The East Carolinian, June 24, 1998






le East Carolinian
ISTIAN CHURCH
id a Women Fel-
e 19 at Commu-
ch at 7:00 p.m.
red. Men are in-
Men Fellowship
9:00 a.m. Break-
Also on Monday,
i. the church will
illowship, which
ster the word of
teraction among
Representatives
s Administration
le church is lo-
Memorial Drive,
r more informa-
four
i the
J
:ome
eit
feel Santos
WMrV-Atn
WovJ ABOUT?
N. Miles
WoUferT
DEAD, MAW
5MST WTE1C
ALLY,
THEY
At,L
r attacks
WEDNESDAY
JUNE 24,19S8
eastcarolinian
EAST CAROUNA UNIVERSITY
GREENVIUE, NORTH CAROLINA
Housekeepers discuss posters found in Jenkins
Art Building they perceive as racially derogatory
Members not satisfied with
university response
Amanda Austin
NEWS EDITOR
hung in the vicinity where housekeepers
were sure to see them and not in the pub-
lic hallways.
The incident occurred one week prior
to Martin Luther King Jr. Day and was
investigated at
time by
s i s t a n t
Members of the Housekeepers Association
U.E.LSO met on Tuesday to discuss issues
of racial slander that took place during the
month of January.
These housekeepers, who are part of
the North Carolina Public Service Workers
Union, claim to have found degrading
posters portraying slaves and slave ships in
the Jenkins Art Building. Housekeepers
claim that these posters were strategically
placed near janitorial closets.
At the meeting, Harold Willoughby
spoke to several housekeepers and mem-
bers of the media and he presented pho-
tographs of the posters found in the
Jenkins Art Building.
Willoughby said that these posters were
" am committed to pursuing all rea
satiable avenues to determine the
identity of the party responsible for
posting the offensive materials in
your
that
A
University
Attorney Toi
Carter.
Carter was
unavailable for
comment, but in a
letter to the
Housekeeping
Department, she
expressed her
concern about the
situation.
"I am committed to pursuing all reason-
able avenues to determine the identity of
the party responsible for posting the offen-
sive materials in your work area Carter
said in a letter dated Jan. 22.
Willoughby expressed at the meeting
the housekeepers disappointment with the
Toi Carter
Chancellor
universities response to the situation.
In addition to the letter from Carter, the
housekeepers also received a letter from
Chancellor Richard Eakin expressing his
concern about the issue. Eakin refers to the
posters as, "depicting
a racially motivated
crime" and of
"derogatory nature
"I would most like
to identify the indi-
viduals) responsible
for this act and see
that they receive the
appropriate sanc-
tion Eakin wrote in
a letter to housekeep-
ers, Jan. 16. "This
administration is
committed to doing
all that it can to investigate this incident
and to identify the responsible part
In addition to this incident, many
housekeepers claim to have been involved
in other racially derogatory situations, but
none are willing to come forward or refute
the fact.
area.
Several housekeepers and members of the media met Tuesday to discuss events that occurred in the
Jenkins Art Building the week prior to Martin Luther King Jr. Day.
PHOTO 6V TMSHA JONES
Greenville ranks
14th in survey of
places to live
Goldsboro, Rocky
Mount place as well
Amanda Ai'stin
NEWS EDITOR
Greenville was recently ranked
number 14 in a 49 city list of best
southern cities to live in. This
ranking is a result of Money
Magazine's annual ranking.
Greenville's num-
ber 14 spot is included
in the category of
cities with a popula-
tion of 100,000 to
249,999.
Mayor Nancy
Jenkins was thrilled
with the ranking, but
thinks Greenville
should have ranked
much higher.
"I was surprised
Jenkins said. "I
thought we should
have been first
Jenkins believes the reason
Greenville ranks high is largely
due to the university and the
culture it brings to Greenville
residents.
"The quality of life in
Greenville is extremely excep-
tional Jenkins said. "We have
offerings for a diversity of needs
and are doing so more everyday.
We have small town charm and
Nancy Jenkins,
Greenville mayor
FILE PHOTO
bigger town amenities
In respect to the university,
this ranking may make ECU
more desirable.
"The city of Greenville and
ECU enjoy and beneficial,
mutually supportive relation-
ship said Chancellor Richard
Eakin. "The high ranking for
Greenville is well- deserved and
will cause ECU to continue to be
attractive to prospective stu-
dents and their parents. I believe
our ranking as the 25th best
wired campus is a distinction
that will be especially
helpful as we seek to
attract outstanding
students to ECU
Money Magazine has
been ranking the best
places to live for 12
years. Previously,
ranking were included
in a 300 city list, but
are now more region-
ally and population
based. With a change
of format, the maga-
zine now has a more
focused comparison. Last year
Greenville ranked 185 out of 300
and fall from the previous years
165 out of 300.
The top three spots were
filled by three Virginia cities,
Charlottesville, Lynchburg and
Roanoke. Other North Carolina
cities to rank were Goldsboro
(9), Asheville (10), Wilmington
(16), Rocky Mount (19) and
Jacksonville (23).
SEE RANKS. PAGE 2
Grounds workers plant flowers on campus among other responsibilities.
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
40peoplecanfor
450 acnes of grounds
Many ruts are formed in the ground from students end others failing to walk on sidewalks.
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
Sidewalks laid to cut
across lawns
TK Jones
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Ernest Williams probably can't tell
you whether the road is paved
with good intentions, but he can tell
you the sidewalks are. With this in
mind, ft is hard to imagine why every-
one must walk beside the sidewalk
instead of on it.
Williams is the mason supervisor in
the facilities services department.
One of his responsibilities is running
sidewalks to better accommodate foot
traffic.
To lessen the number of dirt paths
created by shortcuts, the department
lays sidewalks to cut across lawns in
SEE SIDEWALKS. PAGE 2
TK Jones
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
HP he average cost of a human
�"� life is about $5 in a bull mar-
ket, but for the flora on the west
and east campuses, you can add
about $22,000 to that and still be
a few notes shy of the full song.
Less than 40 people embell-
ish the 450 acres of university
grounds with 11,000 annuals in
the spring and again in the fall.
In addition to planting flowers,
they plant ground cover, shrub-
bery and trees, run irrigation
lines, storm drains, maintain.
streets.
"A tree is not a tree is not a
tree said Doug Galdwcl),
superintendent of the grounds
department. "What people don't
realize is how much planning
goes into what we plant. Some of
our shrubbery comes from as far
as Houston or the Chesapeake
Bay area, just because they have
the quantity and quality we need
at the right bid
SEE LANDSCAPE PAGE 2
m feet; ii w ill break dm i
m .itvliiv"
'Because if I step on
a ill break m mother's b;iel
les the nluei s I .ml li
'I normally tak ih�
except for w hen I'm in a
ITiere's no mom to v alk
;l because of the people
Ini think il i
made lor I
ol sk.iW i �
"I lake a noli v i
ami don'l havt
slide through the slow
or people who
two anil rhn i I
lieeausi u ian po
iss lo jjei .
TODAY
Partly CLoudy
high 94
low 74
TOMORROW
Partly Cloudy
high 94
low 74
Opinion
�EDNESDAV
Lifestyle
QSports
No break between
summer sessionsl
Financial aid goes
for "necessities"
fife
Michael Jordan
Golf Clastic
preview
Online Survey
www.tec.ecu.edu
"Am you tick of the Chicago Bulls?"
the east Carolinian STUDENT PUBLICATION BLOC GREENVILLE, NC 27858 across from Joyner library � newsroom 328-6366 advertising 328-20QQ fax 328-6558 website www.tec.icu.idu �





