The East Carolinian, July 29, 1998






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WEDNESDAY
JULY 29.1998
eastcarolinian
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
Board of Governors
elects new chairman
FirstAfrican
American to serve
Dkbbie Neuwirth
staff write
Benjamin S. Ruffin, a Winston-
Salem executive, was elected as
the chairman of the UNC-Board
of Governors. On July 10 Ruffin
will serve a two-year term.
"This service gives me a
, chance to pay back what this great
I state has given to me Ruffin
' said. "If tuition had not been low
in North Carolina, I probably
would not have been where I am
now because 1 could not have
afforded it. "
Ruffin is a graduate of North
Carolina Central University and
has his master's degree in social
work from UNC-Chapel Hill. He
has earned honorary doctorates
from three universities, and was
'formerly a special assistant to Gov.
Jim Hunt. In addition to these
duties, Ruffin is the chair for the
corporate table of the National
Black Caucus of State
Legislatures.
"This is an interesting turn in
history said Dr. Jim Smith, exec-
utive assistant to the chancellor.
"In the past, the board had been
accused of showing favoritism to
certain campuses, mostly those
with a smaller black population.
One of Ruffin's tasks will be to
treat those campuses who haven't
been considered with equity with-
in the broader circle
"Ruffin was elected by his fel-
low members said Jonie
Worthington, head of information
at the University of North
Carolina. "There were no special
ranks for him to go through
The only requirements for one
to become the chair is for the can-
didate to be a member of the
"In the past, the board had
been accused of showing
favoritism to certain campus-
es, mostly those with a smaller
black population.
Jim Smith
Eiscutive Assistant to Chancellor
board.
Before joining the Board of
Governors in 1991, Ruffin was the
vice president for corporate affairs
for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco
Company. When he joined the
board, he held a position as vice
chairman for two years. In addi-
tion to the titles he has held, he
continues to be active in numerous
other committees.
Ruffin's position was deter-
mined by a 16-15 vote. There was
some speculation that someone
changed a vote at the last minute,
leading to Ruffin's victory.
The granite stone marker in from of the geology building will toon be replaced by a formal
sign identical to all other building signs on campus.
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN.
THE ROCK
Landmark stone, donated by alumni, unearthed after 30 years
T.K. Jones
NEWS EDITOR
w
hen geologists unearth
rocks, a bit of history is excavated in
the process.
Campus officials received this
lesson in elemental geology the day
they unearthed the granite stone, a
landmark for the building for nearly
thirty years.
Students and faculty alike balked
at the mere thought of replacing the
granite stone (a.k.a. "the headstone")
located in front of the Graham build-
ing, but university officials did not.
Last Wednesday a forklift uprooted
the .stone to make room for a uniform
building identification sign.
The uproar was not about the
department having an official univer-
sity sign, but that it could have been
posted in another location. So why
choose the very spot where a granite
stone lay nearly three decades?
"The site for the new sign was
chosen because of its high visibility
said Eugene Langford, construction
and renovation design supervisor, a
division of facilities services. The
new sign is "part of the new signage
system" on campus, replacing the
small, wooden signs in front of
departments with larger, eye-level
signs.
The stone's new location has yet
to be determined. An effort has been
made by the department's faculty to
put the stone on the grass before the
handicap ramp, but the Facilities
Services declined, saying it would
place the signs too close and not look
"aesthetically pleasing
Others have made comments of
the stone itself being distasteful
because it resembles a headstone
more than a sign for a geology depart-
ment. But because the department
wanted a sign relevant to geology,
they chose the granite stone.
"If you want rock that has engrav-
ing on it that is legible, where are you
going to gcftElQCKffllB&2that handle
"The tvek is good a
good place to sit when
you don' want to sit
by the smokers on the
"wall"
ctlon
" was here when my
parents went to
school"
"The headstone adds
flavor to the campus "
"It's a good land-
mark when you need
to give directions in
The rock weighs
between 300-400 pounds
k cost approximately
$600 viJ
The graniteitaeltis sev-
eral million years Old
was pur
depart-
:Mfed
Steek rode are qn ,
into the Stone and a con-
crb�ja�e1t
from
Time management
ranks low, survey says Officers slain in Capitol Building shooting
honored during special ceremony in rotunda
Students concerned
more with academics
Debbie Neuwirth
STAFF WRITER
�While a recent survey found stu-
dents were concerned mostly
about academics, these same stu-
dents reported to have less con-
cerns about personal relationships
and time management.
The Office of Research,
Assessment and Testing conduct-
ed a telephone survey March
through April among random
undergraduates at ECU. The sur-
vey examined important issues to
students on campus and nation-
wide.
Also conducted in the survey
were individual interviews with
students to determine what level
they were on in their studies.
The top three issues facing stu-
dents nationwide were finances,
academics and future plans. But
ECU students responded that aca-
demics, finances and
alcoholdrugs, respectively, were
their main concerns.
Kris Smith, director of the sur-
vey, said the survey helped pin-
point important issues for students.
TODAY
Thunderstorms
high 94
low 75
TOMORROW
Thunderstorms
high 94
low 75
On responding to individual con-
cerns, Smith said academics
ranked number one in order of
importance to nearly all the stu-
dents.
"Our students are concerned
about getting an education Smith
said.
Other issues mentioned by stu-
dents were personal time, relation-
ships and time management. Even
though not listed in the top three,
students still showed concern
about these issues.
Time management included
the problems students face trying
to balance their school work, social
lives and jobs. Of students sur-
veyed, 20 percent said relation-
ships were a main issue outside of
the classroom.
More issues students reported
were problems with binge drinking
and peer pressure. Also, many
found campus safety, campus
involvement and parking to be
extra things they have to worry
about. Included in these issues is
the amount of conflict among stu-
dents. This is brought upon by dif-
ferent diversities and values,
Greek organizations verses non-
Greeks and raceethnicity.
Even though the majority of
students mentioned conflict, 20
percent found there was no con-
flict whatsoever. One student said,
"I think everyone gets along fine
WASHINGTON (AP) Two Capitol officers
cut down in a burst of gunfire will be honored
Tuesday at a special ceremony at the historic
building where they worked and died. Their
remains will lie in the Rotunda, where the
coffins of presidents and commanding generals
have rested.
Capitol Police Chief Gary Abrecht
announced plans to memorialize the two "fallen
heroes" as the suspect in the shooting, Russell
E. Weston Jr lay in a hospital bed in serious
condition.
Coffins bearing the bodies of officers Jacob J.
Chestnut and John Gibson were in the Capitol
Rotunda early Tuesday and remained there all
day. President Clinton, Vice President Al Gore,
House Speaker Newt Gingrich and Senate
Majority Leader Trent Lott all were scheduled
to attend the event, officials said.
Clinton spoke by telephone Sunday to
Chesnut's widow, but was not able to make con-
tact with Gibson's widow, said officials traveling
with the president in New Mexico. They said he
also spoke with 24-year-old Angela Dickerson, a
Virginia woman who was wounded and hospital-
ized overnight Friday before returning to her
home on Saturday.
Abrecht said Gibson, 42, a native of Waltham,
Mass will be buried Thursday at a location to
be announced. Chestnut, 58 and an Air Force
veteran, will be interred the following day at
Arlington National Cemetery.
The two Capitol police officers died of the
wounds when the gunman, a
loner with a history of mental
illness, burst into the Capitol
Friday afternoon and opened
fire with a .38-caliber hand-
gun.
The condition of Weston,
41, from Rimini, Mont was
upgraded from critical to
serious during the day. "His
cardiac status has improved
said D.C. General Hospital
spokeswoman Donna Lewis
Johnson.
Weston was shot in the
chest, arms, thigh and but-
tocks and brought down in a
furious exchange of
gunfire with Gibson.
Authorities arranged a
hearing in absentia for
Weston on Monday in feder-
al court, a few blocks from
the Capitol. Papers filed in court in the District
of Columbia on Saturday charged him with
killing the two officers; the purpose of Monday's
hearing was to bring the case into federal court.
While events were set in motion to honor the
fallen�and bring the suspect to justice�
tourists roamed the Capitol by the hundreds,
some pausing before a pile of flowers that has
grown on the steps outside in tribute to Gibson
and Chestnut.
Tourists pay their respects to the the officers slain
in the unexpected shooting Friday.
PHOTO BV TK JONES
"It's awful that it happened said John
Kurzawa, a 16-ycar-old from Northford, Conn,
who was touring with his family. "I wish it had-
n't happened. I hope as a nation we can get over
it
The repercussions were already setting in,
though, from the grief of the families to the
shaken colleagues of Chestnut and Gibson who
SEE SHOOTIM. PAGE 2
Opinion
WEDNESDAY
Lifestyle
Sports
i Say farewell to
Jfs�&&i QeoloQyrock
Mainstream
culture stomped.
