The East Carolinian, July 15, 1998






WEDNESDAY
July is. is9b
Hurricane
season
under way
Brochures available
from Red Cross
TK Jones
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
This year on average, 10 tropical
storms are expected to develop
over the Atlantic Ocean,
Caribbean Sea or Gulf of Mexico.
Of these, authorities say six will
become hurricanes.
A tropical storm becomes a hur-
ricane when winds and rains climb
to 74 mph or higher, during the
months of June through
November. Years ago hurricanes
would kill hundreds of people,
throwing them to their deaths into
the branches of trees and sides of
buildings.
But today, because of radar,
reconnaissance planes and com-
munication lines, the paths of the
storms can be detected early, and
people are given ample time to
prepare.
Though even with advanced
technology, there is still reason for
alarm.
"Coastline development has
doubled in the last few years said
Dr. Steve Harper, assistant profes-
sor of geology. "So yes, we're able
to track and forecast with more
ease than before, but the popula-
tion growth on the coast makes it
(the benefits of foreknowledge) a
two-edged sword
Dr. Richard mauger, a professor
of geology, said, "Most of the peo-
ple living on the coast are from
inland areas and are unaware of
how to fully prepare for a hurri-
cane. When it's time to evacuate,
everybody's trying to 'get across
the same bridge
When a hurricane watch is
announced, hurricane-like condi-
tions are possible within 36 hours.
When there's a hurricane warning,
the time is reduced to 24 hours.
While the surge affects the coastal
areas, the after-effects causes
inland flooding up to two weeks
later.
The Pitt County Red Cross
sends out advisories for residents
to seek shelter in local schools
before the storm strikes, and those
who are unable should remain in
their homes. Local weather chan-
nels broadcast the events of the
storms and when it is safe to leave.
But access to this information
requires access to electricity, often
unavailable during severe storms.
! Two years ago when hurricanes
Fran and Bertha hit, Lowe's
received 250 orders for generators.
Though they increase their stock
during hurricane season, not every-
SEE HURRICANE. PAGE 2
TODAY
Thunderstorms
high 84
low 67
TOMORROW
Thunderstorms
high 92
low 73
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
eastcarolinian
Student Health Center offers free,
confidential HIVAIDS screening
Estimated one in 500
students have virus
Debbie Neuwirtii
staff writer
HIVAIDS screenings are now offered free to
students at the Student Health Center. It is
estimated that 80 percent of college students
are sexually active, and one in 500 has the
HIV virus. The service will be available in
the fall, and the process will be completely
confidential.
"I hope that students will take advantage
of this, and confidential-
ity is assured said
Heather Zophy, health
educator at Student
Health.
Zophy said that if
students have engaged
in any kind of high risk
behavior, they should
be tested.
"If students have the
virus and are living in an
unhealthy way, it will
make their immune sys-
tems weaker Zophy said.
The process is simple. Students can call
anytime to make an appointment to be
Heather Zophy
Hearth Educator
Flit PHOTO
screened. Then a nurse calls them to give
information and to find out their knowledge
on the disease. The student then goes for
pretest counseling and blood is drawn. The
students are given literature to look over, and
come in approximately 10 days later for the
results.
There is also post-test counseling, regard-
less of the results. With counseling, Health
Services makes an effort to have the student
counseled by the same person both
times.Jblene Jernigan, director of clinical
operations, has done detailed work with the
Pitt County Health Department.
"We are an outreach of the Health
Department, and they will be here with
experienced counselors for post-positive
counseling Jernigan said.
With all of the current medications, peo-
ple with the HIV virus are living up to 20
years with medications. Since Student
Health sees young and healthy people, it is
suggested that students concentrate on mak-
ing changes in their lifestyles if they are at
risk.
Student Health will help with a student's
medical needs as well as their mental health
needs. If a student tests positive, the Health
Department is notified and helps counsel the
patient. Students' names are held confiden-
tial and are reported to the state only as a sta-
tistic. Since the virus is easily detected and is
deadly, students are encouraged by Student
Health to take advantage of this free service.
The commuter parking lot on College Hill Drive is one of many overcrowded lots students compete for spaces in everyday.
PHOTO BY MARC CfllPPEN
Summer parking changes
may cause fall confusion
Meteredparking
heavily affected
Chris Knotts
STAFF WRITER
Before you pull your car into your
favorite parking space this fall you
may want to double check the sign.
Over the summer, parking and
Traffic Services made several
changes in parking designations.
"Probably the biggest change on
campus for 1998 will be the reloca-
tion of some of the metered spaces
said Pat Gertz, director of parking
and traffic.
Metered spaces north of Joyner
Library have moved south, with the
displaced staff going to the north.
Two new metered spaces replace
staff spaces east of Mail Services.
The lot at Fifth and Harding
becomes metered visitor, state vehi-
cle and private parking. Parking on
Beckwith Drive, Wright Circle and
Founder's Drive east of Spilman
converts to staff spaces resulting in a
significant drop in congestion in
front of Wright auditorium. No new
student spaces have been
announced.
Gertz said the total number of
spaces on campus as of March 23 are
7,295. There are 1,703 staff spaces,
876 resident, 1,103 commuter, 1,030
freshmen, 1,757 university registered
and 99 metered spaces. The remain-
ing spaces are allotted mostly for pri-
vate, state and visitor use. Of the total
spaces 1,928 are on core campus,
1,605 are on college hill, 1,264 are at
Allied Health and 1,705 are athletic
complex spaces. The Reade Street
lots contain 793 spaces.
"Freshmen aren't supposed to
park on campus during the week, but
they do said Nancy Roberson,
appeals coordinator with parking and
traffic services. "Then the resident
whose space got taken parks in a staff
space, and the resident gets a ticket
Roberson suggested that more
education of freshmen and more use
of the shuttles could help alleviate
some tough parking situations. She
also said that the staff at P&TS do
everything they can to manage park-
ing � more than just giving tickets.
We are hired to do a job which
Parking Changes
�Metered spaces north of
Joyner Library move south
and are now staff spaces
�Two new metered spaces
replace staff spaces east of
Mail Services
�Fifth and Harding Lot has
become metered visitor, state
vehicle and private parking
spaces
�Parking on Beckwith Drive,
Wright Circle and Founder's
Drive east of Spilman will
become staff spaces
Distribution of
Parking Spaces
as of March 23,1998
2000r
� Univ. Reg. D
? Staff ?
D Commuter �
Source: ECU Parking and Traffic Services
Former professor to
head Orchid Society
First to see Hoosier
variety bloom
Debbie Nei wuth
. staff writer
Dr. Francis Belcik, a retired biolo-
gy professor, was named president
of the Neuse River Orchid
Society. He started growing moth
orchids in 1991, and since then has
been the first person to have a
Hoosier Orchid bloom.
"Most orchids are tropical and
live up in the branches of trees
Belcik said. "A few grow on rocks
and others grow on the ground
Moth orchids are white flowers
with red stripes and red dots.
Growing orchids is difficult in
northeastern North Carolina due
to changing climates. Some
orchids live only a day, whereas
some can last three to six months.
Belcik visited Indiana in 1991
and saw a Hoosier Orchid that had
been crossed from two different
species. They predicted the
flower would be pink, but could
not get it to bloom. After purchas-
ing the orchid and returning home,
the flower turned green with a
white lip. Being the first person to
bloom this orchid, Belcik named it
"Irish Starr" (Epicat Citron Prism).
Belcik has done everything
from collecting crystal bottles and
disco clothing before he started
growing orchids.
"I look for a new wrinkle in life.
I have too many interests Belcik
said.
When a flower is named, the
name is registered at the Royal
Society in England. Besides being
a gardener, a painter and a fisher,
Belcik is involved in three orchid
growing societies.
Orchid societies have many
purposes. They teach knowledge
of orchids, hold shows, and give
rewards. Orchids can cost any-
where from five dollars up to 35
dollars. Blooming size is five inch-
es and over. There are currently
56 species of orchids in North
Carolina.