8 Wednesday, June 17. 1998
FOR RENT
WALK TO ECU. 1 bed apt $275
mo avail, now. Tanglewood Apts
126 Avery St Greenville. 768-6696
2 MALE ROOMMATES NEEDED
for Fall to share 3400 sq. ft. home
near campus. $260 per month. 15
utilities. Ask for Tim. 931-9166.
HOUSE FOR RENT: 302 Lewis St
3 BR, LR, DR. kitchen, central AC.
garage. 5 min. walk from campus.
No pets. $760mo. 919-604-2052.
leave message.
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
wanted to fill 6 bedroom house.
$226 per month. Split food and utili-
ties. Two blocks from campus. Call
919-438-4427.
SUMMER ROOMMATE, CUTE
apartment, your own bedroom and
bathroom, washerdryer in apart-
ment, very close to campus. Call
Kathleen 762-2706.
2000 SQ.FT. HOME. 4 bedrooms.
3 baths, extra large fenced-in back-
yard, washer 8- dryer, near ECU &
PCMH, $800 per month, purchase
available. 524-6790.
2 BR. AFT. AVAILABLE now above
Percolator Coffeehouse. $450 a
month! Please call 768-2616, ask for
Yvonne.
ROOM FOR RENT: clean, respon-
sible person needed to share new 3
bedroom house. $225 plus utilities.
2 miles from campus. Upperclass-
man or grad student preferred. Avail-
able July 1st. 752-2116.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Georgetown Apts. across from REC
center. 1 12 bath, WD. large room
for rent. Call April 752-2209, leave a
message) Need ASAPI
rtllMGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiencey Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED: WANT to
get a lot for your money? MF
needed to fill 3 bedroom house.
Central heatair. large yarddeck.
$217mo. 13 utilities. Available
July 1. Call 561-7710.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED,
share 2 bedroom, 1 12 bath
townhouse $225. 12 phoneutili-
ties, on ECU bus route. Call 756-
7128, leave message. Need ASAP.
HELP WANTED
NEEDED: SOMEONE TO do
teleservicing and selling of office
furniture. Must be enthusiastic, posi-
tive and willing to work. Call 931-
6904 and leave a message.
STUDENTS: LOOKING FOR part-
time work with flexible hours so you
can still enjoy your Summer vaca-
tion. The ECU TeleFund is now hir-
ing for Summer and Fall. $5.50 per
hour plus bonus. Contact the
Telefund Office between 2 and 5 M-
Th at 328-4212.
OFFICE WORK - GOOD PHONE
communication skills and computer
experience needed. Quickbooks Pro,
Excel, Word. Good pay, flexible
schedule, casual dress work environ-
ment. Call Tim at pager 551-7156
andor send your resume to PO Box
3166. Greenville, NC 27836 or fax
to 756-6632. (Handy Helpers, Inc.)
2-3 positions available.
HIRING - CONSTRUCTION ALL
trades. Must have experience and
valid drivers license. Flexible hours
andor full-time Summer and Fall
work available. Page Tim at 551-
7156. Handy Helpers, Inc.
$100 OFF ,
icurity Deposit
Securi
with prtMnlXlon tt this coupon, ollaf ��piras
813188 not v.tttl with My other coupon :
�WESLEY COMMON SOUTH: 10f Z Bedroom,
1 bath, range, taMgerator, Iree watarsewar,
wa9hardryer hookups, Ira basic cab in
some units, laundry facilitias, 5 blocks from
campus, ECU bus services.
IANGSTON PARK: 2 PedrooniS, 11
range, refrigerator, dishwasher, free
wm.sewer. and basic caUe, appro. 900 sc
.visherdryar hookups, central heatair,
clrcks from campus.
COUPLEmY flENOVATED UNITS AVAILABLE.
W Properties have 24 hr. emergency mamlensncg-
rroperty I c
The East Carolinian
AIM HIGH, AIR FORCE- Put your
science of engineering degree to
work for an aerospace leader. Con-
sider being an Air Force officer. Ex-
cellent training and benefits. For a
free information package, call 1-800-
423-USAF.
AEROBIC INSTRUCTORS
WANTED. Certification classes also
forming. Call 827-1781 between
4:00-8:00 p.m. Mon. thru Thurs.
FOR YARD AND GARDEN work for
the rest of the Summer in
Chocowinity 6 to 16 hours per week.
$6.00 per hour, must have car. 975-
3638 or 328-6347.
BABYSITTER NEEDED FOR 6 year
old boy Monday-Thursday 8:00a.m
4:00 p.m. Must provide own trans-
portation and be a non-smoker.
Please call Sherrie at 328-2009 or
after 5 call 355-7697.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: TUBULAR METAL.
frame bunk bed (royal blue) in exce
lent condition. Assembly required):
Needs twin mattress on top bunk
bed. Double mattress provided on
bottom bed. $175 with double mat-
tress,150 without double mattress.
Call 756-9642 on Tuesday or Thurs-
day mornings between 9:30 AM and
12:45 or weekday evenings. Also
computer chair and parakeet cage,
each $10. Like new 24 inch girl's
bicycle, blue with pinkyellow trim,
$40. Car bike rack. $15.
OTHER
MATURE SCHOOL TEACHER go-
ing to 2nd Summer School looking
for apt. or house sitting job. Call 1-
910-791-3296.
NEED SOMEONE TO TUTOR 5-6th
grade level for an eleven year old.
Provide own transportation. 752-
4625, if no answer, leave message.
GOV'T. FORECLOSED HOMES
from pennies on $1. Delinquent tax,
repo's. REO's. Your area. Toll Free 1-
800-218-9000 ext. H-3726 for cur-
rent listings.
FREE CASH GRANT8I College
scholarships. Business. Medical bills.
Never repay. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000. ext. G-3726.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175.
Porsches. Cadillacs, Chevys. BMWs,
Corvettes. Also Jeeps. 4WDs. Your
area. Toll free 1-800-218-9000. ext.
A-3726.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(919) 496-22X4
Dapper
Dan's
Big Summer Sale
10-75 OFF
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Need TimiwrUocI boot
and ihfwsf tw)4 ftmfifi
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD Sc SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00, 2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door & ring buzzer.
PERSONALS
LADIES: LEND ME your sore ach-
ing muscles. Amateur masseur
needs your back to practice on. Call:
Kyle 1-800484-8546 (code 2466)
or POB 8663, Greenville. NC 27835.
SERVICES
WILL TYPE YOUR PAPERS or the-
sis for you. 10 yrs. typing experience.
Excellent quality. $2.00 per page.
321-0668.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
invites you to attend a Women Fel-
lowship Friday. June 19 at Commu-
nity Christian Church at 7:00 p.m.
Dinner will be served. Men are in-
vited to attend a Men Fellowship
Saturday, June 10, 9:00 a.m. Break-
fast will be served. Also on Monday,
June 22 at 7:00 p.m. the church will
host a Business Fellowship, which
is designed to minister the word of
God and provide interaction among
business owners. Representatives
from Small Business Administration
will be present. The church is lo-
cated at 1104 North Memorial Drive,
Greenville, NC. For more informa-
tion call 551-9143.
Typejhis address into your
browser and visit us on the
web
www.tec.
ecu.edu
P�-�W-��JT"fc-�
then bookmark it and come
back frequently: p
We constantly improve it
to better serve you.
comics
Life on Tuesday
Chris Knotts
France
Rafael Santos
GEE GRA�trVANi
OTHER 5TOSES X
SHoUli KNovl ABOUT?!
Life on Tuesday
Chris Knotts
WUd Thing
WHAT5 UP, 6UYS?
YEAH, 8UTDIDNTYbOKNOW TH�T CATS. HAVE NINE lives'?J ft. Jt-L�i
KaltcJK'
1Wr$MW
H0yT'S IS MY TV
THAT'S Mr COUCH!
ALLTHE STUFF IN HERE
IS FROM MY Room
N. Miles
Hey� we thought
YOU WERE DEAD, M4W.L
WAIT A Sec jrJST
REALIZED THAT I ONLY
HAVE ONE MORE UFE LEFT?
WHAT? WRE ONLY
22YRSCLD, HOWT Vou
LOSE � UvES ALREADY?
-A
WELL, LEY'S see
�1 WAS THFSA.T.2 WAS THE
Act "3 I Got A"0ow A
TEST "V 1 WATCKD
VKACWWAPffceiA
"5" MIS FRESHMAN
YEARF7NAlS�.C
SOPHOMORE
tTtAR PWALS
'7 WAS
Junior year
FitAn
AND"2 WAS LAST WEEK.
Actually,
1 THINK tney 1
were All I
TnHEART ATTACKS
VlJTiTmuK i sk
PATTERN-
sr�SZtf. ft
ccT 1






is East Carolinian
STIAN CHURCH
d a Women Fel-
e 19 at Commu-
ch at 7:00 p.m.
'ed Men are in-
Men Fellowship
9:00 a.m. Break-
Mso on Monday,
i. the church will
illowship, which
ster the word of
teraction among
Representatives
s Administration
le church is lo-
Memorial Drive,
r more informa-
four
l the
c.
J
:ome
eit
fael Santos
N. Miles
XO06HT
3EAD, MAW
StAST WEE
AU.Y,
TWEY
TArrAaa
WEDNESDAY
JUNE 24,1998
I the 1 �
eastcaroliman
EAST CAROUNA UNIVERSITY
GREENVIUE. NORTH CAROLINA
Housekeepers discuss posters found in Jenkins
Art Building they perceive as racially derogatory
Members not satisfied with
university response
Amanda Austin
NEWS EDITOR
Members of the Housekeepers Association
U.E.150 met on Tuesday to discuss issues
of racial slander that took place during the
month of January.
These housekeepers, who are part of
the North Carolina Public Service Workers
Union, claim to have found degrading
posters portraying slaves and slave ships in
the Jenkins Art Building. Housekeepers
claim that these posters were strategically
placed near janitorial closets.
At the meeting, Harold Willoughby
spoke to several housekeepers and mem-
bers of the media and he presented pho-
tographs of the posters found in the
Jenkins Art Building.
Willoughby said that these posters were
hung in the vicinity where housekeepers
were sure to see them and not in the pub-
lic hallways.
The incident occurred one week prior
to Martin Luther King Jr. Day and was
investigated at
that time by
Assistant
University
Attorney Toi
Carter.
Carter was
unavailable for
comment, but in a
letter to the
Housekeeping
Department, she
expressed her Toi Carter
concern about the Chancellor
situation.
"I am committed to pursuing all reason-
able avenues to determine the identity of
the party responsible for posting the offen-
sive materials in your work area Carter
said in a letter dated Jan. 22.
Willoughby expressed at the meeting
the housekeepers disappointment with the
" am committed to pursuing all rea-
sonable avenues to determine the
identity of the party responsible for
posting the offensive materials in
your work area
universities response to the situation.
In addition to the letter from Carter, the
housekeepers also received a letter from
Chancellor Richard Eakin expressing his
concern about the issue. Eakin refers to the
posters as, "depicting
a racially motivated
crime" and of
"derogatory nature
"I would most like
to identify the indi-
vidual) responsible
for this act and see
that they receive the
appropriate sanc-
tion Eakin wrote in
a letter to housekeep-
ers, Jan. 16. "This
administration is
committed to doing
all that it can to investigate this incident
and to identify the responsible part
In addition to this incident, many
housekeepers claim to have been involved
in other racially derogatory situations, but
none are willing to come forward or refute
the fact.
Several housekeepers and members of the media met Tuesday to discuss events that occurred in the
Jenkins Art Building the week prior to Martin Luther King Jr. Day.
PHOTO BY TBISHA JONES
Greenville ranks
14th in survey of
places to live
Goldsboro, Rocky
Mount place as well
Amanda Austin
suns SUITOR
Greenville was recently ranked
number 14 in a 49 city list of best
southern cities to live in. This
ranking is a result of Money
Magazine's annual ranking.
Greenville's num-
ber 14 spot is included
in the category of
cities with a popula-
tion of 100,000 to
249,999.
Mayor Nancy
Jenkins was thrilled
with the ranking, but
thinks Greenville
should have ranked
much higher.
"I was surprised
Jenkins said. "I
thought we should
have been first
Jenkins believes the reason
Greenville ranks high is largely
due to the university and the
culture it brings to Greenville
residents.
"The quality of life in
Greenville is extremely excep-
tional Jenkins said. "We have
offerings for a diversity of needs
and are doing so more everyday.
Wc have small town charm and
Nancy Jenkins,
Greenville mayor
FILE PHOTO
bigger town amenities
In respect to the university,
this ranking may make ECU
more desirable.
"The city of Greenville and
ECU enjoy and beneficial,
mutually supportive relation-
ship said Chancellor Richard
Eakin. "The high ranking for
Greenville is well- deserved and
will cause ECU to continue to be
attractive to prospective stu-
dents and their parents. I believe
our ranking as the 25th best
wired campus is a distinction
that will be especially
helpful as we seek to
attract outstanding
students to ECU
Money Magazine has
been ranking the best
places to live for 12
years. Previously,
ranking were included
in a 300 city list, but
are now more region-
ally and population
based. With a change
of format, the maga-
zine now has a more
focused comparison. Last year
Greenville ranked 185 out of 300
and fall from the previous years
165 out of 300.
The top three spots were
filled by three Virginia cities,
Charlottesville, Lynchburg and
Roanoke. Other North Carolina
cities to rank were Goldsboro
(9), Asheville (10), Wilmington
(16), Rocky Mount (19) and
Jacksonville (23).
SEE RANKS, PAGE 2
Many ruts are formed in the ground from students and others failing to walk on sidewalks.
PHOTO BY MABC CBIPPEN
Sidewalks laid to cut
across lawns
TK Jones
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
mest Williams probably can't tell
you whether the road is paved
with good intentions, but he can tell
E
you the sidewalks are. With this in
mind, it is hard to imagine why every-
one must walk beside the sidewalk
instead of on it.
Williams is the mason supervisor in
the facilities services department.
One of his responsibilities is running
sidewalks to better accommodate foot
traffic.
To lessen the number of dirt paths
created by shortcuts, the department
lays sidewalks to cut across lawns in
SEE SIDEWALKS. PAGE 2
HP he average cost of a human
life is about $5 in a bull mar-
ket, but for the flora on the west
and east campuses, you can add
about $22,000 to that and still be
a few notes shy of the full song.
Less than 40 people embell-
ish the 450 acres of university
grounds with 11,000 annuals in
the spring and again in the fall.
In addition to planting flowers,
they plant ground cover, shrub-
bery and trees, run irrigation
lines, storm drains, maintain.
streets.
"A tree is not a tree is not a
tree said Doug CaldweU,
superintendent of the grounds
department. "What people don't
realize is how much planning
goes into what we plant. Some of
our shrubbery comes from as far
as Houston or the Chesapeake
Bay area, just because they have
the quantity and quality we need
at the right bid
SEE LANDSCAPE. PAGE 2
Because il I step i�n c
i ill break m mother'
siik ilk
goes the places I .ml
'I luirmath lake tht sid� "
made fi ii I
cil skater
"I lakt ii hi
and dnni
sluli I lire mi.
r . iK-iipk viliu art uroupi
AtlNl ll (Kop
ls In iel :�
TODAY
Partly CLoudy
high 94
low 74
TOMORROW
Partly Cloudy
high 94
low 74
Opinion
Lifestyle
HJSports
No break between
summer sessions!
Financial aid goes
for 'necessities"
fife
Michael Jordan
Golf Classic
preview
Online Survey
vvirvw.tec.ecu.edu
"Art you tick of the Chicago Bulls?"
Annrnru Da ported nut mat
the east Carolinian STUDENT PUBLICATION ridg, GREENVILLE, NC 27858 across from Joyner library � newsroom 328-6366 advertising 328-20C)p fax 328-6558 wabsite www.tec.
acu.edu ,





