The East Carolinian, July 1, 1998






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WEDNESDAY
JULY 1,1998
eastcarolinian
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
Playhouse manager arrested
on counts of embezzlement
Missing monies more
than originally thougfit
Amanda Aistin
news editor
The ECU Playhouse manager was
arrested Thursday by the SBI's
Financial Crimes Unit for allegedly
embezzling money from the private
Theatre Arts Foundation. Gary
Faircloth, playhouse manager and
treasurer of the private theatre
foundation, was initially suspected
of embezzling approximately
$15,000, an amount that has nearly
doubled since his suspension in
May. �
Faircloth was initially suspended
with pay in connection with the
missing funds. He now stands
against four counts of embezzle-
ment and one count of forgery.
In May, the SBI was asked to
investigate irregularities in the
Theatre Arts Foundation, a
request that came directly
from Chancellor Richard
Eakin.
Agent Curt Ellis, supervi-
sor of the SBI Financial
Crimes Unit, led the investi-
gation which led to
Faircloth's arrest, and said the
evidence against Faircloth is
solid.
"He is on leave with pay
impending an appeals hear-
ing said Toi Carter, assistant
university attorney.
The impending appeals hearing
was requested by Faircloth.
At this stage of the investigation,
the university attorney's office is
involved with the case.
"We are only involved in the
appeals hearing Carter
Pouring bids
due today
Final decision possible
during July 17 BOT meeting
said. "Our involvement is case.
limited by our policies and proce-
dures
Faircloth's request for an appeals
hearing falls under the ECU per-
sonnel employees
exemption from state
personnel act.
"Mr. Faircloth is
requesting an appeal
under those provi-
sions Carter said.
The university
attorneys office was
unable to give specif-
ic information
regarding the case
against Faircloth,
other than the pend-
ing appeals hearing.
After his arrest, Faircloth was
held at the Pitt County Detention
Center until he was released on a
$35,500 secured bond.
Both Kakin and Faircloth have
been advised by their lawyers to
withhold comments regarding this
I wanna be like Mike
Gary Faircloth
PHOTO COURTESY OF
NEWS BUREAU
Clayton holds
teaching seminar
A M A N I) A A I1 S T I N
NEWS EDITOR
Designed to promote
NC teachers
Today is the day, will it be generation next or
the real thing. Bid submissions for Pepsi-
Cola and Coca-Cola exclusive pouring rights
at ECU are due.
Exclusive pouring rights usually include
all university vending machines, concessions
at sports events and the cafeterias. In addi-
tion, the company would also have the ben-
efit of exclusively advertising on campus for
product promotion.
Richard Brown, vice chancellor of admin-
istration and finance said, both companies
are expected to submit bids. Both compa-
nies have been calling to ask questions and
make clarifications.
If all bids are in on time the Board of
Trustees final decision could come during
their July 17 meeting.
"The choice of the board will be to reject
all bids or accept one bid Brown said.
"(The Board of Trustees) can only accept
the highest bid. The one with the most ben-
efits for the university
It is the Board of Trustees' responsibility
to review both bids carefully.
"The information will have to be put into
a spreadsheet to evaluate the net present
value of the total amount Brown said.
"The evaluation committee will review
spreadsheets and bids and review pros and
cons
There are other factors the evaluation
committee will have to review. The board
wil have to review options of full exclusivi-
ty, modified exclusivity (allowing other com-
panies to have 25 percent of shelf space) and
whether the contract will be for a period of
five or 10 years.
"There are other factors, but finances are
a major factor Brown said. "Service being
offered and equipment to be provided, these
are about the only tangibles
Brown said both companies have excel-
lent reputations and good equipment, so in
SEE DEADLINE, PAGE 2
TODAY
Thunderstorms
high 91
low 75
TK Jones
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
A 'Teaching for the Future' sem-
inar was held on campus to pro-
mote NC teachers.
We're having a crisis. We don't
see it right now because we're at
the beginning of it. It's like a
storm brewing. We don't see the
wind blowing very hard or the
cloud cover at first, but it's com-
ing, Congresswoman Eva
Clayton said while reflecting on
what the future holds for North
Carolina's
public
schools.
Clayton
was
responsi-
ble for
organizing
"Teaching
For The
Future a -EvaClayton,
seminar congresswoman
designed file photo
in effort to
curb the teacher shortage in
North Carolina by encouraging
high-school students to pursue
teaching.
Even when the state gradu-
ates a high number of teachers,
there is a problem of retention,
Michael Jordan makes his way across the greenway during a game of golf at the Brooke Valley Country Club on Sunday to
raise money for the Ronald McDonald houses in North Carolina during the 14th annual Michael Jordan Golf Classic
PHOTO COURTESY OF FAULKNER AND ASSOCIATES ADVERTISING
keeping them here. With the
Teaching Fellows Program,
North Carolina gives $20,000
scholarships to persuade high-
school seniors with outstanding
grades to become teachers. But
one stipulation upon receiving it
is, upon graduation a recipient
must teach for four years in NC.
Many pay off their four years and
then leave.
Because of the exodus,
Clayton said there should be
more of a concentration in
recruiting teachers outside acad-
emia as well, hiring military
retirees and people in business
seeking a way out of the profes-
. SEE TEACHING. PAGE 2
Greenville celebrates
nation's birthday
Music, fireworks
planned for events
Chris Knotts
staff writer
Groundskeeping responsibilities
include litter pick up on campus
TOMORROW
Thunderstorms
high 86
low 72
Over 160 trash cans
dispersed on campus
Christopher Scott
staff writer
During the summer months at
ECU the grounds keeping staff
work hard to maintain the pris-
tine condition of our campus.
One major dutywork day the
grounds and picking up and dis-
carding the litter tossed aside by
students during the school hours.
From drink containers and plas-
tic wrappers to cigarette butts,
these groundskcepers are con-
Opinion
Pick up your trash,
don't leave it for
someone else.
t i n u a I I y
removing stu-
dent waste
that is either
collected in
the over 160
trash cans dis-
persed around
campus or
occasionally
thrown to the
ground.
"Keeping
the campus
clean is a six day a week job
said Doug Caldwell, superinten-
dent of the grounds department.
"The heaviest littering days for
the grounds workers occur on
Monday and Friday
Among many responsibilities, grounds keepers must
pick up litter strewn across campus.
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
In the summer, the down-
town area affects campus life,
and not just for the students.
Since central campus is the most
populated area with its multiple
Greenville may not be the largest
of cities, but that won't stop its citi-
zens from making the largest of
efforts at celebrating
Independence day.
For those who are looking for a
July 4th outing, the place to visit
will be the town commons, which
will be teeming with festivities all
day long. The town commons will
be the site of Greenville's Annual
Fourth of July Celebration, spon-
sored by the Greenville Jaycees
and other area businesses.
According to Will Paul of
Greenville Parks and Recreation,
outside fireworks will not be per-
mitted, nor will alcoholic bever-
ages. Events will begin Friday at 6
p.m. begins a carnival, which lasts
until 10 p.m. and $7 will purchase
unlimited rides. The day will
begin on Saturday with children's
events, but throughout the day
there will be something for every-
one. The main event of the day will
be a classic car show, for which reg-
istration begins at 9:30 a.m. and
continues until noon. The show
itself is from 9:30 until 3 p.m.
There will be musical acts and
entertainment throughout the cele-
bration, as well as food, crafts and
cold Pepsi.
Traditionally, the high point of
Independence Day is fireworks.
The Jaycees and Greenville Fire
Department promise a worthwhile
show. The fireworks show begins at
9:15 p.m. and will finish off the
evening with a bang.
