The East Carolinian, August 27, 1998






Look for TEC's new
entertainment magazine
in stands
Wednesdays this Fall
When the cyberdust dears, check
out TEC's new website at
www.tec.ecu.edu
Carolinian
Due to Hurricane Bonnie.
TEC met critical deadlines.
For the latest Bonnie
information look to
www.tec.ecu.edu
THURSDAY, AUGUST 27,1998 VOLUME 74, ISSUE JWOa
Bonnie wreaks minor damage on campus PePsi deaL
Students taking
hurricane seriously
Amy L. Royster
F. II I 0 8 � I N � CIII E F
T. K. Jones
NEWS EDITOR
I lurricanc Bonnie sent caravans of
Bast Carolinians fleeing Tuesday
evening when winds blew in with
gathering speeds and then stalled,
hovering on the edge of the North
Carolina coast. By Thursday, the
slow relentless storm dissipated
leaving several residence halls
flooded, but no other serious dam-
age to campus.
In emergency planning meet-
ings called Tuesday by Vice
Chancellors Richard Brown and
Layton Getsinger, a five-page
checklist was handed out, detailing
every aspect of preparedness and
the decision to cancel classes was
made.
To synchronize when plans
would be activated, some of the
departments chose wind-strength
to use as an indicator. Housing
decided to relocate dorm students
to hallways at 65 mph.
Memories of student reaction
when Hurricane Fran hit haunted
administrators like Emanuele
Amaro, director of Housing
Services, who said, "a hurricane
seems to be an occasion for a
party These fears proved unwar-
ranted due in part to a statement
made by Greenville Mayor Nancy
Jenkins in which she decreed the
city in a state of emergency and
issued an 8 p.m. curfew.
Assistant director of the ECU
Police Department Tom Younce
and Chief Teresa Crocker, who
slept in sleeping bags at the station
house Tuesday and Wednesday
night, say most students stayed safe
indoors.
"The students were just super
Younce said. "We've got some
small limbs down and water dam-
age in several residence halls, but I
think we've survived pretty well
Increased numbers of police
officers worked throughout the
storm patrolling campus and sur-
veying damage. Facility Services
returned to work Thursday at 1
p.m. to begin repairs.
"Going through I found water
damage in the rcc center, flooding
raises
many
questions
Many angered by
distribution of money
TK Jones
NEWS EDITOR
Hurricane Bonnie hit Eastern North Carolina early Wednesday morning with winds in excess of 130 miles per hour. Campus officials
closed the university Wednesday and Thursday. At press time Thursday Bonnie was down graded to a tropical storm and was hover-
in the bottom of Tyler Hall and
water damage in Fletcher Hall
Younce said.
Greenville Utility Company
reported power outages to 6th, 7th.
8th, and 9th streets. By midday
Thursday most power had been
restored to areas heavily populated
bv students.
See Page 4 for moie Bonnie Coverage
Chancellor Eakin Undergoes
Evaluation
Results of survey kept confidential by
Board of Trustees until fall semester
Debbie N e ti w i r t h
STAFF WRITER
Amanda Austin
FEATl'Ut EDITOR
Chancellor Richard Eakin has recently found himself at
the mercy of ECU's Board of Trustees (BOT) and a new
evaluation process to determine his on strengths and weak-
nesses as the chancellor of ECU.
On Aug. 11 the Board of Governors (BOG) began an in
depth evaluation procedure involving Chancellor Richard
Eakin.
This new process was established by the BOG in March
of 1998 stating that every two years university chancellor's
must undergo an evaluation by the university' BOT.
This evaluation takes place in a four part series, and
every other year the evaluation becomes less and less in
depth.
The campus portion of the evaluation procedure has just
been completed and will continue until September. At that
time the BOG will hold a meeting to discuss any issues
about strengths and weaknesses that may arise during the
evaluation.
After issues have been discussed, UNC-System
President Molly Broad will meet with the Chancellor Eakin
for discussions and recommendations.
According to the BOT this years evaluation was taken
very seriously and will continue to be.
ECU is one of three universities currently evaluating
chancellors. The evaluation process includes the help and
input of trustees, alumni, faculty and students as well as a
consultant whose job is to interview Deans and Vice
Chancellors. This consultant is supplied to the BOT by Dr.
Roland Nelson of Greensboro.
Executive Assistant o the Chancellor, Jim Smith feels
that the new evaluation process will be helpful in discover-
ing strengths and areas of improvement.
"I think this is a good policy that the BOG has devel-
oped Smith said. "Some campuses don't have an evalua-
tion system
Chancellor Richard Eakin works at his desk.
FILE PHOTO
Results of the evaluation will be kept confidential from
all, including the chancellor, until the evaluation is com-
pleted in the fall semester.
Computer buying made easy through the internet
Student discounts,
delayed payments
available
J 0 S E P II E 1. 0 E R
STAFF WRITER
Cbmputer Shopper Magazine, one
of the most respected in computer
When ECU gave the greenlight to
softdrink companies to bid on
exclusive pouring rights, they did-
n't know what they were getting
into, or did they?
They didn't know that student
protest goups would form in behalf
of the deportation of Coca Cola.
They didn't know that contentions
would erupt with Papa John's
being denied access on campus to
distribute Cokes during the
Merchant's Fair.
But they did know that they
would receive $7.1 million.
And they also knew that only
universities with competitive ath-
letic departments are approached
by softdrink companies wanting to
collaborate exclusive pouring-right
relationships and that despite its
50-year relationship with the local
distributors of Pepsi, the
University of Nerbraska had even
stronger ties with Pepsi and Coke
with each drink's largest stakehold-
er having interests vested in their
university, and they made a suo
cessful pouring rights choice.
With Pepsi's contract with
ECU, academics will receive
almost $3 million more than it pre-
viously had. The Athletic
Department's purse will bulge
with an additional $4 million, keep-
ing it from having to rely soley on
ticket sales, fund raising, marketing
and promotion since athletic
departments are excluded from
state appropriations for universi-
ties.
Three years ago when money
was needed to build a second tier
on the football stadium, local house
representative Henry Aldridge
stepped in to seek $3 million in
state assistance from the discre-
tionary fund to help build it.
"A lot of people asked me,
'What are you doing getting money
for a stadium and not academics?'
They did not believe, as I do, that
a superior athletic program gives a
school valuable recognition, mak-
ing it an option to students who
might not have heard of it other-
wise Aldridge said.
"We do get a portion of stu-
dents fees, but in return students
are given free admission and prime
seating advantages said ECU
Athletic Director. Mike Hamrick.
product shopping advice, has
released a user-friendly guide for
the college student in search of a
system compatible with their colle-
giate needs.
The 1998 College PC Buying
Guide provides comprehensive
need-to-know information that
makes the often complex task of
researching, understanding, and
purchasing a computer easy for the
technically challenged.
The site. Computer Shopper
Netbuyer, offers sections with the
pros and cons on notebooks, desk-
tops, printers and other accessories
including how to custom fit the sys-
tem to the university's electronic
setup.
While the guide serves as a
stockpile of technological informa-
tion it also allows the consumer to
put this knowledge to use.
Shoppers can view thousands of
products complete with detailed
specifications, comparison charts.
reviews, and buying advice. And
when the time comes to buy, the
customer has several different
options ranging from the high
priced to budget priced and new
and used merchandise.
But is using Computer
Shopper's Netbuyer really a good
research and purchasing tool for
potential computer buyers? For one
ECU student the internet provides
some of the best computer shop-
ping results.
"But no other financial support
"There are several methods to jtomes from the university
research computers at stores like To Hamrick, intercollegiate ath-
Circuit City, web sites and comput-
er shows said Scott Rose, a senior
majoring in Business Education.
"Computer Shopper provides a
lot of information on all kinds of
systems and allows you to find
exactly what you want Rose said.
"There's a much bigger selection
than what you would find at a
SEE COMPUTER PAGE 2
letics provides so much visibility
for a university that it is a rallying
point for alumni, making the per-
ception of the university a positive
one.
"We have other great programs
at ECU, but they don't get the
exposure that athletics does, so
why not market where you can,
SEE IWSI, PAGE 2





