The East Carolinian, June 10, 1998






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WEDNESDAY
JUNE 10.1998
eastcarolinian
EAST CAROUNA UNIVERSITY
GREENVIUi, NORTH CAROUNA
Senator Ed Warren proposes 3 bills to benefit university
S3 milion already received
for science, technology building
William LeLiever
staff writer
Senator Ed Warren recently proposed three
bills to appropriate money for the universi-
ty's Science and Technology Building, the
multipurpose strength and conditioning
center and for doctoral pro-
grams.
Chancellor Richard Eakin
said Warren has already gotten
$3 million to assist in the science
and technology building, but
the current bill asks for $10 mil-
lion. The total projected cost of
the building is $57 million. The
science and technology build-
ing, slated to replace the
Flanagan Building, is one of the
university's most needed neces-
Ed Warren
NC senator
FILE PHOTO
Macs.
"Senator Warren is asking the
general assembly for $10 million
more in funding to construct the
science and technology building
said Richard Brown, vice chancel-
lor for administration and finance.
'This is the most important facili-
ty project facing the university
due to its tremendous need. The
existing science and laboratory
facilities are inadequate and need
updating
"The existing science and laboratory
facilities are inadequate and need
updating
Richard Brown
Vice chancellor for administration and finance
Warren said that since the board of gov-
ernors approved ECU's doctoral status, it
puts the school on the same funding level
as the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill and N.C. State. Warren said
ECU should be getting $12 million a year
but the university budget will not be
� determined until later on.
"It is of the utmost importance that we
make this happen and set proper fund-
ing Warren said.
"It is really to record that there have
been costs in moving from a comprehen-
sive university to doctoral institution
SEE WARREN PAGE 3
Privatization
approved
PCMH was granted privatization in a 5-3 vote June 1. ECU
Medical School will not be affected by the changes.
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
PCMH receives 5-3 vote from county
commisioners June 1
TK Jones
STAFF WRITER
BOT chair
pays $2,350
lawyer fees
Attorney General prohibited
payment of more than $3,000
Rumors about
evaluation forms false
TK Jones
STAFF WRITER
It's official. A June 1 vote by county commissioners gave Pitt
County Memorial Hospital the green light on privatization.
But only a week after the vote, voices are already rising
against the decision.
Although the hospital is now private, it will remain not-
for-profit, meaning, unlike private hospitals owned by prof-
it-seeking companies, PCMH's control will remain local
with a 55 percent governing body in Pitt County.
"This is going to allow us to operate more efficiently and
on equal footing with the other private, not-for-profit med-
ical centers such as Duke and Wake Medical Center said
Doug Boyd, hospital spokesman.
"There won't be any noticeable changes for anyone
other than the attorneys and the accountants that we deal
with on corporate matters Boyd said.
One of the biggest concerns Was whether or not services
would be rendered to the indigent. According to the terms
SEE HOSPITAL. PAGE 3
the 15 minutes students spend
darkening the circles in Student
Opinion of Institution Surveys
(SOIS) could change a professor's
life.
During the end of each semester
students are given a chance to eval-
uate professors in 19 areas of effec-
tiveness. That means about 48 sec-
onds per question to contemplate
on how assignments and lectures
have contributed to better their
education.
Many believe that the surveys
are adjusted to throw out extreme
choices and count only the remain-
ing five. Others say it's the middle
circle, no.4, one should stay away
from because it means undecided,
and it's the one that's thrown out.
"I've always heard that rumor
about not marking the extremes
said Ben Kley, junior. "When it's a
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
professor you really thought was
great, you throw in a couple of
goods (sixes instead of sevens); it
won't hurt them anyway
Besides the confusion of which
circles are counted, is another con-
fusion: What, if anything are the
surveys used for?
"I don't think they're used at all.
I think they (the university) does
them just to say they did
According to Damon Wcrwie,
junior.
But Dr. Robert Thompson,
director of Planning and
Institutional Research, says all
seven circles are accounted for and
weigh heavily on a professor's
career.
They are so heavily valued that
ECU began them approximately 10
years before the UNC system
required their use.
"What we look for are trends - is
someone's evaluations improving or
declining?" Thompson said. "Just
because someone marks low scores
for a professor, it doesn't mean the
professor won't get tenured.
Instead it is entered within the
other responses the professor
receives over a period of time
Dr. Margaret Capen, chair of the
Decision Sciences department in
the School of Business said aver-
ages can be affected by extreme
values, and that distributions of
responses give a more complete
understanding of the responses.
She gave the example if one person
marks no. 7 and another marks
no.l, then the item mean is a four
for the professor. The same item
mean can be generated if one per-
son marks no. 3 and another marks
no. 5
"That's one improvement in the
style of the new SOIS surveys over
the previous format Capen said.
"The former ones didn't give us
distributions of responses, only
means and standard deviations.
The new format gives all three
In other words, with each profes-
sor a list of the distribution of
grades accompanies a list totaling
how many times each of the seven
circles is darkened. Hence, this is
how to get a more accurate reading
of two professors who each score
SEE TENURE. PAGE 3
Amanda Austin
NEWS EDITOR
Ben Irons
Univ. Attorney
Justice may be blind, but it
isn't always free.
The Board of Trustees
was informed by the State
Attorney General that the
University was not responsi-
ble for $2,350 in lawyer fees
when an outside lawyer was
hired to handle a sizable,
confidential litigation.
While one bill, totaling
$3,155.13, was paid by the
university, another bill for file photo
$2,350 was paid by Board of
Trustees Chair H.R. "Gene" Rayfield.
"The decision was made by Mr. Rayfield and
the Board of Trustees to consult with an outside
attorney said Ben Irons, university attorney.
At the time the first bill was paid, Irons and
Rayfield were involved in a discussion with the
attorney general about the litigation and Irons was
unaware that the university had paid the initial
fee.
When the second bill for $2,350 was sent to the
chancellor's office, the chancellor proceeded to
discuss the bill with Irons.
"The chancellor was attempting to act in
accordance with the law and be respectful of the
chairman and the Board of Trustees Irons said.
SEE LAWYER PAGE 3
Grad wins design competition for allergy-safe house
Made for person with low
stamina, chemical sensitivity
Mohamed Hussein
staff writer
A former interior design major at ECU is
not sniffling about her award winning
allergy-safe house.
Michelle Puckett Jenkins, a
Washington resident, recently represented
herself, and ECU, at the annual
Affordable Comfort Incorporated confer-
ence on May 4-9 in Madison, Wis.
TODAY
Thunderstorms
high 91
low 65
TOMORROW
Thunderstorms
high 85
low 72
Dr. Katherine
Warsco of the ECU
School of Human
Environmental
Sciences supervised
the project.
"Michelle did
work in the depart-
ment of interior
design under me and
I had put her under
the Environmental
Protection Agency
grant Warsco said.
The EPA gave a
grant to ECU to do research on numerous
subjects.
Jenkins designed a benign house for
Katherine Warsco
Human,
Environmental
Sciences
FILE PHOTO
Warsco and the interior
design department in the
hope of making a allergy-
free house.
Her entry into the
competition was a house
designed for a person
with low stamina, many
allergies and a sensitivity
to a variety of chemicals.
The design featured,
passive solar heating and
cooling, easy access
throughout the home and
the use systems that are
used to keep the house
free of radon, dust particles, spores and
other pollutants.
WEDNESDAY
Michelle Puckett Jenkins represented the university at the annual
Affordable Comfort Incorporated conference, may 4-9.
In the conference, Jenkins was the only
student not enrolled in an interior design
graduate program, while all the other con-
testants were graduate students.
According to Warsco, Jenkins' work
illustrates the pure academic excellence
of East Carolina University and it's grad-
uates.
"The award shows the quality of
ECU's interior design department
Warsco said.
Contest judges later invited Puckett to
be a key-note speaker in the next ACI
conference.
Jenkins graduated from ECU last
December and works as a design consul-
tant with an architect team at the ECU
School of Medicine.
Opinion
Lifestyle
HSports
University myth
or fact?
Changes coming to
Student Union Films
sf
Online Survey
Ingram competes
at NCAA
championships
www.tec.ecu.edu
"Did you believe you would get a 4.0 GPA for
the semester if your roommate committed
suicide?
Answer in next week's TEC
the east Carolinian STUDENT PUBLICATION BLDG, GREENVILLE, NC 27858 across from Joyner library - newsroom 328-6366 advertising 328-2000 fax 328-6558 website www.tec.ecu.edu





' Wedneidiy, Jum 10, 1898
news
The Eist Carolinian
I
Chatting t
with thin
ancellor
Q
Q
Q
What are your thoughts on the $1.2 million legislative cuts and
their effect on vehicle replacement and maintenance?
It is very frustrating to have to experience a $1.2 million cut in '�
the face of what is perhaps one of the very best years the state of
North Carolina has experienced. Our $1.2 million cut is second j
highest of the universities in the UNC-systcm. It is the result of
happenstance in that when the governor's office decided to make j
cuts they looked for line items that were especially high and our !
need this year for vehicles was especially urgent. By virtue of the !
lines that they picked ECU was the recipient of what anyone '�
would recognize as a disproportionate cut We were an unlucky j
participant. !
The Board of Trustees has decided to request bids from Pepsi j
and Coca-Cola to determine the advantage of offering either com- !
pany exclusive pouring rights. What will this mean for ECU?
When the board decided to request proposals for the exclusive
pouring rights on ECU's campus, they committed to reviewing �
the proposals and determining if any proposal is in the best inter- j
est of ECU. They will receive proposals. They will review them, j
and they will take one or none of them They have decided to '�
find out what the pouring rights would be worth.
Letters to the editor have expressed a sense of obligation to the !
Minges family because they have been donors in the past and �
because John Minges owns the local Pepsi bottler. The issue !
seems to have struck an emotional cord with many people. Will j
the Board of Trustees consider the Minges family when they !
make a decision?
The board will make that choice based on the university's best '�
interest. :
Should the board decide to offer exclusive rights to one of the j
cola companies, what will the money from the company be used '
for? :
Q
Q
It may be a proposal would suggest that money be used for
1 specific conditions or it may come without any conditions.
There are several for instances. The money could be used for
academic scholarships, athletic scholarships, money for capi-
tal projects or money for the general benefit of the university.
We have, as you know, been for some time engaged in a project to
improve the amount and quality of our academic scholarships.
Many people have expressed through letters to the editor that
you wrongly ignored the Due Process Hearing Committee's deci-
sion concerning Sal DcMarco's employment.
I hate to do this, but I really must say that I have no comment
at this time because DeMarco's situation is ongoing with the uni-
versity.
What would you recommend that students "stuck in
Greenville" for summer school do with their free time? What are
your plans for fun this summer?
We're going to spend the 4th of July holiday visiting my son
and his wife in IndianapolisAs for students who have the oppor-
tunity to be in Greenville this summer: I believe that North
Carolina has some of the finest beaches of any state in the Union
and I believe that would be a nice break for students to head to
the beach on a hot daySummer theater is really especially fine
during the summer. It is theater of a quality you would find in
New York City and is a wonderful way to spend a summer
eveningGreenville has also come to the point where we have
some of the finest courses in North CarolinaBradford Creek is a
public course A game of golf would be a nice break.
Warren
continued from page 1
Brown said. "This will provide
increased resources to fulfill our
expanded mission
Warren's bill for the multipur-
pose strength and conditioning
center asks for $2 million to be
appropriated if that amount can be
matched and doubled by non-state
funds.
"The state is going to desig-
.news
briefs
s I .) i e
Judge may grant bond
to computer sex
charges suspect
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) � A
federal magistrate judge is consid-
ering granting bond to a North
Carolina man charged with using an
online computer service to entice a
14-year-old Anniston girl into sexu-
al acts.
U.S. Magistrate Judge Paul
Greene denied bond to Cleveland
Howard Jr. last week. But Greene
has since said he will reconsider
releasing Howard into the custody
of his business partner and requir-
ing he be placed on electronic
home detention.
State dedicates boot
camp for women
HOFFMAN (AP) � North
Carolina dedicated its first boot
camp for women Tuesday, promis-
ing the women would be treated
the same as men.
The $1.9 million IMPACT boot
camp in Richmond County, built
with inmate labor, will accept its
first trainees Monday. IMPACT is
a highly structured military-style
program for probationers between
the ages of 16 and 30.
across
t h e
nation
Washington's oldest
museum receives
Picasso painting
WASHINGTON (AP) � The
Corcoran Gallery of Art is the neW
owner of a still-life painted by
Pablo Picasso.
The small oval painting, "A
Glassbn a Table is being donat-
ed by Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz and
her family. Museum officials
declined to estimate the value of
the work, which is the first Picasso
painting in its collection.
The dark painting, completed
in 1913, is in the cubist style.
Experts see a fruit bowl, a newspa-
per and a faceted glass.
Ms. Leeds-Hurwitz said the
painting came from her grandmoth-
er, Lise Bernheimer Rheinstrom,
who bought it before fleeing Nazi
nate $2 million for this project
Warren said. "Mike Hamrick
(ECU athletic director) and the
Pirate Club have already raised
$8 million, more than enough to
match it
News Wr
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Widneidiy,
Germany for Cuba in 1941.
Mall settles race
discrimination case
ST. ANN, Mo. (AP) � A suburban
St. Louis mall has agreed to pay
$40,000 to settle a lawsuit alleging a
shopper was harassed because he
was black.
The American Civil Liberties
Union sued Northwest Plaza last
year on behalf of Frank Mack. In
19, security guards ordered Mack
to leave the mall because he wore a
bandanna tied around his leg. The
guards claimed the bandanna vio-
lated the mall's unwritten dress
code.
Islamic women
sidestep Turkish
head-scarf ban by
wearing wigs
ANKARA, Turkey (AP) � In
Turkey's ongoing conflict between
the religious and secular, some
women have found a way to bypass
a government ban on Islamic head-
dress replacing scarves with wigs.
Under Turkish law, women can
be fined up to a quarter of their
salaries for appearing in public-
offices and schools with their heads
covered with cloth � as many
believe Islamic custom requires.
To sidestep the law, women in
central Turkey's Islamic strong-
holds have been buying and wear-
ing wigs, in hospitals and state
offices.
Demonstrators demand
economic bailout
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) �
About a dozen demonstrators
staged a peaceful protest outside
the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta,
demanding Washington expedite a
$43 billion economic bailout by the
International Monetary Fund.
The protest, the latest in a series
outside the embassy in recent days,
coincided with the arrival of an
IMF team in Jakarta.
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Ent Cirolinitn
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itals and state
rs demand
bailout
esia (AP) �
demonstrators
irotest outside
y in Jakarta,
;ton expedite a
: bailout by the
ary Fund,
atest in a series
in recent days,
arrival of an
3 Wednmdiy, June 10, 1998
news
The Eitt Carolinian
?
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Tenure
continued from page 1
fours for a mean.
The results are used to evaluate
professors for a number of criteria.
Not only are they used by depart-
ment heads to determine applica-
bility for teaching awards, they also
are used when determining merit
pay, annual raises, evaluations and
tenure.
After six years of teaching at
ECU, professors are then eligible
to apply for tenure. Requirements
vary between departments, but all
begin the process by creating port-
folio (referred to as "PAD").
' Student evaluations, together
with grade distributions, references,
examples of tests and class projects,
research and a teaching philosophy
are packed into a portfolio for appli-
cation of tenure.
Simultaneous to applying for
tenure is the application for promo-
tion. Though promotion usually
happens, it is not guaranteed.
There have been instances where
professors were denied promotion,
but were soon promoted after
resolving committee reservations.
And tenured is not always
received.
A professor who does not have
tenure is under a two-year contract-
ed with the university, and when
the contract has reached maturity
and evaluation occurs to determine
renewal. After a professor's sixth
year, if he wasn't granted tenure, he
is eligible to teach one more year
with ECU before employment is
terminated.
Tenure is important to professors
for two reasons. Not only does it
allow them to settle into a career
with the university without risk of
unemployment, it also provides
them with academic protection for
research and unpopular points of
view.
Lawyer
continued from page
Both Irons and Chancellor
Richard Eakin agreed they had
concerns for the university over
whether or not outside counsel
could be approved without consult-
ing the attorney general.
'The attorney general is counsel
for all state agencies, including the
university Irons said. "For that
reason the attorney general usually
represents the university where lit-
igation is pending. Alternate coun-
sel cannot be selected without con-
sultation from the attorney gener-
al
After meeting with Eakin and
Irons, deputy attorney general
Andrew Venare confirmed the con-
cerns.
"Andy Venare confirmed the
university did not have the authori-
ty to pay the bill under the circum-
stances Irons said.
Venare discussed the situation
with the outside attorney and came
to the agreement that the universi-
ty could pay $3,000, approximately
what the university had already
paid.
"I was informed by the state
attorney generals office that I could
not give a payment beyond $3,000
to a non-university attorney Eakin
said.
Irons said Rayfield's concern was
that the second bill had not been
paid.
"I just paid it myself because I
was embarrassed for the Board of
Trustees Rayfield said.
No board action was taken in the
matter.
Hospital
continued from page 1
of the agreement, the new private,
not-for-profit hospital will serve all
citizens regardless of their ability to
pay for the service.
In lieu of taxes to Pitt County,
the hospital will make a payment of
$1.2 million payable on Jan. 5,1999.
After 1999 the corporation will
make payments to the county equal
to the current tax on the hospital's
real estate and personal property.
Also the new corporation must pay
the county $30 million in cash with-
in the next two years.
Under the umbrella of county-
owned hospital, PCMH was
exempt from paying taxes.
County Commissioner Eugene
James was one of the three in oppo-
sition. He said even though he's not
satisfied with the outcome, he
hopes it will work so that Pitt
County doesn't go broke by a wrong
decision.
James said, "I voted against the
hospital going private for several
reasons The deal wasn't treated
equally in comparison to other
counties, such as Edgecombe who
received $80 million Several oper-
ations took place behind closed
doors, without my being included
and any business making $30-50
mill should not be changed when
they are doing so well as it is
James continued, "We'll see in
the years to come. We won't find
out in a year, it'll take a little longer
than that to spend $216 million, but
we'll see (the results of the vote) in
the end
ECU School of Medicine will
not be affected by the change. The
private, not-for-profit hospital will
maintain the current affiliation with
the medical school.
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I
Wtdrmdiy, Jun� 10, 1998
opinion
The East Carolinian
east&rolinian
Amy L.Rovster Ediiw
Heather Burgess Managing Editor
Amanda Austin Ntws Editor Travis Harkl.kv Sports Editor
IK JONES Assistant News Editor TRACY Hairr Assistant Spons Editor
Andy Turner Lifsityfe Editor Carole Mehle Head Copy Editor
Miccah Smith AssistantLilestyteEditoi Chris Knotts Staff lltustfaiot
Matt Hege Advertising Manager
Bobby "Higgle Webmaster
Serving the ECU cotmwHty vnce 19ft. tha East Caiohruen publahes 11.000 copes evtiy tosdq and ThundaY Tht tead editorial in each edition h the opm
mo of the Ediioriet Board. The Easi Caiotinian wtltomn letretj id the eiw. hnuud to 750 wotita. which may ba ad-tad 'or decency or tunny Tha Eew
Cwotimm mtftti iht right ro edt rx repel tatters lot pubhcanon A tetterj muii ba signed. Laittrs ihouW ba eddietted to: Opinion editor .The East
Carolinian. Student Publications Building. ECU, Greenville. 778&B43&3. f'oi information, calf 91
WP
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41
With orientation beginning this week and a new group of naive freshmen on the way, we here at TEC decid-
ed that we should take the time to address several well known rumors and folk legends about ECU.
1. If a professor is ten minutes late for class, it is okay to leave.
There are several variations to this rule, five to ten minutes for a regular professor, 15 minutes for a doctor.
Unfortunately this is not official ECU policy. Although it is not an official rule, chances are that if your professor
isn't in class 15 minutes after it starts, they are probably not going to be there.
2. If your roommate commits suicide you automatically get a 4.0 for the semester.
Before you start thinking of a way to bump off your roommate to make it look like a suicide, keep in mind that
it is not true.
Assistant Dean Laura Sweet says she has never even heard of the policy.
"I'm not aware of it Sweet said. "But it's not a bad idea
3. If you bubble in all fives or all ones on teacher evaluations, your survey is discarded.
Again, not true. Whatever you put down is what is recorded. Feel free to praise or trash the teacher of your
choice.
4. The Brewster Building was designed to protect faculty and students in case of campus riots.
There are several theories to explain Brewster's narrow windows, large gates and fortress-like appearance. One
is that when it was built in the '60s there was a lot of demonstrating and violence happening at colleges across the
country. The small windows are said to prevent gunmen from shooting at an angle and to prevent students from
jumping out of windows.
Another explanation is that Brewster is meant to impress upon students the 'ruling hand' of the university and
state government.
While these ideas aren't that far fetched, Brewster was designed in sections so that several of the sections could
be closed down at night, while others could be left open for meetings or other events.
5. Swimming classes are required at because many years ago a woman's daughter drowned and that woman
gave a large sum of money to the school with the stipulation that swimming classes be made mandatory, so no one
at ECU would ever drown.
Although we couldn't get any official verification on this, it is believed that the swimming regulations came
into being after World War II when all military personnel were required to know how to swim.
Although many of these legends aren't true it's fun to speculate and pass them on to unknowing freshmen.
mi
OPINION
Columnist
Jeff
BERGMAN
So you wanna be a sell out?
OPINIOI
Columnist
H0NEYCUTT
Believe, but question your beliefs
believe that there comes a
point in every person's life
when we must separate
ourselves from the entity of
our families in order to
become a real person.
Hypothetical situation: You're
cruising along, enjoying the youth
and vitality accompanying the
wonder that is college life, dating
three, four, or possibly 12 different
people when all of a sudden you
are struck with an urgent need. It is
a human need, implanted in us by
evolution and genetics to ensure
the survival of our very race. And it
is making you an absolute mess.
So what happens now? Do you
pick just one of your prospects to
copulate with? Do you have a cou-
ple of cold showers and a bowl of
corn flakes and stay home on
Saturday night? Or do you invite
them all over for an interesting
evening of naked Twister? What is
the modern, educated person to
do?
OK, in this situation we must
measure our opinions on what is
right and proper against what is
more fun and decide which we can
live with. But first you have to sep-
arate your opinions from those that
other people have implanted in
you. Of course you should consider
what your mom would say. You
should not neccesarily listen to
what your mom would say, but con-
sider it nonetheless. But don't
think about your mom too much. I
mean, we are talking about sex
here, and that will leave you with
mental scars that will require thou-
sands of dollars in therapy to heal.
So, do Mom's ideas about premari-
tal sex coincide with yours?
I believe that there comes a
point in every person's life when
we must separate ourselves from
the entity of our families in order to
become a real person. You don't
agree with everything that your
family does. That is apparent
through your refusal to be a part of
the family's annual Drunken Tater
Sack Race. So don't subscribe to all
the same opinions that your family
holds. They may not be a part of
what you really are, and the only
way to become that person is to
hold what you have been taught up
to a brighter light to see the truth
about it. If you never question your
dad's belief in evil trolls who live
under the fridge and blindly accept
it, are you ever going to grow as an
individual? I mean, I believe in the
trolls, but that's just because we
have a special relationship, and as
long as I continue to provide them
with asparagus spears, they will
protect me from the miniature
woolly mammoth in the garbage
disposal. This has no relevancy to
the article, does it? Your parents
aren't always right. They've proven
it time and again. Question what
you believe. That's the only way to
really know that you believe it.
So which theory should you sub-
scribe to in the decision of who to
bump uglies with? What is the cri-
teria for the candidates? Maybe
they shouldn't have criteria. Maybe
there's nothing wrong with a shag
or two from someone that you
wouldn't marry if you were an ille-
gal alien and it was the only way to
remain in the country. You are just
two people with something in com-
mon � so what if the only thing in
common is horniness?
This won't work for everyone, of
course. Some of you just can't get
any, period. And some have this
idea that you have to be in love to
make love. That's a very pretty
thought. And it is true. But there is
a difference between making love
and a roll in the sack.
In the end, we will all do what
makes us happy. The decision that
is the most important is whether
we will do the thing that makes us
happy now, or makes us happy in
the years to come. Whatever it is,
do it safely, have fun, and maybe
we will all have a very good week-
end. If you know what I mean.
ECU is selling out. If they
want to turn their back upon
a family that has donated
time and money to better this
university, then let the bad
decision be made.
ECU's collective intelligence must
decide to sell their (our) soul and go
with Coke or keep the market
open for Pepsi, or whoever wants a
piece of the action. EClI must des-
perately need the money for some-
thing, otherwise why damage a
relationship with a family that has
played an integral part in the devel-
opment of this University? If
money is all they need, have I got
some good ideas for the king and
his court, I mean administration.
The first idea would not onlv
solve the traffic problem on central
campus, but would bring in some
moolah. Toll booths should be
installed in front the General
Classroom building. The ECU
Police, with little else to do besides
wash their patrol cars, could man or
woman the money maker.
Anybody trying to run the toll both
would be pulled over and subject-
ed to a severe body cavity search.
Another of my many great ideas
is selling the chancellor's house (all
hail the king). The great and
mighty chancellor will be given a
choice between living in the dorms
or a double-wide on the mall. If the
King, er, excuse me, Chancellor
chooses to live in the dorms, the
roommate will be a freshman,
whose second home is the Elba
The good news is that if the chan-
cellor lives in the dorms he keeps
his car, but the All-mighry one will
have to buy a parking permit for
the freshman lots only.
If the Chancellor chooses to live
in the double-wide, the car is sold
and an older model takes its place.
The One-Who-Knows-AII-and-
Sces-AII will be given a 1982
Monte Carlo with more rust than
Kenneth Starr has depositions.
This car will be put on cement
blocks in front of the trailer.
This next idea is simple and
straightforward: Do not allow
elected officials to use their time,
supposedly working for ECl i, to do
any campaign-related work.
Included in the money saving idea
is talking to The East Carolinian
and any other paper about the elec-
tion. Also incorporated into this
concept is the non-removal of Easi
Carolinian newsstands and having
them put into a landfill after an
unflattering article is written about
the elected official.
The last idea requires a wee bit
of work but the monetary returns
will be well worth the effort. The
Chemistry lab should be turned
into a mcthamphctaminc manufac-
turing facility. The drugs could be
sold at the student stores and.
much like everything else, at an
exorbitant price. The speed might
even help students for whom cof-
fee docs not cut it, for those 8 a.m.
classes.
ECU is selling out. If they wani
to turn their back upon a family
that has donated time and money
to better this university, then let
the bad decision be made. Et tu.
Brute? As long as ECl I is selling, all
sell outs need pimps and I am vol-
unteering to be ECU's pimp
daddy. Oh, and if you are looking to
cut some unnecessary expendi-
tures out of the budget, kill the arh -
letes-only training facility.
"Experience is not what happens to you,
it is what you do with what happens to you
Aldous Huxley
'Think for yourself and let others enjoy the privilege of
- doing so too
Voltaire
Got Something to say?
Write a Letter to
the Editor and tet
your view be heardf
II
Bring all letters to
our office which is
located on the 2nd Floor of
eastcaroliflian Iks S&dgfll Publications MlQjQg
5 Wednesda
The Smas
Adore
7 O
MIC
What's happc
Pumpkins? I
all soft and p
release Of i,
purchase by
fraught with
tions on that �
I knew
echoes of '
"Bullet With
then again, w
rock album?
around rehas
glory days w it
grunge tunes:
Sure, 1 m
when flannel
choke and '
even a sectioi
back when tl
heads with tl
hair-raising roi
Grunge is
emphasize thi
h'ortunatel'
Corgan has thi
him know whi
the whole mc
the confused
conscious sot
that will ensu
eventual succi
I've got a i
like these: On
itself as good
Sands of fans (
put out u five
stampeding 1
still have a zoi
again) waiting
minute it hits
Not that I
thing. Artists
have earned tl
The Pumpkin
ed following o
now they will
Pans w III a;
behind this i
moments whi
arc fused irrc
perfect expre
unexpected fl;
tion and tend
Which stand al
A very adu
perhaps not be
teen parties th
won't be passe
the backs of ce
to the beach. H
still and moist
take it outside
girls will cry t
listening to it.
And, most ii
received as :
reprieve from
bland young bi
structing rock v
ing to.
If rock no I
the Pumpkin;
where, and so
SEE PUR






