
GOV'T. FORECLOSED HOMES
from pennies on $1. Delinquent tax.
repo's. REO's. Your area. Toll Free 1-
800218-9000 ext. H-3726 for cur-
rent listings.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175. Porsch-
es. Cadillacs. Chevys. BMWs. Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps. 4WDs. Your area.
Toll free 1-800-218-9000. ext. A-
3726.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
GO FOR the gold Aerobics passes
on sale now at the SRC Main Office.
Semester Passes (Gold) specially
priced at $36 and good for all class-
es through Dec. 18. Session passes
(White) and Drop-Ins (Purple) also
available. Call 328-6387 for details.
ECU NEWMAN CATHOLIC Student
Center welcomes the students and
announces a "Bonnie' change of
date of its 11th Annual Pig Pickin'
and Open House to Wednesday, Sep-
tember 2. 4-7PM. Location: 953 E.
10th Street (2 houses from Fletcher
Music Building)
"FAMILY GATHERING B-GLAD (Bi-
sexuals-Gays, Lesbians and Allieds
for Diversity will be meeting every
Wednesday O 7:30PM in GCB 3006.
A great chance to make new friends,
make a difference and have fun!
Look forward to seeing you there.
CATCH THE WAVE Register now
for "Aqua Fitness for Faculty 8 Staff"
at the SRC. Aqua Aerobics is de-
signed as a creative alternative to tra-
ditional aerobics with many of the
same great benefits of cardio and
strength training workouts! Session I
runs now through Oct. 16. No swim-
ming skills required. Call Rec Servic-
es at 328-6387 for further details!
B-GLAD MEETS each Wednesday
at 7:30PM in GCB 3006. B-GLAD is
Bisexuals. Gays, Lesbians & Allies for
Diversity.
KING & QUEEN of the Halls: it's time
to battle Who will be this years
king and queen of the hall? To find
out. come be a part of the annual
king and queen of the halls special
event held in the brickyard in front of
Mendenhalt on Wed. Sept. 2 from 4-
6PM. If you live in a resident hall
make sure you attend to support
your hall in gaining the crown
NEED A noon-time alternative to
fast-food lunches? Join Exercise
Wisely, the mid-day aerobics class
designed especially for the busy
schedules of ECU Faculty & Staff.
Register now at the SRC Main Office
for Session I.
VOLLEYBALL OFFICIALS meeting:
anyone interested in being a volley-
ball official for intramurals must at-
tend the meeting on Wed. Sept. 2 at
9PM in the Student Recreation Cen-
ter Classroom 202. Yes, it is a job
where you can make some extra
cash! Some knowledge of the sport
or any experience is requested.
EAST CAROLINA Friends, a mentor-
ing program for needy kids, is having
its interest meetings Sept. 1st or 2nd
at 6PM in Brewster B-306 If you
want to mentor a child, come see
what East Carolina Friends is all
about.
THE DEPARTMENT OF Communi-
cation Sciences and Disorders will be
providing the speech, language and
hearing screening for students who
are fulfilling requirement for admis-
sion to Upper Division on August 31
or September 1. 1998 for students in
the College of Arts and Sciences.
General College, and the Schools of
Art. Health and Human Performance,
Human Environmental Sciences and
Music. Screenings for students in the
School of Education will be held Sep-
tember 2 or 3, 1998 from 5-6PM.
These are the only screening dates
during the Fall Semester. The screen-
ing will be conducted in the Belk An-
nex (ECU Speech and Hearing Clinic)
located next to the Belk Building
(School of Allied Health Sciences),
near the intersection of Charles
Street and the 264 By-pass. No ap-
pointment is needed-Please do not
call their office for a appointment.
Waiting is outside the clinic waiting
room. Sign in begins at 4:50PM.
Screenings are conducted on a first
coma, first serve basis.






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IFC Fall 1998 Fraternity
Rush
Aug. 55bSept. 3 8-llpm
bids extended at 12 midnight Sept. 3rd
Alpha Sigma Phi - Delta Zeta House
Delta Sigma Phi - 510 E. 10th St.
Delta Chi - AAII House
ThetaChi-312E.llthSt.
Kappa Alpha - 500 E. 11th St.
Kappa Sigma - 700 E. 10th St.
Lambda Chi Alpha - 500 Elizabeth
Pi Kappa Alpha- Sigma Sigma Sigma House
Pi Kappa Phi- 803 Hooker Rd.
Pi Lambda Phi- 410 Elizabeth St.