2 Thursday. Augy�t 27, 1998
news
The East Carolinian
news
briefs
cross
state
Man sentenced for armed postal robbery
HUNTINGTON, W.Va. (AP) � A Mingo County man has been sen-
tenced to nearly three years in prison in the armed robbery of a post office.
Jeffrey Marcum, 22, of Dingess, had pleaded guilty to robbing the
Breeden Post Office at gun point last Oct. 6, U.S. Attorney Rebecca Betts
said Monday following sentencing.
Marcum and co-defendant Robert Baisden used stolen firearms in the
robbery and fled in a stolen vehicle, which they later set on fire, Betts said.
Baisden previously was sentenced to six years in prison.
Police fire shots at boy with water gun
NEW YORK (AP) � A 16-year-old boy was shot by police who mis-
took his black water pistol for a real weapon, with one of the officers fir-
ing all 16 rounds in his gun.
Michael Jones was in critical condition Monday. He was shot six times
early Sunday after encountering police while he rode his bicycle.
Police were looking for the boy after an off-duty police officer report-
ed he was pointing a gun at people and cars.
Police said the boy refused to drop his toy, which looked like a sub-
machine gun. But Jcrmain Congress, who was riding his bike with Jones,
said Jones was dropping his pistol when he was shot.
Officer David Gross fired all 16 rounds from his 9mm semi-automatic
pistol at Jones. Sgt. Michael Jacobellis fired once.
Police Commissioner Howard Safir said a preliminary investigation
indicates the officers acted properly.
Bomb defused in Indonesia's tallest building
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) � Police defused a small bomb that was
discovered in Indonesia's tallest building, newspapers reported today.
The explosive was found by a security guard Friday near a bathroom
door on the ground floor of the 50-story Wisna BNI 46 tower in the capi-
tal, Jakarta. There were no claims of responsibility and police declined to
speculate on who may have planted it.
The bomb was in a 4-inch by 8-inch box and was equipped with a
timer, The Jakarta Post quoted Col. Jacky Uly, commander of the nation-
al police bomb squad, as saying. It was set to explode later Friday.
The building houses some operations of the central bank, which has
been at the center of efforts to revive the nation's paralyzed economy.
A social club for Americans and the offices of about 100 Indonesian and
foreign companies are also in the building.
You drank.
You danced.
You had se)
misses
Free Pregnancy Tests
Call Carolina Pregnancy Center 757-0003
209-B South Evans Street (downtown near Courthouse)
New theater opens
Stadium seating, THX
sound now an option
Body strangled, burned identified as teen-ager
MOORESVILLE, N.C. (AP) � Authorities used DNA to identify a
body strangled and set afire earlier this month as that of a missing 16-year-
old Mooresville girl who had dropped out of school.
Christy Marie Rambo died before she was set on fire Aug. 8, said
Iredell County SherifFs Office Detective Sgt. Julie Gibson. An autopsy in
Chapel Hill failed to show whether she had been sexually assaulted,
Gibson said.
Detectives have identified a suspect but declined to elaborate, Gibson
said. All four of the Iredell sheriffs homicide detectives have been
assigned to the case full-time.
Senate approves bill encouraging year-round schools
RALEIGH (AP) � State officials would study ways to encourage year-
round schools under a bill unanimously approved by the state Senate.
The measure directs the department to make recommendations for
removing barriers that keep local school districts from offering year-round
schools.
The measure now goes back to the House, which already has approved
it.
across!
Debbie Nbuwihth
STAFF WRITER
A 12 screen theater is a new and
more than welcome addition to the
Greenville community. The new
theater, located off of Firetower
Road behind Bells Fork Shopping
Center, opened its doors on Aug. 7.
The Carmike 12 is 60,000 square
feet and is complete with stadium
seating and THX digital sound.
Stadium seating is designed similar
to a lecture hall and is intended to
give all movie goers a fair chance to
see the screen and THX sound is a
feature that is digitally mastered to
enhance sound throughout the the-
ater. The theater uses THX sound
systems in eight auditoriums and
stadium seating in four.
Philip Smitley, assistant vice
president of Carmike Theaters,
feels the new theater will provide a
better experience for all who enjoy
the movies.
Student, Kurt Labutti, was
PEPSI
CONTINUED FORM PAGE 1
hoping it will encourage more and
better students to come because of
it?" I Iamrick said.
When ECU won the Peach
Bowl in 1992 admission numbers
soared to an increase of 877 more
than the previous year. The follow-
ing year experienced an admission
decline by 28.
According to John Durham of
ECU news and communication, a
correlation cannot be drawn except
for the Peach Bowl and enrollment
increase happening in the same
year because there wasn't much
movement in enrollment either
year EGU was in the Liberty Bowl.
Durham says that other factors
impressed by the theater and the
view with stadium seating.
"You get a much better view in a
theater with stadium seating
Labutti said.
The cinemas grand opening
took place in early August, and fea-
tured a special of movies for a dollar
admission fee.
Crowds became excessively
large on opening night and many
people were forced to venture to
the old Plaza theater. The Plaza
Theater has been closed in an
attempt to make sure the movie
business in Greenville does not suf-
fer from lack of business.
Carmike Cinemas owns all of
the movie theaters located in
Greenville, including the Plaza,
Carmike 12, Carolina East,
Buccaneer and the Park Theater.
These four theaters currently serve
over 179,000 movie goers.
Bobby Morse is the head of the
Carmike 12 off Firetower Road.
He feels that the theater will draw
many people, and is pleased with
the crowds thus far.
The Carmike theater offers mid-
night movies on Friday and
Saturday nights, as well as matinees
and regularly scheduled shows.
The matinee price is$4, and the
evening price is $6.
for the jump in enrollment could
have been an increase in high
school graduates.
AN ARAMARK WORKER LOADS THE THE
PEPSI COOLERS AT THE WRIGHT PUCE
FILE PHOTO
3l
tffe INTERNET
' ECU Student Special
$18.95Month
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COMPUTER
CONTINUED FORM PAGE 1
store.
Many people prefer the store
method simply because of the abil-
ity to see, hear, and feel how the
system works, but Rose disagrees.
"It's not what the computer
looks like, it's what it can do that
matters Rose said.
Netbuyer offers both possibili-
ties by providing views of the prod-
ucts it showcases alongside perfor-
mance based specs that give the
shopper a means for comparing
looks and ability.
For those who want to buy over
the web, Netbuyer connects direct-
ly to computer vendors and
includes secure online ordering.
Most vendors offer several pay-
ment plans and delivery methods
to accommodate customers uneasy
about purchasing products over the
UNIVERSITY
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COLLEGE VIEW APARTMENTS
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Debbie
staf
There is now
sights and souni
Joyner Library
Sonic Plaza it
tectural elemen
in the library.
The Sonic F
by an architect, I
from Lexington
been working o
1991, and is fu
Arts Council.
Bruce Flyc, (
services, is impr
ished results.
"I think it m
edition to campi
There are foi
Sonic Plaza. Th
Shell
maye
WASHINGTON
United States si
retaliation from
tary strikes agair
rorist sites in ,
Sudan, Sen. Ric
Ala said Monday
Shelby, chairrr
Intelligence Com
convinced that P
was justified ii
strikes, but he sai
encourage terroris
back.
"I'm sure the
pro quo, a tit f'
from these ki
Shelby said in a
returning from a
India, Pakistan ai
"Our response
was calculated, I
know that that
world of terroris
might even, in a
them a little bit.
have to declare
and on terrorism
Shelby said C
re-evaluate the ef
to protect U.S. p
He said most Am
were built withou
possible terrorist i
are located in area:
ily defended.
"It's probably
worse before it )
said. "The worl
since the demise
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going to be on s
and dissident gr
terrorist attacks on
Because he was
try, Shelby said he
notice of the mili
was briefed she
attacks. He said he
Pakistan when the
siles struck a tei
neighboring Af
Wor





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both possibili-
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3 Thiiridey, Augmt 27, 199B
news
Tha Ettt CaraHnian
Sonic Plaza brings campus new sights, sounds
Desigpedby
miowned'architect
Debbie Neuwirth
staff whiter
There is now a new edition of
sights and sounds in the entrance of
Joyner Library. Named "The
Sonic Plaza it interacts with archi-
tectural elements of the new plaza
in the library.
The Sonic Plaza was designed
by an architect, Christopher Jcnney
from Lexington, Mass. Jenney has
been working on the project since
1991, and is funded by the State
Arts Council.
Bruce Flyc, director of facilities
services, is impressed with the fin-
ished results.
"I think it makes a really good
edition to campus Flyc said.
There are four elements of the
Sonic Plaza. The Sonic Gates, the
Percussive Water Wall, the Media
Glockenspiel, and the Ground
Cloud Wall. These are all art
experimentation and aimed to
interest students in visual arts,
media arts, music and performance.
Student, Leigh Richards finds
the entrance way to the sonic plaza
interesting and amusing.
"The sounds remind me of Star
Trek noises Richards said.
The Sonic Gates are in the
entrance of Joyncr Library and use
sound to enhance the entrance.
The sound images can be heard all
throughout the day, and change in
pitch as the day goes on.
The Water Wall includes 64
water jets that play a pattern of
water mist. Sometimes the pattern
will be slow, other times it will
increase in speed. There will be a
ground score in the wall and at
night the entire wall will be illumi-
nated.
The Media Glockenspiel is an
80 foot clock tower. On the face of
the clock there is a ring of video
monitors that displays different pic-
Shelby warns U.S. strikes
may emboldent terrorist
WASHINGTON (AP) � The
United States should prepare for
retaliation from last week's mili-
tary strikes against suspected ter-
rorist sites in Afghanistan and
Sudan, Sen. Richard Shelby, R-
Ala said Monday.
Shelby, chairman of the Senate
Intelligence Committee, said he's
convinced that President Clinton
was justified in ordering the
strikes, but he said they likely will
encourage terrorist groups to strike
back.
"I'm sure there will be a quid
pro quo, a tit for tat, a response
from these kind of people
Shelby said in an interview after
returning from a two-week trip to
India, Pakistan and Syria.
"Our response was measured, it
was calculated, but we obviously
know that that doesn't rid the
world of terrorism he said. "It
might even, in a sense, embolden
them a little bit. But I believe we
have to declare war on terrorists
and on terrorism
Shelby said Congress needs to
re-evaluate the efforts being made
to protect U.S. personnel abroad.
He said most American embassies
were built without consideration of
possible terrorist attacks and many
are located in areas that are not eas-
ily defended.
"It's probably going to get
worse before it gets better he
said. "The world has changed
since the demise of the Soviet
Union, and now the emphasis is
going to be on smaller countries
and dissident groups launching
terrorist attacks on us in the West
Because he was out of the coun-
try, Shelby said he had no advance
notice of the military strikes but
was briefed shortly after the
attacks. He said he had already left
Pakistan when the U.S. cruise mis-
siles struck a terrorist camp in
neighboring Afghanistan on
Thursday.
The military strike in Sudan
targeted a plant believed to be
manufacturing chemical weapons.
While Sudanese officials have
denied U.S. claims that the factory
in Khartoum was producing such
chemicals, Shelby said the classi-
fied evidence he's seen makes it
clear the attack was justified.
"I'm satisfied of that he said.
"The administration was justified
in what they did and I think they
will have to do more
Shelby said he doesn't agree
with those who have questioned
whether the timing of the military
strikes was designed to divert
attention from Clinton's admission
that he had an inappropriate rela-
tionship with a former White
House intern.
Shelby said he was in India
when he watched Clinton's
address to the nation last week in
which he acknowledged the rela-
tionship with Monica Lewinsky
and then lashed out at indepen-
dent counsel Kenneth Starr.
"I thought he was going to do
closure on the deal he said, "but
apparently from all indications, his
problems haven't closed
Shelby, who had a much publi-
cized feud with Clinton five years
ago when he was still a Democrat,
said he's withholding judgment on
the president until Starr completes
his investigation. But he said
Clinton clearly will not be able to
govern in the future the way he has
in the past.
"The question now is will he
muddle through two more years
he said. "A lame duck with two
years to go in any presidency is
weakened because of the calendar.
Now, not only has the calendar
weakened him, but events have
weakened him too
nection
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tures and images four
times throughout the day.
In the morning there is an
icon of a rooster, at noon a
steam whistle, and at the
end of the day a firing
cannon at sunset com-
plete with an ECU Pirate
mascot. At midnight,
there will be a surprise
sound and image.
The Ground Cloud is
a misting fountain found
at the Tenth Street
entrance to the library.
The fountain will create a
cloud of water at ground
level that people can walk
through. This will also be
illuminated at night.
The entire Sonic Plaza
will be up and running
starting at the beginning
of the semester. Future
opportunities will include
options for music stu-
dents as well as visual and
media arts students.
Students who walking through the Sonic Plaza are surprised by sound waves bouncing between the
columns.
PHOTO BY J�S0R fEATHEB
Quayle says polls don't reflect public
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) � The
public is more upset with President
Clinton's behavior than polls indi-
cate and that is good news for
Republicans in this year's midterm
elections, former Vice President
Dan Quayle said Monday.
"I think that the people are far
more turned off with Bill Clinton
and all of his shenanigans than all of
these public opinion polls are
expressing, at least the public opin-
ion polls that have been in the
newspapers and carried on televi-
sion Quayle said.
Quayle spoke during his latest
swing through the state where
precinct caucuses launch the nomi-
nating season, campaigning for
other Republicans as he considers a
bid for the GOP presidential nomi-
nation.
Though Clinton has been criti-
cized for his relationship with for-
mer White House intern Monica
Lewinsky, his approval ratings
remain relatively high. He has
admitted to an inappropriate rela-
tionship with Ms. Lewinsky.
The president's backers argue
the polls show that voters are will-
ing to look beyond Clinton's per-
sonal conduct and judge him on his
performance in office.
Quayle said the polls don't
reflect the level of outrage among
the public.
"I don't buy these polls that
somehow people don't care
Quayle said.
"They really do care. Sure, they
want the economy to do well and
they don't want a jarring event like
the resignation of a president, at
least right now
During the latest swing, Quayle
was campaigning and raising money
for GOP congressional candidates,
and he said Clinton is a major GOP
asset in the midterm election.
"Clinton's political predicament
is going to help Republicans
Quayle said. "Our base it extreme-
ly agitated. They are bolting with
frustration with the fact that
Clinton seems to be able to get
away with it
'
with no monthly
maintcnani e Fee I i ec online accol
aid And Wachovia
branches and l K all over tW glace.
Tell your parents you're putting al the
money you save on this account ii o CDs.
You've uoi enough on yoin
You shoulc
monev lor ihe latest
tO WOI'IA .tl'K
1 BOO WACHOVIA
WWW.WACHQVIA.COM
JPOJOVIA
Leti
n-S.il ()-h Sun I-t
Sfflhed
T H
COLLEGE ACCOUNT
I