Festivities at Town Commons
exclude drinking, and for those
who want to partake of a refreshing
alcoholic beverage on the fourth,
celebration will have to take place
elsewhere. Although the fourth
takes place on Saturday, none of
the downtown establishments con-
tacted planned on having drink
specials or Independence Day
activities.
However, the Greenville Police
Department anticipates a greater
number of intoxicated drivers than
usual, due to picnics and private
parties.
"We will have the entire police
force out at one time or another
said Captain Kevin Smeltzer, of the
Greenville police. "We have a
mutual aid program here in
Greenville, so officers from other
departments will be here to help
also
Smeltzer also stated that DWI
road checks would be set up at var-
ious locations. As always, drinking
and driving is a bad idea, especially
SEE GROUNDSKEEPING PAGE 2
WEDNESDAY
Lifestyle
Sports
Chinete Buffet
rating results am in.
I
sip
ECU names new
women's basketball coach
t
Online Survey
www.tec.ecu.edu
'Hive you ever littered on campus?"
Are you sick of the Bulls?
80yes 20no





Career Services puts resumes
online for students, alumni
Service planned to
be�n fall semester
Debbie Neuwirth
STAFF WRITER
Career Services is now offering to
help students put their resume
online. They are also making it
available to register online and to
explore career options. The
unveiling of these services is
aimed for August 1, but will defi-
nitely be available by fall.
This new service to put your
resume online is aimed at seniors,
graduate students and alumni.
The program and home page have
been online for a couple of years,
but the new software will better
enhance the ability for first year
students, sophomores, and juniors
to explore their options. The pro-
gram, called Career Quest, and
with employers to submit their job
leads.
The program offers a variety of
options. Students can check posi-
tion listings and do a job search.
The program also displays help on
how to develop an effective
resume. There are help sessions
offered every Monday at 4 p.m. to
explain the process to students.
"Not everyone is at the same
level said Lemar D. Bell, assis-
tant director of career services.
"We can help reach them and
make them feel comfortable with
this service
Another advantage for students
is that they can go online at any
time to sec which companies have
looked at their resume.
"Students have the opportunity
day or night to find out who is hir-
ing. I really don't see any down-
falls Bell said.
"Students can now use the
home page as a gateway to hun-
dreds of job sources said James
Westmoreland, director of career
services.
The registration process is an
online aspect as well.
"This service will teach people
how to look for jobs in their area
Westmoreland said.
This program is an attempt to
get freshmen and sophomores
logged on early so they will have
some help with career decisions
and planning their own course
selections. Keith Kulowiec, a
recently graduated Biology major,
Teaching
continued from page 1
sion. Though they wouldn't have
teaching certificates, they would
have real-life experience and can
take the classes to become certi-
fied simultaneous to instructing a
classroom.
"I think this (Alternative
Certification) holds great promise
when we're not getting as many
young people coming out of the
normal process into teaching
Clayton said. "Some areas of
North Carolina are having a phe-
nomenal growth. With us relying
on traditional ways to get teachers,
we're going to be short. We're
already short on master's certified
teachers
North Carolina is scheduled to
be the fourth state in the amount
of growth in its population, accord-
ing to Richard W. Riley, secretary
of the U.S. Department of
Education and keynote speaker at
the seminar.
Dr. Marilyn Sheerer, dean of
the school of education, believes
the deficit in teachers- particularly
female-stems from "career oppor-
tunities opened up for women
Unlike twenty years ago when
teaching was one of the only career
choice for women. Sheerer said
women now have medicine, law
and the sciences easily available,
so educators must keep "teaching
an attractive alternative with all
the other alternatives that are
offered to women
Deadline
continued from page 1
this case equipment is not a factor.
Though the local Pepsi bottling
company is owned by the Minges
family, after which Minges colise-
um was named, it will ultimately
depend upon who submits the
highest bid because the state bid-
ding process is being used.
"The evaluation committee is
not dealing with issues of donation
and support in this decision
Brown said. "Both companies
have been very generous to the
university
Groundskeeping
continued from page 1
eateries, the groundskeepers
divide the task beginning at 7:30
a.m. into three sections: from
Fletcher Music Center to the
plaza in front of Wright, the mall
surrounding the Cupola, and
from Mendenhall Student Center
to the Student Recreation Center,
according to groundskeeper
Stanley Valentine.
After these teams clear their
designated areas, the second step
of the litter control takes over.
Two running dump trucks which
unload the 58 dumpsters situated
around campus, usually twice a
day, according to Caldwell.
Even during the one-day break
between the summer sessions.
the
1 the I � �
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the grounds department was
cleaning up the debris left by stu-
dents moving off campus or back
home for the last part of the break.
"Wednesday was the busiest
day of the summer, yet Caldwell
said. "But before the fall semester
starts, there will be an acquisition
of sixteen more trash cans to
accommodate the amount of stu-
dent waste.
A large part of littering stems
from the way smokers habitually
throw their finished cigarettes
away on the ground instead of
using an ashtray or an ashtray urn
placed on top of the metallic trash
cans. While the solution to the lit-
tering of cigarettes can only be
started by social habits, Valentine
of the grounds department did
offer a suggestion to stop the
action.
"If the students were required
to wear a visible number on their
clothing, a witness of their infrac-
tion could use the number to
identify the litterer Valentine
said.
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opinion
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eastforolinian
AMf L.ROVSTER Edirar
Heather Burgess MmgmgEditor
Amanda Austin Nmi Editor Tract m. laubach Sponi Editoi
Holly Harris Am. Dm Edna Steve Losev Am Span Editor
Andy Turner UtatyHEdiia Carole Mehle Hi Copy Editor
Miccah Smith auihwilifntyltEdna Chris KnottI SuHiHuttraiot
Matt Hece Adwttiirnj Mrnigar
Busby Tuggle Wabmnin
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Despite tremendous effort and glorious results, the beautification committee's work is being se-
verely undercut by Pirates of the worst kind � litterbugs. Why? Regardless of multiple trash cans
scattered strategically across campus, lots of people will chunk their waste carelessly about. Everyone
wants a pretty campus to show off to our family on Parents Weekend and to our friends from other
universities, but few of us are disciplined enough to put our trash where it belongs on a daily basis.
But litter is not a new problem on campus. Grounds manager Doug Caldwell said litter has been a
tremendous problem through much of ECU's history. Between Tuesdays and Thursdays 12-15 per-
cent of his staffs time must be spent on litter maintenance and control alone, with much of this effort
going to clean up the area around the Wright Place. Since this area is the most littered on campus, a
food service worker is employed strictly to keep the area clean.
On other days, other parts of campus hold remnants from residents' visits downtown. Caldwell
said 25 percent of the groundskeeping work is picking up after students � an embarrassing duty
since we are all adults and we know what trash cans are for. What's worse is that West Campus and
College Hill remain strewn with trash after these party nights, and sometimes there's a distinct path
designating the transition students make from their Fifth Street felicity to their respectable rooms.
There's simply no excuse for it. It's time to cultivate a two-way relationship with our alma mater
and realize that our relationship with ECU extends beyond expecting services from the residence
halls, library, Rcc Center and food distributors. We may not choose to give back, but we can certainly
clean up.
Though there appears to be an inherent tendency toward laziness, it's time for all of us to realize
that our mothers don't live here to clean up our mess.
OPINION
Britt
H0NEYCUTT
Columnist
Complaining's like teletubbies
What's the friggin' deal uiith
pseudo-freshmen and the
Elbo? What the hell is a
Teletubby and why is it filling
my airwaves with a plague
worse than Barney? What
No Ginger Spice? What is the
thinking?
As I haven't really done much
Lflat out complaining this summer�
or at least as much as we're all ac-
�customed to � I decided that I
Jwould take this opportunity to ad-
�dress a few things that have been
Jon my mind of late.
