The East Carolinian, August 18, 1998






8 East Carolinian
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TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 1998 VOLUME 74. ISSUE 01
"We are in this field to record and understand history � Frank Gantelas, Archaeologist
An underwater scholar conducts research at the Western Ledge Wreck in Bermuda in 1992. Students in the Maritime History program must complete scientific diving courses in addition to learning how to dive.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE MARITIME HISTORY DEPARTMENT
Maritime History, program one of two in the nation
Lab assists in preservation of artifacts including,
at one time, a cannon from Blackbeanfs ship
Christopher Scott
staff wr1tf.r
Archaeologists and historians are plentiful on campuses around the world, but at
East Carolina University a rare program provides a training ground for future
archaeologists and historians devoted exclusively to underwater research and
exploration.
The Maritime History and Nautical Archaeology program makes ECU one of only
two universities located in the United States to offer a program of this type.
Started in 1981 by Drs. Watts and Stills in the history department, the Maritime
History program prepares to receive a master's degree in history with an emphasis, of
course, on maritime history and underwater archaeology.
"It is exciting to see a craft come together as you are mapping it out after recording
the information in a zero visibility dive said Jenna Watts, a student in the program.
For three weeks this summer Watts worked on a project along the Patuxent River and
its tributary St. Leonard's Creek in Maryland, investigating a gunboat possibly dating
from the War of 1812. For most of the students working in Maritime History a project
usually can develop into thesis papers.
This seems to be the case for Sarah Milstead. She will be taking part in the Hunter
Galley project Sept. 3 through Oct. 1. "This program gives you practical experience
in a historical reference. It gets you ready for the real world in terms of hands-on expe-
rience
One part of this practical experience comes from the rigorous task of obtaining a
scientific diving certificate.
"The certification is a regulatory measure authorized by the Academy of
Underwater Science that goes beyond recreational diving said Steve Brodie, one of
the instructors of the course. "We practice different aspects of diving such as using
underwater communication, zero visibility diving, and dry suit training While this
course is a must for graduate students in Maritime History and Nautical Archaeology,
the certification is also used in many other fields as well.
Frank Cantelas, head archaeologist of the program, said many people are uncertain
as to what separates Maritime History and Nautical Archaeology. "There are two
main differences between 'us' and 'them Cantelas said. "We are in this field to
record and understand history, while 'treasure hunters' are strictly in it for the money.
The other difference is that we care and strive to preserve the site itself instead of
destroying the craft for financial purposes
One way this program makes history come to life is in the conservatory labs. The
buildings consist of a wet and dry lab in order to preserve artifacts found on wrecks
along the east coast by the department and, in some cases, by the N.C. Underwater
Archaeology Unit. At one rime, the conservatory lab helped in the restoration of a can-
non thought to be from the legendary Queen Anne's Revenge, the flagship of the
pirate Blackboard lost in the Beaufort Inlet.
"We are continually trying to give something back to the community Cantelas
said.
Besides helping the NCUAU, the Maritime History and Nautical Archaeology pro-
gram also works with museums like the Maritime Museum at Beaufort and the
Bermuda Maritime Museum where a field school is held yearly.
Divers remove Keelson from a the along the Western Ledge in Bermuda in 1992.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE MARITIME HISTORY DEPARTMENT
Mi
�Ml





2 TymUy, Augtttt 18, 1998
news
Thi East Carolinian.
3 Tiwrtiy.
The Farmer Voice of America site, purchased by East Carolina University School of Medicine will provide a place devoted to
preventing agricultural injuries.
PHOTO BY JASON FEATHER
Agri-medicine taught;
ECU nationwide model
VOA site converted to
classrooms
Carolvn Rob bins Hyde
st uk writkr
Eastern North Carolina has been
chosen to facilitate a community
outreach program. With the pur-
chase and renovation of the former
Voice of America site, the School
of Medicine will expand education
and training to both the agricultur-
al and medical communities.
"Farming is the second most
dangerous occupation in America;
mining is the foremost dangerous.
Every year, approximately 50 peo-
ple die from farm injuries in NC
and 2,000 are disabled. About 65
percent of farm deaths are heads of
households said Dr. Byron
Burlington, professor of microbiol-
ogy and chairman for the pro-
gram's steering committee.
North Carolina health care
costs from farm related injuries are
in excess of $195 million. In an
effort to minimize injuries and
reduce costs, ECU, in conjunction
with NCSU and NC A&T State
University in Greensboro have
joined forces to embark on a
research program.
The program will unite medical
and agricultural experts to study-
how to prevent agricultural
injuries and improve the quality of
life for North Carolinians involved
in agriculture.
Agriculture is the "lifeblood of
this area according to
Burlingham. Most of the 42 coun-
ties east of 1-95 are centrally locat-
ed around Greenville, making this
the ideal place for the pilot pro-
gram in agro-medicine.
"North Carolina has the second
largest rural population in the
United States. It is the third most
diversified state in the nation with
respect to agricultural products
Burlingham said.
The agro-medicine program
will help to reduce the incidence
of agricultural injuries and illness-
es, thus saving the lives of farm
workers and farm children as well
as saving in health care costs.
After renovation, the site will
house the interlectural headquar-
ters and contain lab facilities that
do not exist anywhere in the
nation.
Students will find expanded
opportunities through this pro-
gram. The agro-medicine program
will focus on many areas of study
offered through ECU and the
School of Medicine including:
family medicine, occupational
medicine, emergency medicine,
internal medicine and preventive
medicine. "Additional training will
be available in such departments
as psychology, sociology, anthro-
pology and health sciences said
Burlington
During the years of the Cold
War, this 594 acres of land was
"America's Ear Over 100 radio
towers still stand which, at one
time, received messages from
around the world. The building
was built to withstand the after-
math of a nuclear impact.
"Beyond the saving of lives,
disablement and injury, there is
the issue of equity. Farmers are
providing one of our most essen-
tial needs; 'food said Burlingham.
Pepsi signs $3 million
signing bonus to university
$200,00 first annual
payment included
TK Jones
NEWS EDITOR
Pepsi proposed and ECU accept-
ed. For 10 years Pepsi and ECU
will attach their initials in a mono-
gram for a union that will secure
Pepsi exclusive pouring rights and
ECU an additional $7.1 million.
The deal was confirmed in
Mendenhall on July 31 when Tom
Minges, president of the local
Pepsi Cola Bottling Co signed
the first check for $3.2 million�
$3 million for a signing bonus and
$200,000 for the first payment �
already nearly beating out Coke's
offer of $3.93 million.
"All I can say is our family has
been involved with the university
for over 50 years, and it was very
important for us to maintain that
relationship said Minges. "We
were very happy to win the bid so
that we could continue maintain-
ing the relationship we have had
for so long already
University provosts and Pepsi's
cop brass toasted glasses filled with
Pepsi to the new union.
"The Minges family has been a
strong advocate and supporter for
ECU for several generations said
President of Pepsi, Tom Minges, along with Vice President John Minges, Chancellor
Richard Eakin and Vice Chancellor Layton Getsinger present check.
PHOTO BY TK JONES
Chancellor Richard Eakin.
"Today's agreement has been a
natural combination in a partner-
ship with Pepsi.
"We are looking forward to the
benefits the agreement will hold
for the future of ECU
The benefits for ECU is $4.2
million in the athletics fund and
$2.8 million in academics. Pepsi
will invest an additional $100,000
in new concession stands at
Dowdy-Ficklen.
The decision for the appropria-
tions was voted on by the universi-
ty's Board of Trustees on July 17.
Some concern was shown when 60
percent of the appropriations were
earmarked for athletics, but in the
end President of the Student
Government Association Eric
RivenbarkY vote was the single
dissenting vote.
Highest number ever awarded
chancellor's scholarship
Eiit seniors receive
$20,000 each
Christopher Scot T
STAFI' WRITER
The rising cost of education at
ECU is no longer a concern for
some of the incoming freshmen
this year. Due to their hard work,
eight high school seniors received
the chancellor's scholarship for
excellence and leadership poten-
tial.
The chancellor's scholarship
pays out to its recipients a total of
$20,000 during their four year stay
at the university along with a
$1,000 scholarship from the univer-
sity student bookstore.
The eight high school seniors
who received chancellor's scholar-
ships were the most that ECU has
given out in a single year. Several
hundred students from the Atlantic
seaboard and the
Midwest applied for the
awards. Meeting the
January 15 deadline for
submission, the qualify-
ing students had to have
a minimum of a 3.5 GPA
and a 1300 SAT score in
the preliminary round.
"Out of the some 300
applicants, 75 are asked
to come to EGO to par- file
ticipate in a second
interview said Debbie
James at the admissions office.
In the second round of competi-
tion for this scholarship, the stu-
dents were asked to write an essay
for the scholarship committee to
review. The essay consisted of the
Chancellor Eakin
following question: "Describe your
educational goals and your reasons
for having chosen the particular
course or study in which you
expect to enroll. If you could do
what you most wanted
to do, what kind of life
would you like to lead
15 or 25 years from
now?"
The scholarship com-
mittee also conducted a
personal interview with
the students them-
selves.
The interview com-
to mittee was comprised of
donors to the university,
alumni, faculty and high
school teachers. Four to five stu-
dents were assigned to each com-
mittee in this final round of compe-
tition. The winners for this year's
SEE SCHOLARSHIP. PAGE 3 .
Set Your
Game Plan!
Football season is just around
the corner. And Christinne's is
the restaurant of choice for ECU
students and fans! So make your
reservations early for game days
and try our New FallWinter Menu.
Christinne's is also ideal for
Homecoming, Formals, Parents'
Weekend and other big events on
campus. Set your game plan today
and celebrate with Christinne's!
Call 355-9500 and make reservations now!
CONTINENTAL CUISINE
'Pirates Supporting Pirates!
Hilton (Greenville
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Attention All Students
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why: Kick off the semester right!
What else: CookoutVolleyball Friday Aug.21
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�m
111





i East Carolinian.
3 Twrtiy. A��tt 18, 1881
news
The East Carolinian
1
sity
ges. Chancellor
check.
the appropria-
y the universi-
:es on July 17.
down when 60
priations were
:ics, but in the
the Student
iciation Eric
'as the single
ded
Describe your
I your reasons
the particular
i which you
you could do
most wanted
it kind of life
like to lead
years from
lolarship com-
conducted a
iterview with
ents them-
erview corn-
comprised of
he university,
ulty and high
r to five stu-
to each com-
ind of compe-
for this year's
PAGE 3
1
)28
I
Sports Writer
POSITION
9fciW
�Writing Experience
Required
�Minimum GPA 2.0
weekly deadlines
Scholarship
continued from page 2
Chancellor's scholarships arc:
Jeffrey Kornegay, Kristen Boswell,
Joshua Hicks, Elizabeth Glasgow,
Emily Holtz, Jon Rogers, Kim
McCumber and Ian Bloom.
All of these students are from
either North Carolina, Virginia or
Maryland. Proximity to ECU was
more than coincidental. The
$20,000 would cover more expens-
es for someone living closer to
ECU than it would a student hav-
ing to travel a greater distance to
attend school in North Carolina.
"Next year, we hope to offer
two scholarships of $30,000 since
the current amount docs not cover
completely the tuition for out-of-
state students said Mrs. James.
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I
I
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I
J
Evaluations
prove useful
Professor critique
forms taken seriously
TK Jonf.s
NKWS f D) fOf.
The 15 minutes students spend
darkening the circles in Student
Opinion of Institution Surveys
(SOIS) could change a professor's
life.
During the end of each semester
students are given a chance to eval-
uate professors in 19 areas of effec-
tiveness. That means about 48 sec-
onds per question to contemplate
on how assignments and lectures
have contributed to better their
education.
Many believe that the survey
reading machines arc adjusted to
throw out extreme choices and
count only the remaining five.
Others say it's the middle circle,
no.4, one should stay away from
because it means undecided, and it
is the one that is thrown out.
"I have always heard that rumor
about not marking the extremes
said Ben Kiev, junior. "When it is a
professor you really thought was
great, you throw in a couple of good
(sixes instead of sevens); it won't
hurt them anyway
Besides the confusion of which
circles are counted is another con-
fusion: What, if anything, are the
surveys used for?
"I don't think they are used at
all. I think they (the university)
docs them just to say they did
said Damon Werwie, junior.
But Dr. Robert Thompson,
director of planning and institution-
al research, says all seven circles are
accounted for and weigh heavily on
a professor's career.
Evaluations are so heavily val-
ued that ECU began them approx-
imately 10 years before the UNC
system required their use.
"What we look for are trends �
is someone's evaluations improving
or declining?" Thompson said.
"Just because someone marks low
scores for a professor, it does not
mean the professor will no get
tenured. Instead, it is entered with-
in the other responses the professor
receives over a period of time
Dr. Margaret Capen, chair of
decision sciences department in
the School of Business said aver-
ages can be affected by extreme
values and distributions of respons-
es give a more complete under-
standing of the responses. She gave
the example that if one marks no. 7
and another person marks no. 1,
then the item mean is a four for the
professor. The same item mean can
be generated if one person marks
no. 3 and another person marks no.
5.
"That's one iittprbA ement in the
style of the new SOIS surveys over
the previous format Capen said.
The former ones didn't give us
distributions of responses, only
means and standard deviations.
"The new format iics all three
In other words, with each pro-
fessor a list of the distribution of
grades accompanies a list totaling
how many times each of the seven
circles is darkened. Hence, this is
how to get a more accurate reading
of two professors who each score
four for a mean
The results are used to evaluate
professors for a number of criteria.
Not only arc they used by depart-
ment heads to determine applica-
bility for teaching awards, they also
are used when determining merit
pay, annual raises, evaluations jiuI
tenure.
After six years of teaching at
ECU, professors are then eligible
to apply for tenure. Requirements
vary between departments, but all
begin the process by creating port-
folios.
Student evaluations, together
with grade distributions, refer-
ences, examples of tests and class
SEE EVALUATION. PAGE 4






4 TwUty, A�i�tt 18, 1998
news
Thi Enl Cirolinim
ECU receives unexpected increase from N.C. Senate
More new opening
than expected
T.K. Jones
NEWS EDITOR
To better accommodate enrollment
increases, the N.C. Senate approved
18 12 new faculty positions for
ECU � 14 more positions than
what university officials expected.
The Senate's decision to
increase faculty was based on
full-time enrollment increases.
Since the increase was marginal
� an average of 15,390 students
enrolled full time for the 1998
fall semester compared to an
average of 15,100 students
enrolled full time in the fall of
1997 � university officials
expected funding equivalent to
last year's, affording 4 12 new
faculty positions.
Instead, under a new bill, the
Senate has enacted a different
method of calculating appropria-
" is a very substantial and
much needed increase in faculty
positions for our university. In
the nine years I have been here, I
have never seen this hind
of an increase
Dr. Henry Peel
Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs.
tions, basing this year's method on
student credit hours, including
part-time enrollment.
"It is a very substantial and
much needed increase in faculty
positions for our university said
Dr. Henry Peel, vice chancellor of
academic affairs. "In the nine
years I have been here, I have
never seen this kind of an
increase
A total of $2.3 million would be
allocated to ECU, ranking it third
from the top in receiving greater
sums. Receiving more would be
UNC-Charlotte and N.C. State,
respectively. UNC-Pcmbroke is
the only university who has a
decrease in enrollment and would
lose enrollment funding given by
the UNC General Administration.
"It is a nice problem to have to
try and find space for additional
faculty said Dr. Robert
Thompson, director of planning
and institutional research. The
departments that would receive
the new positions is yet to be
decided, but the leading factor in
the decision making will be depart-
mental need.
Out of the $2.3 million,
$161,600 would be for library main-
tenance, $5,200 for in-state finan-
cial aid and $760,500 for general
university needs. Over $970,000
would be earmarked as salaries for
18 12 new faculty members.
Though the bill has passed the
Senate, it has yet to pass full leg-
islative approval. It is expected to
be discussed and approved in
late August, and may face
minor adjustments.
Campus' knowledge in ecology, questionable
Floodedlots
could be prevented
TK Jones
NEWS EDITOR
The area of impervious cover on
campus has grown at least as fast as
enrollment and annual budgets;
however, storm water management
has not been a high-priority issue on
campus, according to Dr. Richard
Mauger, geology professor and chair
of the Environmental Advisory
Commission for Greenville.
"Instead of the water infiltrating
into the soil and then the stream, it is
rushed directly into the stream do to
the lack of absorption in pavement
said Mauger, in an explanation as to
why the parking lots along 10th
Street and and the bottom of College
Hill pond over with rain.
What normally would have taken
up to two days for natural concur-
rences to move an average amount of
hourly rainfall, is now
being moved in a few
hours. There is no storm
water retention structure
to slow down the flow
and simulate the runoff
as if it were a natural area.
With rapid runoff comes
transient dam failure.
The walls could slide or a
debris of rocks, limbs and
litter could clog the
waters.
"It's time we put a
moratorium on the igno-
rance defense Mauger
said. "Water flows
downhill. Wherever the
water surface is, the
water will still flow to a
lower level
ECU is encompassed around
Green Mill Run, which is a regulated
floodway. The parking lot below
College Hill was built on the flood-
way about 30 years ago. If nothing
stands in the way of a building and a
floodway, then there is no require-
ment as to how much impervious
Remedial classes
on the rise
34 Sections Offered in "The number of remedial
fill Semester students have increased over
Without a place to drain, water floods the College Hill parking lot.
FILE PHOTO
Evaluation
continued from page 3
projects, research and a teaching
philosophy are packed into a port-
folio for application of tenure.
Simultaneous to applying for
tenure is the application for pro-
motion. Though promotion usual-
ly happens, it is not guaranteed.
There have been instances where
professors were denied promotion,
but were soon promoted after
resolving committee reservations
that kept them from initially being
promoted.
And tenure is not always
received. A professor who does not
have tenure is under a two-year
contract with the university, and
when the contract has reached
maturity, an evaluation occurs to
determine renewal. After a profes-
sor's sixth year, if he was not grant-
ed tenure, he is eligible to teach
one more year with ECU before
employment is terminated.
Tenure is important to profes-
sors for two reasons. Not only does
it allow them to settle into a career
with the university without risk of
unemployment, it also provides
them with academic protection
for research and unpopular points
of view.
surface city ordinances allow.
"We build in compliance with all
drainage codes said Dr. George
Harrell, assistant vice chancellor of
business affairs, defending the near-
ly 35 percent of impervious surface
on campus.
"But they have stretched what we
said said James Jatko, city engi-
neer, commenting on the amount of
impervious surface the ordinance
stipulates � up to 10 percent � for
development not adjoined to a
floodplain. "As a byproduct with
development, excess flooding will
occur. The only thing that anyone
can do who has a a lot of pavement is
to start getting rid of its paved area or
provide detention facilities
"Remove it or detain it. That's
it said Brad Kerr, engineer III.
"And to detain it costs a lot of
money, maintenance and land said
Kenneth Tippette, senior planner.
Floodplain regulations came into
effect in 1978 and detention ordi-
nances in 1980, to combat flooding
caused by building booms where
impervious areas flourished.
Since then ECU built a retention
pond beside the Brody Building and
"is studying the possibility" of
putting another at Minges, simulta-
neous with the new parking lot.
Christopher Scott
STAFF WRITER
As the fall semester begins,
many newcomers will be enter-
ing a university for the first time.
These new students were given
entry level exams before they
were able to register for classes
during their respective orienta-
tion sessions, as most students
do who attend a UNC institu-
tion.
These tests arc placement
examinations that rate the
incoming students on their
knowledge on numerous sub-
jects. These examinations not
only give the advanced students
a chance to forgo classes in
which they excel but they also
point out the problems which
some students need to improve
on to bring them up to the level
of comprehension in the colle-
giate arena.
In order to help these stu-
the field of math, and so, the
largest number of remedial
sections offered this year will
be in mathematics
Dr. Robert Thompson
Department of Planning and Institutional
Research
dents who do not meet the
requirements on the placement
exams, ECU provides remedial
classes for these individuals each
semester in math, reading,
chemistry and music.
Approximately 3,000 fresh-
men will be coming into the
school system this fall. A good
30 percent will not do well
enough on their placement
exams and will be forced to take
SEE REMEDIAL PAGE I
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BY APPOINTMENT
107-D COMMERCE STREET
GREENVILLE, NC 27858
252-355-2768
Color Copies
Faxes
Laminating
Binding
Copies
Notary
Passport Photos
Business Cards
MAIL BOXES ETC.
704 Greenville Blvd. - Phone 321-6021
Suite 400 - Fax 321-6026
Greenville, NC 27858 (Next to Moovies)
Jim and Linda Fields, owners
Posters, Banners
& Signs
Custom Packing
UPS Authorized
Shipping Outlet
Shipping Supplies
Postal Services
P.O. Box Rental
WE WANT TO BE YOUR COPY CENTER!
COPIES ALWAYS 5$ PER COPY FOR ECU STUDENTS.
GREAT COLOR COPIES, TOO!





1
� Eitl Carolinian
ate
$2.3 million,
or library main-
in-state finan-
i(J0 for general
Over $970,000
i as salaries for
nembers.
has passed the
d pass full leg-
is expected to
approved in
d may face
sses
of remedial
icreased over
i, and so, the
of remedial
his year will
matics
lompson
and Institutional
h
lot meet the
the placement
ides remedial
idividuals each
ath, reading,
isic.
3,000 frcsh-
ning into the
s fall. A good
not do well
ir placement
forced to take
l PAGE I
� - �-�.�
, LC.S.W C.S.W.
C.S.W C.C.S.W.
:rc-sac, csac
ION OF
?h.D.
th children,
treatment of
d behavioral
lilies.
mers
king
ized
itlet
iplies
ices
ntal
NTS.
Been Drooling
over our Paper
Make our Paper your Paper
Join the Production Team
Try your hand at design
WITH
eastcarolinian
Production Assistants: Motivated people willing to work in the
mornings, in between the hours of 9 to 5. No experience necessary
Production Layout: Open to CA MAJORS with experience in
Photoshop, and Quark XPress. Get recognition for your work on
Covers of special additions as well as on our new Tabloids
Inquire at the East Carolinian, 2nd floor of the Student Publications
Building Across from Joyner Library
3 Locations
The Plaza Mall
321-0588
East 10th St.
754-8305
Downtown
Cotanche St.
752-8806
Welcome Back
Students!
Come visit us at Mendenhall
on the 18th for tickets to
Pearl Jam or register
at the 3 locations
we want to cover you
Give us a tip or story idea and appear in our next ad.
Call
the
Carolinian
at 328-6366.
I






6 Tuartay. Aatwt 18, 1MB
news
Thi Em Cifoliniin
Student Health Center offers HIVAIDS screening
Fmexams,
confidential results
Deibik Nkiwirtii
STAfF 1IITII
HIVAIDS screenings are now
offered free to students at the
Student Health Center. It is esti-
mated that 80 percent of college
students are sexually active, and
one in 500 has the HIV virus.
"I hope that students will take
advantage of this, and confidential-
ity is assured said Heather Zophy,
health educator at Student Health.
Zophy said that if students have
engaged in any kind of high risk
behavior, they should be tested.
If students have the virus and
are living in an unhealthy way, it
will make their immune systems
weaker Zophy said.
The process is simple. Students
can call anytime to make
an appointment to be
screened. Then a nurse
calls them with informa-
tion and to find out their
knowledge on the dis-
ease. The student then
goes for pretest counsel-
ing and blood is drawn.
The students are given
literature to look over
and return approximate-
ly 10 days later for the
results.
There is also post-test counsel-
ing, regardless of the results. With
counseling, Student Health makes
an effort to have the student coun-
seled by the same person both
times. Jolcne Jernigan, director of
clinical operations, has done
detailed work with the Pitt County
Heater Zophy
FILE PHOTO
Health Department.
"We are an outreach of the
health department, and they will be
here with experienced
counselors for post-posi-
tive counseling
Jernigan said.
With all of the current
medications, people with
the HIV virus are living up
to 20 years when properly
medicated. Since Student
Health sees young and
healthy people, it is sug-
gested that students con-
centrate on making
changes in their lifestyles if
they are at risk.
Student Health will help with a
student's medical need as well as their
mental needs. If a student tests posi-
tive, the health department is notified
and helps counsel the patient.
Students' names are held confidential
and are reported to the state only as a
Teacher
shortage
scares state
Hi$ school seniors
Hearth Educator Heather Zophy presents to students on STD prevention
FILE PHOTO
statistic. Since the vims is easily
detected and is deadly, students are
encouraged by student health to take
advantage ofthis free service.
TRIED & THI K
Consignment Shop
TV STANDS
KITCHKN
TABLES
CHESTS
Hurricanes cause more
damage than ever
CARGO STYLE l
FURNITURE '
BUNK BEDS
DRESSERS
SOFAS
Soaring fibres to
rebuild developments
HOUSEHOLD ITEMS � �JLmJL I �
SMALL APPLIANCES JH2 DICKINSON AVE.
5?
TK Jones
NEWS EDITOR
Dancewear Specialty Shop
� Dance Supplies of all
types for guys & girls
� Sports Bras & Shorts
� Activewear
Mon-Fri 10-6
Sat 10-5
ATBARRE,�
644 ARLINGTON BLVD. � GREENVILLE � (252) 7566670
'his year on average, 10 tropical
storms will develop over the
Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea or
Gulf of Mexico. Of these, six are
expected to become hurricanes
and sweep the Atlantic coastline,
triggering an onset of tornadoes
and torrential rains, according to
authorities.
A tropical storm becomes a hur-
ricane when winds and rains climb
to 74 mph or higher, through the
months of June through
November. Years ago hurricanes
would kill hundreds of people,
throwing them to their deaths into
the branches of trees.
But today, because of radar,
reconnaissance planes and commu-
nication lines, the path of the storm
can be detected early, and people
are given ample time to prepare.
Even with advanced technology,
there is reason for alarm. "Coastline
development has doubled in the
last few years said Dr. Steve
Harper, assistant professor of geolo-
gy. "So yes, we're able to track and
forecast with more ease than
before, but the population growth
on the coast makes it (the
benefits of foreknowledge) a
two-edged sword
"Most of the people living on
the coast are from inland areas and
Radar detecting eye of hurricane near Florida and the Carolines.
PHOIO COURTESY OF WORLD WIDE WEB
PERSONAL EVACUATION PLAN:
�Identify ahead of time where you could go if you are told to
evacuate.
�Choose several places�a friend's home in another
town, a motel, or a shelter.
�Keep handy the telephone numbers of these places as well as a
road map of your locality.
�You may need to take alternative or unfamiliar routes if roads are
closed or clogged.
�Put food and water out for a pet if you cannot take it with you.
�Public health regulations do not allow pets in public shelters, nor
do most hotelsmotels allow them.
�Listen to NOAA Weather Radio or local radio or TV stations for
evacuation instructions.
�If you are advised to evacuate, do so immediately.
SOURCE: THE AMERICAN RED CROSS
are unaware of how to fully prepare
for a hurricane said Dr. Richard
Mauger, professor of Geology.
"When it's time to evacuate,
everybody's trying to 'get across the
same bridge
SEE HURRICANE. PAGE t
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Downtown Greenville's newest Body
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TK Jones
NEWS EDITOR
Eva Clayton
FILE PHOTO
"We're
having a
crises. We
don't see it
right now
because
we're at
the begin-
ning of it.
It's like a
storm
brewing.
We don't
see the wind blowing very hard or
the cloud cover at first, but it's
coming Congresswoman Eva
Clayton said in reflecting on what
the future holds for North
Carolina's public schools.
Clayton was responsible for
organizing "Teaching For The
Future a seminar held on cam-
pus in July that was designed in
effort to curb the teacher short-
age in North Carolina by encour-
aging high school students teach.
Even when the state gradu-
ates a high number of teachers,
there is a problem of retention,
keeping them here. With the
Teaching Fellows Program,
North Carolina gives $20,000
scholarships to encourage high
school seniors with outstanding
SEE TEACHING PAGE 7
Remedial
continued from page 4
at least one of the remedial cours-
es at ECU.
"The number of remedial stu-
dents have increased over a period
of time, mainly in the field of
math, and so, the largest number
of remedial sections offered this
year will be in mathematics said
Dr. Robert Thompson from the
Department of Planning and
Institutional Research. With the
advancement in mathematics
there is a neeXrinstrucsludents
that did nbRick up thisystem of
thought thoroughly enough dur-
ing their high school years.
In comparison with other UNC
institutions, ECU does not fare as
well in students omitted from tak-
ing remedial courses. According
to Dr. Thompson "ECU has a
higher rate for students required
to take remedial courses than
most of the larger institutions in
this state
In order to take care of the
growing number of students in
remedial courses, our college will
be supporting almost 34 sections
of remedial courses for the fall
semester with a large part of the
students enrolled coming from
the North Carolina school system.
Need to make copies?
You shouldn't have to
wait, an hour!
MAIL BOXES ETC.
704 Greenville Blvd
Suite 400
Greenville, NC 27858
(Mext to Moovies)
- Phone 321-6021
- Tax 321-6026
WF WANT TO BE YOUR
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STUDENTS - 5CC0PY
NO WAITING
u
������aajMBM