4 Tlwtriay. Aimwt 27,1MI
news
Thi Ent Ciroliniin
!
I
! Hurricane Bonnie left a half-million evacuated
330,000islanders
orzkndoff
tourists
NAGS HEAD, N.C. (AP) �
More than a half-million tourists
and residents were ordered to leave
the coasts of North and South
Carolina on Tuesday as Hurricane
Bonnie closed in with gathering
speed. Hurricane-force winds could
hit the coast by daybreak
Wednesday. By late Tuesday,
showers and tropical storm-force
winds of at least 39 mph were
falling in southeastern North
Carolina. By early afternoon, traffic
was bumper-to-bumper on roads
leading inland from North
UVAsays
I policy
I nurts
WISE, Va. (AP) � Virginia's
unwillingness to pump more
money into higher education has
driven industrial prospects to
other states, the president of the
University of Virginia said.
John Casteen told Clinch
Valley College's faculty that
Mercedes and BMW chose South
Carolina and Alabama as sites for
new automobile factories because
"Virginia failed to make a credible
presentation
The companies found a com-
mitment toward funding and
developing public colleges in
those states that was missing in
Virginia, Casteen said Friday.
Casteen recommended that
the state usea performance-based
budget system, where funding
goes to programs that show good
results. But he also said the state
needs to increase college funding
to ensure a well-trained labor force
that will attract new industry.
Casceen's remarks come as
Gov. Jim Gilmore's blue-ribbon
commission on higher education
prepares for its first meeting on
Tuesday.
Gihnore does not appear anx-
ious to dramatically increase col-
lege funding. In a speech last
week, he urged newly appointed
university trustees to carefully
manage the schools' money.
Gilmore is committed to
improving higher education but
believes "money being spent
indiscriminately is not the best
solution spokeswoman Lila
Young said. Jill Lawrence, spokes-
woman for the Virginia Economic
Development Partnership, denied
that the state is having difficulty
attracting industry because of its
higher education policies.
"Normally our education sys-
tem is praised and is one of the
key factors in our success she
said. Ms. Lawrence said that the
Mercedes and BMW decisions
were made in the early '90s, and
the state has since attracted many
large industries, including
Motorola and IBM-Toshiba semi-
conductor plants. Casteen said
colleges are more efficient now
because of state-mandated
restructuring efforts in the early
1990s, but Virginia unlike other
states that went through a similar
process has since failed to make
up for the cuts it imposed.
State government still has no
real system of capital project plan-
ning for universities, Casteen said,
although the electorate did
approve a major bond referendum
for higher education building pro-
jects in 1992.
"The stare has slipped into a
situation where it does not know
how to set priorities for higher
education he said
Carolina's Outer Banks as people
tried to get out of the way of
Bonnie, a behemoth ofa storm with
winds of 115 mph.
Many residents were unwilling
to take the chance that the first hur-
ricane of the Atlantic season would
follow the path of some previous
storms and take a last-minute turn
out to sea.
"This is a big sucker said
Sterling Webster, a resident of
coastal Dare County on the Outer
Banks.
"It's very, very frustrating.
We're eating some serious rent
Jane Hanley said as she, her hus-
band and two children were about
to cut short their long-planned
vacation in Nags Head and go back
home to Sparks, Md.
On Monday, Bonnie's path was
so slow and wobbly forecasters
were unsure when or even if it
might hit land. But by early
Wednesday, the storm was cen-
tered about 200 miles south of
Cape Lookout and was pushing
toward the northwest at 14 mph.
Early Wednesday, the National
Weather Service extended hurri-
cane warnings farther south, so they
stretched from Chincoteaguc, Va
to Edisto Beach, S.C. Swimming
was banned at beaches as far north
as New York's Long Island as
Bonnie kicked up dangerously
rough surf along the East Coast.
Four New Jersey lifeguards had to
be rescued Tuesday after being
overpowered by big surf in Point
Pleasant Beach.
More than 330,000 people were
ordered off North Carolina's coastal
islands. About 200,000 more,
including 120,000 tourists, were
instructed to leave South Carolina's
two northernmost coastal counties.
"Anybody who does not abide
by the mandatory evacuation, our
law enforcement has been instruct-
ed to ask them their next of kin
South Carolina Gov. David Beasley
said.
Shelters opened Tuesday for
thousands of displaced residents
and tourists in 23 eastern North
Carolina counties. Shelters also
opened in South Carolina and
Virginia.
Virginia Gov. Jim Gilmore
declared a state of emergency,
authorizing communities to order
evacuations. But none had done so
by late Tuesday.
About 60 Navy ships at Norfolk,
Va were instructed to leave port
and ride out the storm 300 miles at
sea. Other ships were being moved
to inland waterways.
At Pope Air Force Base, N.C,
"every plane that is flyable is leav-
ing said Lt. Tisha McGarry, a
spokeswoman at the base. Fighter
jets also were leaving Seymour
Johnson Air Force Base in North
Carolina.
Dave Davidge of Downington,
Pa was fishing on the beach just
south of Nags Head when a park
ranger sent him packing.
"I'm going out of here and head-
ing to Charleston (S.C). I was get-
ting a little scared, especially get-
ting evacuated off the beach he
said.
It was Davidge's second warn-
ing of trouble from the storm. On
Sunday, his 7-year-old son was
caught in one of the riptides caused
by Bonnie as the storm churned the
ocean hundreds of miles away.
Davidge and a stranger saved the
boy from being swept out to sea.
Many people were staying just
long enough to protect their prop-
erty.
At Surf City, Chris Medlin used
a circular saw to cut plywood to
cover the windows of his fishing
store. "We've done this too many
times to stick around he said.
"Mother Nature tells you when it's
time to split
Farther out in the Atlantic,
Hurricane Danielle moved toward
the U.S. Virgin Islands with 80 mph
winds, and forecasters expect the
storm to be as strong as Bonnie
within days.
I






Etit Cirolinim
;ed
nger saved the I
pt out to sea.
ere staying just
tect their prop-
is Medlin used
:ut plywood to
of his fishing
: this too many
iind he said.
Is you when it's
the Atlantic,
moved toward
ids with 80 mph
cers expect the
ong as Bonnie
t






Leap on over to a job
at easicarolinian
1?1iC i$ now accepting
applications for all writina
positions
jLpply at our offices on. the
Second floor of the Student
Publications Building.
Want to be a friend to a child
in need? Want to see a young
kid smile because someone
shows they care? You can be
that someone! East Carolina
Friends, a mentoring program
for needy kids is having
interest meetings Tuesday
September 1 and Wednesday
September 2 at 6:00 PM in
Brewster B-306. The meeting
should only last an hour. We
are looking forward to seeing
you there.
Need to
pack & ship it?
WE CAN DO IT!
MAIL BOXES ETC.
FedEx � Postal
ing for TV
Etc.
FOODS