I Number One: What's the
�friggin' deal with pseudo-freshmen
Jnd the Elbo? Why doesn't anyone
�tell them how bad the place sucks?
�if it weren't for their complete ig-
norance of the principles of good
�taste in a nightclub (and that's not
�their fault), that place would have
$een closed down and used as a
Jehovah's Witness temple years ago.
Somehow they continue to flock to
it like flies to poop (and what a fit-
ting analogy). The only answer is
that there is a nationwide con-
spiracy to delude high school se-
niors that the 'Bio is the place to be
through various methods of mind
control and hypnosis. You know
those 3D posters you buy in the
middle of the mall at Christmas that
you stare at until you look like a
drooling dolt? They are all encoded
with secret devices to convince 18
year-olds that the Elbo is cool. I ac-
tually saw one once that said "Come
to the Elbo. Ignore the fact that ev-
eryone in here looks more lost than
yourself. Don't look in the corner
at those 40-year-old men with no
teeth trying to pick up every girl
that sets foot in the door. No, you
don't have to be 21 to drink; that's
just a rumor. This is heaven I'm
lucky I escaped with my sanity in-
tact. Sort of.
Number Two: What the hell is
a Teletubby and why is it filling my
airwaves with a plague worse than
Barney? After seeing the show
once, I understand why it is so con-
troversial. Not because of the fact
that they attract and hold the atten-
tion of a much younger audience of
children than scientists thought
possible, thus addicting them to TV
at an earlier age and robbing them
of time that should be spent devel-
oping motor function and interper-
sonal skills necessary to life as a hu-
man being�all as a marketing ploy
for the Teletubby dolls and as a ve-
hicle for global domination by the
British. Nope, I hate it because I
know college students who are
skipping class because they fall into
the enhancement of that slow mov-
ing little world. How can anyone
avoid becoming a moron when four
monkey-aliens are gaga-ing at you
for an hour every day? What's worse
is that their brand of patronizingly
smug cuteness is addictive. You
need to be made to feel stupid ev-
ery morning at ten.
Number Three: What No
Ginger Spice? What isshe thinking?
My life is mined. Now I have to find
a new victim of my sarcasm. Hanson
sounds like a good candidate
I'm running out of ranting space,
so here are some quickies. I went
to ladies night downtown the other
night. O.K diere are four guys here
and 607,875 women � and they're
all in heels, skirts, big hair and
makeup. Why? They're only im-
pressing each other. The four guys
didn't even shower.
Why do people come into the
place where I work (no names �
my stalker and I prefer to keep to
ourselves) where I am obviously
wearing a uniform and working �
and ask if I work there? Do they
think I do that crap for fun? Who
walks into a store and starts straight-
ening things on the shelves out of
the kindness of their hearts?
Why not shave the armpits?
Come on. I understand the Back to
Nature Granola Girl Movement and
the "I don't have to subject myself
to society's standards" spiel, but
can't you just buy some
Birkenstocks or something? Go live
in a commune in the desert? Do
you really have to let the armpit hair
hang?
That's all I have for today,
kiddies. Stay tuned next week for
another dose of gratuitous bitching.
It's like a drug or an episode of the
Teletubbies, isn't it?
OPINION!
Stephen
KLEINSCHMIT
Columnist
Greeks don't get fair shake
We are more successful. We
are more charitable. We are
achievers. And yes. we throw
a pretty good bash every once
in a while we have a better
college experience.
You can use us as your scape-
goats, make fun of us in comic
strips, and in movies (Seen Scream
2?) with the same liberal bias as
Nightline on gun control. You cru-
cify us in the name of popular
culture.On campuses across the
country , we are the people that
everybody hates to admit that they
like. To all those people who have
seen Animal House, and unfairly
label us as hazing, alcoholic wom-
anizers and promiscuous air headed
bimbos: get bent.
It's time to examine the facts.
First, The Center for Advanced So-
cial Research In St. Louis found
that Greeks were 18 percent likely
to drop out college within the first
two years, whereas the general
population wqs at 25 percent. Why
is this? Because the Greek system
motivates their members to achieve
scholastically, and give the person
a circle of friends, which they don't
want to leave. Therefore, we have
more motivation to stay in school.
Second, Greek organizations are
very charitable organizations. We
think we can take the criticism of
being more generous than the av-
erage student. Charities such as the
Greenville Community Center and
The Red Cross depend on these
rather large donations to keep them
operating. Also, Greek organiza-
tions also volunteer at local area in-
stitutions such as the Boy's and
Girl's Club, and to help the elderly.
Finally, 85 percent of our top
business and governmental leaders
have been Greek. Many U.S. presi-
dents, congressmen, CEOs, Su-
preme Court Justices, Generals, Ad-
mirals and top entertainment per-
sonalities have been Greek. Is it
that book smarts will only get you
so far? Is it that employers want
someone who is socially developed,
and can relate to other people?
So what it boils down to is
straight jealousy. We are more suc-
cessful. We are more charitable. We
are achievers. And yes, we throw a
pretty good bash every once in
awhile. In other words, we have a
better college experience. To those
who think you we are paying for
our friends, most of the money we
pay is for insurance,and we still ac-
cept them as our brothers and sis-
ters, even if they don't pay dues, or
i f they arc not in school.To those,
who say we are just a bunch of party
fiends, I probably passed you and
other non-greeks passed out on the
floors of the dorms on the way to
my room last year (generally Greeks
are more responsible too!) If you
can't beat us, join us. We are not
cliquish and will accept you for who
you are. We have different letters,
but the same purpose: Brotherhood
and Sisterhood.
OPINION
Jeff
BERGMAN
Columnist
NASCAR is not a sport, sport
"Write a letter to tke editor!
Letters should be addressed to the Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian,
Student Publications Building, Greenville, NC 27858-4353.
Please limit your letter to 250 words and all letters must be signed by the
sender and include a telephone number.
1ii
Drivers are called athletes in
this auto racing extrava-
ganza, yet most look about as
athletic as their spectators
These guys are athletes? The
racers are only called athletes
by the people who watch the
circular show.
Drive straight, turn left repeat 400
times and you have a NASCAR
race. I have never understood the
growing popularity with this so-
called sport. Drivers are called ath-
letes in this auto racing extrava-
ganza, yet most look about as ath-
letic as their spectators.
NASCAR fans have a devotion to a
specific make of car. Ford and
Chevy are the primary vehicles of
choice for racers and their loyal fans.
These people will argue which car
is better until they are blue in the
face and red in the neck. I guess
these stereotyped, beer guzzling,
country music lovin' fans cannot
read. If they could read the entire
argument could be settled after
reading the impartial
"Consumer'Reports.
Racin' fans will utter statements
that are derogatory to other car
manufacturers; i.e. FORD: found
on road dead. I have never seen
such diehard loyalty to a product.
When is the last time you heard this
phrase, "I don't like Michael Jor-
dan, because he wears Nike"?
Most other types of racing I view as
being actual sports. These other
follow-the-leader games will keep
on truckin' if the weather turns to
rain. Changing of tires is necessary
in order for better traction, but they
do continue the race. NASCAR is
treated like a small child. When the
rains come, they sit inside like litde
children waiting for a break in the
clouds.
The multi-colored cars that Dale,
Jeff, Bobby and the rest of the knot
hole gang drive give me headaches.
Imagine, if you will, the L.A Lak-
ers having every sponsor that some
of the players are spokesmen for on
their jerseys, Nike, Gatorade,
Spalding, Pepsi and Taco Bell. The
plethora of colors would be distract-
ing to the eye, much in the same
way many consider stock cars.
These guys are athletes? The races
are only called athletes by the
people who watch the circular show.
The spectators could call truckers
athletes based upon their criteria for
athleticism. They drive for a long
time, big deal I have made twelve
hour treks before and even filled up
my own gas tank.