When the cyberdust clears, check
out TEC's new website at
Pirates picked
2nd in C-USA.
the east Carolinian STUDENT PUBLICATION BIGG, GREENVILLE, NC 27858 across from Joyner library - newsroom 328-6366 advertising 328-2000 fax 328-6558 website www.tec.ecu.edu





2 WtJnmUy, July 29, 1998
news
Tha East Carolinian
.news
brief;
TV sales up in France
PARIS (AP) � Sales of televi-
sions soared in France before the
World Cup, with manufacturers
recording a 39 percent increase in
April and May over the same peri-
od last year, a newspaper reported
Tuesday.
Most purchases were for a sec-
ond set, as 95 percent of French
homes already have a television,
according to Le Parisien.
King Hussein treated
forlymphatic cancer
AMMAN, Jordan (AP) � King
Hussein told his people Tuesday
that he is undergoing treatment
for lymphatic cancer and expects
to recover fully.
Hussein said he underwent
chemotherapy for the first time on
Sunday and "my general condi-
tion is excellent, my mind is clear
and my morale is high
Hussein, who has been hospi-
talized at the Mayo Clinic in
Rochester, Minn since July 14
spoke by satellite transmission
with Jordanian television.
Oxendine approves $21
million State Farm auto
rate reduction
ATLANTA (AP) Insurance
Commissioner John Oxendine
has approved a $21 million rate
reduction for State Farm Group,
Georgia's largest auto insurance
company.
Oxendine estimated that the
decrease, along with reductions
granted to 14 other auto insurers
since the first of the year, will save
Georgia consumers more than $30
million a year in insurance premi-
ums.
Air Force Academy
vet takes interim VP
post at Peru State
PERU, Neb. (AP) The interim
president of Peru State College
has appointed an interim vice
president for academic affairs to
replace David Ainsworth, who
resigned after making a racially
insensitive comment.
Jerry Martin, a 30-year teacher
at the Air Force Academy in
Colorado Springs, Colo takes
over the vice president post left
vacant when Ainsworth resigned
in May, President Richard B.
Flynn announced Thursday.
Coffee futures up;
cocoa down
Coffee futures soared three per-
cent Tuesday on the Coffee,
Sugar & Cocoa Exchange in New
York on market talk Brazil will
offer incentives to farmers to keep
some of their bumper crop off the
market, supporting prices just as
roasters begin buying for the
heavy consumption period.
On other markets, cocoa
futures fell to five-month lows,
while platinum and palladium
futures rose sharply.
Tentative Settlement
in GM Strikes
FLINT, Mich. (AP) �
Negotiators reached a tentative
settlement today to end United
Auto Workers strikes against two
General Motors Corp. parts plants
that had virtually shut down the
No. 1 automaker, the union
announced.
July 24
- Domestic Dispute - A supervi-
sor at the construction site east of
Joyner Library reported an
encounter with an employee who
had been fired earlier that day.
The supervisor reported the former
employee threatened him.
July 23
- Driving While Impaired - A
student was stopped on Faculty
Way for exceeding the posted
speed limit. An odor of alcohol was
detected and the student was
administered three field sobriety
tests. The student was arrested
and transported to the Pitt County
Detention Center.
July 22
- Breaking & Entering &
Larceny from a Motor Vehicle - A
student reported the vinyl passen-
ger side window on her Jeep had
been cut A cellular telephone was
removed from the vehicle. The
vehicle was parked in the com-
muter lot at the bottom of College
Hill Drive.
- Larceny - A student reported
that a vending machine in Fleming
Hall was open. Several items were
missing from the machine.
July 21
- Damage to Property - A staff
member reported a window on the
east side of the Chancellor's resi-
dence was shattered. The damage
was possibly caused by a BB pellet.
Possession of Drug
Paraphernalia - While assisting a
student with Operation ID in
Fleming Hall, an officer detected
the odor of marijuana coming from
another room in Fleming Hall.
The resident consented to a search
of his room. A small amount of
marijuana was found in a leather
bag in the room. The resident was
issued a campus appearance ticket.
- Assist Rescue - A staff member
was transported from the General
Classroom Building to Pitt County
Memorial Hospital after complain-
ing of chest pains.
July 20
- Breaking & Entering &
Larceny - A staff member reported
the breaking and entering of his
office in the Flanagan Building. A
three-stage mercury diffusion
pump and glassware were taken
from the room.
- Larceny - A resident of
Fleming Hall reported the larceny
of his student identification card
from a bench in the Student
Recreation Center.
Green dye gives scare
Chemical spill
no cause for alarm
Christopher Scott
staff whiter
When Dr. Jack Thorton saw green
water under Tenth Street and
flooding Rock Springs Road on
Friday afternoon, he sprang into
action.
Thorton feared the worst when
he spotted a green liquid seeping
from the sewer on Tenth Street
and decided to alert the authori-
ties.
When Thorton, a faculty mem-
ber in the school of business,
traced the water back to the
Howell Science Complex, he
thought it might be a chemical spill
and notified Bill Koch, head of
Environmental Health and Public
Safety, and Michael Campbell
with the grounds department to
investigate the discolored water.
After the initial investigation, their
answer became clear.
"The basis of the discolored
water is a non-toxic, organic dye,
used to trace the leaks in pipes
where water flows through Koch
said. "This dye is sanctioned by
the National Sanitation
Foundation which approves the
safety of equipment and materials
used in dining facilities
During an inspection of the
drains in the southern part of the
Rawl Building, the grounds depart-
ment used the dye to test the reli-
Shooting
continued from page 1
were being offered counseling, to
talk ofenhanced security at a build-
ing prized for openness.
Among the options was revived
talk of construction of a Capitol vis-
itors center, possibly underground,
that could serve as a way station for
tourists as well as provide for
greater security.
Still, Abrccht, chief of the
Capitol police, said there was little
that could have been done in the
way of security to prevent Wcston's
attack that would have been
acceptable to members of Congress
and the public.
"He was prepared to go in there
and die and take anybody with
him Abrccht said on CNN's Late
Rock
continued from page 1
headstones said Dr. Scott
Snyder, professor of geology.
The stone was purchased with
alumni dollars to replace a similar
stone sign that had maintained the
same area from the 60's until it was
stolen in 1995. The spot lay vacant
for several months before the new
stone took its place. The new
stone is theft-proof with rods pro-
truding from it. The Facility
Services Department worked with
the Geology Department in
mounting and securing the new
stone.
"That's what the irony is said
Snyder. "We worked with the
grounds department (a division of
Facilities Services) to put it in
there (that location)
Edition. "He never got more than
20 feet inside the building
The chief said the slain officers
and others who rushed to the scene
"were heroic in every way
Officials have said Chestnut
tried to stop Weston when he burst
past the metal detector at a first-
floor entrance to the building
Friday afternoon. Chestnut was
shot in the head. A second officer
who had gone to get a wheelchair
for a tourist then fired at Weston,
who ran around the comer and
opened the private door leading
to a suite of offices occupied by the
House Republican Whip, Rep.
Tom DeLay of Texas.
Gibson, assigned to protect
DeLay, shouted at numerous peo-
ability of the pipes and rout out the
leaking ones.
"The dye is usually diluted to
an unnoticeable level, but the
drain in Rawl had backed up and
the flow of water was not strong
enough to dilute the dye
Campbell said. "The drain was old
and filled with vegetation and
debris
The drain is scheduled to be
fixed. The grounds department is
waiting for a certain part of the
draining system to arrive that
needs to be replaced.
"The best part about something
like this is the good response we
receive from the campus commu-
nity Koch said. "By contacting
the correct authorities, this discol-
orization was checked out quickly
and efficiently
pie in the suite to take cover and
exchanged gunfire at short range
with the gunman. Both officer and
gunman fell, Gibson mortally
wounded.
In a series of meetings Sunday,
congressional officials were in
touch with the survivors of the two
men as they attempted to work out
the details of several days of obser-
vances.
Numerous high-ranking govern-
ment officials have lain in state in
the Rotunda since Abraham
Lincoln's casket was brought there
in 1865. Others similarly honored
include Presidents John F.
Kennedy, Dwight Eisenhower as
well as Gens. John J. Pershing and
Douglas MacArthur.
HIB
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program and selected events
sponsored by Recreational services.
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For more information call
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3 Wadnaaday
Ask any
not be ab
geology c
in front o
The rock
"Geology
Graham I
Last We
ing idem
Classroor
While wt
fy buildii
Why cou
building?