Sigma Alpha Epsilon - Alpha Xi Delta House
Sigma Phi Epsilon - 505 E. 5th St.
Sigma Nu-501 E. 11th St.
Sigma Pi - 506 E. 10th St.
Tau Kappa Epsilon - 951E. 10th St.
Phi Beta Sigma - 800 W. 5th St.
Phi Kappa Tau- 409 Elizabeth St.
Phi Kappa Psi- 909 Forbes St.
A2D
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lasts a lifetime.
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i u �l i

NOW A P P E A R I
ON A NEWSSTAND NEAR YOU
new show
with a veteran cast
The curtain has gone up on The East Carolinian's new weekly arts
& entertainment tabloid.
Fountainhead builds upon the already successful Lifestyle section
of The East Carolinian, expanding into a weekly offering of mu-
sic, entertainment arts, theatre and campus events.
All in a convenient, easy to handle tabloid distributed Wednes-
days. Look for th our distinctive black racks in these campus
locations: Mendenhall, Student Recreation Center, Student Stores,
General Classroom, Croatan, Todd, Brewster and Minges.
I
VKKtalnkccicl
T�e Arts & Entertainment Weekly of The East Carolinian
i� 4 ' � - ��





THE FOUNTAINHEAD
(ARTS AND
ENTERTAINMENT
SUPPLEMENT TO
THE EAST
CAROLINIAN)
rubiKe-ci s.&;eAs uWfv-sck





Arts &
Entertainment Magazine of The East
last Carolinian m g
1
WKKtrnkmi.
Wednesday. September 2,898
Bejfind
Childhood
Comks retain their magic
Shannon Meek
Senior Writer
They live in other worlds. Worlds that arc filled with intense colors and
sophisticated stories. Worlds with heroes who soar beyond the limits of imagi-
nation. Worlds in which having a secret identity and saving the world is just an
ordinary day on the job.
They are comic book junkies, and they are frighteningh loyal to their art.
What is it about comic books that survives the journey through a genera-
tion's childhood, even into the college scene? What is it about a man in red
garb scaling walls, or Professor Reinstein emerging from his lab as Captain
America, that appeals to so many cultures and age groups?
The answer is simple. For many, comic books offer an enticing world of
escape.
Randall Miller, a student at ECU, began reading comic books at a young
age. According to MillerComics were ways that kids that did not have a lot of
power could have power. It provided a world that was more interesting than
getting beat up every day
The comic strip had humble beginnings. It was first developed in America
towards the end of the nineteenth century. The art form was first used as a tool
to draw customers into the Sunday edition to the newspaper and later evolved
into an icon of American Culture.
The five men directly connected with its birth, Richard Outcauh, William
Randolph Hearst, Joseph Pulitzer, James Swinnerston and Ruldoph Dirk, are
responsible for popularizing what is now a major part of American culture.
Richard Fdton was a staff illustrator at Joseph Pulitzer's The WorU'm 1895
when he created a one panel cartoon See Comics, continued on past 2
Mall security
guard Gary
Coleman If
accused of
socking fan
right in
the eye.
Kmr Weekly Gossip Fix
Wesley Snipes
sucks blood,
money, time
and viewers'
self-respect
in Blade
Movie Review
Still keeping T�
up with the
soaps? Give gprj
it up, already! Yi -rl-
Greenville movie
theater guide
wktdfwidz
I
fountainhead � 2nd Floor Student Publications Building Greenville. NIC 27858 � Phone 328-6366 � Fax 328-6558 � Advertising 328-2000 � www.fountainhead.ecu.edu





called" Down Hogan'sAlkyT
Shortly after this first appeared, The
Worlds engravers were experimenting
with color inks. Eventually a gap-
toothed Urchin would appear as a con-
sistent character. The" Vellow Kid"
would go down in history as the first
comic strip.
As the "Yellow Kid" was making his
first appearance, William Randolph
Hearsts Journal American began fea-
turing a large panel entitled the "Little
Bears" drawn by a young James
Swinnerton. Later the strip would
develop personality by the addition of
the philandering tiger bachelor,
"Mrjadr
Although both features were the
progenitors of the American comic
strip, it would be Randolphs Dirk's
"Katzenjammer Kids" that would
become recognized as the first mod-
ern comic strip on its first appearance
on December 12,1897, in the Journal
American .Previously cartoons had
no in-pand dialogue. This new strip
had developed the word balloon which
indicated the speaker.