Despise is too nice a word to de-
scribe how I feel about NASCAR
As my Dad says about this "sport
"A bunch of rednecks turning left
I could not agree more.
"Knowledge will forever govern ignorance. And a people who mean to be their own
governors must arm themselves with the power knowledge gives
James Madison. President of the United States. 1822
I
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I

4 Wadnatday, July 1, 1998
cd ;
review
Big Summer SOperduper
CD Review-O-Rama
ANDY TURNER
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Summer finds us only publishing
once a week and offering a much
smaller paper. As a result, we
can't review as many CDs as we
would like. A surprisingly large
number of, let's get technical,
good stuff has been released so
far this summer, so we can't let
you, our lovely and special
readers, miss out on the grab bag
of musical goodness waiting for
you. Here goes:
Billy Bragg and Wilco,
Mermaid Avenue: The men of
Wilco and Billy Bragg team up to
pay tribute to original punk
Woody Guthrie. When Guthrie
died, he left behind a lot of songs
that he had written lyrics for but
no music. Wilco and Bragg
provide the music, which
compliments Guthrie's words to
the T. The best songs include:
"Hesitating Beauty "She Came
Along to Me" and "Ingrid
Bergman who Guthrie
informed, "This old mountain it's
been waitingAll its life for you to
work itFor you to touch its
hardrock, Ingrid Bergman, Ingrid
Bergman Good lord, Ingrid
Bergman. (9 out of 10)
Jonboy Langford and the Pine
Valley Cosmonauts, Misery
Loves Company: Some fellers
from Mekons, Waco Brothers and
Bottle Rockets promise to
"explore the dark and lonely
world of Johnny Cash For it to
be some damned dark and lonely,
LUCINDA WILLIAMS
CAR WHEELS ON A QRAVEL ROAD
Jonboy and friends seem to have
a great time rolling through the
Man in Black's songbook,
including "I Got Stripes "Guess
Things Happen That Way" and a
semi-reggae sounding version of
"I Still Miss Someone (8 out of
10)
Johnny CashWillie Nelson,
VH1 Storytellers: That's right;
we've got collaborations up the
ying, but if necessary, you should
kill people to get your greasy
claws on this one. It's just Mr.
Cash and Mr. Nelson, their
guitars and a bunch of classic
songs, including "Funny How
TOP
of the
Part 2
lifestyle
5 Wednesday, Ji
The East Carolinian
the
debauchery
continues
Editor's Note: We began our search
for the perfect Chinese Buffet last fall.
We promised we would continue our
quest even if it meant getting really dig
guts. Well, we're a little digger, hut we
fulfilled our journey. Here are the
highly anticipated results
ANDY TURNER
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
(6 OUT OF 10)
Do you have a special outfit you wear for
buffet eatin'? You pull out the shirt with the
picture of a gal with a tanned shiny be-hind
that says, "NOTHING BUTT NAGS
HEAD and a pair of short so stained you
don't know what color they are anymore.
After all, you're gonna doing serious eating
and don't want to worry about slop staining
your church clothes.
Well, that outfit won't do at Ming
Dynasty. It's more civilized than your
average buffet atmosphere, and that's a
hell of an accomplishment since they're
within snortin' distance of the Piggly
Wiggly on 10th Street.
The inside of the restaurant is really
quite attractive � in redneck
terminology that would be "it's done up
right good
It's buffet bar, however, could certainly
be improved. The biggest problem is the
small selection; it's particular weak in
comparison to other buffet bars in town.
The quality of the food in the buffet bar
is only slightly above average and many
items don't seem to be incredibly fresh.
They do have big and good egg rolls.
The price is on par with the Greenville
average: $4.99 (lunch) and $6.79 (dinner).
However, the more upscale atmosphere
should encourage you to put down the
bib and "act like you got some
upbringing" and order a single dish.
MlCCAH SMITH
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
(7 OUT OF 10)
Careless students have but a few choices
when it comes to Chinese food, and
Szechuan Garden, located on Evans
Street, is a pretty gbodToption.
For $4.95 at lunch or $6.95 at dinner (not
including the student discount), you can
try the fried chicken wings, which rival
even the Colonel's for crispy brown
goodness.
And be sure to tip the waitstaff, who
enthusiastically aim to please on a
consistent basis.
Mark BRETT
SENIOR WRITER
The Great Chinese
ABuffet
r&SWar
7(see scale to left)
Grand China Buffet10
Mongolian House9
Mandarin Chinese Buffet 7
Szechuan Garden7
Ming Dynasty6
Peking Palace5
��
The first and most important thing to
remember about eating at Mongolian
House is to make sure you get all nine
sauces. No matter how disgusting it
mighr sound to have, say, oyster sauce
and sugar water on the same food, do it.
If you don't, you're missing out on
something special.
Mongolian House specializes in
Mongolian barbecue. You go in, fill up a
bowl with your choice of raw vegetables
and frozen meat, dump the sauce on, and
the chef cooks the whole mess for you on
top of this flat grill made to look like a
shield. It's the manliest restaurant in
town!
And it's quite good. If you like Chinese
food, there's no more unusual experience
in Greenville than Mongolian House. It's
all you can eat, so feel free to make more
than one trip to the food bar. But your
SEE CHOPS. PACE t St
I Bro
��B
Truth,�qualityJ
102B East. V;
Bedford Park
R Go barbaric on July 4th
Time Slips Away "Folsom
Prison Blues" and "Me and
Paul Sure they were playing in
front of a big audience, but this
.album just sounds like a couple of
old friends having a great time �
and they deliver a classic
performance along the way. (10
out of 10)
The Jesus and Mary Chain,
Munki: Everyone's favorite noisy
bastards are back with their first
album on Sub Pop after leaving
American Recordings. The
album begins with "I Love Rock-
N-Roll" and ends with "I Hate
Rock-N-Roll Yeah, what he
said. They're still the band most
likely to make you go deaf. You'll
love it or you'll hate it. Hey, it's
only rock and roll. (7 out of 10)
Lucinda Williams, Car Wheels
on a Gravel Road: Lucinda
Williams' songwriting skills
would make Woody Guthrie
proud. She writes some of the
best songs going today as
evidenced by the likes of
"Concrete and Barbed Wire
"Drunken Angel" and
"Greenville Jim Lauderdale,
Buddy Miller and Emmylou
Harris appear on the album. It's
produced by the Twangtrust
(Steve Earle and Ray Kennedy),
who are on a roll after getting
the most out of 6 String Drag
and Jack Ingram on their
albums. (9 out of 10)
Cedell Davis, The Horror of It
All: Cedell Davis plays the
wildest ass guitar since Pat Hare
grinded through "I'm Gonna
Murder My Baby" back in the
'50s at Sun Studios. Most songs
feature only Davis and his rude
tool, but a full band backs him on
the rolling, rocking "If You Like
Fat Women If you're interested
in the large ones, Cedell suggests
his hometown, Pine Bluff,
Arkansas, where he insists the
world's largest population of big
mamas dwell. (9 out of 10)
Robert Cage, Can See What
You're Doing: Cage offers the
opposite of Davis; he plays the
country blues � a slower, more
meditative blues that Cage
masters on songs like "Liza Jane"
and "How Do You Get Your
Rolling Done Be forewarned,
get ready for some serious doo-
doo blues. (8 out of 10)
I
Dullard
rtk
Net lets you be a
patrioticpig
The information highvay
is the road tkis column
travels. But similar to
cirrus clowns, we're
driving the funny car. We
boldy search the net in
search of all things weird
and flat out strange.
Come join us on this trip
into the world of silly
sites and wacky web pages
MlCCAH SMITH
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Exploding projectiles. Loud
music. Alcoholic beverages. Grilled
meat This is how we Americans
have been celebrating our
independence from England.