Anne Goodman is the treasurer
for the Neuse River Orchid
Society and enjoys many of the
same hobbies as Belcik.
"I like to grow things better
than anything else Goodman
said.
Goodman works for the non-
profit organization where mem-
bers display and sell their plants.
Former professor. Francis Belcik, displays his extensive, personal collection of orchids.
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
Opinion
WEDNESDAY
Lifestyle
QSports
�7 Watch out for the
meter maid. The signs
have changed again.
Spooky stuff in
Eastern, N.C.
Catch some
waves.
When the cyberdust clears,
I check out TECs new website at

I
I
S the east Carolinian STUDENT PUBLICATION BLDG, GREENVILLE. NC 27858 across from Joyner library - newsroom 328-6366 advertising 328-2000 fax 328-6558 website www.iec.ecu.edu





I
2 Wndnesday, July 16, 1998
news
The East Carolinian
Hurricane
continued from page 1
IOSS
the state
University fixes
health ana safety
violations on campus
DURHAM (AP) � North Carolina
Central University has corrected all
130 health and safety violations the
state Department of Labor found
last fall, school officials said.
This fall students will return to a
much safer campus than the one
they left in the spring, said George
Walls, assistant to the chancellor.
Sting Guard Christy
Smith placed on
injured reserve
CHARLOTTE (AP) � Charlotte
Sting guard Christy Smith has been
placed on the injured reserve list
with a broken right finger, the team
said Sunday.
The 5-foot-7 starter underwent
surgery Saturday evening and is
expected to miss three to four weeks.
a c r o s s
Saturn back at work,
only operating GM
assembly plant in U.S.
SPRING HILL, Tenn. (AP) �
Saturn's 8,000 employees returned
from their annual two-week sum-
mer vacation Monday, making
their plant the only fully operating
General Motors assembly plant in
the United States.
Clinton to nominate
election law specialist
to head FEC
WASHINGTON (AP) �
President Clinton will nominate
Karl J. Sandstrom, a
Washington attorney specializ-
ing in election law, to serve as a
commissioner of the Federal
Election Commission, the White
House announced Monday.
July 1
Larceny, Damage to Property
� A staff member reported the
lamp post on the southwest side of
Taylor-Slaughter had been broken
and a stone ash tray missing.
Larceny of Motor Vehicle� A
student reported her vehicle stolen
from the parking lot west of
Minges.
24-hour Lockup - A student was
put under 24-hour lockup at Pitt
County Detention Center due to
extreme intoxication.
Possession of MarijuanaDrug
Paraphernalia - A student was
issued a state citation and campus
appearance ticket for possessing
marijuana and drug paraphernalia.
The contraband was discovered
during a search of the vehicle after
onnr m
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U.S. Army serviceman
dies during
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KUWAIT (AP) � A U.S. soldier
died during a desert training exer-
cise in Kuwait, the U.S. Embassy
said Monday.
The soldier died Sunday; a pre-
liminary medical evaluation indicat-
ed that his death was from natural
causes, the embassy said in a state-
ment.
Muggers terrorize women
with snakes in India
NEW DELHI, India (AP) �
Muggers are using snakes to terror-
ize and rob women in downtown
New Delhi, a newspaper reported
Monday.
In the latest incident Saturday,
three men thrust snakes at a
woman in a taxi and demanded her
money and jewelry, the Times of
India reported. The woman,
Roshni, turned the valuables over.
one can afford $500 for the basic
style of generator. The Red Cross
makes available brochures for sur-
vival kits and home preparations if
electricity is unavailable.
"I do think people take them
seriously and are not going to ride
out a storm because they have
seen the deadly effects of other
hurricanes, " said Amanda Ross,
producer at WITN-TV News.
Parking
continued from page 1
involves enforcing regulations
we don't make the rules, but we
are paid to do a job Roberson
said. "We're humans too, with
families and children. When we
leave that job, we leave. There are
truly people here who care about
helping students. If someone has
been towed or gotten a ticket, we
really do everything we can to
help
the student was stopped for suspi-
cious activity ip the Reade Street
lot. Another student was issued a
campus appearance ticket.
July 2
Failure to Appear � A student
of 144 Fleming Hall was arrested
for failing to appear in court.
July 8
Communicating Threats � A
staff member from Whichard
reported an unknown female left a
threatening message on her voice
mail.
Felonious Larceny � A staff
member reported the larceny of
two hammer drills from the electri-
cal room in the east wing of Joyner
Library.
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July 18 - Widespread Panic wG love &
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July 24 - Culture Club wHuman League and
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Aug.7 - Newport Folk Festival wLyle Lovett,
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Aug. 30 - Dave Matthews Band
Blockbuster Pavillion at Charlotte
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Aug. 14 - Newport Folk Festival
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July 14 - Stabbing Westward wGod Lives
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Listen to the Retro Party every Friday from
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Listen to the Roots Rock show every
Tuesday and Thursday from 9 to 1 2 to win
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Be sure to check out the Widespread Panic:
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LETT
This letter is
Bennett's letter
how we sh
Christians for
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local





. 3 Wadneiday, July 15, 1998
opinion
The East Carolinian
eastffarolinian
Amy L.Royster Mm
Heather Burgess Msnsging Edrior
Amanda Austin Mm Editor Travis Barkley Soorn Ednor
TK Jones Annum Nm Ediiix Tracy Hairr Annum Sports Editor
Andy Turner Ultityi, Editor Carole Mehle H�d Copy Editor
Miccah Smith Aniium lifsitrls Editor Chris Knotts Sufi iiiustnior
Matt Hege Advertising Msntgtr
Bobby Tuggle Wsbmnur
Smog �� ECU annual, unu 1925. tt, Em CnUini v�Om 11000 o��i s�qr Ii�s(si irt rri�d�. 11. Rid ��� �11 i�wi� ��
w�o� ol �� Mural Bind, tin Em brotrw Mamn krrm m da �dn�.ta,irdio!SOinrti.rtrtmnljirt�jl�diclncT�l�i�t.Il�E�i
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oumsw
You're driving. You're looking. You're searching. But, as usual, there are no
parking spaces available. So you proceed to look for a meter spot next to the
Spilman Building, but they are gone; they have been converted into STAFF
parking spaces. But why?
The parking situation for the 1998 school year has undergone some
changes. Many metered spaces in various locations have been changed to staff
and many staff spaces in various locations have been changed to metered
spaces. But � surprise, surprise � no new student spaces have been
announced.
The metered spaces that were in front of Spilman have been moved. Have
you found them yet? They are across the street. How are students supposed
to know the meters have been moved across the street unless they're told? In
this case, a sign would have been nice. Students who tried to park there before
they read this weeks TEC now have costly tickets to pay. What person can
read the mind of the parking officials on campus? What person can keep up
with changes they're not told about? We might be college educated but in this
case spell it out for us please. "Meter spots moved across the street After all,
some of us have been used to whipping into the same spots for four or more
years.
The total amount of spaces on campus are as follows: 1,703 staff spaces, 876
resident spaces, 1,103 commuter spaces, 1030 freshman, 1,757 university reg-
istered and 99 metered spaces.
It seems to us that staff money means more to Parking and Traffic Services
than the students' money; after all, without students, would there be a need for
staff? Why is the staff increasingly being granted more parking spaces while stu-
dents are left to fight it out in the side streets down by the river.
Maybe we students can think of the walking we have to do in a positive light.
Statistics show that the average college students don't get enough activity and
tend to live a sedentary lifestyle, so if you have to walk from your car just think
you are burning away the calories and the fat. And we'll have those stories to tell
our children someday � those "I had to walk 10 miles to school in the swelter-
ing heat just to pay my tuition" sort of stories.
LETTER
to the editor
Teach all religions if any at all
This letter is in response to Mr.
Bennett's letter to the editor about
how we shouldn't criticize
Christians for their "faith Mr.
Bennett criticizes the column
"church or State � Not Both as
an attack on Christians everywhere
for it was suggested that if public
schools were going to teach
Christian views, then the schools
should also teach other religious
views so the students can make an
informed choice.