The East Carolinian
i use their time,
gfof ECU, to do
elated work.
nicy saving idea
East Carolinian
rabout the eicc-
rated into this
-removal of East
inds and having
landfill after an
is written about
quires a wee bit
lonctary returns
the effort. The
:uld be turned
amine manufac-
drugs could be
:nt stores and.
ling else, at an
he speed might
s for whom col-
for those 8 a.m.
ut. If they warn
upon a family
ime and money
crsity, then let
e made. Et tu.
Cl is selling, all
is and I am vpl-
ECU's pimp
u are looking to
ssary expendi-
get, kill the ach-
acilitv.
ye of
dt
ding
5 Wednesday, June 10, 1998
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
CD
rfiviaws
The Smashing Pumpkins
Adore
7 OUT OF 10
Miccwi Smith
sis I l I Ml IS I VI. f. EDITOR
What's happening to the Smashing
Pumpkins? I five they really gone
all soft and gooshy? Their June 3
release of Adore (and subsequent
purchase by yours truly) was
fraught with doubts and specula-
tions on that subject.
I knew not to expect any
echoes of "Cherub Rock" or
"Bullet With Butterfly Wings but
then again, who wants just another
rock album? Who wants to sit
around rehashing the Pumpkins'
glory days with a stale collection of
grunge tunes?
Sure, I miss the olden times
when flannel was a risky fashion
choice and "Alternative" wasn't
even a section in the music stores,
back when the Pumpkins turned
heads with their special breed of
hair-raising rock, but times change.
Grunge is dead. I really can't
emphasize that enough.
Fortunately, it seems that Billy
Corgan has this sixth sense that lets
him know when to turn his back on
the whole mess. Adore rises from
the confused mire of defunct self-
conscious sob-rock with a gtace
that will ensure its fan appeal and
eventual success.
I've got a theory about albums
like these: Once a band establishes
itself as good in the eyes of thou-
sands of fans (like me), they could
put out a five-minute recording of
stampeding buffalo sounds and
still have a zombified fan base (me
again) waiting in line to buy it the
minute it hits the shelves.
Not that I'm saying it's a bad
thing. Artists like Billy Corgan
have earned the right to autonomy.
The Pumpkins deserve a dedicat-
ed following of loyal listeners, and
now they will reap the harvest.
Pans w ill appreciate the thought
behind this album, the delicate
moments when words and notes
are fused irrevocably together in
perfect expression, the raw and
unexpected flashes of naked emo-
tion and tender piano interludes
which stand alone.
A very adult album, Adore will
perhaps not be played at sweet six-
teen parties this summer. Maybe it
won't be passed between friends in
the backs of cars on long road trips
to the beach. But when the night is
still and moist outside, lovers will
take it outside with them. Lonely
girls will cry themselves to sleep
listening to it.
And, most importantly, it will be
received as something new, a
reprieve from the assault by the
bland young bands who are decon-
structing rock without really mean-
ing to.
If rock no longer has meaning,
the Pumpkins will search else-
where, and so they do. Subtleties
SEE PUMPKINS. PAGE 6
Filmspotting
Student Union
Film Committee
plans changes
Andy Turner
lifestyle editor
Did you ever wonder
who decides what films
ate shown in Hendrix
Theatre? Did you think
it was some administra-
tive type in a suit who
sat in their office and
randomly picked
movies for you? Actually,
the Student Union Film
Committee, made up
entirely of students, is
responsible for picking the
movies. The committee has
to make a number of deci-
sions before movies come
to campus.
The committee is com-
prised of 12 voting mem-
bers and other students
who don't vote but ate
allowed to contribute their
input on movie selections.
Scniot Shaun Johnson
serves as chairman for the
committee.
The film committee
begins the selection process
by seeing what movies ate
out there, Johnson
explained.
"We look at the E!
Entertainment Guide,
movie previews, the release
catalog and we make a list
of about 20 movies he
said. "Then, I make a sur
1 '���'

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TOP PHOTO COURTESY Of PARAMOUNT TRAINSPOTTING POSTER
vey and have them rate 1 to
20 their preferences
About 10 movies arc-
eliminated after the survey;
the committee then makes
their final selections on
what movies will show for
that semester.
In the past, the commit-
tee has selected older
movies to be shown during
the summet (movies are
being shown this summer
outside of the Student
Recreation Center at the
swimming pool). 'Phis sum-
mer, however, the commit-
tee went with more recent
movies.
"We wanted to increase
attendance by bringing
some more current movies
in Johnson said. "We
wanted to cater more to stu-
dent needs
Attendance has
increased this summer,
according to Johnson. L.A.
Confidential drew 80 people
COURTESY OF MIRAMAX
and 52 people attended the
showing of liooty Call.
Johnson said the film
committee is considering
some changes for the fall.
The possibility of adding a
Sunday matinee showing of
the'PhiirsdayF ridaySaturd
ay movie has been dis-
cussed, and it is also possi-
ble that Mcndrix will fea-
ture more
indepen-
dent type
movies on
Wednesday
nights. The
Student
Union has
sponsored
Sunday and
Wednesday
showings in
the past.
"I'd like
to do it just
to get more
variety in
it Johnson
added.
Johnson said the
committee hopes to
improve the techni-
cal and sound quali-
ty of the movies this
fall as well. The
Student Union is in
the process of
obtaining a Dolby
Sound System and a
new platter system
for Hendrix
Theatre. The new
platter system,
Johnson said, will
lead to fewer glitch-
es duting film
showings.
I lowever, sneak
previews, popular
among students,
may be discontin-
ued in the fall.
"We've had problems
with our contacts Johnson
explained. "It's a lot of
work getting them to do a
sneak preview
Last year, the committee
brought in The Game,
Galtaca, Kissing a Fool and
other films as sneak pre-
views.
This past fall, the film
committee also sponsored
special weekends, includ-
ing the "Gen-Extra" week-
end featuring Clerks,
Mallrats and Empire Records
and an "Independent's"
week featuring Ulee's Gold,
Trainspotting and Slingblade.
Johnson said he hopes
to build the membership of
the film committee this fall
and plans to start soliciting
membets this summer dur-
ing freshmen orientation.
While the committee can
only have 12 voting mem-
bers, Johnson said as many
people who want to join
can.
"Even if you're not a
voting member, you're still
important he said. "A lot
of people think that if they
can't vote, there's no need
to be there. That isn't
true
If you're intetested in
joining the Student Union
Film Committee, you can
go by Room 236 in
Mendenhall or call 328-
2302 or 328-4799.
Exhibit
showcases
minature
prints
Localarttst
featured
:� sneak previews)
cost Aim
1. (Know What You Did Last Summer$1,450
Kiss the Girts (Double Feature)
2. My Best friend's Wedding$775
3. Men in Black$800
4. Face Off$775
5. Matin Powers$750
6. Can Air$950
ior, Uar$775
Anaconda
Shannon Meek
senior writer
An is versatile. It sticks not to just
one form or subject but transcends,
not only in the minds of the viewer,
but beyond into the realm of cre-
ativity.
Currendy, the Gray Art Gallery
in the Jenkins Fine Arts Center is
showcasing an exhibit which fea-
tures a variety of miniature-sized
prints. This show proves that art is
not limited to such things as form,
subject or size.
There are 78 prints that capture
tiny images, some the size of
postage scamps or small daisies, and
within these prints are the intricate
details of the artists' expression of
sorrow, joy and pain.
Self-taught artist Richard
Mletzko said of the exhibit, "Very
good work. These arc unfamiliar
methods, probably modem meth-
ods, but the work is intriguing
There is an eclectic array of art
forms used in this exhibit. The
work represents almost all types of
printmaking: serigraph, emboss-
ment, intaglio, lithography, engrav-
ing, mezzotint, etching, drypoint
and more modem methods such as
computer manipulated prints.
"There are all kinds of tech-
niques, said Mark Cooley, "It is not
SEE EXHIBIT PAGE I
ra

in
Evil's back in Top 40 music
77t�5 is not a rant. The goal: to
write complete sentences and
hopefully to make some sort of
point. Just another ass with an
opinion
FOR MORE INFORMATION
www.tececu.edu
AM, the smell of evil in
die morning
Mark Brett
senior writer
Music is evil again.
I'm not entirely sure when it
officially happened. Maybe it snuck
in behind the Spice Girls, or per-
haps hidden amongst the well-
scrubbed faces of the Backstreet
Boys. Hell, maybe it was even lurk-
ing in the sculpted bellybutton of
No Doubt's Gwen Stefani.
I don't know how I missed it
before now, but there it was
perched glistening black and heav-
ing atop my stereo when I woke up
this morning. It turned its malevo-
lent gaze upon me and bared its
fangs and I knew. Evil was back in
the music industry, and I welcomed
it with open arms.
It's been a long time since music
was well and truly evil. In the late
The VJs
'80s era of mall pop and hair bands,
everything was written to a very
specific formula. Genuine creativity
and originality were virtually wiped
out, and evil reined supreme on the
Top 40 charts.
But then alternative broke. In
the wake of Nirvana and REM's
success in the early '90s, America
was treated to a lot of really good
pop music and evil fled for a time
like Dracula hearing the rooster
showed the Dead Milkmen their place: the underground
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE OFFICIAL DEAD MILKMEN HOMEPAGE
crow. Sounds were actually new and
fresh for a while, in spite of the
legions of RP"M and Cure
wannabes getting the spotlight. In
their corporate strip-mining of the
underground, the big record labels
left no stone unturned. Fvery weird
indie band seemed to get a shot at
the big time.
pA-en kiddie-punk veterans the
Dead Milkmen wete invited to host
Club MTJ fot a day. Of course, they
immediately stole the mic, hand-
cuffed Downtown Julie Brown to
the set, and made fun of the whole
sick parade. This anti-social behav-
ior led to their fall from grace with
MTV, and that led to "Punk Rock
Girl" being theit only big hit.
Eventually, they even lost theit
tecording contract and had to sub-
mit a demo to theit own label to get
their last two albums released.
Never underestimate the wtath
of the VJs.
While all this strip-mining was
going on, an interesting thing
occurred in the underground these
bands came from. Suddenly, there
was nobody home. With even New
York hardcore stalwarts like
Drunken Boat signed to the majors,
there was no underground. Unless
you were into Death Metal or some
extreme form of German Industrial,
the underground scene pretty much
dried up and blew away.
So not only was the Top 40 not
truly evil, even the music generally
considered evil by the mainstream
disappeared. Evil was gone, gone,
gone, and I never realized until
today just how much I missed it.
But as I smelled its fetid breath
emanating from the radio this morn-
ing like so much rotting meat, I was
invigorated. Suddenly, I've awak-
ened to a world where the Top 40 is
evil again, and the underground is
back like a snarling beast in heat.
The evil of formula pop is back
in the persons of the aforemen-
tioned Spice Girls, Backstreet Boys
and their ilk. Yes, just as we've all
suspected from time to time,
Hanson is indeed the Great Satan.
So get off Marilyn Manson's back.
Plus, now we've got evil "alter-
native" to contend with as well.
The alty formula has spawned
legions of earnest young white boys
clad in gas station shirts, blandly
strumming their guitars in decaying
urban settings all over MTV.
Though they'te smarter than their
hair-band predecessors, and a lot
less sexist, they're every bit as bor-
ing. With them in place, the late
'80s pop landscape is back, evil as
ever.
And, populated with country
music punks and noise guitar cham-
pions, the . underground music
SEE fWL, PAGE 7