Itllij
get the took.
10 Student Discount With Proper I.D.
FINE'S
The Ultimate Fashion Store
Carolina East Mall
Memorial Drive, Highway1
Good Deal
Dorm Delivery only!
10" Pizza loaded with cheese and
one of your favorite toppinss for
only $599 plus tax!
Bigger Deal
Dorm Delivery only!
Large Pizza loaded with cheese and
one of your favorite toppings PLUS a
2-liter Pepsi for only $10.99 plus tax!
Free1
Two 12-oz. cans of Pepsi with
your order of any Domino's Pizza.
Valid at participating stofe only Not valid with any other offer
Prices may vary Customer pays sates tax when applicable
Delivery areas limited to ensure sale driving Cash value MiO
O 1998 Domino's Pizza, inc. Valid through 18-31-98
(
Central Greenville and ECU
758-6660
1201 Charles Blvd.
I
Now that we have your
Attention.
�JZS1 SOCIETY OF
&i PROFESSIONAL
H JOURNALISTS.
Region 2 Mark of Excellence
Best ALL-AROUND Non-Daily Newspaper
FplaeeTEC
Sports Reporting
2nd place Amanda Ross
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3rd place Todd Jones
eoc
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See store for details.
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Red or white Seedless
Crapes
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s-lb. Bag
U.S.D.A. Choice
Boneless
Chuck Roast
Pound
Whole Center i
Boneless
Pork Loins
Pound
All Varieties & Sizes g. One-Oee 0e
Lunchable Sandwiches or " rw
Oscar Mayer HI 11
Fun Pack Lunchables il!CC�
caffeine Free Diet Coke, Sprite,
Diet Coke or
Coca cola Classic
12-pack 12-oz. cans
Cheertas
m
$�&,
Two 12-packs at this
price with $10.00 or
more purchase.
General Mills 12-16-oz. Chex, IBoz. Golden Grahams,
20-oz. Lucky Charms,
Honey Nut Cheerios or
Cheerios Cereal
20-OZ.
1, Lite, Skim or Fat Free Plus
Kroger
mm. Gallon Milk
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Coffee
34.5-39-oz.
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9on2 M
Campbells Tomato or I Bud Light or
Chicken BSKT Dorltos
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10.75OZ.
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Save at leaet $1.57 on 3
on3
67-BSJoad, Regular or wBleach
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etergent
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Items & Prices Good Through August 29.1998
Copyright 1998 Kroger Mid-Atlantic. We reserve
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8 Thiindiy, Augmt 27, 1998
opinion
The East Carolinian
eastSarolinian
Amy lRoister Editor
Heather burgess uwigingu��
AMANDA AUSTIN NmEdilor TRACV M. LAUBACH SpontEditor
HOLLY HARRIS Assistant News Editor STEVE LOSEY AssilttntSports Edim
ANDY TURNER Lilwyli Editor CAROLE MEHLE Held Copy Editor
JOHN DAVIS Assistim tilnlylo Editor John MURPHY Still IHuslulor
MATT HEOE Adwrlistng Minigor
BOBBY TUGGLE Webmasm
S��ig Ha ECU nmmuninr lira KJ?5. it In Curtain patkiMi 11.000 coon iw, luesdiv ind Ttinmlor. tin nd ntam i ndi km a tin
r�on at i� fdwi! Soul Ihi Ian Cotran mconta Imiii 10 rM km, timm io M �wji. rttri mn to ioM lot d�mY or brnily III Ear
Curtain irwm tin ngM to Mr or nun Mm lot wleii�n. Al lentil ana H agntd trrwi siuwld M uonssen to; rjf��� idiim. Tin En
Cm�. Smomi PutHotwns 8�M�IJ. ECU. Cum !J8SM3S3. (�inhnMUm. till 118 3J8.6366
oumew
I
OPINION
Columnist
William Stacey
COCHRAN
Summer offers time to reflect
The fourth of July gave us
once again another reason to
drink and get off unsafe
Chinese pyrotechnics.
Well, lets see what did we learn
this summer? Money means
power. I promised myself that I
wouldn't put my two cents in on
this one, but it has come to this.
In ECLI's attempt to get more
money to get more football players
who can read AND write, ECU has
devoted 60 percent of the $7
million that will be eventually re-
extorted out of the students by
Pepsi to athletics. Around
campus, opinions are pretty critical
of this decision, ranging from
slightly less apathetic than usual to
sporadic cursing. It seems that the
only way we will be able to get coke
on campus is in it's purified white,
powdered form.
Freshman orientation was fun.
Don't deny it. Those little boys and
girls are so awestruck by us that
they would shack up with a hobo as
long as they had an ECU shirt on.
Besides, we really didn't have
anything else to do on a Wednesday
night like study. We went to the
Elbo to create an atmosphere of
diversity, in stark opposition to the
usual local rednecks, rugby players
and Marines who frequent the
place.
The fourth of July gave us once
again another reason to drink and
set off unsafe Chinese
pyrotechnics. Don't get me wrong;
I love the things. I was just a little
peeved when I had some kids who
live in my rapidly aging apartment
complex shooting bottle rockets at
my truck. These kids are probably
the same ones who will end up in
jail in about eight years after they
hold up The Pantry so that they can
get enough money to buy one book
at Dowdy Student Stores.
All in all, it's been a pretty good
summer. In the fall, we will
welcome back all our friends who
have spent the summer
embarrassing themselves as bag
boys at the local Piggly Wiggly and
have them blow their savings on
one night downtown. We better
enjoy this little break we have a
lot of tough partying ahead next
semester.
LETTER
to the Editor
Pepsi deal eliminates competition
itor,
These were the immortal words
that were uttered by John Belushi
in the old Saturday Night Live
"Cheeseburger, Cheeseburger
sketch. What it meant was that you
could order anything in this SNL
restaurant that you liked as long as
it was either a cheeseburger, chips,
or Pepsi. Well the same thing has
happened here at ECU with the
exclusivity contract signed with
Pepsi.
Businesses need competition as
part of the checks and balances in
our economysociety. Companies
must keep abreast of the demand
for competitor's products as well as
the fluctuations in current
consumer preferences in order to
stay competitive in the marketplace
(which proved a painful lesson to
U.S. automobile manufacturers in
the 70s and 80s). From a
consumer's perspective,
competition tends to give us more
product choices at a wider variety of
pricing options.
The new soft drink exclusivity
contract (monopoly) gives us none
of these options. It restricts us to
those specific products which are
distributed by the vendor at
whatever price he wishes to charge.
I have already witnessed the
pricing increase at our vending
machine here in the library, and I'm
sure the prices will continue to
climb over the life of the contract.
Ultimately, the consumers
(primarily students, faculty and
staff) will be paying the price for
the University's cash windfall as
most business vendors tend to pass
expense increases down to the
product level.
A perfect example of where
competition in the marketplace
does work to the consumer's
benefit is in a recent situation that
happened to my wife. She received
an unsolicited offer from a long
distance telephone company which
could allow us to pay a per call
charge of $.10minute at all times
with no additional monthly charge
(which happened to be better than
our existing provider who
countered this by offering to drop
our monthly fee for the next 6
months, allow us unlimited
$.10minute calls, plus give us a
monthly credit of $25 toward our
phone bill. Needless to say, we
were both amazed at this and
realized that this could never
happened prior to the industry
becoming deregulated. Obviously,
there are now more choices and
options for the consumer because
of competition.
To sum up, I feel that society in
general is better off when we have
competition because it allows us to
make more choices and decisions.
Now that our soft drink freedom of
choice has been taken from us, I
can only owner what will be next.
Walter Zoller
GovcrnmentDocuments
Librarian
Joyner Library
OPINION
Jeff
Bergman
Columnist
Suing HMOs should not be illegal
Over the summer we made it clear that we thought the Board of Trustees deal with
Pepsi was a big score for the university. Unfortunately, it's a score that we feel will be
celebrated much more enthusiastically by the Athletic Department than anyone else.
Most students we have heard from are upset that they no longer have a choice. They
feel that their privacy has been invaded and a basic right of choice has been stripped.
While we concede' to sometimes feeling this way. We are more concerned with the
statement this decision makes as to the importance of academics on campus. We need
to improve our somewhat lacking academic reputation and it takes big bucks to do that.
What does this decision say to our friends doing research in labs late at night across
campus? What does this say to the professors who work in cramped conditions? What
does this say to dents the students sitting in hot classrooms? Giving less than half of the
money from the Pepsi deal to academics says to a lot of people that we are less of a
priority right now than athletics.
We feel that the Athletic Department did beautiful leg work and left a tough decision
to the Board of Trustees, but we are ultimately dissapointed with the allocation of
funding. Academics needs a friend. We need a rich benefactor or at least someone
willing to stand up and fight for us.
We will always be the first in line to yell, "Go Pirates but, as we said earlier this
summer, we may be yelling through clenched teeth as we sit sweltering in hot
classrooms.
Aw, to heck with it. I'm
getting tired, so I guess I'll
just go to bed. Wake me up
when there's a woman
president.
To sue or not to sue, that is the
debate. The House of
Representatives has passed a bilj
that would allow people to appeal
their Health Maintenance
Organization's (HMO) decisions
about the care received. Most
Republicans in the House did not
want to add a provision that would
have allowed patients to sue their
HMO.
Republicans, recipients of
campaign donations from HMO
lobbyists, were afraid of losing
these contributions. Without this
money, they could not make those
cool commercials that say they are
fighting for you against big
business.
The health industry has a huge
lobby inside the beltline. Witness
the 1994 advertising blitz brought
by them upon the 1994 Clinton
Health Care Reform. The public's
dismay at the treatment they are
receiving is the only reason
anything is being done. It is an
election year and politicians have
to show interest in the people.
The majority in the House did not
want to add a provision that would
allow patients to sue. The right-
wing party is concerned with
frivolous lawsuits. Republicans
tend to think all lawsuits against
big corporations arc unnecded.
They are probably right; Ford did
nothing wrong when the Pinto
went into production, and the
cigarette companies did not
mislead the public at' all.
Newt and the Gang are correct
when they assume that some
people will take advantage of the
ability to sue. What the collective
intelligence of the Republican
party fails to consider is that the
HMO's will take advantage of
patients if they cannot sue.
The Republican's bill did have
provisions for patients to appeal.
Having the ability to appeal is
necessary to protect the public's
health and well-being. The
question I have is how long will the
appeals process take � six months,
a year, two years? During that time
the patient is waiting they could be
suffering in extreme pain. Thanks
to federal law the patient will have
little recourse.
I support the Republican's idea
for appeals and the Democrats
right to sue agenda. Both should be
made into law. Company's that
promise to take care of your health
should be held to that promise.
An amendment I would like to
sec, but probably will not is prison
sentences. The federal
government should impose stiff
prison terms upon the people
within the HMO empire. Fines are
already in place but what is a
couple of hundred grand to a
billion dollar industry? People want
criminals behind bars and what is
more criminal than making a
person wait for treatment because
the company deemed it too
expensive? This is akin to torture.
OPINION
Britt
Honeycutt
Columnist
We were all Freshman once
Yes, my first day at ECU
was a living hell. I count
myself exceptionally lucky to
be here at all after that
nightmarish experience.
Does anyone remember their very
first day at ECU? There were
thousands of people that you
didn't know and who could care
less about knowing you.You were
crammed into a tiny space that you
were to share with a total stranger
for the next nine months of your
life and that person was already
exhibiting all the outward
symptoms of either a bordarline
psychotic or a TB patient. You
walked into the dining hall where
you were to receive life-sustaining
nourishment for the rest of the
year and were confronted with a
smell sent directly up from the
blackest pit of hell. It was the
specialty of the house- macaroni
casserole, served six times weekly.
You visited your department (if
you had one yet) to meet thirty
other frightened young students
like yourself and about three
hundred wise-cracking, bitter fifth
year sophomores who were to
guide you through your first year.
There were no signs telling you
where to go for your first class or
your second or your third. And if
you asked, a kind smile would
appear on the face of the
individual asked- as they gave you
the wrong directions.
Yes, my first day at ECU was a
living hell. I count myself
exceptionally lucky to be here at
all after that nightmarish
experience. My parents drove
away and left a well adjusted,
socially inclined 18-year-old to
metamorphosize into a groveling,
lost, scared freshman.
I have since recovered. But that
day lives on in my memory iike a
tattoo on the ass of Satan. I know
the pain that this year's freshman
are living. And you probably do
too. So when an obviously lost
freshman asks you for directions,
give them the right ones. Unless
they're cocky, in which case you
should feel free to tell them that
English 1100 is held on the Town
Commons on the first day, and that
they should hurry because the
teacher is giving out free shots of
vodka to the first 20 to arrive.
Here are a few small pointers for
you new guys that may make those
first few weeks a little easier. One:
Learn the Rules of the Sidewalk.
Stay right, don't clump into groups
of three or more (because that
really pisses everyone off, if you
haven't noticed already), look
straight ahead at all times. Two:
Don't wear your ("lass of '98 T-
shirt unless you want the pain.
Three: Trust no one- not even
your mother. She has no idea
what's going on. Four: Act like
you've been here for years, and if
you get lost, try not to look like it.
If you wander around for long
enough, you'll find it. Five- and
perhaps the most important of all:
Stay out of the Elbo. Don't
question me.
The law is pretty simple. If you
don't call attention to yourself, you
won't get picked on. If you choose
to ignore this rule, you are on your
own, and I pity you. And about the
dining hall? It doesn't get better.
It's all downhill from here, brothers
and sisters. Tip Six: Put Papa
John's number on your speed dial.
OPINION
Ryan
Kennemur
Columnist
Wake me up for a femal president
Aw, to heck with it. I'm
getting tired, so I guess I'll
just go to bed. Wake me up
when there's a woman
president.
What kind of world do we live in
when, every time we turn around, a
prominent political figure gets a
"hummer?" Last Monday,
President Clinton had the audacity
to interrupt my television-filled
evening (Monday Nitro, for Gods
sake!) and tell the world that he is a
big fat liar. This announcement
came as somewhat of a shock to
many people. My only thought at
the time wasduh
The Clinton Administration has
been absolutely plagued with
accusations of unlawful acts and
lies, and this whole oral sex thing is
just one more thing to add to the
punch bowk I'd be willing to bet
that, before his head writers got a
hold of the cue card, Clinton's
testimony was going to be
something to the effect of, "Miss
Lewinski and I never had sexwe
made love. It was so much
different from with Hillaryit was
pure pleasure
But No! Instead we get a
mopey-faced, red-eyed Arkansas
boy telling us that it is none of our
business. Well Bill, if you're
reading this (he-he) you should
know by now that your business is
our business. As long as the media
exists, there will be people at your
window, peering in to see every
hand you shake, every deal you
make, and every intern that
performs a service for you. This is
what you get into when you put
yourself in the spotlight. You are
now in the political equivalent of
"The Truman Show
But what gets my goat is the fact
that Hillary will probably stay with
him. But then, if they were to get a
divorce, what would she do with all
her time? She could ride the crest
of the wave of excitement that she
starts across the country, but then
what? She won't have her husband
around to keep her famous. She
would probably cash in on the
whole ordeal, perhaps by writing a
sequel to her famous book, aptly
titling it "It Takes an Intern
Oh, and as for you, Monica
Lewinski! I just have two words for
you. Amy Fisher. Thats right! You
are nothing but a made-for-tv
movie waiting to happen. I wonder
if Tori Spelling will be available for
the part. You will more than likely
be tossed into the pit of wash-ups,
where you will be able to swim side
by side with the likes of Divine
Brown, Kato Kaolin, and that
transvestite that hitched a ride with
Dr. Doolittle that faithful night.
Back to that whole none-of-our-
business thing. If this whole ordeal
was none of our business, why in
the world do he have to endure
seeing it all over the news up until
the part where you get around to
confessing. I believe that this
conduct is a blemish on our society.
It's truly a pity that we (supposedly)
live in the best country in the
world, and yet we cant have a
leader who can keep his.
"Presidential Seal" in his "Oval
Office Aw, to heck with it. I'm
getting tired, so I guess I'll just go
to bed. Wake me up when there's a
woman president