He then reminds us that even
if Christians are wrong the "have
lived good, righteous lives with-
out sin (which he lists as: lying
cheating, adultery, stealing, mur-
der, etc.) I could give an example
of a Christian evangelist who lied,
stole, and committed adultery, but
I won't mention Jim Baker. I am
referring to the Inquisition.
Traditionally, religions try to
grab all the credit for everything
good that happens for their god,
and assign all the blame for every-
thing that goes wrong to their
assorted pantheons of "bad guys
For nothing has caused more con-
flicts over the most trivial things
than religions. Sometimes even
different factions of the same faith
try to obliviatc each other
(Catholics and Protestants come to
mind.) With so many lovepease-
based religions out there, one
would think we could stop fight-
ing over who has the best religion.
In conclusion, we all have our
own views concerning whether or
not religion should be taught in the
public schools or not, but if you
teach one to be fair you need to
give each religion equal time.
William F. FairleyV.
Confessional Hotline
OPINION
Columnist
Stephen
KLEINSCHMIT

ECU has always done a rela-
tively good job at keeping
crime low on campus. If you
speed or park improperly,
you 'II be nailed to the wall.
Too bad there is not as much
consideration for serious
crime such as theft, assault
and vandalism.
Yes, I can spare a dime. And no, I
am not going to give it to you. I
know you hate it as much as I do.
You and some of your closest
friends do the downtown thing and
arc hit up for money by a bum. I am
tired of having some wasted bum
sitting on the street corner wasting
time by asking every person com-
ing by if they have any money �
which the bum will probably use in
one of those downtown establish-
ments anyway.
I am not a mean person. I have
given money and donated time and
effort for Christian Ministries, and
to the annual Crop Walk. I am for
helping the truly disadvantaged
and needy. But I am tired of seeing
Greenville and ECU being defiled
by vagrancy and panhandling.
Several of us have even been hit up
on campus. I was walking to White
Hall to see a friend of mine, and
several students and I were hit up
for cash by a bum on campus. This
put us in an uncomfortable posi-
tion. I talked to one of the student
patrol guys and had the bum kicked
off campus. I am not very tolerant
of people who put me in an unsafe
or uncomfortable position � espe-
cially on campus � and I am sure
many of you aren't either.
So, what do we do? G-Ville's
police are doing a better job down-
town. The biggest problem is the
associated crime with the area.
Let's face it; there is almost a clear-
ly drawn line between poverty and
prosperity in Greenville, and we all
know where it is. And it sucks going
out to your car and having the back
window broken and your stereo
gone. It really bites when you come
back from the weekend and find all
your stuff gone from the house.
The city needs to do more to pro-
tect the students. If it wasn't for the
thousands of ECU students who
come here each year, Greenville
could be just another gas station on
US 264.
ECU has always done a relative-
ly good job at keeping crime low on
campus. If you speed or park
improperly, you'll be nailed to the
wall. Too bad there is not as much
consideration for serious crime such
as theft, assault and vandalism. I
think that we could improve the
quality of life by spending our
money on more student patrol offi-
cers, and less on idiotic million dol-
lar musical clocks.
OPINK
. JtflColumnist
Jeff
BERGMAN
Columnist says, "Bah, humbug
Write, a. Letter to th& Editor
Got something to say? Need somewhere to
say it? Bring your letter to the eastcarolinian,
located on the 2nd floor of The Student
Publications Building
Sometimes big government
is a vast, ineffective
bureaucracy, but most
often it is not.
My fellow college students, we
need to dismantle the liberal pro-
grams that plague our great nation.
The days of big government are
over. The citizens of this country
need a break from the Democrats'
tax-and-spend policies.
The liberal virus that has
attacked our nation has not lived up
to its lofty goals. The first program
that needs to be done away with is
the public library system. This ini-
tiative is designed to encourage
Americans to read. Remember, fel-
low citizens, a literate America is a
bad America. With literacy comes
knowledge. As the people of this
great land gain some semblance of
intelligence, they might see
through our B.S. and actually vote
with a brain, instead of listening to
our snazzy attack commercials.
The next dead program walking
should be the public school system.
Get rid these federal, state and
locally funded institutions. If you
cannot afford to send children to
school, do not have them.
State-run institutions of higher
learning are the next social program
on the guillotine. The public uni-
versities are nothing but breeding
grounds for the liberal-minded fas-
cists. (Amazing coincidence, isn't
it? Someone goes to college to
receive an education and they are
branded a liberal. What does that
make conservatives?)
Next the welfare programs in
this country should be shot like an
illegal immigrant crossing the U.S
Mexico border. The only excep-
tions to the deforming of welfare
should be the handouts that the
truly poor receive: tax-breaks,
grants and anything else billion dol-
lar corporations want.
Included into the welfare extinc-
tion program art college loans and
grants. If the population can not
afford their children, they should
be sent to Ethiopia. In this region of
the world, according to Sally
Struthers, only 17 cents is needed a
day to feed and educate these chil-
dren.
Sounds ludicrous; right? The
above is a cynical look at how the
'conservatives' in this country talk
about the big, bad, evil, federal gov-
ernment. Sometimes big govern-
ment is a vast, ineffective bureau-
cracy, but most often it is not.
Highway construction, rural
electricity, law enforcement, mili-
tary, public schools, the FDA, FAA,
FEMA� these are a few examples
of your government working for
you.
Perhaps you despise the people
who can't pull themselves up by
their bootstraps and stop living off
the government. The answer to
that belief is simple: drop out of
school. Remember, if you attend
ECU, you are receiving a type of
welfare program. North Carolina
picks up the tab for your tuition
from where your grants, loans or
individual payments leave off.
'The real heart of a university is freedom
to express and to criticize
George W. Starcher, university president, 1968





4 Wtdnasdiy, July 15, 1998
Juicebaby
Babyteeth
6 OUT OF lO
Jennifer Lecoett
SENIOR WRITER
It's exciting when a fresh, young
local band releases their first CD.
Still new to the ins and outs of the
business, the first CD allows a
band to practice, experiment and
learn. You could say it's like
watching a baby take its first steps.
Appropriately, local act
Juicebaby is one such band. The
lineup includes Jon Gott on lead
Vocals, Jon Lauterer on guitar and
accompanying vocals, Randy
Miller on bass and Dallas Owenby
on drums. All four originally hail
from Asheville and met in high
school. But because half of the
band was at ECU and the other
half at Western Carolina,
Juicebaby was not officially
together until last May when Gott
and Owenby relocated to
Greenville.
After only three weeks of
rehearsing together, they made a
demo and started playing shows
around Greenville, Nags Head,
Raleigh and Chapel Hill. Passing
out demo tapes over the past year
must have worked pretty well
because these four guys were able
to play enough gigs to horde up
enough money to cut their debut
CD Babyteeth.
For a first effort, this eight-song
CD puts the band out there as a
serious contender against a big
pile of bands who flood clubs with
tapes in a desperate attempt to get
bookings. Careful consideration
was given to the title of their
debut disc as was the jacket art.
For the cover of their disc,
Juicebaby decided to use excerpts
from a painting of recent ECU Art
�School grad Brian Buchanan. This
painting of a tooth with wings
;adds a humorous punch to the
funny theme of baby teeth and
;first experiences.
Although the freshness of
Juicebaby's talent can't go unno-
ticed, it does seem that they can't
make up their mind in which
direction to take their music. The
intro to the first song on the disc is
reminiscent of Joan Jett's "I Love
-Rock and Roll" yet ends with an
unenthusiastic chant of their band
name.
The second song, "Jest
Joshin is catchier but conflicts
with the first in that it has a
Zeppelin feeling about it due in
parts to guitar work and the lead
singer's Plantesque voice.
On first listen, "Toss Da
Bottle" mimics the reggaeish
"Pass the Dutchie" by the 80's
group Musical Youth. However,
the guitar and bass are interesting-
ly paired for a more funky sound.