6 Wadniidty, Junt 10. 1998
lifestyle
The Eilt Carolinian
Wadnaidt)
Pumpkins
continued from page 5
i v e r Shots
This lethal boxing move wilt lay ya flat in a second. These tasteless lit-
tle blurbs take quick hits at the worid of movies, television, music,
hardcore pornography and whatever the hell else we can think of
I
Just because the Descendents
reformed it didn't mean the end of
All; their new release, Moss Nerder
(Epitaph), proves they'fe still the
punkers with the most (and best)
pop aroundWant your pro
wrestling news smart and up-to-
date? Hit wrestlemaniacs.com,
home of the Micasa
news update and the
opinions of Dr.
Doug, the man who
can make Doink the
Clown sound like a
good
ideaCrunching on
ice is a sign of iron
deficiency � not
sexual
frustrationIsland
Records releases a
Tom Waits greatest hits album,
Beautiful Maladies, June 16. It's the
incredible Mr. Waits so we'll go for
it, but Kid in the Hall Bruce
McCulloch did once wisely say,
"Greatest hits albums are for
housewives and little
girlsCongratulations to our
Senior Copy Editor Jim Perkinson
for his new baby girl, Ashlyn
ReedSuicide Kings was a total
bomb. The only reason to watch it
is to savor another
creepy perfor-
mance by the
eerily appealing
Christopher
WalkenAfter
today, there are
only four shop-
ping days left
before Flag
DayThere's
nothing quite like
urinating out in
the open air" (Special Agent Dale
Cooper, Twin Peaks)
�compiled by the Lifestyle
staff
Tom Waits for no man.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ISLAND RECORDS
Exhibit
continued from page 5
just one type of printmaking. That
is what is so amazing about the
show
The show is currently on tour for
one year. The opening was hosted
by Hartwick College in Oneonta,
New York. The show was judged
by Gloria Escobar, presently a co-
chair of the art department at
Hartwick College.
The first place of the miniature
prints was given to ECU professor
Michael W. Ehlbeck for his two
intaglio prints entitled "St.
Kolumba from Dom and "St.
Kolumba, Koin, Germany The
prints were intricately and exquis-
itely crafted.
The show will run through June
22. Along with the mini-print exhi-
bition, the gallery is also showcas-
ing wood block prints by local artist
Ann Conner.
For more information about this
exhibition, call the Gray Gallery at
328-6336.
invoked by synthesizers, violins
and soft drums lend the album a
weird charm that only Corgan
knows how to refine.
Adore is about love soured and
still kept, loss and regret, desire
and self-loathing. It exposes the
tiny hopes of humanity for what
they really are, but without an
excess of sorrow. What Corgan
learned about love and human fal-
lacy is evident throughout
"You're so cruel in all you do
but still I believe I believe you
he breathes in a harmony reminis-
cent of a barbershop quartet.
Skittery drums and tne lulling
rhythm of softly distorted guitars
envelop his voice as if to protect
him from further pain in "Behold!
The Night Marc
"Martha a shimmery love
song for Corgan's deceased moth-
er, drives emotion into the brain
with the sweeping and relentlessly
orchestrated chorus, "But for the
grace of love, who'd will the mean-
ing of heaven from above?"
The new-wave sound of sever-
al early songs on the album pro-
gresses toward what Corgan
described in an interview with
Guitar magazine as "an underwa-
ter world What emotions are
twisted at the beginning of Adore
resolve themselves and are placed
into old boxes that we know well,
the ones we only open on sleep-
less nights.
The last track, called "17 is an
abruptly cut-off little instrumental
ditty that may or may not symbol-
ize human hopes and may or may
not have been inspired by REM;
all I know is I found Corgan's
avant-garde folly rather annoying
and wish it had been left off the
album.
As with past successes, Adore is
an entity to itself and needs no
explanation. Contained within its
small sphere is all that anyone
needs to see into the hidden parts
of Corgan's heart and mind.
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8 WeJntidiy, Jim 10. 1891
8k
sports
Ingram, Dozier represent Pirates
at NCAA championship
Tin East CiroHown
a
Runnerearns
All-American honors
Christopher R. Farnsworth
STAFF WRITER
The NCAA Track and Field cham-
pionships were held last weekend
in Buffalo, N.Y. and ECU was well-
represented. Two runners quali-
fied for the 400 meter dash: sopho-
more Darrick Ingram and freshman
Tyrone Dozier.
Dozier came into the champi-
onship with some momentum and
success. The Raleigh native won
the IC4A 400 title May 24 with a
45.67 and also ran a 45.80 at the
Life University Invitational in
Georgia, both times
under the NCAA provi-
sional qualifying time.
Unfortunately, his post-
ed time of 46.79
Thursday in Buffalo was
not enough to advance in
the finals though he did
finish third in his heat
Ingram, a Lumberton
native, had qualified for
the Championships by a
second place finish in the
IC4As in Fairfax, Va with a 46.07.
He was able to beat his teammate
at the NCAAs though, by running a
46.29 in the fifth heat, good enough
to put him through to the finals
Saturday. What makes this accom-
plishment even more extraordinary
was the harsh conditions of the race
and Ingram's underdog status,
being the last runner selected for
the Championships.
With the temperature
never rising above 54
degrees during the three
day event and a hard
blowing wind beating
against the runners, con-
ditions were difficult and
caused many injuries.
"It was extremely
cold and there were 17
Tyrone Oozier hamstring pulls, the
fiu photo worst I've ever seen
said Bill Carson, track
and field coach. The elements
took their effect on Dozier, who
worried about the wind and ran
conservatively, making what
Carson called a "Freshman mis-
take Ingram's experience of
being an all-American the previous
year with the 4x400 meter relay
team gave him the edge to make to
the finals.
Controversy and disappoint-
ment came Saturday,
however, as Ingram was
disqualified for lane-line
violation. Initially,
Ingram finished sixth
with a posted time of
46.59 and automatic All-
American honors. After
further review by offi-
cials though, he was dis-
qualified for stepping
over the lane line during
the race. Since he start-
ed the race, Ingram will retain his
All-American status. That does not
mean Carson is not disappointed.
"It was a horrible, horrible call
Carson said. "With the wind blow-
ing like it was, they couldn't help it.
I understand the rules are the rules,
but the officials have got to use
some common sense. The kid from
Clemson was all in the other lane
during the race Thursday, but they
didn't call it Carson
said. "If it had been LSU
or Texas, no call. But not
ECU
Still, Carson looks
back at this season as one
of success and triumph.
Noting that they over-
came adversity including
injuries and losing run-
ners, he points out that
the team scored more
points in the CAA and
the ISSUE than ever before. He is
also excited about the future, with
good recruits coming in, the return
of some of the players lost to injury
and academics, and of course the
return of both Ingram and Dozier.
Women's soccer announces latest recruits
Plenty of talent on
way to ECU
Patrick Giovinazzo
staff writer
Head Coach Neil Roberts is
looking forward to a solid season
ahead for the Lady Pirate soccer
squad.
"We've returned 10 of 11 starters
and the recruiting class is very
solid Roberts said.
He has used the prestige of his
coaching award � he was named as
the Colonial Athletic Association
Coach of the Year in 1997 � to aid
in enlisting premier athletes. The
team will include seven newcom-
ers, all with outstanding prior
achievements. The new class con-
sists of three players from North
Carolina, two from New Jersey and
one from both South Carolina and
Virginia.
At the top of the class is Kelly
Gray, from Woodbridge, Va. Gray, a
midfielderdefender, was an all-
state first team selection as a junior
at Woodbridge High School. She
helped lead Woodbridge to a
national ranking during 1997.
From Greenville, South Carolina
to Greenville, North Carolina,
Brooke Baltz looks to help step up
the play at ECU. Playing midfield
at Mauldin High School, Baltz tal-
lied 25 goals and 14 assists last year.
During her outstanding season, she
won MVP awards and led her team
to a regional championship.
An all-state selection from
Grimslcy High in Greensboro,
Meredith Seawell, also has decided
to join the ECU team. Seawell won
all-conference and all-region honors
as a sophomore. During that season
she also served as a driving force in
the team's journey to the sate 4-A
championship.
Amanda Horner, from Raleigh,
and Amanda Duffy, of Holly Ridge,
are the other two North Carolina
players joining the team. Horner
was a goalkeeper for Sanderson
High School and earned merits for
her agility and quick reflexes.
Duffy, while playing for Dixon
High, scored 39 goals during her
sophomore and junior years. She
was also named the Coastal Plains
1-A Conference Player of the Year
last year. Both players are expected
to contribute to future ECU suc-
The last two recruits hail out of
New Jersey. Emily Cozzi, of
Southampton, and Abi Temple, of
Wrightstown, are both highly
skilled young athletes. Coz.i has
"We expect to continue to
improve the team and the pro-
gram, and get to the point
where we're going to compete
for a regular season conference
championship
Neil Roberts
Head Women's Soccer Coach
led her high school to the state play-
offs in each of her first three years.
She also led a local club team with
18 goals and 12 assists last year.
Temple earned an athletic letter
during each of her four years at
Northern Burlington Regional
High School. She was also selected
for All-South Jersey honors during
three of those seasons.
All of this raw talent has left
ECU Women's Soccer in a frenzy,
of sorts.
"We expect to continue to
improve the team and the program,
and get to the point where we're
going to compete for a regular sea-
son conference championship
Roberts said. "This has probably
got to be our best recruiting class,
when you measure pure talent
level
All of the various parts of the
ECU women's soccer team are
adding up to what will surely be a
thrilling season.
Pirate football in
off-season mode
Players train hard for
upcoming season
Jim P h e l p s
STAFF WRITER
ECU football is currently in an off-
season training mode.
During the summer, most of
ECU's football players are in sum-
mer school. Their only training is a
voluntary conditioning session at
either 6:30 a.m. or 4:30 p.m
Strength and Conditioning Coach
Jeff Connors is in charge of over-
seeing these sessions.
Head Coach Steve Logan said
the training sessions are recom-
mended but not mandatory.
"We are not allowed to coach
any football during the summer
Logan said. "The players have the
option to go to a conditioning ses-
sion either at 6:30 a.m. or 4:30 p.m.
They are not penalized if they
don't go, but they godedicated
When August arrives, the team
gets down to some serious business.
"The freshmen arrive on August
5th and they go through a mini-
camp of academics, orientation, and
practice Logan said. "The varsity
arrives on August 9th and that's
when we get serious with practice
Once the team is assembled here
at ECU, they do what the program
calk three-a-day workouts. It is a
workout broken down into seg-
ments. For 60 minutes in the morn-
ing they do individual drills. They
break for fruit and juices to get
rehydrated and change into fresh
clothing. For the next segment,
they do group drills for an hour and
15 minutes. This segment starts
around 11 a.m. The team then
breaks for a couple of hours. The
last segment starts at around 4 p.m.
"We art not allowed to coach
any football during the summer.
The players have the option to
go to a conditioning session
either at 6:30 a.m. or 4:30 p.m.
They an not penalized if they
don't go, but they godedicated
Stive Logan
ECU Head Football Coach
and lasts for an hour and 20 min-
utes. During this last segment, they
go through team drills.
"I feel better about this team
than I did about last year's team
Logan said. "Physically wc arc able
to compete, but the kids have to do
it mentally
When asked how he thinks the
Head Coach Steve Logan seid that the football players attending off-season conditioning sessions have to be extremely dedicated.
FILE PHOTO
team will fair against their oppo-
nents this year Logan's response
was, "We can compete
Logan doesn't think that the loss
of some key players will affect the
team too much.
"It happens every year, by the
third game we should be set
Logan said.
The players have to be dedicat-
ed during the summer to keep
themselves in shape for the upcom-
ing season. The Pirates should be
fired up come August.
Vacant
b-ball
post
filled
Barry Sanderson
announced as assistant
Travis Barkley
SPORTS EDITOR
Barry Sanderson, an assistant bas-
ketball coach at the University of
Arkansas at Litde Rock for the past
six years, has been named as an
assistant basketball coach with the
Pirate basketball program.
Head coach Joe Dooley
announced June 3 that Sanderson
would be joining the squad.
Sanderson, 30, joined the pro-
gram at UALR after serving one
season on the staff at Georgia as a
graduate assistant under Hugh
Durham. Sanderson also served as
a graduate assistant at Texas A&M
during the 1990-91 season.
While working at UALR with
his father, Head Coach Wimp
Sanderson, Barry helped the
Trojans earn the Sun Belt
Conference championship in 1995-
96, finishing with a 23-7 record.
Two players off of that team went
on to play in the NBA Starting
point guard Derek Fisher was a
first round pick by the Los Angeles
Lakers and Joe Stephens signed
with the Houston Rockets.
SEE COACH PAGE I
World
Gup
deserves
coverage
Event often ignored in
UnitedStates
Christopher R.
Farnsworth
STAFF WRITER
On June 10 the world's largest and
most anticipated sporting event
kicks off�the Copa Mundial, Cup
du Monde, the World Cup. With
32 nations vying for global
supremacy in
the world's
most impor-
tant and
loved sport,
the month-
long soccer
fest has fans,
patriots, and
(in England's
case) hooli-
gans raving
and drooling.
Not even the Olympics can
approach the hype and build-up
that the World Cup brings, with
countries whose national teams did
not even qualify for the event still
stopping the machinations of daily
life to watch the games. And of
course, the host country, this year,
the ever-so hospitable French,
rakes in millions of dollars as sup-
porters for die teams flock into the
SEE WOULD CUP PACE I
Chris rarnsworth
FILE PHOTO






9 Wednesday, June 10, 1998
sports
The Eiit Carolinian
WCwaHftiM
Mlt
all
st
d
Person
s assistant
.RKl.KV
ITOR
i assistant bas-
: University of
ock for the past
i named as an
coach with the
jgram.
Joe Dooley
that Sanderson
e squad,
oined the pro-
er serving one
at Georgia as a
under Hugh
i also served as
at Texas A&M
teason.
it UALR with
Coach Wimp
helped the
e Sun Belt
jnship in 1995-
a 23-7 record,
hat team went
NBA. Starting
Fisher was a
ic Los Angeles
ephens signed
ockets.
WE I
ponedin
'tates
d's largest and
sorting event
Mundial, Cup
Id Cup. With
for global
is Famimrth
FILE PHOTO
lyrnpics can
and build-up
brings, with
mat teams did'
the event still
itions of daily
mcs. And of
ltry, this year
Iblc French,
lollars as sup-
flock into the
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Coach
continued from page 8
"We are excited to have an indi-
vidual the caliber of Barry
Sanderson joining our staff
Dooley said. "Barry obviously has
been around basketball a long time
and through our friendship the past
several years, I have developed a
great appreciation for his knowl-
edge of the game. He will be an
excellent addition to our program
Sanderson is one of four mem-
bers of his family in the collegiate
coaching profession. Aside from his
father, his brother Scott is the head
coach at the University of Mobile
(Ala.) while his brother Jim is the
Head Coach of Faulkner
University in Montgomery, Ala.
"I have gained a tremendous
amount of experience at UALR
and certainly will look back fondly
at my time spent there Sanderson
said. "I am excited about the
opportunity I now have at ECU
"Coach Dooley has done an
excellent job and earned an out-
standing reputation in this profes-
sion Sanderson said. "The pro-
gram at ECU is moving in a posi-
tive direction and I look forward to
being a part of the success
World Cup
continued from page 8
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Special Reduced Rate Plans
Anesthesia Available
Nitrous Oxide & Vallum
One visit procedures
Same Day Appointments
All Major Credit cards
Insurance Filed
Confidential & Experienced
Caring Professional
Call Toll Free
1-888-562-7415
Mom - Sat 8 am - 8 pm
country, though the beloved Irish
with their pub hopping and singing
arc absent. In almost every corner
of the world, this tournament, held
every four years, is huge. It's more
thaa an excuse to pause business,
politics, hatred, weddings, in some
cases even the unstoppable death
and taxes (It's an Italian boast. I
don't really get it either). For most,
the World Cup takes precedence
over almost everything.
Except, of course, for America.
Why is that? Are we so caught
up in the NBA finals, the NHL
finals and (God forbid) monotonous
Major League Baseball regular sea-
son that we don't turn our attention
to what the rest of the world is
watching? Four years ago, the Cup
got. pretty good recognition in the
States, but that was because it was
held on our own soil. To top it off,
we held the best damn World Cup
in history! When our team began
its arduous campaign to qualify for
France 98, howeverlittle attention
was given. Now keep in mind that
just qualifying for the finals is a feat
in and of itself, many a proud nation
such as the aforementioned Irish
and the Greeks sitting at home and
last Cup's runners up and perennial
power house Italy having to go into
a playoff just to make it to the tour-
nament. When the US team fin-
ished second in their group, only
behind the talented Mexicans, it
was not heralded with much rejoic-
ing, except in the tight circles soc-
cer fans in America keep. If one
needs more evidence of America's
apathy, take the historical defeat of
Brazil, the world's most feared team
and last Cup's champions. With a
shocking 1-0 triumph, the US team
sent shock waves across the world,
one of the greatest upsets in recent
memory. In America, though, two
Sportscenter anchors delivered the
news toward the end of the show as
if they were announcing some
NCAA lacrosse result. The
spelling bee that ESPN loves to
annoy everyone with got more cov-
erage.
Then again, our reluctance in
embracing soccer as the rest of the
world does may not be a totally bad
thing. Look at the problems in
England with rival fans attacking
each other, or in Italy were a riot
almost broke out during one of the
national team's qualifying games in
Rome, the Holy city. How often do
you see a Bulls fan and a Knicks fan
breaking seats over each other? In
America, sports are beloved and
take a huge scale, but athletes are
taught that while the game is very
important, it is simply a game, and
full of entertainment. You would
never see an American athlete
assassinated for playing poorly, as
Andres Escobar was when
Columbia failed to advance in the
World Cup in 1994.
Still, we do not give the World
Cup the attention it descverves.
Yes, all 64 matches are being tele-
vised by ESPN, ESPN2 and ABC,
but there has been more advertis-
ing for the wretched WNBA
women's basketball regular season
opener. That could all change with
a good performance by the US
team. The boys open their cam-
paign June 15 against the mighty
Germans, and if they can have a
good showing by defeating or tying
them, things could open up. The
US needs to either beat Germany
or the talented Yugoslavians to
advance (Iran should be our easy
match, but you never know). If
they manage this daunting chal-
lenge, perhaps they will receive the
respect they have already earned.
Do not expect the US to win,
though. Barring some miracle on
grass, the second round will be a
signpost of success for America,
though with some luck and skillful
playing, they could make the quar-
terfinals. If you are looking for a
favorite, Brazil is the top choice,
though with star striker Romano
injured, they will have to look to
the sensational Ronaldo even more.
France, Italy and Holland are also
good bets with England and Spain
as possible winners.
For a more in-depth World Cup
preview, listen to WZMB, 91.3 FM
college radio, Wednesday June 10
at 7 p.m. during the sports show
"Pirate Talk The Cup itself starts
with Scotland vs. Brazil 11 a.m.
Wednesday morning. Do yourself a
favor and watch. It is definitely the
greatest sporting event on this
Earth.






10 Wtdmidiy, Jmn ID. 1888
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE WANTED: 2 respon-
sible students looking for 1 room-
mate to share nice 3 BR duplex.
Fenced in yard, back deck. WD,
dishwasher, central heat and air.
Great location! Available now! 830-
692I.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bed apt $295
mo avail, now. Tanglewood Apts
126 Avery St Greenville. 758-6596
2 MALE ROOMMATES NEEDED
for Fall to share 3400 sq. ft. home
near campus. $250 per month. 15
utilities. Ask for Tim, 931-9165.
HOUSE FOR RENT: 302 Lewis St
3 BR, LR, DR, kitchen, central AC,
garage. 5 min. walk from campus.
No pets. $750mo. 919-504-2052.
leave message.
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
wanted to fill 6 bedroom house.
$225 per month. Split food and utili-
ties. Two blocks from campus. Call
919-438-4427.
SUMMER ROOMMATE, CUTE
apartment, your own bedroom and
bathroom, washerdryer in apart-
ment, very close to campus. Call
Kathleen 762-2706.
TWO BEDROOM, 2 BATH in
Dockside for rent. If interested,
please call 551-3455.
ROOMMATE WANTED: ONE FE-
MALE, non-smoker, studious. 4 bed-
room, 2 bath house, $215 monthly
plus utilities, near ECU bus stop.
ASAP contact 752-0281.
DOCKSIDE: 2 ROOMMATES
needed, M or F to share 3 bedroom
apt. Dishwasher, washerdryer, AC.
storage, rear patio, close to campus
bus $250 13 utilities. Amy, 757-
8781.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiencey Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
2000 SQ.FT. HOME, 4 bedrooms,
3 baths, extra large fenced-in back-
yard, washer 6 dryer, near ECU &
PCMM, $800 per month, purchase
available. 624-5790.
2 BR. APT. AVAILABLE now above
Percolator Coffeehouse. $450 a
month! Please call 768-2616. ask for
Yvonne.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP, no
lease to sign 3 bedroom house with
washerdryer, 3 blocks from cam-
pus, $200 a month plus utilities. Call
757-8738, JeffJason.
ONE BEDROOM FOR rent. 12
block from Student Store, WD, cen-
tral heat AC, available immediately.
Call 752-6608, no pets please.
$350month.
LARGE 3 BEDROOM houseapt.
Completely renovated. New kitchen,
bath, hardwood floors.All gas.
Washer dryer. Responsible, quiet
tenants. No dogs. ECU area. $765.
752-3816.
UNIVERSITY TERRACE CON-
DOS, brand new 3 bedroom, 3 bath,
washer dryer, walking distance to
ECU. Cable and phone hookup in
each room. $855month. Call 551-
1363 or (919)783-6725.
HELP WANTED
NEEDEDI SOMEONE TO DO
teleservicing and selling of office
furniture. Must be enthusiastic, posi-
tive and willing to work. Call 931-
6904 and leave a message.
$100 OFF,
Security Deposit
wllh pr�wntitlon ol this coupon, olfw �npirw
m W98 not valid with ny ollwr coupon
-WE6t-6Y COMMON SOUTH: 1or t Bedrooms,
1 bath, range, refrigerator, tree watersear.
wasneirttryer hookups, tree basic cable in
some units, laundry facilities, 5 blocks from
campus, ECU bus services.
-UANOSTON park: 2 bedrooms, t bath
range; retrigerator, dishwasher, free
wmh,sewer, and bask;cable, approx. 900 so
f Eherdryer hookups, central heatteir, 6
circkslrom campus,
COMPLCTEIY RENOVATED UNITS AVAILABLE.
Afi properties have 24 hr emergency maintenance-
rioperttj i I
cflogamant
tMmt � houwi
classifieds
AIM HIGH AIR FORCE Put your sci-
ence of engineering degree to work
for an aerospace leader. Consider be-
ing an Air Force officer. Excellent
training and benefits. For a free in-
formation package, call 1-800-423-
USAF.
STUDENTS: LOOKING FOR part-
time work with flexible hours so you
can still enjoy your Summer vaca-
tion. The ECU TeleFund is now hir-
ing for Summer and Fall. $5.50 per
hour plus bonus. Contact the
Telefund Office between 2 and 5 M-
Th at 328-4212.
HIRING - MUST HAVE car and driv-
ers license, yard sign delivering for
a local company - Good pay, flexible
schedule, steady work, yard signs
are easy to handle, take from one
job-site to the next. Paid per sign.
Page Tim at 551-7156 (Handy Help-
ers. Inc.). 2 positions available.
OFFICE WORK - GOOD PHONE
communication skills and computer
experience needed. Quickbooks Pro,
Excel, Word. Good pay, flexible
schedule, casual dress work environ-
ment. Call Tim at pager 551-715J5
andor send your resume to PO Boa
3166, Greenville. NC 27836 or fax to
756-6632. (Handy Helpers, Inc.) 2-3
positions available.
SWIM TEACHER WANTED for 6
yr. old boy. Experience and training
in swim instruction desired. We are
members of the REC Center. Call
Tracy at 758-0693.
FOR SALE
GUITARS - OVATION ACOUSTIC,
new condition, $300. 262-637-6550.
YAKIMA BIKE RACK, only a year
old in excellent condition. Fits a four
door car, very reasonable price. Must
sell. Call 356-2384.
FOR SALE: TUBULAR METAL
frame bunk bed (royal blue) in excel-
lent condition. Assembly required.
Needs twin mattress on top bunk
bed. Double mattress provided on
bottom bed. $175 with double mat-
tress, $150 without double mattress.
Call 766-9642 on Tuesday or Thurs-
day mornings between 9:30 AM and
12:45 or weekday evenings. Also
computer chair and parakeet cage,
each $10. Like new 24 inch girl's
bicycle, blue with pinkyellow trim,
$40. Car bike rack, $15.
LEATHER JACKETS for MC, full
set of sport leather, some new. 252-
637-6550.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(919) 4964224
Dapper
Dan's
Big Summer Sale
10-75 OFF
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
Wa Ncd TSmbrtUnd boot
Mid �ho�t Good Jean.
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry At Coins � Also Bioien Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00, 2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door & ring buzzer.
The East Carolinian
OTHER
WANT TO BUY: SWORDS, big
knives, helmets, armour. Call 262-
637-6550
GOV'T. FORECLOSED HOMES
from pennies on $1. Delinquent tax,
repo's. REO's. Your area. Toll Free
1-800-218-9000 ext. H-3726 for
current listings.
FREE CASH GRANTSI College
scholarships. Business. Medical
bills. Never repay. Toll free 1-800-
218-9000, ext. G-3726.
SEIZED CARS FROM $176.
Porsches, Cadillacs, Chevys. BMWs.
Corvettes. Also Jeeps. 4WDs. Your
area. Toll free 1-800-218-9000. ext.
A-3726.
PERSONALS
LADIES: LEND ME your sore ach-
ing muscles. Amateur masseur
needs your back to practice on. Call:
Kyle 1-800-484-8646 (code 2465)
or POB 8663, Greenville. NC 27835.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
TEST ANXIETY WORKSHOP: The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop Tuesday, June 16th
from 3:30-4:30. If you are interested
in attending this workshop, please
call the center at 328-6661 for more
information.
GREENVILLE RECREATION AND
PARKS Summer Tennis Programs.
830-4659. Registration thru May
June. Programs run 616-731.
Youth: 5 year-olds TuTh 8 a.m.9
a.m 6-10 year-olds MWF 8910
11 a.m 11-18 IntermediateAd-
vanced TWTh 10 a.m 11-16 Begin-
ners TuTh 5:30 p.m Adult begin-
ner MW 6 p.m Intermediate MW
7 p.m.
Need to find a roommate
to share your apartment?
The East Carolinian classifieds.
mm ire
Li� ooTu�5daj)
Qyis knotts "Franc�
Wad Sorros
Ci'tl tUfXU. SArrns
T� II UK1tNEl
Lf?� onTu�5dau)
Cry-to Knot5 NjOildlrjirjg
MMtes
OH MAW
I 3VST WPrtoen WHY
peopie A.VAW seeti
T6 RESORT TOVtolEMCfc
8
AND TMFfK. SEMCfJj
I WISH SOflEOHE,
WOULD BOMB
THrVPWCE.r,
1