'he East Carolinian
llegal
i's bill did have
ents to appeal.
y to appeal is
ct the public's
1-being. The
aw long will the
: � six months,
�uring that time
g they could be
e pain. Thanks
atient will have
publican's idea
he Democrats
Both should be
ompany's that
! of your health
lat promise.
I would like to
ill not is prison
e federal
1 impose stiff
i the people
ipire. Fines are
ut what is a
J grand to a
y? People want
rs and what is
in making a
tment because
:mcd it too
kin to torture.
)nce
on the Town
t day, and that
because the
free shots of
to arrive.
II pointers for
ly make those
e easier. One:
:he Sidewalk,
ip into groups
because that
le off, if you
ready), look
times. Two:
jss of '98 T-
nt the pain.
ie- not even
has no idea
ur: Act like
years, and if
: look like it.
nd for long
it. Five- and
ortant of all:
21 bo. Don't
iiple. If you
yourself, you
f you choose
j are on your
nd about the
't get better,
ere, brothers
Put Papa
r speed dial.
lent
is book, aptly
Intern
you, Monica
two words for
tats right! You
made-for-tv
)en. I wonder
e available for
ire than likely
: of wash-ups,
: to swim side
es of Divine
n, and that
ed a ride with
iful night.
: none-of-our-
whole ordeal
iness, why in
tc to endure
lews up until
;et around to
vc that this
n our society,
(supposedly)
jntry in the
cant have a
keep his.
n his "Oval
with it. I'm
ss I'll just go
'hen there's a
beeHkere?
www.tec.ecu.edu





I
10 Thursday, AuQUit 3y 1998
8,
features
TheEijl Carolinian
Buzz or
Gender may play a larger role in alcohol consumption than you
drinkingis defined as four or Bineedrinkimk defined as)
Binge drinking is defined as four or
more drinks for a female
Michael D. McElwain-
staff WRITER
Women and men are not created equal after all.
Life along Fifth Street on a Friday night is much dif-
ferent for women then men.
According to several studies, women will experi-
ence a greater effect from alcohol than their male
counterpart according to Robert Morphet, a counselor
at ECU's Center for Counseling and Student
Development. The BAC (blood alcohol content)
becomes higher in women then in men.
Morphet says that if a male and a female of equal
size and weight drink the same amount of alcohol, the
BAC level in the female would be greater than the
male.
"The blood alcohol levels are higher in women
then men, and it also varies during the female's men-
strual cycle Morphet said.
Morphet also added that women are more suscep-
tible to getting liver disease related jto chronic heavy
drinking than men.
Dr. Thomas de Beck, clinical director of the ECU
Student Heath Service, agrees with Morphet
"TBe same amount of alcohol will have more
impact on a female due to physiological reasons de
Beck said.
The reasons stem from enzymes in the female
body and the alcohol absorption rates.
Alcohol, in general, affects the cerebral function of
the brain, according to de Beck.
"When a person is staggering around drunk, the
cerebellum is impaired and can't coordinate motor
movement de Beck said.
de Beck also said that judgment is impaired due to
the effect on the area of the brain's called the cerebral
cortex.
Morphet sees another concern for women where
alcohol is concerned.
"A female is more likely to be victimized more by
lifestyle choices than men Morphet said. "She can
be victimized by her husband, be raped or assaulted
Morphet said that one of the biggest risks for
women are that they are put at a greater risk for
assaults, sexual assaults and rape while intoxicated.
Another concern for women is that more and more
drinking can easily bring about academic trouble. Poor
grades and having to drop out of college could be the
result.
While women tend to metabolize alcohol and
absorb it differently, a study shows that there is a big
difference in the amount that they do drink.
ECU participated in a national study in 1997 called
the CORE Survey. There were 603 responses from
ECU students to the survey and the results surprised
many people.
"Despite the reputation, we are just about smack-
dab in the middle of the national average Morphet
said. "Most universities have that reputation as a party
school, but I don't think it is a big difference from the
other schools of our size
It was that survey that showed the other important
difference between male and female drinking�the
quantity consumed. According to Morphet, binge
SEE WOMEN, PAGE 12
Jamie Guyton, a bartender at Boli's, serves drinks to many men and women from both campus and the surrounding area.
PHOTO BY BRIAN WILLIAMS
When They Drink
2 �
& 15
Number of drinks per sitting
(
1-2 3-4 5-6 7
Number of drinks per sitting
Binge drinking is defined as five or
more drinks for a male
Michael D. McEiwain
STAFF WRITER
If you're a male and have more than five drinks when
you go to one of our local bars or to a party, you are a
binge drinker.
That is the major problem for male drinking at East
Carolina University according to Dr. Robert Morphet,
substance abuse counselor at ECU.
"The risk of alcohol poisoning through binge
drinking and playing drinking games is dangerous
Morphet said.
Research supports the idea that binge drinking is
more predominant for men then women. A 1997
national study of college drinking, the CORE Survey,
showed the difference between the amount of alcohol
consumed when men and women drink.
The survey showed that for ECU male students
that do drink, 20 percent have one and two drinks, 28
percent have three to four drinks, 27 percent have five
or six drinks and 25 percent have seven or more
drinks.
Citing those statistics, Morphet suggests that males
have a tendency to drink more, and that concerns him.
"We don't want to have any alcohol poisoning
deaths here at ECU Morphet said.
Dr. Thomas De Beck, clinical director of ECU's
Student Health Services, is also concerned about male
binge drinking and he voiced his opinion on the idea
of tolerance.
"All it means (tolerance) is that he has drunk so
much for so long de Beck said. "All it means is. that
he is actually in trouble. He has worked long and hard
to get there
"If it takes more than two or three (drinks) to get a
buzz, then you are in trouble De Beck said. "You are
at a crossroads
Morphet said that there is a problem of drinking
within our campus community, but he also points out
that the results from the CORE survey show that
ECU is with the national average. The survey showed
that 66 percent of the female and 69 percent of the
male respondents reported consuming alcohol within
the last 30 days.
Not only do males run a greater risk of alcohol poi-
soning, but they are different from females on how
they conduct themselves while intoxicated.
"Men have a higher chance of getting involved in
anti-social behavior than women addicts Morphet
said.
While nature and nurture play a role in any addic-
tion, Morphet thinks male drinking problems stem
more from the college environment than with this
issue of abuse that seems to be a factor in women
drinking.
"It (male drinking) comes from less abuse and a lot
has to do with the environment and the friends they
are with Morphet said.
Morphet added that men have more social influ-
ences and the reasons for drinking are multifaceted.
The way one reacts from the amount you drink can
vary between individuals, de Beck said, adding that
the key to avoiding alcohol poisoning and any alcohol
related problem is simple�responsibility.
"If you set an appropriate limit, then you have
been responsible de Beck said.
Males who have, or are concerned about, alcohol
SEE MEN. PAGE 14
Safety precautions vital during hurricane season
Residents should never try
to wait out storm
Amanda Austin
features editor
With hurricane Bonnie on the rampage
and possibly headed toward the Eastern
North Carolina shoreline, and hurricane
Danielle not far behind, it is vitally impor-
tant to know how to keep safe. It is impor-
tant even in areas as far inland as
Greenville, which was proven true by the
destruction of hurricanes Fran and Bertha
just two years ago. Hurricanes can be a
matter of life or death.
It has been predicted that this year 10
tropical storms will develop in the Atlantic
Ocean of which 6 are expected to turn into
Hurricanes, hurricanes that have the
potential to take a life if the proper safety
measures are not adhered to.
According to the American Red Cross
an evacuation plan is very important.
People must identify where they will go,
keep telephone numbers of friends and
family handy as well as road maps in case
an alternative evacuation route must be
taken, leave food and water out for the pets
that must be left behind (most shelters and
hotels do not allow pets) and stay tuned to
your local television and radio stations.
"If you are in an area that is evacuated
go ahead and leave, don't try to wait it
out said Charlene Lee of the Greenville
area Red Cross.
Safety precautions are not only impor-
tant for residents of the coast, but also res-
idents of the Greenville area.
Lee recommends that Greenville resi-
dents begin to prepare for a possible disas-
ter now.
Disaster kits including a flashlight and
batteries should be readily available.
Residents should go ahead and stock up on
water and take inventory of their homes
and their belongings.
Residents should also be aware of
where to go if a tornado were to develop
from the heavy winds expected in the
area.
"You should go in a place where there
are no windows and stay out of the sec-
ond and third floors of your homes Lee
said.
According to Lee a hurricane is a seri-
ous mattet and should be taken serious-
ly by all, including Greenville residents.
'The reason we issue warnings is so
people will start taking precautions now,
they are not to be ignored Lee said.
The university has made available a
web site that includes hurricane safety
SEE HURRICANE, PAGE 7
Hurricane Bonnie can be seen here in the Atlantic.
PH0I0 COURTESY OF THE WORLD WIDE WEB





eastcarohnian
nee
ith us!
T Jypryoufcnawoe uaa m person we are
looking sfe.fe need � help this fall, and
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Building Across from Joyner Library
Burn Debris Disaster Free
Smokey is counting on you to follow the rules for
safely burning debris.
1. Check local laws on burning.
2. Don't burn on dry windy days.
3. Clear a 30-foot circle around debris before
lighting fire.
4. Keep shovel, rake and water nearby.
5. Don't leave fire unattended by an adult even
for a minute.
6. Consider alternatives to burning: composting,
recycling, or hauling to a landfill.
REMEMBER, ONLY YOU CAN PREVENT FOREST FIRES.
I
A Public Sefvice ol the USDA Forest Service and Your State Forester.
ECU Ambassadors