From these innovative strips the
fabric of the comic book was sewn and
the art form gradually achieved status
as a major part of American culture.
Comic books evolved as works with
deep themes, dark meaning and plots
that captivated the imagination. They
have not only become a part of
American culture but also college cul-
ture.
"In a lot of ways .comics have been
instrumental in presenting more
mature storylines I read a lot of
comics that disturbed me, but I
enjoyed it because all the entertain-
ment was all of one type. With
comics) you could get into these differ-
ent ways of being entertained and I
was thankful for itMiller says.
Comic book characters have grad-
ually become an integral part of tele-
vision. Wonder woman, Batman,
Superman, Incredible Hulk are just a
few of the comic book characters who
have brought their ongoing war with
evil into the living room.
Recently movies have also taken the
stories of comic books and their
heroes to a new forum. The Superman
and Batman movies have had a
tremendous effect on pop culture.
After the Batman films came a steady
stream of comic book- inspired flicks,
such as Spawn, The Crow, and the
newly released Blade. Even movies
with a mainly college-age cult follow-
ing, like Kevin Smith films, have bits of
comic book culture written into the
dialogue.
There is an attraction to comic books
on the college student level, and not
just because of popular movies.
David Tilly, who works at
Nostalgia Newsstand, believes that
this attraction of college students to
comic art is becauseGenerally college
students are the more intelligent types
who like to read. Comic books are
entertaining reading and are for those
who like to be entertained
Comic books are largely popular
not only because of their plots but also
their heroes. Comic book heroes are
ordinary people with extraordinary
lives.
"It was the comic book heroes that
enticed me when I was younger; I
wanted to break out of supernatural
bounds I think that comics have that
appealsays ECU student Mike Noh In
episode one of Batman, (Detective
Comics May, 1939) the hero is
described asThe'Bat-mana myste-
rious and adventurous figure fighting
for righteousness and apprehending
the wrong -doer.in his lone battle
against evil forces in society his
identity remains unknown
In comics, the heroes actually stand
for something. As representatives of
the dark, sinister world of comics
where good and evil are dearly
defined, Batman, Superman,
Wonderwoman and the villains they
fight not only haunt the movies and
TV screens of our culture, but also
entertain and make our lives richer.
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Review
"Well, we'd better think of
something, and quick
This is how I imagine the
conception of Blade to have
taken place. Apparently a
bunch of movie executives
dedded that what the public
really needed was a good
vampiremartial arts flick.
Unfortunately, what we got
was that dumb Ray-Ban
commercial (you know the
one), stretched out over an
agonizing two hours, cour-
Photo courteiy of www.lycot.comblade tesy of director Stephen
Norrington.
Mkcah Smith
Fountainhead Editor
"Whaddaya mean, there's been no
vampire blockbuster for over a year?"
"The last one was a Md Brooks flop,
sir
Blade is the story of a group of hip
Gen-X vampires who decide it's time
to stop going to underground raves
and start taking over the world. Their
stodgy old leaders, who look and act
like the Mafia, are content to live
among humans, only preying upon us
at night, and to wear sensible Prada
pumps.
But one young leader, Deacon Frost
(Stephen Dorff), hatches a fiendish
plot to establish vampires as world
dominators once and for all. Insert
diabolical laughter.
Frost, who resembles nothing if not an
ex-member of Oasis, quickly gathers
his decadent super-model vampire
friends for a strike against tradition.
There is, however, just one large-sized,
leather-dad problem: a vampire
hunter who goes by the cryptic name
of Blade.
But, then again, everything about this
guy is cryptic so just get used to it.
Anyway, he uses lots of martial arts on
lots of hapless vampire thugs (yes,
thugs still wear black knitted tobog-
gans, no matter what movie they're in,
so you can tell them apart from the
main characters).
See Movie, continued on page 4
When you needed
information during
the hurricane,
we responded.
Updated information was available on
The East Carolinian web site
all day last Wednesday and Thursday.
Depend on us to provide you
with the information you need if another -
hurricane hits.
Or even if it's sunny.
Point your browser to:
Ivv
2 Wednesday, September 2.1998
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q
Band Review
Juicebaby knows how to draw a crowd
Christopher Salerno
StaffWriter
It was the first official Saturday night
in academia as the people headed to
The Corner for a Gen-extra dose of
Greenville's eclectic 3-piece,
JuiceBaby. As the place began to fill,
these heavy hitters started in on
their set. Their playing was excep-
tionally tight, well crafted, and full of
energy. Call it punk-funk, hardcore
or reggae, but everything that has
come and gone seemed to be balled
up in their bag o' tricks.