2 Wtdnndty, J�m 24, 1998
news
The East Carolinian
New cancer
equipment
dedicated
Linear accelerator
one-of-a-kind in area
Debbie Neuwirth
staff whiter
The Department of Radiation
Oncology has dedicated new can-
cer equipment The dedication
Jook place June 18 in the Leo W.
Jenkins Cancer Center from 5:30
to 7:00 p.m and all referring
physicians and Medical Center
faculty staff were invited to
attend.
Mary Jenkins led opening
remarks at the ceremony; the
Cancer Center was named after
her husband. Other remarks were
made by Dr. Hyder Arastu, and
Dr. James Hallock, the Dean of
the Medical School. There was
also a benediction led by Chaplain
Ken Turner.
This new equipment will help
to improve care for patients suffer-
ing of cancer in eastern Carolina.
Mary Blick, an administrator for
the department, felt the ceremony
as well as the new equipment was
great.
Jim Knaves, the Clinical
Manager for the Department of
Radiation Oncology, felt it was
hard to describe what this new
equipment can do. The new
equipment differs from the equip-
ment they have had to work with
in the past.
"The department just added $3
million dollars worth of new
equipment, even though some
was replaced Knaves said.
One of the purposes of this new
cancer equipment was that it helps
doctors keep up with the growing
profession, and all that is available.
The equipment included a one-
of-a-kind linear accelerator�the
only one of its kind here in the
area. Also, a radiation system was
added that can help plan the doses
in three dimensions.
"Overall, we can treat patients
with higher doses and get fewer
side effects Knaves said. The
program sent out at the ceremony
outlined the utilization for these
"Overall, we can treat
patients with higher doses
and get fewer side effects
Jim Knaves
Clinical Manager. Radiaiion Oncology
new materials, and described the
different new types of equipment.
The Leo W. Jenkins Cancer
Center is on Moye Blvd. and has
been open since 1985. The new
equipment not only replaced
some of the older equipment, but
helps the staff to keep abreast with
new changes in technology. The
Leo W. Jenkins Cancer Center
treats about 70 patients a day, and
about 900 new cases per year.
This new equipment can be
used for all types of cancer, and
will be a great benefit for doctors
as well as their patients. The
office is open to patients referred
by their physicians, and the hours
Sidewalks
continued from page 1
their place. And when paths are
pre-existing, to re-route traffic,
walks are added between the ones
that are heavily used and near in
proximity to each other.
"When you go to a place, the
first impression is what will always
be imbedded in your mind; if it has
nice landscape and is clean, it will
receive a positive image Williams
said. "Like someone's home, for
instance. When a home is nice and
neat, you're experience there is
totally different than it is in a dis-
organized, cluttered environ-
ment
Five and one half miles of side-
walks cover east campus alone.
Some are concrete and some are
brick. While next to each other,
they offer a splash of color and
arabesque to ground cover; sepa-
rately they have values of their
own.
Where concrete might require
less labor and last longer, brick
sidewalks, like the one in front of
Wright Circle, are more flexible
when irrigation and electrical lines
are beneath them.
"Brick can be removed without
much effort when a water line or
steam pipe needs repair, and the
same piece can be re-installed
without buying any new materials,
unlike concrete, which takes saw-
ing to remove, and can crack or
break Williams said.
Dr. George Harrell, vice chan-
cellor for Administration and
Finance, said that he wishes peo-
ple would realize the sidewalks are
put in for their benefit and should
be "utilized instead of creating
bare ground paths just to save a
few steps
A PREFERRED
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CENTER
Abortions to 20 weeks
Licensed & NAF Certified
Private Doctor's Office
Special Reduced Rate Plans
Anesthesia Available
Nitrous Oxide & Vallum
One visit procedures
Same Day Appointments
All Major Credit cards
Insurance Filed
Confidential & Experienced
Caring Professional
Call Toll Free
1-888-562-7415
Mon - Sat 8 am - 8 pm
Cubbie's Downtown
STUDENT SPECIALS
3PM-9PM MONDAY THRU SATURDAY W COLLEGE ID
FREE HOTDOG W FRENCH FRIES & DRINK
FREE FRENCH FRIES W ANY CUBBIE'S SIZED
SANDWICH OR A CHICKEN SANDWICH
2 Hot dogs for $1.00
$1.00 domestic beer w any food purchase
VOTED BEST CHEESEBURGER -J �- gLAt"J
& HOTDOG IN PITT COUNTY 3Z0f5P
Archaeology students
search For ruins
Nine boats found near
Castle Island
William LeLiever
staff writer
The Summer Field School in
Maritime History and Underwater
Archaeology plunges to new
depths. The department is contin-
uing its field work off the coast of
Washington. Students involved
will be investigating shipwreck
remains near Castle Island.
Assistant Professor Bradley
Rogers said, the students are doing
a phase two of the ships found near
the island. Phase two involves the
search for, mapping and drawing
the boats. The class has already
found nine ships in only a portion
of the island. Rogers said Castle
Island is an excellent site because
many ships were abandoned off the
coast of this island.
"We found a 90-foot schooner,
small fishing vessels, flats that were
used as barges, others used for con-
struction or transportation, and
even early twentieth century fish-
ing vessels said Frank Contelles,
staff archaeologist.
According to Contelles, the class
expects to find many abandoned
ships on the island.
"This island has been used a
ship graveyard Rogers said.
For now, only a small section of
the island has been mapped.
The archaeology class involved
in this dig is designed to teach stu-
dents how to draw shipwrecks and
to map them underwater. There are
about 12 students in the course and
a few students visiting from other
schools. This class is a part of the
graduate program in the depart-
ment of history.
Rogers said North Carolina has
"We found a 90-foot schooner,
small fishing vessels, flats that
were used as barges, others used
for construction or
transportation, and even early
twentieth century
fishing vessels
Frank Contelles
Stall Archaeologist
an important role in maritime histo-
ry because the towns and civiliza-
tions were dependent on the local
water ways for transportation, busi-
nesses, and food. Washington is
great investigating the past
because of its location.
According to Rogers,
Washington was one of the main
seaside towns in North Carolina. It
was established over 150 years ago
for transportation and food.
Landscape
continued from page I
The grounds are vast enough
that they are broken down into four
divisions according to traffic. Each
grounds crew is given a budget and
the flexibility of choosing what to
plant in smaller gardens like
Whichard's corner and the
Ragsdale courtyard. For large areas
work is contracted outside with
landscape architects.
"They (grounds department)
offer diversity in plant material and
landscape design Caldwell said.
"This is what gives us a different
look in the different areas of cam-
pus.
The crew's botanic understand-
ing makes for healthier plants and
slows plants' death rates by choos-
ing vegetation adaptive to the area,
like the Mondo grass in front of
Garrett Hall.
"The Mondo grass is good
ground cover and has taken over,
requiring little upkeep said
Caldwell.
But then there is the lily turf
that borders Tenth Street.
"I hope I live long enough to see
that thing filled in said Caldwell.
"If I do, I'll probably have all my
hair pulled out before it does
The St. John's Wart, too, in front
of the Wright Circle was a positive
experience gone awry when the
grounds department planted it in
front of Umstead Hall, only to have
it share the space with weeds.
Ranks
continued ftom page 1
Jenkins says that these ranking said.
should make residents realize
what a wonderful place they live
in.
"It should make them proud if
they aren't already aware Jenkins
SILVER
BULLET
"A Touch Of Class"
756-6278
M
Located 5 miles West
of Greenville on 264
Alt. (Behind Aladdin
Services & Limo) Doors open: 7:30 pm
Stage Time: 9:00 pm
TUESDAY: Lingerie Night
WEDNESDAY: Amateur Night and
Silver Bullet Dancers
THURSDAY: Country & Western Night
FRI. & SAT: Silver Bullet Exotic Dancers
"Skylar"
10 OR MORE
GIRL DANCERS
EVERY NIGHT!
BODY PIERCING
V. L,l ll.
Gangi
Navd-Eyebrtw Lip &
EarCartbgt
$25.00
T�M-Uferit
$35.00
Exrtk Pien�s Cal
Fw Pnct
All prices include autoclaved sterilized jewelry. Autoclaving Jewelry and
utensils is the proper method of sterilization. Not soaking in Betadine
Or Alcohol as other shops are doing.
Come to the only Health Dept. Inspected Studio in the Greenville area, and we are
Greenville's first real body piercing studio. We have been In business for over
seven years. We are here to serve you dairy with one atop hi our own public facility,
We are without a doubt the safest, cleanest, moat professional studio in the area!
NO APPOINTMENTS NECESSARY
TATTOOING BY AWARD WINNING ARTIST
For More Information Call: 756-0600
Located At: 4685 US HWY 13 Greenville
(From Downtown - Straight Down Dickinson Ave.)
ft�lP' WE'VE GOT YOUR FAVORITE I DC COMICS AND MORE'
"3t&$5 n
J NOSTALGIA NEWSTAND The Comic Book Store 919 Disunion Avenue �F Greenville, NC 27834 (919)758-6909
209-B S.Evans S
Pittman Building
(near courthouse
Greenville, NC
Free Pregnancy Test
While You Wait Free And Confidential
Services and Peer Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
Hours Vary as Needed
Appointment Preferred
757-0003
Very OtUcieut - Always frtth
CHIKESE FOOD
Winn-Dixie Marketplace
3J0-FE. Arlington Blvd.
Greenville
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
12:00 noon - 10:30 PM
PICK-UP OR FREE DELIVERY
32083OO
fl Save $3.78
Value Meal for Two
2 Regular size Sesame Chicken (034) w
Steamed Met, 2 Soup (choose from Hot
S Sour, Wanton, or Egg Drop soup), 2
Liter of Cold Pepsi, 2 Crispy Noodl
HEflJlsave $5.2
Coupon for Party
2 largo Plates Sesame Chicken(34) w
2 Steamed Rice, 2 Soup (choose from
Hot S Sour, Wanton, or Egg Drop soup)
2 Liter of Catd Pepsi, (8) Sweet Apple
Cheese Wontan.
Brown & Brown
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
Truth.EqualityJustice
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Drug Charges
�All Criminal Matters
�Free Consultation
1UZH tast. victoria Uu 7 c 1 fC C 1
Bedford Park, Greenville O Z"U Z7 O Z
HEY! WE JUST MISSED BIG TUESDAY
DOM WORRY THERE'S AH OTHER OHE NEXT WEEK
ON TUESDAY:
R6ER?0NnlhfPSFSALF A
m nmn mimm
ALL CHICKEN BREASTS ARE HALF A POUND
BUDWEISEQ, BUD LIGHT AND LITE BOTTLES ARE 2202.
ALL DRAFT BEER COMES IN 1602 GLASS
Dai!y Domestic Bottle for jyst $1.50
PARROT HEAD BUS TRIP!
Going to Carter-Finley Stadium on 74. $17.50 round
trip. Tailgate before the Buffett concert. Bus departs
and returns to O'Cool's parking lot. Deposit required.
W1NN D1XK SHOPPING CENTER
CORNER OF GREENVILLE AND ARUNGT0N BLVDS.
355-2946
Kingston Place
Condominiums
2BR, 2 BATHS, washerdryer connections,
private balconies, all appliances, water,
basic cable included.
Kingston Condos;
Newly Remodeled - Available August 1st
2 BR Condos, 2 12 Baths, Large Kitchens
and Large Living Rooms
11141088 square feet.
Free Water Sewer Basic Cable
Pool - Clubhouse, Bus Service
& Much More
If you say you saw us in the East Carolinian you will receive a
$100 security deposit discount Call Ken at:
KINGSTON RENTALS CO. 758-7575
3 Wednesdi
"You dcs
McMuffin;
don't agrei
beginning
before the
decision.
The sch
homes are
necessary i
tainly just
Breaks ;
arrangemei
time. With
nienced.
Also, sti
and other i
The extra i
Many stud
Without
pus. We're
world Th
Things are
in the real
reasonable
ECU is
school yeai
days to the
Thanks, pc
You mus
OPINI
how m
future emplt
leaders of th
be confident
of an emplo
thinking th
pie ted a dij
gram, only
they got the
One of the thi
upon lately on
there are fully
ties that offer c
grams online,
appalling that
master's ofsci
neering from F
of science in m
without even si
pus. It's difficu
ed into one o
resident univei