The best parts of the song are
when Lauterer and Gott are both
SEE JUICE. PAGE5
lifestyle
5 Wednesday.
Doiny
A gtide to haunted places in Eastern North Carolina
L A
Miccah Smith
assistant lifestyle editor
Summer is the time when most stu-
dents have the least to do, and we all
tend to take the occasional road-trip
during this time in search of
relief from boredom.
But when the beach
gets old, camping in the
woods seems less than
appealing and screaming
down the highway trail-
ing beer cans and Little
Debbie wrappers at 70
miles per hour with no
particular goal in sight
seems like just a waste,
maybe it's time to rethink
your travel plans.
If you agree, and if you
have the nerve, now's the
time to take a brave friend,
a blanket and a map, and
turn your headlights into
the swirling mists of leg-
end that surround the
nearby North Carolina
Piedmont and coast.
Scores of haunted or mysterious
places exist in Eastern North Carolina
for the gutsy tourist who's willing to
stay up past bedtime for a gander at
the unknown. Maybe a chill up your
spine is just what you need.
The Lights at Maco Station �
Perhaps the best place in Eastern
North Carolina to actually see para-
normal phenomena, Maco station is
fa m o u s
its legends
of Joe Baldwin's
ghost, who can be seen
swinging its lantern up and
down a stretch of train tracks as
he searches for his head.
Baldwin, a caboose flagman, was
decapitated while trying to pre-
vent two trains for crashing into
each other one night in 1867.
President Grover Cleveland is one
of the countless people who have
witnessed the apparition, which
used to manifest on a fairly consis-
tent basis. The tracks have been
removed, but there is still a good
chance to see Baldwin's lantern.
Maco Station is located 14 miles west
SEE SPOOKY PAGE 6
Who knows what
evil lurks in Eastern
North Carolina?
PHOTO BY JASON FEATHER
Genre revisited during
recentyears
Mark Brett-
senior writer
I was on my fifth glass of scotch
when the idea hit me. Since I had-
n't written a story in a while, it was-
n't very good scotch, but it
got the job done. The idea,
though, the idea was a good
one. I'd write an article on
film noir, and put this first-
person narration I was
spewing out to good use
My first experience with
the noir genre was as a kid,
catching The Maltese Falcon
on some late-night movie
show. I didn't know to call
it noir then, of course, but I
responded to the tough,
cynical edge of the film
nonetheless.
The Falcon, with its
morally-neutral hero Sam
Spade, is a good place to start. Film
noir (or, roughly translated, "dark
film") is a genre preoccupied with
the dark side of human nature.
Noir heroes are typically touched
by that darkness in some way, and
often wrestle with their own baser
instincts while trying to fight the
good fight. Tough, cynical and
generally pessimistic, film noir dra-
mas have little to do with sweet-
ness and light
� Cinematically, noir films tend to
be dark and moody, as well. Style is
everything in a successful noir pro-
duction; shadows are dominant and
the image itself becomes just as
compelling as the story. The inter-
play of shadow and light on-screen
reflects the struggle going on with-
in the characters' hearts.
Even if all of this sounds for-
eign, odds arc that the average
movie-goer has seen at least one
noir film. If you've ever seen a
movie with Humphrey Bogart,
Edward G. Robinson or Robert
Mitchum playing a tough guy, it
could probably be classified as noir.
Films like Casablanca, Gaslight,
Black Angel, Cape Fear and The Big
Sleep are all classics of noir; if
you've seen them, you know noir.
Even if you're one of those
Philistines who refuses to watch
anything in black and white,
smokes it cause he's got it in the Maltese Falcon,
PHOTO COURTESY OF WARNER BROTHERS
you've probably seen a noir film at
some time. The genre, which all
but disappeared in the technicolor
'60s, has made a big comeback in
recent years.
The most obvious and suc-
cessful examples of modern noir
are the films of Quentin
Tarantino. Reservoir Dogs, Pulp
Fiction and Jackie Brown are all
noir films, in subject matter if
not in style. Aside from his trade-
mark snappy dialogue and time-
twisting story structure,
Tarantino's films are all about
the darker side of human nature.
Though he doesn't play around
with shadow that much, prefer-
ring Hitchcock-like camera
tricks for style, Tarantino's films
have done more to popularize
film noir than anything since the
Maltese Falcon back in 1931.
The popularity of Tarantino
has launched a boatload of
modern noir, including such
films as Killing Zoe, Demi in a
Blue Dress and the recent (
Turn and Palmetto. Though
none of these films copy
Tarantino's style, 'they all
evoke the noir mood, and may
not have been made without
the success of Tarantino's
work.
Also following in
Tarantino's wake was
Brian Singer's excellent
The Usual Suspects. This
film is already considered
a modern noir classic,
boasting a wonderful per-
formance by Kevin
Spacey and a plot so com-
plicated it may take a
couple of viewings to unravel
completely. If you haven't
seen it, do so immediately.
Similarly, even- movie fan
should also sec Miller's
Crossing. A gangster film put
together by the Coen broth-
ers (of Fargo and Raising
Arizona fame), Miller's
Crossing spins the gangstertough
guy movie off in new directions.
Without giving too much away, the
film concerns itself with a complex
web of lies, infidelity, and murder;
TV W WTO ��tf 1WM1MCHH'
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Gabriel Byrne gets bitch-slapped in Millet's
Crossing.
all the ingredients for great noir.
And if you didn't catch the homo-
sexual subtext, go back and watch
it again; you missed the whole
point.
And, of course, there's the noir-
est of noir films. Seven, a film so
cloaked in shadow that whole
scenes arc in peril of being swal-
lowed whole by the darkness. I
have seldom seen a movie so utter-
ly pessimistic and depressing. The
statements Seven makes about the
ugly side of human nature and the
numbness of life in modern
America are enough to make even
the happiest person contemplate
putting a gun to his head. I love it.
And the modern noir list goes
on. The Ctvw is supernatural noir.
Blade Runner is sci-fi noir.
Highlander is fantasy noir. The
Professional and La Femme Nikita
are French noir. Hard Boiled is
Chinese noir. Hell, even The X-
Files is noir of some sort.
They're all fine films, and
quite compelling in their long
stare into the abyss. Check them
out, and remember to keep to the
shadows.
The East Carolinian
concert
review
Fogerty's
money in
Va. Beach
Performance truly
beautiful�truly
Andy Turner
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
The summer concert season consis-
tently brings out old farts who decide
to reunite for that "one last tour"
(until next summer), so � similar to
Weekend at Bernie's, except they're
only half dead and Andrew
McCarthy's not around � they drag
themselves across the outdoor
venues of America. It's a fair trade,
you see: you give them all your
money and they give you back your
memories.
Memory-maker John Fogcrty,
touring in support of his latest effort,
Premonition, rolled into the GTE
Virginia Beach Amphitheater last
Thursday night and was met with a
highly enthusiastic crowd of money
makers willing to give their dough to
him. Fogerty, however, was more
than willing to earn his money, play-
ing for more than two hours and
nearly going through the entirety of
his repertoire.
Is Fogcrty any different from the
rest of the money-hungry whores?
Well, yes and no. Of course he wants
to make money, but Fogerty actually
still possesses plenty of talent worth
forking out money to witness. He
certainly ranks with the best of
American songwriters, rock and roll
or otherwise.
It doesn't seem go too far to put
Fogerty next to Chuck Berry and
Hank Williams in the select group of
songwriters so effectively capable of
conveying, through words and music,
very American notions of rebellion
and romanticism, from the street
hustlers of his "Down on the
Corner" to the narrator of "Fortunate
Son" standing firm against hypocrisy.
After years of battling with his for-
mer record company, Fantasy
Records, Fogerty is finally able to
play all his songs, including those he
did with Creedence Clearwater
Revival. The crowd nearly boiled
over as he performed classic CCR
songs like "Looking Out My Back
Door "Green River "Who'll Stop
the Rain" and "Bad Moon Rising
as well as songs from his early solo
career like "The Old Man Down the
Road" and "Centerfield
In addition to being a wonderful
songwriter, Fogerty is also a tremen-
dous guitarist, which he proved over
and over again throughout the night;
he also showed his prowess with the
slide guitar, which he used to per-
form a brief, toned down set of songs
from his last album, Blue Moon
Swamp.
Fogerty played tribute to late
rockabilly performer Gene Vincent, a
native of Norfolk, with a cover of
"Be-Bop-A-Lula He inducted
Vincent into the Rock-N-Roll Hall of
Fame earlier this year. Fogerty and
his quite-capable backing band also
tore through a cover of Hank
Williams' "Jambalaya" much to the
crowd's approval.
After two hours of working hard
for his money, Fogerty concluded
the evening with three of his most
well known and hardest-driving
CCR songs, "Proud Mary
"Fortunate Son" and "Travelin'
Band By that time, very few mem-
bers of the audience were still sitting
SEE FOGERTY. PAGE S
SRECREATK
SERVICES
328-6443
s
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� NO
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s
5 Wednesday, July 17, 1998
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
9:00 p.m.
Student Rec Center Outdoor Pool
Wear your swim suit - bring your lawn chairs and blankets!
(Rain Site - REC Indoor Pool)
?imm
m
3
Thursday
July 16
?Sg!&
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
328-64436387
Free admission with valid ECU One Card or valid
SRC membership card. One guest per ED.
Coolers Welcome - NO ALCOHOL ALLOWED! 328-600447 i 5
or
IfD
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Spooky
continued from page 4
Juice
continued from page 4
of Wilmington.
The Cutlar Farm I footprints � Although not technical-
ly ghostly, these hooi'prints have remained unchanged for
over 150 years and were supposedly left by Jesse Gutter's
horse at the moment of his death. Cutlar hit his head on a
tree limb and was killed during a race. No plant life will grow
in the prints and hogs will not eat out of them. Kd Cutlar
owns the property, which is located one mile west of Bath.
The Devil's Tramping Cround � Like the hoofprints,
this 40-foot circle of sterile dirt in Chatham County, west of
Siler City, will not sustain plant growth of any kind. I hinting
dogs will give up a chase rather than cross it. Objects left
inside the circle are mysteriously removed before morning.
The ultimate dare: spend the night in the circle.
Dromgoole's Castle � Gimghoul (Castle, which is its real
name, may not be truly haunted, but the legend is worth
knowing, and the castle itself, located on the IING campus,
worth seeing. Near the castle is a large rounded rock on
which there are bloodstains from a duel in 1832. Peter
Dromgoolc was killed here by a rival for the love of a Chapel
I Iill girl named Fannie, and his body buried beneath the rock
for 60 years.
I lammock I louse � In the 1700s this Beaufort house was
a famous hangout of sea captains and other socially important
people from the coastal area. Now blobs of ghostly light and
the sounds of men sword fighting float from room to room.
Old bloodstains which darken on humid nights, will not
come out of the floors, even after repeated scrubbing. The
house is on Cape Lookout off of I S. I lighway 70, and faces
the Beaufort Inlet.
singing, leaving the hopes that Lauterer will!
vocalize more often.
"Dishboy" was cool and the most pulled-
together song on the disc so far. It had cool
grooves and a pretty good break down in the mid-
dle. Their instrumentation on this was more than
competent.
The most musical of the selections was "Black
Kycd Pete This song has the potential to be
awesome and actually is when they play it live.
However, on disc the tentative nature in which
Gott sings needs to be pushed to where he can get
really loud.
A ska, funk, metal, new wave blend is the best
way to describe Babytecth. Though they are still
reaching and experimenting, Juicebaby's first CD
is a solid and impressive first effort. The music
was tight and together and it was evident in every
song that these guys practice and take their music
seriously. As Juicebaby says themselves in "All
About Me "it's all good And it is.
Fogerty
continued fiom page
down. With a full mmn behind them on a perfect
summer evening, old and young folks alike were
totally caught up in the excitement of rock-n-roll.
To borrow a cornball phrase John Fogerty used
throughout the night, it was "truly beautiful
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I

6 Wednnday, July 15. 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
NBA
lockout
pointless
One game exchanged
foranother
Christopher R. Farnsworth
staff writer
Everyone's heard the catch
phrase, "The rich keep getting
richer Perhaps it is an uneducat-
ed, lower class lament � then
again, perhaps not. Take the cur-
rent NBA lockout (a complete
shutdown of league operations),
for instance. Once again, the own-
ers and the players have drawn
lines, taking their back-room bat-
tle into the public eye. Though
this is a simplistic view, the lock-
out is essentially one group of
extremely wealthy people feuding
with another affluent party, to get,
well, more money. Yes, there are
some other considerations and
motivations to the ceasing of pro-
fessional basketball, such as free-
dom in the market and the rookie
salary cap. Some players have
actually said that it's about
respect.
That is one huge pile of crap.
The owners are shrewd business
sharks who try to influence the
world of sports the only way they
can. The players are guys who
have spent their lives dedicated to
becoming top-level athletes sud-
denly trying to be businessmen.
These two parties will never real-
ly respect one another; they are
opposite sides of a coin striving to
be like the other. No, this lockout
is about the NBA pie and who
deserves the bigger piece.
Flash back a few years ago to
the baseball strike. After a feud
over money that stopped the sport
dead in its tracks, the players
returned to sparsely-filled stadi-
ums and all-time low television
ratings. The greed of the players
managed to piss off the entire
nation, arid a sport that used to be
the national pastime was reduced
to kissing America's ass just to get
the stands half-full.
The lockout will most likely be
lifted before the NBA season is
set to start. Still, players lose the
ability to work out at their team's
facilities and coaches can't hold
camps, which will really hurt the
rookies. The important thing for
the NBA to do, though, is to reach
a concrete, mutually acceptable
agreement this summer so the
parties are not in arbitration again
in a few years. As baseball
demonstrated, the fans aren't real-
ly big on millionaires scraping for
more. NBA Commissioner David
Stern has done an excellent job
and made it a top priority in giving
the league a good public image. It
would be a shame to throw that
away over something as pointless
as this lockout.
OK, I've whined and com-
plained sufficiently. To top off
this article, I'm actually going to
offer a solution � how unusual,
right? It's one I thought of all by
my lonesome, honest. (All right,
all right, I robbed Darryl
Howerton of Sport magazine
blind. It's just that, once I read his
July issue article, it made much
better sense than my original
idea.) The NBA needs to instill a
so-called 2530 cap to the collec-
tive bargaining agreement, replac-
i SEE LOCKOUT PAGE 7
Women's track, cross country
teams welcome new recruits
Head coach pleased
with incoming talent
Christopher R. Farnsworth
staff writer
Six in-state girls and three out-of-
state athletes make up the 1998
women's track and cross country
recruiting class.
Head coach Charles "Choo"
Justice expressed satisfaction and
excitement regarding the newest
Lady Pirates.
"This was about an average to
semi-large recruiting class, but
there's a lot of talent, particularly in
sprinting, jumping and hurdles
Justice said.
Two of the recruits Justice is
excited about are Gastonia native
Toni Kilgore and Eden native
Toshima Dabbs.
"Kilgore is a two-time 4-A state
champion in the long jump and will
be competitive right away Justice
said.
Dabbs won the 3-A titles in the
400 meters, triple jump and long
jump and combines good sprinting
with excellent jumping abilities.
Justice also feels she will make an
immediate contribution to the
team.
"They're both just tremendous
athletes Justice said.
Some of the other signees the
coach feels will help the team out
from the start are Martina Freeman
and Latonya Little. Freeman lead
the Fayetteville 71st 4x400 relay
team to a third place finish in the 4-
A state track and field champi-
onships. Little, from Charlotte,
helped set the new state record in
4x400 relay in the 4-A champi-
onships and placed fourth in the
55-meter dash in the indoor cham-
pionships.
"I expect them to contribute to
our relay team immediately
Justice said of the two.
Other in-state recruits are Jenny
Cassell of Greensboro and Nichelle
Brown of Greenville. Both are
sprinters and are expected to add
depth to the team.
Due to the heavy recruiting of
in-state runners, ECU has estab-
lished a rapport with local stars and
high school coaches. As Justice
explained, while programs such as
UNC go out and look around the
country for athletes, runners in
North Carolina know that ECU
will focus its attention to the home
state first.
"It's given us a connection with
in-state athletes Justice said. "All
of the kids know each other from
high school competition and are
eager to play together. I feel we
have as good a chance as any uni-
versity to get in-state players
Justice mentioned that Kilgore
and Dabbs are characteristic of
Catch in'
Some
WAWS
East coast shoreline
home to inspirational surfing
Surfing off the North Carolina coast, especially at Cape Hatteras, is a popular activity.
PHOTO COURTESY OF EASTERN SURFING ASSOCIATION
Tracv Hairr
assistant sports e:ditor
While eastern North Carolina is home to a wide
assortment of sports fans, some especially
enlivened during the summer are those who enjoy
surfing. And the ones who are so infested with this
zeal have an ideal location, Cape Hatteras, to exer-
cise their love for water.
Obviously not comparable to the waves in
Hawaii, Hatteras nonetheless invites numerous
surfers to attempt riding the same swells and avoid-
ing the same shifting sandbars that plague sailors in
the surrounding and infamous Graveyard of the
Atlantic.
Zack Newkirk, an ECU senior, has been surfing
for over half of his life. After years of experience his
perception of surfing has been susceptible to
change, and he offered both knowledge and the
romantic view he takes toward the subject after
realizing the individualism of the sport and the nat-
uralness of its setting.
"At first, I was just concerned about getting good
and then to compete in contests Newkirk said.
"But surfing is what you make of it, and for me
it became about progression, conquering fears, hav-
ing fun, feeling free and alive
Frequently, the eastern U.S. and its surfing spots
are undermined or, at least, not credited by the
media like they are along the coasts of California,
mostly because history and current weather condi-
tions have contributed surfing patterns that are now
intrinsical to the west, and even commonplace.
Surfing originated solely as the sport of kings in
the ancient Polynesian culture of Hawaii. As it
evolved, it was brought to the mainland and even-
tually crossed to the east coast, but its initial stages
in the Pacific were the result of several factors that
generate better quality waves.
One mile off the east coast the ocean water may
be around 10-20 feet deep, but at the same distance
away from variable western shorelines, the water's
depth may run hundreds of feet.
And this deeper water increases the energy and
size of ocean swells; a wave traveling across shallow-
water loses this forcefulness and dissipates.
SEE SURF PAGE 7
Surfing Myths
Number 1
If you get stung by a Jellyfish, it
helps to pee on it
True. It is actually a second-
choice remedy next to perfume,
after-shave lotion, high-proof
liquor or vinegar and isopropyl
alcohol, but does, in fact, help
alleviate the pain and swelling
and inactivate the venom if left
on for 30 minutes.
Number 2
A full moon brings good waves.
False. Storms bring the ocean
swells. The moon does not gen-
erate surf, but causes tides, and
though extreme tides can affect
the potency of a swell, they are
sometimes just as extreme dur-
ing a new moon as they are
under a full one.
Fees � not fall enrollment � key to
using Rec Center in summer months
Registration doesn't
guarantee membership
Christopher R. Farnsworth
STAFF WRITER
OK. You are hard at work, plugging
away at summer school, trying to
boost that GPA, or maybe getting
some of those annoying classes that
the university demands you to have
out of the way. Some of your friends
come back from home, or wherever
they are spending their summer, to
visit, since they won't see you until
they return to ECU in August.
Before you hit the bars for some
libation, you head for the Student
Recreation Center for some basket-
ball or to work out perhaps. Easy,
right?
Wrong.
If a student is not enrolled in
summer school, even if he or she is
t
With only summer students allowed, sparse courts are common
PHOTO BY JASON FEATHER
registered for the fall semester, they
cannot get in the SRC without pay-
ing the $5 guest fee or getdng a
summer membership. Until August
15, when students officially become
enrolled for fall, those not in sum-
mer school are guests in the eyes of
the SRC.
"I don't think it's right or fair
said Foster Barker, a rising junior. "I
mean, we pay the school plenty
V
while we're
here, and by
now they know
if we're coming
back in the fall.
They're just try-
ing to get more
money out of
us
Many stu-
dents asked
seemed to share
Barker's opin-
ion. It may not
be a simple
issue of making
more money,
though. According to SRC policies,
the reason students not registered
for summer school have to pay is
that the usual fees are paid through
their tuition, similar to how the
computer lab operates. Without
their fees through tuition, students
are persona non grata.
So, in essence, the truth of the
matter is that students' free mem-
berships to the SRC are not
revoked in the summer. They
never were free. They are paid
through'tuition, along with "educa-
tionaltechnology" fees. It's a bit of
smoke and mirrors.
Junior Derek Benson had a dif-
ferent take on the SRC situation.
"Yes, you should be able to go to
the rec center during the summer if
you've already registered for fall
Benson said. "But students should-
n't be upset at paying fees through
tuition. It works out as a pretty
cheap price of a state-of-the-art
gym and recreation center. You
would pay a lot more at clubs like
Pulse, and not even get as much
There are two possible views to
take, then. One is to be ticked off
that you can't go work out at the
SRC, when you or your parents
have already cut a nice, fat check to
the university. The other is to be
resigned to the whole thing, realize
everyone gets a pretty sweet deal for
such a nice recreation center, and
maybe take summer school next year
to avoid the whole issue altogether.
f
most North Carolina runners in that
they are superior sprinters and
jumpers. That means, however,
that for distance runners, the pro-
gram usually has to look out of
state. For that purpose, Abrial
Hayes of Greenville, Pennsylvania,
Lucretia Chojnacki of Berlin, New
Jersey and Jill Morgan of Medford,
New Jersey were brought in to
wear the purple and gold. Justice
feels especially strong about Hayes,
whom he describes as a "strong
middle-distance runner" who usu-
ally runs the 1600 meters.
Since the team only lost four
seniors, all in cross country, these
recruits will hopefully add energy
to the squad.
Miami's
full of
Pirates j
Dolphins have several
ECU connections
Travis Bark lev
sports editor
Which NFL team has the most
Pirates on its roster? Why it's the
Miami Dolphins, of course.
On June 10, the Dolphins
signed former ECU linebacker
Robert Jones to a one year con-
tract. Jones will join fellow Pirates
Jerris McPhail and Larry Shannon
when. training camp opens later
this month. Former ECU head
coach Bill Lewis is also in Miami as
a defensive assistant.
Jones is a six-year veteran who
has played with the Dallas
Cowboys and, most recently, the
St. Louis Rams. McPhail will be
making the switch from running
back to wide receiver in this, his
third season to team with rookie
receiver Shannon.
Competition for Blake
Jeff Blake's starting quarterback
position for the Cincinnati Bengals
may not be a sure thing this season.
With the retirement of Boomer
Esiason, it was thought that Blake
would reclaim the starting job.
However, recently the Bengals
signed former Steelers and Jet
quarterback Neil O'Donnell to
compete with Blake. Head coach
Bruce Coslet has not named a
starter yet.
Hayes named basketball coach
Farmville Central High School
has named former ECU women's
basketball player Shay Hayes
coach of its girls basketball team.
Hayes played at ECU from
1993 until this past season. She
replaces long-time Farmville coach
Hilda Worthington, who is retiring
after 26 years.
Hayes finished third on the
Lady Pirates in scoring this season, -
averaging eight points a game. She j
was twice named ECU's defensive
player of the year and earned CAA
player of the week during her
freshman year.
Gonzalez possible Dallas QB
Former ECU quarterback Dan
Gonzalez's chances of sticking
with the Dallas Cowboys may have
improved a little.
Dallas back-up quarterback
Wade Wilson recently signed with t
the Oakland Raiders, leaving only �
two QBs on the Dallas roster. Troy ;
Aikman is locked in as the starter, .
but seldom used Jason Garrett is
the only other remaining QBaiThis
��
7 Wednesday, Jn
fBrc
Tmth,Equalitj
102B East.1
Bedford Par
Eas
i
u





7 Wednesday, June 17. 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
it Carolinian
y
s
runners in that
sprinters and
ins, however,
mers, the pro-
look out of
rpose, Abrial
Pennsylvania,
if Berlin, New
n of Medford,
Drought in to
I gold. Justice
; about Hayes,
as a "strong
ler" who usu-
rers.
jnly lost four
country, these
ly add energy
ni's
of
:es
)e several
ections
� K I. E V
TOR
has the most
' Why it's the
course.
he Dolphins
U linebacker
)ne year con-
fellow Pirates
arry Shannon
3 opens later
r ECU head
so in Miami as
r veteran who
the Dallas
recently, the
:Phail will be
from running
er in this, his
i with rookie
Hake
g quarterback
nnati Bengals
lg this season,
t of Boomer
;ht that Blake
starting job.
the Bengals
lers and Jet
)'Donnell to
. Head coach
lot named a
tetball coach
High School
CU women's
Shay Hayes
etball team.
ECU from
season. She
rmville coach
fho.is retiring
:hird on the
ig this season,
s a game. She
U's defensive
I earned CAA
. during her
Dallas QIS
rterback Dan
of sticking
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quarterback 5
I signed with j
leaving only
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ingQBiiThis
� 1
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Surf
continued from page 6
"Hatteras sticks out off shore
probably 30 miles Newkirk said.
"So its waves are usually the best on
the eastern side of the country
Also influential are storms' consis-
tency in journeying from west to
east. The Pacific is thus more vul-
nerable to prospective swells that
don't easily decrease in size. The
continental shelf, which in
Wrightsville Beach juts out as far as
100 miles, constitutes as well to the
eastern inhibition to receive power-
ful surfing conditions.
Regardless of these facts, the
Pacific should not be viewed as
patronizing since, to surfers like
Newkirk, there is still potential in
the east to capture some waves.
"After I surfed bigger waves like
the hurricane swells that hit
Hatteras, I began to form this inter-
personal relationship with the ocean
and was in love with just riding
waves Newkirk said.
"But at the same time, feeling the
mist in my face, the hot sun drying
my back, the purity of the Water�
the whole scene was like delving
into a larger sense of self
Characteristic of this sport is the
idea that diversity is the key feature,
whether a surfer randomly rides the
ocean or considers it a habitual, spiri-
tual practice. It can be both conserv-
ative and radical, vehement and
graceful, but it undoubtedly reflects
a surfer's style and their way of
maneuvering in a world that was sup-
posedly not designed for man.
Surfina Myth
Number 3
Surfing helps a cold.
False: Nasal conditions caused
by allergies improve once a
surfer is in the ocean and away
from pollens and toxins. And
some specialists treat ear, nose
and throat sinus problems by
flushing them with simple salt
water, so while this happens
continuously during surfing, i
seems to cure a cold.
Source: Sutler
209-B S.Evans St
Pittman Building
(near courthouse)
Greenville. NC
Free Pregnancy Test
While You Wait Free And Confidential
Services and Peer Counseling
parolina Pregnancy Center
Hours Vary as Needed
Appointment Preferred
757-0003
A SMALL DEPOSIT WILL RESERVE YOUR UNIT
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-440-5378
OR LOCAL 756-6209
ONLY 24 UNITS
Very Vtliciout - Always Frisk
hOPchoP
CHINESE FOOD
Winn-Dixie Marketplace
310-F E. Arlington Blvd
Greenville
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
12:00 noon - 10:30 PM
PICK-UP OR FREE DELIVERY
321-8300
iWPl Save $3.78
Value Meal for Two
2 Regular silt Sesame Chicken (934) w
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Lockout
continued from page 6
ing the failing, much maligned
three-year rookie salary cap.
Under the 2530 cap, players
under the age of 25 could only
make a 20 percent increase every
year on 1998's average of highest
paid rookies ($3.36 million), no
matter where they played. That
way, smaller teams don't have to
worry about losing a young player
to another team due to money, as
the player won't be able to get any
more from another team then his
own could give him. Also, teams
don't have to pay untried,
unproven -rookies exorbitant sums
of money just to keep them
around.
When the player turns 25 years
old, he becomes an unrestricted
free agent and can try to get top
dollar on the market By now,
teams know what to expect of the
player and are either willing to
dole out the big-time bucks or not
give him an over-inflated contract
(hello, Yinka Dare).
For the players, things get
sweeter when they turn 30. Along
with being an unrestricted free
agent, teams other than the play-
er's current one can disregard the
salary cap and spend all they want.
The proven veterans would be the
ones making all the money, not
untried, inexperienced rookies
who only offer promise, and the
owners would love that. So would
the players and the 25 and over
age group that makes up 75 per-
cent of the league. An additional
good point of the 2530 cap is that
high school and college kids
would tend to stay in school more,
as they won't be able to make the
big money until they're 25 years
old.
So, players and owners, hurry
up and get this unpleasantness
over with quickly and maybe we'd
be willing to forget this incident
ever happened.
Last Chance for Live
Theatre this Summer
&s�ffilfTheatre 1998
presents
A Streetcar
Named Desire
by Tennessee Williams
July 21-25. 8pm
July 25, 2pm
252328-6829
for reservations
and more information
-
the
l tne I � �
eastcarolinian
Advertising Department
Looking for a fast paced job that
can help you prepare for your
career goals?
You Will Gain Experience in:
� Calling on local advertising clients
� Helping to develop creative advertising
� Develop and coordinate advertising campaigns
� Local advertising account servicing
Now taking
Applications for
Summer and Fall
Positions
Applications are available at The East
Carolinian, second floor of the Student
Publications Building or call
328-2000 for more info.
The East Carolinian Advertising Department Can Help
You Get The Needed Experience Before yofx Graduate.





8 Wednesday, Jury 15, 1998
classifieds
The East Carolinian
FOR RENT
LOOKING FOR A PLACE to live?)
Free room and board. Physically dis-
abled woman looking for female live-
in companion. Room and board in
exchange for some personal care
and light housekeeping. References
and background check required. Call
356-9161 and leave message.
MEDICAL STUDENT LOOKING
for clean medical, nursing, or gradu-
ate student to share three bedroom
duplex. One mile from hospital. If in-
terested, please call 758-2474.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
to share four bedroom apartment lo-
cated at Players Club Apartments.
Call 321-7613 for more information.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
for Aug. 1st. Neat, non-smoker, ani-
mal lover to share 2 bdrm. duplex.
$200 deposit, $200 month, 12
bills. Shaded fenced yard. Call 758-
7525 for Lindsey.
1 BEDROOM, ALL UTILITIES in-
cluded, 12 block from campus.
Declawed cats only with pet deposit.
Off street parking. $305. 757-9387.
4 BEDROOM, 3 BATH house near
downtown, washerdryer hookups.
$750. Can be subdivided into 3 bed
2 bath 1 bedbath. Call 757-9387.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share large 2 bedroom house 2
blocks from campus. Must be re-
sponsible and animal loving. $200
per month plus utilities. 910-458-
9039 Christie.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
Start 81, share large 3 bedroom
house 1 block from campus.
Washerdryer included. Rent $217
month 13 utilities. Call Lynn at
758-5684.
RESPONSIBLE ROOMMATE
wanted for nice 3 BR duplex. WD,
central air, dishwasher, fenced in
backyard, back deck. Close to cam-
pus and downtown! Ask for Steve
or Beth, 830-6921.
PRIVATE ROOM AVAILABLE im-
mediately, walking distance from
campus and downtown. Large room
(15'x15'). Private phone linecable
in room .Washerdryer included.
$175 per month plus utilities. Call
Mike at 752-2879.
ROOMMATE NEEDED FOR two
bedroom, two bathroom apt
washer and dryer, walking distance
from campus. Call Kathleen, 752-
2705.
LOOKING FOR FM roommate to
share two bedroom apartment close
to campus. Rent $202.50 12 utili-
ties. If interested please call 758-
3299.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED to
share four bedroom apartment lo-
cated at Players Club Apartments.
Call 321-7613 for more information.
CHRISTIAN FEMALE ROOM-
MATE (nonsmoker) needed for two
bedroom apartment within walking
distance from ECU campus. $218
mo 12 utilities. 9mo. lease be-
ginning Aug. 1. Call 826-3209.
HOUSE FOR RENT. 5 bedroom, 2
bathrooms, large denkitchen with
fireplace, brick patio, on half acre
wooded lot fully fenced in. Pets OK.
2 miles from campus beside Pi
Kappa Phi fraternity house on
Hooker Road. $750 per month. Avail-
able August. Call 321-2030 for ap-
pointment.
Washers and Dryers
FOR RENT
New, X-Large capacity
stop wasting time 8c money
at the laundromat
call 236-5097
ROOMMATES NEEDED -Two sido-
by-side Player's Club apartments
each need a roommate. Washer
dryer, private bath, pool and friendly
fun. Please call 363-2665.
HOUSE FOR RENT, 302 Lewis St.
3 BR, LR, DR, kitchen, central AC.
garage, 5 mins. walk from campus.
No pets. $750mo. 919-504-2052,
Iv. msg.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
to share 2 bedroom apartment.
$187.50mo. plus 12 utilities. Call
Jessica, 757-9640. Needed ASAP!
3 BR. APT. AVAILABLE Aug. 1st
above BW3's. $775.00 a month!
Please call 758-2616, ask for Yvonne.
1 FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
ASAP: Player's Club Apts. to share
4 bedroom townhouse. Your own
bedroom and bathroom. $210 plus
14 utilities per month, washer
dryer in apt. On bus route. Available
August 4! Please call 328-7798 for
more information.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bed apt $275
mo avail, now. Tanglewood Apts
125 Avery St Greenville. 758-6596
2 MALE ROOMMATES NEEDED
for Fall to share 3400 sq. ft. home
near campus, $250 per month, 15
utilities. Ask for Tim, 931-9165.
NEED FEMALE ROOMMATE to
share four bedroom townhouse at
Player's Club. Contact Kelly at
� (919)663-3048. Leave name and
number if not available.
HELP WANTED
PART-TIME HELP needed in ware-
house. Apply in person at the Car-
pet Bargain Center, 1009 Dickinson
Avenue, 758-0057.
NOW ACCEPTING applications for
substituting and part-time teacher
positions. Harmony Childcare, 756-
6229. License Number 1455138,
QUADRIPLEGIC NEEDS physical
assistance in AM hours. Bathing, lift-
ing, personal care, domestic chores
and driving. Good experience for the
helping professional. 830-6028.
LOST a FOUND
REWARD OFFERED - Bathing suit.
Phonics book, possibly sunglasses.
Call 328-7796.
OTHER
GOV'T. FORECLOSED HOMES
from pennies on $1. Delinquent tax.
repo's. REO's. Your area. Toll Free 1-
800-218-9000 ext. H-3726 for cur-
rent listings.
FREE CASH GRANTS! College
scholarships. Business. Medical bills.
Never repay. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000, ext. G-3726.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175.
Porsches, Cadillacs, Chevys. BMWs,
Corvettes. Also Jeeps. 4WDs. Your
area. Toll free 1-800-218-9000. ext.
A-3726.
FOR SALE
AVAILABLE NOW
1,088 SQUARE FOOT, FULLY
FURNISHED, 2 BEDROOM 2
BATH APARTMENT
$500MONTH. 758-5393
"�$100 OFF"
Security Deposit
wtth pntnMM oi M coupon, oflr expires
73196 no) valid with any other coupon
WESLEY COMMON SOUTH: 1 or
2 bedrooms, 1 bath, range, refriger-
ator, free watersewer, washerdryer
hookups, laundry facilities, 5 blocks
from campus, ECU bus services.
Other properties available.
�Al Pmpertxe haw 24 hr. emeroency mamlmance-
108-A BROWN LEA DRIVE
758-1921
"T2LN
tfxXnmKltmi Mujmm
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
Cypress Landing
Now Hiring Marketing
Assistants Sun -Thur, 4pm-
9pm 20-22 hours weekly.
Great hourly wage plus
bonus. Must have strong
communication skills, like
talking to people, customer
service oriented & team
player. Main function will
be telephoning customers.
Call Craig Wheeler
Mon-Fri. to schedule interviews
975-8100
Dapper
Dan's
Big Summer Sale
W-75 OFF
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(9X9)496-224
MERC1 Clinic, Inc. seeks a full time director to
manaRe the facility, volunteer activities, and develop-
mental operations. Good people skills, organizational
ability, and community relations experience required.
Applicants must be familiar with medical clinic opera-
tions and have knowledge of social programs. Bjcnelor'�
degree necessary. Salary commensurate with experi-
ence, $30K plus income potential. Application deadline
71598. Send resume to MERCI Clinic, Inc RO. Box
15254, New Bern. NC 28561.
DC YOU NEED MONEY?
we Need Timberisnd boat
tmt shoes! Good jeans.
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Bnjken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00, 2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, irive to back door & ring buzzi-r.
S 1 L I) I , I S W A P S II ()
FOR SALE: LARGE DORM refrig-
eratorfreezer, almost new, white,
excellent condition, all manuals in-
cluded. $100 OBO. Call 931-0449.
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS Post Script
printer. Laser jet printer. Includes
paper tray and manual feed. $150.
Call 353-7109.
COMPAQ LAPTOP COMPUTER
100 mhz Pentium with 16 mb ram,
color screen, faxmodem. Ms Of-
fice, Aldus Pagemaker, MS Works,
Norton Utilities. Great school or busi-
ness computer, $800. Call 353-
7109.
PERSONALS
LADIES: LEND ME your sore ach-
ing muscles. Amateur masseur
needs your back to practice on. Call:
Kyle 1-800-484-8546 (code 2466)
or POB 8663, Greenville 27836.
SERVICES
HORSE BOARDING. $225 a month
for full board. Training and lessons
are available. Call 353-2536.
NEW STABLES OPEN for boarding
- Riverfield Farm Stables are 5.5
miles from ECU. Large barn, 8
acres. Please call for more informa-
tion. 551-3200.
SPORTS WRITERS
-WANTED
Apply at our office on the 2nd floor
of the Student Pub Building
ADVERTISE IN
eastcarolinian
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Life on Tuesday
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pp. you're rterrr une
. m YWE 010
iA KNOW, DANNX COLU&E
IS A GOO0 PUcf to
LE�RN HOW siuy Som�
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Likew-t- Mice une
ojeejE-txiGswre- C4T5,
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WEDNESDAY
JULY 22.1998
Ad;
to
Fon
foundc
accept
Chris
. r
In a Farmville
ical foundatioi
Adams II plea
embezzlement
ment of the EC
The medica
profit indepc
raises funds for i
and heaith-sciei
was postponed i
he is ordered to
Medical Found
sentencing coul
ishment.
The plea b
through his la
frees the defend
imuml32 year
been given and
pay a total of !
Foundation, a !
incorrect billing
240 hours of i
approximately 1
His co-consf
plead guilty to cl
ting embezzlen
embezzle.
Acting as pre;
Coi
late
Contract
A MAN
NE
Timing is cveryth
campus construct
With Dowdy 1
deck nearing coi
after its deadline
running late �
semester for the S
completed �extr
the projects. And
not come from th
grow on trees. It o
who missed the d
Construction ci
ject � and there
campus � are nei
projects running 1:
sible for expenses
construction.
"Construction
charged a 'penalt
unless there is alsi
contract for early
docs not use bon
Flye, director of f
are, however, subj
expenses incurrec
late construction
the east a


Title
The East Carolinian, July 15, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 15, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1280
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/58785
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