12 Thuraday. Ayjuttaff, 1998
features
Tht East Carolinian
Letter
contimiad (rout paga 11
intelligence, but rather the fashion
sense of the person referred to.
Little quirks like that make it a lit-
tle bit harder, even when English
words are used.
Not only that, even when
English is written, sometimes it's
just a little bit odd. Stuff that just
sounds weird, like "Set aside enjoy-
ment time with your friends"
(which I saw on an advertisement
on a drink machine) is pretty com-
mon, but I suppose that's to be
expected. English is a pretty diffi-
cult language�even American
people make simple mistakes like
spelling "lose" as "loose" or using
"farther" instead of "further
Even with all that, it's is still
admirable that the Japanese are
almost as comfortable with English
as they are with their own language.
Sometimes though, it becomes a
little alarming to people like
myself. English is more of a trendy
fad to teenagers here. The other
day I saw a girl with a t-shirt
adorned with yellow and black
stripes along the message "WARN-
ING-GIRL" Like I wouldn't be
able to tell that from looking at the
front of her shirt anyways. Just the
other night I ran into an elementary
school girl who was wearing a shin
advertising urn, skateboards. The
name of the company was some-
thing she would probably get
slapped for wearing in the States. In
fact, I've seen lots of people wear-
ing t-shirts with profanity on them
that would send the Christian
Coalition up in arms.
I'm not sure how many people
actually know what these shirts say,
but as most people would probably
just look the other way if they did.
It's not too much of a problem here.
As an American though, I just keep
reminding myself that since these
people have been studying English
for about as long as I have been
studying Japanese, I probably
sound just as weird. For now
though I suppose I'll just look for-
ward to moving back into my
"mansion" back in the States.
Greenville's
Best Kept Secret
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INM or Mm ort r ltnt � Cntv�
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13 Thurti
Women
continued from page 10
drinking is defined as consum-
ing four or more drinks for a
female. When drinking, women
consume far fewer drinks than
men.
The CORE survey showed
that, when drinking, 38 percent
of the women consumed
between one and two drinks, 38
percent had three to four
drinks, 19 percent had five or
six drinks and only six percent
had seven or more drinks.
Morphet said that women tend
to not be binge drinkers.
If they do have a problem,
women may be at a disadvan-
tage for treatment
Morphet says that treatment
programs are more targeted
toward men.
"Research studies show that
women tend to do better with
non-behavior counseling
Morphet said.
He added that women tend
to want to explore the issues
behind the drinking.
Morphet says that the pre-
ponderance of people in treat-
ment for alcohol are men.
There are a lot of barriers for
women in getting treatment
like motherhood, lack of insur-
ance, concern over the custody
of children and transportation
problems.
The reasons why women
drink are varied, but there is
one area that seems to stand out
above others. Some studies
show that for females who have
a drinking problem, as much at
70 percent have seen or been
involved with childhood
domestic violence or abuse.
Many treatment programs do
not deal with this issue behind
the drinking.
While drinking is a problem
at ECU, Morphet does not
think that we are much differ-
ent from the national averages,
and the studies show that.
Women do have different rea-
sons for drinking and it effects
them differently that men, and
Morphet said his office is open
for anyone having a problem
with any substance abuse.
Morphet encourages anyone
with a problem to contact his
office at 328-6661. The coun-
seling center has individual and
group counseling available for
those who may need it and is
located on the second floor in
the Wright Building.
Meet the People
� Name: Brandon Barmonte
� Hobby: Golf
� Major: Construction Management
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� Hobby: Playing sax in band
� Major: Art
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RUGBY!
Tuesday, September 1st
at 9:00pm SRC Classroom - RM 202
The ECU Rugby team is looking for
new players.
NO experience is necessary and NO
cuts are made! If you miss football or
just want to try something new, then
come out and join us at an
information and season opening
meeting. September 1st, 9:00pm at
the Student Recreation Center.
For more information, contact
Recreational Services at 328-6387 or
Brad Palmer, Club President at 830-
3638
About
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Tht Eitt Carolinian
nef
irfflSS"
0 Bridle Circle
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ere!
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rd
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13
Thursday, fluouitja, 1898
features
Tht East Carolinian
Want A
Challenge?
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Start your career off on the right foot by enrolling in the Air Force
Officer Training School. There you will become a commissioned
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the Street
What did you de inpreparation for
Hurricane Bonnie?
HighFmsure Unlimited Tannty $54.00
Small'German&ed& P0ktm(plmifmj $35.00
Paul Kaplan
21 years old
Business major
Junior
"I stood in tine
for 20 minutes at Food
Lion and brought the
couches in from outside
Tara Butler
21 years old
Education major
Senior
"I brought my
mailbox in because it was-
n't anchored down
Terese Messick
21 years old
Communications
major
Senior
"I bought batteries, water
and assorted beverages
5y Is the average
�at number of minutes
a student waits to see a financial
aid administrator In February.
f C minutes is the
� V� average time a student
waits to see a financial aid
administrator In August.
O of the students
� �a wait over 60 minutes
to see a financial aid administrator
in August
jROO award,etter$
Jr Uv waernatedoutby
financial aid by July 31, 1998.
166
124
Hurricane
continued from page 10
Stack of Our
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Good Until September 25, (998
Present coupon when ordering. Coupon valid
at Greenville IHOP only. May not be uted in
combination with any other special offer,
discount or coupon. One coupon per person per visit.
DtJ
EAST
CAROLINA
East Carolina University
School of Business
Office of Professional Programs
r 252-328-6377
tips and precautions and can be
viewed at http:www.ccu.edu.
This web site contains informa-
tion about living on campus and
preparing for a hurricane. Safety
precautions include:
�Listening to radio and T.V.
warnings
�Stay in the residence hall and
wait to be advised by staff
�Have access to flashlights
�Record players and radios
should be placed on the floor or in
a closet
�Loose objects should be
placed in drawers
�Windows should be closed
tightly
�Have a container of fresh water
available
�Check food for spoilage in case
electrical current is interrupted
�If outside, avoid contact with
dangling or lose wires
Other information is also acces-
sible via the ECU home page,
including the locations of shelters
and how to protect your office.
Hurry, classes begin September 17
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14 Thyndiy, Auju�t-M. 1991
features
Thi Eilt Carolinian
oneTS
Men
cominued Irom page 10
Classical studies
scholar receives
endowed professorship
Dr. Charles E, Fantazzi of the
University of Windsor, Ontario,
will hold the Whichard
Distinguished Professorship in
Humanities for the 1998-99 acade-
mic year.
Fantazzi, a classical studies
scholar, was introduces at the
College of Arts and Sciences con-
vocation this week. He is the
fourth professor to brought to cam-
pus under the endowed professor-
ship
Scientist gives inside
look at nobel prize
An atomic scientist from Sweden
will offer his ides on how to win a
nobel prize in his first of two
speeches to be held on Thursday
and Friday, August 27-28.
Dr, Reinhold Schuch, a profes-
sor of atomic physics at Stockholm
University and a member of the
Swedish Academy of Sciences that
selects Nobel Prize winners, will
speak as a guest of the university.
Schuch will give an inside look
at the process leading to the selec-
tion of award winners.
Art Exhibit
An art exhibit was held in the
Mendenhall Student Center and
the Jenkins Fine Arts Center at
which the work of 21 women artists
who depict scenes from from an
old Germanic legend were present-
ed.
related problems have an advan-
tage over females.
"There is a historical bias that
treatment is geared toward men
Morphet said.
Morphet also pointed out that
there are more men involved in
treatment groups and that here at
ECU, his treatment groups are
usually 60 percent male and 40
percent female.
The counseling center is open
for anyone concerned about alco-
hol or any other problem. Morphet
said that he hold group sessions
most Tuesday and Wednesday
nights and the center is available
for individual groups.
The center can be reached at
328-6661 and is located on the sec-
ond floor of the Wright building.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
LOCATION: 953 E. 10TH ST. (BOTTOM OF COLLEGE HILL AT EAST END OF CAMPUS)

CHANGE OF DATE DUE TO HURRICANE BONNIE
Ig&Ty i th Annual Back to School
OPEN HOUSE
& PIG PICKIN1!
When: Wednesday, September 2,1998,4:00pm-7:00pm
FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL US 757-1991
WELCOME
BACK!
MASS SCHEDULE:
Sun:11:30am and 8:30pm
Wed: 5:30pm
ALL MASSES ARE AT THE CENTER
Fr. Paul Vaeth Chaplain ft Campus Minister - to more information atouiteu and other pn?
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ID Ttiurtdty, August 27, 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
University negotiates with ESPN for '99 opener
Pimtes hope to open
season at Ericsson
Steve Losey
assistant sports editor
The ECU Athletic Department is
currently in the final stages of
negotiations with representatives
from ESPN Regional and the
Carolina Panthers to play the
Pirates 1999 season opener against
West Virginia at Ericsson Stadium
in Charlotte. The match up
would be televised nationally on
ESPN or ESPN2.
"Negotiations are going on
and there may be an announce-
ment in the next few days asso-
ciate athletic director Henry
VanSant said.
Assistant athletic director Lee
Workman stressed that "noth-
ing's been finalized" as to the
specific terms of the negotia-
tions, but said he hopes to make
an official announcement by the
Sept. 5 opener.
"All I can say is, yes, there is dis-
cussion, yes, it it moving quickly
"All I can say is, yes, there is
discussion, yes, it it moving
quickly towards that
direction, and no, nothings
been finalized yet
Lee Workman
Assistant athletic director
towards that direction, and no,
nothing's been finalized yet
Workman said. "At this point it is
real premature. It's a' matter of
details. We're hoping to have an
announcement between now and
then
On August 4, The News &
Observer reported that ECU
could receive over $1 million
through the deal. ECU officials
refused to comment on the
amount ECU would receive or
the terms of the contract.
"At this point, there's nothing
concrete Athletic Director
Mike Hamrick said. "But if it
were to happen, any time you're on
national TV to 60 million homes,
it's tremendous for your universi-
ty
Workman agreed with Hamrick
that such national exposure is one
of the factors in deciding on mov-
ing the location of the game as orig-
inally scheduled.
"If it thc exposure wasn't very
positive,we wouldn't do it
Workman said.
Tickets will be offered through
the ECU ticket office for a to-be-
determined price. The price is one
of the points still being debated,
according to Workman.
"A lot of ideas have been
thrown around regarding cover-
age Dean Diltz, Communications
Coordinator for ESPN said.
If the deal goes through, it will
be the second time the Pirates
have played in Ericsson Stadium.
The first was in 1996 against NC
State, when the Pirates defeated
the Wolfpack 50 to 29. The game,
dubbed Carolina's Clash, drew a
crowd of 66V47, the largest audi-
ence ever to see a college football
game in North Carolina.
"If it all works out, it'll be a great
opportunity for us Sports
Information Director Norm Rcilly
said.
Stadium construction reaches completion for now
$13 million addition to seat
fans for first home game
Tracy M. Laubach
SPOUTS EDITOR
The upper deck of Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium was completed in late June, a $13
million addition that took a little longer
than originally planned but has slated ECU
with having the third largest seating capac-
ity of all university stadiums in the state of
North Carolina.
Associate athletic director Henry
VanSant claims that the 8,000 seat addition
has made Dowdy-Ficklen a first-class stadi-
um that compares favorably with other
Division I stadiums across the country.
"There are some that are bigger and
some that are smaller, but I have not been
in an upper deck that is nicer than ours
VanSant said. "One of the biggest advan-
tages of sitting in the upper deck is that
there is plenty of leg room, so people can
walk in front of you without causing you to
have to move. Also, there are contour seats
that either 16,18 or 20 inches wide, so they
are very comfortable
The inside of the addition is extremely
spacious, providing enough room to accom-
modate everyone who can sit in
the upper deck. There are four
concession stands, a souvenir
shop and the restrooms feature
automatic flushers and handwash-
ers to accommodate Pirate fans.
"Convenience is another thing
that makes the addition one of
the nicest around VanSant. "It is
easy to get around, so people
should be able to get up to use the
restroom during a timeout and
still get back in time to not miss
anything
Additionally, the upper deck
contains 84 seats that are wheel-
chair accessible and features a
separate handicap level, where
seating is provided for not only handi-
capped individuals but their guests as well.
On August 9-14, the athletic department
hosted an open house of the upper deck at
which time more than 1,000 people visited
the newest part of Pirate football.
"Everyone was absolutely ecstatic about
what they saw VanSant said. "The stu-
dents are going to be very pleased with
what has been done
VanSant explained that although there
was much controversy over the delays and
problems that were encountered during
construction stages, there was never a
structural problem.
Conference USA
Stadium Capacities
Tulane69,767
East Carolina43,000
Louisville42,000
Army39,929
Cincinnati35,000
Southern Miss33,000
Memphis21,500
Houston20,500
Source: Conference USA Media Guide
"There were several insignificant fac-
tors, one of which was a beam that had to
be taken down and replaced after it was put
up VanSant said. "Our general contractor,
Davidson Jones Beers, was on the project
from start to finish, and was just not able to
get the work done as quickly as originally
projected
Pirate Club executive director Dennis
Voting said that with the majority of season
tickets being sold to Pirate Club members,
the additional seats allow for more priority
seating.
"The upper deck will help us to accom-
modate more people with better seating
Young said. "This will definitely help out
program because more people will be
pleased with what wc have to offer
Seating in the upper deck corresponds
to seating in the lower sections of the sta-
dium and 1,000 scats have been reserved
for students, who can request upper deck
seating at the time they pick up their rick-
ets.
Another project that is undergoing
construction at this time is the addition of
a club level, which will seat 1.3(H) high
level donors. With a projected finish date
of 1999, this level will feature entertain-
ment areas and lounges, and will be
between the upper and lower decks.
In the distant future, the athletic
department plans to begin the next phase
of the stadium pro-
ject, which will
include a double
deck on the south
side (otherwise
known as the
"alumni side") of
Dowdy-Ficklen. A
new press box will
be built, as well,
which will run the
entire length of the
stadium.
"When we do
begin this phase
will depend on how regularly we fill 43,000
seats at this time VanSant said. "At a uni-
vctsity this size, we base good participation
from students when wc see a demand for
10,000 tickets. If we see that much support,
it will speed up further additions
Furthermore, the university plans on
purchasing a new scoreboard in cither 1999
or 2(XM), which will cost approximately $2
million. For now, the scoreboard has been
freshly painted and has received routine
maintenance in preparation for the upcom-
ing football season.
"Dowdy-Ficklen is tnily one of the nicest
on campus stadiums around VanSant said.
"You can see the entire city of Greenville from
up there, and it is beautiful
North Carolina Stadium Capacities
1. UNC-Chapel Hill60,000
2. N.C. State53,000
3. East Carolina43,000
4. Duke33t941
5. Wake Foret32,000
Source: Henry VanSant, Associate Athletic Director
Volleyball prepares for
season opener vs. Campbell
Shannon Kaess to lead
Lady Pirates
Travis Barki. ey
senior writer
With the season opener only two
weeks away, the ECU volleyball
team is hard at work, preparing for
what is expected to be a successful
year.
This year's team is extremely
young, featuring six first year
players. Junior outside hitter
Shannon Kaess is the Lady
Pirate's only upperclassman, and
will serve as the team's captain.
Kaess said that even though the
team is young, it has a lot of expe-
rience. Last year's squad also fea-
tured six freshmen, most of whom
saw extensive playing time.
"I think that we'll be more
aggressive on the court Kaess
said. "We have a lot of returning
players who have spent a year in
the program who are practicing
hard and doing what they are sup-
posed to do
Sophomores Liz Hall and Sarah
Kary are two of the players that saw
a lot of playing time as freshmen
last year.
"We have a lot more confidence
this year Kary said. "Wc have a
greater knowledge of the game,
more love for the game
Hall said that the team benefit-
ed by having so many young play-
ers on the court last year.
"We have more experience
Hall said. "We know what to
Bfc- � � -U I
W&r&'&' M
r,dV y

i i! && i
Head volleyball coach Kim Walker gives advice to her athletes, who are taking a quick
timeout during a tough match.
FILE PHOTO
Tennis faces year of change
New coach anticipates
season
expect in the conference this year
Head coach Kim Walker
expects the team to be very com-
petitive.
"It's a good solid group Walker
said. "Our goal is to mesh together
on the court. If we can do that, we
can have a successful season
Walker indicated that while
there is a tremendous amount of
talent to work with, there are sev-
eral areas that need work, most
notably in the serving department.
"Our serving has got to
improve Walker said. "Our ace to
error ratio needs to improve from
last year
When asked how practice was
going, players and coaches alike
sounded very positive about the
team's progress.
"It's going very well Kaess
said. "We have new players that are
very talented
The most heralded of the new
players is 5-8 setter Lisa Donovan.
Donovan led her high school in
Wichita, Kansas to two consecutive
state titles and was named class 5A
state Player-of-the-Year last season.
Walker feels that Donovan may
be able to contribute to team suc-
cess immediately.
"Obviously we are excited to
get a player with the type of cre-
dentials that Lisa has Walker
said. "She's very solid. She should
be able to stan right away
The combination of returning
and new players should allow the
Pirates to contend for the CAA
title. Among the players and coach-
es, American University is the con-
sensus choice as the team to beat.
"We're really looking forward to
playing them" Kaess said. "We've
lost to them in the past, so we real-
ly want to play well against them
"They (American) were confer-
ence champs last year Walker
SEE VOLLEYBALL, PAGE 17
Mar io Sen i; r it At i i: r
SENIOR WRITER
With a new coach and teams loaded
with veterans as well as some
young talented players, the Pirates
will start their 199899 season at the
ECU Invitational in Greenville in
September.
"East Carolina's tennis program
is facing a year of transition Tom
Morris, EGU's new head coach
said.
Morris, who replaced Bill
Moore, had an outstanding career
at Barton College, both as a player
and as a head coach.
"I'm very excited about the pos-
sibilities here at ECU and I'm
proud to be a member of the ECU
family now Morris said.
With a different style of coach-
ing and hard work on the court,
Morris wants to step up with the
team to a higher level of competi-
tiveness. While coaching at Barton,
Morris coached eight Ail-
Americans and eight conference
players-of-the-year.
Newcomers Robert Hooker,
Michael Huez, and Leshaun
Jenkins will complement the men's
team, while Mary Elaine Knox is
the only new member for the Lady
Pirates team at this point.
Huez, a sophomore from Austria,
came to ECU to combine playing
tennis with getting a good education,
which, according to him, is practically
impossible in his home country. Due
to academic eligibility obstacles,
Derek Slate is one of four seniors returning to lead the men's tennis team this season.
, Flit PHOTO
Huez was not allowed to attend the
team in his freshman year.
"Although we lost Neils
Alomar) and Brett Rowley I am
convinced that we can do better
than last year Huez said.
Morris, too, is optimistic that the
teams can improve their last year's
record, where the Pirates conclud-
ed the season 10-10 and finished
fifth in the CAA standings. The
Lady Pirates were 9-7 and also
placed fifth in the CAA in 1998.
i
The men's team boasts four
seniors � Roope Kalajo, a market-
ing major from Finland, who is
expected to lead the men's team
together with Kenny Kirby, Derek
Slate and Stephan Siebenbrunner.
Oliver Thalen, a sophomore from
Sweden, is also looking forward to
put up some good fights for the
Pirates.
According to Morris, the men's
SEE TENNIS. PAGE 17
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Greenville, t
Next tp Chup
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109
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si Carolinian
mmunicacions
4 said.
irough, it will
i the Pirates
ison Stadium.
6 against NC
ates defeated
9. The game,
lash, drew a
largest audi-
llege football
na.
it'll be a great
us Sports
Norm Reillv
3W
y we fill 43,000
said. "At a uni-
d participation
: a demand for
much support,
tions
rsity plans on
I in cither 1999
aroximately $2
)oard has been
ceived routine
for the upcom-
ne of the nicest
" VanSant said,
(irccnvillefrom
cities
I i rector
ige
n this season.
boasts four
jo, a market-
ind, who is
men's team
Cirby, Derek
benbrunner.
omore from
g forward to
;hts for the
�, the men's
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18 Thursday, August 27, 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
Recruits
continued from page 17
son, she won MVP awards and boost-
ed her team to a regional champi-
onship.
An all-state selection from
Grimsley High in Greensboro,
Meredith Seawell won All-
Conference and All-Region honors as
a sophomore. During that season, she
also served as a driving force in the
team's journey to the state 4-A cham-
pionship.
Amanda Homer, from Raleigh,
and Amanda Duffy, of I lolly Ridge,
are the other two North Carolina
players joining the team. I lorner was
a goalkeeper for Sanderson High
School and earned merits for her
agility and quick reflexes. Duffy,
while playing for Dixon I ligli. scored
39 goals during her sophomore and
I
ion's Soccer Schedule
September
, 1HIGH POINT UNIVERSm4 p.m.
5DAVIDSON UNIVERSITY1 p.m.
9Elon College4 p.m.
12-JUniversky of DelewareTournamentTBA
18George Mason University4 p.m.
22VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH4 p.m.
30University of Richmond7 p.m.
October
3-4Holiday Inn Express TournamentTBA
7UNC-WILMINGTON4 p.m.
, 13COLLEGE OF WILLIAN1 AND MARY3 p.m.
; 18JAMES MADISON UNIVERSITY12 p.m.
21Campbell University7 p.m.
; 26RADFORD UNIVERSITY3 p.m.
" 28Old Dominion University 7:30 p.m.
3-1American University2 p.m.
Source: ECU Sports Information Department
junior years. She was also named the
Coastal Plains 1-A Conference Player
of the Year last year. Both players are
expected to contribute to future
ECU success.
The last two recruits hail out of
New Jersey. Emily Cozzi, of
Southampton, and Abi Temple, of
Wrightstown, are both highly skilled
young athletes. Cozzi has led her
high school to the state playoffs in
each of her first three years. She also
led a local club team with 18 goals
and 12 assists last year. Temple
earned an athletic letter during each
of her four years at Northern
Burlington Regional High School.
She was also selected for All-South
Jersey honors during three of those
seasons.
The program will return all but
one starter to the field this
season.Veterans such as goalkeeper
Amy Horton are expected to help
anchor the team's efforts.
"We've returned 10 of 11 starters
and the recruiting
class is very solid
Roberts said. "We
expect to continue
to improve the
team and the pro-
gram, and get to
the point where
we're going to
compete for a reg-
ular season confer-
ence champi-
onship Roberts
said.
Women's soc-
cer will begin the
year with a home
game against I ligh
Point University
on September 1.
To: ECU'S
Men off
r�-
A dog is a dog until he's facing
you then he's Mr. Dog.
Solution
1. Try to negotiate with the Dog,
swallowing some pride f�j-m CaiR!
along the way. ��� raiUl.
2. Try to run away or go around It's Sk) blue
possibly risking injury.
3. Take the Dog on Face to Face, COllar thing
send it running home. FORD DOC
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
0C ! : ' E. 10JHST. I GLLB
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When: Wednesday, September 2,1998,4:00pm-7:00pm
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Mascot Tryouts
1998-1999
Tryouts: Sunday,
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Place: Grassy area between
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium & Scales
Held House
FOB MORE INFORMATION CONTACT COACH C0RBETT AT 328-4510
r