3 Wednesday, June 24. 1998
opinion
The East Carolinian
eastffarolinian
Amy L.Royster Editor
Heather Burgess MimgingEditor
Amanda Austin N�nEditor Travis Barkley Spons Editor
TK Jones Aimiim Naws Editor Tracy Hairr Assistant Spons Editor
Andy Turner Lifestyle Editor Carole Mehle Held Copy Editor
Miccah Smith Assistant Lifestyle Editor Chris KNOTTS Stall Illustrator
MATT Hege Advertising Manager
Bobby Tucgle Webmaster
Strving tht ECU community tinea 1926, it Fan Cerohruen puNrthes 11.000 copies every mdey and Thundty. Tht iud edrtorwl m tacri arjitton n rhc opto
ton at tht Editorial Board. TTw Em Carohmin mltomei leiiin id the editor, hmnid to SB wnds. wtiich may be ediitd (or decency or bmrrty. Tr East
Catohniin reserves the righi id add or rajeci tetters lor publication. Alt tartars must be signed. Letters should be addressed to: Opinion editor The East
Carohnian. Student Pubfiatiom Buirdmg. ECU. Green. Z785M3&3. for information, call 9I9JWB 6386
oumsw
"You deserve a break today so says McDonalds, the house of Big Macs, Egg
McMuffins and assorted greasy goods. Apparently, however, ECU administrators
don't agree with Mickey D's sentiment. Like the end ofthe spring semester and
beginning of first summer session, students will not be allowed any sort of break
before the start of the second summer session. The administrators have made a poor
decision.
The scheduling seems most unfair to out-of-state students and other people whose
homes are far from Greenville. Breaks between classes allow these students the time
necessary to travel home and visit with their families and friends. Families are cer-
tainly just as important academics, and it's unfair to deny students this opportunity.
Breaks also allow students time to sort out different things, including their living
arrangements. Moving, as we all know, requires a tremendous amount of planning and
time. Without the extra time, students are unnecessarily pressured and inconve-
nienced.
Also, students simply like the extra time to relax. The ends of sessions, with exams
and other tasks to complete, are particularly stressful on students and faculty alike.
The extra time allows them the opportunity to regroup and to take it easy for awhile.
Many students and faculty members require this time to retain their sanity.
Without a break, it's likely to decrease enthusiasm and increase hostilities on cam-
pus. We're constantly reminded things will be different once we get to the "real
world The real world doesn't have long Christmas vacations and summer vacations.
Things are tough in the real world. You know what though? You also get paid to work
in the real world. Students are paying ECU to attend school, and it seems perfectly
reasonable to expect occasional breaks.
ECU is not totally to blame; it was necessary for the school to add extra days to the
school year as mandated by the North Carolina state legislature. Adding additional
days to the university calendar is, of course, one of the burning issues of our time,
Thanks, politicians.
You must have not rested until you got that one passed.
OPINION
Columnist
Stephen
KLEINSCHMIT
Online degrees not viable
how many of us, as the
future employers and fastness
leaders of this country, would
be confident with the abilities
of an employee who we hired,
thinking that they had com-
pleted a difficult degree pro-
gram, only to find out that
they got their degree online?
One of the things I have stumbled
upon lately on the internet is that
there are fully accredited universi-
ties that offer complete degree pro-
grams online. I personally find it
appalling that a person can earn a
master's of science degree in engi-
neering from Purdue of a bachelor
of science in nursing from Cal State
without even stepping foot on cam-
pus. It's difficult even to be accept-
ed into one of these programs at
resident universities, which usually
have extensive internships to give
students practical experience and
test their skill and resolve.
The first problem I have with
this system is that students will
have no opportunity to be tested
fairly in a real-world environment.
The programs work like the old
correspondence course program.
Students are sent their course man-
uals and tests but complete their
work online. How can you truly test
someone when every test is open
book? This definitely gives them
an unfair advantage over us regular
students who burn the midnight oil
frequently to prepare for tough
exams.
So, how many of us, as the future
employers and business leaders of
this country, would be confident
with the abilities of an employee
who we hired, thinking that they
had completed a difficult degree
program, only to find out that they
got their degree online? Imagine
you got in a car crash and you
arrived in the emergency room and
found out that yqjir nurse was
unable to perform certain lifesaving
tasks because they had skimmed
over a chapter. Imagine your minis-
ter got his PhD in theology (yes, it's
available) from an online university.
How would you feel about being
engaged in a lawsuit with an attor-
ney who got his law degree (accred-
ited) online? It seems that in their
haste, these universities forgot one
thing: morality.
Yes, by skipping the fundamen-
tals of college life, they have forgot-
ten that practical experience is the
most important part of learning. I
never could change the oil in my
truck until a friend showed me how,
and folks, that isn't even a hard
thing to do! So why would a presti-
gious university, such as Duke, put
their good name on such a risky
undertaking? Money.
That's right. Money. Duke
charges its students $13,000 a year
for the online master of business
administration program. And you
thought your tuition was high!
Other universities entice students
with claims such as being able to
earn a bachelor's degree in as little
as four months, although they say
this is hard to do, but possible. One
can also complete a master's degree
without having a bachelor's degree.
I'm no Doogie Houser, but some-
thing is screwy here. If it was that
easy, then why isn't everybody
doing it? Because a 17- or 18-year-
old with a degree would be laughed
out of every job interview, that's
why.
I agree with the opinions of
many students with whom I have
talked about this subject. These
courses should supplement a
degree program, not replace it.
Personally I feel that these online
degrees are a joke. Heck, if all my
tests could have been open book, I
would have aced French and calcu-
lus.
BOOK
OTMCK
BE
SQtttHoWmCUCHt
D0ESVVT
IMTWE
WjlUSi,
m
11�
tr:
i:
fe

OPINION
Columnist
Britt
HONEYCUTT
Watch out for burglars, each other
we as potential victims
need to watch our asses �
and each others. Because peo-
ple will take your stuff. And
then laugh at you as they run
away down the street with it
Okay, I know that most of those
involved in burglary are not very
bright. If they had two brain cells to
rub together, they would be work-
ing as crack dealers or pimps or
something such as that, which
would bring greater profit with less
risk. Stealing from college students
� especially butt-poor ones such as
myself � will not be profitable
enough to allow them to retire at 40.
Why do they continue to break into
my pathetic shack and take the few
petty items that I own?
If only they, whoever they are,
were literate, perhaps I could reach
them through this column. If you
are literate and know my robbers,
please tell them not to come back. I
don't really have anything left.
They got my Wal-Mart CD play-
er (What the hell were they think-
ing? They could get their own for
$20, for god's sake) and they took
with it my entire sense of security. I
can buy a new CD player. It was
pretty cheap. But Wal-Mart doesn't
carry an anti-scared potion that I
can spray around my room before I
go to bed at night. I checked.
I realize that by living in a huge
city like New York or LA, or even a
smaller city like Greenville, I put
myself at risk for break-ins, attacks,
being eaten by gnomes while walk-
ing home from class, having my
soul sold to the devil by my closest
friends for a Little Debbie's snack
cake, and all sorts of nasty things.
Why don't these things ever hap-
pen out in the sticks?
The house I grew up in was
down a dirt road in the middle of
the woods. Now you would think
that scary, mean people would be
more likely to conduct their ugly
business somewhere like that,
where it takes the police three days
to respond to a call and you can't
escape because of all the bears and
swamps surrounding your yard.
This would be profitable � and
perhaps even fun � for the
demented psycho who broke into
my house. This is where no one can
hear you scream and your neighbors
are too busy committing incest to
stop by and interrupt a burglary in
progress. But in the entire 18 years
that I lived there, no one so much as
jiggled the doorknob. Probably
because no one got past the moun-
tain lions, but that's not the point.
I just wonder what it is about a
city (if G-ville really qualifies as
such) that draws the meanies.
Maybe it's the crack. Or maybe it's
the cultural opportunities. You
know, if my CD player was hocked
to buy tickets to the ballet, I would
really be OK with it. But I doubt it.
Maybe there is an annual bur-
glar's convention held at the
Ramada at which they discuss the
best places in the US to live and
work, and they live in the city just
so they can have a sense of profes-
sional security. They come in
groups. Maybe there is a Burglar's
Union. They have to reach a certain
quota of houses per month � that's
why they break into places like
mine that don't even look like they
contain anything good. If this is
really the case, then next time they
can just ring the doorbell and I'll
give them the CD player. Well, not
mine � I'll give them my room-
mate's � but hey, it's a CD player.
I'm saying that we as potential
victims need to watch our asses �
and each other's. Because people
will take your stuff. And then laugh
at you as they run away down the
street with it. But if there is a posse
of us non-stealing folk, then one of
us can trip the little turd and hog-tie
him, then put him up on a pole on
the Town Commons as an example
to the Burglar's Union. Wonder if
they get worker's comp for some-
thing like that?
LETTER
to the editor
Don't criticize Christians for faith
This letter is in response to the
column "Chruch or State � Not
both published in the June 17
edition of The East Carolinian.
How can someone say they,
have no problems with religion"
and then turn around and attack
Christianity in a dogmatic way? As
a Christian, I do have a problem
with this and find it to be a contra-
diction; don't you?
Why are Christians always
being ridiculed for their faith?
What if Christians are right?
What if there is a Heaven and a
Hell and if you don't accept Jesus
Christ as your Lord and Savior you
will not go to Heaven? For those of
you read this, the choice is up to
you. You can believe the worldly
view which makes one religion as
good as another or you can believe
that Jesus Christ came to this earth
and died on a cross for your sins;
ask Christ to forgive you of your
sins and ask Him to be your savior.
God loves you; that is why He sent
His only Son to die just for you, so
that you could have eternal life
with Him! No matter what you
have done in the past, God will
forgive you and you can be saved.
If Christians are wrong, then
they (Christians) have lived good
righteous lives and have saved
themselves a lot of problems and
heartache which sin (lying, cheat-
ing, adultery, stealing, murder, etc)
causes. It's a winwin situation.
In closing I would like to pose
this question: If you died right
now, where would you spend eter-
nity? Why not check out some
Christian organizations on campus
instead of doing the "downtown"
thing? Who knows? You just might
get saved!
W. Ross Bennett, II
Senior
Got something
to say????
Write a letter to the Editor
and let your view be Heard
Bring all letters to the 2nd floor of the
student publications building
or call 328-6366
eastcarolinian