n East Ciroliniin
;her
age
state
seniors
7 Tuaidiy, August 18. It
news
Tke East Cerelinia
NES
1TOR
va Clayton
FILE PHOTO
ng very hard or
t first, but it's
sswoman Eva
lecting on what
Is for North
chools.
esponsible for
hing For The
r held on cam-
as designed in
teacher short-
lina by encour-
students teach.
e state gradu-
cr of teachers,
n of retention,
:re. With the
ws Program,
gives $20,000
ncourage high
:h outstanding
IG. PAGE 7
m page 4
remedial cours-
af remedial stu-
ed over a period
in the field of
largest number
ms offered this
hematics said
ipson from the
Planning and
arch. With the
mathematics
istrucsludents
p thisystem of
y enough dur-
ol years.
vith other UNC
docs not fare as
lined from tak-
es. According
i "ECU has a
idents required
courses than
institutions in
ce care of the
of students in
ur college will
ost 34 sections
cs for the fall
rge part of the
coming from
school system.
Summer road repairs alter 10th street
Construction finished in
late August
Joseph Elder
staff writer
A recent road resurfacing project on
10th Street around the university area
was met with minor delays and may
not see completion before late
August.
The Department of
Transportation began the revamping
project in July to repair worn asphalt,
cracks in the surface and. overall
rough driving conditions of the street,
but delays in the road work could
cause the project to spill over into the
beginning of the school year.
"The work began two or three
days late so the crew will work
Saturday and Sunday (Aug. 8-9) so
that repaving can begin Monday or
Tuesday (Aug. 10-11) said Wayne
Nottingham, the resident engineer
for the construction division of the
DOT. "Repaving is scheduled to
begin on Monday and we hope to fin-
ish by Friday so that the lane striping
will be completed before the students
return Nottingham said.
Crews scraped the old surface dur-
ing July and then restriped the lanes
which created some question as to
when the laying of the new surface
would occur. According to
Nottingham, the striping served to
relieve traffic confusion and main-
tain the regular traffic patterns of
the street during the time between
scraping and paving the road. But
completion of the project before the
mass return of students begins later
this month remains a question.
Resurfacing should cause only
minor inconvenience to drivers sim-
ilar to those experienced during the
scraping phase of the road work.
Drivers will have access to one lane
in both directions as the paving pro-
gresses opposed to the usual two
with a turning lane. Although cur-
rent traffic may encounter slow-
downs no major problems are
expected, but if the work runs over
into the ECU fall move in dates
more severe complications could
result.
Nottingham expressed confi-
dence that the work will not inter-
fere with the heavy university traf-
fic, but his optimism comes with a
request, "If it rains it will have a
negative impact. Bear with us while
we complete the project
Rain will not only delay the
workers, but will wash away the
painted lines, causing more confusion
to newcomers and slower traffic
for everyone.
The 10th St. resurfacing project, initially planned to be completed before students returned for the fad semester, meets delays.
PHOTO BY HEATHER BURGESS
4
Teaching
continued from pegs 6
grades into teaching. But one stip
ulation upon receiving it is four
years of teaching in North
Carolina. A lot of them pay off;
there four yean and then leave. �
Because of the exodus
Clayton says there should bej
more of a concentration in recruit
ing teachers outside academia as'
well, hiring military retirees andj-
people in business seeking a wayV
out of the profession. Thought
they wouldn't have teaching cer-l
tificates, they would have real-lifej:
experiencet
and can take the classes tot
become certified simultaneous to
instructing a classroom. .
"I think this (Alternative
Certification) holds great promise
when we're not getting as many!
young people coming out of the.
normal process into teaching
Clayton said. "Some areas of
North Carolina are having a phe;
nomenal growth. With us relying
on traditional ways to get teachers I
we're going to be short We're,
already short on master's certified
teachers
North Carolina is scheduled �k;
be the fourth state in the amount
of growth in its population,
according to The Honorable;
Richard W. Riley, secretary of the;
U.S. Department of Education:
and keynote speaker at the semi-
nar.
Doctor Marilyn Sheerer, dean,
of the School of Education at?
ECU, believes the deficit im
teachers, particularly female
stems from "career opportunities
opened up for women She says"
that unlike twenty years ago when!
teaching was one of the only!
career choices for women, women
now have medicine, law and the
sciences easily available, so edu-j
cators must keep "teaching anj
attractive alternative with all the'
other alternatives that are offered
to women. �
I
Store nearest campus: In Greenville at University Commons Shopping Center, corner of Greenville Blvd. & Evans St. or call 1-800-2TJ-MAXX.
1�
GREENVILLE t
AUTO REPAIR INC
� Major & Minor Repair
�Manual Translation
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with Major Repair
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gel





I
IT MAY HAVE BEEN
O.K. IN ANCIENT
TIMES, BUT DON'T
THINK YOU CAN GET
BY WITH IT TODAY
Ml
THOU SHALT NOT THROW OBJECTS

I
OUT THY DORM WINDOW,
The East Carolina University Housing Service is committed to providing a safe
and secure environment for all students, faculty, staff, and visitors. The throwing
of objects from windows, porches, and breezeways is prohibited. Therefore,
DON'T THROW OBJECTS OUT YOUR DORM WINDOW! If someone were to be
hit by a falling object, the damage could be very severe. If caught by the Housing
Service, you can expect expulsion from the dorms or even expulsion from the
university itself.
"HT

��ma





9 Timdty, Augmt 18. 1998
news
Sidewalks laid over footpaths
Rerouting students
off grass tougijob
TK Jones
NEWS EDITOR
Ernest Williams probably can't tell you whether the
road is paved with good intentions, but he can tell you
the sidewalks are. With this in mind, it is hard to imag-
ine why everyone must walk beside the sidewalk
instead of on it.
Williams is the mason supervisor in the facilities ser-
vices department. One of his responsibilities is running
sidewalks to better accommodate foot traffic.
To lessen the number of dirt paths created by short-
cuts, the department lays sidewalks to cut across lawns
in their place. And when paths are pre-existing, to
reroute traffic, walks are added between the ones that
are heavily used and near in proximity to each other.
"When you to go a place, the first impression is what
will always be embedded in your mind; if it has a nice
landscape and is clean, it will receive a positive image
Williams said. "Like someone's home, for instance.
When a home is nice and neat, your experience there
is totally different than it is in a disorganized, cluttered
environment"
Five and one-half miles of sidewalk cover cast cam-
pus alone. Some are concrete and some are brick.
While next to each other, they offer a splash of color
and arabesque to ground cover, separately they have
values of their own.
Where concrete might require less labor and last
longer, brick sidewalks, like the one in front of Wright
Circle, are more flexible when irrigation and electrical
lines are beneath them.
"Brick can be removed without much effort when a
water line or steam pipe needs repair, and the same
piece can be reinstalled without buying any new mate-
rials, unlike concrete, which takes sawing to remove,
and can crack or break Williams said.
Dr. George Harrell, vice chancellor for administra-
tion and finance, said that he wishes people would real-
ize the sidewalks are put in for their benefit and should
be "utilized instead of creating bare ground paths just
to save a few steps
Footpaths like this one near the Erwin Building pose a problem for personnel uncertain of whether or not to pave every path on campus.
PHOTO BY BRIAN WILLIAMS
Southern speak
redefined in new book
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP)
Southernisms are getting
scarce as hen's teeth in some
parts of the South, but you
allought to know that they
ain't gone. Not by a long shot.
And just in case they fade
from some memories, Roy
Wilder Jr. is back with a
reminder: a new printing of
"You All Spoken Here
As a collection of Southern
words and phrases, it's as
smart as a tree full of owls.
Wilder, 83, mixes
Southernisms and history,
and adds a few explainers to
help folks who aren't, from
here. ,
Take striking stick, one of
those wooden kitchen match-
es you can strike with a fin-
gernail. It's known as a barn-
burner in western
Pennsylvania and a farmer
match in northern Illinois, he
writes.
It's not really necessary to
learn everything in the book
to get by in the South, and
SEE SOUTHERNISMS PAGE 14
Hurricane
continued from page 6
When a hurricane watch is
announced, hurricane-like con-
ditions are possible within 36
hours; when there's a hurricane
warning, the time is reduced to
24 hours. While the surge affects
the coastal areas, the after effects
cause inland flooding up to two
weeks later.
The Pitt County Red Cross
sends out advisories for residents
to seek shelter in local schools
before the storm strikes, and
those who are unable should
remain in their homes. Local
weather channels will broadcast
the events of the storms and
when it is safe to leave.
But access to this information
requires access to electricity,
often unavailable during severe
storms.
Two years ago when hurri-
canes Fran and Bertha hit,
Lowe's received 250 orders for
generators. Though they
increase their stock during hurri-
cane season, not everyone can
afford the $500 for the basic
style of generator. The Red
Cross makes available brochures
for survival kits and home prepa-
rations.
"I do think people take them
seriously � and are not going to
ride up a storm because they
have seen the deadly effects
of other hurricanes said
Amanda Ross, producer at
WITN-TV News.
Assemble a Disaster Supplies Kit
Including the Following Items:
M First aid kit and essential medications
4 Canned food and can opener
M At least three gallons of water per person (one gallon of water per
. person for at least 3 days; often more is needed)
My Protective clothing, rainwear, and bedding or sleeping bags
0. Battery-powered radio, flashlight, and extra batteries
M. Special items for infants, elderly, or disabled family members
M Written instructions for how to turn off gas and water if
authorities advise you to do so. (Remember, you'll need a
professional to turn them back on.)
SOURCE: NOAA
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o Single
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11 Tuudiy
BUILI
Welcome Back to the
World of ECU
Where to Go and "How to Use" many of the services in the small country we call East Carolina University!
Monday - 1
Frid
Satin
Sure
MENDENt
breakfa
lunch
dinner,
brunch,
dime
Monday -
Satur
Sunc
WHERE do I PARK?
Parking on campus is by permit only. All vehicles parked on university
property must be registered with the Department of Parking and
Transportation Services and have a valid parking decal. To register
your vehicle, visit Parking and Transportation Services, 305 E.
10th St to complete a vehicle registration card.
Questions? Call 328-6294.
If you are a returning student, please notice that
METERED PARKING has been changed. Meters are now available in
the 5th & Harding St. Lot for central campus convenience, and south of
Joyner and Mendenhail for the west campus. Metered parking is also
available near Financial Aid and Mail Services, as well as adjacent to the
Student Rec Center. Parking and Transportation Services continually
seeks additional parking locations for students and staff. During the
year, parking lot designations may change in order to better utilize
parking areas. New parking opportunities or lot adjustments will be
announced when warranted. Listen to AM530 for updates about
campus parking.
CAMPUS EMERGENCY
HOTLINE
3280062
Need to know if CLASSES are CANCELLED?
Call 328-0062, the Campus Emergency Hotline. It
carries recorded information regarding class delays or
cancellations due to severe weather. This recorded
information is also broadcast over AM530 radio, the
ECU Parking Information Station.
Need EMERGENCY assistance?
Call the ECU Police directly by using any blue light phone, or
call 9-1-1 from any campus phone. ECU Police are on duty
24 hours a day, 7 days a week to assist you.
Walking alone at night?
Dial 328-6787 or use a blue light phone to call for a Student Patrol Escort.
They'll escort you between campus buildings andor parking lots!
LEARN outside of classes?
As a supplement to your academic education at ECU, the ECU Police
Department provides workshops for better living! Self-defense
workshops, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Awareness classes, and other crime
prevention topics such as date rape, parking lot safety and security, etc.
are presented by the ECU Police. Call 816-2421 for details on scheduling
a class for your group or organization.
Expecting some MAIL?
Student mail is delivered Monday through Saturday to resident
mailboxes by University Mail Services. Mail Services also provides a US
Postal Service customer window for you to purchase stamps, mail
packages and overnight express, and pick up packages sent to you via
US Mail. Mail Services is located just west of the mall, near the cupola.
Questions? Call 328-6091.
Need BOOKS? a COMPUTER? new SOFTWARE?
some cool ECU CLOTHES? class SUPPLIES?
ECU-Dowdy Student Stores, located in the Wright Building, offers a great
selection of merchandise and friendly service catered specifically to the
needs of ECU students! We strive to keep our pricing in line with
competitors, and then return our profits, less expenses, to the students
through scholarships and support of student activities. By shopping ECU-
Dowdy Student Stores, you are helping us to help the students of ECU.
Ronald E. Dowtiy
Student Stores
Where your dollars support scholars!
Store Hours:
Mon. - Fri 7:30 am - 7 pm
Sat 9 am - 3 pm
328-6731
What can I DO with my ECU 1 CARD?
The ECU 1 Card is the official identification card for
ECU. All students and staff must have an ECU 1
Card. In addition to being the ID card, the ECU
1 Card is also your library card, Rec Center j
card, dining card, and activity card. Show it
to vote in SGA elections or play intramural
sports.
Use the ECU 1 Card INSTEAD of CASH!
With a GOLD KEY account tied to your card, you can
use it to pay for prescriptions at Student Health
Services, buy event tickets, and more! Open a Gold
Key Account at the 1 Card Office. Add money to
another stripe on your ECU 1 Card using a Cash-to-
Card machine, and you can use the card in vending
machines and copiers. The 1 Card Office, located
inside Dowdy Student Stores, Wright Building, is
open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m
328-2015 to assist you with any 1 Card matters.
Need to COPY your class notes, a
term paper or resume?
Self-service, card operated copiers are located in
Joyner Library, some classroom buildings, and at
some community service desks. Full service,
RAPID COPY CENTERS are located in
Joyner Library (2nd floor) and at the School of
Medicine, Brady GE-101. Rapid Copy Joyner is
open daily, including evening hours.
Additional services such as full-color digital
copies and color output, binding, typesetting,
laminating, and faxing are also available through
RAPID COPY. Commuter students may find RAPID
COPY CENTRAL more convenient. Its off-campus,
Harris Building location is 2612 E. Tenth Street,
inside University Printing & Graphics.
Hungry for a SNACK or SOFT DRINK?
ECU Vending Services provides snack and
beverage machines all over campus. Most
machines are operated by coin, currency, or the
ECU 1 Card (if activated). You may add cash value
to the magnetic stripe on your ECU 1 Card through
Cash-to-Card machines located in Joyner Library,
Mendenhail, Student Stores lobby, Fletcher
Music Library, Nursing Building, Aycock
Computer Lab, Belk Lounge, and Tyler
residence halls. If you have problems with a
vending machine, call Vending Services at
328-2417.
Dowdy Student Stores is a
distribution outlet for
ECU Football student tickets!
WIN FREE TEXTBOOKS in the First
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11 Tundiy, Auguit 18, 1998
news
Tht East Carolinian
BUILDING SCHEDULES:
MENDENHAU.
Monday - �Hursdery, 3 a.m. until 11 p.m.
Friday, 8 a.m.until midnight
Saturday, nocn until midnight
Sunday, noon until 11 p.m.
MfNDENHAU AND TODD DINING HALLS
Monday - Friday
breakfast, 7 a.m. until 9:30 a.m.
lunch, 11 a.m. until 1:30 p.m.
dinner, 4:30 a.m. until 7:30 p.m.
Saturday - Sunday
brunch, 10:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m.
dimer, 4:30 pjm. until 7 p.m.
THE SPOT
Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. until 11 p.m.
Saturday noon until midnight
Sunday, noon until 11 p.m.
THE GALLEY
Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. until
12:30 a.m.
Saturday, noon until 9 p.m.
Sunday, noon until 12:30 a.m.
THE WRIGHT PLACE
Monday - Friday, 7:30 a.m. until 9 p.m.
Saturday, 9 a.m. until 5 p.m.
Sunday, 1 p.m. until 5 p.m.
CROATAN
Monday - Friday, 7:30 a.m. until 3:30 p.m.
JOYNER LIBRARY
Monday-lhursday, 8 a.m. untill a.m.
Friday, 8 a.m. until 8 p.m.
Saturday, 10 a.m. until 6 p.m.
Sunday, 1 p.m. until 1 a.m.
STUDENT RECREATION CENTER
Monday �- Thursday, 6 a.m. until 11:30
p.m.
Friday, 6 a.m. until 10 p.m.
Saturday - Sunday, 11 a.m. until 10 p.m.
STUDENT HEALTH CENTER
Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. until 5 p.m.
Wednesday, 9 a.m. until 5 p.m.
Cutbacks result of
Governor's programs
n n ' J macd f�r tnc UNC school sys-
iSmaTt btaTt, inCreaSm tern is dispensed among each uni-
, . . versity where, at ECU, the chan-
teaCherSalaries cellor and six vice chancellors in
joint agreement decide where to
disperse the funds, approximately
TK Jones $185 million this year.
Groundskeeping responsibilities
include litter pick up on campus
NEWS EDITOR
If someone asked Jim Plummer to
make out a Christmas wish list for
ECU, at its top would probably be
$1.2 million, the sum lost earlier in
the month by a cutback in the
UNC system.
Since Plummer became direc-
tor of the budgeting in 1992, this is
the largest cut he's seen.
"This is in a year when the
state is projected to have an $11.4
billion surplus Plummer said.
Plummer said the funds were
being cut to help fund the gover-
nor's $150 million recommenda-
tion for programs such as Smart
Start and salary increases for ele-
mentary and secondary school
teachers.
For a cutback to occur it begins
with the vanguard of the UNC-
system Board of Governors in
Raleigh tightening their belts and
reducing the amount of money
appropriated for each of the 16
schools in the UNC system. The
agreed figure is sent, along with
other state agencies requests, to
the governor. The governor can
decrease, increase or not alter the
figure before passing it on to legis-
lature.
After legislature reviews and
modifies the governor's plan, they
return it to the governor where he,
in turn, can either sign or veto.
Upon agreement, money ear-
"This is in a year when the
state is projected to have an
$11.4 billion surplus"
Jim Plummer
director of budgeting
The $1.2 million cutback will
hit vehicle replacement hardest,
with 34 vehicles and one garbage
truck needing replaced, and utility
expense reserves, approximately
$244,000 needed to curve infla-
tionary increases.
"This proposed cut in the gov-
ernor's budget would result in
delaying the replacement of these
vehicles at least for another year
Chancellor Richard Eakin said. If
money is not restored by the
General Assembly for their pur-
chase, Eakin said, "we will not
allow unsafe vehicles to be used.
We will either have to invest funds
to do major repairs or take some of
the vehicles off the road
Compensating for the utility
cut will be much less dramatic.
The university's energy conserva-
tion efforts have been saving
money so that the projected
expenses will be below the budget
for the next year.
"Weather conditions, of course,
could affect those projections
Eakin said.
Over 160 trash
cans dispersed
Christopher Scott
STAFF WRITES
During the summer months at
ECU the grounds keeping
staff work hard to maintain the
pristine condition of our cam-
pus.
One major duty of the
grounds keepers work day is
picking up and discarding litter
tossed aside by students dur-
ing school hours. From drink
containers and plastic wrap-
pers to cigarette butts, t,hese
groundskeepers are continual-
ly removing student waste that
is either collected in the over
160 trash cans dispersed
around campus or occasionally
thrown to the ground.
"Keeping the campus clean
is a six day a week job said
Doug Caldwell, superinten-
dent of the grounds depart-
ment. "The heaviest littering
days for the grounds workers
occur on Monday and Friday
In the summer, the down-
town area affects campus life,
and not just for the students.
Since central campus is the
most populated area with its
multiple eateries, the
groundskeepers divide the
task beginning at 7:30 a.m. into
three sections: from Fletcher
Music Center to the plaza in
front of Wright, the mall sur-
rounding the Cupola, and
Among many responsibilities, grounds keepers mutt
pick up litter strewn across campus.
PHOTO BY MARC CHIPPEN
from Mendenhall Student
Center to the Student
Recreation Center, according
to groundskeeper Stanley
Valentine.
After these teams clear their
designated areas, the second
step of the litter control takes
over. Two running dump
trucks which unload the 58
dumpsters situated around
campus, usually twice a day,
according to Caldwell.
Even during the one-day
break between the summer
sessions, the grounds depart-
ment was cleaning up the
debris left by students moving
off campus or back home for
the last part of the break.
"Wednesday was the
busiest day of the summer,
yet Caldwell said. "But
before the fall semester starts,
there will be an acquisition of
sixteen more trash cans to
accommodate the amount of
student waste.
A large part of littering
stems from the way smokers
habitually throw their finished
cigarettes away on the ground
instead of using an ashtray or
an ashtray um placed on top of
the metallic trash cans. While
the solution to the littering of
cigarettes can only be started
by social habits, Valentine of
the grounds department did
offer a suggestion to stop the
action.
"If the students were
required to wear a visible num-
ber on their clothing, a witness
of their infraction could use
the number to identify the lit-
tercr Valentine said.
Arefti Waiting for Your Kids
to Talk to YOU About P
Partnership for a Drug-Free
North Carolina ��
Partnership for a Drug-Free America
1 -888-732-3362
www.drugfreeamerica.org
WANTED:
ECU students interested in becoming representatives for
the Department of Athletics as members of the Pirates
Crew. The Pirates Crew is a volunteer organization that
assists ECU Athletics in fund raising activities and the
recruitment of student athletes.
Call 328-4566 for an application and more information if
you are interested.
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12 Twriiy. Att.it 18, 1998
news
Tht East Carolinian
I
4 year degree may earn
$1 million over life span
Results show learning lifelong
process, reward
Carolyn Robbins Hyde
staff white
Learning is no longer a one-time event, but a
continuous, life-long process.
When you weigh the net worth of an under-
graduate degree earned from ECU against the
costs involved, the rewards are colossal.
In the recent publication of "The East Book:
A Guide to Markets and Purchasing Patterns in
Eastern North Carolina information was gath-
ered by students hired by the Survey Research
Laboratory to conduct telephone interviews.
These interviews took place between May 5
and June 18, 19. This survey showed approx-
imately 1,255,4U people live in the 22 eastern
counties involved in the survey. Of this amount,
458,554 households have an average yearly fam-
ily income of $34,674.
According to this research, an undergraduate
four-year degree from ECU may be worth more
than a million dollars over the course of a life-
time.
An average annual income of $24,728 was
reported by those with a high school diploma.
The survey showed an average annual income
of $33,666 in households in which a two-year
degree was earned from a community college.
An average income of $48,603 was earned in
households where at least one person had
earned a four-year college degree.
"This data indicates an annual income
increase of $8,938 if at least one person in the
household earned a community college
degree said Dr. Ken Wilson, associate profes-
sor of sociology and director of the Survey
Research Laboratory.
"PCC offers a two-year degree at an average
cost of $2,000, which includes tuition, fees and
books said Susan Nobles, director of external
affairs division of Pitt Community College.
According to Michael P. Balko, Jr universi-
ty cashier, a North Carolina resident could earn
a four-year degree from ECU for roughly
$26,000 (including tuition, fees, books, room
and board).
SEE DEGREE PAGE 14
Greenville ranks 14th in
survey of places to live
Goldsborv, Rocky
Mount place as well
Amanda Austin
features editor
Greenville was recently ranked
number 14 in a 49 city list of best
southern cities to live in. This
ranking is a result of Money
Magazine's annual ranking.
Greenville's number 14 spot is
included in the category
of cities with a popula-
tion of 100,000 to
249,999.
Mayor Nancy
Jenkins was thrilled
with the ranking, but
thinks Greenville
should have ranked
much higher.
"I was surprised
Jenkins said. "I thought
we should have been
first
Jenkins believes the
Greenville ranks high is
due to the university
and the culture it
brings to Greenville
residents.
"The quality of life
in Greenville is
extremely exception-
al Jenkins said. "We
have offerings for a
diversity of needs and
are doing so more
everyday. We have
small town charm and
bigger town ameni-
reason ties
largely In respect to the university,
Nancy Jenkins.
Greenville mayor
FILE PHOTO
this ranking may make ECl I more
desirable.
"The city of Greenville and
ECU enjoy and beneficial, mutu-
ally supportive relationship said
Chancellor Richard Kakin. "The
high ranking for Greenville is
well- deserved and will cause
ECU to continue to be attractive
to prospective students and their
parents. I believe our ranking as
the 25th best wired campus is a
distinction that will be especially
helpful as we seek to attract out-
standing students to EGU.
SEE RANK. PAGE 14
Transit authority sets
guidelines for drivers
Managers can earn
$13,430 to $18, 710
William L f. L i e v e r
STAFF WRITER
The student transit authority
recently set strict guidelines for all
student managers and drivers;
approving a compensation proposal,
setting maximum work hours and
making new job qualifications.
Managers must
be enrolled for at
least nine hours of
classes and receive a
minimum GPA of
2.3. In addition,
they must have a
valid class 'B' N.C.
drivers license.
Student transit
managers earn
between $13,430 to
$18,710 a yea, mak-
ing them the high-
est paid student
employees on cam-
pus. Their salaries,
received as a month-
ly stipend, come in
addition to money
for tuition, text books and housing
costs.
"I am about to get a raise said
Dean Wheeler, transit manager. "I
think that most (transit) positions
will not be affected that much by
the changes
Transit Drivers get paid per
hour with a starting pay of eight dol-
lars per hour. Transit drivers must
be enrolled students.who maintain
a 2.0 GPA and possess a class 'B'
N.C. driver's license. Drivers may
not be hired if they have previous
DWIs or reckless driving citations.
"I think they set these qualifica-
tions to be self monitored by the
transit said Eric Rivenbark, SGA
president. "If they work 40 hours
or 60 hours, the managers will get
the same monthly stipend. I think
it is important for the drivers and
managers to realize that they are
students and they need to concen-
trate on that first. Transit should be
just a part-time job while they are in
school
The maximum work hours for
transit employees is 40 hours a
week. The
transit
authority
r e c o m -
mends only
25 hours a
week or
fewer.
Students are
not permit-
ted to
receive
overtime
pay and arc
not paid for
hours spent
studying.
"It is
really not
saying peo-
ple can not work over 25 hours as
long as we (transit) give more peo-
ple the opportunity so as to allow
management to have enough stu-
dents to draw from said Joey
Weathington, transit advisor.
According to Rivenbark, transit
is one of three in the nation that is
student run. He says ECU's transit
may not be the most efficiently run
system because it is student run
and student funded, but it is impor-
tant to know that students are run-
ning the show and doing a good job.
" think it is important for the
drivers and managers to real-
ize that they are students and
they need to concentrate on
that first. Transit should be
just a part-time job while they
are in school
Eric Rivenbark
SGA president
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Thi Ei�t Ciroliniin
t sets
ivers
driving citations,
it these qualifica-
lonitored by the
Rivenbark, SGA
y work 40 hours
lanagers will get
stipend. I think
the drivers and
e that they are
need to concen-
Pransit should be
while they are in
work hours for
is 40 hours a
week. The
transit
t authority
r e c o m -
mends only
25 hours a
week or
fewer.
Students are
not permit-
ted to
receive
overtime
pay and are
not paid for
hours spent
studying.
"It is
really not
saying peo-
ver 25 hours as
give more peo-
' so as to allow
vc enough stu-
m said Joey
: advisor,
enbark, transit
ic nation that is
s ECU's transit
: efficiently run
is student run
but it is impor-
jdents are run-
ning a good job.
Trade
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14 Tmidir, A�imt IB, 1988
news
Tht Eiit Carolinian
Campus gardens, high upkeep
40 people care for 450
acres of grounds
TK Jones
NEWS EDITOR
The average cost of a human life is
about $5 in a bull market, but for
the flora on the west and east cam-
puses, you can add about $22,000 to
that and still be a few notes shy of
the full song.
Less than 40 people embellish
the 450 acres of university grounds
with 11,000 annuals in the spring
and again in the fall. In addition to
planting flowers, they plant ground
cover, shrubbery and trees, run irri-
gation lines, storm drains, maintain
streets.
"A tree is not a tree is not a tree
said Doug Caldwell, superinten-
dent of the grounds department
"What people don't realize is how
much planning goes into what we
Ranks
continued from page 12
Money Magazine has been rank-
ing the best places to live for 12
years. Previously, ranking were
included in a 300 city list, but are
now more regionally and popula-
tion based. With a change of for-
mat, the magazine now has a
more focused comparison. Last
year Greenville ranked 185 out of
300 and fall from the previous
plant. Some of our shrubbery
comes from as far as Houston or the
Chesapeake Bay area, just because
they have the quantity and quality
we need at the right bid
The grounds are vast enough
that they are broken down into four
divisions according to traffic. Each
grounds crew is given a budget and
the flexibility of choosing what to
plant in smaller gardens like
Whichard's corner and the
Ragsdale courtyard. For large areas
work is contracted outside with
landscape architects.
"They (grounds department)
offer diversity in plant material and
landscape design Caldwell said.
"This is what gives us a different
look in the different areas of cam-
pus
The crew's botanic understand-
ing makes for healthier plants and
slows plants' death rates by choos-
ing vegetation adaptive to the area,
like the Mondo grass in front of
Garrett Hall.
"The Mondo grass is good
ground cover and has taken over,
Grounds workers plant flowers on campus among other responsibilities.
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
requiring little upkeep said
Caldwell.
But then there is the lily turf that
borders Tenth Street.
"I hope I live long enough to see
that thing filled in said Caldwell.
"If I do, I'll probably have all my
hair pulled out before it does
The St. John's Wart, too, in front
of the Wright Circle was a positive
experience gone awry when the
grounds department planted it in
front of Umstead Hall, only to have
it share the space with weeds.
years 165 out of 300.
The top three spots were filled
by three Virginia cities,
Charlottesville, Lynchburg and
Roanoke. Other North Carolina
cities to rank were Goldsboro (9),
Asheville (10), Wilmington (16),
Rocky Mount (19) and
Jacksonville (23).
Jenkins says that these ranking
should make residents realize
what a wonderful place they live
in.
"It should make them proud if
they aren't already aware
Jenkins said.
Degree
continued from page 12
The data showed that house-
holds where at least one person
earned a four-year degree, the
annual income increased by
$23,875. This investment increases
family income by approximately
$1.1 million over a person's life-
time.
Wilson suggests a college degree
is not only a good investment for
the student, but also for the state of
North Carolina.
"The state currently pays $6,977
per semester for each in-state stu-
dent at ECU, but each graduate
pays extra taxes on the extra
income earned. If the student
remains in North Carolina, over the
course of their lifetime, the state
should collect about $100,000 in
extra taxes
"The East Book" provides
information on the buying habits
and marketing patterns of residents
Southernisms
continued from page 9
some of the phrases should be
familiar to cable television watch-
ers who have been fed a steady
diet of. 'The Andy Griffith Show"
reruns for the last 20-plus years.
But it helps folks moving to or
traveling through the South avoid
feeling like a short dog in high
grass.
Take red-eye gravy. That will
often be offered with the grits that
come with breakfast if hash
browns aren't specifically request-
ed. Red-eye gravy sounds awful �
the grease from fried country ham,
a dollop of black coffee
and boiling water � but rest
assured, it's some kind of good
eating.
You might want some coffee
with that, and you might want it
saucered and blowed. (That's cof-
fee that has cooled down a bit by
pouring some onto the saucer and
blowing over it.)
And after breakfast, you might
need to find the "necessary
another word for the outhouse or
the facility.
Then there's "mess as in a
mess of greens.
Or "mess" as in "Ain't that Ray
Wilkinson a mess? Wilkinson,
retired farm director of WRAL-
TV in Raleigh, is
also a collector of old stories
from the South and other regions.
"I have enjoyed celling them to
make people happy Wilkinson
said. "I do a little presentation
called 'Let's keep the fun in liv-
ing A lot of times, people get so
immersed in their day-to-day
problems in life that they don't
enjoy things as they travel along. I
think Roy has done the same
thing. His is based on the vernacu-
lar, and I do it with sortof an
accent"
Some of the words have
become politically incorrect, such
as pickaninny, a term for a young
black child. Wilder explains that
the term was introduced by slaves
from the West Indies as their way
of pronouncing either the
Portuguese pequenino or Spanish
pequeno nino.
"It's a good old word Wilder
said. He said the only complaint
about the book after its last print-
ing was from a black state legisla-
tor who took exception to the
phrase "a bunch of crap" because
"it's a dirty word
of the 22 counties which comprise
the center of eastern North
Carolina. Other information col-
lected from this survey included
the typical spending amounts on
such items as groceries, clothing
and other pertinent information
regarding the patterns of spending
in eastern North Carolina.
This survey showed 20 percent
of the households interviewed take
at least one long vacation a year.
Nearly half of the surveyed people
reported eating breakfast away
from home on a typical day. During
the week, this figure jumps to near-
ly 60 percent for lunches outside of
the home. Also noted was the fact
that during the week, this figure
rises to 67 percent for dinner meals.
Primary sources of receiving infor-
mation remains the newspapers,
word-of-mouth and being familiar
with the place of purchase.
To receive an individual copy of
"The East Book" please contact
the ECU Regional Development
Services, Willis Building, 300 E.
First St Greenville, NC 27858, or
call (252) 328-6650.
I
ECU Transit
Check out the changes for
the '9899 school year!
Introducing the BLUE
route which provides
service to commercial areas
throughout Greenville
including Carolina East Mall
For more details on the Fall
routes, pick up schedules at
Mendenhall Student
Center, ECU Parking and
Traffic Services, Joyner
Library as well as other
locations throughout
campus
ECU Transit is also hiring
drivers. For more info call
328-4724
f
DAILY
FOOD &
ASHICKIN'
BAR SPECIALS
mmi.t.m m&M J- .Jit iiKu-JSX Mfc,
The Best Checking
Account Is Here!
Now at NewSouth Bank Basic Checking!
An account designed for students and graduates alike.
Unlike other "student accounts the benefits don't expire
when you graduate. Check it out at your local
NewSouth Bank branch!
Basic Checking
(For those age 30 and under)
VNo Minimum Balance
Unlimited Checkwriting
fir No Fee Visa CheckCard
ANo Annual Fee Credit Card
AOnly $.99 per month
301 E. Arlington Blvd.
Greenville 321-2600
Member FDIC
�Subject to credit approval
mm �����.��
1
NewSniith RanK
All The Bank You'll Ever Need
I