Is the ne1
departmc
departmt
have a la
class for
but are p
the outsii
A stone i
the I960'
stone is
school's �
Besides 1
insult to i
ogy depa
It's hard
on a part
money tc
ter of can
In additi
useful w
OPINI
These stinky
such aren't
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floor and b
I am in love. H
ass smells and I
his ears, but w�
He moved in w
everything is w
the swamp b
house on Frida
sight.
Found crea
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It is beyond
why people arc
much money c
when there ar
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3 Wadnaiday, July 29, 1998
�J-n
opinion
Tht Eait Carolinian
eastcarolinian
Amy L.Royster Editor
Heather Burgess Managing Editor
Amanda Austin News Editor
TK Jones Assistant News Editor
Andy Turner Lifestyle Editor
Min aii Smith Assistant Lifestyle Editoi
Travis Barkley SponsEditor
Tracy Hairr Assistant Sports Editor
Carole Memi.e Head Copy Editor
Chris Knotts Staff Illustrator
Matt Hege Advertising Manager
Bobby Tuggle Webmaster
Serving ihe CD rammumiy smca 192b. irw Fas Cuoliniin publishes 11.000 copies every luesdey end Thursday Thf lead editorial in nth tdmon a tht
opinion of ihe idiional Board. The E�i Carolinian welcomes letters 10 ihe editor, limited to ?S0 words, which may be edited Itx decency�brevity The Eat
Catolmun reserves the tight to edit or reject tellers In publication. AH letten must be signed. Letters should be addressed to: Opinion editor .The Ent
Carol��. Student Publications Building. ECU. GreermHe. ?'BaB4353. Fur inlormetron. call 9tS.378.6366.
ouwiew
Ask any ECU student where the Graham building is and they might
not be able to tell you where it is. Ask them which building houses the
geology department and they'll say, "Why, it's the one with the rock
in front of it
The rock we're referring to is the large, polished, granite stone with
"Geology" engraved on it that, until recently, sat in front of the
Graham building.
Last Wednesday, the stone was removed in favor of a uniform build-
ing identification sign like those in front of Austin or the General
Classroom Building.
While we are not opposed to having official university signs to identi-
fy buildings, why did they have to remove a campus landmark?
Why couldn't the university put the new sign on the other side of the
building?
Is the new sign even necessary? The stone was chosen by the geology
department because they wanted a sign that was relevant to their
department. What better way to identify the geology building than to
have a large granite stone out front? Most students taking a geology
class for the first time may not know where the Graham building is,
but are pretty sure that their class is in the building with the rock on
the outside.
A stone identifying the geology department has been in place since
the 1960's. Over the years it has become a treasured part of ECU. The
stone is so beloved that when the original was stolen in 1995, the
school's alumni paid for a replacement.
Besides being a waste of time and money, removal of the stone is an
insult to faculty, students and alumni � especially to those in the geol-
ogy department.
It's hard to believe a school that raised money to restore an old cupola
on a part of campus that most people don't even go to would spend
money to remove a cherished gift donated by the alumni, at the cen-
ter of campus activity.
In addition to identifying the geology department, the stone became
useful when giving directions to visitors, orientation students and
opinion!
Columnist
Britt
H0NEYCUTT
Go for the mutts
These stinky little shitzus and
such aren't guaranteed for
anything but crapping on the
floor and biting your ankle.
I am in love. His name is Pepe. His
ass smells and he has bugs living in
his ears, but we're working on that.
He moved in with me recently and
everything is wonderful. We met in
the swamp beside my parents'
house on Friday. It was love at first
sight.
Found creatures are the best
kind.
It is beyond my comprehension
why people are willing to spend so
much money on an inbred animal
when there are tons of perfectly
good ones with diverse genetics
right there in the swamp beside
your house. Or even if you don't
have a swamp Everybody does
have a swamp, right?
Remember the kid in high
school whose parents were first
cousins? Nobody would even
invite him to a party, much less let
him live in their house. The extra
head may have had a little some-
thing to do with that, but inbred
animals are much the same. The
very people who made fun of poor
Billy's mom and dad for hooking
up at a family reunion make pup-
pies do their mommies all the time
in the name of "pure lines
Every animal I've ever loved
was a mutt, and they've never done
me wrong. Well, there was Pork
Chop, the Yorkshire terrier. He was
so butt-stupid that all the other
dogs made fun of him until it drove
him to cross dress and he began to
delve into the frightening world of
underground doggy transvestism.
Let's not talk about Pork Chop.
I have, however, been wronged
by countless rottweillers, dober-
mans and dalmations � the latter
of which bit me smack in the ass for
no apparent reason. It seems that
dalmations sit around thinking
about how good a nice big hunk of
human hiney would be. I still have
the scars.
And the money you pay! As if
vet bills, pet food, toys and acces-
sories weren't expensive enough
alone. Then people spend
unneccesary hundreds simply to
own a slip of paper stating that your
dog or cat is an inbred idiot. These
animals are far more prone to birth
defects and mean personalities in
general (i.e. the aforementioned
dalmatian), and yet everybody
wants one! But then, I guess the
same reasoning applies to the pop-
ularity of the Spice Girls.
It sickens me to see someone
pay upwards of $300 for a sickly,
rotten, certified animal when there
are so many sweet furry things
waiting for someone to save them
at the humane society, the pound
and swamps all over the area you
know, maybe Pepe is alone in his
swamp cat status. Okay, forget
about the swamp.
There are millions of starving,
homeless animals who would much
rather come live with you than be
put to sleep. Give your local kennel
a chance. These animals will be so
grateful that you saved them from
certain destruction that you're
guaranteed an affection, loyal pet.
These stinky little shitzus and such
aren't guaranteed for anything but
crapping on the floor and biting
your ankle.
Y (i fl I i'f; 5fe�. �
sn was
OPINION
Columnist
Jeff
BERGMAN
To sue or not to sue
The question I have is how
long will the appeals process
take � six months, a year,
two years? During that time
the patient is waiting they
could be suffering in extreme
pain. Thanks to federal
law the patient will have
little recourse.
To sue or not to sue, that is the
debate. The House of
Representatives has passed a bill
that would allow people to appeal
their Health Maintenance
Organization's (HMO) decisions
about the care received. Most
Republicans in the House did not
want to add a provision that would
have allowed patients to sue their
HMO.
Republicans, recipients of cam-
paign donations from HMO lobby-
ists, were afraid of losing these con-
tributions. Without this money,
they could not make those cool
commercials that say they are fight-
ing for you against big business.
The health industry has a huge
lobby inside the beltline. Witness
the 1994 advertising blitz brought
by them upon the 1994 Clinton
Health Care Reform. The public's
dismay at the treatment they are
receiving is the only reason any-
thing is being done. It is an election
year and politicians have to show
interest in the people.
The majority in the House did
not want to add a provision that
would allow patients to sue. The
right-wing party is concerned with
frivolous lawsuits. Republicans
tend to think all lawsuits against big
corporations are unneeded. They
are probably right; Ford did nothing
wrong when the Pinto went into
production, and the cigarette com-
panies did not mislead the public at
all.
Newt and the Gang are correct
when they assume that some peo-
ple will take advantage of the abili-
ty to sue. What the collective intel-
ligence of the Republican party
fails to consider is that the HMO's
will take advantage of patients if
they cannot sue.
The Republican's bill did have
provisions for patients to appeal.
Having the ability to appeal is nec-
essary to protect the public's health
and well-being. The question I
have is how long will the appeals
process take � six months, a year,
two years? During that time the
patient is waiting they could be suf-
fering in extreme pain. Thanks to
federal law the patient will have lit-
tle recourse.
I support the Republican's idea
for appeals and the Democrats right
to sue agenda. Both should be
made into law. Company's that
promise to take care of your health
should be held to that promise.
An amendment I would like to
see, but probably will not is prison
sentences. The federal government
should impose stiff prison terms
upon the people within the HMO
empire. Fines are already in place
but what is a couple of hundred
grand to a billion dollar industry?
People want criminals behind bars
and what is more criminal than
making a person wait for treatment
because the company deemed it too
expensive? This is akin to torture. ;
OPINIOI
Columnist
Stephen
KLEINSCHMIT
Enjoy the rest of summer
In the fall, we will welcome
back all our friends who
have spent the summer embar-
rassing themselves as bag boys
at the local Piggly Wiggly and
have them blow their savings
on one night downtown.
Well, lets see what did we learn
this summer? Money means
power, I promised myself that I
wouldn't put my two cents in on
this one, but it has come to this.
In ECU's attempt to get more
money to get more football players
who can read AND write, ECU has
devoted 60 percent of the $7 mil-
lion that will be eventually re-
extorted out of the students by
Pepsi to athletics. Around cam-
pus, opinions are pretty critical of
this decision, ranging from slighdy
less apathetic than usual to sporadic
cursing. It seems that the only way
we will be able to get coke on cam-
pus is in it's purified white, pow-
dered form.
Freshman orientation was fun.
Don't deny it. Those little boys and
girls are so awestruck by us that
they would shack up with a hobo as
long as they had an ECU shirt on.
Besides, we really didn't have any-
thing else to do on a Wednesday
night like study. We went to the
Elbo to create an atmosphere of
diversity, in stark opposition to the
usual local rednecks, rugby players
and Marines who frequent the.
place.
The fourth of July gave us once
again another reason to drink and
set off unsafe Chinese pyrotech-
nics. Don't get me wrong; I love the
things. I was just a little peeved,
when I had some kids who live in,
my rapidly aging apartment com-
plex shooting bottle rockets at my
truck. These kids are probably the
same ones who will end up in jail in,
about eight years after they hold up
The Pantry so that they can get
enough money to buy one book at,
Dowdy Student Stores.
All in all, it's been a pretty good
summer. In the fall, we will wel-
come back all our friends who have
spent the summer embarrassing
themselves as bag boys at the local
Piggly Wiggly and have them blow
their savings on one night down-
town. We better enjoy this little
break we have a lot of tough par-
tying ahead next semester.
"If I open my mouth to speak, must I always
be correct, and by whose standard?"
Alice Walker, author, 1983






Wedneidiy. July 29. 1998
lifestyle
The Em Carolinian
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Big band swing makes a
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Pompadours, zoot suits and crinoline skirts are
all the rage, while bands with bizarre names like
the Cherry Poppin' Daddies and the Squirrel
Nut Zippers make you grab a partner and boo-
gie down.
As retro movements go, swing dancing is
huge.
The high-energy jitterbug style first tweaked
interest in 1993 when Disney released "Swing
Kids about German youth in the 1930s whose
love of American swing made them targets of
the Nazis. The 19 movie "Swingers about
single life in Los Angeles, furthered swing's
popularity.
It became an official phenomenon with The
Gap's recent U.S. TV ad featuring young cou-
ples doing a raucous Lindy Hop to Louis
Prima's "Jump Jive an' Wail
Big band swing is embraced by all ages, espe-
cially - and most surprisingly - by under-30s.
Swing kids don't see much romanticism in a
mosh pit.
"Dancing with a partner was such a thing of
the past. With this, you can just go up to any-
body. There's no obligation. There's no pres-
sure. It's like, "Hey, let's just dance said Craig
Lozowick, 25, decked out in pin-
stripe suit, skinny tie, slicked-back
hair and sideburns.
"Everyone in our generation
danced separately until this. It
has so much energy said his
dancing partner, Stacy Wyllys,
looking elegant in old-style
glasses and a 1940s pink dress
bought at a vintage clothing
shop.
Soon the duo, moving in
triple time, is on the dance floor at
Man Ray's, a South Florida club
learning like many other places
that swing pays. Nearly 300 peo-
ple were dancing on a recent
night.
Swing is everywhere, from The Masquerade
in Atlanta to The Spanish Ballroom in
Washington, D.C where the 16-piece Tom
Cunningham Orchestra performs. It's at The
Supper Club in New York City, The Derby in
Los Angeles, and Cafe du Nord in San
Francisco.
The West Coast neo-swing movement can
be traced to bands like Royal Crown Revue,
which started mixing in swing with its punk-
influenced ska nearly a decade ago. F'ormer
rocker Brian Sctzer of the now-defunct Stray
Cats is a current swing guitarist who got his
roots in rockabilly.
"What a lot of the swing people are playing
right now is jump blues, like Louis Prima or
Louis Jordan said Steve Perry, lead singer of
the Cherry Poppin' Daddies. "Real swing is
more like Fletcher Henderson, Duke
Ellington, Benny Goodman and
Glenn Miller. That's what we
play
And, of course, MTV
motored the trend when
the network put the Cherry
Poppin' Daddies' "Zoot Suit
Riot" in the rotation and the
song became an alternative hit.
"The zoot suiters were considered the punk
rockers of their age because they were very out-
rageously dressed said Perry, whose band
Even chinos can swing.
PHOTO COURTESY OF
THE GAP HOMEPAGE
came out of the grunge
scene in the Pacific
Northwest.
The eight-piece band
isn't the only one mak-
ing the scene. There's
the jump sound of Big
Bad Voodoo Daddy, the
Western bent of Big
Sandy and his Fly-rite
Boys or the Dixieland
stylings of Squirrel Nut
Zippers, who really
scored the first neo-
swing hit with "Hell
Many of the big-horn
bands dress in natty
1940s attire. Songs about
gambling and alcohol,
like the Voodoo Daddy's
"You and Me and Bottle
Makes 3 feeds into
that day-after-prohibition-
ended feeling of the
music.
Then there's the dancing.
Swing is mainly an American invention,
evolving out of ragtime and jazz dancing in
the 1930s and '40s. Unlike a tango or a waltz,
swing is more improvisational and comes in
many styles: jive, jitterbug, Lindy, push,
whip, shag, East Coast swing, West
Coast swing, imperial, Jamaican and
Bop.
"When soldiers from World
War II came with the Service to
the major port cities of New York
and Chicago, they would see
swing and take it back home to
Oklahoma, Carolina, Los Angeles an
it would mutate said Randy Atlas,
president: of the" South Florida Swing
Dance Association.
That's why in California there's
West Coast swing. In Texas it's called
push and in the Carolinas it's shag. Each is a
slightly different take on swing, kind of like a
regional accent.
The 1990s resurgence of swing is grounded
in the '30s music of Benny Goodman and Glenn
Squirrel Nut Zippers kick it East Coast style
PHOTO COURTESY OF S0UIRREE NUT ZIPPERS HOMEPAGE
Miller, and the jump swing of artists like Louis
Prima.
"The Lindy Hop or the jitterbug, that's what
"Dancing with a partner was such a
thing of the past. With this, you can
just go up to anybody. There's no
obligation. There's no pressure. It's
like, Hey, let's just dance
Craig Lozowick
Swing Enthusiast
the swing kids are doing now Atlas said.
Modern swing bands play all types of old-
time swing, but swing dancing cati be done to all
types of music from 70s disco (the Hustle was
a form of swing) to Sheryl Crow.
"When the dancers hear music in shuffle
time, that's 110 to 125 per minute, they are just
as happy as hogs in mud Atlas said.
Many new converts say ithey became inter-
ested in swing after the movie "Swingers in
which a guy finally meets a girl thanks to know-
ing how to dance to the house band, which hap-
pens to be Big Bad Voodoo Daddy.
The Gap ad also piqued interest.
"We've gotten an overwhelming response.
We've received phone calls, letters and e-mails
from people saying they were going to go out
and take some swing lessons Gap spokes-
woman Rebecca Weill said from the company's
San Francisco headquarters.
The ad brought Brian Tindell and Daminica
Landimarino to Man Ray's.
She couldn't get over the swing fashion.
"Next week I'm bringing my skirt. Forget
these pants. Wearing skirts and dresses,
you just feel free the 31-year-old nurse
said.
Tindell, an engineer, said
swing is helping him finally
understand his folks.
"This is the first time I under-
stand what my dad was trying to do when he
gets on the dance floor at a wedding reception i
he said. "I've got to bring the parents here. I
think they would get a blast out of this
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328-60044715
5 Wedmidiy,
I
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10
60044715
5 Wedntiday, July 29, 1
Let it bleed
lifestyle
Tha East Carolinian
Don'letthe mainstream
suck you dry
Mark Brett
SENIOR WRITER
It makes me sick to see aging punks. I mean
it. All the sagging mohawks and drooping tat-
toos All the sneering, "aren't you old enough
to know better" attitude Sometimes I just
have to shake my head.
It's one of the sad facts of life here at the end
of the century that the original punks are now
pushing 40. These guys have been mad at the
world for a long time now, and I can respect that,
but when half of your concert Jbantcr begins
"Back in my day you have a problem.
But some of the punks have aged gracefully.
The Ramones' mop-topped, leather jacket look
has served them well, and the Sex Pistols' John
Lydon has really managed to ease into middle
age with style. Lydon's kept his perspective
with an acid sense of humor (always a good
thing to be armed with), but the Ramones seem
to have survived primarily because they just
weren't as pissed off as everyone else.
They formed their band in the first place
The Ramones, the real "backstreet boys.
PHOTO COURTESY OF SIRE RECORDS
because they were just bored
with '70s arena rock and want-
ed to get things jumping again.
They were entertainment
rebels, not political ones, so
they lasted longer than their
contemporaries.