4 Wadnnday. Juna 24. 1998
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
Summer
Theatre takes
on classics
Former students
return for productions
Stephanie Russell
staff whiter
Free Money?
Students find other uses for
financial aid besides school
Karen Whaley
Delamere
PHOTO COURTESY Of
SUMMER THEATRE
Rediscover the spirit of the Fabulous '40s with the ECU
Summer Theater's 1998 season. You'll also be able to wit-
ness some of the acting talent that has emerged from
ECU.
World War II powered enormous industrial and scien-
tific energy during the 1940s that would change the course
of history. At the same time, the war unleashed amazing
creative energy throughout the United States. This cre-
ativity sparked one of the most glorious ages of Broadway
theater history. This summer,
blast into the past with Rodgers
and Hammerstein's Oklahoma
Noel Coward's Blithe Spirit and
Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar
Named Desire.
In March of 1943, Oklahoma!
burst onto the Broadway scene
and took the American theatre
going public by storm. Every day
for more than five years, people
waited in lines for hours in search
of tickets to the acclaimed show.
Oklahoma! has become one of the
most beloved and popular musi-
cals in history. It is a classic of the
theatre, treating audiences to a
genuine piece of Americana.
This ground-breaking production combined song and
dance, plot and characterization in a way never seen
before. The show revolutionized the musical; song and
dance now contribute to the overall story. Today, the
songs of Oklahoma! are showbiz
standards, and its production
numbers are unforgettable. Don't
miss this classic of American theater.
Oklahoma! is here now and runs thorough
June 27.
The second show of the season is Noel
Coward's Blithe Spirit. It is the uproarious tale
of a novelist and his second wife haunted by
the spirit of his first wife. Definitely not a
benevolent spirit, she "translates" his current
wife into a ghost as well. The novelist is
unable to escape the influence of either one of
his ghostly wives, the perfect framework for a
farcical comedy.
Blithe Spirit first opened in 1941, but has
returned from beyond an appearance July 7-
11.
The final Broadway blockbuster this
summer is Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar
Named Desire. Winner of many awards
including the Pulitzer Prize, this show
opened in post-war 1947 and never played
to an empty seat during its first run.
Captivating theatergoers past and present, it
is the powerful story of Blanche Dubois's
struggle to survive in her reality. Stanley
Kowalski, her brother-in-law, refuses to live
in anything but brutal honesty. These two
strong characters cannot cannot coexist in a
two-room apartment. See who wins on July
21-25.
Season tickets are $45, $55 or $65 depending on your seating preference,
and entitle the holder to one reserved seat ticket per show. All shows are at 8
p.m with the exception of a 2 p.m. matinee on Saturdays (in addition to the
8 p.m. showing). Purchase tickets by phone at328-6829 or328-1726 oral the
box office in the lobby ofMcGinnis Theatre.
Miccah Smith
assistant lifestyle editor
For most college students, the years spent at
school, in limbo between home and the real
world, are a perfect opportunity to learn
about money.
Scraping together quarters for laundry, liv-
ing for weeks on bread, peanut butter and
Ramen noodles and working night shifts at
demeaning fast-food jobs are what it's all
about.
This is all part of the lean-and-mean
American work ethic,
and students have sur-
vived in this way for
decades. They learn
just what their parents
hope they will: the
value of money and
the importance of
independence and
personal responsibili-
ty-
Or, at least, they used
to learn about respon-
sibility. Modern stu-
dents are embracing
the "buy now, pay later" concept with an
enthusiasm that they may well regret after
graduation.
Easily-obtained credit cards are popular
scapegoats for students who have been
lulled into debts of thousands of dollars; it's
easy to see how recklessly flashing a credit
card throughout your freshman year can
have you pulling yourself painfully out of
the hole even after graduation.
But student loans are treated with much less
consideration. Students forget that loans
from various institutions are not free money;
"Actually, I didn't spend any
of the loan on school I
guess a lot of it went to,
probably, downtown
- George Fedynskyj
"Booh, food, rent I'm
always spending it on art
supplies
- Carl Neilson
they are to be spent judi-
ciously and repaid after graduation.
ECU students can get money, through the
government-subsidized
Stafford loan system, from a
number of lenders including
several banks.
The lenders can charge inter-
est (up to 8.25 percent) during
the semester or starting six
months after the student ceas-
es to attend school full-time.
Subsidized loans are interest-
free while a student is in
school, but students with
unsubsidized loans incur inter-
est charges even while in
school.
ECU student Carl Neilson
explained how his loan works:
"They send the
money to the
school and then
you get the remain-
ing amount
The excess, which is the check
that a student receives from the
school after tuition has been cov-
ered, can be spent on whatever
the student deems necessary.
A few wild stories have been
told of loan money spent on
brand new cars or cosmetic
surgery, but these are exceptions
to the rules. Loans weren't
meant to be frittered away as carelessly as
birthday spending money, but even little
luxuries can add up quickly.
Most students spend their extra money on
CDs, travel, weekends downtown, restau-
rants, rent and other things that seem neces-
sary at the time.
"I paid a couple of credit card bills said
Keifa Moore.
Rondica Brown said, "I usually use the
money to pay my bills I go shopping, go
out to eat
'I paid a couple of credit
card bills
� Keifa Moore
" try not to spend it all
really quick
� Paul Hardison
" usually use it to pay my
billsI go stopping, go out
to eat
� Rondica Brown
"You've got to
budget yourself pretty well said Neilson,
who also supports himself by working at
The Percolator.
Brown feels the same
way. "I usually try to
budget it out over the
semester she said.
But not even careful
budgeting can erase
the fact that these
students will gradu-
ate with sizable
debts to pay back to
their lenders.
Students often rely on
the money left over
from tuition as a steady
source of income, opt-
ing not to find jobs to
help alleviate some of
the debt.
These students find
themselves graduating
with debts of up to
$15,000 or more, not including the interest
that they will be required to start paying six
months afterward.
Yet year after year, the number of students
applying for Stafford loans remains substan-
tial.
Karen Barbee, associate director of finan-
cial aid, attributes the growth in student
debt to an increase in the freedom to bor-
row.
In the '90s, students are seen by lenders as
reliable adults from whom they can extract
plenty of interest. But, in truth, many stu-
dents are too naive to avoid debt until it's
too late.
For students especially, taking financial
responsibility means more than securing a
loan and paying interest; it also includes tak
ing steps to ensure financial freedom after
graduation.
Run off with Drive-By Truckers
James Darren
PHOTO COURTEST OF SUMMER
THEATRE
Songs so good you '11
smell 'em
Lynette Darn Johnson
PHOTO COURTEST OF SUMMER
THEATRE
Andv Turner
lifestyle editor
You ever listened to one of those
all-night trucker radio stations on
AM? The lost highway isn't as
lonesome when you're listening to
country classics spun by a grizzled,
irreverent old DJ. Eventually,
though, the station fades out and
it's just you again � without Hank,
Webb and Mr. DJ. To prevent this
from happening in the future, go
out immediately and secure your-
self any sort of recorded material
by the Drive-By Truckers.
The Athens, Ga. band released
their debut album, Gangstabilly,
this spring on Soul Dump Records,
the label run by vocalistguitarist
Patterson Hood. Gangstabilly lets
Hood, guitarist Mike Cooley,
can't smell it. Good
country songs
should affect at
least three-fourths
of your senses. A
Drive-By Truckers
song is likely to
touch all five. Take,
for example, the
band's "Bulldozers
and Dirt "Can't
get the red stains
off of my
sockscan't get ya
out of my mind
That gets you all
over � your nose
even goes raw,
filled with the cold
smell of red clay
and heartbreak.
"Bulldozers and
Dirt" is not on the
album; it was
released as a single.
McQueen, women running off with along with "Nine Bullets late last
truckers and devil-worshiping year. That recording marked the
Republicans.
"New Gsajntry"
(L to R) Adam Powell, John Neff, Patterson Hood, Loretta, and Mike Cooley (not pictured: Matt Lane)
PHOTO COURTESY OF SOUL DUMP RECORDS
bassist Adam Howell, drummer
Matt Lane and steel guitarist John
"Sho-Nuff" Neff tear their way
through 11 songs about Steve
stinks, but you
SEE TRUCKERS. PAGE S
Committed, uncommitted will enjoy X-Fiks
MOvlEreviewjjf
X-Files heroes figfit the
future
Mark Brett
senior writer
The truth is out there.
This is the sentiment, hopeful yet some-
how sinister, on which the cult favorite
television series The X-Files is based. It's a
fitting motto for a series about one man's
earnest belief in what most could only call a
paranoid fantasy: the existence, and gov-
ernmental cover-up, of UFOs.
The fact that you probably already know
all this, and that this odd little cult phe-
nomenon has become a
mainstream success, is a
neat quirk of modern
American culture. That
The X-Files has now
spawned a by-all-reports
successful feature film is
nothing short of astound-
ing.
All of which brings us,
as you've no doubt
already guessed, to X-
Files: Fight the Future, the
aforementioned X-Files
movie. Picking up where
the show's latest season
(its fifth) left off, Fight the Future drops
viewers right into the middle of a compli-
cated web of plots.
There's this black oil stuff, see, that's
really some kind of alien life form that
creeps into people's orifices and takes con-
trol of their minds. And there's this mili-
taryindustrial conspiracy to aid the aliens
and cover up their existence.
And our heroes, FBI
agents Fox Mulder (David
Duchovny) and Dana Scully
(Gillian Anderson), have
spent the last five years get-
ting closer and closer to the
truth of all this through a
series of blinds, half-truths,
alien assassins, assorted
homunculi and various and
sundry threats to their lives
and careers.
Still with me? If you're an
X-Files fan, I'm sure you are.
Devotees of the show can
quote all this stuff chapter and verse. But
never fear. If you're not among the show's
legion of fans, Fight the Future does an
impressive job of bringing you up to snuff
on what has gone before.
And it manages to do it without boring
the rabid fans to death. A scene in which a
drunken Mulder relates his life story to a
bartender could have been an exercise in
tedium to fans. But instead, it comes off as
a funny and revealing look at just how para-
noid Mulder must seem to those around
him.
Much of the movie is sharp in this way.
The banter between Mulder and Scully is
snappy. The performances from series stars
Duchovny and Anderson are among their
best to date. The scares are genuinely
shocking. The special effects are top-notch
and appropriately goopy. The script is sub-
tle, and it doesn't slow down for those who
aren't paying attention. All in all, it's good
old-fashioned X-Files fun, moody and styl-
ish and confoundingly complex.
If I seem to be avoiding plot details,
that's because I am. Half the fun here is in
the discovery of it all, and far be it from me
to blow any of the revelations.
For fans, I'll just say this. We don't learn
much in the way of brand new secrets, but
many previously-known facts are expanded
upon or changed. There may be a new sta-
tus quo on the series in the fall, however, as
some major alliances are shaken up. The
much-publicized nude scenes have been
blown all out of proportion (Duchovny's
butt shot didn't even make it into the final
cut). And, yes, there is a romantic moment
between our heroes, but it's not exactly
what you might think.
So by all means, see X-Files: Fight the
Future. It's an intelligent and exciting sci-
ence fiction film, and those don't come
along too often. Some might complain that
it's really just a big-budget episode of the
TV show, but come on. What did you
expect, really?
And, if you want an added bonus, also
check out the soundtrack CD and find the
hidden bonus track that explains the whole
conspiracy, beginning to end. It reveals a
few secrets that the movie never quite
spells out, and-makes me look forward to
the fall season even more. At the risk of
turning cheese-ball here at the end, the
truth is in there
i
MAMMI
3�
m