'?��� I I �� ti����i��
the
eastcarolinian
orientation issue
Technology






10 Wtdmtdty, Jyn� 10, 1998
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE WANTED: 2 respon-
sible students looking for 1 room-
mate to share nice 3 BR duplex.
Fenced in yard, back deck. WD.
dishwasher, central heat and air.
Great location! Available nowl 830-
692I.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bed apt $295
mo avail, now. Tanglewood Apts
125 Avery St Greenville. 768-6696
2 MALE ROOMMATES NEEDED
for Fall to share 3400 sq. ft. home
near campus, $250 per month, 15
utilities. Ask for Tim. 931-9166.
HOUSE FOR RENT: 302 Lewis St
3 BR. LR, DR. kitchen, central AC,
garage. 5 min. walk from campus.
No pets. $750mo. 919-504-2052,
leave message.
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
wanted to fill 6 bedroom house.
$225 per month. Split food and utili-
ties. Two blocks from campus. Call
919-438-4427.
SUMMER ROOMMATE, CUTE
apartment, your own bedroom and
bathroom, washerdryer in apart-
ment, very close to campus. Call
Kathleen 752-2705.
TWO BEDROOM. 2 BATH in
Dockside for rent. If interested,
please call 651-3455.
ROOMMATE WANTED: ONE FE-
MALE, non-smoker, studious. 4 bed-
room, 2 bath house. $215 monthly
plus utilities, near ECU bus stop.
ASAP contact 752-0281.
DOCKSIDE: 2 ROOMMATES
needed, M or F to share 3 bedroom
apt. Dishwasher, washerdryer, AC,
storage, rear patio, close to campus
bus $250 13 utilities. Amy, 757-
8781.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiencey Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
2000 SQ.FT. HOME. 4 bedrooms.
3 baths, extra large fenced-in back-
yard, washer & dryer, near ECU &
PCMH. $800 per month, purchase
available. 624-6790.
2 BR. APT. AVAILABLE now above
Percolator Coffeehouse. $450 a
month! Please call 768-2616. ask for
Yvonne.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP, no
lease to sign 3 bedroom house with
washerdryer. 3 blocks from cam-
pus, $200 a month plus utilities. Call
757-8738, JeffJason.
ONE BEDROOM FOR rent. 12
block from Student Store, WD, cen-
tral heat AC, available immediately.
Call 762-6508, no pets please.
$350month.
LARGE 3 BEDROOM houseapt.
Completely renovated. New kitchen,
bath, hardwood floors.All gas.
Washer dryer. Responsible, quiet
tenants. No dogs. ECU area. $765.
752-3816.
UNIVERSITY TERRACE CON-
DOS, brand new 3 bedroom, 3 bath,
washer dryer, walking distance to
ECU. Cable and phone hookup in
each room. $855month. Call 551-
1363 or (919)783-6725.
HELP WANTED
NEEDEDI SOMEONE TO DO
teleservicing and selling of office
furniture. Must be enthusiastic, posi-
tive and willing to work. Call 931-
6904 and leave a message.
icurity Deposit
Securi
wrth prtwnttflon of this coupon. o(fw �xpiffrs
80198 not v�Hd with any other coupon
-WEStEY COMHQN SOUTH: 10f 1 D9droomS,
1 hatfi, r�nge, refrigerator, (roe watersewer,
washerdryer hookups, free basic cable in
some-units, laundry facilities, 5 blocks from
campus, ECU bus services.
IANGSTON park: 2 bedrooms, 1 bath
rarga refrigerator, dishwasher, free
wro.tewer. and basic cable, appro. 900 sq.
6herdryer hookups, central heatair, 6
clrcksfrom campus. '
COMKETEIY RENOVATED UNITS AVAILABLE.
V properties have 24 tir emergency maintenance-
i i
coogamBnt
Age 4 !� XcuMt
AIM HIGH AIR FORCE Put your sci-
ence of engineering degree to work
for an aerospace leader. Consider be-
ing an Air Force officer. Excellent
training and benefits. For a free in-
formation package, call 1-800-423-
USAF.
STUDENTS: LOOKING FOR part-
time work with flexible hours so you
can still enjoy your Summer vaca-
tion. The ECU TeleFund is now hir-
ing for Summer and Fall. $5.50 per
hour plus bonus. Contact the
Telefund Office between 2 and 5 M-
Th at 328212.
HIRING - MUST HAVE car and driv-
ers license, yard sign delivering for
a local company - Good pay. flexible
schedule, steady work, yard signs
are easy to handle, take from one
job-site to the next. Paid per sign.
Page Tim at 551-7156 (Handy Help-
ers, Inc.). 2 positions available.
OFFICE WORK - GOOD PHONE
communication skills and computer
experience needed. Quickbooks Pro,
Excel, Word. Good pay, flexible
schedule, casual dress work environ;
ment. Call Tim at pager 551-7156
andor send your resume to PO Bog
3166, Greenville, NC 27836 or fax to
756-6632. (Handy Helpers, Inc.) 2-3
positions available.
SWIM TEACHER WANTED for 6
yr. old boy. Experience and training
in swim instruction desired. We are
members of the REC Center. Call
Tracy at 758-0693.
FOR SALE
GUITARS - OVATION ACOUSTIC,
new condition. $300.252-637-6550
YAKIMA BIKE RACK only a year
old in excellent condition. Fits a four
door car, very reasonable price. Must
sell. Call 355-2384.
FOR SALE: TUBULAR METAL
frame bunk bed (royal blue) in excel-
lent condition. Assembly required.
Needs twin mattress on top bunk
bed. Double mattress provided on
bottom bed. $175 with double mat-
tress,150 without double mattress.
Call 766-9642 on Tuesday or Thurs-
day mornings between 9:30 AM and
12:45 or weekday evenings. Also
computer chair and parakeet cage,
each $10. Like new 24 inch girl's
bicycle, blue with pinkyellow trim,
$40. Car bike rack. $15.
LEATHER JACKETS for MC. full
set of sport leather, some new. 252-
637-6550.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(919) 496-22X4
Dapper
Dan's
Big Summer Sale
10-75 OFF
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We New! TSmbtrUnd boor
ani �ho��t Good Juris.
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Biakfin Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00, 2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door & ring buzzer.
S n
S II t)
The East Carolinian
OTHER
ANNOUNCEMENTS
WANT TO BUY: SWORDS, big
knives, helmets, armour. Call 262-
637-6550.
GOV'T. FORECLOSED HOMES
from pennies on1. Delinquent tax.
repo's. REO's. Your area. Toll Free
1-800-218-9000 ext. H-3726 for
current listings.
FREE CASH GRANTSI College
scholarships. Business. Medical
bills. Never repay. Toll free 1-800-
218-9000. ext. G-3726.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175.
Porsches. Cadillacs, Chevys, BMWs,
Corvettes. Also Jeeps, 4WDs. Your
area. Toll free 1-800-218-9000, ext.
A-3726.
PERSONALS
LADIES: LEND ME your sore ach-
ing muscles. Amateur masseur
needs your back to practice on. Call:
Kyle 1-800484-8646 (code 2465)
or POB 8663, Greenville. NC 27835.
TEST ANXIETY WORKSHOP: The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop Tuesday, June 16th
from 3:30-4:30. If you are interested
in attending this workshop, please
call the center at 328-6661 for more
information.
GREENVILLE RECREATION AND
PARKS Summer Tennis Programs,
830-4569. Registration thru May
June. Programs run 616-731.
Youth: 5 year-olds TuTh 8 a.m.9
a.m 6-10 year-olds MWF 8910
11 a.m 11-18 IntermediateAd-
vanced TWTh 10 a.m 11-16 Begin-
ners TuTh 5:30 p.m Adult begin-
ner MW 6 p.m Intermediate MW
7 p.m.
Need to find a roommate
to share your apartment?
The East Carolinian classifieds.
comics
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the
line � �
eastcarolinian
orientation issue
Technology
M





d&an
mmim

Graanvilla
TOBACCO
r
WATER PIPES
�Graffix
�Graphics
�Kaos
�Tobacco Master
�Pull Toobs
�Chills
LIVE IN STORE GLASS BLOWER
�Custom Work
�Daily Schedule
During Fall & Spring
�Weekly Exhibitions
During Summer
�Extensive Hand-Blown
Glass Inventory
DORM SUPPLIES
�Beer Funnels
�Blacklights
�Tapestries
�Incense
�Lava Lamps
�Herbal Smoking
Blends
BODY PIERCING BY KRISTEN
�Greenville's Most Experienced
Body Piercer(over 8 years)
�Autoclave Sterilization
�Highest Quality Jewerly
�Safe and Clean
�Great Prices
7

BLACKLZGZZT ROOM
�Posters
�Pipes
�Candles
WHIP CREAM SUPPLIES
�ISI 10 count box
�ISI 24 count box
�Crackers jur 3
�Dispensors�n3
NOVELTY CIGARETTES G CIGARS
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
CURRENT LOCATION
429 South Evans Street Mall
561-PIPE �561-7473
future LOCATION
505 South Evans Street
(old Onix location)





The East Carolinian
Orientation Issue
ECU ranks 25th "Most Wired" university
Only public
university in
UNC-System
to rank
Top 40
1. Dartmouth College
2. New Jersey Institute of
Technology
3. MIT
4. Renesselaer Polytechnic
5. University of Illinois, Urbana-
Champaign
6. Carnegie Mellon University
7. California Institute of
Technology
8. Indiana University,
Bloomington
9. University of Oregon
10. Worcester Polytechnic
Institute
11. University of Delaware
12. Dakota State University
13. Emerson College
14. Rhodes College
15. Virginia Polytechnic Institute
16. University of Virginia
17. North Western University
18. Drexel University
19. College of Saint Benedict
20. New York University
21. Sweet Briar College
22. Baylor University
23. UCLA
24. University of California at
Santa Cruz
25. ECU
26. University of Central Florida
27. Stanford University
28. Middlebury College
29. Ohio State University
30. Yale University
31. University of Notre Dame
32. University of Vermont
33. Florida Sate University
34. Rochester Institute of
Technology
35. Saint Johns University
36. University of Mississippi
37. Michigan State University
38. Texas A&M
39. University of Maryland,
College Park
40. University of Missouri-Rolla
Amanda Austin
NewsEmivr
In a world of increasing
technological pursuits, ECU
steps to home plate and
ranks 25th as one of
America's "most wired" col-
leges. The university is the
only public university within
the UNC-system schools to
be included in Yahoo!
Internet Life magazine's list-
ings.
Yahoo! based rankings
upon 22 factors in four dif-
ferent categories.These cat-
egories include general ser-
vices, academics social life
and computer statistics.
Some of the categories
that helped the university
attain the ranking were
campus network, campus
computer labs, student
Technology at ECU is supported by
the computer main frame, located in
the Austin classroom building.
PHOTO BY HEATHER BURGESS
newspaper
on-line, net
training stu-
dents and
classes with
online mate-
rials.
"ECU con-
tinues to
make great
strides in
raising the
information
technology
(IT) bar in
education
said Ernest
Marshburn,
director of academic com-
puting. "Beginning with a
commitment to upgrade the
campus networking system
with fiber optics and just
this year becoming the 'first'
university in the nation to
implement
Microsoft
Exchange 5.0,
ECU continues
to make steady
progress in edu-
cational (IT)
In past listings
provided by
Yahoo! Internet
Life magazine,
ECU ranked as
low as 93rd, a
considerable
jump to this
year's ranking of
25th. The uni-
versity has man-
aged to out-
rank Duke and
Wake Forest,
the only other
North Carolina
Webmaster, Booby Tugge, worts with
the student media to ensure all updated
material appears on the web page.
PHOTO BY HEATHER BURGESS
universities included in
Yahoo's rankings.
Chancellor Richard Eakin
attributes ECU's technolog-
ical achievements to three
main factors: the installation
of a $14 million asynchro-
nous transfer mode (ATM)
fiber optic network, the
information-technology fee
included in student tuition
and ECU's commitment to
equip faculty with up-to-
date technology, for exam-
ple, faculty members are
provided a new computer
every three years.
The ATM fiber optic net-
work is one of the many
feats that has enabled ECU
to rise among the highest
ranks, as well as being the
first university to imple-
ment Microsoft Exchange
5.0 as its campus-wide mes-
saging system. Microsoft
was chosen after the uni-
versity tried five different
messaging systems over an
18 month evaluation
period.
Why we are
25
notl
General Ranking
Campus Network - Yes
Web Access (restricted) - Yes
Default E-mail Account - Yes
Campus Computer Lab - Yes
Academic
Online Registration - Yes
Online DropAdd - Yes
Online Transcripts - Yes
Net Training-Students (req.) - Yes
Net Training-Faculty (req.) - Yes
Percentage of classes with online materials -
Percentage of classes with Online work -15
Distance Learning - Yes
Social Life
Percentage of student Home Pages -15
Student Newspaper - Yes
News group Hierarchy - No
Online Gaming Network - No
Electronic Ride Board - No
Campus Cybercafe - No
Computer Statistics
Public Computers
Recent Computer Buys - 25
Lab Waiting Time (min.) � 15
Percentage of students who own computers -
20
40
Comments
"Campus touch-screen kiosks will let students
access grades, Web Sites and syllabi
Microsoft proved to be
the most effective means for
"nomadic user" access. The
system provided world-wide
e-mail accessibility, attach-
ment capabilities and many
other assets. The exchange
was also the most cost effec-
tive plan available among the
different systems that were
experimented with.
The information technolo-
gy fee, which students pay
along with their tuition,
allows funds up to and
exceeding 1700,000 a year
to be spent on technological
equipment that will benefit
the student as well as the
university as a whole.
"We want our students to
graduate with more than just
computer literacy said
Richard Brown, vice chancel-
lor for administration and
finance. "Employers look for
people who know how to
function in the 'information
age' and our graduates are
becoming more and more
attractive because of the
hands on experience they
have gained at ECU
According to Marshburn,
ECU is not resting with this
achievement, but will contin-
ue to make many advance-
ments and earn recognition.
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page 3
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Technology on the forefront
The East Carolinian
Orientation Issue
Entering freshmen SAT scores increase
Average previously
roughly 1015,
now 1020
William LeLiever
Staff Writer
The average SAT scores for an
entering freshmen have taken a small
but relevant increase. In past years
the average SAT scores equaled
roughly 1015. but this year they are
projected to increase to over 1020.
The Scholastic Aptitude Test is used
to predict how the student will do in
college.The student grade point aver-
age and dass rank are also good tools
to predict how a student will fit in at
the university they decide to attend.
"We do not weigh the SAT as heav-
ily as the GPA and dass rank said
Ellen Scott, associate director of
admissions, "tt is a factor, but not a pri-
mary factor. We feel the four years of
academic work is more indicative of
how they will do in college than one
test"
One reason for this increase is the
competition between out-state and
in-state applicants. The school can
only enroll 18 percent of the fresh-
men dass from out-of-state.
"Since we can only take a certain
amount of out-of-state students, it is
naturally harder for them to get in
Sonic Plaza brings
architectural artwork
End ofJune
expected date of
completion
TK Jones
Staff Writer
Students, please fill free to touch, sit
on and walk on the art � the Sonic
Plan architectural art, in front of die
new entrance of Joyner library, that is.
The Sonic Plaza has been an ongo-
ing project since 1992 and its com-
pletion is drawing near. The projected
goal was to have it finished before the
end of May. Now it is delayed until the
end of June, and for internationally
known artist Christopher Janney, the
Sonic Plaza's artist, this seems
approachable.
Janney was chosen after winning
the Artworks for State Buildings
Program contest in 1992.
"We started on the blueprints
immediately after we won the com-
petition, but with the rapid flow of
new software, it is taking a little
longer Janney said.
Upon completion, the
sound sculpture will
include four elements: a
percussive water wall,
ground cloud, media
glockenspiel and sonic
gates.
The percussive water
wall, a 15-foot by 40-foot
brick wall with an
appendage of 64 water
jets, will be near the
entrance to the library.
Using proximity sensors,
water will undulate in pat-
terns set by the amount of
surrounding activity.
The ground cloud is a
12-foot circle of water
that responds to a change in wind
speed by pulsating at different levels,
in harmony with the wind.
The media glockenspiel will bring
some sound to campus. As the day
shifts from morning, to noon, evening
and midnight, the dock will indicate
the change by releasing symbolic fig-
ures. At morning, a rooster will crow.
At noon, a steam whistle and smoke
will blow. In the evening, the sound of
a cannonball being fired will be heard.
And at the stroke of midnight, your
Upon completion the sonic plaza will be the
home of a percussion mater mall and
ground cloud for students to enjoy.
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
stagecoach won't turn into a pump-
kin; however, there will be a surprise
about what will be seen. Students in
the School of Music are coming up
with the sound.
When finished, the Sonic Plaza will
have a total cost of $116,235.
"The source of these funds is the
State of North Carolina as a part of
the overall project cost of $30 mil-
lion, approved by the voters as part of
a statewide bond referendum said
Bruce Ftye, facility service director.
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said Velvet Reynolds, admissions coun-
selor.
ECU is rated 25th as the most
wired university in Yahoo! Internet
Life Magazine, up from 93 a year ago.
"Campus touch-screen kiosks allow
students at ECU to access grades,
web sites and syllabi. Connected stu-
dents can also register for classes,
drop and add courses, check tran-
scripts, and read the student newspa-
per without even leaving their dorm
room the magazine stated in their
comments about ECU.
"Befog a technologically advanced
university wHI place our students at an
advantage in this computer age Scott
said.
The school has also received doc-
toral two status this year which has
increased the market value of the
diploma.
"When companies are looking at
students resume's this status will
make the degree from ECU more
valuable Reynolds said.
University to build new
dining hall on west campus
Construction to
begin in about
one year
Mohamed Hussein
Staff Writer
Students crowding into
Mendenhall
Dining Hall will
soon have a new
spacious place to
eat
During the
spring semester
of 1998 the
Board of
Governors of the
UNC system
approved spend-
ing more than $92 million on con-
struction projects at eight UNC
campuses around the state. Of that
$92 million, $7.4 million will go into
constructing a new dining hall at
ECU. The money for the projects is
directly coming from the sale of rev-
enue bonds. The bonds will be
repaid from income earned by the
facilities through rent, direct sales
or fees.
"The bonds keep the university's
"Constructon
would not begin
for another year"
Richard Brown
vice chancellor of finance and
administration
dining hall improvements moving
forward said Richard Brown, vice
chancellor of finance and adminis-
tration.
The dining hall will be located on
the west end of campus. It will
include a 600-seat dining hall and a
food court. It will be adjacent to
Reade Circle at the site of the
amphitheater currently. The food
will be prepared and served by
Aramark, the multi-million dollar
food service
provider on campus.
"Construction
would not begin for
another year
Brown said .
Brown expects the
dining hall will be as
good as Todd Dining
Hall on College Hill.
This new dining hall
will be a major site
of attraction and a major improve-
ment to ECU's west campus.
At the present time, Mendenhall
Student Center houses the main
dining hall on west campus.
Mendenhall was first built in 1974
and is still in good use today, but
the separation of the dining hall
from Mendenhall will make it easier
to have more room for events in
the student center.
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Page 4





The East Carolinian
Orientation Issue
Technology on the forefront
Many construction projects near completion
Major factor
interfering with
process is weather
Melanie Hackworth
Staff Writer
People walking across campus
can't miss the signs of continuous
construction to many buildings and
areas. According to university offi-
cials, numerous construction pro-
jects are drawing to a close and
more are starting.
Projects such as the stadium upper
deck, Fletcher cooling towers, and
HVAC telecommunication rooms
are nearing an end. Final inspection
for the upper deck of the stadium
will occur in April.
Updating of the equipment in
Fletcher cooling towers at $250,000
apiece is also nearing completion.
Dr. George Harrell, assistant vice
chancellor for administration and
finance said the university is happy
with the construction progress.
"Almost everything is on sched-
ule Harrell said.
The major factor interfering with
the progress of the projects appears
to be the weather.
"El Nino has really gotten a hold
of us said Bruce Flye, director of
facilities, planning, design and con-
struction.
"The amount of rain that we've
had has certainly affected the pro-
jects Harrell said.
Despite the weather, "the only
project that's behind schedule in a
major way is the stadium Harrell
said.
Projects such as the addition of an
elevator to Rawl and the Sonic Plaza
of Joyner Library are continuing on
at the scheduled pace. �
The Sonic Plaza at Joyner is sched-
uled to be finished in 30 to 60 days.
The plaza will feature motion detec-
tors connected to sprinklers, video
screens and a ground cloud.
The plaza is designed by an artist
and is made in close collaboration
with the North Carolina Arts
Council.
"This is believed to be one of the
finest examples of this kind of art-
work Flye said.
Plans are underway for the new
Science and Technology Building
which will be located behind the
General Classroom Building.
The new building will basically
vacate the classes from Flanagan.
The project
includes two 250
person lecture
halls, two 125 per-
son halls, labs and
classrooms. The
price tag for this
project is $57 mil-
lion.
Officials are
beginning designs
for a new west
campus dining area
where the
amphitheater is
currently located.
Also, plans to add
on to the Jones
Cafeteria to make a coffee shop
atmosphere are beginning.
Construction will be starting soon
on the renovation of the Student
Hearth Center and Jarvis Residence
Constructions projects to improve the university
can be viewed from most anywhere on campus.
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
Hall.
Officials said that 31 projects are
planned for this summer.
"We do expect to have a busy
summer again Harrell said.
Counseling center provides academic, personal advice
95 percent positive
response from
students involved
Amanda Austin
News Editor
The university's center for counsel-
ing and student development is on
hand and available to students.
Students who need to find answers
to problems they may not otherwise
be able to solve may come to the
counseling center for help.The center
provides students with caring, listen-
ing, guidance, self exploration and sug-
gesting new perspectives for consider-
ation and providing information.
"We are here to help and support
students in their academic years at
ECU said Lynn Roeder, director of
the center.
Throughout the academic year the
counseling center provides students
with workshops and personal devel-
opment groups.
Some workshops available focus on
providing help with academics and
improving skills, as well as a student's
study habits. Other workshops help
students deal with rape, date rape and
body self-consciousness for survivors
of sexual assault
The counseling center also provides
personal development groups that
address personal issues.
On the flip side of group work-
shops, the counseling center is avail-
able to provide personal, one-on-one
counseling for individual students who
wish to discuss particular issues that
may lay heavily on his or her mind.
According to Roeder, the center's
counseling "helps keep many students
in school"
The center has a 95 percent positive
response from the students who have
visited the center and as a result have
stayed in school.
The counseling center is located in
room 316 of the Wright Building.
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page 5