Tht Em Carolinian
us in "Ain't that Ray
mess?" Wilkinson,
director of WRAL-
, is
sctor of old stories
1 and other regions.
yed telling them to
happy Wilkinson
little presentation
eep the fun in liv-
imcs, people get so
their day-to-day
fe that they don't
they travel along. I
s done the same
sed on the vernacu-
it with sortof an
the words have
ally incorrect, such
a term for a young
ilder explains that
itroduced by slaves
Indies as their way
ing either the
luenino or Spanish
old word Wilder
he only complaint
after its last print-
black state legisla-
exception to the
i of crap" because
i
gure jumps to near-
r lunches outside of
noted was the fact
week, this figure
nt for dinner meals.
of receiving infor-
i the newspapers,
and being familiar
f purchase,
i individual copy of
ik" please contact
nal Development
Building, 300 E.
'ille, NC 27858, or
50.
king
;re!
:king!
lates alike,
don't expire
r local
S
g
rd
Card
II Ever Need
X
L.
TWICE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
The East Carolinian
Pick us up Tuesdays and Thursdays for news and
information you need to know about campus
issues and activities.
MINORITY MAGAZINE
Expressions
Pick us up three times during the Fall and Spring
terms for discussion of the problems and issues
facing ECU's minorities.
STUDENT RADIO STATION LITERARY ARTS MAGAZINE
WZMB9L3FM Rebel
Pick us up 24-hours a day for a wide variety of Pick us up annually in the Spring to view a
music including alternative, jazz, metal, rap and showcase of campus literary and artistic cre-
more. ations-
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
MEDIA
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, CALL
328-6009
Watch for the debut of our web site next week!





I
Are You
about
back-to-class
shopping
ECUDowdy Student Stores is
your one-stop-shopping place
for books, supplies, computers,
software, and official ECU
paraphernalia.
$S�E)

FREE
Hugger with purchase
of $5 of more
Tuesday, August 18 only
One per student, please. Offer jjood while supplies last.
ECU Cluebook Planner
One per student, please.
Offer sood while supplies last.
Entire Stock of
Mens and Womens
ECU T-Shirts
Buy1,
Take HALF OFF
a second of equal
or lesser value
August 15-22, 1998. Not valid with any
other offer or discount. Regular price
t-shlrts only.
NOTEBOOK BLOWOUT!
250 count BONUS PAK of
filler paper $1.79
4 pack - 80 count spiral
bound notebooks $3.49
1 subject 100 count spiral
bound notebook 1.99
3 subject spiral bound
notebook $2.95
5 subject spiral bound
notebook $3.95
All notebooks featureECU logos!
Computer Department Specials available through
September 30,1998:
CAMPUS� Graduate: features 32MB SDRAM, 3.2GB Hard Drive, 32X CD,
4MB PCI VC, Ethernet, 56K Modem; Soundblaster, Windows 95 (upgrade to
98 through Microsoft) Network Connection, MS Office Prof; 15" monitor,
color printer. 4 yr. Limited Warranty on Computer. With Pentium� 233
MMX. $1,899
CAMPUS� Galileo: features 128MB SDRAM 100 MHz, 8.6GB Hard Drive,
32X CD, 8MB AGP VC, Ethernet, 56K Modem, internal Iomega Zip drive,
soundblaster, Windows 95 (upgrade to 98 through Microsoft), Network
Connection, MS Office Prof; 15" monitor, color printer. 4 yr. Limited
Warranty on Computer. With Pentium� II 350MHz$2,999 With
Pentium� II 400 MHz. $3,199
Twinhead� Laptop Slimnote TE200TZ: 200 MHz, 16MB RAM, 2.1GB Hard
Drive, 12.1" DSJN, 20X CD, NiMH Battery, Windows 95. $1,495
Apple� Power Macintosh G3: Desktop 233 MHz, 512K L232MB RAM,
4GB Hard Drive, 24X CD, keyboard, mouse, integrated FPU, Ethernet, 256K
cache. Display sold separately. Free virtual PC with G3. $1,577
Apple� Power Macintosh G3: Tower 300 MHz, 1 MB L2,64MB RAM, 4GB
Hard Drive, 24X CD, keyboard, mouse, integrated FPU, Ethernet, 256K
cache. Display sold separately. Free Virtual PC with G3 $3,117
Limited time offer from manufacturer. Ask about FREE delivery and set-up for ECU
students on certain brands of computers (limited delivery area).
Tuesday, August 18: 7:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday, August 19: 7:30 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, August 20: 7:30 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Friday, August 21: 7:30 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Saturday, August 22: 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Monday, August 24: Regular hours begin:
Monday - Friday: 7:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Saturday: 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
We Honor Our Competitor's Apparel and Gift Coupons!
Ronald E. Dowdy
Student Stores
Where your dollars support scholars!
Wright Building 4 388-6731 4 www.studentstores.ecu.edu
ENTER OUR
tit
�wmnmm
purchase necessary. Textbook orlze includes all
LOCAL ADDRESS
STUDENT ID
Bt"avVkV ylpllWIMII
�No purchase necessary. Textbook prize includes all
required textbooks for Fall 1998 ECU courses taken by
student. Schedule verification and photo ID required.
Refund will be given for previously purchased required fall
1998 textbooks If current Dowdy Student Stores receipt Is
shown. Drawing for textbooks to be held August 17, 18,
and 19,1998. Drawing for Sony� Compact CDRadio
Cassette to be held August 21,1998. Need not be present
to win. Winners will be notified by phone or mall. One entry
per student.
$5 OFF of your purchase of $75 or more!
Make your purchase at ECU-Dowdy Student Stores and we'll take
$5 off of your purchase of $75 or more.
COUpOII required. Discount not valid on computer hardware or software, In conjunction with any other discount, tale, or previously purchased merchandise, '
or with reserved books or special orders. Offer expires August 1998.
fc
One Drawing Each Day:
AUGUST 17, 18 & 19 for
FREE TEXTBOOKS!
CDRADIOCASSETTE
DRAWING ON Friday,
August 21st!
Save your receipt)
� Store Policy prohibits returns without a store
receipt AND proper identification. This aids
in the prevention of theft which helps keep
costs down. Students are encouraged to save
ALL receipts)
Sale prices and special offers
good while supplies last.





,lHPUs
L I TZ
I
i
m
�TARGET
I











HOME AWAY FROIVffioME
Bodum dinnerware.
Practical and cool, too.
Hair care. Try the Salon
Selectives or Finesse line.
Caress body bars.
Don't leave home without it!
Pond's cleansing strips.
Good-bye clogged pores.
Old Spice.
First impressions count.
Schick razors.
You clean up nice.
Sony video tapes.
Tape the soaps.
Sony cassette tapes.
Tape the lectures.
Sony PlayStation.
Study break!






WANT SOME EXTRA CREDIT?
OPEN A TARGET GUEST CARD.
'
rd purer
Featuring a back-to-college fashion show
with students as models, iive band perfor-
mances, free gift bags and more. Brought
to you by Mademoiselle and Target.
For more information see
the September issue of
Mademoiselle magazine.
Get your FREE Campus '98
Life handbook featuring
tips and tons of coupons
for heading back to
college. Look for them
on campus or at your
. local Target store,
Offr good Mf quinttty nut
�TARGET





Modern, sale
r4t
Action, sale
eastik
Our lowest prices
of the season on
Eastpak backpack:
of DuPonf Cordura r$on.
Guaranteed
H





USEYOUf
ANYITO
timrmt.





USE YOUR TARGET GUEST CARD TO PURCHASE
ANY ITEM ON THESE 2 PAGES AND AN ADDITIONAL
�����1� � .J �� - M iTIlliiwrii
�M�g
GOES TO YOUR SCHOOL
CALL1-800-3164142 FOR COMPLETE DETAILS.





Xhilaration
novelty jeans.
Cotton denim.





THREESTY
ONE GREA"
LESO
PRIC
KHAKIS,
" Shoes, sale
Women's Cherokee casuals.
Vinyl.
�TARGET
I





.88
IvJsole
Women's
Cherokee
leather casuals.
� Other women'i
Cherokee leal
casuals on sale,
reg. 17.99,
sale 14.88
88
10
Girls' and toddler girls'
Cherokee casuals and
boors
Sale
OUR
C
of the season!
lowest
O O Men's and women's
OO Spalding leather athletic
Sale shoes. Styles shown
� Dunlop and other
Spalding leather athletic
shoes also on sale.
�4
10
88
�TARGET
Styles shown, sale
Character shoes
for toddler girls
and toddler boys.
� All other character
shoes on sale.











2.J8
Men's Honors
cotton pocket T-shirts

� Extended sizes
sale 2 lor S12
CHEROKEE COMFORT
AT THE RIGHT PRICE.
793
w Henley, sale
bsjg
,m
2





099
� Pack
Kids' Hanes' and
Hones Her Way
� 6-pk. boys' or girls'
underwear. � 6-pk. boys
crew or jogger socks.
6-pk. women's
Hanes Her Way8
panties.
FAMILY-SIZE
SAVINGS.
5"
SIX RAW l�
OB
�0 -
6-pk. men's
Hanes briefs.
� All other men's
Hanesunderwear,
3.38-8.88
MEN s
BRIEFS
Hanes Her Way
Cotton Curves bra.
Style No. GI63
6-pk. men's
Hanes socks.
6-pk. giris' Honors bobbie socks.
Fit iiz��5-67-�X, 9-11.
6-pk. women's socks. Honors
or Cherokee cuffed style.






The Design Select collection. 180 thread
count percale sheet sets. Cotton-polyester.
� 4-pc. sheet sets: full, queen, king,
sale 22.99-39.99
� Matching accessories, sale 9.99-49.99
Accent table or glass top.
Table requires tome assembly
� Furio decorator tablecloths
and toppers, sale 3.99-11.99
Twin sheet set, sale
The Hunter Reed collection. Handsome
sheet sets in 180 thread count percale.
Cotton-polyester. � 4-pc. sheet sets:
full, queen, king, sale 22.99-39.99
� Matching accessories, sale 9.99-49.99
Each shown, sale
Save on all area rugs.
Rugs shown in sizes
20x34" and 21x34"
All other sizes and
styles, sale 7.99-29.99
10
�TARGET
F EXPECT MOM. PAY L�SS.





15
Selected toss pillows
and floor cushions.
Many colors, patterns and
styles to decorate your space.
Reg. 7.99-29.99, sale 6.79-25.49
Freedom Bay" 200 thread count
cotton sheets and pillowcases.
� Full to king sheets, flat or fitted,
sale 14.99-29.99
�Two pillowcases, standard or king,
sale 14.99 & 16.99
� Comforters and other accessories,
sale 5.99-79.99





2"
25x50" bath
towel, sale
Essence cotton towels.
�Washcloth, sale 1.49
� Hand towel, sale 2.49
� Bath sheet, sale 5.99
Bath rugs and lid covers.
100 DuPont Antron nylon.
Sale 4.49-8.99
�TARGET
V EXPECT MORE. PAY LESS.





our lowest
PRICES
of the year!
Extreme Zone binders with storage
pockets. Sturdy and water-repellent.
600 denier cover and interior lining.
AUGUST IS
Spacemaker school
box holds your
favorite supplies
� Spacemaker
school box with
handle, sale 1.99
1.99
ich, sale
80-sheet wireless
notebooks.
Manufacturer may vary
by store
BONUS
MONTH
BACK-TO-
SCHOOL
SUPPLIES
USE YOUR
TARGET
GUEST CARD
ON
SELECTED
ITEMS-
FROM
PENCILS
TO KIDS
CLOTHES-
AND WE'LL
GIVE AN
ADDITIONAL
TO ANY
ELIGIBLE
K-tZ SCHOOL!
FOR COMPLETE
DETAILS. CALL
i-oo-3t�-�m.
trARGET
The Target Guest Card it a credit
card issued by Retailers National
Bank. Subject to credit approval.
�Some restrictions apply





ipUT-OF-SIGHT
7JNDERBED
STORAGE. �
IO88
I Mmmk Each, sale
� Sale
Rubbermaid 28-gal.
jumbo storage box.
� 20-gal sale $10
Nos. 2268, 2267.
Rubbermaid 50-gal. RoughTote.
Think big! Durable heavy-duty
storage container. No. 2550
Easy-access underbed storage.
� Sterilite 70-qt. box with
double-hinged lid.
� StyleMaster 40" storage
box with hinged lid.
Organize with style.
� Iris 4-drawer clear mini chest.
� Tenex 3-drawer rolling storage chest.
1
9





Sale
(ughTofe.
-duty
3.
18
Laundry and storage accessories.
'all.
f f Breathable polypropylene storage closet;
V V� laundry sorter with overhead caddy;
�acn deluxe garment rack.
sale' �i��
fmuta
11
W"

8
j
hest.
f Hanging closet organizers
4 of breathable polypropylene.
i V� V� Shoe bag, accessory bag, jumbo
Each garment bag and others.
sale
��jy
I I �
99
99
Low Price
New at Target!
Hoover Elite upright
features triple filtra-
tion, headlight and
onboard tools.
20-ft. power cord.
No U4296-930.
259
Low Price
Hoover SteamVac
Ultra with exclusive
5 brush agitator and
powered hand tool.
No faucet hook-up.
Includes detergent and spot
cleaner. No F5881 900.
�99
Sale
Fantom Fury dual-
cyclonic upright
with 2-stage motor,
HEPA air filter and
onboard tools.
Needs no bags.
No.PIOOSIFYSI.
our lowest
PRICE
ever!
259
12 amp Fantom Thunder
dual-cyclonic upright
has a powerful 2-stage
motor, HEPA filter, 7-ft. hose,
onboard tools and more
Never needs bags.
No. F12052TH5I.





Playful Spirit carts,
Each has 1 locking wheel
industrial casters, steel
frame and plastic drawers
Home Improvement Dept
Playful Spirit mini trash container with
push closure and enameled steel construction.
Home Improvement Depl
Playful Spirit carts and shelving.
� 3-shelf cart has contemporary casters, steel frame and plastic shelves
2-shelf unit has 2 hanging towel bars and plastic shelves.
Home Improvement Depl Asjembly required.
EXPECT MORE MY LESS.
Each, sale
Playful Spirit accessories.
� Vanity-size trash container
has enameled steel construction.
� Splat-base mirror has steel
and plastic construction.
Home Improvement Depl





Modern Spirit storage.
� Wall shelf with 2 hanging towel
bars. � New at Target! Circle shelf
with 2 glass shelves. � Hotel rack
with 1 shelf and 2 towel bars.
� 3-shelf cart on casters.
Home Improvement Depr Atsembly required on all.





�COMING-
ATTRACTIONS
Available Tuesday, August 18
The Borrowers,
Polygram.
Available Wednesday,
August 19
9.75 Charles Frazier
11.99 Artisan
Sale
EMERSON Our lowest price ever!
3-CD music system with remote control.
Has AMFM stereo, auto-stop cassette
deck and Bass Boost. No. MS7737.
9.99 Fox
9.99 Fox
00 ROYAL paper shredder for letters, billing
' statements and financial documents. Shreds
Sale up to 5 stacked pages at once. No. jaws.
�99
Coming September 1,
NFl Game Day '99 for PlayStation.
Sale
MEMOREX
19" color TV with
181-channel tuner,
sleep timer and
25-key remote control
No- MT119I. TV hai diogonally
measured screen and is shown
with simulated picture.
139"
Extra Special Value
MEMOREX 4-heod hi-fi stereo VCR
with rewinder. Features front AV inputs,
clock display, commercial skip and remote
Control. No. MVR4040 Hems packoged together
Sale
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS
TI-86 graphing calculator.
128 KB memory, 8-line by
21 -character display.
Electronics Dept.