i






��
p
m
5 Wednesday, Jun� 24, 1998
he East Carolinian
"S
t smell it. Good
ury songs
lid affect at
t three-fourths
'our senses. A
e-By Truckers
; is likely to
h all five. Take,
example, the
1's "Bulldozers
Dirt "Can't
the red stains
of my
scan't get y;i
of my mind
t gets you all
� your nose
i goes raw,
I with the cold
II of red clay
heartbreak.
Bulldozers and
" is not on the
m; it was
ised as a single,
jllets late last
ig marked the
PAGE s
all, however, as
laken up. The
les have been
nf (Duchovny's
it into the final
nantic moment
t's not exactly
�Files: Fight the
id exciting sei-
se don't come
t complain that
episode of the
What did you
led bonus, also
D and find the
lains the whole
id. It reveals a
e never quite
Dok forward to
At the risk of
: the end, the
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
209 E. 5th St.
752-7303
$1 JO BUSCH U6HT
BOTTLES
COMeiff
2m
WEDNESDAY
MAMMOTH RECORDING ARTISTS
far too jones
SPECIAL GUEST: fj
S2 32�Dtwr MIKE C0RAD0 BAND
SATURDAY
C R A V I N'
M ON special guest Ultraviolets
ADV. TTX AVAILABLE AT
CD ALLEY � SKUiVs
EAST COAST MUSIC &
VIDEO
ONLY
ADV. flX
COMING JULY Nth - CHAIRMEN OF THE BOARD

PLAYERS CLUB
ARARTNIEMTS
Now Leasing (919) 321-7613
1526 Charles Blvd.
Greenville, NC 278S8
WITH
LETTUCE &
TOMATO!
$ 1s9 CORONAS
$250 LIME MARGARITAVILLES
$395 CHEESEBURGER IN PARADISE PLATTERS
BUY ONE GET ONE FREE!
(�APPETIZER SPECIAL AFTER 9PM DINE IN ONLY)
DOWNTOWN MARGARITAVILLE 757-1666
June
24 Wednesday
Comedy Zone at The Attic
Ashley Stove at Peasant's
Spice Girls at Virginia Beach
Amphitheater
Bob, TBA at The Cave in
Chapel Hill
SMO, Ode to Abbey at Local
506 in Chapel Hill
Morbid Angel at The Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro
25 Thursday
Sunnywheat at Peasant's
fura, The Holy Smokes at The
Cave in Chapel Hill
Marsha, Pablo Honey at Local
506 in Chapel Hill
26 Friday
Hobex at Peasant's
Too Far Jones, Mike Corrado
Band at The Attic
Stevie Nicks, Boz Scaggs at
Walnut Creek Amphitheater in
Raleigh
The Crowflies at The Cave in
Chapel Hill
The Tender Idols, Poor
Valentino at Local 506 in Chapel
Hill
Clang Quartet, Analogue, Elvis-
X at The Lizard & Snake in Chapel
Hill
27 Saturday
Cravin' Melon at The Attic
Ergot at Peasant's
Drive By Truckers, The
Pinetops at Local 506 in Chapel
Hill
TBA at The Cave in Chapel Hill
Mercury Birds, Tarot Bolero at
The Lizard & Snake in Chapel Hill
Hobex at The Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro
28 Sunday
Open mic at Peasant's
Lynn Miles at Irregardlcss Cafe
in Raleigh
Jennyanykind at The Cave in
Chapel Hill
Neil Diamond All-Stars, Drive
By Truckers at Local 506 in Chapel
Hill
The B-52's, The Pretenders,
Royal Crown Revue at the Virginia
Beach Amphitheater
29 Monday
Hamlet Idiot, Hatari at Local
506 in Chapel Hill
TBA at The Cave in Chapel Hill
30'Tuesday
Big Lick at Peasant's
Norm's Birthday w Led
Zeppelin at Local 506 in Chapel
Hill
Spring-Heeled Jack, Amazing
Royal Crowns at Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro
TBA at The Cave in Chapel Hill
Metallica, Jerry Canned, Days of
the New at the Virginia Beach
Amphitheater
Stevie Nicks, Boz Scaggs at
Virginia Beach Amphitheater
Truckers
continued from page'
coming together of Hood's "dream
team some of whom he met
through his job as sound man at
Athens' High Hat Music Club.
Minus mandolin player Barry
Sell, the five Truckers went into a
local studio to record Gangstabilly,
but not before paying their dues to
play the blues: they helped build
the studio in exchange for studio
time. "I was working 80 hours a
week Hood says. "It was still a lot
of fun. It beat having some asshole
record executive criticizing how
much I cuss
Their labor was not in vain as the
resulting album is a testament to
the power of the Drive-By
Truckers. Ragged-but-right raw
music combines with Hood's gritty,
soulful vocals on songs like "The
Living Bubba a tribute to Gregory
Dean Smalley, founder of Atlanta's
Bubbapalooza and a member of
The Diggers who fell victim to
AIDS. "In his last months, when he
was dying, he still played and
played Hood says. "He hardly
stopped, played his ass off
The soul in Hood's voice and
music comes as no surprise when
you take into account that he was
brought up in Muscle Shoals,
Alabama, where his father, a studio
musician at the famed Muscle
Shoals Studio, worked with the
likes of Otis Redding, the Rolling
Stones and Aretha Franklin. David
Hood still works there, one of the
holdouts who didn't escape north to
the fertile land of Nashville. "I
come by being stubborn naturally
Hood explains.
Hood and the Truckers live for
their weekend gigs up and down
the Southeast, finding success in
their home state and the Carolinas
and Virginia, where they've played
Richmond's Capital City Barn
Dance. This summer they plan on
making some Midwest dates and
finishing up a second album for
release by the end of the year.
"The next album goes together
with Gangstabilly" Hood says. "It
tells the rest of the story
Editors Note: Drive-By Truckers
will be performing this Saturday and
Sunday night at Local 506 in Chapel
Hill.
ELTORO
Exclusive Men's Hair Styling Shoppe
Est 1968 - Specializes in AmericanEuropean
2800 E. 10th St.
Eastgatc Shopping Center
Say Pirates &
Get Hair Cut
Wburger � 1LME
IN r'imu riAro j-
PARADISE!
Eastgate Shopping Center c A �
Acrols From Highway Patrol for $7 Every time.
Behind Stain Glass Regular10
MonFrl,9-6 6
Walk-Ins Anytime
752-3318 Full Line Professional Hair Care Products
PIRATE SPECIAL
$7.00
Haircut
VISITING PROFESSOR from
the University of Georgia
(male) seeks short term
lodginghouse sitting possibili-
ties for the fell semester 1998,
beginning August 22nd
and ending December 10.
Please contact @ 706.5414582
or email: a@coe.ugaedu
IT'S TIME AGAIN FOR CHICO'S 8th ANNUAL
1 JIMMY BUFFETT FIESTA! ?
A PAIR OF TICKETS WILL BE GIVEN AWAY DURING
OUR LIVE REMOTE W ARROW 93.3 FROM 7-9 PM I
TUESDAY, JUNE 30TH!
Wyndham Court
Apartments
� Now leasing for Summer nnd hill
� Two bedroom Apts. convenient to campus
� On ECU bus route
� Pets OK with deposit.
561-RENT
DURHAM
WOMENS
CENTER
ABORTION
THR
AT LOW I :
� STATE LICENSED FAC1UTY � LOCAL - 6ENBIA1
� BOARD CERTIFIED ANESTHESIA
GYNECOLOGIST � C0NRMNTIAI CAM
�W STUDENT DISCOUNT
800-782-5077
4007 N. ROXBOnO RD DURHAM
HERE WHEN YOU NEED US
SINCE 1976
APARTMENT MOVE IN SPECIAL
NO SECURITY DEPOSIT
FREE MOVING VAN
(UP TO $50)
(VALID FROM 52798 TO 7298)
2 BEDROOMS, 1 BATH APARTMENT
$375.00 PER MONTH
FREE WATER SEWER
900 SQUARE FEET
WASHER DRYER HOOK-UPS
DISHWASHER REFRIGERATOR STOVE
CENTRAL AIR AND HEAT
PETS O.K.
CALL: PITT PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
AT (252) 758-1921
(Must prmamnt ad for special, not valid with any other coupon)
i
r