Turn on the grill and toss on a
few of those dogs that are pumped
full of red dye, and maybe some
garden burgers to help you score
points with your vegetarian friends.
But just in case you'd like to try
something different this year,
something a little less processed
and a little more, er, barbaric, the
Internet is ready to help with an
endless supply of tasty recipes
created for outdoor cooking on
occasions like the Fourth of July.
The "BBQing Home page"
(home.cybertron.com-khalle),
frequented by hungry hillbillies,
offers instructions on how to slap
anything from shrimp and steak to
wings, swordfish, corn and wild
game on the barbie.
This ain't no Sunday-school
barbecue. Nothing about real
barbecue is processed,
reconstituted, preserved in pellets
for your convenience. This is juicy,
dripping fresh kill that was
screaming a mere five minutes ago.
That's a damn fine pie you've got.
PHOTO COOTESY OF WAWINE
Nothing goes with outdoor food
like a super-sweet southern
dessert, and the best of those are
SEE BBQ PAGE 5
Can you say disturbing:
?
Tokyo Fist explores
Tsukamotos twisted
world
reason, we just never get to see
some mighty good movies
on the big screen.
When they hit video,
however, they're ones for the
taking. This series will look at
some of the films that didn i
nuke the Greenville tut,
the ones that got away
Mark Brett
SENIOR WRITER
�-OOT"OF icT
Disturbing. That's the word for
Tokyo Fist, the latest film from
Japanese director Shinya
Tsukamoto. Filled with crunching
bones, impossible gobbets of blood
and numerous scenes of amateur
body piercing, this recent video
release should keep you squirming
for hours after its final scene fades
to black.
Tsukamoto, who wrote, directed
Hit me.
PHOTO COUTESY OFMANGA
and stars in Tokyo Fist, is best-
known for the horrific Tetsuo: the
Iron Man, a legend on the cult film
circuit A remarkably violent and
fetishistic film,
Tetsuo concerns
itself with a man
who mysteriously
(and messily)
becomes a
machine. At turns
terrifying,
nauseating and
darkly funny,
Tetsuo has to be
seen to be
believed.
Tsukamoto's
preoccupation
with bodily fluids
and the violation
of the flesh
continues in the
determinedly
unpleasant Tokyo Fist The film
focuses on Tokyo insurance
SEE TOKYO. PAGES
15
1
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si
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5 Wtdrmdiy, July 1, 1996
�r
iimm
The Ent Cirotiniin
Free Pregnancy Test
While You Wait Free And Confidential
Services and Peer Counseling
parolina Pregnancy Center
Hours Vary as Needed
Appointment Preferred
757-0003
VISITING PROFESSOR from
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possibilities for the fall
semester 1998, beginning
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and ending December 10.
Please contact @ 706.542.4582
Tokyo
continued from page 4
Brown & Brown
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SINCE 1976
salesman Tsuda (played by
Tsukamoto), whose life is slowly
destroyed by his pain-obsessed
fiance Hizuru and Takuji, an old
high school friend who's become a
boxer.
When he suspects Hizuru of
cheating on him with Takuji, Tsuda
begins training to fight as well. His
unfounded accusations and
increasingly violent behavior drive
Hizuru to Takuji, and into a bizarre
Chops
continued from page 4
bowlful is pretty filling, so don't
count on needing seconds.
They could stand to give you a
little more bread with your meal,
but that's really my only
complaint. Lunch is a better deal
than dinner, so I'd suggest going
during daylight hours, but make
sure you go some time. In the
overwhelming number of
Chinese restaurants here in the
Emerald City, Mongolian House
is truly something different.
series of ritual body piercings which
she performs on herself with
various sharpened (and often
heated) household items.
Meanwhile, various people arc
graphically demolished in the
boxing ring, something really
painful-looking happens involving
Hizuru's nipple rings and
everybody bleeds a lot.
And that's really about all. It
sounds pointless and exploitive,
but that's only half-right. Tokyo
Fist is exploitive. Horribly so, in
fact. Each fresh act of violence is
depicted in loving detail. We feel it
when a nose breaks, when blood
sprays from a shattered jaw, when
BBQ
continued from page 4
ival
to
in
ine
ice
lo it.
up a
iblcs
i, and
rou on
e a
n
lese
'ience
e. It's
more
ur
first
2) PLAYERS CLUB
jJA PARTMENTSJ
1526 Charles Blvd. � Greenville, NC 27858 ,
(919)321-7613 (3v�
BSaftflfflaftftBaftfifl
straight from southern Baptist after-
church potluck dinners. Their
recipes are sampled prodigiously on
the Wawine recipe page
(wawine.comrecipe.htm).
Chocolate Coca-Cola cake tops
the list with that tasty trailer-park
blend of decadent chocolate and
bubbly Coke. And don't forget to
check out the easy-to-make Better
Than Sex cake (not recommended
by the Baptist Ladies' Club) which
is distinguishable as a southern
treat by its inclusion of vanilla
pudding.
A discerning eye is useful when
the fish hook goes through Hizuru's
nostril. The film glories in the pain
and doesn't let up.
Little of the violence here is
cathartic; nobody gets to feel better
for very long after pulping
somebody else's face. Though all
the pain may bring about some
kind of purification by the end, it's
difficult to say if anyone is really
better off because of it.
And that difficulty is ultimately
what makes Tokyo Fist more than
just violent pornography. At the
beginning of the story, Tsuda's life
is stifling. He's constantly tired and
seems to have contracted some
chronic illness. He's lost touch with
cruising the net for summer fare.
Don't bite off more than you can
chew; keep the recipes simple,
since you'll be dragging this food
around in a wicker basket (or
carrying it on pointy sticks) while
you search for a decent fireworks
display.
And beware of recipes
submitted by persons named
Blanche (i.e. Blanche Edwards'
raspberry salad.) They usually call
for a ring mold or something and
are altogether disgusting, since
they consist of things like Jell-O,
melted ice cream and nuts.
The most important thing to
keep in mind is a sense of
adventure. Try barbecuing for real.
Impress your friends and parents.
Get back to your roots and have a
barbaric Fourth of July.
kh
you've got.
IAWINE
outdoor food
t southern
of those are
'?
5'
listic film,
to concerns
with a man
mysteriously
messily)
nes a
ine. At turns
r i f y i n g ,
:ating and
y funny,
o has to be
to be
'ed.
kamoto's
ccupation
bodily fluids
he violation
the flesh
nes in the
rminedly
st. The film
insurance
BUMMER!
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PINK MARGARITAS $2.75
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-lU-saspuK-rs
OJUMi- - .
6 Wtdnudiy, July 1, 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
Gibson named woman's basketball coach
Wadnasday, Ju
I
Sta
Recruiting plus in hiring,
officials say
Jim Phelps
STAFF WRITF.R
Out with the old and in with the new.
Dee Gibson was named as the women's
basketball head coach recently, athletic
director Mike Hamrick announced.
Former women's basketball
coach Anne Donovan resigned
over the summer after heading
off to coach in the pros.
Gibson, 28, a native of comes
to ECU after serving as an assis-
tant most recently at Nebraska.
She was also a member of the
staff at Texas A&M from 1995-
97 and at Murray State
University, served on coaching
staff of the last three out of five
national championship teams.
"Dee brings a great deal of
experience recruiting on the national
scene, which is something that was very
attractive for us in the hiring process
Hamrick said. "We are excited to have her
Dee Gibson
PHOTO COURTESY
UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA
joining the ECU staff and look forward to
seeing a turnaround in the pro-
gram. She has been an asset to
every program that she has been
with and has proven she is ready
to be a head coach at this level.