Sale
179.47
ISale
lTI-82
New at Target!
12-pk. Pringfes chips
in 2-oz. cans.
15;
99
Sale
90-min. Target Hotline' pre-paid
phone card. � 40-min. card, 7.99
Minutes debited to the next whole minute
Rale quoted is for United States; international
rates vary.
Each
Diaper Genie refills. Original
and wide-opening liners for Diaper
Genie diaper disposal system.
�29
tnergizer alkaline batteries.
8-pk. AAorAAA.
4-pk. C or D, or 2-pk. 9-volt,
5ale4.29ficu.on.i i.vpi
I Each, sale
General Mills kids' snacks.
6-ct. Fruit by the Foot or Fruit
Gushers, 8-ct. Golden Grahams,
10-ct. Fruit Roll-Ups and more.
'jofcmotft
baby
2J5
049
JL. Each
Crest. 6 2-oz.
Extra Whitening
or Multi-Care.
� 6-oz. Neat
Squeeze or
8.2-oz tube,
1.89 each
Baby care and hair care.
10- to 15-oz. Johnson's products
or 9-oz. L'Oreal Kids shampoo.
igjjgjgm
DRAWSTRING
TKASHBAGS
Herbal Essences or Daily
Defense shampoos,
conditioners or styling aids.
Does not include 25-4-or.
' Pack, sale
All Glad Family Pack trash
bags. 13 30 33- or 39-gal.
drawstring, Quick-Tie and
handle-tie closure.
Each,sale
Duncan yo-yos. Butterfly, Neo
Imperial ana many other styles.
Agei 5 and up
Dishwashing. 65 oz Cascade,
42-oz. Palmolive liquid or
85-oz. Palmolive gel.
I Each, sale
Hostess. 10-ct. Twinkies or
8-ct. Cup Cakes in regular or
low fat, and more.
310
Sale
Crystal Light
drink mix.
Makes 12 quarts.
Assorted flavors.
value Pack
i





U"M1I
SoaWhite
99
Sale
Cherokee cotton canvas
oxfords. Women's, girls' and
toddlers Women's available in wide width.
122
4-pk. GE Soft White light
bulbs. Various wattages.
Pampers Mega Baby-Dry
Stretch diapers. Sizes 1 -5.
in
Puffs. 250-ct. Puffs, 144-ct.
Puffs Plus or Advanced
Extra Strength.
From oil filters.
� Fram air filters, sale 2 for $7
Does not include Tough Guard oil filters.
Each
Irish Spring soap. 12-pk. bars.
Softsoop. 64-oz. refill with free
7.5-OZ. pump. Free oiler good while
quantity lasts. Items packaged together.
Baker's Secret nonstick
bakeware. Easy to clean.
Medium cookie sheet,
large loaf pan and more.
�49
wEach
100-oz. Tide liquid laundry
detergent. Regular or Tide with
bleach alternative.
Dixie. Coordinating plates, bowls,
napkins; or 100-ct. 5-oz 200-ct.
3-oz. or 80-ct. 9-oz. cups.
�for
Laundry help. 80-ct. Bounce
dryer sheets, 40-use Downy
liquid or refill carton, or
32-oz. Woolite.
pks. I JL. Sale
12-pk. Scott bathroom tissue.
KQdaK
PREMIUM
PROCESS ING
2ND SET
FREE!
vJsole
24 exposures
4x6" prints with
index print.
35mm film only.
Advertised sale prices good August 16-22,1998 at Target, Target Greatland and SuperTarget. To find the location of the nearest Target, call toll-free 1-800-800-8800.
�TARGET
Apply
today.
We also honor
Marshall Field's, Dayton's,
Hudson's, DiscoverNovus, VISA,
asterCard, American Express and
wbit cards. ATM available.
�te.
�TARGET
OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 8 AM T010 PM.
Pharmacy hours, where applicable, vary.
Every Target supplement ii recyclable. Help protect our environment. Printed in USA.
Exceptional Price, Price Cut and Low Price items ore
ot everyday low pricei if o Target store, Target
Greatland or SuperTarget regularly sells an item
below the ad price shown, you will receive the lower
price at that store. Regular prices may vary locally on
certain items We reserve the right to limit quantities
lo normal retail purchases. Target Guest Card
quoted monthly payments are subject to approved
credit, sales tax ond, on account balances below
$200, o $20 minimum payment. The Target Guest
Cord is issued by Retailers National Bank.
Newspoper Advertising Supplement. �1998 Target
Stores A Division of Dayton Hudson Corporation





Car insurance from GEICO. Because its neuer
too eariq to begjnjiaking sound financial decisions
Just about everyone understands the
value of saving money. So whether you
already have your own car insurance
policy or you're ready to start one. Our
great student rates make GEICO a wise
choice, indeed.
What's more. GEICO tillers the
convenience of complete 24-hdur
service. We'll take your call, day or.
night, to answer a question or even to
handle a claim. In fact, in main-
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48 hours of reporting the details of an
incident. And even if your car isn't
driveablc, we'll come to your �� V i
assistance wherever you are. ; �� �
GEICO aLso makes pa)Tnent
You may save 15
or more
? Money-saving
discounts
? Convenient
payment plans
? Complete 24-hour
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882-7222,
geico.com
a breeze. Where available, you can use
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We've been offering dependable,
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Fill out the savings comparison
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Use this chart to see what GEICO
could saue you on your car insurance.
YOUR CURRENT COVERAGEYOUR CURRENT PREMIUMGEICO PREMIUMYOU SAVE
Bodily Injury: Per Person Per OccurrenceCAR1 CAR 2
Property Damage: Per OccurrenceCAR1 CAR 2�
Personal Injury Protection or Medical Payments: Per PersonCAR1 CAR 2

Uninsured Motorists: Per Person Per Occurrence Property DamageCAR1 CAR 2

Comprehensive (Your Car): DeductibleCAR 1 CAR 2

Collision (Your Car): DeductibleCAR1 CAR 2i

Rental Reimbursement: Per DisablementCAR1 CAR 2

Government Employees Insuranceo � 01 ICOGencral Insurance Gi � GfclCO Indemnity Co � i,l lu'H jmuIu Co � 1 hoe sliarclwklrr.owned cotnfanles ate not affiliated Milt ill. 1 5 Government GEfCO aulo insurance is not aeaitlhle InMAorNJ G0CO sVuhittftUW IH 20076GEICO SAVES YOU THIS MUCH$
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all 1-800-802-7222.24 hours a day. for a great ualue on car insurance.
Or check the yellow pages for a local office near you
(u( out and heep in youi miiii'i





17 Tuaiday, August 18, 1998
features
The East Carolinian
oiling with a MTV VP
ECU graduate Mark Kemp lives out his life-long dream
editing Rolling Stone Magazine and now at MTV
A M A N I) A A I .S I I N
Imagine yourself having lunch with Puff Daddy
before a photo shoot with the Spice Girls and finish-
ing your long day off by relaxing in your elegant
apartment in Brooklyn, N.Y.
What is a fantasy to many is a reality for ECU
graduate Mark Kemp, Vice President of Music
Development at MTV and former senior editor of
Rolling Stone Magazine.
To say that Kemp has been
successful in his career would
be a vast understatement. This
Ashboro native has experienced
jobs many will only dream of.
It was in 1996 that Kemp's
career began to flourish after
being offered the position of
senior editor at Rolling Stone
Magazine. After three short
months, the 38-year- old was
offered the position he had
always dreamed of�music edi-
tor.
During his.stay at Rolling
Stone, Kemp put many stars on
the cover of Rolling Stone
including Marilyn Mansoh, The
Spice Girls, Eddie Veder, Puff
Daddy, Beck and Tu Pac.
It was during his time at
Rolling Stone that Kemp real-
ized what direction his life had
taken and what a success he had
become. He recalled a time
when he was sitting in his office
and the man who he had
admired much of his life,
I lunter S. Thompson, appeared
outside his window holding a
drink in one hand and a ciga-
rette in the other.
"That's when it hit me that I
was at Rolling Stone Kemp
said. "There I was at the place I
had always fantasized about
Kemp's response to his suc-
cess is simple, "I just set out to
do it and I did it
It was a dream Kemp had
always carried with him, even
through his five-year academic
career at ECU, where he
majored in English and
minored in philosophy. Though
Kemp enjoyed writing and the
guidance of two professors, Alex
Albright and Bill Hallberg, his true
love was still music and the overall
experience of being away from
home and, of course, his dream to work at Rolling
Stone.
As Kemp reflected back on his days at Rolling
Stone, he spoke of an interview he had with
Morrissey when he had asked who the stars idol was
while growing up. He had been amazed as
Morrissey seemed to drift away with a glaze over his
eyes as he told him about his days growing up when
In 1982, Mark Kemp participated in protests against the United States invasion of El Salvador.
PHOTO FROM THE 1982 BUCCANEER
Mark Kemp, a member of ECU's graduating class of 1983, worked his way to vice president of music
development at MTV.
PHOTO COURTESY OF MTV
he would retreat into his room at night and place the
needle of the record player onto a Patty Smith
record and just listen.
He realized at that moment that stars are
people too, but "you never think of your heroes
having heroes he adds.
Kemp's career at Rolling Stone was short
lived when he was asked to lunch by the presi-
dent of MTV and offered the position of vice-
president of music development. I le jumped at
the opportunity and
in November 1997
Kemp was assigned
to put the M (music)
back into MTV.
"I first started
writing and appearing
on shows Kemp
said.
At MTV, Kemp
and his team of writers are responsible for creating a
variety of shows including The Smashing Pumpkins
Ultra-Sound and The
Morning After, a show about
how stars deal with death.
In addition to working at
MTV Kemp is writing arti-
cles on the side for the New
York Times. His latest pro-
ject is about the new rise of
southern music and how
southerners work their guilt
into their music.
The road to success was
not short and for Kemp it
meant working in a variety
of places.
After his graduation from
ECU in '83, Kemp moved
to Greensboro to find a job
as a reporter. His first
attempt failed and he
moved back to Greenville to
play in the band he had
played with during his years
at ECU. But, in 1984 he was
offered a job with the
Burlington Daily News
Times. After many heated
discussions with his band,
which was obviously not
going to move to a higher
level, Kemp accepted the
job.
While at the Burlington
Daily News Times, Kemp's
dreams to write for maga-
zines flourished. In 1987
after attending a magazine
and book publishing semi-
nar at New York University
he made the choice not to
return to Burlington. A short
six week stay in New York
turned into a permanent
vacation.
The transition from a
small town in North
Carolina to New York was
not an issue for Kemp. He
had visited New York many
times to visit friends and
could remember when a
round trip ticket could be purchased for $90.
The move paid off in '86 when Kemp was
offered a job writing for Discover Magazine.
While writing for Discover, Kemp found plea-
sure in writing articles on the side for magazines
such as The Village Voice and Option.
In 1991 the editor of Option magazine stepped
down and Kemp was offered the position. He
accepted and made his next big move that took
him across the country to Los Angeles, CA.
During his years at Option, Kemp transformed
the small magazine into a glowing success by
putting "less obscure people and more well
SEE KEMP. PAGE 19
c
Mark Kemp.
Class of 1983
vice president of music
development, MTV
" remember most what I learned outside of school.
When you leave home there is so much to learn out-
side of academics. You have to learn to live
Mark Kemp
cltfse
personal
Major: English
Minor: Philosophy
Graduated: 1983
laved in Aycock Hall at ECU
Favorite Glass: Medieval
Renaissance Studies
Favorite Professors: Alex Albright,
Bill Hallberg, Greg Ross
Favorite hangout spots in
Greenville:The Tree Top, The
Attic and The New Deli
Writing Inspiration: Hunter S.
Thompson (inventor of Gonzo
Journalism)
Favorite Bands: Rolling Stones,
Bob Dylan, The Altaian Brothers
Favorite Issue of Rolling Stone:
the Beck issue
Co-wrote Smashing Pumpkins
Ultrasound and The Morning After

I





IS Tundiy, August 18. 1998
features
Th� East Carolinian
Persuading the earth to reveal our secrets
Dr. David Phelps
works at Croatan site
Chris Knotts
STAFF WRITER
In a back room amidst fragments of
pottery, tobacco pipes and lead shot
from muskets, I find an older gen-
tleman in an Oxford shirt. We
shake hands and he escorts me into
a neat, tastefully decorated office
with a clay mask and lots of degrees
hanging on the wall.
The soft-spoken Dr. David
Phelps is an archeologist of the
truest sort. He was a professor and
director of archeology at ECU until
a few years ago. He retired from
teaching after twenty-six years.
He's been in the business of arche-
ology for forty years and he's not
finished yet. Although he is fin-
ished teaching, he continues his
work at ECU doing research.
One project Phelps works on is
the legend of the lost colony, one of
North Carolina's greatest myster-
ies. What happened to all those
people centuries ago who disap-
peared without a trace? Why did
they write "Croatan" on that tree?
If anyone ever finds the answers to
questions like these, it will be
archeologists like Phelps. He is cur-
rently involved in several archeo-
logical research projects, one of
which is a coastal investigation of
Croatan, which was, for some time,
the capital of the Native American
Croatan kingdom.
"Our ultimate goal for this pro-
ject is to thoroughly investigate
Croatan Phelps said. "Some of
the area has been well preserved by
sand and water
that is salty
and acidic
But it's diffi-
cult because
the town of
Buxton has
been built on
top of it.
Instead of dig-
ging in the
middle of a
large field like
other sites,
we're digging
in the middle
of people's
front yards
Phelps said
they may be
able to unravel
the mystery of
Croatan if
given enough
time. The
process is long
and delicate,
and the things he and his team are
digging up are old, old, old.
"We have areas of the Croatan
site which date back to 1100
through 1500 A.D and maybe
even earlier. We have also found
things which date around 1650 to
1720 A.D. which was about the
time of colonial contact
The coastal digs are challenging
and researchers have to work
around tourist seasons and academ-
ic schedules, when dig crews may
be hard to get together. The teams
consist of students, graduate stu-
dents, professional archeologists
and ECU alumni. When tourists
don't clog the area, the projects also
Many artifacts discovered by ECU archaeologists can be viewed in Dr. David Phelps
office in the archeology building, behind the financial aid office.
PHOTO BY CHRIS KKOTTS
rely on local volunteers who lend a
hand with the uncovering of the
ancient artifacts.
"The director of a dig can't do
as much digging and working as he
would like, but I'm still right down
there in the dirt I still participate
in the dig when I can Phelps said.
Phelps is now ECU's director of
the Coastal Archeology office. This
office is a branch of the Institute for
Historical and Cultural Research.
History and culture is what archeol-
ogy is all about. Phelps has a way of
bringing understanding and mean-
ing to unearthing broken pots, dig-
ging in the dirt and working out-
doors in the heat and humidity of
North Carolina's
coast.
"It's the chal-
lenge of seeing from
artifacts how human
beings have lived,
and how they have
behaved Phelps
said. "It's a balance
between the physi-
cal effort of the
work and the men-
tal; trying to solve
the mystery from
what they left
behind
When Phelps
was asked about the
Indians of North
Carolina, whose his-
tory and ways he
slowly discovers
throughout his
work, he answered
that apparently the
kingdom of Croatan
on the coast was pri-
marily a horticultural community,
obtaining food from farms and
goods by trading up and down the
coast.
"We kind of make too much of
the Indians being mean and war-
like. They were people just like
anyone else, and when the need
arose, they fought, and war was
something that sometimes hap-
pened. No country is truly peace-
ful, though they might have peri-
ods of peace. It's the humans that
make war with each other. I mean,
An excavation team from ECU works at one of the many Croatan historical sites.
PHOTO COURTESY OF OR. DAVID PHELPS
we like to think of our country as a
peaceful one
"Archeology gives a very com-
fortable perspective on humanity.
You see that different things hap-
pen throughout the course of histo-
ry that are thought of as crises
large problems that must be dealt
with. In studying the span of
human history you see that these
'crises' are just momentary phe-
nomena and with humanity you
have the comfort of time
After studying centuries of
human history Phelps thinks that
not much has changed in the world.
"WellI don't think that much has
SEE EARTH, PAGE t
Summer spent with state medical examiners office
Senior biology major
takes part in autopsies
Michael D. McElwain
STAFF WRITER
For most students, this summer was spent
on getting that perfect tan at the beach,
watching reruns on television or visiting
family and friends. One East Carolina stu-
dent, however, has a different story to tell.
Kamlyn Jones, a senior biology and pre-
med student at ECU, had the opportunity
to travel and learn about our state and fed-
eral government. She describes the experi-
ence as rewarding and fun but also likened
it to a regular 40-hour work week.
Jones worked for the Institute of
Government and enjoyed a summer
internship with the North Carolina medical
examiners office. As a member of the
Institute, she visited state and federal gov-
ernments. While in the medical examiners
office, she helped work on autopsies.
'This watching autopsies has helped
me with anatomy. It was a very unique
experience Jones said. "It's something
you would have not missed if given the
opportunity
Out of 250 applications, Jones was one
of 20 chosen to intern with the Institute.
She started the process with an application
in January, had an interview competing
against 100 to 200 people in March, and
was told she had a position as a state intern
in late April. That was when things got
busy.
"It was a 10-week program and we cov-
ered a lot Jones said.
Though primarily with the medical
examiners office, Jones fit in a lot of other
activities as well. She attended weekly
seminars on such topics as cloning, sex
education in public schools, and morals and
ethics in politics. She also spent time visit-
ing different divisions of the state govern-
ment and attended task force meetings
such as child fatalities.
While in Raleigh, Jones stayed with the
other interns at Meredith College. Rising
at 5:30 in the morning and returning to the
dorm after 5 p.m. made for a long day, but
Jones still found time to unwind.
"We got to relax some and watch
movies she said. However, the work is
what she enjoyed the most.
Just a week prior to the deadly shootings
on Capitol Hill, Jones traveled to
Washington, D.C. There, she had the
opportunity to meet with the local repre-
sentatives in the House and Senate.
Senior Kamlyn Jones is one of few selected for government
internships at the State Medical Examiner's Office
PHOTO BY MICHAEL MCELWAIN
"We stayed for a couple of days and had
fun Jones said. The "fun" included not
only the meetings on Capitol Hill, but also
a private tour of the White House where
she met Buddy, the President's dog and a
visit to Washington think tanks like the
Heritage Foundation.
Most of the summer, however, was
spent in North Carolina at the center of our
state government�Raleigh. She was able
to take tours of Central Prison and
Women's Prison and she attended a
reception for the state interns at the
governor's mansion where she met
Governor Hunt.
Because of her interest in biolo-
gy, Jones enjoyed working in the
medical examiners office with other
interns. She spent time in the vari-
ous divisions at the office and went
over old cases. But it was when she
went to the scene of an accidental
death that proved to be one of her
most interesting experiences.
"Visiting a death scene was unique
and kind of morbid Jones said.
Due to reasons of confidentiality,
Jones could not elaborate on what
happened or give many details of
the case. She said she had the
opportunity to go to the scene while
helping a medical examiner investi-
gator.
Back in Greenville, Jones is relaxed and
happy to be home. The 20 year-old
Washington, N.C. native smiles and her
voice is hurried with excitement as she tells
about her summer work. Her voice changes
and she gets serious, however, when she
talks about being at home.
"It was really fun, but I am extremely
happy to be at my apartment Jones said,
adding that she is ready for her next semes-
ter here at ECU.
Right now, Jones hopes to go on to med-
ical school and she is interested in family
medicine and medical missions at home
and abroad. The internship has helped her
she said.
"If nothing else, the experience has
helped me meet people and meet top dogs
in the state Jones said.
This is actually the second internship
for Jones. The first one was during the
summer between her junior and senior year
at high school. She had the chance to work
with the American Heart Association as an
intern at ECU. She worked in the Brody
Building at the ECU School of Medicine
and the experience helped her in deciding
to choose ECU for her degree.
The opportunity for her latest intern-
ship may have not come along at all.
"Most interns in this program come
from Chapel Hill since that's where the
Institute for Government is located Jones
said. "If not for Mrs. Carr, I would not have
found out about this
Linda Carr is a coordinator at the coop-
erative education department here at
ECU. Jones gives credit to the cooperative
education department in helping secure
her internship.
B0BTMtiSPUR
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Eatt Carolinian
storical sites.
ec chat these
Ticntary phe-
humanity you
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is thinks that
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hat much has
Elf
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19 Tuudir, August 18, 1998
features
Th� Eist Carolinian
Scholarship recipients outstanding freshmen
Jeffrey Todd Kornegay Ian Cummings Bloom Jon Christopher Rogers
ronr. Calypso, NC
From: Kernersville, NC
From: Griffon, NC
Hobbies:
Basketball, tennis, drawing, painting, lifting weights, building
models and playing the violin.
National honor society, service club, quiz bowl
team and science club.
Hobbies:
Reading, going to the movies and a great "baseball fan
Key club, quiz bowl team, Spanish club and
the mam and science competition teams.
Hobbies:
Computers, statistics and auto racing
Emily Christa Holtz Elizabeth Lee Glasgow Joshua Hamilton Hicks
From: LaPlata, Md
prom; Lithonia, Ga
� xonwVirginia Beach, Va
Hobbies:
Photography, dance, needlework, collecting unicorns and
Barbie collectibles.
Hobbies:
v
Conductinfrmusicas well as playing French horn
and baritone.
Student council, Future Teachers of America,
the Bible club, and the Spanish honor society.
Hobbies:
Volunteer at the public library, sings in the church choir and
assists Spanish introduction in an elementary school.
Kristen Elizabeth Boswell Kim McCumber
Kemp
continued (torn page 17
Prom: Rocky Mount, NC
I liirh School Attended
Southwest Edgecombe High School
Hieh School A
Student council, national honor society,
service club, monogram club and science club.
Hobbies:
Athletics, traveling and music.

Unavailable
From: Spring Lake, NC
N.C. School of Math and Science
ah School At
Student council, debate team, Asian cultures
club, Native American club and newspaper staff.
Hobbies:
Civic club activities, tutoring and volunteer at
Womack Army Hospital.
known people on the cover
"I wanted the option to com-
pete with Rolling Stone
Kemp said. "I felt we should be
writing for a larger audience
Though writing skills devel-
oped into a career for Kemp, he
feels that it wasn't what he
learned in school, but what he
learned outside of the class-
room and with his band that
directed him into his career
choice.
"I remember most what I
learned outside of school
Kemp said. "When you leave
home there is so much to learn
outside of academics. You have
to learn to live
When asked what makes his
job enjoyable, Kemp replied
that in the beginning it was the
thrill of dealing with the stars
he had idolized all his life, like
the Allman Brothers, The
Rolling Stones and Bob Dillon.
But, now that the thrill has
begun to wear away, he now
finds himself thrilled by seeing
how the artists tick and tapping
into their creativity.
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20 Tirndiy. August 18, 1988
features
The Eiit Carolinian
ttkM
dtromcies ECU student's
experiences abroad xseekty in Ae
Featuressection. Wehaveaskmonty
that participants honestly convey
their semester or year oversees.
Got sooo homesick this morning - they had a big get
together with a bunch of host families, and I felt sooo lost
It got a little bit better, though.
I got coerced into softbalt and had fun despite myself,
and now I don't dislike the sport so much anymore.
Well, enough of the bad news, I suppose. Classes are
pretty comfortable now - at this school each class only
meets once a week for about an hour and a half. Most of
the class work gets done outside of class, though, as the
students are expected to study on their own. Right now
most of my classes are Japanese language classes - con-
versation, listening, and reading and writing. The books
for these classes arc way better than the books at ECU.
They are actually written in a way that makes sense.
So tar the only problem I've had is that the kanji (writ-
ing) class that I was in went way over my head � I needed
to know about 170 kanji for that class and I knew maybe
45 or so I don't remember the kanji very easily, and
since I don't remember those first 45 the first time, I
opted to drop to the first class to make sure I learned
them correctly. (Either way I get the same credit for it, I
just want to make sure I learn them instead of BSing my
way through a tougher class.)
But at least now I've got something to study - before,
I just plain didn't have anything to do. Now most of my
free time is spent catching up to the rest of the Japanese
students. I actually started class about a month and a half
late so I've got a bit of catching up to do.
Graphic design class is a litde different - me and James
are actually enrolled in a graduate level class here but
it's okay because we arc going over things that we learned
in the first year at ECU. Graphic design is a lot different
over here I haven't even figured out how yet, but I just
know that it is.
So far, I've only been to one art class. The
graphic design teacher, Shimakage-sensei,
took me and James out to dinner the other
night so that we could work on my schedule.
He's a pretty cool guy - while we were sit-
ting there waiting for the eel to arrive, we
played around with Shimakage-sensci's digital camera.
He made James look like a demon and stuff, it was pret-
ty funny. Here in Japan, James said that it was expected
that the professors take their students out for dinner and
such Shimkage-scnsei tried to get me to drink some the
other night, but I was still sick from before. '
James and I also got a job teaching English to this one
lady for two hours a week or so. This lady's daughter is
getting married to an American and she wants to be able
to speak English at the wedding, so she's asked us to
teach her. Pay is going to be pretty good, too, about 8,000
yen each day (about $60).
Basically, if James can't make it to a session, I'll go in
his place, and whomever teaches on a particular day gets
the money. Here in the dorm, though, we got a pretty
mixed bag. Me, James and Adam all come from the same
university - we're the only Americans in this part of town,
it seems. James kinda' stands out from the crowd with his
red hair, Adam just shaved his head bald and we're all so
darn tall. But a lot of the other students here in the foreign
students dorm speak English too - the guy sitting next to
me now is Chris - he's from Canada, and knows four lan-
guages. The four of us usually hang out with a guy from
Thailand named Rashapoon - there's a lot of other Thai
people here as well.
Most of the other foreign students here are Chinese,
but there are a few from other countries as well - Harry
(he goes by the name Aroodo, I think because it is easier
to pronounce) is from Brazil. There are people from
Malaysia, Mexico, the Phillipincs, Taiwan and even
Zimbabwe.
Communication was kinda' tough when I first got here
but I think I'm starting to get the hang of it. Most of the
Chinese people usually have excellent Japanese, but a lot
of the people here don't. A lot of the people actually pre-
fer to speak English, even though that isn't their native
language. Even the programs often get shown in English
as well - there's one channel that seems to specialize in
English-language movies - subtitled in
Japanese, of course. The news broadcasts
on the HDTVBSX channels usually have
dual audio tracks, too. Sometimes the
channels here just rip stuff directly off
American television. I was watching the
Bulls-Pacers game this morning and it
even had some of the NBC commercials in it I'm pretty
lucky English is my primary language in that respect
Sincerely,
Andre Germain
I suppose I have always been a litde different from everyone else. I
mean, isn't being different what makes us individuals? In America, tt
doesn't really matter, but in a country where individualism isn't exactly
encouraged in school, someone like me sticks out like a good meal at
Mendenhall.
It's pretty much expected for foreigners to be different here in Japan
though. In America, people come from all over the place, so it's expected
that everyone will act different In Japan, though, most of the people (I'd
probably have to say at least 90) are Japanese. So when you're not
Japanese, people have this tendency of staring.
Not that I'm a stranger to staring, I get that a lot back in the States, too.
I actually think it's kind of amusing that people here spend a good deal of
time staring at me, as if they just don't realize that I'm staring right back
at them. People dress a lot differently here, you sec. Even with ninety-
degree weather almost every day, I've only seen one person wearing
shorts in the two months since I came here.
Of course, I'm not going to start wearing
slacks just because the whole country is -
I'm American, you see.
When it all comes down to it, people
immediately spot me out in the crowd as an
American. As such, they expect me to act
differently, so if I do something stupid, it just confirms what they were
thinking all along. If I do the right thing, though, it usually scares people,
so I make a point to learn the correct way to do things just for that purpose.
Which isn't to say that I like making trouble -1 don't A lot of other
Americans (no, I'm not the only one) have also recognized that people
expect Americans to act stupid and do the best to live up to that expecta-
tion. Then again, I think some Americans would do that even if they
weren't in Japan.
On the plus side, though, I'm actually kinda' glad that I'm American
instead of another country's citizen. A lot of the signs here are printed in
English as well as Japanese, which makes it a little bit easier than if my
native language were, say, Spanish or Swahili. Aside from that, I can go to
just about any video store and find about as many movies from America as
I can movies from Japan, most of them conveniently in English with
Japanese subtides.
And in probably the weirdest twist of fate - although the Japanese, on
the whole, appear not to like Americans, a lot of them sure wouldn't mind
dressing in American clothes and listening to American music. I don't
think I'll ever be able to listen to Green Day again without having flash-
backs of Japanese punk-wannabees jumping about to music
In the meantime, though, I'm making a point to write about as much
of the Japanese cultural differences as possible, like how the Japanese
word mansion usually means "an apartment about the size of a dorm
room To say that things arc a little different here would be a gross under-
statement.
Sincerely,
Andre Germain
Mr
I! Student Center
enti
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Face it: In order to survive college, you've got to use computers.
Don't worry � We've got 'em.
Located on the ground floor between the Outer Limitz Bowling Center and the billiards
center, the computer lab at Mendenhall features brand new Pentium-based and Power
Mac computers, color and laser printers, and desk scanners. And there's always an
assistant ready to help.
OPEN MONDAY-FRIDAY 8 A.M10 P.M SATURDAYSUNDAY 1 P.M10 P.M.
ZtOKNOCK EM DOWN
Check out the Outer Limitz Bowling Center in Mendenhall Student Center's basement.
Try Glow-Blowling (unlimited bowling under black light) every 2nd and 4th Saturday of
each month from 8-11 p.m. It costs just $6.25 from 8-11 p.m $5.50 from 9-11 p.m.
(includes shoe rental). Come hungry for free pizza and drinks from 8-9 p.m.
Give your Monday a boost from 1 -6 p.m. with 50-cent bowling (shoe rental included.)
Make Wednesday and Friday discount days by rolling 10 frames for just1 (shoe rental
included) between 1 -6 p.m.
Waitthere's more! You can get 50 cents off a game just by picking up a "Your Place to
Be"flier at the Information Desk; coupons are found on back of flier. Call 328-4740 for
Outer Limitz hours
miwk'EMUP
Find your inner pool shark at the Mendenhall Student Center billiards center. The bil-
liards center has 12 tables, and it only costs $2 to play for an hour. If you pick up a "Your
Place to Be"flier at the Information Desk, you get 50 cents off; coupons are found on
back of flier. OPEN SUNDAY-THURSDAY 1 P.M10:30 P.M FRIDAY 1 P.M11:30 P.M
SATURDAY NOON-11:30 P.M.
ZmR FREE FLICKS
Watch all the blockbuster movies � for free.
Just bring your ECU One Card and you and a guest can catch great movies all year long.
Our premier film stars Dustin Hoffman, Sharon Stone, and Samuel L. Jackson in the sci-fi
adventure Sphere (PG-13). AUG. 20-23 AT 8 P.M. AT HENDRIX THEATRE
mWiLLOiuff
Classes just started, but it's already time for a break.
Relax in the Cynthia Mendenhall TV Lounge at Mendenhall Student Center.
Catch sports, news, movies, or the soap operas on our big-screen TV while lounging on
our comfy sofas and chairs.
ZoiscJwttWuRm
Join organizations, get involved on campus, and learn how to be a leader.
The Student Leadership Development Programs offers a wide range of programs
designed to tap into your potential.
For more information, call 328-4796.
24.
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I