I
I
6 Wednsedey. June 24, 1998
sports
The Eait Carolinian
Fans
deserve
all stars
Travis Barkley
sports editor
On July 7, Major League Baseball
will hold its annual All-Star game at
Coors Field (Denver), home of the
Colorado Rockies.
Many fans, myself included,
have been anxiously awaiting the
game as well as the home run hit-
ting contest the day before. Due to
the thin air in Denver, baseballs
travel a lot farther in Coors than
they do at most stadiums. This
year's home run derby could be one
of the greatest shows of power in
baseball history. Today's players are
bigger and stronger than ever
before. The potential for tape mea-
sured homers is very high. It may
be a chance to see some of the
longest home runs that will ever be
hit.
However, not everybody is excit-
ed about this potential home run
barrage.
Two of the best all-around play-
ers may be bowing out. Barry Bonds
and Ken Griffey Jr. said recently
that they would rather not partici-
pate in the home run derby. Both
say that they need the rest and
don't want the media or fan frenzy
of the contest.
Bonds says that he needs to rest
his ailing back. If this is true, then
why play in the actual game the
next day? If he is hurting that badly,
then he should do the fans a favor
and stay in San Francisco. While
Bonds is a great player and would
add a lot to the derby, he probably
won't be missed. There are plenty
of other deserving sluggers in the
National League who would be
glad to compete.
The All-Star break is a great
opportunity for the players to
make amends to the fans.
Griffey cites concerns about hav-
ing to "change his swing" to be in
the contest. This is an outrageous
claim when you consider that
Griffey hit 56 home runs last year,
one of the highest totals in history.
Griffey is a home run hitter, what
will he have to change? The derby
is the equivalent to a couple of extra
rounds of batting practice. The only
difference is that it will be televised
and someone will be keeping score.
While this kind of behavior
might be expected from Bonds,
who has a reputation of being
unfriendly towards fans, it is a bit of
a shock coming from Griffey.
Griffey is one of, if not the most
popular players in the game.
His refusal to participate is the
latest insult to baseball fans every-
where.
Fans are just now starting to
come back to baseball after the
1994 strike.
The All-Star break is a great
opportunity for the players to make
amends to the fans. Something as
simple as a home run hitting contest
could go a long way towards fans
forgiving the players for the strike.
With sluggers like Mark
McGwire, Sammy Sosa and Juan
Gonzalez, the contest will still be
exciting.
It's too bad that two of the best
players in the sport won't be partic-
ipating.
Jordan Golf Classic
Comes to Greenville
Left: Kim Zimmer
Above: NBA star Rodney
Ronald McDonald
House receives funds
Patrick Giovinazzo
staff writer
Greenville is about to, once again,
become the host of a national
celebrity event. The Michael
Jordan Celebrity Golf Classic will
begin next Friday, June 26, at the
Greenville Country Club with the
Celebrity Skins Game. This tour-
nament began back in 1984 as the
Eastern Carolina Celebrity Golf
Classic.
The objective of the event has
always been to raise money for the
Greenville Ronald McDonald
House. Michael Jordan made his
first appearance here in 1985,
while he was still playing for the
North Carolina Tar Heels. Then,
in 1988 Jordan donated $20,000
while serving as honorary chair-
man. A year later, the tournament
was renamed. Since then, the
MJCGC has been redesigned to
benefit all four McDonald Houses
in North Carolina.
This year's tournament should
prove to be particularly exciting.
For the first time, the event will
include a Celebrity Skins Game.
This will involve an interesting
format. Jordan will be playing
against three other surprise
celebrity golfers. Each hole will
have its own cash prize, called a
"skin and whoever wins a hole
receives the cash. A tie on any hole
pushes the cash prize to the next
one, and the money will just keep
accumulating until someone wins.
Half of all the money won will be
donated to a charity of the celebri-
ty's choice and the rest will go to
the Ronald McDonald Houses of
North Carolina.
The golf tournament itself will
be played Saturday and Sunday,
the 27th and 28th. Half of the
players and celebrities will tee off
on Saturday at 9:30 a.m. and the
other half will start Sunday at 9:00
a.m. Spectators will be able to pur-
chase one ticket to attend both
days. A new highlight of the event
will be a "best-ball" format. This
will allow each player to hit their
own ball from the tee to the green
rather than switching off between
teammates.
The fourth annual Celebrity
Jam will add more excitement to
the weekend. This year's Jam will
highlight the country, pop and
contemporary Christian stylings of
Gary Chapman, the host of TNN's
Prime Time Country and The CCM
Countdown. The concert, Friday at
8 p.m will be held in the Wright
Auditorium on the ECU campus.
Tickets for the Celebrity Jam are
on sale now at the ECU Central-
Ticket Office.
Right before the concert at 5:00
p.m the Dutch Boy Painting
from Guiding Light prepares to putt.
Rodgers (center) in last year's tournament.
FILE PHOTOS
Party will be held at Champagne's,
located the Greenville Hilton.
This is a special occasion for
Ronald McDonald I louse kids and
patients.
"You can see the faces of the
children light up as they meet
their favorite celebrities said Bill
Bowen, tournament chairman.
"You know what this event means
to them. This is a day for smiles
and laughter that they won't soon
forget
The kids arc teamed up with
celebrities to paint their own ver-
sion of "The House That Love
Built All of the paintings are
then autographed by both
painters, framed and sold at the
Celebrity Auction on Saturday.
So who will be attending this
year's tournament? Quite a wide
range of celebrities. Stephen
Baldwin, John Daly of Real-TV,
Patrick Duffy, Bob Eubanks,
Steve Guttenberg, Jeremy
London, Tim Meadows and
Damon Wayans will be a few of
the actors involved. From the
sports world, Ernie Banks, Jeff
SEE JORDAN PAGE 7
Students climb
Grand Tetons
Adventure gtvup
overcomes obstacles
Christopher R. Farnsworth
STAFF WRITER
Imagine laboring to breathe the
thin oxygen at 13,000 feet above
sea level. Waking at the crack of
dawn and hauling a sore body and
a heavy backpack up a hostile
mountainside. Sleeping on the
frozen ground, the temperature in
the low teens and it's late May.
Sometimes vomiting before bed-
time as dizzying altitudes and
dehydration take their dreadful
toll. Would this image fit the aver-
age description of an "amazing
Adventure Program employee Kyle England
PHOTO �1 MATT SMITH
experience"? It does for the seven
members of the East Carolina
Recreational Service's Adventure
Program who undertook a three
week mountain climbing excur-
sion to the Rocky Mountain
National Park in Colorado and the
Grand Tetons in Wyoming.
"It (the climb) was indescrib-
able Kyle England, a student
employee at the ECU Adventure
Program said. "You can see every-
thing. Once you get up there, you
just kind of look around. You real-
ize it's a gigantic accomplish-
ment
England and five other student
staffers, along with adviser John
Brown, left Greenville on May 17
and spent the first five days climb-
ing peaks such as Tailor Glacier
and the 14,300 feet Longs Peak in
the Rocky Mountain National
Park. The next six days were
spent in the Grand Tetons, where
the group scaled the Cascade
Canyon. They returned to
Colorado for the final days of the
trip.
Another student, Matt Smith,
commented on the effects of the
altitude and the demanding physi-
cal aspect. "Since we're all in pret-
ty good shape and we're experi-
enced, it never got too bad Smith
said. "The altitude hits different
people in different ways
A testament to Smith's observa-
tions was when Brown, the most
experienced and in-shape of the
group became nauseated during
the climb. The next night it was
Smith and England vomiting
because of the thin air and dehy-
dration. To keep these ailments to
a minimum, the group called upon
their experience in mountain
climbing and backpacking.
"We were really efficient
England explained. "For the most
part we felt no effects from the alti-
tude, except for Summerridge,
when we started to vomit
"We kept really good pace
Smith said. If we moved faster or
had heavier packs, it would have
been worse
When the sun rose above the
peaks like a multi-hued explosion
of light, however, the climbers
were ready, willing and able.
The trip served as a learning
1
Making the climb (from left to right): Josh Lindgren, John Brown, Kyle England,
Virginia Walser and Alan Houfek
PHOTO BY MATT SMITH
experience as well, for the group of
student staff members who belong
to a club called Natural Extremes.
The club raised the money for the
trip and the Adventure Program
supplied most of the gear and the
supervision.
The site was not chosen ran-
domly, Brown said.
"These mountains offered all
kinds of obstacles and required
many skills Brown said. "Snow,
ice, backpacking, food preparation,
altitude. Not the least of which
were self-confidence and personal
achievement
"It's cold and you're by your-
self England said. "Some people
backed off of the same climb, but
we didn't
Smith remarked on the risks
and consequences of the climbs
when he said, "It takes all your
strength and dedication. It's all
you. You can either quit or go on,
but if you screw up, you can die
Dire conditions, indeed, but
without a doubt remarkable ones.
If interested in participating in
some of the excursions the
Adventure Department have
planned, contact either John
Brown or Steve Bobbitt at the
ECU Student Recreation Center.
Celebrity
Players
Running Back
Dallas Cowboys
Jason
Point Guard
Pheonix Suns
Quarterback
ECU, Cinncinnati
Bengals
Wide Receiver
Carolina Panthers
Willie
Green
Wide Receiver
Denver Broncos
Otuart
Scott
ESPN
SportsCenter
Anchor
Prop 62
allows
athletes
to work
Players may earn
extra money
Jim P ii v. i. p s
STAFF WRITER
I
Proposition 62 is a new NCAA rule
that allows athletes to have jobs
and earn money in addition to
what they're allowed from their
scholarships. Various questions
have arisen concerning how ECU
and its athletes will handle these
new regulations when it goes into
effect August 1.
"We have not really fine tuned
the paperwork yet said Rosie
Thompson, director of compliance
for ECU.
Full grant scholarship athletes
at ECU before Proposition 62
were unable to hold jobs of their
own to earn extra cash. Already
they have their books, tuition,
fees, and room and board paid for
them.
Under Proposition 62 athletes
will be able to earn as much as
$2,000 during a school year.
"We will monitor the actual
employment of the athletes and
any outside jobs that are given to
them Thompson said. "The
employer will sign a document
agreeing to pay the athlete for
work done
With employers signing this
document, it prohibits any unfair
or large sum payments to athletes.
SEE NCAA PAGE 7






lit Carolinian
Ity
vers
nm it
nith
ning Back
as Cowboys
ason
idd
nt Guard
lonix Suns
ake
rterback
I, Cinncinnati
gals
aghib
nail
e Receiver
ilina Panthers
nine
reen
ie Receiver
lver Broncos
tuart
cott
PN
artsCenter
chor
.62
ws
ttes
ork
jyearn
oney
I. PS
TER
cw NCAA rule
i to have jobs
n addition to
ed from their
ins questions
ing how ECU
I handle these
en it goes into
ally fine tuned
said Rosie
of compliance
irship athletes
reposition 62
i jobs of their
:ash. Already
ooks, tuition,
board paid for
in 62 athletes
n as much as
ol year,
or the actual
: athletes and
it are given to
i said. "The
a document
ie athlete for
signing this
its any unfair
its to athletes.
�E7

7 Wednesday, June 24. 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
NEWMAN
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
Welcome Summer Students!
Jordan
continued fiom page 6
Mass Schedule:
� Sun: 11:30am and 8:30pm
� Wed: 5:30pm
� All Masses are at the Center
We look forward to seeing you!
rcl In I In- i- nun (
H:30.im .mil ')pm.
directions to site
unit plan -1230 sq. ft.
?student housing
gets no better!
NEW STUDENT
CONDOMINIUMS FOR SALE
YOU GET THESE FEATURES
AND MANY MORE:
�3 BEDROOMS
� 3 BATHROOMS
�3 WALK-IN CLOSETS
�WALKING DISTANCE FROM CAMPUS
�SELECT YOUR OWN ROOMMATES
�SAVE THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS ON
EDUCATIONAL COST
DON'T MAKE THE MISTAKE OF NOT
DISCUSSING THIS WITH YOUR PARENTS.
AVAILABLE AUGUST 1, 1998!
A SMALL DEPOSIT WILL RESERVE YOUR UNIT
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
CALL TOLL FREE 1-800 440 5378
ONLY 24 UNITS
SPECIAL FINANCING AVAILABLE
Blake, Willie Green, Lou Holtz,
Evander Holyfield, Raghib
"Rocket" Ismail, Michael Jordan
(of course), Jason Kidd, Jim
Palmer, Stuart Scott, Emmit
Smith and Lynn Swann will be
participating.
"Every year we are thrilled and
honored that so many well-known
celebrities want to donate their
time to come to Greenville and
support the North Carolina
Ronald McDonald Houses
Tournament Director Pam
Crocker said. A total of 50 celebri-
ties will team up this year to help
raise funds for the North Carolina
Ronald McDonald Houses.
With all this action going on
right here in Greenville, few will
want to miss out. The skins game
isn't open to the public, but two
day tickets to Brook Valley can be
purchased at $10 for adults, $5 for
kids six to 12 and kids under age
six get in free. Tickets can be
bought on event days at a parking
facility that will be opened at
Minges Coliseum. Shuttle buses
will run throughout both days to
transport ticket-holders to and
from Brook Valley.
This is the last year of Brook
Valley's six-year contract with the
Michael Jordan Golf Tournament.
As of now, Brook Valley is unsure
of whether the tournament will
return there or not.
"I don't know if they are inter-
ested to renew the contract
Brook Valley General Manager
Armando Pinto said. "We will find
that out after the tournament this
year
While this might leave some
fans and supporters of the tourna-
ment worried, there is apparently
no need. A representative of
Faulkner & Faulkner Associates
Advertising, the company that
organizes and maintains the event,
has said, "It will not leave
Greenville. Whether it be at Brook
Valley or not, it will not leave
Greenville
Everybody wants an autograph,
so remember to be patient and
courteous. TheMichael Jordan
Celebrity Golf Classic could possi-
bly bring as much joy to the city of
Greenville as it will to the hun-
dreds of young children that will
.delight in this experience and
benefit from its proceeds.
schedule of events
FRIDAY iini- 26 EVENT
10:00 a.m.
Greenville Country Club
3:00-5:00 p.m.
Champagne's at the Hilton
8:00 p.m.
Wright Auditorium. ECU
Celebrity Skins Game
Dutch Boy Painting Party
Celebrity Jam
SATURDAY June 27 EVENT
8:15 a.m.
Brook Valley Country Club
9:30 a.m.
Brook Valley Country Club
2:00-4:00 p.m.
Greenville McDonald House
Michael Jordan Press Meeting
1st Round Tournament
Ronald McDonald House
SUNDAY une 28 EVENT
9:00 a.m.
Brook Valley Country Club
2nd Round Tournament
These locations not open to public.
Source: 1998 Michael Jordan Celebrity Golf Classic Media Kn
NCAA
continued from page 6
"I think Proposition 62 is in the
best interest of the athlete that is
denied the opportunities that
other students have because they
are . on a full scholarship
�aaaawiaawaaM
Thompson said.
Opponents of Proposition 62
have a different view. They ques-
tion where the athletes are going
to find time to work during the
school year. They say that it leaves
the door open for athletes to
accept "bogus" jobs from boosters
that don't require a lot of work and
pay outrageous amounts.
Although, it appears that the feel-
ing for Proposition 62 is a positive
one in Pirate Country. The view is
that it gives the athletes what they
were denied before and permits'
them to extend their responsibili-
ties beyond the demands of acade-
mics, practice and games.
When asked how she felt over-
all about Proposition 62,
Thompson stated, "It's a good
thing
M0
i
v