Dee has a superior reputation
within the coaching ranks and
comes highly recommended by
several people whose opinions I
strongly value
Gibson, a native of
Fayetteville, Arkansas, recently
served as a recruiter for the
Cornhuskers, coordinating all
visits with potential signees, and handling
the recruiting calendar as well as evalua-
tions. She dealt with issues of compliance,
the recruiting budget, scheduling and sum-
mer camps, and with individual player
development during practice and on-thc-
floor coaching during games. At Texas
A&M, she handled national recruiting
and scouting.
"Dee is a classy person who will one
day be a superstar in the coaching ranks
said Paul Sanderford, longtime Western
Kentucky University coach and current
Nebraska head coach. "She is a proven
recruiter who will be a fine addition to
ECU's staff. With the talent in that part of
the state, Dee will build a great program
if she can keep the local products at
home, and I believe she has the ability to
do that"
Gibson spent one season as an assis-
SEE GIBSON PAGE 7
fast fact
DEE GIBSON
1. Began playing basketball for Wake
Forest and finished last two years at
UNC Charlotte.
2. Started coaching at UAB as assistant
in 1993.
3. Went to Murray State University and
handled recruiting
4. Went to Texas A&M from 1995-
1997 where she handled national
recruiting and scouting.
5. Went to Nebraska as a recruiter
coordinator
6. Hired as head coach for ECU Lady
Pirates.
Source: Press Release i
sS
APA
Jordan Golf
Classic big success
New format gets
rave reviews
Patrick Giovinazzo
STAFF WRITER
Thousands of spectators had the
chance to meet their favorite
celebrities, including Michael
Jordan � and they didn't even
have to leave Greenville to do it.
Jordan, along with
half of the other
celebrity golfers,
played a private round
at Greenville Country
Club on Saturday.
Plenty of fans still
turned out at Brook
Valley on Saturday,
though. They came to
watch Tim
Meadows, Stuart
Scott and Jim
Palmer among oth-
ers. It was no coin-
cidence that things
picked up at Brook Valley Sunday
� Jordan was playing there.
Nearly 10,000 people showed
up to view the Golf Classic on
Sunday. As the day went on, the
crowd grew larger and louder, but
few received autographs from the
event's namesake, as Jordan
declined most attempts from
those who desired his signature. �
The tournament, in its four-
teenth year, ended up being the
most profitable ever. In it Emily
Faulkner, of Faulkner and
Associates Advertising, helped
organize the tournament. "I think
we about doubled what we did last
year and that was $200,000. So we
think it's over 400,000 dollars this
year said Emily Faulkner, of
Faulkner and Associates
Advertising, who helped organize
the event.
Al Wood,
who played in
the first
Celebrity Golf
Classic but
not again until
last weekend,
won the
celebrity skins
tournaments.
He and his
other four
amateur
teammates
shot a 121 on
Saturday and
a 123 on Sunday. Their 244 fin-
ished tops among all others. ESPN
analyst Lee Corso's group finished
second with a 245. The Jordan
team ended with a total of 261 and
17th place, making Jordan far from
the winner he was during the NBA
championships.
Fans are now left with a year
Tim Meadows of Saturday Night Live was one of many celebrities who teed off in the
Jordan Classic over the weekend .
PHOTO BY FAULKNER AND ASSOCIATES ADVERTISING
Michael Jordan speaks with reporters at
Saturday's press conference
PHOTO BY FAULKNER AND ASSOCIATES ADVERTISING
before they'll get another
opportunity to chase
down Jordan's autograph.
Yet, rhe future of the tour-
nament remains a little
unsure. Brook Valley
Country Club's contract
with the tournament is
done, but the organizers
are sure the event will
remain in Greenville. The
new format changes will
also be evaluated. This
year introduced the new
"best-ball" style, the
Skins game and the two-
day split up of the event.
"Most changes seemed to
be a success Faulkner
SEE JORDAN PAGE 7
Official Results:
3. Jim Palmer247
4. MattBlair247
5. Damon Wayans248
17. Michael Jordan261
Despite time differences, Greenville soccer
fans make time to watch World Cup
Students have to
scramble to view games
Christopher R. Farnsworth
STAFF WRITER
In Germany, streets empty and
pubs are packed wall to wall with
soccer-crazed kaisers lifting steins
brimming with beer and ale. In
Italy, masses throng to the streets,
where immense television screens
broadcast their beloved azzuri's
campaigns. In multi-cultural New
York City, taverns and bars fill up
for the games, whether the patrons
are Italian, Irish, Dutch, Cuban or
of any other origin wanting to
watch their descendant nation, or
maybe the American team's match-
es. Withalmost every comer of the
world represented at this year's
World Cup, the fans who cannot
make the pilgrimage to France to
cheer for their team all find ways to
watch the globally-televised
fbmes.
To consider a much smaller mar-
ket than the aforementioned areas,
people here in Greenville are view-
ing the World Cup in various ways,
some with a practiced eye, others
learning the intricacies of the sport
as the tournament progresses. A
few are setting up shop at local
restaurants, taverns or bars, such as
Chicago Style Hot Dogs, La Vista
or Professor Q'Cools. That practice
became especially important dur-
ing the U.S. team's opening match
against the mighty German side.
For some unfathomable reason, the
local ABC affiliate decided not to
air the game, forcing potential
watchers to places equipped with
satellite dishes to see their national
team play. Other than that particu-
lar disaster, though, the games have
been easily accessible on ESPN,
ESPN2 and ABC.
Since the games are being held
in France, there is approximately a
six-hour difference, so the majority
of the matches are broadcast in the
late mornings and afternoons.
Because of the not-so-prime times,
most watch the games at home.
One such person is graduate stu-
dent Julian Martinez. A 23-year-old
of Spanish dcent, Martinez is not
new to watching the sport and has
followed the Cup closely.
"I usually watch the games at my
"Unless you see other countries
play, you don't see other styles;
you don't see the best players or
the best teams. The World Cup
lets you see the best of soccer
Julian Martinez
graduate siudem
apartment between classes said
Martinez. He is also quick to point
out the difference between watch-
ing the American Major League
Soccer (MLS) and college soccer to
watching international level soccer.
"Unless you sec other countries
play, you don't see other styles; you
don't see the best players or the best
teams. The World Cup lets you see
the best of soccer he explains.
A student with much less socce
exposure is rising senior Jim
Matheny. The Zebulon native has
also primarily viewed the games at
his apartment
"My roommate pretty much
has (the games) on constantly
Matheny said. "So, at first, we had
to watch them. I've gotten more
interested, however, as the whole
thing went on
Matheny is not a watcher of
MLS or any other soccer but finds
himself paying attention to the
World Cup.
"I don't know if it's a four year
thing or what he said. "But
watching the World Cup is like
watching the Olympics. I mean, I
don't watch figure skating usually,
but I do then. The soccer played
at the Cup is also at the highest
level, so it's a lot more attractive to
watch
Wherever they are watching the
games, many people around
Greenville are finding ways to fol-
low the tournament, despite the
awkward kick-off times. They will
have to get used to it, as the 2002
World Cup will take place in Japan
and South Korea, a 12-hour time dif-
ference to America.
Time for Thirsty
Thursdays
Professional baseball,
cheap beer in Kins ton
Travis Barkley
sports editor
As most ECU students know, there
is not a professional baseball team
locally. There is however, a team
just down the road in Kinston.
The Kinston Indians, or K-
Tribe as they are called, are the
Class A affiliate of the Cleveland
Indians.
For several years now, the
Indians have offered a popular pro-
motion known as "Thirsty
Thursdays
"It's one of our more popular
events said Dave Echols, assis-
tant general manager of the
Indians. "Thursdays and Saturdays
are our biggest nights
On Thursdays,
admission for stu-
dents is only $2.
Once inside, those
over the age of 21
can treat themselves
to draft beer for 75
cents.