19 Thunday. Aupmt 27, 1998
East Carolinian
sports
Tht Eait Carolinian
ia

x
Cincinnati game
rescheduled
mpus
R
SID�ECU's football game at the
University of Cincinnati this fall
will be played on Thursday, Nov. 5
and will be televised nationally on
ESPN. Gametime will be 8 p.m.
EST. The original date for the
game at Nippert Stadium had
been Saturday, Nov. 7.
This will be the second consec-
utive season that the Pirates and
Bearcats have met in front of the
ESPN cameras for a national tele-
cast. ECU prevailed 14-7 last Nov.
15 in Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium.
"This is another great opportu-
nity for our program to experience
national exposure Mike
Hamrick, ECU athletic director
said. "Our program's stature has
continued to rise on a national
scope and ESPN recognizes that.
We are excited about playing
Cincinnati before a national audi-
ence
"This game, in addition to our
other television opportunities,
gives us as good a local, regional
and national television arrange-
ment as anybody in the county
In addition to ECU's exposure
with ESPN, the Pirates also will be
seen this season as part of
Conference USA's national televi-
sion package on FOX Sports Net.
Two ECU games (Oct. 3 vs. Army
and Oct. 31 vs. Houston) will also
be carried regionally on FOX
Sports South while the Pirates also
have a unique three-year agree-
ment for extensive local coverage
of their games on WITN-TV,
Channel 7.
ECU will be making its ninth
national television appearance in
the past three seasons. It will be
the Pirates' third exposure on
ESPN in that period. ECU also
has played on ESPN2 three times
in those three years.
uryyK
i
eStf
ent ID
Off
irvice
nda
th
Dr.
NC
)
Cincinnati Bearcats face
unlikely repeat in bowl
appearances
CINCINNATI (AP) Don't look
for the University of Cincinnati to
go to a second consecutive bowl
game. The Bearcats will be paying
the price for last year's break-
through season.
Cincinnati went 8-4 last year,
made its first bowl appearance in
47 years, won the Humanitarian
Bowl and had five players drafted
(and seven signed) by the NFL.
By comparison, Ohio State that
school two hours north lost the
Sugar Bowl and had no one drafted.
Instead of feeling smug,
Cincinnati is feeling hard-pressed
to match its best all-around season
in 20 years. The core of the team is
gone, and the Bearcats are nicked
The College FlI
ATTENTION COMMUNICATION MAJORS!
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to finish fourth in Conference
USA.
� "We've lost more starters (12)
than anybody in the league and
sent seven guys to the NFL
coach Rick Minter said. "We've got
more question marks than at any
time since I've been here. But I
feel good about where we're
going
For one thing, the program has
more stability than at any time in
the recent past. Minter is entering
his fifth season at Cincinnati and
agreed to a four-year contract
extension over the summer.
"If we can continue on the
course we're on, we'll be fine
Minter said. "We may need three
or four good recruiting years to
catch up, and I think our 1998 class
will prove to be the best one we've
signed
The bowl victory helped, giving
Cincinnati some positive national
attention for the first time since it
beat Penn State in the opener of
the 1983 season.
They're even paying attention
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in Clifton, where football season
usually means that students are
getting excited because basketball
season is around the corner.
"Before, people would just ask
if we were going to reach .500
said defensive tackle Kevin Ward.
"Now people ask which bowl we
can go to
"People are asking when our
games are and what we're going to
do this year offensive guard Vince
Byrd said. "Last year, all I got was,
'Oh, he's big so he must be a foot-
ball player Nobody really cared
Those who are paying attention
realize the potential trouble spots:
1. Three offensive linemen
must be replaced and two of the
top three tacklers in school history
(linebackers Phil Curry and Brad
Jackson) are gone.
2. Cornerback Artrell Hawkins
is playing for the Cincinnati
Bengals.
3. The quarterback position will
be split between sophomore
Deontey Kenner and returner
Chad Plummer, who is a better
runner than passer.
The Bearcats' best leturning
player is senior safety Tinker Keck,
who tied an NCAA record with four
punt returns for touchdowns last
season.
"We've turned a lot of people's
heads with the bowl game Keck
said. "It could be the turning point
of this program. But we have to go
out and perform again to back it
up
Ohio State may be forced
to compete without
Katzenmoyer
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) Top-
ranked Ohio State has almost
everybody back and a schedule tai-
lor-made for a title run.
Yet their national championship
hopes might rest in the hands of a
music teacher.
Andy Katzenmoyer, the heart
and soul of top-ranked Ohio State's
defense, must pass summer-school
classes in music, golf and AIDS
awareness to be eligible.
Without him, the Buckeyes will
be very good. With him, they have
a shot at the school's first national
championship since 1968.
So the first hurdle before travel-
ing to 11 th-ranked West Virginia on
Sept. 5 and eons away from the
ominous Nov. 21 dance with
defending national champ
Michigan is making the grade in
summer-school classes.
Three Buckeye standouts�
Katzenmoyer, the Butkus Award-
winning linebacker, All-Big Ten
free safety Damon Moore and the
team's best offensive lineman, Rob
Murphy�must pass muster to
remain eligible.
They will find out a few days
prior to the opening kickoff
whether they have made the grade
or likely played their final colle-
giate game in last year's 31-14
Sugar Bowl loss to Florida State.
If any or all of the three are inel-
igible, Ohio State could duplicate
what happened the last time it was
No. 1. Back in 1980, coming off a
one-point loss in the Rose Bowl
that was the only blot on a perfect
season and with a roster loaded
with veterans, the Buckeyes lasted
exactly one poll as No. 1 and ended
up a disappointing 9-3 on the sea-
son.
"Whether we're the best team
in the country or not, I don't
know coach John Cooper said
during preseason workouts for his
11th season at Ohio State. "I like
our football team. I like their atti-
tude, their work ethic. It's an honor.
to be ranked No. 1, but obviously
it's a lot more important to be
ranked No. 1 when the season's
over
With the Big Ten now a pan of
the Bowl Championship Series, a
perfect season and the Buckeyes
would almost be assured of an
opportunity to prove they are No.
1.
But already they are somewhat
of an oddity, since they are
believed to be the only team ever
picked No. 1 to start a season while
riding a two-game losing streak.
Talent abounds. Joe Germaine
was third in the country in pass effi-
ciency last year while splitting time
at quarterback with Stanley
Jackson. Germaine directs an
offense that includes primary tar-
SEE EXTRAS. PAGE 20
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plttlfe? ��' "S' B :is?Sft4i
m
20 ThttrtiUy, Augml 27, 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
Extras
continued fiom page 19
gets David Boston and Dee Miller,
tailbacks Michael Wiley and Joe
Montgomery and fullback Matt
Keller, who has packed on 40
pounds since coming to Ohio State.
The major concern is an offen-
sive line that, while experiencing
growing pains last year also caused
some pains for the guy it was sup-
posedly protecting. An optimist
sees the offense's 30 points and 406
yards per game in 1997; the pes-
simist wonders about 47 sacks.
"We'll have a more physical unit
or else we'll have some new faces
in it offensive coordinator Mike
Jacobs said.
Katzenmoyer is the headline
performer on a defense that may be
allowed to run free to create havoc
much like the 1996 unit built
around cover corners Shawn
Springs and Ty Howard.
If current cornerbacks Antoine
Winfield, the 1997 team MVP and
leading tackier, and Ahmed
Plummcr can go man-to-man on
opposing wide receivers, look for
Ohio State to turn up the pressure
on passers and force a lot more
turnovers than the 46 of a year ago.
"The coaches have confidence
in them said Moore, the starting
strong safety. "They can let the
linebackers, D-line and the safeties
fly and leave 'Twan and Ahmed
out on an island
James Cotton moves in at
defensive end opposite Rodney
Bailey, with Clinton Wayne and Joe
Brown providing pressure from the
tackle spots. Katzenmoyer, Na'il
Diggs and Jerry Rudzinski make
up a quality linebacking corps and
Gary Berry and Moore are athletic
and omnipresent.
Even the kicking game is
superlative. Punter Brent
Bartholomew averaged 45.2 yards
last season, the fourth best mark in
school history, and placekicker Dan
Stultz added a new dimension with
his distance kicks.
Voters in both major polls have
agreed that Ohio State is the best
team in the country not just
because of the personnel, but also
its schedule. No. 13 Penn State,
No. 23 Michigan State and swag-
gering Michigan�which holds an
8-1-1 upper hand over Ohio State
since Cooper came aboard�all
must come to Columbus.
The immediate concerns are
classwork and the Mountaineers if
the Buckeyes hope to hold that No.
1 ranking for long.
"I'm proud. That's what you
work for, to be ranked No. 1
Cooper said. Then he added the
clincher "We have to live up to it
now
Dallas Cowboys coach
cuts 14 players
IRVING, Texas (AP) Dallas
Cowboys coach Chan Gailey cut 14
players from the squad Monday,
including third-year wide receiver
Jimmy Oliver of Texas Christian
and second-year cornerback Lee
Vaughn of Wyoming.
Oliver had been a strong candi-
date to win a job early in training
camp but missed valuable training
time after an injury and never
caught up. He also lost out in his
attempt to win a job as a kick
returner.
"We were intrigued with
Oliver's speed but it just didn't
work out for him Gailey said.
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Government
Association
Stop
complaining
about campus
issues & do
something
about them.
Register now
for student
legislative
positions.
Positions Available:
Dorm student Representative
Day (off Campus) Student representatives
Class Officers
Qualifications:
Must have a 2.0 GPA, be a full time student and be in good
standing with the university
Register in the SGA office - Room 255 Mendenhall Student
Center between the hours of 8:00 AM and 5:00 PM before
September 4,1998.
Candidates Mandatory meeting will be held on Wed.
September 9,1998. Time and Location to be announced.
Elections Date: wed September 23,1998
Make A Difference, Join SGA.
Diego State and Anthony Eubanks
of Arkansas also were trimmed,
along with quarterback Josh
LaRocca of Rice.
Defensive lineman Darren
Benson, lost for the season with a
knee injury, was placed on injured
reserve.
Others cut were guards Todd
Perkins of Texas A&M-Kingsville,
Antonio Fleming of Georgia and
Kent Booth of Northern Illinois;
linebackers Greg Bright of Georgia
and Chike Egbuniwe of Duke;
tight ends Rod Monroe of
Cincinnati and Cory Geason of
Tulane; center Earl Scott of
Arkansas; and fullback Bobby
Rodriguez of Houston.
Dallas gets one more crack at
winning an exhibition game for
Gailey on Thursday night at
Jacksonville. Then the Cowboys
get 10 days to prepare for the sea-
son opener against Arizona.
"I don't put much stock in pre-
season said the Cowboys coach.
"Keeping the starters'healthy is the
main thing. I wouldn't want to go
0-5, but it wouldn't bother me
Dallas has lost one starter for the
season�linebacker Broderick
Thomas, who was hurt in training
camp.
Backup defensive lineman
Benson hurt his knee during
Saturday night's 22-14 loss to the
St. Louis Rams. Dallas also lost
cornerback Wendell Davis Kbr the
year with a training camp knee
injury.
Benson's loss gives Dallas just
two healthy defensive tackles for
the Jacksonville game, Antonio
Anderson and Chad Hennings.
Leon Lett suffered a sprained left
knee in a scrimmage against New
Orleans but was expected back on
Sept. 6 for the Cardinals.
Cornerback Deion Sanders also
was expected to be ready for the
opener. He has been nursing a
knee injury.
Reserve defensive back Charlie
Williams broke his right thumb
against the Rams and could miss a
game or two to start the season.
Linebacker Nate Helmslcy,
who has a sprained left elbow, and
defensive end Kavika Pittman,
who has a knee sprain, were
expected to be ready for the
Cardinals although they will miss
the Jacksonville contest.
The Cowboys must decide by
Tuesday by NFL rule whether
assistant coach Bill Bates will play
this season.
Dallas also is looking at free
agent kick returner Herschel
Walker about possibly playing
again. There is no time limit on
signing Walker.
Steelers original lineman
dies at age 89
PITTSBURGH (AP) Samuel V.
Cooper, an original member of the
1933 Pittsburgh Steelers, died at
the age of 89.
Cooper, who was one of just two
surviving players from the first
Steelers team, died Saturday at the
Manor Care Nursing Home in
Green Tree, a Pittsburgh suburb,
after suffering a stroke last week.
Cooper was captain of the
Geneva College football team in
1932 and was signed when scouts
for team founder Art Rooney's
fledgling Pittsburgh Pirates�as
the Steelers were then known�
saw Cooper play in the first North-
South game in Baltimore.
The Steelers signed him as a
lineman for $1(X) per game.
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I
TWICE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
The East Carolinian
Pick us up Tuesdays and Thursdays for news and
information you need to know about campus
issues and activities.
MINORITY MAGAZINE
Expressions
Pick us up three times during the Fall and Spring
terms for discussion of the problems and issues
facing ECU's minorities.
STUDENT RADIO STATION LITERARY ARTS MAGAZINE
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Pick us up 24-hours a day for a wide variety of Pick us up annually in the Spring to view a
music including alternative, jazz, metal, rap and showcase of campus literary and artistic cre-
more. ations.
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
MEDIA
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, CALL 328-6009
Watch for the debut of our web site next week!
t





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Radison Inn,
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Title
The East Carolinian, August 27, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 27, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1284
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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