Lead guitarist and singer (ohn
Lauterer served up the heavy,
Helmet-like changes backed by the
solid drumming of Dallas Owenby
and exceptional bass runs of Randy
Miller. The band performed some
juicy numbers such as "Brave New
Wfarkfand "Mud, Blood and
Fruitjuice"(as heard on WZMB).
As far as vocal style goes, Lauterers
singing really lent itself to the mobili-
ty of the bands sound, as he wasn't
angry but rather upbeat and clear,
something not usually found in
music as loud and heavy.
This interesting form of blend
music is fairly new, especially for
Greenville. MTV would love it The
Pepsi generation seems to chug it
down. Maybe it should be mandato-
ry for incoming freshmen to experi-
ence JuiceBaby before entering col-
lege.
"There are a lot of good chances
hereGreenvillej"said bassist Randy
Miller. "Even though it's a small
town, the area supports its music.
Lots of people care Miller also cited
clubs like Peasant's Cafe and The Attic
contributing to the chances offered
for newer bands like JuiceBaby.
See Band, continued on page 4
- Central Greenville and ECU
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i
Bucknefs Since infused
with introspection
Caleb Rose
StaffWriter
If we humans should collectively
feel sorry for any one person, it is
Richard Buckner. Since, the third
effort by Buckner, is a continuance
of his prior records. But the flame
inside from not being heard has
evidendy ignited into a wild-fire
of torn emotions and anger in his
latest work.
Please allow me to paint a picture
of this guy. At first glance, he looks
like some poor fella who lives in a
one room, run-down apartment,
has no job, no food, and one little
guitar that he uses to tell this
story. When he performs it is usu-
ally alone or accompanied by only
one other musician who is proba-
bly playing a steel guitar. He keeps
all of his equipment in an old
raggedy suitcase and travels to his
gigs via taxi cab. His songs are
merely his own tears expressed as
music.
This somberness is still expressed
in Since, but it is conveyed differ-
ently from the usual solo guitar
and sad shakey voice. Since
embodies songs that are delivered
along with a full band (meaning at
least guitar(s), bass, drum kit, and
sometimes piano). For instance,
the opening track, tided "Believer
opens with a slightly distorted
guitar and brutally voiced vocals
as he screams "Believe me!
Believer
On the following track, "Faithful
Shooter Buckner reacquaints
himself with the sadness that is so
common in his music, and he
does this even with the power of
the full band. The song is one that
could easily have been performed
solo but is reinforced probably for
the better by this backing group
bagged to record the album.
This incorporation of a full band
is not a first for Buckner; he has
used this format on previous
recordings, but none have the
essence that the music on Since
reveals. Considering most musi-
cians choose to stay with the roots
they have planted, it is not a sur-
prise to hear a handful of songs
that are performed solo while his
guitar gently weeps (apologies to
Mr. Harrison).
"Slept" is one example. One can
easily picture Buckner sitting up
in that lonely apartment strum-
ming a few chords as he starts this
insomniac song with the words
"Awake tonight I'll, fall away to
sometime until we meet
" Slept" is followed by another sole
instrumental guitar piece titled
"Pico Although this is a complex
and appropriate song for this
record, it is too nostalgic of
Buckner's past recordings. It
seems that there is at least one
song on all three albums that fea-
ture a fast paced, finger picked
guitar mumbling a pleasant
melody for only a few seconds.
Some may find significance in
songs like "Pico" but in this case it
is more than likely just a "filler"
song used to take up room and
make the track listing longer.
As obvious as it is that Richard
Buckner has taken a dramatic
turn in his song arranging, he is
still excelling as a songwriter. He
has also shown good taste in
musicians to fill in the album by
recruiting the likes of Syd Straw,
Dave Schramm, and Son Volt
pedal steel guitarist Eric
Heywood.
Perhaps it is good to jazz up your
musical style and try new things
just as farmers are told that they
should rotate their crops in order
to keep the nutrients in the soil
from depleting. In this case, and at
this rate, Richard Buckner will be
around for a long while.
Note: Richard Buckner will be
playing at the Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro, NC, on September 6.