As I find myself becoming
an aging punk (not as old as the
first wave, but still pushing 30
any day now), I find the
Ramones an inspirational
example. I don't have it in me
to be as angry as I was 10 years
ago, but I can still keep sticking
it to The Man by refusing to
give in to what the entertain-
ment industry feeds me.
Why waste money on the
latest big Hollywood schlock?
It's only going to be moderate-
ly entertaining. Why buy an
album from an artist whose
popularity seems mainly based
on how much MTV airtime he
got?
Godzilla is a perfect example
of the attitude I'm talking about. Millions of
people went to see this movie, and why?
Because it got a lot of hype. It was all over TV
and radio and even major magazines. You could-
n't be wired into American society and not have
heard about it.
rAnd because everybody has
heard about it ad nauseum for
weeks before its debut, millions
N of people went to sec it. People
ifc- who have never seen a Godzilla
movie before in their lives went
to see it. People who hate mon-
ster movies went to see it. And
all because of an ad campaign.
In the music industry, this
trend is even worse. It's very sel-
dom that a band breaks into
widespread popularity through
genuine fan support these days.
No, the way the music industry
works is much different and
more insidious.
The record company will find
an act with a sound they can
"Me want my MTV
PHOTO COURTESY OF UNIVERSAL PICTURES
mold, or better yet, they'll create one. They'll
have company songwriters concoct music for
this group to perform that's written according to
charts and formulae designed to maximize its
popularity based on what's been popular in the
recent past. Then they'll give the group a
"look also based on recently popular trends,
film a video designed to look just like all the
other videos out there (that whole washed-out
"Losing My Religion'TOne" look) and push
like crazy to get it into heavy rotation on MTV.
Appropriate pockets are greased along the way,
of course, and eventually all the right people are
telling us we should look like this. And thus the
Backstreet Boys are born.
Why do we put up with this? Or, more accu-
rately, why do we settle for this? Why don't we
grow a backbone, or a brain, and decide what we
like for ourselves? I mean, I know people are
busy and don't want to be bothered, but this dri-
ves me mad. Maybe it's time for all of us to take
a cue from the Ramones and become just a little
punk rock. If nothing else, it'll give us some-
body to take our frustrations out on who really
deserve it
Cat man gets his due
This is the column where we focus on the
stuff we miss and the stuff you missed. We
will examine the books, movies, and
albums we feel deserve further exploration.
The stuff we dug back in the day
Gene Vincents legacy
lives on
Andy Turner
lifestyle editor
In Jim Jarmusch's 1989 film,
Mystery Train, two Japanese charac-
ters in search of the American (pop
culture) Dream in Memphis, Jun
and Mitsuko, argue over whether
Elvis or Carl Perkins is the real king
of rock-n-roll. The gal goes with
(he Big E, but the feller picks Cool
Cat Carl. Most people probably
agree with the little lady, but
there's that old familiar question:
What if things had been different?
tf things had been different, Carl
Perkins may have very well been
the king of rock-n-roll, or some of
the other Sun Record guys like
Jerry Lee Lewis, Billy Lee Riley or
Sonny Burgess could claim the
Gene Vincent was smokinl
PHOTO COURTESY OF RAZOR AND TIE
title. It might have even been "The
Black Leather Rebel from
Norfolk, Va Gene Vincent.
Vincent, who was nominated
into the Rock 'N' Roll Hall of
Fame earlier this year, is probably
best known for the breathy romper
"Be Bop-A-Lula which hit num-
ber seven on the pop chart back in
June 1956. He never got higher
than seven on the charts, but he
charted with other songs including,
"Race With the Devil "Dance to
That crazy cat can
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE
now rest in peace.
R0CKABIUY HOMEPAGE
the Bop "Wear My Ring" and
"Lotta Lovin
Razor and Tie released a great-
est hits compilation of Vincent's
work last year, The Streaming End:
The Best of Gene Vincent and
His Blue Caps. Though
called "The Best of the
songs on the 20-track com-
pilation were recorded in
1956 or 1957. So, technical-
ly, the compilation only
features the best of two
years of Vincent's career,
but I've heard songs he
recorded after 1957 and
rarely does the music hit
you as hard as these early
songs do.
The gut-grabbing raw
splendor of the early songs
can largely be attributed to the
Blue Caps: Cliff Gallup (lead gui-
tar), Willie Williams (rhythm gui-
tar), Jack Neal (upright bass) and
Dickie Harrell (drums). They
hooped and hollered and mauled
their way through songs like "Who
Slapped John "Bluejean Bop
"Jumps, Giggles & Shouts" and
"Woman Love
On The Screaminf.nd, Gene
and the Blue Caps sound like
they're hammered on cheap hooch
and ready to brawl. Listen to the
thumping "Cat Man" and it sounds
like Vincent is going to jump right
out of the jukebox and get a Id of
any teenage daughter he can find.
The picture of Vincent on the
cover of The Screaming End helps
make it a little clearer why Billy
Graham was proclaiming rock-n-
roll the devil's music. Vincent's
greasy hair is wild, his eyes far-
away and crazed. His legs are fixed
at an odd angle (like Kevin
Spacey's character in the Usual
Suspects) due to a 1955 motorcycle
accident that shattered his left leg.
He looks like a deranged juvenile
delinquent. At that moment, he
was the epitome of unkempt, unfil-
tered, unscrewed-with rock-n-roll.
Vincent was only 36 when he
died in 1971 from a ruptured stom-
ach ulcer caused from drinking too
damn much during a painful life
that never got as far as it should
have. Thankfully, the Rock 'N'
Roll Hall of Fame saw fit to include
him. He belongs there. He's influ-
enced scores of musician, and most
importantly, he's one bad cat.
The wild man from Norfolk
could have been king. Let's just be
thankful it wasn't Pat Boone.
ra
W
in
This is not a rant. The goal: to
write complete sentences and
hopefully to make some sort of
point, fust another ass with an
opinion
Female musicians
are people, too
ArgfilFm a musician,
not yer little sis!
Miccah Smith
Assistant Lifestyle
Editor
It's obvious to most of America
that girls know how to rock. The
'90s have been a unique opportu-
nity for women to be noticed and
appreciated for their musical abili-
ties.
Bjork, Tori Amos and PJ
Harvey happen to top my personal
list of femme fatales in rock, but
even scores of no-talent hacks like
Paula Cole and the mediocre Lilith
Fair posse are making a quick buck
on the growing trend toward
appreciation of female artists.
In the real world of college gigs
and bands, however, female song-
writers are often perceived as infe-
rior. Female guitarists like myself
find it hard to connect with male
guitarists, even if it's just to jam
casually. -
I'll meet some guy and discover
that the guitar is our common
ground, set up a jam session and
bring my gear, all ready and eager
to exchange ideas. The loser guy
will then proceed to pick out an
agonizingly mangled Dave
Matthews cover ("Wait a sec I
think the chords go like this )
much to my boredom and chagrin.
Then I'll mention how I like a
particular style or group, and he'll
shake his head ("Sorry, man. I
don't know any U2. And what's
classic rock?"). Then he'll make
me listen to the opening riff from
some Nirvana song.
I rarely get a chance to play, and
I usually don't get to finish my
songs, because I'm so busy trying
to be polite by stopping the
moment he looks a little less-than-
thrilied.
Then he'll have the nerve to
suggest some music I ought to lis-
ten to, as if he's taking me under
his wing. Like I need a wiser, older
brother or something.
I'm sure all the musically talent-
ed dudes on campus salivate over
Jewel and have Alanis Morissette
posters plastered to their walls, but
they need to pay attention to the
chicks next door. We've got fan-
tasies of stardom and talent just
like they do, and I, for one, don't
enjoy being patronized and
ignored.
In case any of you musician
guys are reading, I'm quite sure I
know what I'm doing, and all I
want is to be treated like an equal.
I'd like to share ideas with you. If I
wanted your advice, I'd ask for it.
And I'm sure my female contem-
poraries would agree.
July
29 Wednesday
Larry The Dream Weaver at
The Cave in Chapel Hill
TBA at Local 506 in Chapel
Hill
30 Thursday
For Richer or Poorer at the
Student Rec Center pool
Dave Matthews Band at
Walnut Creek Amphitheater in
Raleigh
Threadbare at The Cave in
Chapel Hill
The Speed Devils, Crash
Cadillac at Local 506 in Chapel
Hill
Seven Mary Three at Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro
31 Friday
Jeff Hart and the Ruins at The
Cave in Chapel Hill
Rodeo Boy, Ashley Stove,
Number 1 Family Mover at Local
506 in Chapel Hill
Triangle Blues Society Annual
Talent Showcase at Cat's Cradle
in Carrboro
1 Saturday
OZZfest '98 at the Walnut
Creek Amphitheater in Raleigh
Alejandro Escovedo performs Friday night at the Brewery in Raleigh.