22 Tuesday, August 18, 1998
features
Tht Eiit Carolinian
covering the
Pirates
te Street
I
It's still legal to sleep in
two downtown parks
during the day
RALEIGH (AP) It's still legal to
sleep in two downtown parks dur-
ing the day.
The City Council narrowly
defeated on Tuesday a proposal to
ban camping or sleeping in two
downtown parks at all hours.
City Manager Dempsey
Benton had proposed extending a
nighttime sleeping ban in Moore
Square and Nash Square parks to
24 hours a day.
Benton said homeless men,
whose numbers are rising sharply,
virtually take over the parks,
intimidating other park users and
interfering with maintenance.
The council's four
Republicans, including Mayor
Tom Fetzer, supported the plan.
But the council's four
Democrats opposed it because
they said it didn't address the
overall issue of homelessness.
The Downtown Raleigh
Alliance, a private-public partner-
ship of major downtown property
owners, endorsed the proposed
law.
Lawsuit accuses LA com- Wally the wallaby
pany of e-mail 'spamming
with wrong return
on the loose
DURHAM (AP) A Los Angeles
company has been accused of using
a Durham company's electronic-
mail return address when sending
unsolicited "mass junk mailings" on
the Internet.
Netmar Inc. of Durham filed the
lawsuit in Durham County Superior
Court on Thursday against
Worldtouch Network Inc. and its
owners, identified as Christopher
Lee Knight and Jane Doe Knight.
The lawsuit seeks $780,000 in
damages and an injunction against
Worldtouch. Worldtouch officials
could not be immediately reached
for comment at the company office.
According to the lawsuit,
Netmar designs web sites and pro-
vides other services to Internet
users, but it says its reputation has
been harmed by Worldtouch's
alleged use of Netmar's return
address when sending "electronic
garbage and pollution" on the
Internet � mainly computer soft-
ware advertisements.
RALEIGH (AP) Wally the wal-
laby has wandered from home. His
owners, Robert and Sharon
Snyder, spent Tuesday night dri-
ving around northern Wake
County, hoping for a glimpse of
Wally, whom they describe as
clean and mild-mannered.
There was a report of the mar-
supial romping through a subdivi-
sion and one person even caught
the animal on videotape.
The Snyders drove to the
neighborhood, but Wally had
already hopped along.
They hope that Wally will
come home after he gets bored.
"Maybe he'll find that the grass
isn't greener out there Sharon
Snyder said.
Wally has a son, Roo, and
another offspring on the way. He
has two mates, Scarlett and
Felicity. Inside his spacious pen
are plenty of grass to graze on and
an apple tree.
In addition to the four walla-
bies, the family has 12 ostriches,
three emus and three African
pheasants.
How do wu feel about the recent
deal ECU made with Pepsi?
Amanda
Blackmail
19 years old
Nursing major
sophomore
"WelL.it doesn't really
matter to me
Kimberly
Jackson
18 years old
Biology major
sophomore
"I think it sucks. A lot
of people like Coke
instead (Even though
it's the same thing)
Jeff Day
38 years old
English
Department
Graduate Student
"I think it's outra-
geous and scandalous
that 60 of that money
went to athletics, once
again supporting the
misconception that this
is an athletic franchise
Meet the People
� Name: Greg Asbury
� Major: Economics
� Hobby "Iguesssports.
Rollerblading, running,
racquetball
� Name: Yaqoob Mohyddin
� Major: Anthropology
� Hobby "Smoking expensive
cigars
"A little lie is like a little pregnancy, it doesn't take
long before everyone knows
C.S. Lewis
"A friend is someone who has the same
enemies you have
Abraham Lincoln
"All of the biggest technological inventions created by
man - the airplane, the automobile, the computer -
says littie about his intelligence, but speaks
volumes about his laziness
Mark Kennedy
"A happy person is not a person in a certain set of cir-
cumstances, but rather a person with a certain
set ofattmtdes
Hugh Downs
"A good sermon sltould have a good beginning and a
good ending, and they should be as close
together as possible
George Burns
WELCOME
BACK
STUDENTS
23 Tuudiy,
Aa
Help ova
with grot
Aman
FEAT1
The key to su
dally during
To make it tc
many of your v
true, you must
on academics,
mate party.
A successfu
former ECU s
vice president
ment at MT
from luck, but
determination
should start
college career.
E
really changed,
time goes by, a
but humans s
experience. It
death, and lov
search for food,
ways of cheatii
the experienc
doubt things
The countries
but people
Technology
don't, really
Phelps addi
favorite show
which depicts
future still tryii
differences, be
selves and othc
However, tl
JC.






23 Tuesday. August 18, 18
features
The East Carolinian
Academic standing important to future
Help available to those
with gooes in distress
Amanda Austin
features editor
The key to success is work, espe-
cially during your college years.
To make it to the top and make
many of your wildest dreams come
true, you must first place emphasis
on academics, not finding the ulti-
mate party.
A successful career, like that of
former ECU student Mark Kemp,
vice president of music develop-
ment at MTV, comes not only
from luck, but from hard work and
determination. This process
should start now with your
college career.
According to Gene
Owens, common mistakes
made by first and second
year college students are
assuming college will be
like high school, failure to
develop a balance
between academic and
social activities, losing aca-
demic motivation, practic-
ing poor test-taking skills
and failure to attend class-
es regularly. All problems
which lead to an unsuc-
cessful college career and
lurk in the shadows when
applying for jobs.
"Students have to prac-
tice self-discipline and that
takes a level of maturity
many first-and second-year stu-
dents haven't developed ade-
quately Owens said. "Successful
students attend class, prioritize
A student spends her free time preparing for her next
FILE PHOTO
responsibilities, ask questions and
practice self-discipline
Those students who do some-
how manage to fall through the
Earth
continued from page 19
really changed Phelps said, "the
time goes by, and cultures change,
but humans still have the same
experience. It's the same life, and
death, and love the same daily
search for food. We may find better
ways of cheating these things, but
the experience is still there. I
doubt things will really change.
The countries or the politics may,
but people will always fight.
Technology changes, people
don't, really
Phelps added that one of his
favorite shows was Babylon 5,
which depicts humans in the far
future still trying to work out their
differences, both between them-
selves and other races.
However, the advances in tech-
nology have been helpful in the
practice of archeology. In the
1800s, related Phelps, archeology
was really able to take off. Then in
the 1960s technology gave
research and discovery a real boost.
Radar, computerized cataloging of
artifacts and radio-carbon dating
have all been implemenjted in the
search for how we used to live long
ago.
Phelps has been working long
enough to see quite a few of these
changes. He had an early interest
in the field, he said, when he was
about eight years old and had an
uncle who was an archeologist.
"He had a farm nearby, and he
used to take me out there and put
me to work picking up pieces of
pottery and things
Later Phelps served in the U.S.
Air Force and then pursued an
education in architecture, but was
soon to become interested in
archeology once again.
"I became sort of disenchanted
with architecture, and found that
archeology had a sort of aura of
mystery and investigation that I
liked more than planning water
pipes and weight loads of beams in
buildings
In forty years of archeology,
Phelps said, he has never been dis-
appointed. He has achieved his
goals and worked with some excel-
lent people and places. Most of his
work has been in Florida, Georgia
and North Carolina, with a few
other places here and there. He
loves his work, and the meaning
and importance behind it. And
although we've seen the movies
about Indiana Jones and Nazis and
magic artifacts, I know that the real
knowledge will be slowly found by
people like the tall, quiet Dr.
David Phelps, working patiently to
uncover as much of our past as he
can.
cracks have many places
to turn to for help. The
office of undergraduate
studies operates the acad-
emic difficulty report pro-
gram, the Academic
Support Center also offers
a variety of workshops and
counseling sessions on
topics such as major selec-
tion, study skills and time
management.
Tutoring is also an
option available to stu-
dents as is Supplemental
Instruction, which is avail-
able through the office of
undergraduate studies.
Students with falling
grades are placed in an
awkward situation when it comes
to declaring a major or even gradu-
ating, in many cases it just can't be
done.
class.
Haklp available for thoan In ac�deml
1. Office of Undergraduate Studies
AcademicPtMcutty Report Program
Counseling workshop
Tutoring
Supplemental Instruction
2. Canter for Counseling and Student Pavslopment
Individual and group'assistance
3. The Writing Canter
A: The Heading Canter
5, Math Tutoring Program
0. Mentoring through Minority Affairs v
7. Freshman Seminar
6. First Year Experience Program
9. Residence Hall Academic Support Program
SOURCE: OFFICE Of UM�RURAOUAT� STUDIES
"Many majors require a cumu-
lative grade point average of 2.5 or
higher Owens said. "Students
with low grades have the added
stress of working themselves out
of the academic hole
With all the help available to
students on campus it is hard to
imagine why a student should be
performing badly and if life-long
success is not an incentive, it
should be kept in mind that those
on academic probation are not eli-
gible for financial aid.
The nightmare of
mental illness
WASHINGTON (AP) The
nightmare of mental illness began
subtly for the Mosers, when their
studious son dropped out of college
and his personality changed. By age
30, he wrote 40-page letters
describing men "beamed down
from the night sky He threw a
hammer at his father and carried a
machete.
The assault helped the Rev. R.
Leroy Moser and his wife persuade
a Massachusetts judge to send their
son to a psychiatric hospital, but
state law still let him refuse med-
ication. Once calm, he was released
and a few years later attacked his
parents with jagged glass. After five
years in jail, still unmedicated, he
disappeared, then landed in jail
again.
The Northampton parents' saga
sounds eerily familiar. Russell
Weston Jr the schizophrenic
accused of shooting to death two
police officers in the nation's
Capitol, had his own story of years
without treatment and a family
unable to get him help.
"What they experienced is the
nightmare many of us have lived
with Jane Moser said, her voice
trembling. "The story of Russell
Weston, of our David, of many oth-
ers I'm afraid, are at least the norm
for the mentally ill in our country
Now, advocates hope the
Capitol shootings could lead to help
for the nation's thousands of
untreated patients. Democrats and
Republicans in Congress have
asked the National Alliance for the
Mentally III to draft suggestions on
improving mental-health care, and
a bill is expected when Congress
returns in September.
Through the 1960s, the mental-
ly ill were routinely institutional-
ized in asylums tagged "snake pits.
"Then scientists discovered
antipsychotic drugs, and reformers
successfully argued that forcing
SEE IllNESS. PAGE 25
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Schizophrenia at a glance
CHICAGO (AP) An estimated 5
million Americans have a serious
mental illness. Among the worst is
schizophrenia, which afflicts 2.5
million.
The disease causes hallucina-
tions and delusions, and patients
are unable to separate reality from
the warped images in their minds.
Paranoid schizophrenics, who have
a more severe form of the disease,
are obsessed with particular delu-
sions, especially the belief that
someone is controlling or endan-
gering them. Other symptoms
include incoherent speech, an
inability to feel pleasure and with-
drawal.
Many schizophrenics are reclu-
sive. Scientists say violence is rare
in treated patients, and most vio-
lence is directed at relatives, other
caregivers or at the patients them-
selves. One in 10 schizophrenics
commits suicide.
Schizophrenia is a brain disease
that often strikes between adoles-
cence and age 30. Sophisticated
medical scans show schizophrenics'
brains contain abnormalities, both
in structure and in how neurons
fire, that make them function dif-
ferently from healthy people's
brains.
Treatment has significantly
improved in the last five years.
Older medicines like Haldol could
control some symptoms and were
available in long-acting injections
that could work for several weeks.
But they didn't help all symptoms
and could cause severe side effects,
including Parkinson's-like prob-
lems with movement
They have given way to newer
drugs with significantly fewer side
effects, such as Zyprexa and
Risperdal.
With continuing medication,
about 25 percent of schizophrenics
recover enough to support them-
selves and function in society. Dr.
Karen Weihs of George
Washington University said.
Study shows drug-free, mentally
ill patients non-violent citizens
CHICAGO (AP) A new study has
found that mentally ill people who
are drug-free are no more violent
than their neighbors.
The finding backs up what
mentally ill people and their fami-
lies have known for years, says
Andrea Cooke, executive director
of the a Chicago-based Mental
Health Consumer Education
Consortium. But surveys show that
it's not what comes to mind when
many Americans think of psychi-
atric patients. Cooke knows. She's
schizophrenic.
"I don't really fit the bill. I have
a masters degree I'm able to
work Cooke says. "And I don't
think I'm unusual
The study, published in the
May issue of the Archives of
General Psychiatry, followed 951
acute psychiatric patients in the
year after their discharge in 1994
from hospitals in Pittsburgh,
Kansas City and Worcester, Mass.
Researchers compared the find-
ings with a sample of 519 non-
patients who lived in the same
neighborhoods as the patients dis-
charged in Pittsburgh.
They found that discharged
mental patients with substance
abuse problems are five times as
likely to commit acts of violence as
people without drug problems,
while non-patients with substance
Illness
continued from page 23
unwilling Americans into psychi-
atric wards violated their civil
rights. State hospitals began clos-
ing, and the era of "de-institution-
alization" began with promises
from politicians to spend money on
community-based care.
Advocates for the mentally ill
say that care never materialized:
More than half of schizophrenics
receive inadequate therapy, scien-
tists reported this spring. Fewer
than 30 percent get appropriate
medication, and no more than 10
percent live in areas like Wisconsin
where comprehensive care known
to reduce relapse is provided.
Up to half the nation's homeless
may suffer mental illness, includ-
ing schizophrenia and manic
depression. Advocates estimate
159,000 mentally ill people are
jailed merely to await psychiatric
hospital openings, not for breaking
laws. There are fewer than 70,000
publicly funded psychiatric beds,
abuse problems had three times the
violence rate of the general popula-
tion.
But the violence rate was about
the same for patients and non-
patients who were drug-free.
John Monahan, one of the
study's co-authors, says he hopes
the findings will help undo some of
the misconceptions he believes
have driven public policy.
He points to moves in the late
1960s to allow involuntary admis-
sion to psychiatric facilities for
patients commonly deemed "dan-
gerous to self or others
"I think the public's fears arc
greatly exaggerated said
Monahan, a psychologist at the
University of Virginia School of
Law.
The study did find that alcohol
and other drugs did make everyone
studied dangerous to others, partic-
ularly family members. Because of
that, Monahan and his colleagues
also arc calling for better integra-
tion between providers of mental
health services and substance
abuse treatment.
"Often times, the discharged
patients don't get from one to the
other Monahan says. "They fall
between the cracks
Ken Steelc, a schizophrenic
from New York, agrees.
"For the vast majority this
down from 500,000 in the 1960s.
Two-thirds of hospitals expel
mental patients whose insurance
runs out during treatment, a health
journal reported last year.
Overlying such figures:
Americans do have a constitutional
right to be, well, crazy. Patients can
be forced into hospitals or to take
medication only if a judge deems
them dangerous to themselves or to
others. A few states allow forced
treatment for the "gravely dis-
abled
Particularly schizophrenics
often refuse medical care. The dis-
ease affects a brain region responsi-
ble for judgment, so they truly
don't know they're sick, Dr. Karen
Weihs of George Washington
University said.
Yet most mental care comes
from community clinics that don't
treat patients unless they show up
for appointments.
Indeed, Wcston, the Capitol
shooting suspect, was discharged
from a Montana hospital, moved to
his parents' Illinois home and soon
stopped taking his medicine. The
local mental health clinic won't dis-
stigma of violence and other persis-
tent and inaccurate myths keep us
in the closet says Steelc, who now
fights for rights for the mentally ill.
He says that even when he was
abusing alcohol, he didn't hurt any-
one.
"The only thing I've ever been a
danger to is myself says the 49-
year-old, who spent 32 years in
state hospitals in New York some of
that time on suicide watch.
Now on medication that has
made him "delusion-free and
voice-free" for three years, Steele is
well enough to help plan public
events for the mentally ill, includ-
ing a picnic this Sunday in New
York for 5,000 people.
The event is meant, in part, to
counter the common image of
mentally ill street people.
"The most visible aspects of
serious mental illness are those sit-
uations where something has gone
wrong says Robert Bernstein,
executive director of the Bazclon
Center for Mental Health Law in
Washington. "But for the most part,
mentally ill people live successfully
and they're good neighbors and you
don't hear about violence. You
don't hear about it because you
don't necessarily know they have
mental illness
cuss Weston but told The
Washington Post it can do no more
than urge patients by telephone
and mail to come in.
What works? Madison, Wis
pioneered a program that helps the
mentally ill function in communi-
ties with lower relapse and hospi-
talization rates, studies show. A
"treatment team" is on 24-hour
call. They watch patients swallow
medicine, intervene with landlords
who want patients evicted for
bizarre behavior and even teach
relatives how to interact calmly
with patients to prevent stress that
can cause a relapse. Such services
are offered statewide only
in Wisconsin, Rhode Island, New
Hampshire and Michigan and
in scattered cities in 25 other
states, said
5
I
en S
08 &�
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9
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Numbers
Q male professors
I J were employed during
spring semester 98.
Ajjg female professors
I A� were employed during
spring semester 98.
?Writing Experience
Required
�Minimum GPA 2.0
�Must be able to meet
weekly deadlines
7,631
male students
were enrolled
for spring semester 98.
female
10,485
students were enrolled for spring
semester 98.