Wednesday, September 2,1998 3





W?MII
weekly top hits
15. Snuff 'Nicl
Motown"
14. Getaway Cruiser
TmRne"
13. Josh Wink
"Simple Man"
12. Everclear
"Sunflowers"
11. Rancid
"Hooligan
10. Beastio Boys
"Intergalactic"
9. Plastiscene
"Picture in My Mind"
8. Royal Crown
Revue "The
Contender"
7.3 Finger Cowboy
"Kissed"
6. CIV "Haven't Been
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5. Ani Difranco "32
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4. Glister "Airport
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3. The New Morty
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2. Hobex "Groove
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1. Squirrel Nut
Zippers "Suits Are
Picking Up the Bill"
1984 an overlooked sci-fi classic
Miccah Smith
Fountainhcad Editor
j Ever had one of those days when it
� feds like the world is out to get you?
; A sneaking suspicion that you were
i being watched? An intense craving
: for fresh razor blades?
: According to Michael Radford's ele-
gam adaptation of George Orwell's
classic existentialist nightmare,
1984, those fears just may be real-
ized in the twisted world of the
future.
In the starkly depraved world of
Orwell's 1984, the crowded streets,
decrepit buildings, hollow-eyed
workers and relentlessly blaring tele-
screens on every wall provide a night-
marish backdrop to the life of an ordi-
nary man named Winston (John
Hurt), his descent into crime against
the government, and his ultimately
dehumanizing redemption.
Winston's government job requires
that he alter old newspapers to fit the
current position of the Party, a political
machine that controls the entire conti-
nent of Oceania, where Winston lives.
War becomes peace, hero becomes
1984 soundtrack it the technolicious
work of tha Eurythmics
Photo courtesy of www.pirto.corn
criminal, past is forgotten, all at the
whim of the Party. Food shortages are
turned into food surpluses, and
although everyone knows the truth,
they can't allow themselves to believe
it.
Children in his world are small, pig-
like and venomous, eager to report
their parents and others for "thought-
crime" and other crimes against the
Movie, continued from page 2
The obscenely muscular Blade
(Wesley Snipes) has this chip on his
shoulder 'cuz some vampire killed his
momma. That explains everything
conveniently. But to top it off, he's also
a humanvampire hybrid, struggling
to find his place in a crazy world
whose seamy underbelly is swarming
with creatures of pure evil who also
happen to be snappy dressers.
I won't give away the plot of the movie.
Ill just say that Blade is a tortured
soul, and he's got a Vanilla Ice haircut
Oh, plus there's this chick (played by
tf Bushe Wright). And a crusty (but
kind) old man (Kris Kristofferson)
who helps Blade out
Here's the basic combat stats, a la Joe
Bob Briggs: about 30 dead undead,
three dead people, one zombie,
exploding head fu, kung fii, various
shiny objects of death and destruc-
tion, hackneyed plot, moody lighting
and about six tons of black vinyl for
costumes.
"There are worse things out tonight
than vampiressays a grimfaced
Snipes to his quivering co-star.
"Like what?" she breathes.
"Like me
1 couldn't have said it better.
Bind, continued from page 2
: Lots of people seemed to care
: Saturday night down at The Corner.
J In a town where the music scene
� thrives on its diversity, these guys
� seem to fit right in. Some of you
� might have seen the band before as
� JuiceBaby is now over a year old and
� getting better. You can grab their
newest CD which is available at CD
Alley. These guys are great at what
they're doing. Look out for future
JuiceBaby shows in town.
state. Citizens are also closely
guarded twenty-four hours a day
by thought police from the tele-
screens in their homes and work-
places.
Big Brother, a godlike projection of
the Party's, is said to be watching
over all, and his face, too, is
inescapable. Citizens of Oceania
live a contradictory, broken life,
unable to revolt because of their
inability to have secrets.
Thoughtcrime encompasses any
actions or thoughts that conflict
with the Party's ideal of total sub-
jugation. Punishment is by death,
or so rumor has it. But Winston
soon shows his true colors as a hard-
ened thought criminal.
"There is truth, and there is untruth
Winston writes in his illegal journal.
"Freedom is the freedom to say two
plus two equals four
He further complicates matters by
plunging into a love affair with a
woman named Julia (Suzanna
Hamilton), and their clandestine meet-
ings cause him more emotional tur-
moil than he ever dreamed possible.
Scenes of death and destitution,
visions of himself as a boy taking food
from his starving mother and sister,
haunt his dreams.
In the end he is caught, as everyone is,
and he learns for the first time the
futility of resistance and the ephemeral
qualities of outmoded ideals like "free-
dom loyalty" and even "truth The
lesson is hard for him to learn, but a
jarring climactic scene renders him
unable to reject it anymore.