Outdoor Pool Hours
Monday- Friday 10:00am- 6:00pm
Saturday- Sunday 11:00am- 6:00pm
Weather permitting � may be subject to change
Fitness H
Ab Solution Date July 15 Cost Free 5:30pm-6:30pm SRC
You and a partner can work together with a Personal Trainer to reach your fitness goals. 12
Price Personal Training for packages of 8 sessions. 12 sessions, and 16 sessions, for mere
Information or to register for Partner Training call 328-6381 or stop by the SBC Main Office.
JULY3
THROUGH
JULY 5
Adventures
Outdoor Adventure Camp I
Climbing Camp
Intramural
n 3 Basketball Reg,
Date July 6-10 Ages 8-11 Cost $80
Date Jun. 28-Jul. 2 Ages 14-99 Cost$isc
CLOSED
ate June
nwn
For More Information Contact Recreational Services At 328-6387.





FOR RENT
FOR RENT: S BLOCKS from ECU.
1 bedroom, 1 bath, living area &
kitchen, female only, cable & local
phone included-unfurnished-
$360.00 a month 13 utilities. No
pets. No smokers. Call 919-497-
0809 or 800-667-0032 & leave
message. '
NEED FEMALE ROOMMATE to
share four bedroom townhouse at
Player's Club. Contact Kelly at
(919)863-3048. Leave name and
number if not available.
FEMALE NONSMOKER ROOM-
MATE needed for apartment two
blocks from campus. Pay $175.00
13 utilities for own room. Call
Becky or Heidi at 758-1317.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
starting August 1st. Share 2 bdrm.
at Tar River Estates. Master bdrm.
wwalk-in closet $260mo. 12
utilities, 6 mo. or 1 yr. lease. Call
413-0806.
SUBLEASE APARTMENT, College
Town Row, near campus. $420
month. 2 bdrm. Contact Bradley. 551-
3177.
TWO, 2 BEDROOM DUPLEX apts.
3 blocks ECU. Refinished hardwood
floors. Very clean. $495 and $545,
12 mo. Aug. 1 st lease. No dogs. 752-
3816, leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
to move into two bedroom house on
Summit Street ASAP. Nice location.
Ask for Stephanie at 754-9971 or
leave message.
2000 SQ.FT. HOME, 4 bedrooms.
3 baths, extra large fenced-in back-
yard, washer & dryer, near ECU &
PCMH, $800 per month, purchase
available. 624-5790.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bed apt $275
mo avail, now. Tanglewood Apts
125 Avery St Greenville. 768-6696
2 MALE ROOMMATES NEEDED
for Fall to share 3400 sq. ft. home
near campus, $250 per month. 15
utilities. Ask for Tim, 931-9165.
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
wanted to fill 6 bedroom house.
$226 per month. Split food and utili-
ties. Two blocks from campus. Call
919-438-4427.
PRIVATE ROOM AVAILABLE im-
mediately, walking distance from
campus and downtown. Large room
(15x15'). Private phone linecable
in room. Washerdryer included.
$175 per month plus utilities. Call
Mike at 752-2879.
SUMMER ROOMMATE, CUTE
apartment, your own bedroom and
bathroom, washerdryer in apart-
ment, very close to campus. Call
Kathleen 752-2705.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Georgetown Apts. across from REC
center, 1 12 bath, WD, large room
for rent. Call April 752-2209, leave a
message! Need ASAP!
ROOM FOR RENT: clean, respon-
sible person needed to share new 3
bedroom house. $225 plus utilities.
2 miles from campus. Upperclass-
man or grad student preferred. Avail-
able July 1st. 752-2116.
2 BR. APT. AVAILABLE now above
Percolator Coffeehouse. $460 a
month! Please call 768-2616, ask for
Yvonne.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED,
share 2 bedroom, 1 12 bath
townhouse $225. 12 phoneutili-
ties, on ECU bus route. Call 756-
7128, leave message. Need ASAP.
HELP WANTED
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROUNA SKY SPORTS
(919)49634
GENERAL YARD WORK such as
weeding and edging. The yard is part
of the annual Greenville Yard and
Garden Show. Dickinson Avenue in
Greenville, $5hr. 356-1793.
FREELANCE COPYWRITER. The
Ad Agency of Greenville, Inc. seeks
experienced copywriters for Impres-
sions magazine and agency assign-
ments. Graduate students or experi-
enced writers in the English or Com-
munications program preferred.
Please send resume and writing
samples to: 101 East Victoria Court,
Suite A, Greenville, NC 27858
STUDENTS: LOOKING FOR part-
time work with flexible hours so you
can still enjoy your Summer vaca-
tion. The ECU TeleFund is now hir-
ing for Summer and Fall. $5.50 per
hour plus bonus. Contact the
Telefund Office between 2 and 5 M-
Th at 328-4212.
NEEDED: SOMEONE to do
teleservicing and selling of office
furniture. Must be enthusiastic, posi-
tive and willing to work. Call 931-
6904 and leave a message.
HIRING - CONSTRUCTION ALL
trades. Must have experience and
valid drivers license. Flexible hours
andor full-time Summer and Fall
work available. Page Tim at 551-
7166. Handy Helpers, Inc.
SUMMER JOBS AVAILABLE.
Joan's Fashions, a local Women's
Clothing store, is now recruiting for
summer positions. Employees are
needed for Saturdays and weekdays
between 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
The positions are for between 7 and
20 hours per week, depending on
your schedule and on business
needs. The jobs are within walking
distance of the university and the
hours are flexible. Pay is commen-
surate with your experience and job
performance and is supplemented
by an employee discount. Apply in
person to Store Manager, Joan's
Fashions. 423 S. Evans Street,
Greenville (on the Downtown Mall).
OFFICE WORK - GOOD PHONE
communication skills and computer
experience needed, Quickbooks Pro,
Excel, Word. Good pay, flexible
schedule, casual dress work environ-
ment. Call Tim at pagei 551-7156
andor send your resume to PO Box
3166, Greenville, NC 27836 or fax to
756-6632. (Handy Helpers, Inc.) 2-3
positions available.
OTHER
ADORABLE KITTENS WITH un-
usual colors need a loving family!
Ask for Stephanie at 764-9971 or
leave message.
GOV'T. FORECLOSED HOMES
from pennies on $1. Delinquent tax,
repo's. REO's. Your area. Toll Free 1-
800-218-9000 ext. H-3726 for cur-
rent listings.
FREE CASH GRANTSI College
scholarships. Business. Medical bills.
Never repay. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000, ext. G-3726.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175.
Porsches, Cadillacs, Chevys. BMWs,
Corvettes. Also Jeeps, 4WDs. Your
area. Toll free 1-800-218-9000, ext.
A-3726.
PERSONALS
LADIES: LEND ME your sore ach-
ing muscles. Amateur masseur
needs your back to practice on. Call:
Kyle 1-800-484-8546 (code 2465)
or POB 8663, Greenville, NC 27835.
SERVICES
WILL TYPE YOUR PAPERS or the-
sis for you. 10 yrs. typing experience.
Excellent quality. $2.00 per page
321-0668.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT
CENTER wishes to welcome Sum-
mer Students and invite you to wor-
ship with us. Sunday Mass Sched-
ule: 11:30 a.m. and 8:30 p.m.
Wednesdays: 5:30 p.m. The
Newman Center is located at 953
E. 10th St, two houses from Fletcher
Music Building. Call 757-1991.
COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
CHURCH Pastor James Corbett will
host a Rebuilder's Fellowship, which
is designed to provide a special time
of ministry for those who have been
divorced, separated or widowed.
The fellowship will take place Mon-
day, June 29 at Community Chris-
tian Academy, 2009 Highway 33.
Greenville, at 7:30 p.m. For more
information call 551-9143.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: FULL SIZE mattress
and boxspring. like new, $100.
Matching sofa and loveseat, $150.
Call 757-0125.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
Security S�po�Jt
with prmnUUon 0( this coupon, oft�r �plr��
801OT not vnM with �ny olnw coupon
-WEBUV COMMON SOUTH: 'Of 2 bedroom.
1 bath. range, refrigerator, free waterseww.
wa6herdryer hookups, free basic cable in
some units, laundry facilities. 5 blocks from
campus. ECU bus services.
uukwton park: 2 bedroom, 1 bam
range, refrigerator, dishwasher, free
watitfsewer. and basic cable, appro. 900 sq
ft mtsherdryer hookups, central heala. 6
block from campus.
COMPUTTEIY HENOVATEO UNITS AVAILABLE
-All Properties have 24 hi emergency maintenance-
.OQQQerneot
MMlkrti Houm
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Need TimbetUrtd boon
And shoes! Good Jeans.
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry It Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00, 2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door k ring buzzer.
comics
Need to find a roommate
to share your apartment?
The East Carolinian classifieds.
Life on Tuesday
Chris Knotts France
Rafael Santos
ftcuc TMJnxr n CMHA
Life on Tuesday
Chris Knotts Wild Thing
N. Miles
WEDNESDA
JULY 1,1998
Pla
on
Missing
than on
Am a
The ECU PI
arrested Th
Financial Cri
embezzling n
Theatre Art
Faircloth, pis
treasurer of
foundation, v
of embezz
$15,000, an a
doubled sine
May. �
Faircloth v
with pay in
missing fum
Pou
du
Final
Today is the d
the real thinf
Cola and Coca
at ECU are di
Exclusive
all university v
at sports even
tion, the comf
efit of exclusn
product promt
Richard Brt
istration and f
are expected
nies have beei
make clarificat
If all bids
Trustees final
their July 17 n
"The choio
all bids or ac
"(The Board
the highest bic
efits for the un
It is the Bo:
to review both
"The inforr
a spreadsheet
value of the
"The evaluat
spreadsheets a
cons
There are
committee wil
will have to re'
ty, modified ex
panies to have
whether the cc
five or 10 years
"There are i
a major factor
offered and eqi
are about the o
Brown said
lent reputation
SE


Title
The East Carolinian, June 24, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 24, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1277
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy