The East Carolinian, July 8, 1998






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WEDNESDAY
JULY 8.1998
eastcarolinian
EAST CAROUNA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
Trustees get
pouring bids
Exclusive soft drink
rigits still undecided
TK Jones
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
The bids are in, but the battle is
not yet over.
Coca-Cola and Pepsi-Cola, cur-
rently sold together on campus, are
seeking exclusive rights to sell
their products noncompetitively,
offering bids to achieve the
monopoly.
Pepsi offered $7 million while
Coke offered $3.93 million to have
their products alone promoted on
campus for a 10-year period.
Though the figures vary greatly,
they do not suggest an obvious
winner. While Pepsi gave only one
bid, that for the 10-year contract,
Coke offered three additional bids
under shorter contracts.
1 The evaluations committee
determined the net present value
of each drink, finding Pepsi's mon-
etary net value is $5.8 million, and
Coke at $2.7 million.
"In terms of net value only,
Pepsi has the more attractive
offer said Layton Getisinger,
associate vice chancellor of admin-
istration and finance.
"Entering into an exclusive
arrangement is something the
board has yet to decide
Getsinger said.
But, if the board decides to
have an exclusive soft drink served
on campus and at university func-
tions, then ECU will not only be
the first in the UNC system, but
the first school in the state to have
this sort of contract.
The board of trustees will
decide the stipulations of arrange-
ments with either company after
they have voted on whether to
accept either of the offers in their
July 17 meeting. The university
has the option of rejecting both the
proposals.
One challenging factor for the
committee is to determine how
much of the bids represents funds
above and beyond what the uni-
versity would receive from the
combined current soft drink con-
tracts. Currently soft drinks are
available in dining halls, snack
bars, athletic events and vending
machines.
Though it might sound unusual
for only one company to hold
exclusive control over an area, it
isn't unheard of. Exclusive rights
are also contracted out in dining
services and housekeeping.
While it is still undecided as to
what to use the proceeds for, uni-
versity officials have suggested
earmarking it for academic and
athletic scholarships.
PCMH receives
bomb threat
Pitt County Memorial Hospital was the recent object of a disgruntled citizen's anger.
FILE PHOTO
Recent privatization
possible cause
Amanda Austin-
news editor
In light of recent national bomb-
ings, officials are taking a threat-
ening letter delivered last week to
Pitt County Memorial Hospital
very seriously.
The two page handwritten let-
ter stated that "something was
going to occur such as a bomb"
and that this something would
TODAY
Thunderstorms
high 94
low 74
TOMORROW
Thunderstorms
high 94
low 75
occur sometime in the next three
years.
"We take it very seriously
said Tom Former, hospital
spokesman. "We take any type of
threat like that very seriously. We
take all precautions to investi-
gate
The writer of the letter men-
tioned the use of fertilizer, a possi-
ble reference to the Oklahoma
City bombing and other bomb-
ings.
The Greenville Police and in-
house hospital security are taking
extra precautions to insure the
SEE BOMB. PAGE 3
Mason Douglas, one of many students attending both summer sessions, enjoys a warm day painting near Joyner Library.
PHOTO BV JASON FEATHER
Summer school
enrollment steady
One-day break, decided on by a Calendar
Committee, has no effect on enrollment
5000
4000
3000
2000
1000
IINDERGRAD
Amanda Austin
news editor
Students attending both summer school
sessions during the '98 school year are in
for the long haul. One day is the only
break students were given to recuperate
from the first summer session.
In 1997 summer session terms ran
from May 20 to June 24 and July 1 to
August 1. The 1998 summer session
terms run from May 19 to June 23 and
June 25 to July 31.
Breaks in between summer sessions
and regular semesters are chosen by the
members of a Calendar Committee.
Even with the break � or lack there-
of� overall enrollment for summer ses-
sion one (SSI) was up by 11. In 1997,
5,047 undergraduates and 1,124 gradu-
ates attended SSI. In 1998, 4,968 under-
graduates and 1,214 graduates attended
SSI.
"The regular membership of the
Calendar Committee is composed of six
faculty and one student member
appointed by the SGA president said
Don Sexauer, chairman of the Faculty
SEE BREAKS. PAGE 3
SSI SS2 SSI SS2 SSI
1996 1996 1997 1997 1998
500. . UNDERGRAD
400
300
200
100
Out-of State
SSI SS2 SSI SS2 SSI
1996 1996 1997 1997 1998
Year 2000 brings anticipated computer
problems to university systems
Information technology systems
must be replaced
Debbie Neuwirth
STAFF WRITER
New Year's Eve 1999 will usher in a new mille-
nium as well as a host of computer problems
anticipated to affect everything from elevators
to telephone systems on campus.
Don Dunlap of Computer Information
Systems said ECU is in good shape compared to
other universities in solving the computer prob-
lems. Years ago computer memory was very
expensive, and when used for programming,
years and dates were abbreviated. As a result,
when the years 2000 and 2001 come around,
mainframes will be confused and the computers
will not know how to read them.
In 1993 and 1994, Computer Information
Services (CIS) redid the student systems. This
includes the registrative admissions and finan-
cial aid. Few problems are expected in these
areas because they have been brought to atten-
tion early on. However, information technolo-
gy, such as computers and telephone systems,
operate by computer chips in the hardware
which will need to be replaced.
"There are 50 months left of programming
effort Dunlap said.
Everything will be done in time, Dunlap
said. He added that personal computers are the
main problem now. This problem can be reme-
died by checking the software for these databas-
es. Through much work and coordination, per-
sonal computers will be worked on from now
through January, and mainframes by the end of
the year.
Richard Kerns, assistant dean for computer
services in the School of Business, said because
the efforts to fix the problem started in 1994,
that led off to a good start.
"It is unpredictable to think we have covered
everything Kerns said.
Computer equipment is very expensive, but
the turnover rate is very fast. Computer
Services and CIS are spreading their help to the
entire university to fix the computer problems.
SEE COMPUTER PAGE 3
Opinion
Lifestyle
ElSports
If our shots are free,
why isn't a dip in the
pool free too?
Bored this summer?
Try Sunday in the
Park.
Sfc
Online Survey
Ward convicted,
Mazyck cleared
in assault.
www.tec.ecu.eclu
"Do you consider NASCAR a sport?"
Answer to be posted next week
the east Carolinian STUDENT PUBLICATION BLDG. GREENVILLE, NC 27858 across from Joyner library - newsroom 328-6366 advertising 328-2Q0Qffax 328-6558 website www.tec.ecu.edu





jgjMtMHHrtmtl
news
J
The East Carolinian
3 Wedneiday,
I
Aldridge, McLawhorn run
head to head for Senator
Universityfundinga
topconcern
TK Jones
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Henry Aldridge
Incumbent
1. ECU received a cutback of $1.2
million, the second highest cutback out-
side of Chapel Hill. Why do you think
ECU has been shortchanged in the
UNC-sys tern's ads?
I am nbt certain, but I am going
to find but. ECU has always been
on the short end of the stick, but I
will continue to fight for East
Carolina and this region to make
sure we receive our share.
2. Do you foresee any money allo-
rdterl for road expansion in Pitt
County?
Yes. Pitt County is a growing
area with a vibrant economy. We
have a high quality of life which is
making the Greenville area an
attractive place to raise a family,
(toad money will come.
3. What can you do to bring in new
industry?
Continue to work on legislation
that will enhance our children's
education. We must make certain
our children will be able to com-
pete in the global economy of the
21st century. We must also better
train and educate our work force so
that we will attract good, high pay-
ing, high-tech jobs. In addition,
government should get out of the
way and let the free market flour-
ish.
4. How do you feel about the
Legislature's decision regarding death
row?
The bill did away with a death
row inmate's choice between
death by gas or by lethal injection.
Now, lethal injection is the only
option. We did away with cyanide
gas because of safety reasons for
prison medical staff.
5. How does the delay in candidate
choice for the state House affect your
campaign?
None whatsoever. My cam-
paigning will be the same regard-
less of my opponent. I am the con-
servative, pro-family, less govern-
ment candidate.
6. What can be done with the
Global TransPark now that it has lost
Federal Express?
The loss of Federal Express to
the Triad was not good news. We
will continue to fight for the
TransPark. I am not convinced
that it is time to give up on the
Global TransPark.
New industry, fair
share concerns
T K Jones
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Marian McLawhorn
Challenger
I. ECU received a cutback of $1.2
million, the second highest cutback out-
side of Chapel Hill. Why do you think
ECU has been shortchanged in the
UNC-sys tern's cuts?
My husband and I are both
graduates of ECU, and we have a
son who is a senior there. I will
work vigorously to increase alloca-
tions for ECU in the future.
2. Do you foresee any money allo-
cated for road expansion in Pitt
County?
Yes. When I am elected to the
Legislature, I will work with the
leadership in the General
Assembly and the governor to see
that Pitt County gets its fair share
of the allocation of funds.
3. What can you do to bring in new
industry?
Money magazine recently
ranked Greenville as one of the
top 15 small southern cities to live
in. Using criteria such as econom-
ics, education and housing,
Greenville ranked in the top 8 per-
cent for its forecasted job growth
to 2002. I will strongly support any
efforts
to encourage industrial growth
in eastern North Carolina.
4. How do you feel about the
Legislature's decision regarding death
row?
The House voted 99-6 on June
9 to make lethal injection the only
option available for inmates on
death row. It is predicted that the
Senate will pass the bill also.
5. How does the delay in candidate
choice for the state House affect your
campaign?
The only way it affects my cam-
paign is perhaps in name recogni-
tion, because my name was not on
the ballot during the primary.
The campaign is fully opera-
tional, and I am excited about
being the Democratic nominee for
the 9th District state house seat.
6. What can be done with the
Global TransPark now that it has lost
Federal Express?
I was disappointed that
FEDEX did not choose Kinston
for its new operation; however, I
still believe that the TransPark is a
valuable idea. There will be other
opportunities. We should be
patient, and we should be realistic.
"Ring around tree" causes problem
Lackofass
stumps experts
TK Jones
ASSISTANT KtWS EDITOR
The campus landscape has a prob-
lem: ring around the tree.
There is a lack of grass growing
around the base of many trees'on
catfrjiuSt Whether the problem
sterfts from lack of water or lack of
sunlight is a highly debated topic.
The biology department and
grounds department butt heads
over the issue of why grass under
the trees on the mail has a shorter
life span than grass removed of
- trees, and what to do about it
. "My jjuess is it's more bf a light
� jftottlcm than water said Vincent
Heflis, biology: professor. "The
, grass is shaded out because of the
coverage mature trees can have
Bellis said there are three or four
ground covers that can thicken out
in shaded areas, but they cost more
than' the grounds department's
purse can afford. .
According to Doug Caldwell,
manager of the grounds depart-
ment, it's rhore a lack of water
rather than sunlight because of
Whether it be lack of sunlight or lack of water, campus trees appear bare around the roots and many disagree on the solution.
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
trees' root absorption.
'The irrigation system for the
mall is about seven weeks old. We
need to give it a chance, at least a
year, before we see the grass fill
in Caldwell said. "Grass will get
enough peripheral sunlight by our
limbing trees up several feet
So far as choosing a grass that
grows well in the area, Caldwell
says he leans toward the fescue
grass he plants throughout the cam-
pus because of its ability to combat
the heat and the low pH balance in
soil.
Though the grounds depart-
ment and the biology department
debate whether the answer to pro-
mote grass growth is water or light,
they agree on its number one killer
people.
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Lawmakers press for
sexual harassment law
RALEIGH (AP) For decades it
has been the subject of countless
court battles and headlines, yet
nowhere in North Carolina law can
be found the words "sexual harass-
ment
State lawmakers have vowed to
change that this year after the
State Personnel Commission ruled
it could not help a former state
employee despite evidence sexual
harassment by her supervisor had
created "a hostile work environ-
ment
Even so, lawmakers disagree
over how state law currently
addresses the complicated issue of
sexual harassment and what
changes are needed. Equally
uncertain is whether the push to
clarify the law will become lost in a
partisan political struggle.
"I just saw this as a nonpartisan
issue that we needed to correct
said Rep. Leo Daughtry, R-
Johnston, who has sponsored a
plan to rewrite state law to clearly
prohibit sexual harassment of state
employees. "Both the Democrats
and the Republicans worked
together to find a way to swiftly
address it
Still, the plan by Daughtry, a
likely Republican gubernatorial
hopeful in 2000, has become a
political football despite assur-
ances from Senate Democrats that
they will act on the issue.
The Senate voted down the bill
Wednesday, less than a week after
first rejecting it as "not germane
Senators have admitted their origi-
nal decision to reject the plan was
payback for House leaders reject-
ing as "not germane" a campaign
finance reform plan packaged in a
stripped-down House bill that was
sent to the Senate last year.
Daughtry's plan was packaged
in a stripped-down Senate bill sent
to the House.
Sen. Leslie Winner, D-
Mecklenburg, says the latest "no"
vote on Daughtry's plan had noth-
ing to do with political gamesman-
ship, but with giving the entire
issue careful consideration.
Most important, she said, is
clarifying what state law currently
says regarding sexual harassment
and whether the State Personnel
Commission was correct in its rul-
ing.
"First of all, it's not clear to me
that the State Personnel
Commissioninterpretation was
correct Winner said in an inter-
view last week. "The attorney
general does have some concerns
about it. I think we ought to hear
some concerns about it
The attorney general's office
has not issued a formal opinion on
Daughtry's plan, but officials there
are studying the changes and
expect to issue an opinion next
week.
Although state law does not
specifically mention sexual harass-
ment, it does prohibit sex discrim-
ination. Among the definitions of
sex discrimination included in
Office of State Personnel regula-
tions is the creation of an "intimi-
dating, hostile or offensive work-
ing environment
State law also prohibits retalia-
tion or threats against state
employees who report "a violation
of state or federal law, rule or regu-
lation
Still, most state employees in
the past had sought relief from
sexual harassment either through
the courts or through the federal
Equal Employment Opportunity
Commission, which has specific
prohibitions against both "quid
pro quo harassment" and creation
of "a hostile work environment
Computer
continued from page 1
Break
continued from page 1
Even though there are intense
changes in mainframes, most of
the work on them have been com-
pleted. Leon Gipson of CIS feels
most labs on campus should be
2000 compliant. He believes that
most of the problem is with the
personal computers and the
servers, but they are currently
being identified by individual
departments. "We are well coordi-
nated in our efforts, so we know
what we are looking for Gipson
said.
At this time, Computer Services
and CIS are looking at what is not
compliant. Then the decision to
replace or surplus equipment is
made. There are 543 days left until
the year 2000, and compared to
other universities, ECU is well on
their way to attacking the problem.
Senate. "There are also a number
of ex-officio members, without
vote, representing Academic
Affairs, Student Life, Business
Affairs and the Registrar
When deciding on breaks, the
Calendar Committee must look at
many different angles, including
the space of time between the reg-
ular semesters.
"Not being privy to the discus-
sions the committee might have
had relative to the one day break
between summer sessions, I can
only surmise that the number of
days available between the two
regular semesters is a major factor
in their decision Sexauer said.
After the calendar had been
decided it must be approved by
the Faculty Senate and the
Chancellor.
"The calendars for fall and
spring and both sessions are devel-
oped by the Calendar Committee
of the Faculty Senate Sexauer
said. "The committee submits its
report to the Faculty Senate for
discussion and possible amend-
ment. The report is sent to the
chancellor for final approval
Though students may feel
overwhelmed with only a one day
break, departments on campus
have not had a problem with it
According to Michael Balko,
director of housing, there has not
been a problem getting students in
and out of the residence halls in
only one day.
Rose Mary Stelma, director of
financial aid, said there have been
no concerns or adjustments made
and all has worked out as usual in
financial aid.
Calendars have been approved
by the Calendar Committee
through spring semester 2001.
Bomb
continued from page 1
hospitals safety.
"The in house police force is
being extra vigilant to keep eyes
open for suspicious behavior and
characters Former said. "The
main thing we do is turn it over to
the proper authorities
Cpl. William Harris of the
Greenville Police said it appears
the letter was written by someone
who is upset by the hospital's trans-
fer to privatization.
Hospital privatization took place
June 1, despite extreme public
opposition. The author apparently
felt the hospital had been stolen
from him or her.
Once the Greenville Police
Department is involved, it is their
responsibility to bring in other
authorities, such as the State
Bureau of Investigation and the
Federal Bureau of Investigation, if
needed.
Harris said that at this point the
Greenville Police Department is
assisting the hospital and the SBI �
has assisted the Greenville Police,
but the Greenville Police are run- '
ning the investigation.
Harris was unable to comment
on any leads in the investigation :
except that they are asking anyone
with leads to please call Crime
Stoppers at 758-7777.
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I
I
4 Wednndiy, July 8, 1898
opinion
The Eait Caroliniatj
eastcarolinian
AMY L.Rovsteh Editor
Hk.VIHKR BuRGtSS Mimging Editor
Amanda Austin NmEditor Travis Bahki.ky SpomEdiiw
TK Jones Assistant N�ws Ednor TRACY Hairr Assistant Sports Editor
Andy Turner tifwnlt Editor Carole Mehlk Head Copy Editor
Miccah Smith AssistantUfestyltEditor Chris KNOTTS StartIDustrator
Matt Hege AdvtnisingMinsger
Bobby Tuggle Wsbmtstir
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OUNIGW
Are all of the departments wired with the same sources of information?
According to Computing and Information Systems (CIS) they are. But if
this is the case, then why is it possible for a student enrolled full-time in
the spring and fall semesters, but not taking any summer classes, to have
access to certain facilities and not others? Or, should we say, not without
a fee.
Anyone with a One Card indicating they had attended the previous
semester can use the library's facilities without any questions. But try to
use that same card to get into the Student Recreation Center over the
summer and you won't make it past the front door without paying an
additional $30, the same fee charged to faculty.
The cashier's office said the bottom line is that anyone not paying for a
session of classes technically should not be able to use anything that
would normally be funded through the university fees � even when the
computer shows the student is enrolled for the next semester � but each
entity can come up with their own rules.
So, question the library about their act of kindness in extending their
privileges a few weeks through the summer and thev will tell you so lone
as you re enrolled in the tall, there's not a problem.
Another service provided throughout the summer is Student Health.
You can still purchase medicine and see health care providers at a fraction
of what independent medical practices charge, again, so long as you're
enrolled in the fall. ,
And the computer lab in Mendenhall? Not a problem, just show your
card so they'll know you're enrolled for fall.
The rec center, on the other hand, said if you aren't currently taking
classes, then you can't use the facilities unless you pay. Aren't we already
paying with the increase in tuition? Whose building is it anyway? And
who are they to be the ones on campus to refuse to give student dis-
counts?
OPINION
Columnist
Jeff
BERGMAN
Liberal is in eyes of beholder
Opinion columnists are the
only part of the media
I view as having a decisive
liberal or conservative slant.
Not all opinion columnists
are liberal.
According to conservatives, the
media industry is run by a bunch of
bleeding heart liberals. We 'tree-
huggers' put our personal left-wing
slant on everything from political
races to the problems in the world.
I believe this about as much as I
think the sound of a chainsaw rip-
ping through an old growth forest is
music.
Opinion columnists are the only
part of the media I view as having a
decisive liberal or conservative
slant. Not all opinion columnists are
liberal. Opinion columnist Walter
Williams is about as much of a left-
of-center Democrat as Ronald
Reagan was an actor.
Suppose the media were one-
sided; explain why we have a
Republican controlled congress.
The standard answer for that ques-
tion is the voters saw through the
many years of lies by the media and
voted in a much-needed conserva-
tive voice in government. The
Republican explanation is devoid
of good sense.
In 19 Bill Clinton won the
presidency again. Throughout that
year the media reported on
Clinton's supposed sexual impro-
prieties. The voting public still put
the man back into office. The fuzzy
logic that right-wing individuals
claim is the explanation would
assume that two years after the so-
called '94 revolution, we, the public
lost a few IQ points.
If the media were as liberal as
many claim then explain to me why
the reporting of Clinton's sex life is
front page. Meanwhile, Phil
Gramm's dumping of a few thou-
sand into a T&A flick goes unre-
ported � except by the extreme
liberal Al Franken.
Sure the news is liberal. That
explains why hundreds of reporters
are trying to infiltrate Nike plants
around the globe to see if children
are being exploited. Note to nar-
row-minded individuals: the
reporters are in Washington right
now, covering the oh-so-important,
"If Air-Force One is a-rockin don't
come a knockin
Yeah, we are all a bunch of hip-
pie liberals, trying to influence peo-
ple. If that is the case, we have
failed as miserably as the Bay of
Pigs. The liberals in the media sure
have done a great job: Health-Care
reform failed miserably and welfare
for the poor has been cut, while
welfare for the rich is rarely men-
tioned.
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OPINION
Columnist
Britt
H0NEYCUTT
Freebies have hidden cost
Even if I know it's crap I
want it � if it's free.
but nothing is ever truly
free � unless you steal it.
There's something about the word
"free" that drives a girl insane.
Even if it's not really free. As long
as it says so, I'm hooked. Like "buy
one, get one free You're not get-
ting a freaking thing for free,
buddy.
I'm a sucker for something that
is free. If anything comes in the
mail � say, for instance, an offer for
seven free CDs (which will actually
cost about forty bucks in shipping
charges) � I'm all over it like a
soggy diaper. Never mind that sign-
ing up for the "club" means being
hounded by a neverending barrage
of postcards and obligations and
resigning your personal taste in
music to a corporate conglomerate
who will now saturate vou with sub-
liminal messages directing you to
buy Nikes and Kathie Lee Gifford-
wear, thus supporting their lack of
adherence to the child labor laws
and the endless cycle of poverty in
Guatemala. All because the enve-
lope said "Free
The saddest part (well, aside
from the starving Guatemalan chil-
dren in sweat shops) is that as we all
know, I no longer own a CD player
(thanks to our marvelous system of
justice that lets burglars out for
"good behavior"). Yet I still signed
up for the BMG deal. Now that's
skillful marketing. Columbia
House also sucked me in like a gold
chain- wearing, chest hair-looking-
like-taco meat pimp downtown on a
Saturday night. I still owe them my
first born child.
You know what gets me every
time? When they throw in the Mini
Super Duper Thingie Bopper for
free with your purchase of a Super-
Super Duper Thingie Bopper on
the infomercials. I mean, it slices,
dices, mows the lawn, milks the
cow, and makes a wonderful center-
piece for any dinner party � and
the Mini Thingie is lightweight for
traveling! Now who could pass that
up? Not me.
Even if I know it's crap I want it
� if it's free. I signed up for 15
credit cards last year solely for the
T-shirts. I buy books at UBE just
for the packet of deodorant, mouth-
wash and cough syrup. In the end I
spend more money trying to get the
free stuff than I would have origi-
nally.
There must be some sort of psy-
. chological connection between the
idea of a freebie and the euphoric
feeling of triumph. I always feel
like I've beaten the man as he
walks away with my money and a
grin and I stand there with a dorky
smile and a handful of crap. But it
was buy one poo, get the second
free!
What I've learned from my mis-
adventures is that nothing is ever
truly free � unless you steal it.
OPINIOI
Columnist
Stephen
KLEINSCHMIT
Remember why we moved off campus
we hated having someone
other than our parents boss us
around, make us live in acco-
modations worse than our
room at home, eat food crap-
pier than the stuff at the gro-
cery store and park our cars
so far away
While I was helping my sister
Lauren move into Fletcher Hall on
Sunday for her technology camp, I
took a short trip back down
Memory Lane. It's been about a
year since I loaded all my stuff into
my beat -up '85 Ford Ranger and
made my first trip to ECU. I
remember making several trips to
get all my junk into my room in
Jones Hall, where it was arranged in
its usual disorderly manner. I also
remember meeting a bunch of peo-
ple who were pretty interesting and
seemed pretty nice.
Then I met the resident assis-
tants. My RA Brian was a pretty
cool guy. He wasn't a jerk, and
would generally leave you be. But 1
know a lot of people whose RAs arc
real nut cases. I really wasn't into
having someone who is my age
putting all sorts of rules on me that
not even my Mom would force
upon me. Of course, we got away
with murder. Cold beer was easier
to get than hot water. Everybody
knew somebody with a bong in the
closet. I don't know why the dorms
aren't run like an apartment com-
plex. You're an adult. If you want to
drink a beer in your home, then
why should ECU send its moral
crusaders to give you a ticket? They
could care less about the drinking;
they just want any extra money that
they don't have to earn.
Another sketchy area: visitation.
For some ungodly reason, ECU
won't let you stay in your friend's or
girlfriend or boyfriend's room after
2 a.m. I remember going to N.C,
State to see a friend of mine in his
dorm and we stayed all weekend,
because obviously State isn't.on a
big power trip over their dorms.
And their dorms are better than
ours. Half of our dorms are so old
and dilapidated; I had a nicer place
to live when I was in Army basic
training! Heck, some floors on
White Hall look like they filmed
Armageddon there!
Then there is food and parking.
No kitchens mean you have to eat
at the dining halls, which are
crowded and serve fattening pseu-
do-laxatives. Then parking is a joke
everywhere. The extra $96 for a lit-
tle moronic sticker was the decid-
ing factor on me not returning to
the dorms. Heck, I always have
parking at the apartment and it's
free!
And Traffic and Parking is
always out to make a dishonest
buck. If you are a cashier or a ticket
writer, when we come in to pay the
fine, it takes everything we have
not to smack you in the face.
So basically, we hated having
someone other than our parents
boss us around, make us live in
accomodations worse than our room
at home, eat food trappier than the
stuff at the grocery store and park
our cars so far away that we have to
ride a bus to get there. No wonder
we like apartments so much. Our
freshman year of college was worse
than living at home during our
senior year of high school!
Write a letter to the Editor!
5 Wednesday, Ju
Cl
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The Wanderi
Songs of Foi
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the best kind. Hi
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you're interested
ing for you in Vir






The East Caroliniarl
5 Wednesday, July 8. 1988
lifestyle
Tha East Carolinian
en
se
:ost
ise of a Super-
ie Bopper on
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CD
reviews
The Wandering Eyes
Songs of Forbidden Love
8 OUT OF 10
A'n.PI Turner
I I I I s I H (� t- 111 I OH
A waitress at the 24 Hour Diner back
home once told me that cheatin' sex was
the best kind. How she got from "how do
you want your eggs?" to advocating the
fleshly pleasures of infidelity, I'm not sure,
but at three in the morning in a greasy
diner filled with truck drivers and waitress-
es missing one or more front teeth, all
kinds of interesting conversations are pos-
sible.
And speaking of interesting possibili-
ties, you should check out The Wandering
Eyes' Songsof Forbidden l.ove(Lazy S.O.B.
Recordings), a collection of cheating songs
that explore the world of seedy, sleazy
motels and heartbreaking lies.
The Wandering Eyes are an Austin,
Texas country supergroup, featuring the
likes of Rosie Flores, Ted Roddy, Dale
WatgQn, and Kelly Willis. Anyone familiar
with the other work of these folks knows
that bringing them all together means a
whole lot of vocal talent in one place.
You've probably heard the original ver-
sion of "Me and Mr. Jones modeled after
R&B singer Billy Paul's "Me and Mrs.
Jones "Me and Mr. Jones" is one of two
tracks Willis sings lead on � the other
being the Moe Bandy ditty "It's a Cheatin'
Situation" � and it's the better of the two.
Willis wraps her gorgeous voice all
around this version from the cheating
woman's point of view. Willis fans will
have to make do with this project until
early next year, when an already complet-
ed album is expected to be released; she
was recently signed by Rykodisc after
being without a label since she was
dumped by A&M.
Fibres is another gal with an amazing
voice; her cheatin' heart aches and you
can't help but be affected by her interpre-
tations of "In Some Room Above the
Street" and "Even If I Have To Steal
I Ier voice is as tender as properly pre-
pared fried chicken, and she sucks the
bone marrow out of both of the songs for
all they're worth. "Even If I Have to Steal"
is one of three songs inspired by Mel
Street, "The King of Cheatin' Songs to
whom the album is dedicated.
The honky tonk angels aren't the only
ones who can sing convincingly about
stolen love. Watson contributes "Lovin' on
Backstreets" and an original, "Unspoken
Kind He has one of those Ernest Tubb-
so-damn-deep-you-know-he-means-it
voices. There aren't too many like Dale
Watson around anymore except, of course,
Ted Roddy, who gets just as low down as
Watson on "Devil in Mrs. Jones" and
"Hell Yes, I Cheated
Songs of Forbidden Love is done with
equal amounts of emotion and tounge-in-
cheek snickering. It's a hoot and it's sad as
hell, but if you know what's good for you,
you'll stick to listening to this album and
not try to live out any of the songs. But if
you're interested, there's a waitress wait-
ing for you in Virginia
Weekend
Relaxer
Sunday in the Park celebrates 25th season
M i c c a h Smith
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Patriotic music was on the bill of fare
Sunday night when the Greenville Choral
Society performed in the Town
Commons amphitheater for a picnicking
crowd of Greenville residents as part of
the annual Sunday in the Park concert
series.
Six ECU School of Music students,
along with faculty member George
Broussard, accompanied the Society dur-
ing "The Battle Hymn of the Republic
Older citizens clapped along to old-
fashioned gospel favorites and veterans
were asked to stand for a special musical
salute.
The concert was part of an anniversary
celebration for Sunday in the Park, a
Greenville tradition for 25 years.
Young adults fondly remember grow-
ing up with Sunday in the Park as part of
their summers, and even non-residents
enjoy the cultural benefits of the series.
Mary Robinette, from east
Tennessee, attended her third concert
of the season on Sunday. Asked which
has been her favorite, she replied, "I
liked this one better my daughter
and grandson were in it
Stewart Aronson has been praised
highly for creating, developing and
nursing Sunday in the Park through its
first 25 years. "He is the true spirit of
Sunday in the Park said a resident
who did not wish to be named.
Aronson came to Greenville to work
with the ECU Summer Theater program,
one of the few cultural resources available
to residents during the summer. In the
summer of 1974 the Summer Theater
went on hiatus, creating a potential for
cultural stagnation for residents who had
come to depend on the theater for quality
entertainment.
As a direet result of a conversation
between Aronson and Boyd Lee, then
director of Greenville Parks and
Recreation, the first concert was held that
June in a sunken kudzu-encrusted field at
the junction of Third and Fourth streets
with Readc, near what is now the fresh-
Panama Steal performs Aug. 2.
PHOTO COURTESY OF PANAMA STEEL
men parking lot downtown.
The field, surrounded by high earth
walls, was a natural amphitheater and pro-
vided space for families to spread their
blankets and listen to bands outside,
which became a popular way to spend a
summer Sunday night.
The first season of Sunday in the Park
was a success. "We've been doing it ever
since said Aronson, who participated in
Sunday's program, acting as Master of
Ceremonies and lending his trained voice
to the Choral Society.
On July 26, 1987, a new amphitheater
was dedicated on the Town Commons,
SEE SUNDAY. PAGE I
Sunday
in the Park
concerts
July 12
New Vintage Bluegrass Band
July 19
Supergtit Cowboy Band
July 23
Folk Concert and Old
FashionedHoot-NAnny
August 2
Panama Steel
(ECU School of Music steel drum
band)
Oklahoma! delights
summer theatre audience
THEATREreview
First of three l40s classics
for summer season
Stephanie Russell
THEATER REVIEWER
The East Carolina Summer Theatre has
once again created magic in McGinnis.
This season, a celebration of the theater of
the fabulous forties, opened with the
Rodgers and Hammerstein classic,
Oklahoma
Set in the mid-western frontier before
Oklahoma was a state, the play is a story
about people and the land they love. As a
sort of romantic comedy musical of the
times, there are love triangles, affairs of the
heart, and plain, good old-fashioned cow-
boy games.
Steven Edward Moore shines as Curly, a
cowboy with a heart of gold. Moore belts
out such classics as "Oh, What a Beautiful
Morning" and "People Will Say We're in
Love" with tremendous zeal and enormous
talent. His voice is perfectly suited to the
romantic cowboy he portrays. Moore
brings Curly to life in all of his rugged �
and gentle � splendor.
Laurey, the love interest of Curly and
Jud Frye, is played by Alayna Hamilton.
Hamilton, an alumnae of East Carolina,
makes a triumphant return to the
McGinnis stage in this outstanding produc-
tion. She can sing, dance, and act�what
more could you possibly need to star in a
musical? Maybe stage presence and chem-
istry with your fellow actors, both of which
Hamilton has in abundance.
These two are supported by an equally
talented cast, all of whom make Oklahoma!
the huge success that it is. James Darrah
(Will Parker) and Nicole Fenstad (Ado
Annie) almost steal the show. Both are
incredible singers and actors. Fenstad's
rendition of "I Cain't Say No is hilarious,
thanks in part to her amazing comic timing
that shows itself throughout the show.
John Darrow, Walter Shoen, and Patch
Clark (Jud Frye, Ali Hakem and Aunt
Filler, respectively) provide further fabu-
lous support. These three are as important
to the overall success of the show as any of
the lead characters. From serious drama to
sarcastic humor, Darrow, Shoen and Clark
know how to do it all!
Unbelievable choreography from David
Wanstreet showed off the talents of a
remarkable ensemble. All cast members
were integral parts of the show, singing and
dancing their way into the heart of the
action � and the audience. The vocal
direction of Mort Stine and the orchestra,
under the direction of Dr. Douglas
Morrison, were a further delight.
Costuming by Jeffery Phipps and scenery
by Robert C. Alpers, were, as always,
absolutely wonderful.
You may have missed your chance to see
a Rodgers and Hammerstein's classic of
Broadway. The East Carolina Summer
Theatre '98 has done a remarkable produc-
tion of Oklahoma Don't miss the opportu-
nity to catch another classic of the fabulous
forties. Blithe Spirit, a farcical comedy by
Noel Coward, started yesterday and runs
through Saturday.
Tickets are on sale now and are avail-
able by phone at 328-6829 or 328-1726, or
Out of Sight tops usual summer fare
MOVIEreview
Movie allows your date's
coolness to be measured
8 OUT OF 10
Randall Martoccia
contributing writer
Do the novels of any pop writer make bet-
ter movies than those of Elmore Leonard?
I suppose the high brows in the crowd
could point to Jane Austen and get little
argument (since so few of the rest of us
have seen the flicks based on her books),
but one look at the trailers is enough to
show that these cinematic tea parties are
not exploiting the medium to its full poten-
tial.
Movies, whatever their inherent faults
(see Armageddon if you need reminding),
are most effective when showing lives, not
manners, in peril.
Hubba Hubba and George get cozy.
PHOTO COURTESY OF UNIVERSAL PICTURES
And Leonard's strength is making us
care about these lives. How does he do it?
Why do we like Get Shorty's Chili Palmer,
Jackie Brown's Jackie Brown, and the gang
of robbers and accomplices
in Out of Sight?
While I could give you
all sorts of crap about
Leonard's ability to endow
his characters with humani-
ty and about his special tal-
ent for realistic dialogue,
that would not be entirely
true. You want these char-
acters to live mainly
because they are so enter-
taining.
Avoiding the bullets will
permit them to continue
pulling off their schemes
and saying funny things.
The dialogue in these
movies (especially Out of
Sigfit) is too witty to be real-
istic. One priceless bit has a
car thief arguing that he
couldn't possibly be steal-
ing the car he is seen trying
to hotwire because he had
already stolen it a week ago.
As to the actual story,
Out of Sight, directed by
Stephen Soderbergh, has
all of the by-now familiar
Leonard elements: hidden loot, double-
crosses, and games of criminal one-upman-
ship.
George Clooney plays Jack, a chronic
t
bank robber, and plays him well. Gone are
many of the annoying tendencies he com-
mits each week on ER. For once, he does
not look like one of those bobbinhead
dolls from the ESPN baseball commercials.
Jack breaks out of jail with help from
Buddy (Ving Rhamcs, being his usual bad-
ass self). FBI agent Karen Sisco, played by
hubba-hubba Jennifer Lopez, spots them
and attempts to intercede, only to be dis-
armed and thrown in the trunk with Jack.
They talk about movies as if they're on
their first date, while he drums his fingers
on her outer thigh as if it was their second
or third. Nothing explicitly erotic goes on
back there, but the sexiness of the situation
makes what follows not only believable,
but also inevitable.
Yep, you guessed it; they fall in love.
Sort of. Despite those sparks she felt in the
trunk, she still tries to gun him down the
first chance she gets.
The movie then convincingly traces
how their attraction for each other becomes
irresistible. In a wise move, Soderbergh
gives us none of those tedious scenes
where friends and family attempt to talk
the lovers out of it
Sure, Buddy frowns about Jack's need to
see her, and Dennis Farina, as Karen's
father, shakes his head disapprovingly, but
they both seem somewhat amused by the
SEE MOVIt. PAGE I





6 Wtdimdiy, July 8, 1998
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
I
I
Movie
continued from page 5
July
8 Wednesday
Mayfly and special guests at
The Cave in Chapel Hill
Sweetfeed, This Bike Is A Pipe
Bomb, Syrup at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill
Sarge, Flu-13 at The Lizard &
Snake in Chapel Hill
Clutch w Phunk Junkeez at
Cat's Cradle in Carrboro
PagePlant at the Virginia Beach
Amphitheater
9 Thursday
Goodwill Hunting ax. the Student
Rec Center pool
Shark Quest, Dynamic Truths at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill
Vecordia at The Lizard & Snake
in Chapel Hill
Athanaeum at Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro
John Fogerry, Whiskeytown at
the Virginia Beach Amphitheater
10 Friday
The Tim Stambaugh Band at
The Cave in Chapel Hill
The Fountains, Three Piece
Suit, Alphaman at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill 13 Monday
David Olney w Claire Holley at John Svara
The Lizard & Snake in Chapel Hill at The Cave
Wake w Chip Robinson at Cat's in Chapel
Cradle in Carrboro Hill
11 Saturday
TBA at The Cave in Chapel Hill
The Billygoats, Mercury Dime
at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
16 Deluxe w Sunset Valley at
The Lizard & Snake
Hipbone at
Cat's Cradle
in Carrboro
12 Sunday
New
Vintage at
Sunday in the
Park in
Greenville
Pete Best
at The Cave
in Chapel Hill
Cherry
Valence,
Bucks Deluxe
at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill
Girls
against Boys
w Buffalo
Daughter and
Stanford
Prison
Experiment at
Cat's Cradle
in Carrboro
DKV Trio featuring Ken
Vandermark w Gold Sparkle Duo
at The Lizard & Snake in Chapel
Hill
The Queers, Nobodys,
Chixdiggit at Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro
14 Tuesday
T. Strickland at The Cave in
Chapel Hill
The Rock-A-Teens, Gam at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill
Link 80, Blankface in Carrboro
John Fogerry peforms with Whiskeytown Thursday at the Va.
Beach Amphitheatre.
PHOTO OF REPRISE RECORDS
oumnierTheatr e 1998
presents
"A complete!) insane 1arce that is also uproauuis. . .
It liardh ouches the siiLie as ii rules a demeiled
broomsitek to hilarilv Pure entertainment!
- The New York1 nnes
Noel Coward's
BlitW
piri
t
July 7-11,1998,8:00 p.m.
July 11,1998,2:00 p.m.
252328-6829
niKition
Located on the East Carolina University Campus in Greenville, NC,
the East Carolina Summer Theatre is a Not-for-Profit Professional Theatre
featuring talents from all across the country.
situation and confident that the for-
bidden lovers will ultimately come
to their senses.
The scenes with Clooney and
Lopez together are very sexy.
Soderbergh skillfully turns the
thermostat up in tiny clicks of the
dial � an illicit phone call, a goofy
wave from a closing elevator.
When they do get together
(sorry), the doomed nature of their
relationship and the gradual
buildup give this scene more pas-
sion than can be found in a hundred
so-called erotic thrillers.
Instead of heading off with your
buddies to the next summer block-
buster, call up that girl or guy
you've been wanting to know bet-
ter, and drag them to the Buccaneer
theater (I know; 1 hate that one
too).
Now, don't sweat that your date
is ogling Clooney or Lopez,
because you'll be doing some
tongue-wagging yourself, and make
sure you hang around for the
denouement.
A good judge of your date's cool-
ness is whether he or she laughs
during the final scene. Here's some
advice � no laughter, no second
date.
Singing Cowboy
dead at 86
Sunday
continued from page 5
and temporary stages in the field
were replaced by a sheltered stage
on which the Sunday in the Park
concerts are now performed.
Earlier in the season Greenville
was treated to performances by a
swing band and The Monitors.
Upcoming events include a blue-
grass band and folk concert.
LOS ANGELES (AP) � Happy
trails, Roy Rogers. The cowboy
and one of the last of the white hats
from the golden era of Hollywood
westerns died Monday. He was 86.
Rogers died in his sleep of con-
gestive heart failure at his Apple
Valley home, in the high desert 90
miles from Los Angeles.
"What a blessing to have shared
my life together with him for
almost 51 years said Dale Evans,
Rogers' wife and singing partner.
Rogers was a star of television,
radio and movies, turning out
country music songs, 87 Westerns
� 26 of them with Miss Evans �
and a 1950s TV series that contin-
ues in reruns. For 12 years, from
1943 to 1954, he was the No. 1
Western star at the box office in a
magazine poll of theater operators.
With his trusty horse Trigger,
Rogers played the straight-shoot-
ing good guy who always fought
fair � instead of killing the bad
guys, he would shoot the gun out
of their hands � and always lived
to sing about it.
"I really appreciate what he
stood for, the movies he made and
the kind of values they embod-
ied President Clinton said.
"Today there will be a lot of sad
and grateful Americans, especially
of my generation, because of his
career
Rogers' theme song was
"Happy Trails to You sung over
aclippity-clop beat and bum-bah-
dee-dah bass line. It was co-written
by his wife.
His movies included King of the
Cowboys, Song of Texas, The Cowboy
and the Senorita, Don't Fence Me In
and My Pal Trigger. In the movies,
Roy Rogers
PHOTO COURTESY OF ASSOCIATED PRESS
his sidekick was whiskered Gabby
Hayes; on television, it was Pat
Brady.
Rogers and Gene Autry were
the most popular cowboy crooners
in Hollywood history.
"This is a terrible loss for me
Autry, 90, said in a statement. "I
had tremendous respect for Roy
and considered him a great human-
itarian and an outstanding
American. He was, and will always
be, a true Western hero
In addition to Miss Evans, he is
survived by a son, three daughters,
15 grandchildren and 33 great-
grandchildren.
A memorial service was planned
for Saturday at the Church of the
Valley in Apple Valley, followed by
a procession around the Roy
Rogers-Dale Evans Museum in
Victorville.
"The Undefeated Best
Place to Hear Live Music
in Greenville
-Greenville Times
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7 Wedneiday,
NA
seldoi
Drivers s
rwi
Tra
ASS1STAN1
In our modern
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vith all its appan
he more highly'
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east likely to ha
t as a topic amoi
This is due m
ion-athletic dri'
kill on the trad
lot versed in to
ealistically the
tivolved may b
that's essential
lasketball and 1
How athletes to
rhen they've
itigued, but in
itensified by th
ice helmets and
Hers must attemf
while losing 10-1
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ince this menti
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peeds up to ;
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acket is a tool ft
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functions, or if l
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should be, then a
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tor when consid
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suggests workin
common goal.
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so why do so mar
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changing scorebc
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lation for both th
beyond the mor
NASCAR as a sp





i East Carolinian
)oy
rs
1CIATED PRESS
skered Gabby
n, it was Pat
e Autry were
A'boy crooners
T-
: loss for me
statement. "I
pect for Roy
great human-
outstanding
rid will always
:ro
s Evans, he is
ree daughters,
rid 33 great-
; was planned
Church of the
y, followed by
id the Roy
Museum in
?????
:
x
)TTLES
7 Wednesday, July 8, 1898
NASCAR
seldom seen
as sport
Drivers shorn skill, are
real'athletes
Tracy Hairr
assistant spouts editor
snorts
� V JJThe East Carolinian
Ward guilty, Mazyck cleared of
assaulting student in Mendenhall
Football players'futures
still unknown
Travis Bark lev
sports editor
One ECU football player has been convict-
ed and one has been acquitted on charges of
assault.
Kevin Ward, a defensive back from
Kinston, and Travis Mazyck, a wide receiver
from Virginia Beach, Va were accused of
assaulting fellow student Kevin Hyman at a he will
fraternity party at Mendenhall Student would
Center on April 26.
On July 1, Mazyck was
found not guilty, while Ward
was ordered by a judge to per-
form 20 hours of community
service, write a letter of apolo-
gy to Hyman and stay out of
trouble. He received an addi-
tional 35 hours of community
service in a student hearing
after the trial. His final sen-
tencing has been postponed
until Sept. 2. It is expected that
Travis Mazyck
receive a prayer for judgment, which
spare him of a criminal record.
Ward was found
guilty after admitting
in court that he pushed
and swung at Hyman.
Ward said he was try-
ing to protect a woman
Hyman was arguing
with.
Hyman contends
that Ward saw him
arguing with the
woman and pushed
him in the face. When
Kevin Ward
FILE PHOTO
In our modern world of controversy,
disputed ideas often revolve around
what exactly defines an athlete, distin-
guishes him or her from a spectator and
low any particular event even qualifies
n being termed a "sport NASCAR,
vith all its apparent simplicity, is one of
he more highly viewed activities in the
Southeastern U.S but perhaps the
east likely to have prestige accompany
t as a topic among sports critics.
This is due mostly to conceptions of
ion-athletic drivers, who require no
kill on the track, who supposedly are
ot versed in true competition, when
;alistically the necessary endurance
wolved may be slightly greater than
hat's essential for most other sports,
asketball and football, for examples,
How athletes to be exchanged, either
hen they've become injured or
tigued, but in sweltering heat that's
itensified by their fire-proof suits, full-
ice helmets and gloves, NASCAR dri-
;rs must attempt to retain their sanity
�hile losing 10-12 pounds of sweat.
t Yes, racing requires patience. So
Bhat? Well, it's much more complex
since this mental discipline is just a
preparatory exercise.
The cars that are raced weigh
round 3,500 pounds, are capable of
peeds up to 200 mph, and even
ough it appears the aim is merely to
et ahead of the others while turning
ift, maintaining such a powerful vehi-
le, with an equivalent one just inches
way, certainly demands precision.
Not just anyone could do it.
Given that the pit crew must be in
ood health, jumping over a wall,
umping gas and changing tires in
omctimes less than 18 seconds, the
rivers must likewise be physically able
sustain uncomfortable conditions as
ricy do what most athletes try to do,
A�in.
And just like a baseball bat or tennis
racket is a tool for the hitter, so is a car
potential means for the driver to gain
advantage over his competitors.
If this machine, or driving tool, mal-
'unctions, or if there's not a carefully
lanned out meal that will rest for four
lours and not pursue an exit, or if a pit
rew isn't quite as vigorous as they
hould be, then an entire team is affect-
d and loses the race.
Being one of the key terms in any
athletic association, this idea of a
team" is undoubtedly a deciding fac-
or when considering whether or not
MASCAR is a sport, simply because it
uggests working together toward a
ommon goal.
Not predetermined, racing involves
avoiding risks, a respectable level of
concentration, and, at best, adrenalin-
pumping entertainment. These charac-
teristics definitely apply to other sports,
so why do so many refrain from placing
NASCAR in an athletic classification?
Probably the absence of a visible and
changing scoreboard and the fact that
when televised, a race does unjustly
appear repetitious.
But it's the observer who's easily
deceived by appearance that will forev-
er remain ignorant to NASCAR drivers,
far from being destitute of strength,
and the peril of their activity, quite
comparable to mountain climbing, foot-
ball and even ice-skating.
On the track, it's man against man,
machine against machine, and during a
race there's a sense of speeding stimu-
lation for both the drivers and fans that,
beyond the monotony, should entitle
NASCAR as a sport.
Crossbones has
provided the latest
information about
ECU sports for
over two and a
half years.
Banner courtesy of
Crossbones.com
Crossbones lets Pirate fans speak
Popular website enters its
third year of operation
Christopher Farnsworth
staff writer
An almost endless cache of information,
the internet has millions of sites for every-
thing imaginable. So, it's not really much
of a surprise to find ECU sports well-rep-
resented and still growing.
One of those sources, one not run by or
through the university, is Crossbones.com,
a website devoted exclusively to ECU
athletics. Created about two and one half
years ago, the site gives information on
whatever is presently relevant to Pirate
sports and updates on former Pirates who
have careers in professional sports. The
prime and most popular feature though, is
Piratetalk, an open forum for all to talk
about their loves and hates involving the
Bucs. Students, alumni, fans, rival fans and
(its rumored) even athletic
department officials use the
chat room, discussing any
sport, though football is a
favored topic.
Crossbones.com
actually evolved from
an underground
newsletter called the Skull and Crossbones,
run by alum Coby Heath. A few years ago,
Heath was approached by Alan McDavid,
�and'the newspaper joined the rat race of
the information superhighway. Then, a
year ago, another former ECU student,
Mark Barber, purchased half of the young
website.
"We do it as a hobby, really Barber
c
LOGO COURTESY OF CROSSBONES COM
said, "We don't get much money, though
we do sell ads-usually just enough to break
even
Though many current students and
Greenville residents use the website, one
of its primary functions is to ser-
vice alumni and fans who are
spread all over the country. Since
local newspapers would not be
much help to the distant Pirates,
and national publications such as
USA Today only offer game scores,
the ECU supporters can log on and
get all the information and updates they
desire.
Most of what one can find on
Crossbones.com are football reports and
related news, though during their respec-
tive seasons, information on all ECU
sports are present. Piratetalk is the best
SEE CROSSBONES PAGE 8
Gibson fills two spots on coaching staff
Basketball coach
adds assistants
ECU Sports
Information
cjhkhjkkhj
Jennifer Mitchell and Todd
Buchanan have been hired as
assistant women's basketball
coaches at ECU, Pirate Head
Coach Dee Gibson announced
on June 25. The additions
come just three days after
Gibson was named the eighth
head coach in Lady Pirates'
basketball history, replacing
Anne Donovan who departed
for a head coaching job with the
Philadelphia Rage of the ABL.
"Jennifer and Todd are hard
working people, and will be well
liked throughout the program
Gibson said. "Jennifer brings
"Dee has moved up the
coaching ladder quickly
because she is a great
recruiter and now I will
have the chance to learn
from her
Jennifer Mitchell
experience coaching in the
CAA, as she knows the teams
and their styles and has knowl-
edge of recruiting the East coast.
Todd brings head coaching
experience to the program and
has recruiting ties all over the
United States. Both of
them are welcomed
additions and should
help us build a win-
ning program
A former teammate
of Gibson's while at
Wake Forest, Mitchell
comes from Virginia
Commonwealth
University where she
spent the past two sea-
sons as an assistant
coach. Included in her duties
with the Rams were scouting,
recruiting and working with the
post players. Prior to VCU,
Mitchell had her first coaching
job as an assistant at the
University of Missouri-Kansas
city from 1994
The Roanoke, Va. native was
a thfee-time prep All-America
Jennifer Mitchell
FILE PHOTO
honorable mention in high
school before going on to play at
Wake Forest. A 1991
WFU graduate, she
was a three-time All-
ACC pick and left as
the Decans all-time
leading scorer and
rebounder.
"Dee has moved
up the coaching lad-
der quickly because
she is a great
recruiter and now I
will have the chance
to learn from her Mitchell said.
"ECU presents a great opportu-
nity because it has a lot to offer
for a coach as well as for recruits
and players. I look at this as a
challenge for me to do well and
think we can do well as a team
Also joining Gibson's staff,
Buchanan most recently was a
SEE BASKETBALL. PAGE 8 �
Hyman pushed Ward back, Mazyck stepped
in to separate the two. Hyman says that
Ward punched him, causing him to
fall against a pillar. Hyman says that
both Ward and Mazyck kicked him
while he was on the ground.
However, several witnesses testi-
fied that Mazyck was too far away to
kick Hyman.
While the player's legal questions
have been answered, it is unknown
what kind of impact this incident will
make on the Pirate football program.
Ward was expected to see action in
the secondary this season, while
Mazyck was thought to bolster a receiving
corps that lost three players to graduation
last year.
Assistant Athletics Director Norm
Reilly said there hasn't been any official
decision about the status of the players.
"It's a team matter Reilly said. "It's
being dealt with internally
WITN
to air
Pirate
sports
Channel 7 becomes
EClTs official station
Senior linebacker Rod Coleman will be chasing
opposing quarterbacks on WITN this fall.
Travis Bark lev
sports editor
Pirate fans who want to watch ECU foot-
ball games on television this season will
be able to do so, just as in years past.
However, the station carrying these
games has changed.
WITN Channel 7 replaces WNCT-
TV Channel 9 as, the official station of
Pirate athletics.
"We're really pleased to be the official
station of the Pirates said Mike Weeks,
president and general manager of WITN.
"We're taking on the Pirate logo and
branding it with our own Weeks said.
Pirates play-by-play announcer Jeff
Charles said the change of stations was
made for several reasons.
"The top priority is increased expo-
sure for our entire athletic program
Charles said. "Channel 7 has made a total
commitment to our program
Charles said the decision was a con-
sensus between many in the athletics
department
"Several people in the athletics
department were consulted, along with
SEE WITH. PAGE 8





I Wadneidiy. July 8, 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
WITN
continued from page 7
my input Charles said,
"intimately Mike Hamrick (athlet-
ics director) made the final deci-
sion
Weeks said that WITN has had
its eye on Pirate football for many
cars.
"The day I came in (to WITN)
�even yours ago, it was a priority
Weeks said. "They (ECU) value
partners that have been with them
for awhile, so there was no reason
for them to change. We started
working hard and tried to demon-
strate that we could provide things
that other stations can't
Despite the games airing on a
different network, there won't be
too many changes.
"Our football coverage will be
the same Charles said. "It will be
the same announcing team. Cliff
Stoudt will be back in the booth.
Creative Sports Marketing will still
handle production. The games will
still look the same
In addition to televising Pirate
football, WITN will also show
Pirate basketball games as well as
the Steve Logan and Joe Dooley
coaches shows.
It's in these shows where the
most changes will be visible.
"The coaches' shows will have a
little different look Charles said.
'They will be produced by channel
7 and for the first time we will have
a set
Charles said that WITN will air
between four and five football
games and six basketball games.
Because' KSPN and Fox Sports
South have first pick as to the
games they want to televise,
WITN's exact schedule is still
unknown.
"We're going to do a minimum
of four Charles said. "We're going
to do the Virginia Tech game and
the Ohio game for sure, but we
won't know about the others until
later
"Our fans will be excited about
Virginia Tech Charles said. "It's
our season opener and we should
bring a lot of fans
For Pirate fans not able to make
the trip to Blacksburg, don't worry;
you can catch all the action on
WITN.
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Basketball
continued Item page 7
bead coach at the University of
Monravcllo from 1996-98. Under his
guidance, UM had a combined
tecord of 19-36 in two seasons. Before
Caking over the head coaching duties
at UM, Buchanan was an assistant
coach and recruiting coordinator at
Oral Roberts University.
Buchanan began his collegiate
coaching career at Murray State,
where he was an assistant coach from
1992-95, including one year on the
Lady Racers' staff with Gibson
(1994-95). At MSU, Buchanan
worked with the guards and post
players, while having on-court coach-
ing responsibilities and recruiting
duties. Before coaching at on the col-
legiate level, the 1995 MSU graduate
coached for five seasons at the high
school level in Kentucky, where he
compiled an impressive 112-37
record between Calloway, Murray
and Lyon County high schools.
"I am honored and excited to be
here at ECU and to be working with
Dee again Buchanan said.
"Coming to ECU is a great opportu-
nity for me personally. Coaching with
Dee again will be a thrill because we
have talked about it before and I'm
glad we finally have the chance. She
will bring a personality and excite-
ment to the game that probably has
not been seen around here before
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Crossbones
continued from page 7
place to garner details about a
favored sport. The open confer-
ence is also a place to find recruit-
ing pews of an exclusive nature.
"There's a great deal of recruit-
ing information, and most sports
fans are into that Barber explains.
"I'd say 80 percent of our recruit-
ing information is accurate. But,
just as with all of the things posted
an I'iratetalk, you take it with a
uniin of salt. Sometimes it's accu-
rate; sometimes its speculation
Barber also adds that while uni-
versities cannot print or say any-
rliing in the media about a possible
recruit until they sign an intent to
play form, ('rossbones.com has no
tich limitations. For instance, if a
recruit whom ECU is considering
lives in Hickory, an alumni or
Pirate fan who lives in the town or
nearby would get on the net and
post what the potential recruit is
doing or toward what school he or
she might favor.
In the end, Crossbones.com
serves the same purposes as all the
other forms of media which chron-
icle the happenings of Pirate
sports, including this very publica-
tion. Unlike all the others, howev-
er, the privately owned and spon-
sored website has no constraints or
limitations set upon it, and above
all else, it is 100 percent interac-
tive. The hearts, minds and opin-
ions of those who love ECU sports,
and some who hate them, are post-
ed on the site. To join in the fray,
just log on at
www.Crossbones.com.
the
I tne I � �
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And Student Media
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9 Wtdntidiy, July B, 1998
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Players Club Can Help!
� COME IN TODAY AND RESERVE YOUR APARTMENT FOR THE FALL WITH NO
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PLAYERS CLUB
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Now Leasing � (919) 321-7613
152(1 Charles Blvd. � Greenville, C 27858
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Sports provides students
with motivation to learn
ORANGEBURG, S.C. (AP) �
For 25 days each summer, the gym
at South Carolina State University
echoes with the din of hundreds of
young math and science scholars.
They run through times-table
drills. They goosh together glue
and liquid starch to make a slick,
white polymer. They stretch their
environmental vocabularies.
And, oh yeah, they play
sports. Basketball, golf, swim-
ming. Volleyball, softball, ten-
nis.
"We use (sports) as a carrot,
to elicit that behavior that we
want says Ken Mosely, a
teacher at South Carolina State
who originated the National
Youth Sports-sanctioned pro-
gram there in 1993. The pro-
gram rotates short classes in
math and science with court or
field time.
"(Children) excel in sports
because they want to play it
all the time, without anybody
motivating them Mosely says.
In Moscly's, and in two other
such programs at the University of
South Carolina and Francis Marion
University, hundreds of mostly
low-income children attack math
and science with fervor though
maybe not quite the fervor they
reserve for play because they know
that studying earns them coaching
in sports, too.
Ten-year-old Pasha Franklin is
among the 350-plus children who
will attend South Carolina State
each weekday through Friday. She
sat one day at a folding table,
scratching at u math worksheet as a
tiny,
face.
hat-mounted fan cooled her
"It's OK she said of the pro-
gram. "I like science, because
that's my best subject, and I like
sports (especially basketball)
Pasha said she wasn't the only
one learning something this sum-
mer: "Now my mom's helping me,
too. She learned how to do some
more math" because Pasha takes
"That's one thing the program
tries to do, teach parents who may
have limited skills themselves.
Every parent wants to be able to
help his or her children succeed
Ken Mosely
Souih Carolina State teachrer
her work home.
That's one thing the program
tries to do, teach parents who may
have limited skills themselves,
Moseley says. Every parent wants
to be able to help his or her chil-
dren succeed, he says.
Nine-year-old Brandon Watkins
said he would rather be having
"real fun" watching movies this
summer, but he liked some things
about the summer program.
"You can learn about doing
stuff, and you can do it at home
he said.
The program takes children
ages 10 to 16 and teaches them not
only math, science and sports, but
drug-resistance and personal
hygiene. Some of the older stu-
dents come from group homes
reserved for those in minor trouble
with the law.
But even those children seem
happy to knead plastic baggies of
goo to make a Silly Putty-like blob
of polymer.
Though much of the program
centers on classroom instruction,
Mosely and his staff manage to
teach math and science through
sports, too.
"If you want to teach some-
body about vectors and angles,
what better way than basketball?"
he asks.
"We can really get them inter-
ested in percentages when they're
making free-throw shots. (And
they learn) what angle of release
will help them to get the best
shot
Last year, about 40 National
Youth Sports Programs nationwide
emphasized math and science.
This year, the NCAA-sponsored
program has boosted that total to
100.
Like UNC-Chapel Hill, SCSU
has offered programs for several
years. This year, with about 450
children, SCSU is the first to
emphasize math and science.
"Sports has the ingredients of
teaching many other life skills
says Albert Neal, a clinical profes-
sor in the School of Public Health
who administers USC's program.
And sports show children they
can excel, he says.
"All of the A's they've been
missing other places, they get
them through sports Neal said.
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V
Outdoor Pool Hours
Monday- Friday 10:00am- 6:00pm
Saturday- Sunday 11:00am- 6:00pm
Weather permitting� may be subject to change
Fitness T
Absolution Date July, 15 Cost Free 5:30pm-6:30pm SRC 2391
You and a partner can work together with a Personal Trainer to roach your fitness goals. 12
Price Personal Training lor packages of 8 sessions 12 sessions, and IB sessions, for more
Information or to register for Partner Training call 328-638? or stop by the SRC Main Office.
Adventures
Outdoor Adventure Camp II Date July 13-17
Sea Kayaking Camp Date July 13-17
Ages 8-11 Cost $80
Ages 14-99 Cost$isc
i
Intramural
ee Golf Singles
julyi6
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
For More Information Contact Recreational Services At 328-6387





10 Wtdntsday, July 8. 1998
classifieds
The East Carolinian
FOR RENT
Christian female room-
mate (nonsmoker) needed for two
bedroom apartment within walking
distance from ECU campus. $218
roo 12 utilities, 9mo. lease be-
ginning Aug. 1. Call 826-3209.
ROOMMATE NEEDED - Two side-
hy-side Player's Club apartments
each need a roommate. Washer
dryer, private bath, pool and friendly
fun. Please call 353-2665.
2 BEDROOM APT.DUPLEX, very
cean. 3 blocks from ECU. No dogs.
$495. 752-3816. leave message.
2 BEDROOM, 1 12 BATH apt
dishwasher & pool, 890 sq.ft ECU
bus service. $400 per month & a
small deposit. 758-7348 ASAPI
HOUSE FOR RENT. 5 bedroom. 2
bathrooms, large denkitchen with
fireplace, brick patio, on half acre
wooded lot fully fenced in. Pets OK.
2 miles from campus beside Pi
Kappa Phi fraternity house on
Hooker Road. $750 per month. Avail-
able August. Call 321-2030 for ap-
pointment.
HOUSE FOR RENT, 302 Lewis St.
3 BR, LR. DR. kitchen, central AC,
garage, 5 mins. walk from campus.
No pets. $750mo. 919-504-2052,
Iv. msg.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
to share 2 bedroom apartment.
$187.50mo. plus 12 utilities. Call
Jessica, 757-9640. Needed ASAP!
ROOMMATE NEEDED - DOWN-
TOWN apt. available now or Au-
gust. $237.50month. Call 757-0812.
3 BR. APT. AVAILABLE Aug. 1st
above BW3's. $775.00 a month!
Please call 758-2616, ask for Yvonne.
ROOMMATE WANTED. 2 BR apt
in Ringgold Towers. $235 rent plus
half utilities furnished. Contact Ruff
at MruffOUSA.Net or pager 800-819-
5144.
NEED FEMALE ROOMMATE to
share four bedroom townhouse at
Player's Club. Contact Kelly at
(919)663-3048. Leave name and
number if not available.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
starting August 1st. Share 2 bdrm.
at Tar River Estates. Master bdrm.
wwalk-in closet $260mo. 12
utilities. 6 mo. or 1 yr. lease. Call
413-0805.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bed apt $275
mo avail, now. Tanglewood Apts
125 Avery St Greenville. 758-6596
2 MALE ROOMMATES NEEDED
for Fall to share 3400 sq. ft. home
near campus, $250 per month, 15
utilities. Ask for Tim. 931-9165.
"$100 OFF"
Security Deposit
with presentation of thl� coupon, offer axplnw
73196 not valid with any other coupon
WESLEY COMMON SOUTH: 1 or
2 bedrooms, 1 bath, range, refriger-
ator, free watersewer, washerdryer
hookups, laundry facilities, 5 blocks
from campus, ECU bus services.
Other properties available.
-AM Properties have 24 he. emergency maintenance-
108-A BROWNLEA DRIVE
758-1921
onoQernenr,
AHJflm-O 1 faHl rtaM
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
Cypress Landing
Now Hiring Marketing
Assistants Sun -Thur, 4pm-
9pm 20-22 hours weekly.
Great hourly wage plus
bonus. Must have strong
communication skills, like
talking to people, customer
service oriented & team
player. Main function will
be telephoning customers.
Call Craig Wheeler
Mon-Fri. to schedule interviews
975-8100
1 FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
ASAP: Player's Club Apts. to share
4 bedroom townhouse. Your own
bedroom and bathroom. $210 plus
14 utilities per month, washer
dryer in apt. On bus route. Available
August 4! Please call 328-7798 for-
more information.
HELP WANTED
PART-TIME HELP needed in ware-
house. Apply in person at the Car-
pet Bargain Center, 1009 Dickinson
Avenue, 758-0057.
FREELANCE COPYWRITER. The
Ad Agency of Greenville, Inc. seeks
experienced copywriters for Impres-
sions magazine and agency assign-
ments. Graduate students or experi-
enced writers in the English or Com-
munications program preferred.
Please send resume and writing
samples to: 101 East Victoria Court,
Suite A, Greenville. NC 27858
STUDENT REP - AT&T authorized
Agent needs 20 students now! No
exp will train.100-300week. PT
FT. (800) 592-2121 x724.
Dapper
. Dan's
Big Summer Sale
10-75 OFF
FOR SALE
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS POST
Script printer. Laser jet printer. In-
cludes paper tray and manual feed.
150. Call 353-7109.
COMPAQ LAPTOP COMPUTER
100 mhz Pentium with 16 mb ram,
color screen, faxmodem. MS Of-
fice, Aldus Pagemaker, MS Works,
Norton Utilities. Great school or busi-
ness computer. $800. Call 353-
7109.
LOST & FOUND
REWARD OFFERED - Bathing suit.
Phonics book, possibly sunglasses.
Call 328-7796.
FREE CASH GRANTS! College
scholarships. Business. Medical bills.
Never repay. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000. ext. G-3726.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175.
Porsches, Cadillacs. Chevys. BMWs,
Corvettes. Also Jeeps. 4WDs. Your
area. Toll free 1-800-218-9000, ext.
A-3726.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
SINGLE MOTHERS SUPPORT
Group meeting at Catholic Social
Ministries, 3219 Landmark St 7A.
Greenville (across from Wal-Mart and
next to Goodwill). Please call Lenore
at 355-5111 to register. All are wel-
come, free of charge.
OTHER
Type this address into your browser
and visit us on the web
www.tec.
GOV'T. FORECLOSED HOMES
from pennies on $1. Delinquent tax,
repo's. REO's. Your area. Toll Free 1-
800-218-9000 ext. H-3726 for cur-
rent listings.
AVAILABLE NOW
1,088 SQUARE FOOT, FULLY
FURNISHED, 2 BEDROOM 2
BATH APARTMENT
$500MONTH. 758-5393
then bookmark it and come back
frequently. We constantly improve it
to better serve you. ��N!�
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
C9I9)496-ZZ4
MERCI Clinic, Inc. seeks a full lime director to
manage the facility, volunteer activities, and develop-
mental operations. Good people skills, organisational
ability, and community relations experience required.
Applicants must be familiar with medical clinic opera-
tions and have knowledge of social programs. Bachelor's
degree necessary. Salary commensurate with experi-
ence. $30K plus income potential. Application deadline
71598. Send resume to MERCI Clinic, Inc P.O. Box
15254. New Bern. NC 28561.
DC YOU NEED MONEY?
We Need Tjmterimd boats
mi shoes! Good ��.
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00, 2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, irive to back door & ring buzzer.
S T U I) I� I S W A P S II
comics
eastcarolinian
advertising department
Matt HeqeAdvertising Manager
Lori Cobb Campus Account Rep.
Chris CrumlichRetail Account Rep.
Emily OrzechowskiRetail Account Rep.
Amy YatesRetail Account Rep.
The only way to reach
the ECU Community
phone fax
328-2000 328-6558
Life on Tuesday
. Chris Knotts
France
Rafael Santos
HIV TV�Y,L&
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Life on Tuesday
Chris Knotts Wild Thing
N.Miles
WEDNESDAY
July is. i998
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This year on :
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Of these, autt
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Dr. Richard
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Fran and B
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Though they
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SEE HUR
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Title
The East Carolinian, July 8, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 08, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1279
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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