Viewers get to ponder the movie's mes-
sage of warning long after the end
credits are over, making Radford's
"Avwd-W'tvmm,
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q
More area movie options to
choose from than ever before
Nina M. Dry
StaffWriter
Its the weekend and what's a better
way to spend it than by going to see a
good flick with some friends? The
question is'where to go?" Vll here is
the low down of what Greenville has
to offer and which places are best for a
night at the movies.
The Carolina East 4 is located in the
Carolina East Shopping Center on
Memorial Drive. Carolina East was
known as the nicest theater in
Greenville for awhile, but has recently
been knocked down to number two
by Carmike 12 (more on them later).
Unlike Park, Carolina East shows
newly released movies
in their four theater
establishment They
also have discounted mati-
nees which will cost you $4.00 a
pop instead of the regular $6.00 for
evening showings. The only problem
about Carolina East is transportation.
Sorry kids, If you don't have a car it
will be pretty hard getting to the the-
ater.
Then there is the Buccaneer Triple
on Arlington Blvd. They have recendy
changed their format. Instead of
showing the newly released, they
show the second string films.
Also they have matinee show-
ings on the weekends beginning
around 1 p.m. and evening show
ings every night. The best part about
it is that it only costs a dollar to get in
any time. It is about a seven minute
drive from campus, but for those of
you without a car, there is no need to
worry because ECU'S Blue bus will get
you there. Just get off at
theK-Mart
shopping cen-
ter. It is right
behind the Office
Max.
The newest the-
ater is the Carmike
located on Firetower
astshows youthere.
iati-p Hf: be!
11.
Road. It has 12 auditoriums with
capacity ranging from 100 to 270
seats, surround stereo in the auditori-
ums, four of the auditoriums have sta-
dium seating, an arcade room, a lavish
lobby waiting room, and four conces-
sion stands: two main ones in the
lobby and two mini ones called
y satellites in the rear. There
is a variety of recent
movies shown at the
Carmike during matinee
hours for $4.00 and evening showings
for $6.00. With its recent
opening, it has
become quite pop-
ular with ECU stu-
dents.
"The new Carmike is great Ryan
Henne, ECU senior said. "I loved the
stadium seating, the movable armrest,
and the surround sound is better than
any other?
"I liked the entertainment within
the building said Mckenzie
See Theaters, continued on page 7
Sitting in the back
of the classroom
catching up on
soap operas on the
3-inch screen of
your handheld TV
Gathering some
friends around the
old laptop for a
DVD showing of
Indiana Jones,
or some equally
moving Harrison
Ford flick
Things to
Septembub
edy;
Space Engine, The Willard Grant
Conspiracy, Laraza at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill
I
3 Thursday
JGB at The Attic
Carroll Dashiell and Co. at
Staccato
Shiner, Farewell Bend, Jackdrag at
Cat's Cradle in Carrboro
Last of the Juanitas, Mercury
Birds at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
4 Friday
Ozone Quartet, Smokin' Granny,
The Dark Feather Project at Local
506 in Chapel Hill
Richard Buckner at Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro
5 Saturday
Arvid Ray Munson at Chefs 505
Star Volcanic, Chip Robinson at
Local 506 in Chapel Hilll
6 Sunday
Panama Steel at Courtyard Tavern
Drive By Truckers at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill
7 Monday
Superchunk at Local 506
in Chapel Hill
8 Tuesday
The Subhumans at Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro
Dillinger Escape Plan, Makeshift at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill





Your Weekly Gossip Fix
Princess Diana's feiry-tale life
and real-world death was the
stuff of movies. Now; it's caught
the attention of Broadway sort of.
"Queen of Hearts a musical
portrait of Diana's life and death
is scheduled to open off-off
Broadway in October, playwright
Stephen Stahl said Wednesday.
He said it was a very loving and
basically straightforward portrait
of Diana
Queen of Hearts" opens Oct. 5
at the Grove Street Playhouse in
Greenwich Village.
Several other cultural icons have
been immortalized in musicals.
Eva Peron and opera diva Maria
Callas both were the subject of
popular shows.
Diana, 36, died in a Paris car
crash with her boyfriend, mil-
lionaire Dodi Fayed.
SYRACUSE, New York (AP)
Billy Joel says recurring throat
problems have forced him to
g
postpone the fall leg of his world
tour
Earlier this year, the Piano Man
canceled several American and
European dates, including an
appearance with Elton John,
because of an upper respiratory
infection,
Joel has spent the summer recu-
perating at his home in Long
Island, New York, and has
rescheduled all bis
September and October
concerts for November
and December.