Echols said since
the program began
in 1989, more stu-
dents come to the
games.
"I think we get a
lot of support from
ECU Echols said.
"Obviously with col-
lege students, there
is a lot of turnover,
but they know about
it
While the promo-
tion has been suc-
cessful, Echols said
the Indians are
always looking for
ways to make it bet-
ter.
"We are talking
about having the
(Mu.
Mike Corrado Band play on
Thursdays to get more of an ECU
presence and to liven up the
atmosphere Echols said.
One potential problem of
Thirsty Thursdays is trying to find
designated drivers. The Indians
are looking into ways of solving this
problem.
"We'd love to try to establish
some kind of shuttle service that
could pick up the students in
Greenville and bring them to and
Ea
SEE INDIANS PAGE 7

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8 9SEPTEMBER
Monday - Saturday
Sunday
7 p.m.
2 p.m.
� Double Header (June 29) - 6 p.m. start
Games in gray blocks are home games.
To order tickets or for more information, call 527-9111 or (800) 334-
S467
PRE Frederick Keys
LYN Lynchburg Hillcats
WIL Wilmington Blue Rocks
PW Prince William Cannons
DAN Danville 97s
KIN Kinston Indians
WS Winston-Salem Warthogs
SA Salem Avalanche
Loc
theEaf





st Carolinian
h
otm
N
II for Wake
i years at
! as assistant
niversity and
in 1995-
itional
ecruiter
ECU Lady
: Press Release
sty
and play on
ore of an ECU
liven up the
s said.
problem of
s trying to find
The Indians
s of solving this
ry to establish
:le service that
e students in
g them to and
PAGE 7
3
FRE
17
SAL I
WSl
24
LYN
25
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21 22
FRE SAL
ER
(800) 334-
7a
dians
m Worthogs
none
Wednesday, July 1, 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
NEWMAN
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
Welcome Summer Students!
Mass Schedule:
� Sun: 11:30a.m. and 8:30p.m.
� Wed: 5:30p.m.
� All Masses are at the Center
We look forward to seeing you!
about programs sp
h' New m.in C
APARTMENT MOVE IN SPECIALMM
NO SECURITY DEPOSIT
FREE MOVING VAN
(UP TO $50)
(VALID FROM 52798 TO 7298)
2 BEDROOMS, 1 BATH APARTMENT
$375.00 PER MONTH
FREE WATERSEWER
900 SQUARE FEET
WASHER DRYER HOOK-UPS
DISHWASHER REFRIGERATOR STOVE
CENTRAL AIR AND HEAT
PETS O.K.
CALL: PITT PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
AT (252) 758-1921
(Mutt present ad for special, not valid with any other coupon)
ouiiimefTheatre 1998
presents
"A completely insane farce that is also uproarioi
It hardly touches the stage as it rides a demented
broomsitck to hilarity . Pure entertainment
The New York Times
Noel Coward's
Bliil
tie opiri
t
July 7-11,1998,8:00 p.m.
July 11,1998,2:00 p.m.
, 252328-6829
nervations and more intbrmatic
Located on the East Carolina University Campus in Greenville, NC,
the East Carolina Summer Theatre is a Not-for-Profit Professional Theatre
featuring talents from all across the country.
Gibson
continued from page 6
tant at Murray State University,
where she handled recruiting and
scheduling and worked with the
post players. She began her coach-
ing career at the University of
Alabama at Birmingham, where
she was a restricted earnings assis-
tant coach with the Lady Blazers in
the 1993-1994 season. UAB went
undefeated in the Great Midwest
Conference that season and earned
its first-ever trip to the NCAAs
before finishing with a 23-6 record.
Gibson started playing basket-
ball at Wake Forest University and
played for two seasons before
transferring to the University of
North Carolina at Charlotte for her
final two years. She was named to
the Dean's List three times and the
Metro Conference Commissioner's
List for two years, and was also
entitled the outstanding graduat-
ing senior in communications her
final year at UNC-C.
"I am excited that Dee is in the
CAA and think having a coach of
her quality and caliber will only
improve the league said UNC
Wilmington men's Head Coach
Jerry Wainwright, who was an assis-
tant at Wake Forest when Gibson
was a player. "I think with her out-
going personality and people skills,
Dee is a perfect role model for a
student-athlete. I believe she will
have a tremendous impact on in-
state recruiting at ECU because of
her experience and the fact she is
genuinely excited to be coaching
in the state of North Carolina
With such achievements consid-
ered, the Lady Pirates and ECU
are looking for Gibson to do a lot
for the program this season and are
excited about her arrival.
Beth Jaynes, an upcoming
senior Lady Pirate said, "The team
seems to be excited and positive
about the change of coaches
Gibson was described by Jaynes
as one capable of tremendous per-
son-to-person relationships.
"She is more of a people's
coach said Jaynes.
Jaynes added that Gibson "is as
tough as Donovan, but not as strict
or formal
The team can expect to run a lot
this year and get a lot of basketball
in. Gibson really wants to beat her
old team, UNC Charlotte, this
family and feel that I am walking
into a great situation Gibson said.
"I think ECU is a gold mine wait-
ing to happen, as there are all kinds
of possibilities for its program.
Overall, this is an exciting opportu-
nity and I look forward to the chal-
lenge. I have always loved the state
of North Carolina ever since 1 was
a player here and have hoped one
day there would be an opportunity
to come back, so coming to ECU is
exactly what I have been looking
for
Gibson graduated from UNC-C
in 1993 with a bachelor's degree in
communications. She is currently a
member of the Women's
Basketball Coaches Association
and Black Coaches Association.
The search for a head coach was
a tortuous one for the Pirate, with
seven candidates other than
Gibson. Among the candidates
were: Rick Reeves, head coach at
Liberty; Joanne Boyle, assistant
coach at Duke; Ann Hancock,
assistant coach at UNC; Mike
Holloman, head coach at
Louisburg Junior College; Connie
Guinn, former head coach at Berry
College in Georgia; and Shawn
Campbell, an assistant at Virginia.
year.
'I am excited to join the ECU
Indians
continued from page 6
from the game Echols said.
Besides cheap beer, there are
plenty of other reasons to go to an
Indians game, Echols said.
"Every Saturday we either have
a giveaway or fireworks Echols
said. "Something is going on at the
park for every game
Going to an Indians game also
means seeing potential major
league players.
Current ones such as Albert
Belle, Charles Nagy, Jim Thome
and Manny Ramirez all played in
Kinston at one point or another.
Jaret Wright was pitching in the
World Series last year � only a year
after pitching for the K-Tribe.
Not every Kinston player will
make it to the majors, but Thirsty
Thursdays provides a chance to see
professional baseball up close for a
low price.
Jordan
continued from page 6
said. "Michael talked about maybe
refining some things, but nothing
drastic
No matter what the changes,
Greenville is expected to remain
the home of the event and hopeful-
ly continue to generate proceeds for
the Ronald McDonald Houses of
North Carolina.
directions to site
unit plan -1230 sq. ft.
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8 Wednttdiy, July 1. 1898
classifieds
The East Carolinian
FOR RENT
2 BEDROOM, 1 12 BATH apt,
dishwasher & pool, 890 sq.ft ECU
bus service. $400 per month 6 a
small deposit. 768-7348 ASAPI
1 FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
ASAP: Player's Club Apts. to share
4 bedroom townhouse. Your own
bedroom and bathroom. $210 plus
14 utilities per month, washer
dryer in apt. On bus route. Available
August 4! Please call 328-7798 for
more information.
ROOMMATE WANTED: WANT to
get alot for your money? Female
needed to fill 3 BR. house. Central
heatair, great yarddeck. $217mo.
13 utilities. July paid for! Call 353-
2027.