Technology on the forefront
The East Carolinian
Orientation Issue
Distance Learning provides classes via internet
Many learn from
comfort of home
Laura Lee Hines
staff writer
Distance learning has proven a
success at ECU. Distance learning
involves either the internet or tele-
conferencing, and often a combina-
tion of the two.
"For 1997-1998, we (ECU) have
had 103 distance learning classes
said James Byrd, distance learning
specialist.
These classes are offered to help
make education more convenient
Byrd said the development of the
distance learning program was
established by the adult learner; 98
percent of the students enrolled in
distance learning classes are nontra-
ditional students (24 yean or
older).
Every course offered through a
distance learning program Is also
offered on campus.
Classes offered on campus are
also benefiting from the distance
learning programs. Teleconferencing
and the internet allow students to
communicate with others world-
wide without leaving the classroom.
"It exposes students to people and
technology they otherwise wouldn't
be exposed to Byrd said.
Such technologies as CUSeeMe
video cam, listservs and chat rooms
are incorporated in these class-
rooms. Students have the opportu-
nity to use this technology through
ECU, an opportunity many universi-
ties do not offer. Experience with
such technology makes ECU stu-
dents stand out when applying for
jobs, enhancing job opportunities.
The use of cutting edge technolo-
gies in the classroom also challenges
faculty.
It requires on the part of the fac-
ulty, to always be looking for a bet-
ter way said Barry DuVall, profes-
sor in the department of industrial
technology. It takes professors
that can admit that they can learn
from their students
Students can attend university
classes from home due to
developments in distance learning.
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
Fall semester brings student publications via internet
Helped to gain status
as"2Sth MostWired"
Laura Lee Hines
staff writer
With the start of fall semester, student media
will be available both in an out of cyberspace.
The student publications include The East
Carolinian newspaper, the literary and arts
magazine The Rebel, minority student magazine
Expressions and the campus radio station,
WZMB-FM 91.3.
Junior Bobby Tuggie is an instrumental part
of the student media online. Along with stu-
dent media adviser Paul Wright, Tuggie has
managed to bring student publications online.
"I wanted to leave something behind at
ECU Tuggie said.
The development of The East Carolinian web
site helped ECU gain recognition as one of the
top 25 "most-wired" universities by Yahoo!
Internet Life magazine.
Wright said ECU student publications were
brought online, following the trend of com-
mercial and student newspapers.
Publications are updated as hard copy publi-
cations are released, allowing students, faculty,
staff, alumni and Pirate fens to stay in touch
with Pirate life wherever they travel.
The East Carolinian site not only contains
contents of the paper, but also contains
enhanced information relating to stories, a
weekly poll concerning campus events and stu-
dent interests, hot links to sites related to
campus events, and a thorough calendar of
campus-wide events. This site is visited over
3,000 times per day.
"It's a great way to inform students about
issues that involve them said Tuggie.
Beginning in the fell, student media will host
a second web site for student organizations.
There are over 250 registered organizations
STUDENT MEDIA WEB ADDRESSES ARE:
WWW.TEC.ECU.EDU
www. RE BEL. ecu.edu
www.EXPRESSIONS.ecu.edu
www.W2MB.ecu.edu
www.CLUBHOUSE.ecu.edu
on campus and beginning in the fall, each of For more information, visit our web site at
those organizations will have free access to www.tec.ecu.edu
this web site where they can post their own
web pages.
00

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page 6





The East Carolinian
Orientation Issue
Technology on the forefront
Fiber optics network links students to world
First in state
to provide for
students,
faculty, staff
Laura Lee Hines
staff writer
Students can connect to comput-
ers around campus, the ECU main-
frame and other parts of the world
in a matter of seconds with the
campus fiber optics network.
Approximately three years ago, the
university installed a $12-$ 14 billion
fiber optics network, becoming the
first university in the state to pro-
vide the speed of a fiber optics sys-
tem to faculty, students, and staff.
Jeff Huskamp, associate vice
chancellor for administration and
finance � information technology
and chief information officer at ECU,
stated that general administration
hails the ECU fiber optics system as
"the leading campus network of any
school in the system
The network is a system of fibers
connecting computers. This system
of fibers is similar to telephone
wires, but provides a pathway for
communication much faster than
through telephone wire. Due to the
capacity of the fiber optics network,
students can connect to the ECU
mainframe, the internet and e-mail in
a matter of seconds and the speed of
access is much faster than connec-
tions through modems and tele-
phone lines.
The fiber optics system is faster
than the current internet connection
and within two years, the internet
connection will be upgraded to
assure use of the capacity of the
fiber optics network.
The ECU mainframe houses stu-
dent records, including one card data
such as declining balance amounts
and the use of meal allotments. With
the fiber optics network, data stored
on the one card is updated as stu-
dents use their cards.
"There are about 10,300 connec-
tions on campus Huskamp said.
These connections to the fiber
optics network are found in dorms,
computer labs, offices and the
library.
"If people don't have computers,
we have at least 40 labs said Blake
Price, director of computer and
information systems. "They all have
internet connections
Among those 40 labs is the recent-
ly updated Mendenhall computer lab.
Starting this summer, the Mendenhall
computer lab will house 40 comput-
ers and be open 24 hours a day.
Students can connect to computers around tie world due to fiber optics.
PHOTO BY JASON FEATHER
Jarvis Hall undergoes extensive renovations
Only surviving
building used for
original purpose
Mohamed Hussein
Staff Writer
Jarvis Residence Hall, the universi-
ty's oldest building, is in the process
of being renovated.
"Jarvis Hall Is being renovated to
improve the building's overall
schematics and quality said Inez
Fridley, associate director of facilities
management.
Jarvis Hall, named for a university
founder, Governor Thomas J. Jarvis,
was built in 1909. tt is the only sur-
viving early building still used for its
initial purpose. But the renovations
will combine modern conveniences
with the look the building had when
it was new, close to 90 years ago.
"The renovations will upgrade the
total mechanical and technical
aspects of the building Fridley said.
The changes will include new
rooms that are similar to the ones
already there, a new office suite and
a large student lounge.
Manny Amaro, university housing
director, said the renovations will
include extensive interior changes.
Repairs to elevators, fire sprinklers,
electrical heating and cooling sys-
tems and upgrades in plumbing are
included in the project.
"Since Jarvis has such a long histo-
ry on campus, it's important that we
preserve it and restore some of the
fixtures it had when it was new
Amaro said.
"The actual work will not begin
until the Ml of this year, but we are
taking bids right now Fridley said.
The actual work will take about
one year to complete. But the ques-
tion is where to house the overflow
of students.
The answer is that the hall has
been unoccupied since last fall and
there has not been an overflow
problem yet In fact, some students
have their own rooms in the dorms.
Officials say the work being done
to jarvis is another milestone In the
massive renovation work being done
on the campus. They hope that by
the time Jarvis Hall is finished, it will
set a precedent for quality on
campus.
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page 7





Technology on the forefront
Joyner library stacked
with more than books
Currently In
phase II of
renovations
William LeLiever
Staff Writer
ECU's Joyner Library is in
the middle phase II of Its ren-
ovations and prepared to
serve every student's needs.
The library contains the
Center for Academic
Communication, a reference
department, documents and
maps, media and teaching
resources, periodicals and microforms, and
the new music library and North Carolina
collection.
The center for academic communication
(CAC) offers the faculty, students and staff
access to electronic and visual media and
equipment. CAC also broadcasts the North
Carolina Research and Education Network
(NCREN) and North Carolina Information
Highway teleconferencing facilities.
"The teleconferencing facilities enable stu-
dents who are unable to be present in
Greenville to take ECU classes and interact
with professors from other parts of the
state said Tom McQuad, member of the
CAC department
The North Carolina Collection collects,
preserves and makes both printed and non-
printed material pertaining to North Carolina
available. It provides current events of the
state as well as historical information. An
emphasis Is on eastern North Carolina coun-
ties east of Interstate 95. In the online library
catalog, called Horizon, materials in the North
Carolina Collection are separated into cate-
gories: Joyner NC stacks; Joyner NC refer-
ence; Joyner NC documents; and Joyner NC
rare.The collection also includes microfilm, 16
state newspapers and 125 state periodicals.
"We (as a department) can spend more
Among the many helpful resources at Joyner Library is the
Online card catalog system to locate texts within the library.
I PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
time with students for term papers and pro-
jects said Maurice York, North Carolina
librarian. "Some of the resources we have are
not posted in the online catalog, such as maps,
newspaper clippings, and microforms, so it is
important for students to ask. Students
should also know this department is not just
about historical information pertaining to the
state but also current events as well
The Media and Teaching Resources Center
provides audiovisual materials and the equip-
ment for in-library viewing: audio cassettes,
laser discs, school television programs, CD-
ROMs, and videotapes.
"Most of the people who use this area are
going into teaching( it is a K-12 area) and just
reflection of the tools they will use in their
teaching environment" said Dawn Flye, media
and teaching librarian.
The reference department is a question-
and-answer department The staff helps stu-
dents with term papers by suggesting appro-
priate indexes and CD-ROMs; recommending
sources for complex topics and assisting with
research questions that require a search of
library materials. The department has style
guides for writing term papers, such as MLA
and Turabian.
"It is our first priority to help the patrons
get started on their research papers said
Mary Williams, reference librarian.
Joyner Library Hours
Summer Hours Nay 14- August 19
Sunday 1-11 p.m.
Monday-Thursday 8 a.mll p.m.
Friday 8 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Saturday 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Regular Hours
Sunday 1 p.m. -1 a.m.
Monday-Thursday 8 a.ml a.m.
Friday 8 a.m. - 8 p.m.
Saturday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Exceptions to scheduled hoar
June 23 8 a.m. - 6 p.m.
June 24 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
July 34 closed
July 31 8 a.m. - 6 p.m.
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-page 8
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The East Carolinian
Orientation Issue
Technology on the forefront
Help available for those in academic trouble
Tutorial programs
offered through
departments
Natasha Phillips
Semor Writer
Many students, at some point in
their college career, may experience
academic difficulties.
ECU categorizes academic difficul-
ty on three levels: academic warning,
academic probation and academic
suspension.
"Academic warning only considers
the number of hours attempted at
ECU; however, academic probation
includes transfer hours said
Donald C. Joyner, assistant dean of
the office of undergraduate studies.
"Academic probation requires stu-
dents to maintain a certain GPA;
however, failure to comply with uni-
versity standards may result in sus-
pension. If suspended, a student has
the following three options: attend
summer school, write a letter of
appeal to the Readmission Appeals
Committee, or accept the period of
suspension and apply for readmis-
sion Joyner said.
Students who encounter academ-
ic difficulty may choose to receive
assistance. A supplemental instruc-
tion program is offered through the
office of undergraduate studies.
"Our Supplemental Instruction
(SI) leaders provide academic guid-
ance through discussion groups to
all interested students. SI leaders
attend the class along with the stu-
dents three times a week to discuss
scholastic issues. Instructors teach
students efficient and productive
study techniques in a particular area
of study Joyner said .
Many departments offer tutorial
programs. Computer aids, academic
enhancement workshops, outreach
programs and Individual conferences
are additional sources for students
experiencing academic difficulty.
Some academic programs are
optional: however, academic warning
or academic probation workshops
are mandatory. Students are
required to attend an Academic
Success Workshop and to meet with
their academic adviser.
Students are notified through the
mail that "failure to attend one of
these workshops will result in your
record being tagged and you will be
unable to adjust your schedule or
register for further courses
"Non-mandatory workshops are
offered throughout the semester to
everyone. There's no charge, but
very few people consistently attend
the meetings. Students can't take
advantage of the program if they
don't come said Dorothy H. Muller,
dean of the office of undergraduate
studies.
During mandatory meetings, stu-
dents are asked to complete a self-
assessment form. This form lists the
most common factors contributing
to academic dilemmas. Over the
last three years, the four most
reported reasons for academic diffi-
culty have been the following: lack
of academic motivation, poor class
attendance, poor test-taking skills
and an inadequate balance between
extracurricular activities and class
work.
"Poor academic performance is
not always the result of a lack of
knowledge. Academic transition and
occupational uncertainty can make
college an extremely stressful peri-
od. We encourage students to
objectively look at their strengths
and weaknesses. Through individual
conferences and personal discus-
sions we hope to guide students in
the right direction Joyner said.
"The university recognizes the
importance of advising conferences
between advisers and students
Muller said.
The adviser survey form is one of
many methods used to help improve
the overall college experience by
improving advisement Student par-
ticipation is absolutely necessary;
however, only IS percent of the stu-
dent population complete and
return their forms.
"The office of undergraduate
studies strongly encourages stu-
dents to complete their adviser sur-
vey form. Another form will be
released in March. This form can be
completed in person or on the web.
Students may seek help for academic problems through the services
offend by undergraduate studies located in Bretester-A.
PHOTO BY JASON FEATHER
Either way, student participation is
completely confidential. We hope
more students will take this oppor-
tunity to voice their opinion said
Muller.
The adviser survey form is not the
only method used to increase acad-
emic performance. The office of
undergraduate studies offers grade
calculation instruction, tips for col-
lege success, academic assistance
resources and academic support
centers.
"I encourage students to use the
office of undergraduate studies as
frequently as possible. Come in for
an individual conference and discuss
your goals with a qualified staff
member. Although we are here to
assist the student body, self-aware-
ness tends to be the most valuable
teacher. Be honest and truthful with
yourself. Know your limitations and
build on your strengths Joyner said.
For more information about the
office of undergraduate studies, visit
Brewster A-II3. call 328-6001, or
visit the office web site under
Academic Life on the ECU home
page.
UNI
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page9
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Technology on the forefront
The East Carolinian
Orientation Issue
Incoming freshmen hit with campus card scam
1.5 million
sold in 1997
at $20 per card
Mohamed Hussein
Staff Writer
A scam has been unveiled dealing
specifically with campus identifica-
tion cards.
A company called the National
College Registration Board (NCRB)
sent out millions of junk mail letters
to graduating high school seniors
urging them to purchase a Campus
Card in preparation for their
entrance into college.
"What they did was send out let-
ters all over the country telling the
incoming college freshmen that they
could use this card as a certified col-
lege ID, meal and bookstore debit
card said Jennifer Sutton, director
of the ECU One Card department
Approximately 1.5 million cards
were purchased in 1997 at $20
apiece. National colleges and univer-
sities have not acknowledged the
Campus Card, therefore making
NCRB's card worthless. Freshmen
purchasing the card may enter col-
lege expecting to use their new card,
but will end up having to obtain a
special card for their institution.
Many college representatives have
filed law suits against NCRB in peti-
tion.
"What has been done is a Cease
and Desist letter has been forward-
ed to the company on April 24 said
Ben Irons, university attorney. "We
have asked them to inform us of the
remedial action they are going to
take to clear up the confusion
However, the web site of NCRB,
www.campuscard.org, looks quite
authentic. The main page is embla-
zoned with an intellecttial reef
donned with a book in the middle of
it. The site also has a mission state-
ment that boasts that the company
"endeavors to improve the daily lives
of college students across the coun-
try by providing them with as many
unique benefits and services as pos-
sible The company promises that
the card can be used to get discounts
at participating stores, but the stores
are limited to NCRB's home state of
New Jersey. The company has added
a disclaimer to the site in response
to negative feedback from universi-
ties that it falsely accepted the card.
According to Irons, the university
will not take any action against
NCRB if they make the necessary
corrections. However, if they refuse
to take ECU off the list of universi-
ties that supposedly support the
card, officials will contact the
Consumer Protection division of the
attorney general and file for an inves-
tigation. Irons said he is still awaiting
a reply from NCRB.
Both Sutton and Irons said that for
now, the main issue is protection of
incoming freshmen. Irons said that
there has been discussion of a letter
mailed out to all incoming freshmen
alerting them of the scam, and a dis-
tribution of information to local high
school seniors.
"What I'm going to do is contact
the guidance counselors at the area
high schools and tell them to inform)
their students of the scam going on
Sutton said.
Student drinking patterns consistent with national average
1,200 students
randomly selected
603 replied
Natasha Phillips
Senor Writer
A recent survey administered by
the Division of Student Life, the
CORE Institute Alcohol and Other
Drug Survey, contradicted what has
been said to be a party atmosphere
at ECU.
The results have supplied new
light on the actual number of stu-
dents who drink at ECU.
"The results of the survey are
very comparable to peers national-
ly said Ronald Speier, dean of stu-
dents.
This is the first time a survey like
this has been administered at the
university.
A total of 1,200 students were
randomly selected and sent a sur-
vey to complete. Of the students,
603 replied. There were slightly
more females, on-campus residents
and freshmen who responded than
are represented within the popula-
tion.
ECU drinking patterns are consis-
tent with the national average.
Nationally, 16 percent of college
students did not drink In the past
year, 21 percent only drank on six
or fewer occasions during the last
year, and 38 percent reported binge
drinking "in the last two weeks
At ECU, 17 percent did not drink
in the past year, 20 percent have
drank in the past year, and 39 per-
cent have reported binge drinking
"in the last two weeks
"Students perceive students drink
more than they do in reality
Speier said.
Now that the survey has been
completed, administrators are able
to decide on their greatest points
of concern and what they plan to
do about them.
With the release of this survey
students should be more accurate-
ly informed about the actual drink-
ing habits of their peers.
"To help people understand the
results of the survey and to portray
a more realistic view of our cam-
pus, we will be involved in a media
campaign this semester to help our
campus and community understand
the truth about student involve-
ment with alcohol said Dr. Donna
Walsh, director of health promo-
tion and well-being.
If one is going to drink, drink
responsibly. Don't drink more than
one to two drinks the first hour. Sip
the second and skip the third. Avoid
drinking games; don't drink quickly
and eat first Learn more about how
alcohol affects someone your size
and gender, and consider the conse-
quences of being intoxicated.
Over-drinking may lead to legal
problems, unplanned pregnancy,
transmission of STDs, acquaintance
rape, assault andor death.
For more information about
binge drinking, alcohol, drugs, sexu-
ality, or general health and safety
issues, please stop by 210 Whichard
or call Walsh at 328-6793.
page 10





French Onion Soup
Cup of Baked Potato Soup A
Crock of Baked Potato Soup M I
Snack Attack
Pried Cheese, Bufiih Wuup and Bacon & Cheese Potam Skins
Artichoke and Spinach Dip & Chips
Stuffed Mushrooms
$3.95
$3.95
Ranch. Thousand bland,
y Mustard, Fat-Free Mum,
and Low-Fat Ranch
9
Chicken Caesar Salad
Southern Fried Chicken Salad
Carolina Shrimp-Pecan Salad
Oriental Chicken Salad
Garden Salad
Caesar Salad
Soup & Salad
Baked Potato Soup and choice of Garden Salad or Caesar Salad
Substitute French Onion Soup for an additional $1.00
$4.95
$4.95
$5.95
$4.95
"Roadside" Chicken Sandwich1
toENCH Dip Sandwich
ryl's All-American Burger
iarryl's Burger wl Cheese
fL's Bui Kheese
Teak and Cheese Sandwich
Darkyl's "Colossal" Club� BtogH
)undingm Chicken Salad Sandwich
Grilled Chicken Sandwich
Sandwich Combos H
B Half
I Chicken Salad xndwich or
and Baked Potato Soup
$1.95
$1.95
$3.70
SPECIALTIES
Lunch Chicken Finger Platter
Lunch Cajun Fried Shrimp
Barbecue Pork Ribs - 12 Slab
Ham & Cheese Quiche
Florentine Quiche
$4.95
$5.95
$8.95
$3.95
$3.95
PASTAS
All pastas include your choice of a cup of Baked Potato Soup
or Garden Salad or Caesar Salad
Bowtie Pasta With Grilled Chicken
Lunch Chicken 6L Pasta
Lasagna
$5.95
$5.95
$4.95
� Ha9
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
$5.95
Astounding"
Chicken Salad Sandwich or
Half "Cot
with Choice of French Onion Soup,
or Garden Salad, or Caesar Salad
DESSERTS
Pecan "Turtle" Sundae $3.99
Cappuccino Cake $3.99
Cheesecake $3.29
Topped with Fresh Strawberries in Sauce, add 59C
Caramel Cheesecake $3.79
Charleston Chocolate Chip Pie1" $3.79
Note: Student Discounts Not Valid On Lunch Menu
Don't Forget, during evenings, Darryl's still offers
ECU students a 25 Discount on items ordered from
their regular Dinner Menu.
800 East 10th Street � 752-1907





How technology fits our lifestyle
The East Carolinian
Orientation Issue
COMPUTER
CWY
READ THIS
BEFORE YOU
BUY A
COMPUTER
Miccah Smith
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Welcome to the computer age,
kids. Campus survival demands at
least weekly use of a PC, either in a
lab setting or at home.
Shopping for a computer can get
really confusing really fast, especially
for the influx of computer illiterate
freshmen whose skills include fum-
bling around back for the power
switch, cursing profusely and jump-
ing up on a chair every time they
see a mouse.
So before you all get ripped off,
there are a few things that might be
worthwhile to learn about technol-
ogy how to use it, how it will help '
your college career and, most
importandy, where to get it good and cheap.
Campus computer labs facilitate the minimal technol-
ogy demands made by most students, but the comput-
ers are far from "cutting edge Students can
choose from elderly IBMs from the
Prehistoric era or just plain Macintoshes.
Lab computers are basically-good for
paper typing, e-mail and Internet chatting
for whomever's lucky
enough to snag a ter-
minal. Fortunately, ECU
is gradually increasing the
number of terminals available to
students, and they provide fairly
consistent service.
But campus labs keep funny
hours. And the computers arent
guaranteed not to "get a little crazy'
from time to time. Horror stories of dec-
imated disks, crashed servers and total
blackouts abound.
Fortunately, ECU doesn't require
incoming freshmen
to own their own
computers, but
the way things
are going, stu-
dents are
well-advised
t
Just a few
COMPUTER
R E T A I L E R S
These local computer stores are
ready with the advice you need to
make an informed decision about
your new PC.
SW Computers:
830-6696
Computer Geeks:
3 55-333 9
Excalibur Computer Systems:
3 5 5-6600
Complete Solution:
7 56-8900
Systematic Solutions:
3 2 1-7 056
Gateway computers can be reached
on the net at
www.Gateway.com
i n g
their
own
PCs, if only
for the assurance that
their precious term papers
are in capable hands.
A good computer shouldn't cost more than
$2,000, and often costs much less. Xiao Xin Lu,
an upcoming junior and computer science
major, ordered a custom computer from
Gateway 2000, the folks who deliver the goods
In those huge cow-printed boxes. "They use
good parts, quality parts he said.
Two other brands he thought about while
shopping were Dell and Micron. For Lu, it was
simply a matter of choosing the best package
any of those companies had to offer. The
Gateway PC came with a modem, software,
mouse, speakers, microphone, joystick, sound
card and 15-inch monitor, all for $2000.
Custom computers such as these are gaining
popularity over stock PCs, because they're rel-
atively inexpensive and can be tailored to fit
individual needs. But according to Johnny Smith
of Excalibur Computer Systems, locally made
custom computers, called "clones are the best
choice.
Easy repairs and upgrades are the main ben-
efits of owning a local clone. "You will never
get a Gateway technician at your house, ever
said Smith.
Excalibur
Computer Systems
is just one of a big
handful of local
places where you
can get a
"clone SAJ
Computers,
Systematic
Solutions
and
Computer
Geeks also
sell upgrad-
able custom
systems
here in
Greenville.
So appar-
ently cus-
tom com-
puters are
the wave of
the future.
But where to
start? What's
the minimal
" computer
you'd have to
buy to get decent
performance from
games and other soft-
ware?
Smith's suggestion is "at least a
Pentium 200 with "at least 32 megs of RAM,
at least a two gigabyte hard drive, a 57.6 stan-
dard speed modem and a two meg 3-0 video
card
Not surprisingly, his store can hook you up
with just such a model, with the usual (15-inch
monitor, Windows 95, keyboard, mouse and
floppy drive all thrown in to boot) for $999.
Chris Eckes, assistant manager of Electronics
Boutique, recommended a minimum of a
Pentium II 233.
John at Computer Geeks also pushed
Pentium II, namely the Valtec Victory Series, which fea-
tures a 233 mhz processor, with 32 megs of RAM, 32
byte CD ROM, Windows 95, Altec Speaker System.
56.9K modem, monitor, mouse, keyboard, etc. for
$1549.
ECU students don't need modems, since an Ethernet
connection through the campus system is usually at
least 50 times faster, but they need to purchase and
install Ethernet cards for internet access from any per-
sonal PC on campus.
Lu didn't buy his card from the student store, which
some people accuse of inflating prices.
So you're dead-set on a brand
spankin' new PC, but you don't
know a disk drive from a hole in the
ground. Just use your common sense
and those scary salesmen won't take
advantage of you.
�Ask questions. Lots of 'em.
That's what sales reps are
for. Unsure of what is meant
by "meg" or "RAM?" Call
up a store and demand an
explanation.
Don't make any hasty
decisions. Take a day to
think over the best deal
you've been offered. Don't
waste your money.
�Ask your friends what
they've got, what they wish
they had and how much they
paid for theirs.
�Make sure the system you
buy is totally upgradable
and that any necessary
repairs can be made with
minimal trouble.
�If all else fails, haggle like
a Marrakesh market woman.
You may find that you don't
require your own PC for college,
but then again, maybe you do. Just
be sure that you'll find plenty of
uses for whichever model you set-
de on.
On that subject, Lu's final advice
is dear: "tf you're going to buy a
computer, you have to think about
what you're going to use it for
first"
It's all downhill from there.
page 12