,x My doctor is encour-
aged by the progress I've
made, but he wants to be
sure that I am 100 percent
before I step out on stage
again Joel said
Wednesday.
LONDON (AP) Oasis has a
sound that draws heavily too
heavily, some critics complain
from its idols, the Beatles.
Now, Oasis star Noel Gallagher is
planning to emulate them in his
movfedebut
Gallagher isset to make a brief
appearance in the movie' "Mad
Cows walking across the Abbey
Road intersection pictured on
the cover of the Beatfcs' 1969
album of the same name.
INGUWOOft California AP)
Gary Coleman, the former
"What you talking "bout" kid on
TVs; "DiTrent Strokes pleaded
innocent to hitting a woman who
sought bis autograph at the mall
where he works as a security
guard.
The woman, los
Angeles bus driver
Tracy Fields, said
Coleman signed an
autograph and then
flew into a rage when
she asked him to per-
sonalize it for her son
on July 30.
He punched her in the
eye and kept hitting her after she
fell into a gumball machine in a
uniform store, she said She suf-
fers headaches and muscle
spasms as a result, she alleges in
a dlrs 1 million lawsuit against
Coleman.
Coleman played the affifok
Arnold Jackson on � WrFrent
Strokes which originally aired
from 1978 to 1986.
"ChicoV
Wendi Scott
Freshman
Elementary ad.
"What is
yourfavorite
restaurant in
Greenviller
"Danyl's"
Rob Hornbuckle
Freshman
Bio Pramtd
1
'
m
H� m&g �:
TTil
"Staccato"
Mike Ferdinando
Senior
Finance
mmmm
1 s4LnA
WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 2 AT 8 PM
THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 10 THROUGH
SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 12 AT 8PM
SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER 13. MATINEE AT 3 PM
CITY OF ANGELS
rail (he l.l I Mink-





4fr
q
t jy Cancer (June 21
horoscopes H
L mo,t �f them cai
Aries (March 21 - April 19)
'
You will spend
this week try-
ing to get to
the bottom of
things. The good news is, you
will succeed! The bad news
is, the bottom of things is
sometimes ugly, and often
smells bad.
Taurus (April 20 - May 20)
might not be a good thing to
say. Newborns can be a bit
blotchy, and new parents can
be a bit touchy
Gemini (May 21 - June 20)

n
Noticing a
picture on a
colleague's
desk, you will
comment "I've never cared
for those hairless cats That
You will come
up with a the-
ory about
people - that
you can learn
a lot about them,
simply by removing the first
letter of their name. For
example, Ron - On. That's
why I'm on-line. That also
explains why Hugh acts so
primitive, sometimes. And if I
were you, I'd avoid Alice.
-July 22)
You will dis-
cover a secret
about the
Spice Girls �
most of them can't tell Cumin
from
Coriander. In fact, some of
them are vague about whether
Black and Red Pepper come
from different types of plants.
You will quite sensibly decide
to avoid going to their place
for dinner.
Leo (July 23 - August 22)
a(T
Unknown to
you, people
think you are a
wimp - just
because of your weak
handshake. You need to get
one of those hand exercisers,
and use it constantly for a few
months. Then, crush their lit-
tle hands into pulp!
to Mendenhall Student Center
It's Your Place
FHDAV. SEPT. 11 AT t P.M. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
Dave Brubeck, jazz master, is a must-see for any jazz enthu-
siast; and at 77 years old can give anyone a run for the
money. Student tickets are $10 in advance at the Central
Ticket Office, $20 at the door. Presented by the S. Rudolph
Alexander Performing Arts Series.
To Get A Clue
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 9 AT 11 A.M. IN WRIGHT PLAZA
Literally and figuratively. Face it: Starting a new semester
at school is tough enough and sometimes you just need a
way to sort through the maze. We've got the perfect oppor-
tunity. Come see what different clubs and organizations
have to offer you. Free stuff and give-aways, and who
knows, maybe you'll walk away with more than a free cup.
To See Your Mummy
TUESDAY. SEPT. 22 AT 4 P.M AND 7J9 P.M.
IN HENDRIX THEATRE
No, not the one that does the laundry. The Travel Adventure
Film and Theme Dinner Series will take you to exotic Egypt
to see King Tut, pyramids, the Sphinx and, yes. mummies.