PHOTO COURTESY OF BLOODSHOT RECORDS
�i





6 Widnaidey, July 29. 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
Pirates picked second by C-USA coaches!
Conference champs
Southern Miss top list
Travis Barklev
SPORTS EDITOR
The Golden Eagles of Southern
Miss have been chosen by the head
coaches of Conference USA to
repeat as conference champions,
with ECU not far behind.
The annual preseason poll of the
league's football
coaches was
released last week.
ECU and Tulane
tied for the second
spot, with
Cincinnati in the
fourth position and
Houston picked
fifth. Memphis was
picked sixth,
Louisville seventh
and C-USA new-
comer Army round-
ed out the rankings
at eight.
The champion of
C-USA will be the L-
host team of the Liberty Bowl in
Memphis, on December 31.
Southern Miss has won the first
two C-USA titles, sharing the
crown with Houston in 1996 and
winning last year. They went on to
demolish Pittsburgh in last year's
Liberty Bowl 41-7.
Southern Miss placed three
players on the preseason all-confer-
ence team, including projected
defensive player of the year, defen-
sive lineman Adalius Thomas.
ECU was picked to win C-USA
in last year's poll, but got off to a
slow start, dropping their First two
conference games. The Pirates won
their next four to finish third in the
conference, their first in C-USA.
ECU also placed three players on
the all-confer-
ence team: cen-
ter Danny
Moore, along
with lineback-
ers Roderick
Coleman and
Jeff Kerr.
Tulane was
the surprise of
the conference
last year, finish-
ing second after
being picked by
the coaches to
finish last.
Tulane placed a
�' league-high
eight players on the all-conference
team: three on offense, three on
defense and two on special teams.
SEE PIRATES. PAGE 7
Conference-USA
Preseason Poll
(as selected by the league's
head coaches)
2. ECU
3. I v iint
4. Cincinnati
5. Houston
6. Memphis
8. Army
SOURCE : CONFERENCE USA MEDIA GUIOE
7 Wadnasday,
�on All-Conference
Selections
Tensive Player of the Year: Shaun King, QB, Tub
insive Player of the Year: Adalius Thomas, DL,
Teams Player of the Year: Tinker Keck. PR, Cincinnati
ohaun King, tulane
Toney Converse, Tulane
Ketric Sanford, Houston
Henry McClendon, Southern Miss
Danny Moore, ECU
Rick Nord, Louisville
Nell Ravitz, Army
Brian Uhl, Cincinnati
Ibn Green, Louisville
JaJuan Dawson, Tulane
Sherrod Gideon, Southern Miss
he:
eval
Senior center Danny Moore was one of three Pirates named to the preseason all C-USA team
Defense:
DL Marquis Bowling, Memphis
John Nix, Southern Miss
Dennis O'Sullivan, Tulane
Adalius Thomas, Southern Miss
Jeff Kerr, ECU
Roderick Coleman, ECU
Courtney Dinkins, Louisville
Michael Jordan, Tulane
Tinker Keck, Cincinnati
Mike McKenzie, Memphis
Special Teams:
Tinker Keck, Cincinnati
Brad Palazzo, Tulane
Brad Hill, Tulane
SOURCE: CONFERENCE USA MEDIA GUIOE
io:
Chec
8
8
Upper deck not big
draw in ticket sales
Shannon tears ACL
Army, Homecoming, expected
to be seasons biggest draws
Patrick Giovinazzo
staff writer
The new upper deck at Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium is
complete. Pirate fans will be able to enjoy home games
from the new vantage point this season.
So what will the upper deck do for ticket sales? Not
much-at least not this season anyway. Ticket Office
Manager Brenda Edwards doesn't expect much of a
change in season ticket sales this year.
"We're hoping maybe next year that sales will pick
up there Edwards said.
Season ticket sales are projected to reach about
14,000; nearly the same as last year.
ECU football's first game will take place on Sept. 5
at Virginia Tech. It is possible for students to buy tick-
ets to the game through ECU. The ticket office will
have tickets for the next two to three weeks at a price
of $27.
At home games, students will continue to sit in the
designated area in the lower deck. There will also be
two student sections in the upper deck if they are
needed.
The ECU ticket office is expecting several home
fames to produce major ticket sales.
"We really foresee the Army game to be a real big
turnout, and then, of course, homecoming is always a
&ood turnout Edwards said.
The Army game will be October 3. This season is
Army's first in Conference USA. ECU last faced Army
m 1995, beating the Cadets on their home field 31-25.
This year's homecoming game will be the following
week, October 10, against University of Alabama-
Birmingham. UAB is slated to join C-USA in 1999.
For now the ticket office remains a couple of hun-
dred sales ahead of last year at this time. Students and
other fans can call the office to buy tickets for the
Virginia Tech game or to purchase season tickets.
The new upper deck may not produce immediate
yields in ticket sales, but it is expected to play a large
role in the future of ECU athletics. As Pirate football
grows and gains national respect, this upper deck will
support the growing number of spectators.
For ticket information call: (252) 328-4500 or 1-800-
DIALECU
1998PIRATE
FOOTBALL
DateOpponent
Sept. 5at Virginia Tech
Sept. 12UT-Chattanooga
Sept. 19at Ohio
Oct. 3Army
Oct. 10UAB
Oct. 17at Alabama
Oct. 24at Southern Miss
Oct. 31Houston
Nov. 7at Cincinnati
Nov. 14Louisville
Nov. 21at Memphis
Starting times will be announced at a later date
SOURCE: 1:CU Dept. of Athletics
1
Dolphin receiver
out for the year
Travis Barklev
sports editor
What should have been the happi-
est day of Larry Shannon's life
quickly turned out to be one of the
most disappointing.
On July 22, Shannon, a former
Pirate wide receiver, signed a
three-year contract with the Miami
Dolphins, who drafted the ECU
product in the third round of last
April's draft. During that morning's
practice, Shannon fell and injured
his right knee.
Shannon suffered a torn anterior
cruciate ligament. After swelling
around the knee subsided, an MRI
revealed that
Shannon will
need surgery.
"Larry has
talent; there's
no doubt
about it
Head Coach
Jimmy
Johnson said.
"I .think he's
going to play
for us.
Unfortunately it doesn't look like
it's going to be this year
Shannon's injury is similar to the
one Yatil Green suffered last year.
Green, a wide receiver from the the
University of
Miami, was the
Dolphins' number
one draft pick in
1997. Green tore
his ACL during his
first practice with
the Dolphins last
year and missed all
of last season.
Green's injury last
year was one of
three serious knee
injuries that the
Dolphins endured
during training
camp.
Shannon is
already the second
Dolphin to be lost
for the year. Earlier
last week, offen-
sive lineman
Randy Wheeler
was paralyzed
when his truck
flipped over and
hit a tree.
Shannon led the
nation in yards per
catch as a junior in
19. Shannon bat-
tled ankle injuries
most of last season,
missing the first four games.
Finally healthy, the Dolphins felt
that Shannon would be able to con-
tribute immediately.
His size and speed were thought
to make him the deep threat the
Dolphins lacked last season.
By drafting Shannon, Miami
reunited him with former ECU
Former Pirate receiver Larry Shannon tore his ACL during his
first NFL practice and will likely miss his entire rookie season.
FILE PHOTO
teammate Jerris McPhail, who is
making the switch from running
back to receiver this season. Now it
looks like the reunion will have to
wait until next year.
The Dolphins signed former
Eagles receiver Michael Timpson
on Monday to help ease the burden
of Shannon's loss.
ECU alum receives athletic training award
Gatorade honors Barnes
with Ttm Kerin Award
Patrick Giovinazzo
staff writer
An ECU graduate is being honored for his
outstanding achievements in the athletic
training world.
Ronnie Barnes, head athletic trainer for
the New York Giants, has become the fifth
recipient of the Tim Kerin Award for
Excellence in Athletic Training. Barnes
received his award during the recent 49th
Annual Meeting and Clinical Symposia of
the National Athletic Trainers' Association
(NATA).
This accolade, sponsored by the
Gatorade Company, annually honors a
trainer who embodies the characteristics of
the late Tim Kerin. Kerin is specifically
remembered for his dedication, integrity
and service to the athletic training profes-
sion.
"Tim Kerin contributed greatly to the
I
profession of athletic training and will not
be soon forgotten Barnes said. "I am
proud to accept this award in honor of
him
Back in 1974, ECU presented Barnes
with his bachelor of science degree, and he
went on to earn his master of science from
Michigan State University in 1979. Since
then, Barnes has spent much of his time
advancing the profession of athletic train-
ing. He has served on several NATA com-
mittees, including the Minority Athletic
Trainers' Committee.