The East Carolinian
Orientation Issue
How technology fits our lifestyle
Fun without beer in the Emerald city
Non-alcoholic
entertainment
guide
Mark Brett
Senor Writer
So you're a brand-spanking new
ECU freshman, and you're too young
to get into any of the bars (cough-
cough). What else, you're asking
yourself, is there to do in the
Emerald City? Some people would
tell you that there's not much, and
they wouldn't entirely be wrong.
But don't panic. There are other
options out there, and we're here
today to outline them for you. So
put away your drinking cap, and
check out Greenville's Non-
Alcoholic Attractions.
If movies are your bag, Greenville
is home to five theaters, of varying
quality. In no particular order
Hendrix Theater: Hendrix is the
campus theater, and students are
welcome to attend second-run
Hollywood blockbusters for free.
This makes it your best movie value,
but be wary. K you want to sit and
quietly enjoy a film, Hendrix is not
the best place to be.The crowd has
a tendency to get rowdy, and 40
people playing 40 different games of
Mystery Science Theater at the' same
time can be trying.
But Hendrix does occasionally slip
in a quality film or two (by accident,
it often seems), which is more than
we can say for the rest of the the-
aters in town
The Park; Downtown Greenville's
own dollar theater! Well, actually,
admission price is $1.50 (two bucks
on the weekend), but you get the
idea. The Park is another see
ond-run movie house, and it
typically gets the same big
name movies that played at
the other theaters a couple
of months earlier. But every
once in a while, they'll slip
us a ringer. Jackie Chan's
Operation Condor screened
at the Park on opening
night, for instance, as did
Quentin Tarantino's Jackie
Brown.
Though a bit rundown, the Park
gives you the best bang for your
movie buck (considering that you
really don't pay anything at Hendrix).
The Buccaneer:Three screens in a
building designed for two. The Buc
(as we affectionately call it) is also a
bit run-down, and it typically plays B-
Grade action movies and comedies.
This isn't a hard-and-fast rule, but if
it stars Steven Seagal, the Buc is the
first place to look.
The Plaza: Also a bit run-down
(sensing the trend here?), the Plaza is
the place to go for second-tier
major releases. Films like Bean play
here, and that's really the only nice
thing I can say about it
Carolina East Cinema: This is the
"nice" theater. It's got digital sound
on two of its four screens, and all
the big releases
open here.
Titanic sank on the Carolina East
screens for a solid five months, with
a recent return engagement (just for
those five people in town who had-
n't seen it already). Children's
movies also tend to play here, appar-
ently because parents are afraid to
leave their children at the other,
more dilapidated theaters.
The Elusive Multiplex: Rumored to
be coming for over a year, a massive
multi-screen theater is being built on
the outskirts of town, and the the-
ater owners are promising that its
completion will mean a better vari-
ety of films in Greenville. I can only
hope this means more than the the-
atrical release of every Pauly Shore
movie in this town, but I'm not hold-
ing my breath.
If you want to see better films,
Greenville's only option is
unfortunately video. We've
got the standard spate of
Blockbuster and
Blockbuster wanna-bes
(Moovies, Hollywood
Video, etc.). but the best
place to go for more
avante-garde cinema is
East Coast Music and
Video. They have a wide
selection of Japanese anima-
tion, foreign and cult films and
a slightly-less-wide selection of
new and used CDs.
They also have a fine selection of
more . adult films, but if you want
porn specialists, the place to go is
Sweet Dreams. Located on
Greenville Boulevard, Sweet Dreams
covers all your sexual accessory
needs.
For a much wider selection of
music, go downtown to CD Alley.
Looking for that rare Dead Boys
vinyl release? Want some vintage
Patsy Cline? If CD Alley can't get it
nobody can. Greenville does have a
Blockbuster Music, and our Circuit
City generally offers the best prices
in town, but why give your hard-
earned cash to evil corporate giants
when a place this cool exists in
walking distance of campus?
If you're of a more cerebral bent
Greenville also has its share of book
stores.There's aWaldenbooks at the
Carolina East Mall, a Book
Warehouse across the street from
that mall, and a Barnes & Noble near
Circuit City. They offer all the read-
' ing material you'd expect to find in
such places, with Book Warehouse
being the cheapest and Barnes and
Noble having the best selection.
And, finally, for all the comic book
fans pouring into town (join us!), the
place to go is the Nostalgia
Newsstand. Located off Dickinson
Avenue, the place is a bit hard to
find, but it's more than worth the
effort Nostalgia stocks the typical
super hero comics, but that's just the
tip of the iceberg. Spider-Man,
BghtbaK, Gen 13, Schizo, batman.
Acme Novelty Library, Zombie World,
Hate, Stray Bullets, Sin City Whatever
comics fix you crave, Nostalgia
Newsstand has it
Okay, that's it That's pretty much
all there is to do in Greenville that
doesn't involve alcohol in some way.
Well, there's always love, friendship
and intelligent conversation, but I
can't tell you how to find that Social
misfits are on their own
THE PLACE
FOR ALL YOUR
PET'S NEEDS
3140A Moseley Dr.
(Behind Parker's BBQ on
Greenville Blvd)
758-6603
Mon-Sat: 11 to 7
Sunday: 1 to 5
Aquariums & Supplies
Saltwater and Freshwater Fish
Reptiles. Small Animals, and Supplies
Live and Frozen Food
Tank Maintenance and Leasing Available
FRIENDLY AND KNOWLEDGEABLE STAFF
WELCOME NEW STUDENTS
page 13





���
How technology fits our lifestyle
The East Carolinian
Orientation Issue
Greek debate: What should you do?
Go Greek!
"Brotherhood" and
"Sisterhood"
Shannon Meek
Senior Writer
When arriving for the first time to a college or
university, one feels overwhelmed and swallowed.
The new students are standing outside their dorm
or apartment with the summer heat entangling
itself in their flesh and the pounding thought of,
"OHMIGOD! What am I to do next?"
Joining a fraternity and sorority can be extreme-
ly beneficial to a student in college. Fraternities and
sororities, in fact, somehow become the stepping
stone from college into life. Being a member of a
fraternity or sorority is more than just a flower, a
mascot, a secret song and ritual. But by belonging
to a group of people, a student can learn about
themselves and life. Those times that people share
with each other in the Greek society stain each
member's mind and captivate hisher heart.
Everyone knows that the Greeks do have their
fun, but the Greek system is a powerful tool for
social support, philanthropy and scholarship, things
that benefit the members of the Greek system
allowing them to blossom.
The Greek system instills social values within its
members. It teaches them priceless lessons about
how to get along with others. It teaches how to
compromise, share and accept one another for
each individual's strengths and weaknesses. By
sharing in each other's emotions, hardships and
experiences for four years, Greek life enriches the
college life, ft becomes an invaluable guide of
learning how to live with others
The sororitiesfraternities gain skills in helping
people adapt to new environments. For incoming
freshmen, belonging to a fraternitysorority gives
them a sense of acceptance in a strange atmos-
phere. The already established members of the
Greek system become mentors. They are interest-
ed, concerned and involved in their new meme-
ber's lives.
The fraternitysorority is a positive memory of
the college experience. This is seen shining in the
Alumni's faces when they return to each individual
chapter. Their eyes will glisten as they talk about
their sorority fraternity. The chapter of the indi-
vidual Greek societies gives alumni a place to
return to. They learn social skills that carry them
throughout life. By being Greek, they experience
unique memories that they could not experience
anywhere else. In these societies there Is an over-
flowing well of support, acceptance and encour-
agement for each other.
An important aspect of Greek life is devoted to
academics. Fraternitiessoroities require their
members to maintain a high level of scholastic
achievement New associates or members of the
Fratternitiessororities are greatly encouraged to
keep high academic values. Each individual chapter
has an elected scholarship chair, who guides, over-
sees and encourages each members academic
progress.
Panhellenic Council, the governing body of the
sororities, deemed this year The Year of the
Scholar. Panhellenic comprised a notebook with
valuable study tips in order to help ensure acade-
See GREEK, page 15
Or not!
Columnist has better
things to do
Miccah Smith
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Well now, this is interesting. Since
Shannon is a Greek, she automatically gets
stuck defending them, and I get to bash
them. I really can't tell someone not to go
Greek, because my opinion is that Greeks
are here to stay, and they fill a certain place
in society.
Frat boys and sorority chicks (let's call
them FBs and SCs, because tH&'s probably
how their test tubes are labeled in the lab)
are people too, I think.
Why the lab? you ask. What test tubes?
Well, my theory is that FBs and SCs are
specially bred in laboratories under ideal
conditions, then released into society at
about junior high age, just in time to begin
the necessary social bonding to ensure
their climb to the top of the business and
political worlds.
In junior high, nothing brought tears to
my eyes quicker than a gaggle of 14-year-
old developing GreekJets (we'll call them
ProtoGreeks), clustered like sure-footed
raptors around their trembling prey
(myself), who had been singled out of the
herd for the inability to afford stylish jeans.
By high school, ProtoGreeks have pretty
much finished weeding out undesirable
social connections and begin to form their
own nucleus consisting of guys who are
smart but would rather play soccer and
girls who are cheerleaders and honors stu-
dents.
Plumage includes clothes that are stylish
but not extreme (khakis, chinos,
Timberland boots, you now, the Gap
scene). They've got business casual down
to a science by age 16. Preferred vehicles
include mainly forest green Jeeps.
In college the ProtoGreeks sort them-
selves out into little categories called
sororities and fraternities, whose main
functions are to keep large amounts of
Greeks (dropped the "Proto Congrats)
on hand for spontaneous drinking taunt-
ing and parading exercises that will help
them become the best citizens possible.
Those who didn't get forest green Jeeps
for graduation are content to drive putty-
colored Volvos or any other antique for-
eign car, provided that the car in question
is coated thoroughly with Grateful Dead
stickers. The boys sprout little goatees and
the girls go blonde, remembering their
cheerleading days with a sneer.
Most fraternities sport at least one
token "original guy" over whom the girls
giggle. "He's crazy they sayTee-hee This
probably means that he wears a funny hat,
or plays with silly putty, or owns a hermit
crab or something. I tell you, Greeks just
aren't that big on deviation.Anything more
extreme may just scare 'em.
So, anyway, my point is, all you
ProtoGreeks know who you are. Come
forward and fill the empty spaces the
seniors left behind.The rest of us have bet-
ter things to do.
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The ehviromerit inside of Peasants is hopefully like nowhere
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How old do you have to be to get into Peasants? 18 with an
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page 14





The East Carolinian
Orientation Issue
How technology fits our lifestyle
Get involved early at ECU
Plenty of clubs
to join
Shannon Meek
Senior Writer
For those of you wondering how
to get involved at ECU, joining a club
can be a great way to find a connec-
tion and meet other students. At
ECU you can find various numbers
of clubs from the newly evolving
SURGE (a computer gaming club) to
Natural Extremes to the School of
Anything Goes Anime(SAGA).
The clubs are as eclectic as the
ECU students themselves and any-
one can find a club which fits their
various interests. Clubs are not only
a great way for new students to
meet people, make friends and con-
nect with people who have similar
interests, but clubs are also extreme-
GREEK
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14
mic success. There is also a scholar-
ship banquet, a gala held in order to
honor the scholar. The Greek system
maintains a high idea of scholastics.
The chapters constantly inspire their
members to rise to academic suc-
cess.
A major aspect of the Greek life is
dedicated to philanthropic endeav-
ors. Each individual fraternitysorority
ly beneficial.
"The most practical benefit about
joining a club is that it makes stu-
dents more competitive for the job
market; beyond that it makes college
more fun said Jim Sturm, director
of Student Leadership.
For those who wonder how to
join a club, or what becoming a
member entails, Student Leadership
is holding an annual organizational
Fair entitled "Get A Clue" on Sept. 9
from 10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. in the
Wright Circle. There, the various
clubs will showcase what they have
to offer to the student body.
Xiaoxin Lun, president of SURGE,
the upcoming computer gaming club,
said, "Gamers are a special breed: a
club is a great way to get people who
aren't outgoing involved in campus
Scott Gassel, activities coordinator
for the America Marketing
Association, said, "Getting involved
with campus and more importantly
your major is something that every
student should achieve
Frederick Fladenmuller. adviser to
the French Club, saidNot only does
The French Club) give the students
the opportunity to be exposed to a
foreign language in a natural con-
text, but also it creates a sense of
common purpose increase interest
For a complete list of the different
clubs that you can join contact the
Student Government Association at
328-4726 or Student Leadership
Development at 328-4732.
has national as well as local charities
in which they supportThe Greek sys-
tem is continuously getting involved
for the betterment of their environ-
ment Each society chooses innova-
tive and unique ways to support the
community and encourages the pub-
lic to take an active part in the bet-
terment of others.
Just in the past year, Pi Lambda Phi
has sacrificed their opulent housing
and slept in their cardboard village in
order to raise awareness for the
Ronald McDonald House. Delta Zeta,
has hosted its second annual spaghet-
ti dinner in order to raise money for
the hearing impaired. This sorority,
along with Alpha Omicron Pi, had an
Easter hunt for unfortunate children,
Zeta Tau Alpha raised money for the
Breast Cancer Foundation. Alpha Xi
Delta held an All-Sing to benefit their
various philanthropic endeavors, and
The NPCHS groups had a sleep-out
in the mall to benefit the homeless.
These are just a few examples of the
Greeks perpetual efforts to improve
their surroundings.
I made my choice: I'd rather be
Greek.
I
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page 15





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How technology fits our lifestyle
The East Carolinian
Orientation Issue
How not to go broke your first year
Managing your
money
Pat Reid
Lifestyle writer
Congratulations, you've made it!
You're on a college campus, away
from home and in control of your
own life now. Despite what your
parents may think, most of you are
for enough away that you can do
without too much input from them.
However, that means that you have
some decisions to make for your-
self that could affect your life for
years to come, including financial
decisions.
Every college student, whether it
is true or not, makes jokes at some
point like, "Money? Please, I'm in
college Unfortunately this sce-
nario is most often true, as college
life seems to be a giant money vac-
uum that sucks its victims dry. So,
how do you avoid the poor man's
burden of college? Start planning
now for the rest of your life.
First and foremost, all students
should have a banking account of
their own; a checking account is
highly recommended. Checking anc
i savings is even better, but you have
to fit your accounts to your money.
When opening a checking account.
shop around for the best offers.
One major pitfall of checking
accounts is the infamous bounced
check. Overdraft protection allows
you to guard against this. Some
banks have a line of credit available
that, in the event of insufficient
funds, will cover the check up to a
certain amount Some banks also
have a system that, if you also open
an account at the bank, will take the
extra amount of the check from
your savings account. These are
important options, considering that
a big enough mistake will stay on
record with the credit bureau for
seven years.
Another step in money manage-
ment is to prioritize. Take a look at
what is important to you and
decide how much money you want
to put into each thing. Then decide
what sacrifices will have to be made
to accomodate that For example,
last year I decided to buy a new gui-
tar. I looked at my money and
decided I could eat cheaper and
say home more instead of going
out a lot So, I used the money I
saved from those amendments in
my life to cover my purchase.
Speaking of going out everybody
knows that Greenville has a reputa-
tion and some great clubs, but
before you head out the door, think
about how much money it'll take to
complete your plans for the night
and vow not to spend more. It's
easy to get caught up in club-hop-
ping or buying food downtown, but
it gets expensive quick, so be care-
ful.
Finally, avoid the Satan of college
finances: credit cards. Yes, it feels
nice when all these companies send
you packets offering you instant
credit but realize that as friendly as
those companies sound, their main
interest is themselves. If you do feel
that you must get a credit card or if
you decide to get one to build a
credit history, shop around again.
Some have lower finance charges,
and with a little bit of looking, you
can find one with no annual fee.
Always be sure to read the fine
print and keep track of what you
charge. Allow yourself to use the
credit card in certain situations and
think about how you're going to pay
the bill before you charge. If you
realize that you won't be able to
pay the bill, put the card back in
your pocket and remember that
you'll thank yourself later.
No financial plan can account for
everything, and nobody is perfect at
keeping money. However, if you
take the time to lay down some
rules for yourself and then keep to
them, you'll find that after your
time here at ECU, you'll be on bet-
ter ground than many of your peers
and you'll have a good start on how
to live the rest of your life.
Most banks haareMree banking plans that
really help, sojjgb't 6@raid to ask. Other
questiorl kcef fcnind are
I chargoM e account
at monthlytOT and
may pop up?
lose and readily
�Is therewcertain number of free ATM
withdrawals?
What is the fee fj Swing aVjkher bank's ATM?
4-hour account
�Is there a "1-800 number
information?
�Does the bank offer a form of overdraft
protection?
HOME -RELOCATION fi- -REFERRAL SERVICE OFFERS.
PERSONALIZED LEASING ASSISTANCE.
GUIDED TOURS Of GREENVILLE AREA PROPERTIES.
COMPREHENSIVE RELOCATION PACKETS INCLUDING GREENVILLE,
PITT COUNTY �r NORTH CAROLINA AREA INFORMATION, MAPS.
RENTAL LISTINGS, SERVICE INFORMATION AND MUCH MORE!
PHOTOGRAPHS OF CHOSEN PROPERTIES CAN BE E-MAILED
INSTANTLY OR MAILED PARCEL POST TO YOUR HOME.
COMING SOONVIRTUAL WALK-THRUS" ON YOUR COMPUTERI
AGENCY REPRESENTATION BY A LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
TO ACT AS YOUR LIAISON WITH LOCAL PROPERTY MANAGERS.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT.
BECKY ANVERSON
3938 AVON ROAD
QRIMESLANV, NC
27837
TELEPHONE
252-830-5559
OR FAX.
252-830-0115
Viiit air env the, web Ixttp: www.reloca-teto-eeAVvdleno.cam
page 18
NEWMAN
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
Would Like to Welcome
All Future Students and Parents
and Invite. You to Join us in Worship
Summer and Fall Campus
Mass Schedule
� Sundays at 11:30am and 8:30pm at the Newman Center
All Orientation Guests are Welcome
to Visit Our New Facility
953 EAST 10TH STREET
(AT THE FOOT OF COLLEGE HILL DRIVE)
Fr. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain and Campus Minister
757-3760 757-1991





The East Carolinian
Orientation Issue
How technology fits our lifestyle
Where to grub for
next to nothing
Eating cheap in
Greenville
Andy Turner
Lifestyle Editor
When your tummy starts growling, you're
going to need to remedy the situation quickly
so you can effectively continue with your aca-
demic pursuits. You need cheap places to grub
because you're in college and, rightfully, have no
money. Here, then, are a few suggestions:
Venters Grill (Mumford Road): You haven't
really had the Greenville experience until
you've paid a visit to Venters. This place is as
colorful as one of them sweaters Bill Cosby
wears: menu on a chalkboard, bad checks from
as far backas 1983 on the wall, signs warning
against cursing or tipping. "Country Cookin
is the specialty, and it is mighty special - and
mighty cheap (you can eat a lot for about $5 or
$6). Their collards, barbecue chicken and but-
terbeans are good enough to beg for and the
cheese biscuits on Friday are liable to increase
the homicide rate in Greenville (Kids do it for
expensive shoes, and it's much more logical to
fight for a good biscuit than fancy footwear).
Warren's Hot Dogs (1938 N. Memorial
Dr.): For a mere three bucks, you get two of
the nastiest looking hot dogs on earth, a bag of
chips and a drink. Hot dogs aren't for looking
pretty; they're for chomping down as
quickly as possible and then belching
loudly, which you will do after enjoying
one of Warren's tremendously tasty
dogs, featuring their special, secret, clear hot
sauce. And it's open 24 hours a day.
Cubbies (SOI S. Evans St 600 E. Arlington
Blvd.):The Evans Street Cubbies is right down-
town and within walking distance of campus.
Good and greasy burgers, hotdogs and steak
subs are the specialty. You won't walk away
hungry.
Mazatlan Mexican Restaurant (103
Eastbrook Dr 608 SW Greenville Blvd.):
Mazatlan boasts excellent Mexican food at a
very low price and great service. Be fore-
warned, however, you could get addicted to
the chile rellenos.
Chico's (521 Cotanche St): If you want
inexpensive Mexican food a little closer to
campus, try Chico's. People have also been
known to drink there at night.They have good
specials every day of the week.
Denny's (800 S. Memorial Dr.): Denny's is
open 24 hours a day. It's always there for you:
breakfast, lunch, dinner, or in the late, late night
when you realize you need other food besides
beer.
Waffle House (306 E. Greenville Blvd.) Like
Denny's, but smaller, Waffle House has good,
cheap food all day long. Your life is not com-
plete until you've had your hash browns scat-
tered, smothered, covered, topped, diced,
chunked and peppered.
Alfredo's (218 E. 5 th St): A slice of Alfredo's
can be your salva-
tion at two In the morning.
That's all you need to know,
dear freshmen.
Papa Oliver's (316-C E.
10th St.): If you're daring
enough to try pizza that has
more than pepperoni on it,
try Papa O's.They have a ton
of great, "gourmet" pizzas
and an assortment of subs
and pasta dishes at reason-
able prices.
Pizza Inn (Hwy. 264 By-
Pass, 3702 S. Memorial Dr.)
Pizza Inn has a way cheap
lunch and dinner buffet that
packs diem In. If you're hun-
gry after you leave, you're
probably Rerun from What's Happening?.
B's Barbecue (B's Barbecue Road.): B's is a
ways from campus, but it's worth the trip. Like
venters, you have to experience B's to get a full
whiff of the Greenville experience.
China Buffet (3040 S. Evans St): China
Buffet is another place where you won't leave
hungry. It boasts the best Chinese buffet in
Greenville. Plus, you get a buck off if you're a
student
BW-3 (114 E. 5th St): On Tuesday's, you can
go to BW-3's and get wings for a mere 20
cents.
Rumor has it they serve beer here also
Of course, there are plenty of other inex-
pensive places to eat but that's half the fun:
finding them yourself. When your parents
come, you can get them to take you to more
expensive places like Outback and Lone Star.
But when they are not in town, you'll want to
sometimes get away from the wacky and over-
priced world of campus dining. Now, you have
an idea of where to start
1
would like to welcome everyone to Orientation '98.
Don't get caught in the hustle and hustle of school and
forget to visit Greenville's hottest address. v"
Check out all the amenities including the olympic-size
outdoor pool and fitness center and make us your new
home away from home.
214 Elm St 5
Greenville, NC 27858
(252)752-4225
k&
page 19






How technology fits our lifestyle
The East Carolinian
Orientation Issue

Your dorm room and roommate await
Adjusting to your
new life
Jennifer Leggett
Senior Writer
It was a 97-degree day in the mid-
dle of August. My parents were help-
ing me move into my room in
Clement Hall and were probably as
happy to get me out of their house
as I was to go. I was actually relieved
when they left, and later that night, as
I inspected the premises and roamed
that hall in search of new friends, I
remember thinking that dorm life
might not be so bad.
WellI definitely have lots of good
stories to tell. But I have never
regretted for one second living in a
residence hall. It has been an educa-
tion all in its own, and even though
some of the time I was miserable,
most of the time living in die dorm
was pretty cool.
Just think, as freshmen, most of you
are away from home for the first
time. Maybe you are scared or a lit-
tle worried, and that is okay. But,
with so much freedom, after the first
night or two you won't even remem-
ber why you were worried in the
first place.
What could be better than living
on a hall with 32 or so people, stay-
ing up late, going downtown, dodging
calls from your mother, exposing
your hallmates to your exquisite
music choices (Just don't be mad
when they return the favor) and
ordering pizza at two in the morn-
ing? When you live in the dorm, the
world is yours. No one is screaming
at you to mow the town or eat broc-
coli. Your mom isn't yelling at you to
turn the stereo down a few decibels.
And you don't have to wash your
dishes until they are so rank you
can't stand them.
On the down side to all this, you
have to do your own laundry, eating
at Mendenhall pales in comparison
to a home cooked meal (even if that
home cooked meal is a TV dinner)
and when you are worshiping the
porcelain god after a night of heavy
drinking at the Elbo, just pray you are
lucky enough to have a roommate
who will hold your head.
Speaking of roommates, room-
mates can be a great thing. In fact, my
best friend was my roommate at ori-
entation. But from my experience,
ECU Housing is not known for
matches made in heaven. There is
only one section on the housing
application where you get to make
any decision about who you spend
the next two semesters with � the
"smoking" or "non-smoking" box.
Wow! What a scientific approach to
placing strangers together who have
to live in a 9 by 12 room for two
semesters. Shouldn't ECU Housing
at least ask for your music prefer-
ences or a zodiac sign?
But no matter how uncomfortable
things may be, having an automatic
friend such as a roommate makes
things a lot easier. So what if they eat
all your Jell-O out of the mini fridge
or borrow your favorite jeans with-
out asking? You can feel confident
you will always have someone to eat
with in the dining hall.
There is so much about life in a
residence hall that could never be
squeezed into this piece.You will just
have to have your own experiences
and wade through this first year in
the dorm the best you can. Just be
sure that if you are living without air
conditioning, bring lots of fans
because it will be practically unlivable
until October. Also, try to follow the
rules. You knowno overnight guests
COi
:E
!�
:s-
�c
Wecome to your new home
FILE PHOTO
of the opposite sex, no drinking in
your room unless you are 21, no
more than six people in your room
at a time, blah, blah, blah.
Your resident assistant will give the
rest of the rules and it is best to stay
in good graces with your RA. Some
of you will have a great time living on
campus. Some of you will end up
wanting to live in your car rather
than see your roommate's face again.
At least when it is all over, you will
have some great stories to tell and in
five years it won't matter if your
roommate boiled your goldfish or
scratched your $25 Rage Against the
Machine import
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iafs EALLY HAPPENINIp
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95 of ECU students dont drink from Sunday to Thursday
84 of ECU students drink once a week or less
68 Mid no to an offer to use alcohol or other drugs
68 dMnf use marijuana hi the past year
Ntyth: 74 of our students believe the Dears drink 3 times a week
Fact only 17 report drinkkw this often
Tell Your Friends
t of the CORE
1997
the Division of Student life at East Carolina University
I
f
page 20





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page 21





ECU Business Services
Doing 'Whatever it Takesto provide the course materials and textbooks you need! to provide a safe and secure
environment! to ensure you get your mail from home! to provide you with a place to park! to provide the services
you need to get your class work done! to improve your quality of life at ECU!
WHERE do I PARK?
Parking on campus is by permit only. Freshman
parking for resident students is located
off of Reade Street and at the School
of Allied Health off of Charles Blvd.
Freshman commuters may park at Minges
Coliseum and utilize the Rapid Shuttle Service.
How do I REGISTER MY CAR?
Vehicle registration brochures are mailed to students. If you
didn't receive the registration application, visit our web site
(www.ecu.eduparkins) to print out a registration form from
your computer, or call (252) 328-6294. The early vehicle
registration deadline is July 17. After Jury 17, registration
should be made in person at our office, 305 E. Tenth Street
Need EMERGENCY assistance?
Call the ECU Police directly by using one of the 74 blue
light phones, or cad 9-1-1 from any campus phone.
ECU Police are on duty 24 hours a day, 7 days a
week to assist you. Watch for announcements of
special crime prevention workshops presented by
the ECU Police Department throughout the year.
Walking ALONE at night?
Dial 328-6787 or use a blue light phone to call for an ECU
Police Student Patrol Escort They'll walk or drive you between
buildings andor parking lots after dark!
What's the ECU 1 CARD?
The ECU 1 Card is the official university ID card. It's also
your library card, rec center card, dining card, and
activity card. Show it to vote in SGA elections or play
intramural sports. Add money to it, and you can use it
in vending machines and copiers. Financial aid students
can defer funds to the card to pay for books at ECU-
Dowdy Student Stores. With a GOLD KEY account tied
to your card, you can use it to pay for prescriptions at
Student Health Services, buy event tickets, and more.
Other functions are planned, so watch for details!
Questions? Call the 1 Card Office, (252) 328-2015.
Need to COPY a term paper?
Self-service, card operated copiers are located in Joyner
Library, some classroom buildings, and some residence
halls. These machines operate with the ECU One Card (ID
Card). You must first put money on the card using a Cash-
to-Card machine.
Full service, RAPID COPY CENTERS are located
in Joyner Library; at the School of Medicine,
Brody GE-101; and at 2612 E. Tenth Street.
Rapid Copy Joyner is open daily, including
evening hours. Additional services such as full-
color digital copies and color output, binding,
typesetting, laminating, and faxing are also
available through RAPID COPY. Call 328-6171 for info.
Need a RIDE?
ECU Transit operates a FRESHMAN SHUTTLE between campus
and the Freshman parking lot at Allied Health; as well as PIRATE
RIDE shuttle between campus buildings. There's also the RAPID
SHUTTLE SERVICE for those parking at Minges Coliseum. Plus,
there are bus routes all over Greenville! Call ECU-BUS1 for the
latest information. Bus schedules are available In Mendenhall
Student Center.
ECU Transit Is a student wn organization and is
not a department of Business Services. We Just
thought you'd like to know more about it!
Expecting MAIL?
Student mail is delivered Monday through Saturday to resident
mailboxes by ECU Mail Services. ECU Mail Services provides a
US Postal Service customer window for you to purchase
stamps, mail packages and overnight express, and pick
up packages sent to you via US mail. Mail Services is
located just west of the mall, near the cupola.
Questions? Call (252) 328-6091.
Need BOOKS? a COMPUTER to connect
to the campus network? SOFTWARE? some
cool ECU APPAREL? class SUPPUES?
ECU-Dowdy Student Stores offers a great selection of
merchandise and friendly service geared specifically toward
ECU students! All required class materials are available
through ECU-Dowdy Student Stores. We strive to keep
our shelves stocked with the materials you need, and
keep our pricins in line with competitors. Best of all,
our profits, less expenses, are returned to students
through scholarships and support of student
activities. By shopping ECU-Dowdy Student Stores,
you are hclpins us to help the students of ECU!
Student Stores
Wright Building (252) 3286731
www4tudentstores.ecu.edu





the East Carolinian
Orientation Issue
Technology score points
vmmmmm
Baseball devices make life
easier for scorekeepers
Improvements in
record keeping reflect
growing technology
Tracy Hairr
Assistant Sports Editor
One of the key features of modern society is the
widespread impact of technology.
Just as it has other
aspects of
commercial businesses, this
influential movement has also penetrated the
world of baseball with such devices as the automated score-
book and radar gun. Utilizing a computer, the automated score-
book (TAS) is a program issued by Stat Crew Software, Inc. in
Cincinnati, Ohio. It was designed to aid in the compilation of
team scores and statistics and lessen all the work that previ-
ously accompanied the handwritten records.
"It just makes things so much easier said Jerry Trickie, assis-
tant sports information director.
"You can put in a player's name, position and different scores
and the computer saves it until it needs to be calculated later
Trickie travels with ECU's baseball team to every game and
has certainly sensed the advantages of this scoring method.
Though TAS is popular among other sports such as basketball,
football, soccer and ice hockey,Trickie admits that for baseball
it is especially convenient
"It's a more simple game than football, for example Trickie
said.
"In baseball you have guys hitting balls and catching them and
on a football field there's so many actions going on at once.
While I've been using this program for baseball, I've found it
really useful
Simple or not, there are numerous plays during a baseball
game that are immediately categorized according to a player's
position and starting history, and these stats can be further
broken down into an individual's batting or fielding game-by-
game summary. Adding to the benefits are its capabilities to
generate team summaries and provide a play-by-play narrative
at the end of a game.
TAS is equally important for all levels of sports from recre-
ational teams to international organizations and is used at
most colleges as well.
"I'm pretty sure that all North Carolina schools use it"
Trickie said.
"I know that the conference schools at least have used it for
several years. Some might have more advanced programs, but
they're all used in the same
way
Also relevant to baseball, for both
fans and the players, is the radar gun
that records pitching speeds. The
ideas surrounding this contraption,
however, do not necessarily
associate
a top pitching speed with
playing power. While some might
argue that the display of a speed
affects a pitcher's mental approach to
the game, others suggest that this is not the
main concern on the field.
Keith LeClair. head coach of ECU baseball,
feels that overall the radar gun is an effective tool
for this sport
"It shows you a little of the pitcher's arm
strength LeClair said.
"The radar gun usually helps coaches evalu-
ate the pitchers and project their perfor-
mance in the future. It doesn't fulfill the
total criteria, but it's always important for
the coaches to consider?'
Leclair said there are no negative 1
impacts concerning radar use and the gun
usually did not pose any type of threat to
the pitcher's opinion of his skill.
"Everyone usually thinks that they throw
faster than they really do, but they're more'
concerned with getting the batter out when'
they're up to pitch Leclair said.
"I really don't think the use of the radar gun is so
much of a mental thing
Whatever consequence arises from knowing
how fast a pitcher is or is not throwing, the
radar gun has dramatically altered the per-
spectives from which baseball is viewed.
Together, the automated scorebook and the radar
gun are constantly being revised as baseball, a
game of stats, continues to grow through
such technological advances.
THE
AUTOMATED
SCOREBOOK
All hitting, fielding,
pitching and situational
stats are automatically
calculated.
� Supports baseball or
softball, the DH rule,
Softball tie-breaker rule,
40-player rosters.
� Select the sort order,
headings and statistics
minimnuis for your reports.
� Creates report text files
for word processing or to
transmitfax.
� Produce HTML files for
the Internet automatically.
� Utility functions to
manage your game files
on disk.
� Conference package
available to generate NCAA
conference leader forms.
� Pitch-charting feature lets
you generate pitch-by-pitch
reports.
� Media stats display
feature to display in-game
stats on data display
monitors.
page 23
tfftMlitttffiltJiiMtiM
�.?





Technology scores points
Network hasn't
announced '98
schedule
Jim Phelps
Staff Writer
Is ESPN coming to Greenville this
season for Pirate football?
That is usually a question asked
since the games are so fun and excit-
ing.
Assistant Athletics Director Norm
Reilly said ESPN hasn't said if or
when it will televise any ECU games.
"We don't know. There is no way
of telling, we have to wait until they
announce it Reilly saidESPN does-
n't have to declare whether they are
coming or not until usually 12 days
before game. It depends on what
kind of season we are having Reilly
said.
The set up for an ESPN game is a
little different than for regular home
games. A site team comes in a month
or two before the broadcasting. A
crew might come a couple days
before the game and make sure the
platforms are set up in the end zone
areas and that everything is ready to
roll on the day of the game. The tal-
ent and directors also come to make
sure everything is set up correctly.
The ESPN crew also talks to the
head coach, offensive and defensive
coordinators, and also the players on
and off the camera. They question
the coaches about the team's offense
and defense but the coaches are
always careful to not give away the
game plan.
For ECU students, ESPN games
are a type of festival. ECU student
Troy Harris says ESPN games are an
event
"I meet up with the fellas and we
grill out Harris said. "We then walk
to the stadium. If it's raining I'll turn
on the television
Senior Eddy Ng says that games
televised on ESPN are usually more
exciting.
"I like ESPN games because the
announcers are better Ng said. "It's
more hyped up
Other students at ECU in the past
have come to show their school
spirit by painting their bodies in pur-
ple and gold and some even have
gone shirtless in the rain and cold.
Others make signs in hopes of get-
The East Carolinian
Orientation Issue
ESPN coming M
to Greenville? "
Games televised on ESPN often
inspire people to dress up and
make signs, in hopes of getting seen
on television. Home made shirts
and painted faces, Hie those pic-
tured here, are not uncommon.
PILE PHOTOS
ting on television. The atmosphere is
exciting and always looked forward
to.
ESPN games are fun and exciting
and hopefully they will come to
Greenville this season for another
exciting Pirate football game.
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Technology scores points
Student Rec Center
offers latest technology
Computers play
a large role
in design and
day to day
operation
Patrick Giovinazzo
$taff Writer
Technology is not a new
concept at the Student
Recreation Center. If you've
ever visited Christenbury
Gymnasium, you'll know how
true that is. Unlike
Christenbury, the SRC was
born out of technology. The
design and construction of
the building involved all sorts
of high-tech procedures.
Everything from the lighting
to the employee time clock is
either computer designed or
computer controlled.
Nance Mize, director of
recreation services, has seen
the Rec Center materialize
over the last few years.
"We researched various
technological kinds of sys-
tems in the planning of the
Student Recreation Center
Mize said. "The whole design
of the Student
Recreation Center
was based on the
most current technol-
ogy at that time
These innovative
design concepts can
be found in virtually
every area of the
SRC.
ft doesn't end here.
The SRC department
is also responsible for
creating and maintain-
ing areas outside the
facility doors.
Intramural fields are a
large segment of this
external obligation.
The new fields
behind the Allied
Health building have
all been engineered
and planned using
state-of-the-art
methods. There are
automated sprinklers
high-tech field measuring
devices. Upkeep of the fields
requires the new science of
turf management
One of the department's
utility assistants, Charles
Freedle, works everyday with
the new technology.
"Being that the SRC is such
a new facility, technology plays
an important role in every-
Stair masters are only one of the
many different kinds of exercise
equipment found at the SRC
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
and
thing from maintaining elec-
tronic equipment and univer-
sity-owned vehicles to the
upkeep of the new Blount
intramural sports complex"
Freedle said. He is just one of
the many employees who gets
to see the how's and why's of
the Student Recreation
Center. It is this technology
that helps the Rec Center
meet and exceed the needs of
its users.
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page 25





Technology scores points
The East Carolinian
Orientation Issue
I
Pirate Football trains hard to play hard
How ECU gets
ready for games
Jim Phelps
Staff Writer
ECU Pirate Football means
business when they step on
the field. They are able to do
this thanks to the specific
training routine that they go
through every week.
The players nave a choice to
start their training either at
6:30 a.m. or at 4:00 p.m.
Strength and Conditioning
Coach Jeff Connors oversees
the athletes' progress.
"We begin their training by
running in order to build lin-
ear speed and to condition
them Connors said. "After
running they break up into
position specifics and practice
1998 ECU Football
Schedule
DateOpponent
Sept 5at Virginia Tech
Sept 12UT-Chattanooga
Sept 19at Ohio
Oct3Army
Oct 10UAB
Oct 17at Alabama
Oct 24at Southern Miss
Oct 31Houston
Nov. 7at Cinncinnati
Nov. 14Louisville
Nov. 21at Memphis
Starting times will be announced at a later date
"We make sure to
work every muscle
group with lifts
like power cleans,
snatches, back
squats, bench
press, and Incline
press
Jeff Connors
Coach Strength and
Conditioning
drills for their positions. This
part of the training takes
about an
hour
After
running
they hit
t h e
weights.
This part
of their
training
focuses
more on
free
weights.
The
Pirates lift
weights
four days
during the
week, tak-
ing Wednesdays off.
"We make sure to work
every muscle group with lifts
like power cleans, snatches,
back squats, bench press, and
incline press Connors said.
"Twelve sets in 12-15 exercis-
es total during this workout"
Everything the players go
through is time productive
and is supervised by the
coaches. Every minute is
important
"This entire training routine
is constant for two hours and
we train eight hours per
week Connors said.
For the incoming freshmen
the training schedule is much
different. The new recruits
train six
days per
week at
2:30 p.m.
and they lift
weights
first for an
hour. The
new
s ign e es
don't arrive
until
August and
this ' is
expected
to be a
develop-
mental year
for them.
One
other aspect of the Pirate
football program is how they
get ready for upcoming oppo-
nents. The coaches work long
hours to ready their team on
their opponent. They watch a
film on the opposing team and
evaluate their actions.
Coaches make sure that the
players are conditioned to
react to certain things that the
opposing team does.
The coaches make sure that
the players are ready to.hit
the field in top condition and
demonstrate a winning atti-
tude in Pirate Country.
Football Practice
Routine
Freshman Recruits
1. Run for conditioning
2. practice position drills
3. weight lift (Wednesdays off)
Upperclassmen
1. Run for conditioning
includes:
2. practice position drills
power cleans
3. weight lift (1 hour)
snatches
(same)
back squats
incline press
Can practice at 6:30 a.m. or 4:00 p.m.
Practice at 2:30 p.m. sue days a week
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Calendar of Events
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Technology scores points
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page 27





It's Your Store.
Where, dollars support scholars,
shopping makes sense
ECU-Dowdy Student Stores is owned and operated by East Carolina
University. Our profits are directed back to scholarships and contributions
to student activities. Our purpose is to carry all materials needed to meet
the educational needs of ECU students and to promote and enhance school spirit.
Our genuine commitment is to you, the students of ECU. Afterall, it's your store.
I
� Largest Selection of New & USED Textbooks
� Book Buy-Back Program
� Educational Discount Pricing on Computer
Hardware & Software
� Official Headquarters for ECU Insignia Apparel
� Gift Items & Room Decor
� Reference, Tradebooks & Magazines
� School & Art Supplies
� School Rings, Jewelry, Caps & Gowns, Graduation Announcements
� Newly Expanded Medical Bookstore!
Customer satisfaction is our f priority!
Visit us during your Orientation Session and
register for a chance to WIN FREE in-state
tuition or FREE textbooks!
Textbook prize includes required textbooks only; one prize awarded for entries received during each
orientation session. Tuition prize does not include fees; one prize awarded for all entries received
during 1998 summer orientation sessions. Visit Store for details. No purchase necessary. One entry per
person for textbook drawing and one entry per person for tuition drawing, please.
Look for information on Textbook Reservations, Backpack Bonus, and a
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Orientation & Summer Hours
Monday - Friday: 7:30 am - 5:00 pm
Ronald E. Dowdy
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Where your dollars support scholars!
Wright Building
(252)328-6731
Fall & Spring Wright Store Hours:
Monday - Friday: 7:30 am - 7 pm
Saturday: 9 am - 3 pm
www.studentstores.ecu.edu
We sladly accept Visa, Mastercard, Personal Checks, Cash, and Financial Aid Deferments.
-Vi'i