HOUSE FOR RENT. 5 bedroom, 2
bathroms. large denkitchen with
fireplace, brick patio, on half acre
wooded lot fully fenced in. Pets OK.
2 miles from campus beside Pi
Kappa Phi fraternity house on
Hooker Road. $750 per month. Avail-
able August. Call 321-2030 for ap-
pointment.
HOUSE FOR RENT, 302 Lewis St
3 BR, LR. DR. kitchen, central AC,
garage, 5 mins. walk from campus
No pets. $750mo. 919-504-2052,
Iv. msg.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
to share 2 bedroom apartment,
$187.50mo. plus 12 utilities. Call
Jessica, 757-9640. Needed ASAPI
ROOMMATE NEEDED - DOWN-
TOWN apt. available now or August.
$237.50month. Call 757-0812.
3 BR. APT. AVAILABLE Aug. 1st
above BW3's. $775.00 a month!
Please call 758-2616. ask for Yvonne.
ROOMMATE WANTED. 2 BR apt
in Ringgold Towers, $235 rent plus
half utilities furnished. Contact Ruff
at Mruit8USA.Net or pager 800-819-
5144.
FOR RENT: 5 BLOCKS from ECU.
1 bedroom. 1 bath, living area &
kitchen, female only, cable & local
phone included-unfurnished-
$350.00 a month 13 utilities. No
pets. No smokers. Call 919-497-
0809 or 800-567-0032 & leave
message.
NEED FEMALE ROOMMATE to
share four bedroom townhouse at
Player's Club. Contact Kelly at
(919)663-3048. Leave name and
number if not available.
FEMALE NONSMOKER ROOM-
MATE needed for apartment two
blocks from campus. Pay $175.00
13 utilities for own room. Call
Becky or Heidi at 758-1317.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
starting August 1st. Share 2 bdrm.
at Tar River Estates. Master bdrm.
vwalk-in closet $260mo. 12
utilities, 6 mo. or 1 yr. lease. Call
413-0805.
TWO, 2 BEDROOM CUPLEX apts.
3 blocks ECU. Refinished hardwood
floors. Very clean. $495 and $545,
12 mo. Aug. 1st lease. No dogs. 752-
3816, leave message.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
C919)496-224
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
to move into two bedroom house
on Summit Street ASAP. Nice loca-
tion. Ask for Stephanie at 754-9971
or leave message.
SUBLEASE APARTMENT, College
Town Row, near campus, $420
month, 2 bdrm. Contact Bradley.
551-3177.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bed apt $275
mo avail, now. Tanglewood Apts
125 Avery St Greenville. 758-6596
2 MALE ROOMMATES NEEDED
for Fall to share 3400 sq. ft. home
near campus, $250 per month, 1
5 utilities. Ask for Tim, 931-9165.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED,
share 2 bedroom, 1 12 bath
townhouse $225, 12 phoneutili-
ties, on ECU bus route. Call 756-
7128, leave message. Need ASAP.
HELP WANTED
FREELANCE COPYWRITER. The
Ad Agency of Greenville, Inc. seeks
experienced copywriters for Impres-
sions magazine and agency assign-
Dapper
Dan's
Big Summer Sale
10-75 OFF
ments. Graduate students or experi-
enced writers in the English or Com-
munications program preferred.
Please send resume and writing
samples to: 101 East Victoria Court,
Suite A, Greenville. NC 27858
SUMMER JOBS AVAILABLE.
Joan's Fashions, a local Women's
Clothing store, is now recruiting for
summer positions. Employees are
needed for Saturdays and weekdays
between 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
The positions are for between 7 and
20 hours per week, depending on
your schedule and on business
needs. The jobs are within walking
distance of the university and the
hours are flexible. Pay is commen-
surate with your experience and job
performance and is supplemented
by an employee discount. Apply in
person to Store Manager, Joan's
Fashions. 423 S. Evans Street,
Greenville (on the Downtown Mall).
NEEDED: SOMEONE TO do
teleservicing and selling of office
furniture. Must be enthusiastic, posi-
tive and willing to work. Call 931-
6904 and leave a message.
FOR SALE: LARGE uohiw reirig-
eratorfreezer, almost new, white,
excellent condition, all manuals in-
cluded. $100 OBO. Call 756-5777.
COMPAQ LAPTOP COMPUTER
100 mhz Pentium with 16 mb ram,
color screen, faxmodem. MS Of-
fice, Aldus Pagemaker, MS Works,
Norton Utilities. Great school or busi-
ness computer, $800. Call 353-
7109.
OTHER
FOR SALE
ADORABLE KITTENS WITH un-
usual colors need a loving family!
Ask for Stephanie at 754-9971 or
leave message.
GOV'T. FORECLOSED HOMES
from pennies on $1. Delinquent tax,
repo's. REO's. Your area. Toll Free 1-
800-218-9000 ext. H 3726 for cur-
rent listings.
FREE CASH GRANTS! College
scholarships. Business. Medicf bills.
Never repay. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000, ext. G-3726.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175.
Porsches, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMWs,
Corvettes. Also Jeeps, 4W0s. Your
area. Toll free 1-800-218-9000. ext.
A-3726.
PERSONALS
LADIES: LEND ME your sore ach-
ing muscles. Amateur masseur
needs your back to practice on. Call:
Kyle 1-800484-8546 (code 2465)
or POB 8663. Greenville. NC 27835.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT
CENTER invites you to worship with
us. Sunday Mass Schedule: 11:30
a.m. and 8:30 p.m. Wednesdays:
5:30 p.m. The Newman Center is
located at 953 E. 10th St, two
houses from Fletcher Music Build-
ing. Call 757-1991.
SINGLE MOTHERS SUPPORT
Group - A chance for single moth-
ers to talk, share feelings and ideas
and gain support from other single
mothers, meeting at Catholic Social
Ministries, 3219 Landmark St 7A.
Greenville (across from Wal-Mart
and next to Goodwill). Please call
Lenore at 355-5111 to register.
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS Post Script
printer. Laser jet printer. Includes
paper tray and manual feed. $150.
Call 353-7109.
GREAT COM; JTER, GREAT
PRICE. Compaq Multimedia com-
puter 486 processor, 15" monitor,
14.4 modem, 24 mb ram, 400 mb
hard disk, cd rom, and software. Call
754-8155, $750 OBO.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
"$100 OFF"
Security Deposit
with presentation of thto coupon, otter expires
7&196 not valid with any other coupon
-WESLEY COMMON SOUTH: 1 or
2bedrooms, 1 bath, range, refriger-
ator, free watersewer, washerdryer
hookups, laundry facilities, 5 blocks
from campus, ECU bus services.
Other properties available.
�Alt Properties new 24 tv. emergency maintenance-
108-A BROWNLEA DRIVE
758-1921
rropeftu, I li
onopement
ApurtrmblfaraJ Houm.
DC YOU NEED MONEY?
We Nwd TimbetUnd booh)
am) shoes) Good Jeans. -
Life on Tuesday
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Bmken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00, 2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, irive to back door & ring buzzer.
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not yet over.
Coca-Cola ar
rently sold toget
seeking exclus
their products
offering bids
monopoly.
Pepsi offeree
Coke offered $3
their products a
campus for a 10-
Though the f
they do not si
winner. While P
bid, that for tht
Coke offered th
under shorter co
1 The evalua
determined the
of each drink, fir
etary net value i
Coke at $2.7 mil
"In terms o:
Pepsi has the
offer said L;
associate vice ch
istration and fin;
"Entering it
PC
b
Pitt County Memoi
Recentpri
possib
Amand,
NEWS
In light of recet
ings, officials ar
ening letter deli
Pitt County M
very seriously.
The two pagi
ter stated that
going to occur
and that this
the east c


Title
The East Carolinian, July 1, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 01, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1278
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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