Barnes is currently the president of the
"Ttm Kerin contributed greatly to the
profession of athletic training and
will not be soon forgotten. I am
proud to accept this award in honor
of him
Ronnie Barnes
Head athletic trainer for the New York Giants
i
Professional Football Athletic Trainers
Society. In 1984 and 1988 he was named
the NATA Professional Athletic Trainer of
the Year.
Barnes continues to exhibit his award-
winning service and dedication. He now
serves on the NFL Subcommittee on Mild
Traumatic Brain Injuries and the National
Youth Foundation for the Prevention of
Athletic Injuries.
Barnes has been cited as an example for
all students involved in the ECU athletic
training program.
I
d-i





7 Widnndty, July 29, 1988
sports
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his ACL during his
rtire rookie season.
IcPhail, who is
from running
i season. Now it
on will have to
signed former
chael Timpson
:ase the burden
d
etic Trainers
ie was named
:tic Trainer of
bit his award-
cion. He now
littee on Mild
I the National
Prevention of
n example for
ECU athletic
(
Patriots tight end
Coates faces domestic
abuse charges
WRENTHAM, Mass. (AP) �
New England Patriots tight end
Ben Coates pleaded innocent to
domestic abuse charges this morn-
ing in Wrentham District Court
Coates, 28, was arrested at his
Franklin home Sunday night for
allegedly beating a girlfriend,
police said. Jennifer Marshall, 27,
of Norton, was treated and released
from the hospital, Franklin police
said.
"He is absolutely innocent
said defense lawyer Peter Barlow.
Coates, free on $500 bail,
declined to speak to reporters after
his arraignment. It was unclear
whether the 6-foot-5-inch, 245-
pound player would attend training
camp later in the day.
It was also not clear whether
Marshall was Coates' current girl-
friend. A police report said she
went to his home because she sus-
pected he was having an affair and
spotted an unknown car in his dri-
veway.
Coates allegedly became
enraged and began arguing with
Marshall, the report said.
Coates then allegedly shoved
Marshall several times, slammed
her against the hood of a car and
said, "I'll knock you out accord-
ing to a statement she gave to
police.
Coates told police he pushed
Marshall to defend himself. He
said they were not dating anymore.
Patriots spokesman Don
Lowery attended the court appear-
ance and said coach Pete Carroll
would address reporters at a previ-
ously scheduled news conference
later in the morning at the team's
training camp in Smithfield, R.I.
Coates, who earned All-Pro
recognition in each of his last two
seasons and was selected to the Pro
Bowl in each of his last four sea-
sons, is the highest paid tight end
in the NFL. In 1994, he set a new
NFL record for receptions by a
tight end with 96. He is heading
into his eighth season with the
Patriots.
3fans killed, 6 injured
in Michigan auto race
BROOKLYN, Mich. (AP) Hardly
anyone watching the roaring spec-
tacle of the U.S. 500 auto race
noticed an unusual speeding object
� a flying tire.
The tire had flown from a car
driven into a wall by an out-of-con-
trol driver Sunday. It bounded high
off the top of the fence protecting
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the fans from the track slammed
down in the crowd and bounced
further up the grandstand into
another knot of fans at Michigan
Speedway.
Three people were killed and
six people were injured. No specta-
tors had died in an accident in a
major U.S. auto race in more than a
decade.
"Just for a split second, out of
the corner of my eye, I caught what
looked like something flying
spectator Mark Kuyers said. "I
think the people that got hit didn't
even see it coming. It was com-
pletely a freak thing. The tire
bounced a couple of times and
landed in the walkway
Killed were Michael Terry
Tautkus, 49, and Sheryl Ann
Laster, 40, of Milan, Mich; and
Kenneth Dale Fox, 38, of Lansing.
Dr. Gregory Baumann, the chief
medical director at Michigan
Speedway, said two of the people
died instantly from the impact of
the debris. The third person was
taken to a track medical unit,
where resuscitation failed.
The accident occurred after dri-
ver Adrian Fernandez lost control
of his car while traveling at least
200 mph and slammed into a con-
crete wall. The tire and debris
cleared the wall and a fence before
striking the spectators.
"The wall is four feet above the
track surface and there's 11 feet of
fence and cable explained Greg
Penske, president of Penske
Motorsports Inc which owns the
track. "So there's 15 feet from the
track surface to the top of the
fence. One of the victims was in
row eight and another was in
approximately row 10
Tim VanderMel, of Waynesville,
N.C was one of the spectators
who saw the tire coming.
"I was watching (the tire) come
toward the stands and, as people
saw it coming down, they just start-
ed scrambling. It was almost like it
was in slow motion he said.
None of the six injuries was
more serious than a fractured leg,
and four of the people were treated
at a hospital and released. Two oth-
ers were in stable condition.
The race went on, with most of
the 50,000 spectators unaware of
the tragedy. Few of the teams or
drivers knew about the deaths
either, including Fernandez, who
sustained bruises to both knees.
Pirates
continued from page 6
Green Wave quarterback Shaun
King was picked by the coaches to
repeat as offensive player of the
year.
Cincinnati safety Tinker Keck
made the team as a defensive back
and as a return specialist. Keck was
Races are rarely halted unless then;
is a dangerous situation on the
track
The crowd was on its feet and
cheering when Greg Moore made
the last of a record-breaking 62 lead
changes on the final lap for the vic-
tory.
"People came here to watch us
race and put on a good show, which
we did today Moore said. "But
that tragedy definitely puts a
damper on it"
The deaths marked the first
fatalities at a Championship Auto
Racing Teams event or any other
major oval track race in the United
States since the 1967 Indy 500,
when a tire came off a car and was
struck by another car, sending it
into the top row of the grandstand
and killing a fan.
They were also the first specta-
tor fatalities at the Michigan
Speedway since 1969, when one
fan was killed during a Trans-Am
race on the road course.
Rookie needs camp,
coach says
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) Andre
Wadsworth believes he knows the
Arizona Cardinals defense well
enough to offset the practices
missed during his holdout. His
coach calls that kind of self-confi-
dence misplaced.
"To me, he's behind simply by
missing the first day, and that will
never change, and he won't catch
up coach Vlnce Tobin said
Monday. "The more he misses, the
further behind he's going to get.
Whether he can play effectively
when he gets here, I think,
depends on him, but he's behind
Wadsworth, a defensive end
from Florida State and the third
player drafted last April, has missed
the first five days of training camp.
The Cardinals hoped the talks
would accelerate this week
because quarterback Ryan Leaf,
the No. 2 pick overall, agreed to a
$31.25 million, five-year contract
with San Diego over the weekend.
But Tobin wasn't aware of any
progress.
Bob Ferguson, Arizona's vice
president of player personnel, and
Eugene Parker, Wadsworth's
agent, did not return calls to their
offices.
also named to repeat as special
teams player of the year. Offensive
lineman Brian Uhl joins Keck as
the only other Cincinnati player on
the all-conference squad.
Louisville placed three players
on the team. They are led by tight
end Ibn Green, who led all'
Division 1-A tight ends in recep-
tions last season. Houston,
Memphis and Army are represent-
ed on the team by one player a
piece.
HAVE AN EYE FOR SPORTS?
The ECU Athletic Video Office is seeking to hire student
assistants to film football and basketball events for the
1998-99 academic year. All majors are encouraged to
apply. Internship opportunities are also available for
communications majors.
If interested, call the Athletic Video Office
at 328-0059 to set up an appointment.
Writ Letter to tke, Editor
Got something to say? Need somewhere to
say it? Bring your letter to the easfcarolinian ,
located on the 2nd floor of The Student
Publications Building
MgMH
IMM





I Wedimd�y,Juy29, 1998
"
The East Carolinian
FOR RENT
2 BEDROOM APARTMENT for
rww. Near the college. Call 756-
1050.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 4
bdrm. apartment. Security dep. and
1st months rent already pd. $240.00
per month. Call 1-800-216-7923 ext.
2407.
ROOMMATES NEEDED. $225 in-
cludes utilities, very nice house at
1607 Cedar Lane, across from bus
Stop. Call 919557-0445.
ROOMMATE NEEDED AUGUST 1.
share 3 bedroom house 3 blocks
from school. $200 13 utilities.
Contact Greg. 768-1686.
FOR RENT: 2 BEDROOM, 1 bath
apt. on 10th Street in Forest Manor
Apartments. Free watersewer.
$356 per month. Call 768-1921.