All this without ever having to leave the comfort of
Mendenhall. An all-u-can-eat dinner is served at 6 p.m. for
just $12. Dinner tickets must be reserved by 6 p.m. on
Thursday, Sept. 17 with meal cards, cash, check, or credit
card. We'll even guarantee it's safe to drink the water. The
film is FREE to students with a valid ECU One Card.
To Beat The MM- Week Blues
WEDNESDAY. SEPT. 2 AT I P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Check out a movie at Mendenhall with the ECU Student
Union's New Sundance Cinema series, which screens on
Wednesday nights This week's film: Fallen staring Denzel
Washington and John Goodman. Admission is FREE with
your valid ECU One Card.
To Share Your Talents
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 9 AT 6JO P.M.
IN MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
Free time on your hands? Want someplace to showcase
your talents? We want you! No, it's not the Army, it's the
Student Union. We've got eight committees all in need of
your input. Come to the Student Union Reception and talk
with us; we would sure like to talk to you. Free dessert to
all who come.
To Knock 'Em Down
Give your Monday a boost from 1-6 pm. with 50 bowling
(shoe rental included.) Make Wednesday and Friday dis-
count days by rolling 10 frames for just $1 (shoe rental
included) between 1-6 p.m.
Wait there's morel You can get 500 off a game just by pick-
ing up a "Your Place To Be" flier at the Information Oesk
Coupons are found on the back of the flier
Call 328-4740 for Outer Limitz hours.
Virgo (August 23 -
f September 22)
T You will invent a
�JllAnew type of lin-
gerie, and will make millions.
The stripes are the key
to your success. You will call it
"Ze Bra
Libra (September 22 -
October 22)
$1
Those spiders
are growing
larger around
your house, and it's becoming
more of a
challenge to escape. You may
want to consider acquiring a
flame thrower. (Hint: illicit
nuclear
dump nearby.)
Scorpio (October 23 -
November 21)
What fun!
You'll be called
in to a special
meeting at work soon, where
someone will have a "pink
slip Sounds like party attire
to me!
Sagittarius (November 22 -
December 21)
M
Bad news:
people think
you're
becoming paranoid. Isn't that
just typical, though? I
mean, they don't even HAVE
invisible malevolent air-squids
spying on THEM, do they?
7 Capricorn
m F (December 22
Jk - January 20)
IV V Things
haven't been going well for
A
Aquarius
(January 21 -
February 18)
It's about
time you
learned some more recipes
dealing with zucchini. Lots
and lots of
zucchini. You'll need one of
those new Martha Stewart
"Kitchen Shovels I'm afraid.
The
good news is, you'll find sev-
eral nice zucchini recipes in
my new cookbook "Recipes
For Disaster" (the sequel to
"Another Fine Mess").
Pisces
(February
19 - March
20)
In a fit of outrage against the
bizarre behavior of
Afghanistan's Taliban, you
will organize an international
protest group. Your goal: no
Taliban man who appears in
public without wearing the
traditional tutu and scuba flip-
pers will be given any oppor-
tunity to trade internationally.
Horoscope courtesy of
www. h umorscope.com
Theaters, continued from page 5
Thompson,an ECU senior. "It gave
me something to do while waiting
for the movie to start
In all businesses, there is always
competition. Some rise above to
conquer the opposition while others
crumble under the pressure. Two
movie theaters, Plaza Cinemas and
Park Theater, are among those that
couldn't measure up against all of the
competition, especially against some
of the new theaters.
Even though it's not considered
strictly a movie theater, Hendrix
Theater, located in Mendenhall
you lately, and you're sinking
into a fairly ugly bit of self-
pity. You merely need to- "
count your blessings! (1)
You've got a tremendous tal-
ent, which some day may be
in demand, (2) You're almost
normal � LOTS of people
have extra
appendages, (3)
Student Center, shows recent movies
every Thursday, Friday, and Saturday.
Admission is free with an ECU One
card for all students. Students are
even allowed to bring one guest.
"Out of all the theaters, Hendrix
is the besCsaid Mike Underwood, an
ECU junior. "It's right on campus,
which is convenient, and it's free
Greenville has a variety of movie
going options for its residents to
choose from. Find the best one that
fits your budget and interests and
have a night out at the movies.
Wednesday, September 2,1998 7 ��





I
Become a member.
Put your organization
in cyberspace.
WWW.
clubhouse
ecu.edu


Title
The East Carolinian, September 1, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 01, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1285
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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