26 TuMdiy. August 18, 1998
features
Th� Eltt Carolinian
Misunderstood melon: cantaloupe consumption at a,ll-time high
LOS BANOS, Calif. (AP)
George Meek squats and parts the
broad green leaves shielding ripe
cantaloupes from the broiling San
Joaquin Valley sun. He plucks a
solid cantaloupe from the vine and
slices it open with a pocketknife.
The orange flesh glows like a neon
sign and gives off an unmistakable
musky odor.
Chewing on the juicy, sweet
melon, it is easy to see why
Americans are eating more can-
taloupes than ever a record 11.7
pounds per capita in 1997, accord-
ing to the U.S. Department of
Agriculture. That's a 27 percent
jump from 1990 levels, and it's
expected to keep increasing.
"We never used to sell this vol-
ume of melons said Don Sorani, a
produce buyer for the Berkeley,
Califbased Andronico's Market
chain who has been in the business
for about 40 years. "It has a lot to do
with diets. People are just eating
healthier now
Cantaloupe is gaining on
America's favorite melon, water-
melon. Per capita consumption of
watermelons has risen 21 percent
since 1990 to 16.1 pounds. Honey
dew rounds out the melon catego-
ry at 2.6 pounds, a 24 percent
increase.
The melon boom comes at a
time when health-conscious shop-
pers are demanding more fresh
fruits and vegetables.
Supermarkets eager to distinguish
themselves from discount ware-
house stores have responded by
beefing up the produce section.
Where stores a decade ago stocked
some 100 produce items, they now
routinely offer more than 3Q0.
Annual sales of produce in super-
markets grew to $34.9 billion in
19 from $25.1 billion in 1986,
according to Supermarket Business
magazine.
Shoppers looking for healthy
foods turn to cantaloupe for its high
levels of vitamin C and beta-
carotene. The melon may even
help prevent cancer, said Elyse
"It's not that hard to grow can
taloupes. Just plant the seeds
and add water
George Meek
cantalopue grower
Robin, a registered dietitian in San
Francisco.
The cantaloupe also boasts a
thick and scaly, or "netted rind
that may appeal to consumers wor-
ried about possibly poisonous pes-
ticides.
"Melons are particularly safe to
eat because they are sealed, so con-
taminants can't move through the
plant, or at least they haven't been
shown to said Mary Peet, a
horticulture professor at North
Carolina State University.
"Generally if you have a melon
that's unbroken or unblemished,
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STORE LOCATED AT:
3140-B MOSELY DRIVE
GREENVILLE. NC 27858
PHONE:252-561-7654
what's inside is going to be safe
Cantaloupes are healthy, and
they also taste better than ever.
Farmers have recently bred mel-
ons that are 10 percent to 15 per-
cent sweeter than before, said
Gary Lucier, an economist with
the USDA.
Back at the Los Banos melon
farm, about 100 miles south of
San Francisco, Meek squeezes
cantaloupe juice into a short,
cylindrical device called a refrac -
tometer. The manager with
Lindemann Produce holds the
tube to his eye like a telescope to
examine the juice's sugar content.
The federal standard for top grade
melons is 9 percent sugar, but
Meek said growers typically can
produce melons that are at least 11
to 12 percent sugar. Even IS per-
cent is not unheard of.
Foreign melons are another big
reason why consumption is up.
Imports�and the resulting year-
round availability�account for
almost half of the increase since
1994, Lucier said.
During the winter and spring
months, Meek's company imports
cantaloupes from Mexico and every
Central American country except
for Belize. Shoppers who consis-
tently find cantaloupes in the
supermarket get used to buying
and eating them. .
Cantaloupe production in
California has also been on the rise
in the last few years. The state pro-
duces 60 percent of all U.S. can-
taloupes. The 19 crop was worth
$232.3 million, and ranked 23rd
among California's commodities.
"It's not that hard to grow can-
taloupes Meek said. "Just plant
the seeds and add water
Fanners actually water the crop
only three times during the 90-day
growing period. Melons require a
hot and dry climate. After
California, the top four melon-pro-
ducing states are Texas, Georgia,
Florida and Arizona.
This year, wet El Nino weather
delayed planting by a few weeks.
But the cantaloupe crop should still
be healthy because melons were
planted in other fields originally
intended for cotton, said Mike
Tanner, the Merced County agri-
culture commissioner.
Though cantaloupes have
recently grown in popularity here,
the melons have actually been
around for centuries.
Egyptian writings from 2400
B.C. are among the first known ref-
erences to
cantaloupes. The contemporary
name comes from a papal residence
in Italy called Cantaloupe ("wolf
howl"), where the melons were
grown in the 16th century.
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AUTOMOTIVE
510 N.GREENE STREET GRENVILLE, NC
Servicing all your automotive service needs. Make David's your choice
for auto repair. Convenient located to the college, hospital, medical
school, and all points in between. We perform repairs when if s broken
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Christopher Columbus brought'
melon seeds to the Americas.
In modern times, the cantaloupe
remains a misunderstood melon.
What most Americans think of as a
fruity cantaloupe is actually a
muskmelon. The real cantaloupe,
which is grown in Europe, has a
rind that looks like a peeled orange,
with a series of vertical indenta-
tions running from tip to tip.
Melons are also vegetables, not
fruits. The cantaloupe is a member
of the cucumis, or gourd, family.
Close relatives include the cucum-
ber and the squash.
"If you break open a green can-
taloupe, you'll taste the cucum-
ber Meek said.
With the surge in demand for
cantaloupes, watermelon and
honey dew, Americans are expect-
ed to eat a total of 31.9 pounds of
melons per capita this year.
The United States still has a;
long way to go to catch up with the
world-champion melon eaters.
Turkey boasts the highest per capi-
ta melon consumption, at 223
pounds, according to Lucier. The
U.S. ranks a lowly z41st
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Thi Eut Carolinian
high
lumbus brought-
ic Americas,
es, the cantaloupe
iderstood melon,
icans chink of as a
le is actually a
: real cantaloupe,
in Europe, has a
e a peeled orange,
vertical indenta-
n tip to tip.
10 vegetables, not
oupe is a member
or gourd, family,
elude the cucum-
h.
apen a green can-
aste the cucum-
e in demand for
atermelon and
ricans are expect-
f 31.9 pounds of
this year.
tares still has a;
catch up with the
melon eaters.
! highest per capi-
mption, at 223
� to Lucier. The
z41st
lent
n of
,s!
r a job
?linian
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classifieds
FOR RENT
LARGE, BRIGHT, FURNISHED. A
C. quiet room available to female
grad student in home of author near
campus. Silver line, China 10ECU
Harris Printing plant stop on 10th
St. No pets. No smoking. Share fa-
cilities. $275 all utilities included ex-
cept telephone. 752-5644.
ECU AREA, TWO AND three bed-
room houses. All with central heat
and some type of AC. Two with
fenced yards. Pets OK. Yard work
included. 830-9502.
ONLY 3 BLOCKS FROM ECU.
Large (15'x 15') room, private phone
line, cable, washerdryer. $175
month plus utilities. Call Miriam at
321-0723 for details.
ROOMMATE WANTED
GRAD STUDENT OR MATURE
non-smoker, share 2 BR with w
dryer, $220 utilities. Call 752-
2844. Close to campus.
MEDICAL STUDENT LOOKING
FOR clean graduate or nursing stu-
dent to share three bedroom duplex
one mile from hospital. If interested,
please call 758-2474.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED to
share four bedroom apartment lo-
cated at Players Club Apartments.
Call 321-7613 for more information.
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE
2 BR. 1 bath. Reedy Branch Apts.
$197mo. 12 utilities. Upper-
classman or graduate preferred. Call
Crystal, 329-1438.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
to share four bedroom apartment lo-
cated at Players Club Apartments.
Call 321-7613 for more information.
ONE OR TWO ROOMMATES
needed immediately to share 5 bed-
room house on 3rd and Rotary.
$220mo. rent. Call Natalie @ 551-
3801.
HELP WANTED
HIRING - MUST HAVE CAR and
drivers license, yard sign delivering
for a local company. Good pay. flex-
ible schedule, steady work, yard
signs are easy to handle, take from
one job-site to the next. Paid per
sign. Page Tim at 561-7156 (Handy
Helpers. Inc.). 2 positions available
CHILD CARE WORKERS NEEDED
Community Bible Study, a women's
interdenominational Bible study
needs several young women to work
with children four and under on Tues-
days 9-11:45 a.m. at First Pentecos-
tal Holiness Church at 204 Brinkley
Road, Greenville and on Thursdays
9-11:45 a.m. at Christ Presbyterian
Church at 105 Tar Road, Winterville.
to provide patient, loving care and
instruction to our youngest partici-
pants. Experience preferred, refer-
ences request, must be able to pro-
vide own transportation and make
a commitment through December
10. Call 756-9394.
NANNY NEEDED FOR TWINS. A
professional couple is seeking an
extra special nanny who will enjoy
playing, reading, and providing cre-
ative and stimulating activities for 2
good natured babies. Hours are
Monday-Friday 7:00-3:00. Will con-
sider live-in. Fax resume to 746-4702
or call 746-3805 after 3:00 p.m.
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL LOOK-
ING for student manager. Position
starts immediately thru May 4th. Will
work weekends. For more informa-
tion and application call 328-4590,
ask for Randy Rueth.
ACCT. MANAGERSFULL-TIME.
Seeking motivated and energetic
individuals, communication skills,
lifting, and professionalism are re-
quired. Advancement opportunities
and benefits. Mail or fax resumes to
Mr. Show at 353-4329 or 2400 S.
Memorial Blvd 27834. EOE
HEALTH EDUCATION, EXERCISE
Nutrition, Recreation. Nursing, and
other majors: HealthQuest Horizons
has student positions to assist with
wellness program research, wellness
assessments, health risk appraisals,
and clerical. Full-time, part-time and
internship opportunities. Stipend
pay. Call 816-5632.
MALE OR FEMALE SALES
CLERKS. 15 hoursweek. Apply at
The Big Splash Golf Range, 758-
1341.
Dapper
Dan's
Sllwi JcMdlA lS MlllV
I 7 I Wins St. l.ill 7.SJ 750
PART-TIME BABYSITTER
NEEDED Wednesday and Thursday
after school. Must provide own trans-
portation. Call 355-3476 after 4:30.
Provide references please.
COMMUNITY SCHOOLS a- REC-
REATION are looking soccer offi-
cials to officiate youth recreation
soccer game on Saturdays. Anyone
interested should call 830-4244.
PART-TIME JOBS AVAILABLE.
Joan's Fashions, a local Women's
Clothing Store, is now filling part-
time positions. Employees are
needed for Saturdays andor week-
days between 10AM and 6PM. The
positions are for between 7 and 20
hours per week, depending on your
schedule and on business needs.
The jobs are within walking distance
of the university and the hours are
flexible. Pay is commensurate with
your experience and job perfor-
mance and is supplemented by an
employee discount. Apply in person
to Store Manager, Joan's Fashions.
423 S. Evans Street, Greenville (on
the Downtown Mall).
COMMUNITY SCHOOLS ft REC-
REATION are looking for individu-
als with some knowledge of soccer
rules and good organizational skills
to be Site Supervisors for youth rec-
reation Fall soccer program on Sat-
urdays beginning August 29. Inter-
ested persons should call 830-4244.
AEROBIC INSTRUCTOR. PITT
COUNTY Memorial Hospital is seek-
ing qualified individuals to teach
aerobic classes through its Employee
Recreation and Wellness Depart-
ment. Persons will contract to teach
on a part-time basis. Interested can-
didates should contact Rose Ann
Ahne between 8AM-4:30PM at
(252)816-6501. Pitt County Memorial
Hospital.
GREENVILLE RECREATION AND
PARKS Department Fall Adult Soc-
cer Officials' Meeting. The Greenville
Recreation and Parks Department
will be holding an organizational
meeting for all those interested in
officiating in the Fall Adult Soccer
Leagues. Position pays $12-$ 16 a
game. Clinics will be held to train
new and experienced officials. How-
ever, a basic knowledge and under-
standing of the game is necessary.
The meeting will be held Tuesday.
August 11, 1998 at 6:30 PM at Elm
Street Gym. Experience require-
ments, clinic schedule, and game
fees will be discussed. For more in-
formation, please call the Athletic
Office at 329-4550 between the
hours of 2PM-7PM, Monday thru
Friday.
GREENHOUSE PRESCHOOL
NEEDS full-time and part-time teach-
ers to work Monday-Friday 2:45-
6PM. Call 355-2404 for information.
Great experience for CDFR or ELEM
majors.
LOOKING FOR A PART-TIME job?
The ECU Telefund is hiring students
for the Fall semester to contact
alumni for the ECU Annual Fund
Drive. $5.50 per hour. Make your
own schedule. If interested, call 328-
4212. M-TH between the hours of 3-
6PM
CM9M Wachovia Corponrton
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The East Carolinian
BABYSITTINGHOUSEKEEPING.
10-16 hoursweek: minimum wage.
Beginning 81798. Must be avail-
able 2:30-4:30 PM, Monday-Friday.
Phone 353-4239 after 6PM.
NEEDEDI SOMEONE TO do
teleservicing and selling of office
furniture. Must be enthusiastic, posi-
tive and willing to work. Call 931-
6904 and leave a message.
PART-TIME JOB POSITIONS avail-
able. Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department
Fall Youth Soccer Coaches. The
Greenville Recreation & Parks De-
partment is recruiting for 12 to 18
part-time youth soccer coaches for
the fall youth soccer program. Ap-
plicants must possess some knowl-
edge of the soccer skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 5-16. in
soccer fundamentals. Hours are from
3PM until 7PM with some night and
weekend coaching. Flexible with
hours according to class schedules.
This program will run from Septem-
ber to mid November. Salary rates
start at $6.15 per hour. For more
information, please call Ben James
or Michael Daly at 329-4550 after
2PM.
WANTED: NANNY TO CARE for
3 month old 8AM to 6PM Monday
through Friday. Immediate opening.
Requires 12 month minimum work
commitment, safe driving record,
nonsmoker, own transportation,
swimming skills, and CPR certifica-
tion (or willingness to complete train-
ing). Experience necessary. Salary
$300.00 weekly, social security and
vacationholidays. Send letter stat-
ing qualifications and interest, in-
cluding phone no. to: Nanny. Posl
Office Box 8088, Greenville, NC
27835.
HELP WANTED
in The East Carolinian
advertising department.
Call 328-6366 for info.
FOR SALE
IBM THINKPAD COMPUTER
Memory 8MB hard drive, 540MB
processor, Intel DX4-75MHZ. Still
has warranty. Call 752-2246.
BEAUTIFUL, HIGH QUALITY 1987
14x76 2 bedroom, 2 bath Fisher
mobile home with 14x22 deck. All
appliances and 200 amp service in-
cluded. $9,500 or best offer. Call
753-7235 or 328-6765.
DORM REFRIGERATOR $80 New
sells $159.00. 4.4 cubic feet. Used
three semesters by a neat vegetar-
ian. Very good condition. Call 757-
3283.
NEED FURNITURE777 FOR
SALE Twin bed $70. bookcase
$30. computer desk $65 or all 3 for
$ 150 OBO. great shape) Please call
Tim at 830-2122
OTHER
GOV'T. FORECLOSED HOMES
from pennies on $1. Delinquent tax,
repo's. REO's. Your area. Toll Free 1-
800-218-9000 ext. H-3726 for cur-
rent listings.
FREE CASH GRANTS! College
scholarships. Business. Medical bills.
Never repay. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000, ext. G-3726.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175.
Porsches, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMWs,
Corvettes. Also Jeeps, 4WDs. Your
area. Toll free 1-800-218-9000, ext.
A-3726.
SERVICES
1 800 WACHOVIA
WWW.WACHOVIA.COM
WACHOVIA
Uti
Started.
THE COLLEGE ACCOUNT
WORD PROCESSING AND DESK-
TOP publishing. 24 hour service
with pickup and delivery available.
Call 830-5559 for quotes on papers,
resumes, cover letters, flyers and
more.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Community Christian Church invites
you to attend a Women's Fellowship
Friday. August 21 at Community
Christian Church at 7PM. Come
learn how you can live victoriously
in every area of life as a woman, wife
and mother. Sister Delores Corbett
will be the speaker. The church is
located at 1104 North Memorial
Drive, Greenville. NC. Dinner will be
served. For more information, call
561-9143.
OPEN HOUSE AND PIG PICKIN
The Newman Catholic Student Cen-
ter welcomes all students to ECU
and wishes to announce its 11th
Annual Open House and Pig Pickin'
on Wednesday, August 26. 4-7 PM
at the Newman Center. 963 E. 10th
St. (at the foot of College Hill Drive).
Fun. food, friends and fellowship. For
more information, call Fr. Paul Faeth
(767-1991).
PERSPECTIVES - CO-SPON-
SORED BY Dept. of Medical Hu-
manities, ECU School of Medicine
& the Bioethics Center, University
Health Systems of Eastern Carolina:
Wed Aug. 26, 12:30-1:30PM Brody
2W-50: "The New Debate about
Human Germ-line Gene Therapy
John C. Fletcher, Ph.D. Professor of
Biomedical Ethics, University of VA.
Wed Sept. 9, 12:30-1:30PM Brody
2W-50: "The Trusted Doctor
Rosamond Rhodes. Ph.D. Associate
Professor of Medical Education, Di-
rector, Bioethics Education, Mt. Sinai
School of Medicine. Mon . Sept. 28,
12:30-1:30PM Brody 2W-50:
"Adressing Patients' Spirituality"
Dana E. King, M.D. Dept. of Family
Medicine, ECU School of Medicine
The public is invited to attend. For
further information, call 816-2361.
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER.
The Newman Catholic Student Cen-
ter wishes to welcome all students
to ECU and invites you to worship
with them. Sunday Masses are at
the Newman Center, 953 E. 10th
Street (2 houses from the Fletcher
Music Building). Time: 11:30AM and
8:30PM. For more information,
please call Fr. Paul Faeth, 757-1991.
GREENVILLE REC &- PARKS Fall
Tennis Programs. Adult- Beginner:
MonWed 6-7PM 99-1019. Tue
Th 7-8PM 910-1020. Intermedi-
ate: MonWed 7-8PM 99-1019.
TueTh 6-7PM 910-1020. Morn-
ing-Beginner: MonWed 9-10AM 9
9-1019. Morning-Intermediate:
MonWed 10-11 AM 910-1020.
Thursday Playday. TH. 9:15-11:30AM
910-1029. Youth-Novice I 6-7
years MW 5-5:45PM 99-1019.
Novice II 8-9 years TTh 5-5:45PM
910-1020. Afterschool I 10-13
years MW 4-5PM 99-1019.
Afterschool II 14-18 years TTh 4-
5PM 910-1020. Jr. High Girls
Team 11-14 years MTWTH 4-5:30
831-1022
ADVERTISE IN
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
CLASSIFIEDS!
CANNABIS
STUPIDA
Partnership for a Drug-Free
North Carolina CS
Partnership for a Drug-rree America
1 -888-732-3362
www.drugfreeamerica.org
"Yea. Buffy, I totally can't
believe they really printed
my letter to the editor
like. I heard they want to
publish yours too
Editor must be
Must
aslcarolinian
l
I





I
That's the number for the Student Union Entertainment Hotline.
You can find out what movies, concerts, lectures, novelty attractions, and more are coming to
ECU. If you would like to help plan these events, you can join one of the committees that
make up the Student Union. Come by Room 236 Mendenhall and pick up an application form.
Upcoming Student Union Events
KRAMER s 80 Rock: ffluic in Ihe Yideo flge
Wednesday, October 7
Hendrix Theatre 8:00 p.m.
VIRTUAL REALITY
ROAD SHOW
Tuesday, September 22
Wright Auditorium 8:00 p.m.
Student tickets are only $3.00 in advance.
All other tickets are $6.00 in advance.
ALL TICKETS AT THE DOOR WILL BE $8.00.
Get a behind-the-scene look at the Seinfeld sets, characters, and sto-
ries. Tickets are sure to go fast for this show. Get yours today from the
Central Ticket Office - Mendenhall.
StudentFacutlyStaff tickets are free in advance when valid ECU
One-Card is presented at the Central Ticket Office - Mendenhall. All other tickets are $5.00 in
advance.
ALL TICKETS AT THE DOOR WILL BE $8.00.
An exciting multimedia trip through the 80s with Barry Drake, one of rock music's foremost
historians. New artists, new hairdos, and new attitudes kept the 80s rocking. From the arrival of
MTV in the early 80s, to the rapid downfall of Milli Vanilli in the late 80s, this fast-paced
presentation will examine, celebrate, and put into perspective the music of one of the most
complicated decades in the long history of Rock & Roll.
FILMS
8:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
Free admission with valid ECU One-Card.
One guest is permitted per ID.
New this year: Blockbuster films will now be shown on Sundays,
as well as the traditional Thursday - Saturday nights.
On Wednesdays, Sd�t Cutm will feature the films from
independent filmakers and studios.
Thursday - Sunday, August 20-23
Sphere
Sdt fiimem
Wednesday, August 26
The Replacement Killers
Thursday - Sunday, August 27-30
The Big Lebowski
Wednesday, September 2
Fallen
S�dC� @ltm
Wednesday, September 9
Breaking Up
Thursday - Sunday, September 10-13
City of Angels
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' ' f






29 Tuesday, Augmt 18, 1998
sports
Tin East C$n6nm
Former Pirate Jeff Blake prepares to throw a pass during his days playing for ECU. Now the quarterback for the Cincinnati Bengals, Blake remembers ECU fondly.
FILE PHOTO
Cincinnati's star quarter back pirate at heart
Blake left 32 Priate records in his wake
Tracy M. Lah bach
STOUTS EDITOR
When Jeff Blake graduated from ECU in 1991
with a degree in construction manage-
ment, he took his athletic talent with
him and headed to the pros. However,
with personal college accomplishments
ranging from setting 32 Pirate records to
being named 1991 ECAC Player of the
Year as a senior, Blake left a mark in the
history of ECU football that is still
talked about today.
After giving ECU four strong years
as the quarterback, Blake was drafted
in 1992 by the New York Jets in the
sixth round (166th overall) where he
completed four of nine passes in three
games as a rookie. Not seeing much action with
the Jets, Blake was stolen by the Cincinnati
Bengals in 1994.
As the Bengals new starting quarterback, Blake
produced the team's first victory of the season at
Seattle on Nov. 6, and was then named AFC
Offensive Player of the Week and AFC Offensive
Player of the Month for his effort.
Success continued in 1995 as Blake was award-
ed a passer rating of 82.1, the Bengals highest
since Boomer Esiason's 92.1 rating in 1989. He
went on to lead the AFC in touchdown passes
with 28, two better than second-place John Elway,
and was selected to the AFC Pro Bowl Squad as
the No. 2 quarterback vote-getter behind Dan
Marino. When Marino withdrew due to injury,
Blake stepped up as a starter and came through to
set a new Pro Bowl record with a 93-yard touch-
down pass, connected to Pittsburgh's Yancey
Thigpen.
In 19, Blake became the first quarterback in
Bengals history to rush for 300 yards in consecu-
tive seasons, posting 309 in 1995 and 317 in 19.
He started every game and played 97.3 percent of
total offensive snaps (1059 of 1088).
Although Blake's ratio between touchdown
passes and interceptions is the best in the history
of Cincinnati football, he lost his position as a
starter for the last five weeks of 1997 as Boomer
Esiason stepped in. Bengals head coach Ken
Anderson expects that Blake will return to play at
the same level he showed in 1995 and 19.
"Jeff is a durable player who will be out there
for you every play, and he is also a mature per-
former who has proven that he won't make a big
mistake with poor judgment that could lead to an
interception Anderson said. "He struggled at
times last year but he didn't have the benefit of
the much-improved running game we developed
after Boomer took over as the starter, so Jeff
shouldn't have to carry us like he did at times
early in the season
Born in Daytona Florida, Blake came to
Greenville in 1988 to begin his college career with
the Pirates. Although he saw success in all four
seasons at ECU, his most prestigious accomplish-
ments were during 1991, his senior season.
Ranking in the top ten in total offense and
passing efficiency in NCAA statistics all season
long, Blake was named ECAC Division I-A Player
of the Week five times for his performances
against Central Florida, South Carolina,
Syracuse, Pittsburgh and Southern
Mississippi. Following the Syracuse
game, he was The Sporting News
National Offensive Player of the Week,
and his jersey was sent to Kings Island,
Ohio to be used in a display titled
"This Week in College Football
Blake spends the off-season in
Orlando, Florida, with his wife
Lewanna and three children, Emory,
Torre and Trey. As with most profession-
al athletes, staying healthy and injury
free ranks high on his list of priorities.
"Some people know how to fall when they are
hit. Some people don't Blake said. "If you know
how to fall to protect yourself when you are hit,
you won't get hurt. You just learn over the years
how to take a lick
Making the Connection
Jeff Blake is the
Son of Emory Blake, who played
in Che CFL for Toronto and was
Jeff's high school coach.
Godson of Tim Raines of base-
ball's New York Yankees.
Brother-in-law of Robert Jones,
former ecu teammate and line-
backer for the St. lewis Rams.
Source: Cincinnati Bengals Department of Media
Jeff Blake's
2 i
Accomplishments
as a senior
at ECU
-Broke 32 ECU records
between 1988 and 1991.
Named 1991 ECAC Player of
t5?e Year
:ed in the top 10 in 1991
tal offense and passing
iency in NCAA stats.
Blakejs jersey was sent to
ege Football Hall of
ter Syracuse game
whereat was used in a display
ek in College
1
ECAC Division I-A
yet of the Week five times
ihiasi.
d The Sporting News
aai Offensive. Player of
for his performance
racuse.
-Listed seventh on Heisman
Trophy list in The Sporting
-Listed in the top ten on The
Football News Heisman Trophy
list (1991).
SOURCE: ECU SPORTS
INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
Jeff Blake's Career Statistics with the Pii
COMP INT
4
37
116
203
O
2
10
60 18
PCT
44.5
52.1
52.9
65.2
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30 fttfan Atntt w. utt
sports
Thi East Carolinian
I
Football team prepares for season opener
Pirates set to kickoff 1998
onriufoot
TRAVIS Barklby
SINIOK WIITBH
The summer of 1998 was a productive one
for the ECU football team, as it prepares
for its season opener against Virginia Tech.
That was the indication that Head
Coach Steve Logan gave at the annual pre-
season football media day held on August
10.
"Academically we had a very good sum-
mer, we got ourselves in place to compete
for another year Logan said. "We had a
great summer conditioning wise
Most players spent the summer in
Greenville working with strength and con-
ditioning coach Jeff Connors. As a result,
Logan said that nearly every player is top
shape heading into three-a-days.
"We have what we call a combo drill
where we break the kids down into three
groups, skill positions and safety, tightends
and linebackers, with linemen being the
third group Logan said. They run 16
110 yard dashes. Out of 105 players, all but
12 made their times, only four of those 12
were scholarship athletes
Logan said that is one of the highest
rates that the team has had and is a
tremendous start to the season. Having the
players in good shape to start the year will
allow the team to pick up where it left off
in the spring.
"Usually in the spring we go for 15
straight days, but this year we went one
day on, one day off, and spread it over the
entire 29 day period that the NCAA
allows Logan said. "It was physical and it
was fundamental. We blocked and tackled,
blocked and tackled, blocked and tack-
led
Logan expects the Virginia Tech game
to be a very physical one.
"When practice starts it's going to be
the same thing, it's going to be very, very
physical, right up
until we get ready to
play Virginia Tech
Logan said. "When
we play Tech it is
going to be a very
physical football
game and we are
going to make sure
that our half of the
physicalness is held
up
Logan said that
the changes were
made to give the
team more of an
edge. He said that
last year the team
became "flat but
that this year's team
really embraced the
physical style of prac-
tice.
"The players
were excited about
it Logan said. "I
think they've got a
good feel for it"
One of the ques-
tion marks heading
into the season is the
development of the
offensive line and
the running game.
Of the offensive line,
Logan said that it
should be a strength.
"Last year we
played around 12 guys looking for the right
combination Logan said. "So we've got a
lot of guys with experience, and we had a
coaching change at that position that I
think will help us. I saw some immediate
results during the spring
In addition to new offensive line coach
Steve Shankweiler, former defensive line-
man Dwaync Ledford moves over to the
offensive side of the ball where he will man
the left tackle position. Ledford put on
about 10 pounds this summer while still
running around a 4.8 40-yard dash. His
Jeff Kerr hat been tabbed a preseason first-team All-Conference USA selection.
FILE PHOTO
move became possible after the emer-
gence of Brian Johnson last year on the
defensive line. The move was made to
give both players more playing time.
"You're always trying to get your 22 best
athletes on the field Logan said. "Brian
allows us to do that
With improvements being made to the
offensive line, the running game is expect-
ed to benefit greatly. Last year ECU aver-
aged a disappointing 67.5 yards a game
rushing. Sophomore Jamie Wilson backed
up Scbtt Harley last year. This year he will
be counted on to improve the Pirate
ground attack.
"Jamie Wilson is an all-around kind
of player that we will try to utilize in a
variety of ways Logan said. "He runs
routes well and has very good hands
Wilson will be lined up in the "mid-
line" position directly behind the quar-
terback, as well as offset back so that he
can come out of the backfield as a
receiver. Wilson said that he is ready to
take a bigger part in the offense.
"Last year it was kind of hard, I don't
like coming off the bench Wilson said.
"I feel more comfortable with the
offense this year. I think that with the
improvements in the offensive line it
will make my job a lot easier
"We're trying to get back to what we
enjoyed a few years ago when we had
Junior Smith and Jerris McPhail in the
backfield at the same time Logan said.
"We want to line up two backs in the
backfield a lot more than
we have the past two sea-
sons. Leonard Henry
looks like he will be able
to perform very well as
the mid-line back
On defense, there are
high expectations, espe-
cially from the front
seven.
"Our defensive unit
has got to step out on the
field and perform
Logan said. "I don't think
anyone was comfortable
with the way they per-
formed last year
"They have proven that
they can perform in the
past Logan said. "Most of
those attitude adjustments
took place all winter long
and all summer long
Junior linebacker Jeff
Kerr feels that last year was
a disappointment, and that
this year's defense will be
much improved.
"We had too much talent, strength and
speed on that team not to win more than
five games last season Kerr said. "This
year we've got better chemistry as a team
Kerr added that this year's defense is
much more experienced than it was a year
ago.
"Last year we had zero experience
going into the games Kerr said. "I had no
experience at all. Going into this year
we've gotten a little bit better because
we've been able to work with each other
this summer
While the front seven is expected to be
a strength, there are concerns about the
secondary. While there is plenty of talent,
depth might be a problem.
"Forrest Foster, Kevin Monroe, Kelvin
Suggs along with Tavares Taylor have
played a lot of football for us Logan said.
"Beyond those four it gets interesting, to
SEE FOOTBALL PAGE 31
Septembers@ Virginia Tech
September 12lT-CHATimoOGA
September 19@Ohio
October 3ARMY-0B-
October 10UAB
October 17@ Alabama
October 24@ Southern Miss
October 31HOUSTON
November 7@ Cincinnati
November 14 November 21LOUISVILLE & Memphis
��ounce �CU Sports Information Department
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:�t Carolinian
r
strength and
in more than
r said. "This
ry as a team
's defense is
it was a year
i experience
tid. "I had no
to this year
tter because
h each other
ipectcd to be
is about the
nty of talent,
mroe, Kelvin
Taylor have
' Logan said,
iteresting, to
NOOGA
Vliss
� �
31 Tuesday, August 18, 1998
sports
Tha East Carolinian
Team leaders remain key to success I
Standout players are the
ones to watch
Patrick Giovinazzo
staff writer
ECU athletics are ready to kick into high
gear. As fall classes begin, so do Pirate
sports. Men's and women's soccer, volley-
ball and cross country are ready to start off
the new season. In order to accommodate
every ECU sports fan, we've managed to
create a list of players to watch from all the
various teams.
Women's soccer is ready for the '98 sea-
son. Along with a number of talented new
recruits, the team is depending on return-
ing goalkeeper Amy Horton. Horton set a
school record when she registered 1.4
goals over average lat year.
"I think she Horton may be someone
4fTy
Jamie Mance
FILE PHOTO
Amy Horton
Flit PHOTO
to be considered for a preseason all-confer-
ence selection Head Coach Neil Roberts
said.
Women's soccer will begin the year with a
home game against High Point University on
September 1.
Men's soccer is also looking forward to a
productive season. Nearly the entire team has
been playing together for at least two years.
One to watch among these guys should defi-
nitely be Brett Waxer. A junior sweeper, Waxer
will be up for the captain position again this
year, a title he's maintained since his freshman
year.
"I'd say our captain would be one to
watch Head Coach Will Wiberg said.
The team will start the year with a chal-
lenging game at Elon College on September 2.
Volleyball will also offer some action to
Pirate sports fans this fall. Shannon Kaess, a
junior from Andover, Minnesota, will become
team captain this year. Head Coach Kim
Football
continued from page 30
say the least. We've got to play some young guys and get
some experience under their belts
Logan is pleased with the way Taylor has recovered
from the knee injury he suffered last year against Wake
Forest.
"Tavares has recovered and is running at full
strength Logan said. "I have a feeling that Tavares is
going to be a key ingredient in the secondary before it
is all over with. He has great instincts
While there are some question marks and new faces
on this team, there is a lot of talent and a lot of reason
for optimism.
"I feel real good about this team, emotionally
Logan said. "The process right now is preparing for
Virginia Tech. If we stay focused on the process, then
the outcome, hopefully, will be more wins than losses
Jamie Wilson will start the Pirates off as No. 1 running back.
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Kerri Hartling
Brett Waxer
Walker will be counting on her
again this season.
"She's been with me for
three years, since I took over
the program Walker said.
The team will open with a
home game September 1
against Campbell.
Women's cross country is
anticipating a fruitful year. Five
of the top six runners have
returned, and several new
recruits arc expected to make a
positive impact. Kerri Hartling
is a senior from Long Island,
New York. Hartling has been
team MVP the last two years
and has assumed a role of team
leader and captain. She missed
last spring's track season with an
injury, but has since recovered.
"I think she's really anxious
to come back Head Coach
Shannon Kaess
FILE PHOTO
Charles Justice said.
He went on to comment on
her dedication as a team
leader.
"She will often forego indi-
vidual accomplishments in
order to help the rest of the
team perform better
The team finished third in
the conference championships
last year. Their first meet will
be held at Coastal Carolina on
September 4.
Finally, men's cross country is preparing for a fresh
start. The team is looking to build on last year's suc-
cesses. At the conference championships last fall,
they finished fifth out of eight. A returning athlete,
Jamie Mance, is expected to continue to be a team
standout.
"He's been our top runner for the last couple
years Sports Information Director Gerald Vick said.
The first meet will be held at Coastal Carolina on
September 5.
Tennis welcomes new coach
Program kgins season
with Tom Morris
Tracy M. Laubach
SPORTS EDITOR
Tom Morris has been hired to
direct the Pirate tennis program
after spending the past eight years
as head coach at Barton College.
The previous ECU coach, Bill
Moore, resigned in May to accept a
position at Pfeiffer University.
While at Barton, Morris lead his
men's teams to six conference
championships and his women's
teams to four league titles. In a
recent press release, Morris said
that he is very anxious to have an
opportunity to work with the
"There are only a few places I
would consider leaving
Barton for, and East
Carolina was one of them. I
am indebted to Mike Hamrick
and Henry VanSant for giving
me this opportunity
Tom Morris
Head Tennis Coach
Pirates.
"There arc only a few places I
would consider leaving Barton for,
and East Carolina was one of
them Morris said. "I am indebted
to Mike Hamrick (ECU athletic
director) and Henry VanSant (ECU
associate athletic director) for giving
me this opportunity
As an athlete, Morris played for
Barton College (1976-79) where he
was a team leader and made his
mark as one of the college's most
successful student athletes in histo-
ry. He played No.l singles for all
four years, and earned All-America
recognition twice. He posted 105
career singles victories, which still
ranks as the school record at Barton.
"We are excited to have Tom
Morris coming on board to direct
our tennis program Hamrick said
in a recent press release. "His
record as a player and a coach at
Barton speak for themselves and
we feel that our tennis program can
be extremely successful with Tom
to represent us in these endeavors
Join us for
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I
I