FOR RENT: 2 BEDROOM, 1 bath
apt. range, refrigerator, free water
sewer, washerdryer hook-ups. laun-
dry facilities. 6 blocks from campus,
ECU bus service. 758-1921.
FOR RENT: 1 BEDROOM, 1 bath
apartment, $275.00 per month. Free
watersewer, range, refrigerator,
pets O.K. Call 758-1921.
MEDICAL STUDENT LOOKING
for clean medical, nursing, or gradu-
ate student to share three bedroom
duplex. One mile from hospital. If in-
terested, please call 758-2474.
1 BEDROOM, ALL utilities included.
12 block from campus. Oeclawed
cats only with pet deposit. Off street
parking. $305. 767-9387.
4 BEDROOM, 3 BATH house near
downtown, washerdryer hookups.
$750. Can be subdivided into 3 bed
2 bath 1 bedbath. Call 757-9387.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share large 2 bedroom house 2
blocks from campus. Must be re-
sponsible and animal loving. $200
per month plus utilities. 910-468-
9039 Christie.
RESPONSIBLE ROOMMATE
wanted for nice 3 BR duplex. WD,
central air. dishwasher, fenced in
backyard, back deck. Close to cam-
pus and downtown) Ask for Steve
or Beth. 830-6921.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
nice 2 BR2BA duplex in Heritage
Village. $247month 12 utilities.
Grad student or mature individual
preferred. Call Mike at 329-4116 or
353-6799.
ROOMMATE NEEDED FOR two
bedroom, two bathroom apt
washer and dryer, walking distance
from campus. Call Kathleen, 752-
2705.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED to
share four bedroom apartment lo-
cated at Players Club Apartments.
Call 321-7613 for more information.
1 FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
ASAP: Player's Club Apts. to share
4 bedroom townhouse. Your own
bedroom and bathroom. $210 plus
14 utilities per month, washer
dryer in apt. On bus route. Available
August 4! Please call 328-7798 for
more information.
AVAILABLE NOW
1,088 SQUARE FOOT, FULLY
FURNISHED, 2 BEDROOM 2
BATH APARTMENT
$500MONTH. 758-5393
Dapper
Dan;s
Big Summer Sale
10-75 OFF
ROOMMATES NEEDED - Two side-
by-side Player's Club apartments
each need a roommate. Washer
dryer, private bath, pool and friendly
fun. Please call 363-2666.
HOUSE FOR RENT. 5 bedroom. 2
bathrooms, large denkitchen with
fireplace, brick patio, on half acre
wooded lot fully fenced in. Pets OK.
2 miles from campus beside Pi
Kappa Phi fraternity house on
Hooker Road. $750 per month. Avail-
able August. Call 321-2030 for ap-
pointment.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
to share 2 bedroom apartment,
$187.50mo. plus 12 utilities. Call
Jessica. 767-9640. Needed ASAPI
WALK TO ECU. 1 bed apt $275
mo avail, now. Tanglewood Apts
125 Avery St Greenville. 758-6596
HELP WANTED
BABYSITTER NEEDED FOR one
small child, afternoons only, Mon
Fri starting August 25. Interviewing
now. Call Ms. White 355-7745 eve-
nings, 321-3350 daytime.
PART-TIME CARPET CLEANER.
Two days and two nights a week.
Valid driver's license and heavy lift-
ing required. Call 756-9857 between
8-5.
HIRING � MUST HAVE CAR and
drivers license, yard sign delivering
for a local company. Good pay, flex-
ible schedule, steady work, yard
signs are easy to handle, take from
one job-site to the next. Paid per
sign. Page Tim at 551-7156 (Handy
Helpers, Inc.). 2 positions available.
AEROBIC INSTRUCTOR. PITT
COUNTY Memorial Hospital is seek-
ing qualified individuals to teach
aerobic classes through its Employee
Recreation and Wellness Depart-
ment. Persons will contract to teach.
on a part-time basis. Interested can-
didates should contact Rose Anne
between 8ANM:30PM at (252)816-
6501. Pitt Co. Memorial Hospital.
MORNING RUNNER NEEDED for
local law firm. Reliable transporta-
tion a must. M-F, 9AM-1PM. EOE.
Send resume to: Legal Administra-
tor, 1698 E. Arlington Blvd
Greenville, NC 27858. 321-2020.
NEEDEDI SOMEONE to do
teleservicing and selling of office
furniture. Must be enthusiastic, posi-
tive and willing to work. Call 931- .
6904 and leave a message.
HELP WANTED: RESPONSIBLE
female with dependable transports- �
tion wanted to pick up two children
from school at 2:50 and take to our
home to care for and help with'
homework until 6PM beginning Au-
gust 24. Call 758-3111 after 5:30.
Washers and Dryers
FOR RENT
New, X-Large capacity
stop wasting time & money
at the laundromat
call 236-5097
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(919)496-2X4
DC YOU NEED MONEY?
We N��4 TSmtwiiwd boots
nut ho�il Good JtMuw,
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00, 2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, irive to back door & ring buzzi'r.
CAMPUS MANAGER PT. Need
$$? Enjoy meeting people? Student
Advantage, a national student mem-
bership company seeks motivated,
outgoing individuals to manage on-
campus eventspromotions and lo-
cal sponsor program. Fax resume to:
404-873-6695 or e-mail potts�
studentadvantage.com or phone 1-
800-313-1667. attend: Erin Bales.
GREENVILLE RECREATION AND
PARKS Department Fall Adult Soc-
cer Officials' Meeting. The Greenville
Recreation and Parks Department
will be holding an organizational
meeting for all those interested in
officiating in the Fall Adult Soccer
Leagues. Position pays $12-$ 16 a
game. Clinics will be held to train
new and experienced officials. How-
ever, a basic knowledge and under-
standing of the game is necessary.
The meeting will be held Tuesday,
August 11, 1998 at 6:30 PM at Elm
Street Gym. Experience require-
ments, clinic schedule, and game
fees will be discussed. For more in-
formation, please call the Athletic
Office at 329-4550 between the
hours of 2PM-7PM, Monday thru
Friday.
AFTER SCHOOL SITTER NEEDED
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays
only. Pick-up my child at 3:15PM.
Must be energetic, flexible, great
with kidsl Great references, excellent
driving record. Must start August 26.
Call 353-5623 after 7PM any day.
SERVERS NEEDED DAY OR night
Apply in person at Charlie Tom's,
465 Grimes Rd. in Washington, 262-
946-8895.
This program will run from Septem-
ber to mid November. Salary rates
start at $5.16 per hour. For more
information, please call Ben James
or Michael Daly at 329-4650 after
2PM.
FOR SALE
PART-TIME JOB POSITIONS avail-
able. Greenville Recreation 8- Parks
Department
Fall Youth Soccer Coaches. The
Greenville Recreation & Parks De-
partment is recruiting for 12 to 16
part-time youth soccer coaches for
the fall youth soccer program. Ap-
plicants musi possess some knowl-
edge of the soccer skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
-youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 5-15, in
soccer fundamentals. Hours are from
. 3PM until 7PM with some night and
weekend coaching. Flexible with
hours according to class schedules.
DRESSER WITH LARGE mirror
and matching nightstand, four years
old, must sell ASAP. $100. Please
call Tracey, 766-6818, leave mes-
sage.
COMPUTER-PACKARD BELL.
33.6K modem, 1.5GB hard drive.
16MB RAM, CD-ROM. Microsoft Of-
fice '97, (Word. Publisher. Excel).
Windows '95. upgraded twice. Ask-
ing $800. Call Brandon, 754-8094.
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS Post Script
printer. Laser jet printer. Includes
paper tray and manual feed. $160.
Call 353-7109.
COMPAQ LAPTOP COMPUTER
100 mhz Pentium with 16 mb ram,
color screen. faxmodem. MS Of-
fice. Aldus Pagemaker, MS Works.
Norton Utilities. Great school or busi-
ness computer, $800. Call 353-
7109.
FURNITURE - TWIN SIZED bed
(frame and mattress) $30. Drafting
desk and lamp, $20. Study desk
$20. End table $10. Dresser $16.
Call Brandon, 754-8094.
BLUE RECUNER in great condition,
perfect for dorm room or apartment.
$150.00 OBO. Call John. 661-7456.
PERSONALS
LADIES: LEND ME your sore ach-
ing muscles. Amateur masseur
needs your back to practice on. Call:
Kyle 1-800-484-8546 (code 2465)
or POB 8663. Greenville 27835.
SERVICES
RIVERFIELD FARM STABLES
open for boarding 5.5 miles from
ECU. Full board $200 a month. Train-
ing and lessons available. For more
information call 551-3200.
comics
Life on Tuesday
Chris Knotts
France
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Title
The East Carolinian, July 29, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 29, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1282
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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