32 Tundiy, Auguil 18, 1998
Th Eitt Carolinian
New logos help stores to higher sales
Football season predicted to
impact sales drastically
Tracv M. Laubach
SPOUTS EDITOR
When the university unveiled its "new"
look after Christmas break, there was no
celling just how successful the newest
Pirate in town would be. However, after
just one semester of representing ECU,
the new logos have become an image chat
most of che Pirate community is proud co
call their own.
"The new Pirate represents our school
with a more modernistic appeal which
leads to a better, bolder image. I think
most students have welcomed the change because
they realize that it is a new generation, and it
was time for ECU to make a statement
Chesley Black
Junior business administration major
"We have seen very mixed reactions
Sue Brown, merchandising manager of
Dowdy-Ficklen Studenc Stores said.
"Some like the new look, but some still
prefer Pee Dee. The students that have
grown up with Pee Dee have had a hard
time with the change, but by carrying mer-
chandise featuring both Pee Dee and the
newer Pirate, we are pleasing just about
everyone
Lee Workman, director of athletic pro-
motions and special events, said that at this
point it is too early to say exactly how
much sales in ECU apparel have increased
because of the new logo.
"It will take 12 to 18 months before we
will be able to see how much of an impact
the logo has had on our sales Workman
said. "Our sales have been up in the first
marketing quarter, and we have seen a very
positive response so far
Chesley Black, a junior
business administration
major, is one of many
devoted Pirate fans happy
to see the university repre-
sented by a bolder image.
"The new Pirate repre-
sents our school with a
more modernistic appeal
which leads to a better,
bolder image Black said.
"I think most students
have welcomed the
change because they real-
ize that it is a new genera-
SEE MERCHANDISE. PAGE 34
Sue Brown, merchandising manager, prepares for the school store rush
at the beginning of the semester.
PHOTO BV HEATHER BURGESS
Student Recreation Center promotes health and fitness
Wide range of activities and
services available in fall
Alex J Un�
STAFF WRITER
Are you looking for fun and fitness, adventure
and excitement on campus? All of this and a lot
more are offered by the ECU Department of
Recreational Services.
The Student Recreation Center has blos-
somed into a world of sports opportunities that
offers an endless package of activities to
accommodate the needs and interests of every
individual on campus.
While many of the traditional recreational
activities are offered, a variety of smaller pro-
grams are available as well. With more than 70
percent of the ECU population participating
in recreational activities since the opening of
the Rec. Center in January 1997, the main goal
of the department is to promote recreational
health for the entire campus.
With facilities ranging from a 10,000 square
foot weight-training room, exercise studios, an
indoor track, a climbing wall, indoor and out-
door pools, basketball, racquetball and volley-
ball courts, the Student Rec. Center provides
something for everyone.
New equipment to look for this semester
includes aqua basketball hoops, water volley-
ball nets, and in the fitness area will be an
advanced stair-stepper cardiovascular
machine.
Senior Debra Dixon said that going to the
Rec. Center is a great place to relieve stress
and be healthy.
Kyle Mattocks offers assistance to a weightlifter on the fitness floor at the Student Recreation Center.
PHOTO COURTESY OF RECREATIONAt SERVICES
"It's such a pleasure to come here, and I
love bringing my kids along Dixon said.
"The staff is friendly, polite and helpful and
the facilities are clean, have a pleasant atmos-
phere and are geared toward your comfort
Compared to recreational facilities at other
colleges, the Student Rec. Center is among the
best, according to senior physiology major
Dennis Drinkwater.
"I am a transfer studenc, so I have seen
many different facilities, but the ECU Student
Recreation Center is by far the most impres-
sive because of the new equipment"
Recreational Services offers five types of
programmed events throughout the year.
These include: Club Sports, Intramurals,
Special Events, AerobicFitness and
Adventure Programs. These programs are
organized Co promoce compecicion, team-
work, fitness and facing new challenges.
Campus Special Events are a collaborated
effort between Recreational Services,
University Housing and Campus Dining
Services Many unique activities and social
gacherings are pare of chis program, including
King and Queen of che Halls, which is a bat-
cle becween residence halls that will feature
the world's largesc slip-n-slide, and on
Parencs Weekend, a Ticanic parcy will be
held ac che Rec. Cencer in che pool.
Personal and parcner craining packages
will also be available. Parcner craining is a
SEE REC. PAGE 38
Aerobics Registration
Gold Pass ($35)
Semester Pass: Valid Aug. 24 - Dec. 18
White Pass ($20 each session)
Session 1: Valid Aug. 24 - Oct. 17.
Session 2: Valid Oct. 19 - Dec. 18
Purple Pass ($10)
Drop in Pass: Valid for any five classes
Source: EGtl Department of Recreational Services
mmmmmmmmmm
Personal Training Packages
1 session
2 sessions
4 sessions
8 sessions
12 sessions
16 sessions
$20
$36
$64
$112
$144
$160
A fitness assessment and nutrition analysis are
included in packages 8, 12 and 16.
Source: EGt I Department of Recreational Services
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MTGIF at O'Cools Ifs a great way to start the weekendl
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tThe Sunday Ticket is at O'Cools I Watch your favorite pro
team every Sunday.
In the Winn Dixie Shopping Center
605 Greenville Blvd ' 355-2946
i
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i
I
3
33 Tundiy. Auq
QI
Tinnin,
repk
For the first til
teim will head i
number one qua
Last year's st
was signed by t
players to comp
year senior Er
Weaver and red-
for the top spot.
Head Coach;
won't decide on
QB's during the
"I gave all th
spring Logan s
do the job
While all thn
son, chances arc
game.
"We won't p
probably play t
Logan said.
When asked r
ing games, Loga
tern and he won'
series or on a qu:
"We'll go by
how our team is
One of the bi
quarterbacks is tl
been in the prog
ed playing time:
in his career. La:
teams, serving a:
During the final
five of 11 passes
Garrard was r
the top-rated qu
he signed with
240), speed and
to make an im
Garrard looked i
completing six o
STT
S1
has ii
All
STUD!
Doi
men





33 Tuudiy, Auguit 18, 1998
sports
Thi East Carolinian
QB position to be shared by three
Tinnin, Weaver and Garrand to
replace Dan Gonzalez
Travis Barkley
senior writer
For the first time since 1992, the ECU football
team will head into the season without a clear cut
number one quarterback.
Last year's starter Dan Gonzalez graduated and
was signed by the Dallas Cowboys, leaving three
players to compete for the number one job. Fifth
year senior Ernest Tinnin, sophomore Bobby
Weaver and red-shirt David Garrard are all battling
for the top spot.
Head Coach Steve Logan says that he probably
won't decide on one starter and will play all three
QB's during the year.
"I gave all three QB's equal repetitions in the
spring Logan said. "We've got three guys that can
do the job
While all three will play at some time this sea-
son, chances are they won't all play in the same
game.
"We won't play three in a game, but we will
probably play two in every game this season
Logan said.
When asked how he plans to rotate his QB's dur-
ing games, Logan said that there isn't any set sys-
tem and he won't switch guys strictly on a series by
series or on a quarterly basis.
"We'll go by feel Logan said. "It depends on
how our team is playing
One of the biggest concerns about this group of
quarterbacks is their lack of experience. Tinnin has
been in the program since 1994, but has seen limit-
ed playing time and has attempted only two passes
in his career. Last year he played mainly on special
teams, serving as the short man on the punt team.
During the final spring practice, Tinnin completed
five of 11 passes for 60 yards.
Garrard was regarded by many prep observers as
the top-rated quarterback in North Carolina when
he signed with ECU in 19. With his size (6-3,
240), speed and arm strength, Garrard is expected
to make an impact at some point this season.
Garrard looked sharp in the final spring practice,
completing six of 10 passes for 164 yards. He also
rushed for 56 yards on eight carries. Garrard also
showed his ability to avoid the pass rush and find
receivers down field.
Weaver saw action in three games last year and
completed four out of eight passes for five yards
with one interception. While Weaver is somewhat
small when compared to Tinnin or Garrard, (he is
listed at 6-0,190), he makes up for lack of size with
blazing speed. Weaver is one the fastest players on
the team. Because of his speed, many have won-
dered if Weaver will be moved to another position,
such as safety or wide receiver.
"He could, but we
won't be going any-
where Logan said. "He
certainly has the ability to
do those other things
Kevin Ward and Arnie
Powell came to ECU as
quarterbacks but were
moved to other positions
last year. Ward is now a
safety and Powell will
back up Troy Smith at
split end.
"It's important to go
into a season with three
QB's Logan said. "We
put some option in our
offense, so our guys will
take some hits this year.
We are going to need
three quarterbacks that
can play
Besides Tinnin,
Garrard and Weaver, the
only other QB on the ros-
ter is true freshman
Richard Alston. Alston,
out of Warrenton N.C. is
expected to red-shirt this
season, along with almost
all of the incoming fresh-
men.
"Right now I'd bet
that they all red-shirt
Logan said. "Usually
what happens is that a
couple of guys get
banged up and a few
(freshmen) end up play-
ing
Logan indicated that there won't be many spe-
cialized plays for each individual quarterback.
"They'll all be doing the same thing, running
the same plays Logan said.
Although they will run the same offense, each
one adds a different dimension to the team.
"Tinnin throws the ball really well Logan said.
"Weaver is about the third fastest guy on our team
and Garrard is kind of a combination of both
Despite the inexperience, their is a lot of talent
among the three quarterbacks and big things are
expected from the group this fall.
Contenders:
JLavid Garrard 9
Red-Shirt Freshman 6-3,240
Durham, N.C Southern Durham High
1998 final spring scrimmage: 6 for 10, li
rushes 56 yards
High School: 9,023 yards of total offense, ac
for 113 career TD's
Dobby Weaver
Sophomore 6-0,190
Hyatsvillc, Md. Dematha High School
1997:4 for 8 five yards, 1 INT
High School: 76 for 121,1,223 yards 9 TD
senior season.
kmest Tinnin 15
Senior 6-1,210
Burlington, N.C. Cummings High 5
1998 final spring scrimmage: 5 for ti
1995 spring game: 7 for 9, 105 y
offensive MVP
Source: f� F.CU Foodull Medii Guide
Runners hope to pick
up where they left off
Returning athletes expected to help cross
country program to continued success
Tracy Hairr
senior writer
After placing third in the 1997 CAA Championships and
recording their best conference finish in ECU's history, the
women's cross country team laid down a solid foundation from
which another successful year is expected to stem.
The Lady Pirate leaders during last year's season were
junior Kerri Harding and sophomore Robin Bates and it is
their experience that will lead the other runners.
"We do
have the top
two girls that
are return-
ing Head
Coach Charles
Justice said.
"Others will
depend upon
their success
because as
they go, the
team will go
Of equal
significance,
the younger
athletes,
including
Becky Testa
and Fran
Lattie, made
an impact on the team as well by consistently improving their
talents and performing their best at the conference champi-
onships.
"They're essentially the same team coming back for next
year Justice said. "They're very experienced and have been
the best team over the last couple of years
Along with the already existing talent, Len Kiepack from
New Jersey will be added as a new coach for the 1998 season.
"He coached some top athletes at Columbia High School,
so we're looking forward to working with him Justice said.
Just as the women's roster for next year comprises experi-
enced members, the men's cross country will encompass a
SEE RUNNERS. PAGE 40
Kerri Hartling makes her way toward the finish line.
FILE PHOTO
ATTENTION
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
Student Leadership Development Programs
has important information for you which includes:
� Homecoming Details
� "Get A Clue" Information
� Organization Registration Forms
(due September 9)
� Leadership Opportunities and
Resources for Your Group
All this and more can be found in your mailbox
(YES, YOU HAVE ONE)
at
STUDENT LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS
109 Mendenhall Student Center
328-4796
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DON'T MISS OUT
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34 Twidiy. Aaiuit 18. 1898
sports
Thi Eitt Carolinian
Men's soccer adds five recruits to roster
Team to begn season
atElon College
Patrick Giovinazzo
st�fp writek
The ECU men's soccer team is
anxious to begin the 1998 season,
as the squad has added five new
recruits to their roster.
Among the five freshmen
recruits, three are from North
Carolina while Virginia and Florida
each send one.
Out of Garner, N.C. comes
Brad Jernigan, who led the Athens
Drive team to regular season
championships twice over the
course of four seasons.
Daniel Smith of McLeansville
was an all-district selection last year.
During his three years playing for
North Guilford, he tallied 51 goals
and 31 assists.
Demar Martin comes to ECU
Sean Hawley dribbles past an opponent.
FILE PHOTO
from Greensboro after being chosen
as an all regional selection for his
play with Southeast Guilford. He
helped lead his team to the confer-
ence championships in 19 and
1997.
Matt DeStefano, a goal-
keeper from North Palm
Beach, Florida, is expected to
contribute this season as well.
"Matt will help solidify
our team at the critical goal-
keeper position Head
Coach Will Wiberg said.
DeStephano was a first
team all-area selection last
season at the Benjamin
School. He also played as a
starting goalkeeper in his area
Olympic Development team.
Rounding off this season's
new recruits is Chris Brugh
from Mechanicsville,
Virginia. Brugh managed to
lead his team in scoring the
past two years and was a
three-time all conference
selection.
"Chris is an excellent tar-
get player and proven finish-
er Wiberg said.
The rest of the team has been
focusing on keeping in shape and in
rhythm over their summer vacation.
"Most of our players have played
together for at least two years, so
that's a big advantage for us
Wiberg said.
Because Wiberg has not seen
most of his athletes since May, the
majority of their summer training
was left up to the individual ath-
letes.
Preseason started for the team
on August 12, at which time the
team fulfilled their short term goals.
"We are looking to keep our
players healthy and get in a real
rhythm, and just get comfortable
with playing with each other again
Wiberg said.
The team will face it's first chal-
lenge of the year at Elon College on
September 2. Last season the
Pirates beat Elon in the final
minute of play. It is a match that
both teams consider significant.
Head Coach Wiberg and
Assistant Coach Jeff Oberg are
hopeful for what the season may
bring. For anyone interested in
joining the team, open walk-on try-
outs will be held on August 19 from
3-6 p.m. Contact the university ath-
letic department or soccer office for
further information.
Men's
Soccer
Schedule
AUGUST
25METHODIST COLLEGE (S)4 p.m.
28Barton College (S)5 p.m.
SEPTEMBER
2 Elon College 4 p.m.
6 Appalachian State University 1 p.m.
10 VIRGINIA TECH 4 p.m.
18-19 Nike Cup Tournament TBA
26 James Madison University 2 p.m.
30 UNC-Asheville 4 p.m.
Merchandise
continued fiom page 32
tion, and it was time for ECU to make a state-
ment"
Merchandise with the newer logos was put
out on store shelves in January, shortly after the
university unveiled the new look. Since then,
stores carrying ECU apparel have seen impres-
sive sale increases.
"At first, we could not tell how well the stu-
dents would respond to the new image, but it
seems as though the more people look at it, the
more they like it Sue Stamats, manager of
sportswear at U.B.E said. "We are really expecting
sales id be good this 611, as football season approaches
Managers at Dowdy-Ficklen Student Stores
look forward to learning more about how to use
the new logos creatively by using different
graphics, colorations and styles this semester.
They hope to give both incoming and returning
students something new to look for.
" We really want the store to look different
when the students come back Brown said.
"We have had a good response with the orienta-
tion groups over the summer, and we hope to
carry that into the upcoming semester
Other stores carrying ECU apparel include:
Belk, JcPenny, Overtons, Target and Walmart.
Sales at these stores, along with Dowdy-Ficklen
Student Stores and U.B.E have consistently
depended on the success of the university's ath-
letic teams according to Jake Jacobs, associate
director of Dowdy-Ficklen Student Stores.
"We definitely see a dramatic increase in
sales when our teams have winning seasons
Jacobs said. "When the Pirates win, people are
likely to buy more, especially during football
and basketball seasons. Our football team will
come onto the field this season with a new look
from head to toe, and we will be carrying that
merchandise in our store as well
However, regardless of athletic success,
Jacobs feels that Pirates fans are as loyal as they
come. This is something that is quite clear sim-
ply by looking up into the stands at any of the
home football games. No matter where you
look, you see the same two colors.
"ECU people are very devoted to purple and
gold Jacobs said. "Students, alumni, support-
ers and the community alike are die hard fans
OCTOBER
6
9
14
18
21
24
27
30
CAMPBELL UNIVERSITY 4 p.m.
University of Richmond 7:30 p.m.
UNC-WILMINGTON 4p.m
UNC-PEMBROKE 2:30 p.m.
OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY 3 p.m.
High Point University
College of William and Mary
AMERICAN UNIVERSITY
NOVEMBER
4
6
it
George Mason University
NC STATE
VCU
CAA Tournament
1:30 p.m.
7 p.m.
3 p.m.
t p.m.
20 p.m.
3 p.m.
TBA
Home games in caps.
Source: ECU Sports
Be Wise 8c
Immunize
DON'T BE A TARGET
The ECU Immunization Policy mandates:
Students must be withdrawn from classes if
immunization information is not complete
before September 25, 1998 (end of the 30
day grace period).
I Student Health Service� 328-1093,
841 for more information. Did you know
il shots can be obtained at Student Health
just call 528-631 7 for n
it 14 for You
25 Off Your Entire Check At Danyl's'
Just show your ECU student ID at the
Darryl's across from campus and get a 25
discount on your entire dinner check. Try our
famous Saucy Barbecued Pork
Ribs, Award Winning Fajitas
Grande, New Wood-Fire Grilled
Steaks, Fresh Vegetable Pasta.
Roadside Chicken Sandwich, Steak and Cheese
Sandwich, Spicy Buffalo Wings, or any of our
Delicious Desserts. It's all specially priced for
ECU students. So stop by tonight
and enjoy East Carolina's favorite
place for food and fun!
'Does not include Alcoholic Beverages
800 East 10th Street � 752-1907
R
Inf
Pri
8pi
E

Do
Pre
1





rWELCOME BACK.
East carolinA
RecExpo
Information, Demonstrations, Free
Prizes, and More Aug. 18-20 5pm-
8pm in the SRC concourse
"T Pros
Jtall
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
)About
�290
m
I � T
carolina
un�mty
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
Don't Forget To Pick Up Your
Program Guide
It's
About
VQU
I FyyIrecreatio
JLUU SERVICES
EAST
CAROLINA
UNTVEKS1TY
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
328-6387
Fitness
Free Aerobics
Aug. 17-22 Schedule in mainoffice SRC 239 & 240
TNT Energy Explosion
Aug. 20 5:30pm-7pm SRCSports Forum
Free Aqua Fitness
Aug. 24-29 5:30pm-6:30pmSRC Pool
Introduction to Step
Aug. 26Sep.l 3pmSRC 239
Introduction to Slide
Aug. 26Sep.l 5:30pmSRC 239
Intramurals
I

Flag Football Officials Meeting
Aug. 25 9pm SRC 202
Flag Football Preview Reg. Meeting
Aug. 31 5pm MSC244
NFLECU Pick'etn Entries
Aug. 31 10am SRC 128
Volleyball Officials Meeting
Sep. 2 9pm SRC 202
Adventures
Sea Kayaking Goose Creek
Aug. 27 Day Trip Adventure Center
Backpacking Linville Gorge
Aug. 28-30 Trip Adventure Center
Special Events
King and Queen of the Halls
Sep. 2 4pm MSC Brickyard
I

I
ARISE
Open House
Aug. 26
7pm-9pm
SRC Rotunda
i





mmmm
36 Tyidiy, Aageit 18, 1998
sports
Thi Ent Carolinian
Athletic opportunities offered to all
Mount Recreational Sports
Complex, celebrates grind opening
I
Alex Jun
staff whiter
Clubs and organizations are an essential part of campus
life. They are a good way to meet new people and
develop a sense of identity in an unfamiliar place.
Recreational services provides a sports related organi-
zation in the form of club sports and intramurals.
Club sports arc student oriented organizations that
are sponsored by Recreational Services, and involve
practices, competitions and recruiting new players.
The various clubs compete against clubs from other
universities in intercollegiate non-varsity leagues. This
semester, 15 clubs will be offered, including: disc golf,
kayaking, men's lacrosse, men's rugby, swimming,
men's and women's ultimate frisbee, underwater hock-
ey, men's and women's volleyball,
water skiing and a variety of mar-
tial arts.
This semester is expected to
be an exciting one for the
Intramural program with the
opening of the new Blount
Recreational Sports Complex.
This 18 acre, 2.1 million dollar
outdoor facility will accommodate
10 flag football, six soccer and five
softball fields.
The new facilities will help the
program run more efficiently and
increase flexibility in scheduling practices and games.
Patrick Daniel, coordinator of Intramural Services,
said having a variety ofactivities to choose from is very
important to the success of the program.
"We provide competition in the form of teams as
well as individual sports Daniel said. "Last year a
total of 39 different activities were offered and we are
constantly looking to add new activities to provide
more of a variety. With, more
diversity to choose from, it
allows us to offer more activities
than just the traditional ones
Intramural Sports is divided
into four leagues: Independent,
Greek, Residence Hall and Co-
Recreational. Independent is
open to all students, faculty and
staff. The Greek league is an all
fraternitysorority program,
while the Residence Hall
league is limited to students liv-
ing in the dorms. The Co-
Recreational league combines male and female partic-
ipants and is designed to provide fun, relaxation and
socialization. All spouses of enrolled students and
employed facultystaff are eligible to play as well.
"I participated in Intramural sports because me and
some of the guys from my dorm wanted to compete
SEE INTRAMURAL PAGE 3t
"Last year a total of 39 different
activities were offered and we are
constantly looking to add new
activities to provide more of a
variety
Patrick Daniels
Coordinator of Intramural Services
Lacrosse is one of many intramural programs offered on campus.
PHOTO COURTESY OF RECREATION SERVICES
Recreational activities provided for disabled
ARISE plans events and
pro-ams for fall semester
Tracy M. Laubach
SPORTS EDITOR
When the Student Recreation Center
opened it's doors in the spring of 1997, it
-also opened up many opportunities for the
ARISE Program. ARISE, standing for
�Adapted Recreation and Intramural Sport
Enrichment program, provides recreation-
al and athletic opportunities for (but not
limited to) ECU students, faculty and staff
'with disabilities.
The ARISE program at ECU is
designed to create an awareness of recre-
ational opportunities for individuals with
physical disabilities. It also aims to provide
training in physical fitness, muscular
strength, cardiovascular endurance and
flexibility.
ARISE has been able to offer more
interactive programs since the opening of
the Student Recreation Center.
Chris Mackey climbs the rock wall using his arm strength only.
PHOTO COURTESY OF RECREATIONAL SERVICES
Christenbury was not accessi-
ble for the programs that are
offered now, and while ARISE
was established on campus
many years ago, a calendar of
programs was difficult to estab-
lish because there was no place
to hold them.
With programs ranging from
Wheelchair Basketball League
to the WheelPower Dance
Troupe, ECU earned the
"Adapted Physical Activity
Council's 1998 Program of the
Year Award" in March, an
honor that program director
Terry Edwards feels will
encourage many disable stu-
dents to come to ECU.
"ECU is one of few univer-
sities in the country to offer
this program, and the only
school in the state of North
Carolina to offer it Edwards
said. "This award has earned
us national recognition, and I
think that individuals with dis-
abilities will look at ECU more
seriously because of it
Although the ARISE program is
designed to encourage disabled students to
be involved in recreational activities on
campus, participation is not limited to dis-
abled students. Able students,
faculty and staff are encouraged
to participate in the programs as
well.
"A lot of people that are not
disabled still come out and take
part in our programs Edwards
said. "Anyone who wants to learn
about and play adaptive sports
can participate
On August 26, ARISE will
hold it's annual Open House at
the Student Rec. Center from 7
to 9 p.m. This will provide a
chance for students to learn about how to
use adaptive equipment and learn more
about what ARISE has to offer.
"We will have different people sta-
tioned around the gym to show those with
disabilities how to use the adaptive equip-
ment, including the lifts, ramps, and hand-
cranked machines Edwards said. "People
will be able to check out a wheelchair and
join in for a wheelchair basketball game
On August 28, ARISE will meet again
f ij
Terry Edwards
FILE PHOTO
at the Student Rec. Center for an activity
night, which will feature more organized
activities including the climbing wall, rac-
quctball, wheelchair softball and more.
ARISE also provides
practicum experience for ECU
students studying adapted
physical education, recreation
and leisure studies, and thera-
peutic recreation. Students
pursing careers in these areas
have been known to take part
in many of the ARISE pro-
grams as part of their learning
experience.
This semester, ARISE will
be participating in numerous
activities and community
events. In September there will be a Fall
Fiesta which will include an Adaptive
Waterski Clinic, and in October an
Adaptive Sports Day will be held that will
feature workshops on weight lifting,
wheelchair basketball and refining athletic
skills. Also planned for part of National
Rehabilitation Week (Sept. 16) is a wheel-
chair basketball game ECU versus mem-
SEE ARISE. PAGE 31
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�5-







38 Tmidiy, August 18, 1998
sports
Th� East Carolinian
Pee Dee's duties go beyond entertaining fans
Mascot cms in need of
one additional Pirate
Paul Kaplan
senior writer
As the football team prepares for
it's season opener against Virginia
Tech, Paula Corbett, the ECU
cheerleading coach, along with her
three masked Pee Dee's, arc
preparing for another exciting sea-
son of pleasing ECU fans.
ECU's own lovable Pee Dee the
Pirate has undergone a bit of cos-
metic surgery this past summer to
prepare for what is expected to be a
great Pirate football season.
"This summer, Pee Dee has
gotten new hair on his head, a new
hat, some new skin on his nose, a
new earing, and a new pair of
gloves and boots Corbett said.
"He's going to look really spiffy for
the first game
The university spent approxi-
mately two thousand dollars on
Pec Dee's costume last summer.
"It's expensive but you have to
do it He gets cleaned up every
summer and the price depends on
what needs to get done Corbett
said. "This year we're buying a
cooling vest to help keep the stu-
dents cool inside the costume
Many ECU fans do not realize
that Pee Dec's fall season consists
of much more than just providing
entertainment for children at the
games.
"Our season kicks off around the
first week of school and after that
we have about three to five appear-
ances a week during the fall sea-
son senior mascot Jym Baker said.
At this time, the Pee Dee crew
is made up of three students.
"We don 7 discriminate if you
have never done it before. You
just have to have a certain per-
sonality about yourself "
Jym Baker
Senior Mascot
There will be an additional tryout
for a fourth Pee Dee in August,
"Because we make so many
appearances, ranging from shaking
hands at a car lot to many Pirate
Club activities, we have more than
one Pec Dee Corbett said. "Also,
we go through every Pee Dee we
have on game days. Your carrying
around an extra 30 pounds and the
air in the suit gets really hot and
humid
Being selected as one the four
mascots requires much more than
dressing up in purple and gold.
Each member of the Pee Dee crew
is required to attend one cheerlead-
ing practice a week and is also
required to learn all of the cheers in
order to know what game day will
be like.
"We had one guy who lost 15
pounds from being in the costume,
and last year one guy got heat
exhaustion during a game Baker
said. "It is really something you
have to train for
In the tryout, potential mascots
have to put on a skit, or an
impromptu "funny act" to show
their ability to entertain. The
judges ask questions and evaluate
reactions to mock game situations,
like touchdowns or inter-
ceptions.
"Pee Dee also has a
certain posture you must
be able to do, with your
chest out and your chin
up Baker said. "We
don't discriminate if you
have never done it
before. You just have to
have a certain personali-
ty about yourself
For those of you still
questioning the fate of
our friend Pee Dee,
there are no plans of him
being fazed out' or
replaced by the new
Pirate logo, released in
January. Pee Dee is here
to stay, so be sure to let
him know how much
you appreciate him on
game days.
Pee Dee dances with fans in the stands at a home
basketball game.
FILE PHOTO
ARISE
continued from page 36
bers from the Rehabilitation
Center from Pitt Memorial
Hospital.
Perhaps one of the most unique
programs ARISE features is the
VVheelPower Dance Troupe,
brought to ECU four years ago by a
young lady named Jennifer
Haynes, a disabled student deter-
mined to dance. After working
with people in Raleigh while she
was in high school, Haynes came'to
ECU eager to teach students here
to dance.
The group holds weekly prac-
tices at the Rec. Center and partic-
ipates in two or three performances
a year, usually one on campus and
another at the Annual Adaptive
Physical Education Conference in
Greensboro. Haynes graduated in
May with a degree in Special
Education, but returns to ECU this
semester as a graduate student and
returning dancer.
As the program continues to
advance, more adaptive equip-
ment has been purchased and
more time has been set aside to
teach all who are interested about
it.
"We have purchased wheel-
chairs and hand-cranked bikes that
can be checked out at the Rec.
Center Edwards said. "We also
have some new equipment that is
wheelchair accessible. We are real-
ly encouraging people to come to
our Open House to learn about our
program and all that we have
to offer to both disabled and
able students
REC
continued from page 32
Or. Elisabeth Heininger participated in the adaptive water-ski clinic that
was held last year.
PHOTO COURTESY OF RECREATIONAL SERVICES
August
24-28Sports Workshop Reg.
24-28Wheelchair Basketball Reg.
26ARISE Open House
26Wheelchair Basketball Game
28ARISE Activity Night
29Wheelchair Basketball Practice
September
8-14Aqua ExerciseSwim Reg.
9Climbing Wall Workshop
12Wheelchair Basketball Practice
14' Aqua ExerciseSwim Begins
19Adapted Water Ski Clinic
19Weights and Cardio Workout
26Wheelchair Basketball Practice
October
3Tat River Expedition
7Climbing Wall Workshop
10Wheelchair Basketball Game
16Adaptive Sports Social
17Adaptive Sports Day 1998
23Weights and Cardio Workout
24Wheelchair Basketball Practice
November
11Climbing Wall Workshop
14Wheelchair Basketball Game
16Kayaking Workshop
8 a.m6 p.m.
7-9 p.m.
11 a.m.
6:30 p.m.
10a.m4p.m.
11 a.m.
11 a.m.
10a.rnl p.m.
7-9 p.m.
11a.m.
6:30 p.m,
10a.m4p.m.
7 p.m.
11 a.m.
7-9 p.m.
11 a.m.
7-9 p.m.
group of two or more people hiring a person-
al trainer (opposed to just one) to help reduce
the cost. Some packages include a fitness
assessment and nutritional analysis.
Adventure programs offered through
Recreational Services include a variety of out-
door trips that offer a fun, safe and exciting
way to meet people. Each adventure program
is rated from lx to 5x, depending on the
intensity involved.
"These trips are a good way to meet new
friends, challenge yourself and learn outdoor
skills Todd King, coordinator of marketing
and special events said.
The hours of operation at the Student
Recreation Center for the fall semester are as
follows: Monday-Thursday, 6 a.m. to 11:30
p.m Friday, 6 a.m. to 10:30 p.m and
Saturday-Suhdav, 9 a.m. to 10 p.m.
For more information about the Student
Recreation Center or any of the programs it
offers, please call 328-6387.
Intramural
continued from page 36
SRC
SRC
SRC Pool
I and have fun C.J. Johnson, a 5-on-5 baskct-
I ball participant said. "I definitely think every-
one should get involved because it is a great
way to meet people
All information listing the fall activities and
registration deadline dates for both club
sports and intramurals are available from pub-
lications through the Student Recreation
Center or can be accessed from their web
Source: ARISE Brochure, available at the Student Recreation Center
page at www.rccserv.ecu.ecu.
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I

39 Tuatday, Auguit 18, 1988
sports
Thi East Carolinian
Golfers look tO improve Cheerleaders rank 16th nationally
Coach hopes to see
changes this season
TRACV HA.IRR
SENIOR WRITER
For the 1998-99 golf team,
few changes will be made to
the program, but a great deal
of improvement is anticipat-
ed to result from both an
experienced team and one
that's accepting new fresh-
men competitors.
"Our guys have really
been working hard this sum-
mer Head Golf Coach
Kevin Williams said. "This
year I'm hoping we'll really
improve on the course
During the 1996-97 sea-
son, the golf team competed
eight times in tournaments
against schools ranking
amongst the top 25.
However, last year, ECU
golfers were faced with a
much more challenging
schedule, meeting these top
rivals 30 times. Thus, there
was, in this last year, a com-
pletely separate battle to
endure aside from focusing
on individual skills and
achievements.
"I was really disappointed
in our performance
Williams said. "Even if the
team was young, they had a
lot of experience and I think
we should have played bet-
ter.
The incoming freshmen will
invite those returning to pursue
their individual talents more seri-
ously since expectations for this
season are not set in stone.
"I'm hoping the freshmen will
really push the juniors because it's
September
5-6
19-20
October
12-13
26-27
November
2-3
Columbus State Intercollegiate @ Callaway
Gardens, Georgia
Hosted by Columbus State University
Georgetown Hoya Invitational @
Landsdowne Resort
Hosted by Georgetown University
4th Annual Mocs Fall Invitational @ Valley
Brook G & CC
Hosted by University of
Tennessee-Chatanooga
ODUSeascape Collegiate Invitational @
SeaScapeGG
Hosted by Old Dominion University
First National South Intercollegiate @
CC of South Carolina
Hosted by Francis Marion University
Source: ECU Sport Information Department
time for them to start producing
more Williams said.
A particular absence that will be
noticed is that of Kevin Miller, one
of the most honored student ath-
letes at ECU. Among the many
awards he has received are the
inaugural MasterCard Graduate
Scholarship Award, he's been cho-
sen as a Golf Coaches Association
Ail-American Scholar, and was hon-
ored as ECU's Outstanding Male
SEE GOLF. PAGE 40
Write, a, Letter to tke Editor
Got something to say? Need
somewhere to say it? Bring your letter to the ,
located on the 2nd floor of The Student Publications Building
Squad represents
ECU on and off field
Paul Kaplan
SENIOR WRITER
After practicing since August 8,
the ECU Cheerieading squad is
ready for an exciting football sea-
son and a great year. Prior to
August, the squad practiced one
weekend a month to stay in shape
for the upcoming season.
Last April, the squad compet-
ed in the National Cheerieading
Association's annual competition,
which was aired nationally on
CBS. The ECU cheerleaders fin-
ished the competition in 16th
place overall.
"I think they did very well and
I'm really proud of the job that
they did Head Cheerieading
Coach Paul Corbett said.
Last spring, the squad had try-
outs where they picked up 10
more cheerleaders, giving them a
total of over 40 members. The
squad is currently made up of var-
sity and junior varsity teams, both
of whom cheer at the home foot-
ball games. Fof the games, the
junior varsity is posted on the
Pirate Club side, with the varsity
on the student side of the field.
"We really have a great squad
this year. They all have great atti-
tudes and they all work really well
together, and I think that is what
counts Corbett said.
Aside from cheering at the
games, the cheerieading squad
participates in a large number of
community service activities and
fund raising projects. Over the
summer many of the cheerleaders
spent time at a local middle school
for a cheerieading camp for girls
Lara Harrington laads Pirate basketball fans to a cheer GO ECU
FILE PHOTO
ages 5-18.
"We ran cheerieading camps in
many different places around
Greenville and we also participate
in Walk-A-Thons for charities like
the United Way or the March of
Dimes Corbett said. "We do
appearances all the time, whenever
anybody calls us
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40 Ti.iy, Am.tt 18, 1988
sports
Tht Ent
I,
Disc golf interest grows across campus
Sport is fit far everyone,
regardless of skill level
Alex Jun
STAFF WtlTII
Have you ever wondered what that
strange looking field across from the Bclk
building is? Or what it is that those unusu-
al metal baskets are used for? No, they are
not abstract arc projects set up by the art
students. This field is used for the high fly-
ing, fast paced game of disc (golf.
Disc golf is a rapidly 'growing sport
whose popularity continues to grow. Even
famous personalities such as Jerry Garcia
have been known to take up an interest in
the sport There are more than a dozen
courses set up in North Carolina and in 46
other states across the country.
Worldwide, disc golf is played in IS
countries. Rules for the game are set by the
Professional Disc Golf Association
(PGDA), which sponsors many tourna-
ments around the world.
There are many reasons why disc golf
appeals to almost anyone, regardless of age,
gender or ability. Not only is it inexpensive
and easy to learn, it encourages mental and
physical conditioning and is fun and relax-
ing.
Graduate student Tim Weeks said that
there are many advantages to being
involved in the disc golf program at ECU.
"I started to play for the convenience
Weeks said. "It is a game that I could prac-
tice on my own and not have to keep score.
The game is fun and it's also a great way to
meet nice people
Lew Hoffman, an ECU alumni and
touring professional complimented the
ECU course as one that is fit for anyone,
regardless of skill level.
"Anyone can play regardless of skill
level. The ECU course in a beginner
friendly course but one that can also be
challenging to advanced players Hoffman
said. "This is not a game of brute strength.
It involves technique, hand-eye coordina-
tion and finesse
Disc golf is also a good way to get exer-
cise, especially for those students with par-
ticularly demanding schedules, such as
senior Karl Garcia. .
"I have a busy class schedule but it is
easy for me to come out and play a few
rounds Garcia said. "I started playing
because it was a great way to participate in
low impact exercise and I have tons of fun
at the same rime
The principles of disc golf are very sim-
ilar to ball golf but differ in equipment
The disk is similar to a frisbee but is some-
what smaller and heavier. Three different
types of disks are used, depending on the
distance you are looking to achieve: the dri-
ver, mid-range and the putter.
The game begins by throwing the disk
within the teeing area toward a metal bas-
ket Once the disk comes to rest it is
flipped forward repeatedly until it reaches
the basket. Obstacles including but not
limited to trees, bushes, stumps, curves and
bends await each basket
The ECU Recreational Services disc
golf program was established in 1986 as a
Boilmakers want to
prove 1997 was no fluke
No jet-lag for Packers
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind.
(AP) �Purdue's football team
shocked the Big Ten and most of
college football in 1997. Now they
want to prove it was no fluke.
The Boilermakers were looking
for an encore performance today as
they took to the field for the earli-
est start of preseason practice in
school history.
Coach Joe Tiller, his staff and
the players have spent months in
off-season work in an effort to
demonstrate that last year's success
i was no fluke.
We've worked much harder this
year than in the past said Tiller,
who was hired from a successful
Wyoming program to revive a
. Purdue program that had become
I known for futility over the past
decade.
That included having the
coaching staff monitor academic
progress of the players to insure
that they are academically eligible
' for the upcoming season.
I don't think we're going to lose
anybody, Tiller said Sunday as
Purdue held its annual media day.
We think we came out of the sum-
mer with what we think is an all-
time high GPA (grade point aver-
age). We were much more diligent
as a staff.
The challenge now is to
demonstrate that 1997 was no one-
year fluke.
In Tiller's first season at the
helm of the program, the
Boilermakers overcame an open-
ing-game upset by Toledo to finish
9-3. Expected to be at the bottom
of the Big Ten standings at the
start of the season, Purdue finished
in a tie for second place and made
its first bowl appearance since
1984. A victory over Oklahoma
State in the Alamo Bowl capped
the turnaround.
A lot of the right things have
occurred here in the past 12
months, and yet we may not be as
good, Tiller said. When I compare
this winter to last winter, our guys
are in better shape, they worked
harder. This summer we had 70
players here all summer long, last
year we were in the 40's and some
were coming and going.
Purdue will depend heavily on
a veteran defensive unit headed by
GREEN BAY, Wisconsin (AP-
That's more like it
Even with Robert Brooks and
Dorscy Levens out the Green
Bay Packers' No. 1 offensive unit
shincd against the New Orleans
Saints one week after a pitiful per-
formance in Tokyo.
Granted, Mike Ditka's Saints
aren't Marty Shottenheimer's
Kansas City Chiefs, but Packers
coach Mike Holmgren was happy
with the rebound that jump-start-
ed Green Bay's 31-7 exhibition
victory Saturday night at
Lambeau Field.
It was really important that
they get off to a good start,
Holmgren said. As you know I
was not pleased with how we
came out of the gate in the game
against Kansas City in Japan.
They have a lot of pride and have
a chance to be a good offensive
football team and they executed
much, much better.
In three series against Kansas
City, the Packers No. 1 offense
gained five yards on nine plays
and lost two fumbles that led to 14
fast points.
Against the Saints (0-1), the
Packers' No. 1 offense ran 16
plays, scored on both possessions
and gained 129 yards, an average
of 8.1 yards per play.
Travis Jervey started for the
second straight game in place of
Levens, the Packers' holdout half-
back, and gained 100 yards with
two touchdowns on nine carries
before halftime.
Plus, he followed up a 35-yard
burst negated by a penalty, with a
44-yard TD sprint that gave
Green Bay (2-0) a 21-0 halftime
lead.
Brett Favrc, who was just 1-of-
5 for two yards and a fumble
against Kansas City, completed 7-
of-8 passes for 86 yards against a
patchwork secondary that was
without left cornerback Alex
Moldcn (calf) and lost right cor-
nerback Tyronne Drakeford to a
bruised back on the seventh play.
Obviously, two turnovers in the
first two drives last week was not
good, so we wanted to redeem
ourselves, Favre said. We got it
together and ran the football well.
When we passed it we completed
it. And went for it on fourth down
one time and made a great play.
NFL kicks off preseason
BOSTON (AP) �Peyton
Manning and Ryan Leaf weren't
the only big-name quarterbacks to
debut in new places as the NFL's
exhibition season got into full
swing.
Doug Flutie moved slightly
south from Canada to Buffalo, Neil
O'Donnell wore Bengals stripes
instead of Jets green and Jim
Harbaugh took the opposite route
of the Colts by going from
Indianapolis to Baltimore.
While Harbaugh and Leaf
enjoyed success, Flutie, O'Donnell
and Manning struggled with their
new clubs. Harbaugh, obtained in
an offseason trade from
Indianapolis, went 10-for-13 for 60
yards and scrambled twice for 28
yards in Baltimore's 19-14 victory
over the Bears. He left with 6:07
left in the second quarter after
moving the Ravens 80 yards in 17
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plays in a drive that consumed
more than 11 minutes and gave
Baltimore a 9-0 lead.
"We were playing little ball
Harbaugh said. We'll try to get the
ball downfield more, but we took
what they gave us.
In other NFL preseason games,
Minnesota beat New England 28-0
in the only game Sunday night.
On Saturday, Pittsburgh topped
Buffalo 24-13, the New York Giants
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Golf
continued from page 39
Student-Athlete for the 96-97 year.
"We'll really miss Kevin's lead-
ership, what he accomplished both
academically and athletically
Williams said. "He's a true
student athlete
Runners
continued from page 33
group who have steadily under-
gone Pirate competition, returning
every runner from the 1997 team.
"Justin England, Stuart Will and
Jamie Mance are the top three
guys for next year Justice said.
"Jamie suffered from a torn achilles
so this makes him questionable for
the season. This injury will be a big
determinate for whether or not his
nine-basket maze. The following year, nine
more baskets were installed to complete
the 18 basket course, which covers 3,695
yards.
For a more challenging course, Hoffman
recommends the Farm Life course in
Williamston.
"Those who want a variety and a greater
challenge in skill level should check out
the Farm Life course Hoffman said.
"The course is free and much more diffi-
cult"
A disc can be checked out from the Rec.
Center with a valid ID card, or purchased at
the Bicycle Post and Outpost Trail Shop.
Fot more information, check out
http:eastnet.educ.ecu.edudisc or contact
Student Recreational Services at 328-6387.
As new members of the team
continue to prepare for the upcom-
ing season, Coach Williams fore-
sees an unpredictable year with an
ambitious group of men striving to
succeed.
"We've got a lot of money invest-
ed in these guys, and a lot of good
things in place, so I want us to be
better this year Williams said.
performance is successful
During the 1997 season,
Mancc's achievements included
placing first for the Pirates in three
races and finishing in the top 20 in
five events.
Although Mance's contributions
would be beneficial to the team,
other runners with salutatory skills
and experience from previous sea-
son with the Pirates can be expect-
ed to step up and help the team to
victory.
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42 Tuaiday, August 18. 1998
sports
Tht Eait Carolinian
Pirates picked second by C-USA coache
Conference champs
Southern Miss top list
Travis Barkley
SENIOR WRITER
The Golden Eagles of Southern
Miss have been chosen by the head
coaches of Conference USA to
repeat as conference champions,
with ECU not far behind.
The annual preseason poll of the
league's football coaches was
released last week. ECU and
Tulane tied for the second spot,
with Cincinnati in
the fourth position
and Houston
picked fifth.
Memphis was
picked sixth,
Louisville seventh
and C-USA new-
comer Army
rounded out the
rankings at eight
The champion
of C-USA will be
the host team of
the Liberty Bowl
in Memphis, on
December 31.
Southern Miss
has won the first two C-USA titles,
sharing the crown with Houston in
19 and winning last year. They
went on to demolish Pittsburgh in
2. ECU
4. Cincinnati
5. Houston
6. Memphis
7. Louisville
8. Army
SOURCE . CONFERENCE USA MEDIA GUIDE
last year's Liberty Bowl 41-7.
Southern Miss placed three
players on the preseason all-confer-
ence team, including projected
defensive player of the year, defen-
sive lineman Adalius Thomas.
ECU was picked to win C-USA
in last year's poll, but got off to a
slow start, dropping their first two
conference games. The Pirates won
their next four to finish third in the
conference, their first in C-USA.
ECU also placed three players on
the all-conference team: center
Danny Moore, along with lineback-
ers Roderick Coleman and Jeff
Kerr.
Tulane was the surprise of the
conference last
year, finishing
second after
being picked by
the coaches to
finish last.
Tulane placed a
league-high eight
players on the all-
conference team:
three on offense,
three on defense
and two on spe-
cial teams. Green
Wave quarter-
back Shaun King
was picked by
the coaches to
repeat as offensive player of the
year.
Cincinnati safety Tinker Keck
made the team as a defensive back
Conference-USA
Preseason Poll
(as selected by the league's
head coaches)
?. SombftJTi MIms
PiremBMiMsn All-Conference
Selections
Offensive Player of the Year: Shaun King, QB, Tulane
Defensive Player of the Yean Adalius Thomas, DL, USM
Special Teams Player of the Year: Tinker Keck, PR, Cincinnati
OfTenae:
QB Shaun King, Tulane
Toney Converse, Tulane
Ketrtc Sanford, Houston
Henry McClendon, Southern Miss
Danny Moore, ECU
RickNord, Louisville
NellRavife, Army
Brian Uhl, Cincinnati
Ibn Green, Louisville
JaJuan Dawson, Tulane
Sherrod Gideon, Southern Miss
RB
RB
OL
OL.
OL
OL
OL
TE
WR
WR
?!
Senior center Danny Moore was one of three Pirates named to the preseeson all C-USA team
HI f PHOTO
on the team. They are led by tight
end Ibn Green, who led all
Division 1-A tight ends in recep-
tions last season. Houston,
Memphis and Army are represent-
ed on the team by one player a
piece.
and as a return specialist. Keck was
also named to repeat as special
teams player of the year. Offensive
lineman Brian Uhl joins Keck us
the only other Cincinnati player on
the all-conference squad.
Louisville placed three players
Defense:
DL Marquis Bowling, Memphis
John Nix, Southern Miss
Dennis O'Suffivan, Tulane
Adalius Thomas, Southern
Jeff Kerr, ECU
Roderick Coleman, ECU
Courtney Dinkins, Louisville
Michael Jordan, Tulane
Tinker Keck, Cincinnati
Mike McKenzie, Memphis
DL
DL
DL
LB
LB
DB
DB
DB
DB
Special Teams:
RS Tinker Keck, Cincinnati
PK Brad Palazzo, Tulane
P Brad Hill, Tulane
SOURCE: CONFERENCE USA MEDIA GUIDE

Sports editor advises
students to get involved
Get invoked with
recreational services
you possibly can. ECU athletes
work very hard to represent this
university, and as a member of this
university, it is your job to support
them. Refer to The East
Carolinian for schedule updates
and game reminders.
Finally, as the sports editor for
the campus newspaper, I would
love to hear from you! Please send
any comments, story requests,
questions or complaints to me at:
www.tec.ecu.edu. My staff and I
will do our best to keep you updat-
ed, but feel free to send you com-
ments to me at any time. Have a
wonderful" semester, and GO
PIRATES!
Tracy M. Laubach
SPORTS EDITOR
It is a new year, a new semester,
and a new opportunity for you, as
ECU students, faculty and staff to
take advantage of all that this uni-
versity offers you in terms of recre-
ational and athletic activities.
Whether you are a new student,
a transfer student, a returning stu-
dent, or one of those who has been
around for enough years to have
earned three or four degrees, now
is the time for you to take action.
No matter where you are from
or what your interests are, there is
something for you through
Recreational Services. Over 70
percent of the ECU population has
used the Student Rec. Center
since it opened, proving that what
they are offering is not only pro-
moting health and fitness, but is
also a lot of fun and a great way to
meet new people. Don't be afraid
to try something new. Get a group
of friends together and take part in
one of the campus special events,
or go along with recreational ser-
vices staff for an adventure pro-
gram white water rafting or back-
packing. Try new things, and you
just might find a new hobby or
interest
Club sports and intramurals are
a wonderful way for more serious
athletes to participate in competi-
tive sports. If you are one of those
who competed on a high school
team but decided that you did not
want to dedicate your entire col-
lege experience to that sport, club
sports and intramural programs
would be great for you. These
organizations allow you to partici-
pate in the sports you love and
want to be competitive in, but do
not want to dedicate your whole
life to.
Aside from recreational ser-
vices, be sure to attend as many
sporting events this semester as
jH Es
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Mon Frl. 9-6
Walk-Ins Anytime
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Thi Eut Carolinian
1
uQB.Tu
mas, DL, USM
:k, PR, Oncinnati
UtDE
M
?.M.
Carolinian
We need help this fall and spring.
We are now accepting applications
for all sections of the paper.
News, Sports, & Features Writers
� Opinion columnists
� Production Assts.
� Advertising Reps.
�Photographers
�Copy Editors
�Cartoonists
of aLifetime
Apply at our office on the second floor of the Student Publications Building.






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Title
The East Carolinian, August 18, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 18, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1283
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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