The East Carolinian
Orientation Issue
Technology scores points
Student Rec Center offers adventure
New programs
scheduled for
the fall
Chris Farnsworth
staff writer
Not many students enter the
Student Recreation Center looking
for adventure. A quick workout, a
game of basketball or racquetball,
maybe a dip in the pool. There is,
however, much more available to the
unsuspecting student right in the
SRC building.
"We're kind of hidden said Steve
Bobbin, assistant director of adven-
ture programs and ropes challenge
course. "The Wall is the most visible
thing
Indeed, it is quite hard to miss the
two-story multi-faceted indoor
climbing wall, which occupies much
of the rear wall of the SRC. As
Bobbin explains, the Wall is only the
tip of the iceberg, though.
"We go above and beyond what
other universities offer he pro-
claims. "Our programs are educa-
tional, but definitely fun. If you don't
keep it fun, people won't come
back
People coming back has not been a
problem for the Adventure Programs
Department Since most of the
excursions they plan only allow
about a dozen students, the quota is
filled in a matter of days usually
probably because these adventures
take would-be thrill seekers.
Outdoor rock climbing, backpacking,
rafting, sea and river kayaking, canoe-
ing and hang gliding are all offered by
theAPD. Destinations include Stone
Mountain State Park, Linville Gorge,
Pilot Mountain. Mt. Rodgers in
Montana, the wild rapids of Wast
Virginia, Cape Fear, Kitty Hawk and
much more.
In addition, new programs are
scheduled for the fall 1998 semester.
Fall break at Shenandoah National
Park and the Crystal River Manatee
snorkeling trip highlight the tentative
curriculum. Abo, incoming freshmen
should note that Rode Climbing wilt
now be offered as a PE 1000 level
class. The course will instruct stu-
dents on the basics of rock climbing
using the Wall in the SRC.
Perhaps one of the most impor-
tant aspects of the Adventure
Program is its emphasis on leader-
ship development. The trips offered
all encourage teamwork, self-
reliance, and responsibility.
"Almost all trips are led by the stu-
dents Bobbin points out, "We
want to develop students, make
them better people
Bobbin outlines one of the
Adventure Program's major goals as
preparing students for life after col-
lege. The leadership and teamwork
the trips demand teach the students
how to act like professionals, he says.
As a matter of fact, the ADP offers
teamwork trips to businesses and
corporations as a way of developing
and solidifying the employees ability
to work and depend on each other.
The Adventure Program offers a
wide variety of excursions and
opportunities to escape the grind
college can create, something not
many other universities can boast.
As if that is not enough reason to
check it out, the Adventure Program
is mostly self-supported, generating
its own revenue, so it is relatively
cheap.
Keeping track of calories at the SRC
Know how to
maximize your input
Patrick Giovinazzo
staff wrtf.r
Not everyone who walks through the doors
of the Student Recreation Center is con-
cerned about the exact number of calories
they are about to burn, but some are.
Through the application of technology, this
is possible. Many of the cardiovascular work-
out machines, including stair-steppers, exer-
cise bikes and treadmills, have calorie count-
ing capabilities. But how can a machine really
know how many calories you bum? It's sim-
ple. The device just factors a few variables
together, and comes up with a number: your
total calories burned.
This small, electronic gadget is really just
responsible for computing numbers. All of the
variables add up to a degree of difficulty,
which directly relates to energy expended,
and ultimately total calories burned. First,
most of the machines ask you to enter your
weight. This is used to calculate how hard
you'll have to work to move your body. Next,
you'll choose an incline setting. This number
represents the energy needed to work the
machine. Finally, there is the speed at which
you perform and the distance you "travel
These two numbers are figured into the first
two and the final product of the equation
emerges.The result of all this energy output is
the burning of calories.
To burn maximum calories, you must maxi-
mize the degree of difficulty, the speed and
the length of the workout
Kari Brown, assistant director of student
recreation services, stresses the importance
of energy output
"It's really how hard that you're working
Brown said. "To change your calorie output
change your energy output"
Brown has dealt with students who feel that
they must be burning more calories than the
machine says. These students don't realize
how much energy is really required to burn
calories. It is important to keep your goals in
mind. Don't be discouraged by numbers that
don't add up to your expectations.
Remember, the road to physical fitness is
paved with sweat
page 29





Technology scores points
SAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Are you artistic,
good at grammar,
enjoy writing, or a
good communitator?
We have openings for all our media
The East Carolinian (newspaper)
WZMB (radio station)
Expressions (minority magazine)
Rebel (literary magazine)
Stop by our booth in Menden hall
before you get your one card
and fill out an application.
page 30
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T I'm Sm IB
Live On
"Last year I had an opportunity to live on campus and
be a winner. But instead I chose to live off
campuswhat a mistake. I got stuck with utility,
phone and cable bills.The security deposit I had to pay
for the apartment really cut me short on money. I had
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dishes. I even had to clean my own bathroomYuck! I
didn't have time to meet new friends because I had to
spend so much time cleaning my apartment�not to
mention shopping for groceries. I had an 8:00 class,
and searching for a commuter parking space was a big
headache. If I had lived on campus, I could have just
walked to class. Boy, did I learn from my mistakes.
Now I'm back on campus






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I
WEDNESDAY
JUNE 17 1998
I the 1
eastcarolinian
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
BOG reviews
DeMarco case
Hearing scheduled
for Thursday
TK Jones
Sal DeMarco,
former professor
FILE PHOTO
The fight from tenured professor
Sal DeMarco to keep his job has
reached its climax on the decision-
making academic ladder, ascending
to the level of the Board of
Governors.
Alan McSurely, attorney for
DeMarco, submitted a petition to
the board today contending the
case's defense in hopes that the
board will hear a grievance. It has
until July 20 to provide a decision
oh whether to hear the case.
Another court case will be heard
June 18, filed by ECU and heard by
the Employment Security
Commission (ESC). ECU termi-
nated DeMarco for alleged miscon-
duct in April and is now attempting
to withhold
an unem-
ployment
check, total-
ing $258
weekly.
"It is a
statutory law
when ESC
determines a
person was
dismissed
due to mis-
conduct con-
nected with work, such a person
would be disqualifiesyrom receiv-
ing benefits said Ben Irons, uni-
versity attorney.
The employeremployee has the
right to appeal the referee's deci-
sion. DeMarco's lawyers are
expected to subpoena Chancellor
Richard Eakin.
According to DeMarco, rules
were broken in March when a due
process committee came to the
conclusion that DeMarco "did not
commit misconduct of such a
nature as to indicate that he is unfit
to continue as a member of the fac-
ulty and recommend that he be
reinstated as a tenured faculty
member
"This university broke their
own policy and they broke state
and federal laws DeMarco said.
"Eakin can fool around with the
faculty manual, but he's not getting
away with violating the constitu-
tion
In the meantime, the American
Association of University Professors
(AAUP) is questioning that a viola-
tion in due process has occurred in
DeMarco's dismissal and is asking
that ECU hold DeMarco in suspen-
sion with pay and give the due
process committee a chance to
respond to Eakin's rejection of their
report.
Chancellor Eakin was unavail-
able for comment due to a trip to
Raleigh.
Professors group
asks decision be
reconsidered
Eakin rejected
recommendation for
reinstatement
GREENVILLE (AP) � The
American Association of University
Professors is asking East Carolina
University to reverse its decision to
fire tenured Professor Sal
DeMarco.
Chancellor Richard Eakin fired
the speech-pathology professor in
April, rejecting a faculty commit-
tee's recommendation to reinstate
him.
DeMarco was fired for miscon-
duct. He was accused of intimidat-
ing colleagues with threats and
ridicule.
The AAUP is questioning how
" don V know where the
mean-spiritedness ends.
Where is the humanity?"
Sal DeMarco
DeMarco's dismissal was handled
by Eakin and the ECU Board of
Trustees, said C. Robert Kreiser,
the AAUP's associate secretary.
"The DeMarco case raises a lot
of serious issues about academic
due process Kreiser said in a tele-
phone interview from Washington,
D.C.
Kreiser said the faculty commit-
tee that recommended DeMarco's
reinstatement should have been
allowed to discuss its finding with
Eakin before he made his decision.
He also said DeMarco should have
been given a chance to argue his
case before the Board of Trustees.
ECU officials said university
procedures were followed in both
instances cited by Kreiser.
ECU is currently trying to block
DeMarco, who has multiple scle-
rosis, from receiving a weekly $258
unemployment check from the
Employment Security
Commission.
"I don't know where the mean-
spiritedness ends. Where is the
humanity? I just don't under-
stand DeMarco said.
University attorney Ben Irons
said since DeMarco was fired for
misconduct he is not entitled to
unemployment benefits.
"It would be irresponsible for us
not to contest his claim Irons
said.
The ESC has scheduled a hear-
ing Thursday on the issue.
DeMarco is appealing his dis-
missal to the UNC Board of
Governors.
i you walk across campus, don't
be surprised if you see a lost and
confused parent or student.
Freshmen orientation has begun
and many newcomers are wander-
ing the campus, overwhelmed with
the excitement of beginning a new
journey in life.
Whether orientation has helped
them adjust to new changes is die
question.
Prior to orientation, participants
received information regarding visitation, transporta-
tion, and living arrangements.
"ECU sent everything possible. They were excel-
lent about sending information said Tracey Funai,
incoming freshman.
Most of the students surveyed
agreed that ECU had adequately
informed them about orientation;
however, not all students felt that
way.
"I had no clue where to go or
what to bring said Karen A. Price,
also an incoming freshman.
All of the prior preparation
could not prepare students for the
unexpected.
"There were so many people.
ECU could not have prepared me
for that said incoming freshman
Amanda Duffy.
During orientation, campus
maps, schedule books, and regis-
tration brochures were distributed
to the student body.
"The schedule was the most helpful. It told me
what to do, where to go, and what time to be there
Duffy said.
Participants took part in traditional exercises: group
placement, seminar engagements, and social activities.
Many freshmen wonder eimistily on cimpus while attending orientation sessions.
PHOTO BY JASON FEATMEd
"I attended all of the activities. They were help-
ful because they told me about the classes at ECU
Duffy said.
The purpose of orientation is to supply informa-
tion and reduce nervous-
ness andor unnecessary
anxiety.
"Yes, orientation did
reduce my anxiety. It let
me see that I can get
adjusted said Tonya
Custcr.
Recognizing the signifi-
cance of information distri-
bution, students acknowl-
edge the significance of
attending orientation.
"The purpose of orien-
tation is to help you with
your schedule and famil-
iarize you with campus.
ECU fulfilled that pur-
pose Duffy said.
Of course, orientation
isn't all work and no play.
Most students participated in and enjoyed group
Freshmen
Orientation
Events
� Attend academic seminars
�Attend small group meetings
� Take placement tests
�Take tours of the campus
� Go to a Pig Pickin'
�Learn how to make up a schedule
�Register for classes
�Learn about campus organizations
�Get their ECU One Card made
SEE ORIENTATION PAGE 2
No complaints received
about parking congestion
Orientation students get
commuterprwiledges
Cutbacks
result of
Governor's
programs
Smart Start, increased
teacher salaries included
Amanda Austin
news editor
When many orientation students
file onto campus they bring with
them many cars, leaving many
commuting students wondering
where to park.
Parents and students who attend
orientation are given the same
parking privileges that those stu-
dents who hold commuter and lim-
ited stickers arc given. Orientation
participants are able to park any-
where on campus with the excep-
tion of staff, private, handicapped
and exceeding time in metered
spaces. Drivers found parking in
areas not designated for their use
are ticketed just as students with
commuter and limited stickers are.
Orientation participants have
"Once they (orientation
participants) get to where they
are going, they are pretty much
there all the time
Pit Sam
Parking and Traffic Services
been given this parking privilege
since the first orientation at ECU.
"We normally have given fresh-
men student parking (while they
attend orientation) said Pat,
Gertz, Parking and Traffic Services.
Parents who accompany their
children to orientation are given the
same parking privileges. Parents
are spoken to by employees of
parking and traffic services and are
advised to park on College Hill
near Todd Dining Hall. At this
location a shuttle is available to
carry the participants to their desti-
nation on campus.
"Once they (orientation partici-
pants) get to where they are going,
they are pretty much there all the
time Gertz said.
' But, orientation students are not
spoken to by members of parking
and traffic and therefore tend to
park in the commuter lots on
College Hill when lots surrounding
the dorms are full.
Gertz said that parking and traf-
fic services has not received any
formal complaints from commuter
or limited sticker holders concern-
ing a lack of parking spaces during
orientation periods.
Optional parking is available to
commuters behind the student
recreation center, Cotanche street,
Mingcs Coliseum and west cam-
pus.
Gertz says that there have been
no formal discussions or rccomen-
dations to move orientation parking
to Minges Coliseum where partici-
pants could then be shuttled to
their campus destination.
Chancellor Eakin
FILE PHOTO
TK Jones
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
If someone asked Jim Plummcr to
make out a Christmas wish list for
ECU, at its top would probably be
$1.2 million, the sum lost earlier in
the month by a cutback in the
UNC system.
Since
Plummcr
became
director of
the budget-
ing in 1992,
this is the
largest cut
he's seen.
'This is in
a year when
the state is
projected to
have an $11.4
billion surplus Plummer said.
Plummer said trwjJuBds were
being cut to help fund the gover-
nor's $150 million recommendation
for programs such as Smart Start
and salary increases for elementary
and secondary school teachers.
For a cutback to occur it begins
with the vanguard of the UNC-sys-
tem Board of Governors in Raleigh
tightening their belts and reducing
the amount of money appropriated
for each of the 16 schools in the
UNC system. The agreed figure is
sent, along with other state agen-
cies requests, to the governor. The
governor can decrease, increase or
not alter the. ue before passing it
ontolegil�itim
After iiru're reviews and
modifies tftjf jj$iy�jrnotf plan, they
return it to the governor where he,
in turn, can eithe signer veto.
Upori agreement, noney ear-
marked for the UNC school system
is dispersed among each university
where, ai'ECU, the chancellor and
six vice chancellors in joint agree-
jnent decide where to disperse the
funds, approximately $185 million
this year.
The $1.2 million cutback will
hit vehicle replacement hardest,
with 34 vehicles and one garbage
truck needing replaced, and utility
expense reserves, approximately
$244,000 needed to curve inflation-
ary increases.
"This proposed cut in the gov-
ernor's budget would result in
delaying the replacement of these
vehicles at least for another year
Chancellor Richard Eakin said. If
money is not restored by the
General Assembly for their pur-
chase, Eakin said, "we will not
allow unsafe vehicles to be used.
SEE BUDSET PAGE 2

TODAY
Sunny
high 91
low 72
TOMORROW
Partly Cloudy
high 94
low 71
Opinion
Lifestyle
w�?r
tjfc .
The heat it on
in Austin
gSports jjgf
Do away with
pennies!
Ingram competes
at NCAA
championships
Online Survey
www.tec.ecu.edu
"Did you believe you would get a 4.0 GPA for
the semester if your roommate committed
suicide?"
Answer in next week's TEC
tW east Carolinian STUDENT PUBLICATION BfDG. GREENVILLE, NC 27858 across from Joyner library - newsroom 328-6366 advertising 328-2000 fax 328-6558 website www.tec.ecu.erJu





2 Wtdimdiy, Juni 17, 1998
news
Tha E.jt Carolinian
I
.news
briefs
Fraternities accused
of luring students
with drinking
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) �
Despite a campuswide crusade
against student drinking, two
University of North Carolina frater-
nities are accused of passing out
fliers inviting underage students to
drinking parties.
The flyers allegedly were dis-
tributed last week during an orien-
tation session for incoming stu-
dents.
Two orientation leaders said
tjjcy saw members of Alpha Tau
Qmega and Phi Kappa Sigma pass-
ing out the flyers, Wolf Johnson
said. The leaders claimed the fra-
ternity members were targeting
incoming female students.
The fraternities have denied
the allegations, which are being
investigated.
If the allegations prove true,
Wolf Johnson said, the two fraterni-
ties could face a hearing before the
Greek Judicial Board.
across
Deer charges through
front of dears store
MASON CITY, Iowa (AP) �
Shoppers at a Sears store here
weren't the only ones charging.
A deer crashed through a front
window on Saturday and spent 10
minutes running through the store
before it had to be shot to death.
Dozens of customers were taken
outside, and no one was injured.
"I saw him running through the
store. He was injured, so I imagine
he was frightened by that, and also
that he couldn't get out said store
manager Carol Cary.
Police tried to corral the deer,
"but he was just too upset; they
couldn't catch him, so he had to be
destroyed Cary said.
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CD ALLEY
Group establishes
endowed professorship
in author Betts' honor
English, Tunisian fans
clash during match
MARSEILLE, France (AP) �
Riot police lobbed tear gas to break
up new violence today between
English and Tunisian fans, who
brawled on the beach and clashed
outside the stadium as their teams
met for a World Cup match.
In the third clash in less than 24
hours, hundreds of drinking trou-
blemakers battled briefly but vio-
lently on the Prado beach where a
huge screen was showing the
game, which England won 2-0.
Orientation
continued liom page 1
activities, cookouts and recreational
exercises.
"I went to a pig pickin' and to
the recreational center. The social
activities were beneficial because
they let me see what ECU has to
offer Custer said.
The number of people, an unfa-
miliar environment and the consis-
tent walking did aggravate some
individuals; however, the overall
consensus is that the experience
was beneficial and worthwhile.
"I didn't like not knowing where
to go, but it did familiarize me with
the campus and faculty. In the
future, ECU could improve their
orientation program by sending
more information and allowing
more free time Price said.
The majority of the student pop-
ulation would probably opt for
more free time; however, recogni-
tion of class attendance and survey
completion is tedious, but neces-
sary.
Orientation is designed to help
students prepare and cope with this
vital transitional phase of develop-
ment.
"In my opinion, orientation was
excellent Custer said.
Will support creative
writing program
CHAPEL HILL (AP) � A group
of admirers plans to establish a $1
million endowed professorship in
honor of Doris Betts, the creative
writing professor and author who
inspired many of the state's writers.
The group also plans to create a
fund to support the university's cre-
ative writing program.
Michael Hooker, chancellor of
the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, announced the honors
Friday night during a ceremony in
which Betts was receiving the
North Caroliniana Society Award.
The Doris Betts Distinguished
Professorship in Creative Writing
will be the first endowed professor-
ship in the creative writing pro-
gram.
"I am so excited that we will be
able to honor this renowned
Carolina teacher who has helped
build our program into one of the
best in America Hooker said.
"And while certainly no one can
replace Doris, this professorship
will help us by providing the means
to attract a nationally recognized
fiction writer
The professorship also will
strengthen the program and ensure
its continuity as Betts begins a
phased retirement this year, he
said.
Betts said she was particularly
pleased to have her name perma-
nently connected with the creative
writing program.
"I love the whole university, of
course, but my blood and bone
marrow have been spent there, and
those students and writers are our
legacy she said.
The drive for the professorship
began with 1950 Carolina graduate
Ben M. Jones III, a philanthropist
and longtime contributor to UNC-
CH who lives in Naples, Fla.
Budget
continued from page 1
We will either have to invest funds
to do major repairs or take some of
the vehicles off the road
Compensating for the utility cut
will be much less dramatic. The uni-
versity's energy conservation efforts
have been saving money so that the
projected expenses will be below
the budget for the next year.
"Weather conditions, of course,
could affect those projections
Eakin said.
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opinion
The East Carolinian
eastcarolinian
Ami L.RorsTER Edilnr
Heather Burgess MnugngEditor
Amanda Austin NranEdiim Travis Barklev SoottiEdiioi
TK Jones AnnumNrWiEdna Tracy Hairr AnininiSponiEditor
ANDY Turner LileitvleEditor Carole Mehle HudCopyEditor
Miccah Smith Assistant Lifestvle Editor Chris Knotts Stillllluiimot
Matt Heoe AdwniiingMiiugei
Bobby Tugole Webmtsior
Strung twfCU community tmc r97&. Iht Eon CatofifflUI pwMfSTMl 11.000 cop iwrr imtot �" Tnworf Thi aid Mhorill m Ndl edition it ltd offifl-
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OUNICW
As we all know, summertime brings heat. The further we get into summer, the hotter it gets. Hot, hot, hot. The
sort of hot that makes an ECU student dread walking to class, because even that brief walk, no matter how light-
ly one is clad in the thinnest and the lightest of cotton, will inevitably steam the skin, dry the mouth, and cause
invasive sweat to roll down into the eyes. This energy-draining, motivation-sucking heat is what we get when
summertime comes in North Carolina. However, there is redemption. Summer session students can conquer the
oppressive heat because they know that when they finally reach class, where they must spend several hours, the
sweat and the.suffering will evaporate into crisply air-conditioned comfort.
Or maybe not.
On Monday, some students didn't have the benefit of a nice, cool classroom. In the Austin building, a mal-
function in the air-conditioning equipment resulted inwhat do you think? You got it, No air conditioning. And
that was truly unfortunate, because on Monday temperatures reached higher than 90 degrees. Students who
attended classes in Austin, even in the morning, complained that the classrooms were sweltering, hotter in fact
than the outside temperature. One student even stated that it felt as if the heat was on.
And that's not all. Elsewhere on campus, in the General Classroom building, students felt as if they were freez-
ing. This is entirely possible, because the temperature of every building on campus is regulated independently.
Students have been complaining of cold GC classrooms for years. There have been rumors that the temperatures
in these classrooms are kept colder than normal in order to keep drowsy students awake.
When questioned about the unsatisfactory temperatures on campus, Dr. George Harrell, vice-chancellor for
facilities services, related that because every building on campus is cooled independently, there is no way to take
some of the coolness from one building and direct it into another, less effectively conditioned building. A novel
explanation, to be sure, but hardly a comfort to students who had class in Austin on Monday. He also related that
facilities employees were skilled and efficient in maintaining the air conditioning systems, and that the important
thing is that they were aware of the Austin problem and had rectified the problem. But when facilities mainte-
nance was contacted, they stated that there was a malfunction in the Austin air conditioning, but mentioned noth-
ing about having rectified it.
If not, it certainly should have been. We feel that the comfort and needs of students are paramount, especial-
ly in the summer, and that facilities should strive to keep our classrooms at least a little bit cool.
Otherwisearriving to class is worse than going to class.
OPINIOI
� Columnist
Britt
H0NEYCUTT
Remember what's important
Staying up all night
to watch the sun
come up won't seem
so unimportant when you're
80 and you're looking
back on your life.
This morning I woke up, swam
through a sea. of unwashed cloth-
ing, tried to fix myself some break-
fast from the three bread crumbs in
the bottom of an empty bag and
the drippings from the ceiling, and
realized that I could perhaps be a
procrastinator. I base this idea par-
tially on the fact that I woke up 10
minutes before class and tried to
shower and do my homework
before leaving.
I don't really know if I'm a true
procrastinator. Right now I'm just
way too busy to worry about gro-
cery shopping or cleaning my room
or personal hygiene. You know,
some things just have to be put
before others. Naps and trips
downtown come first, of course. I
have priorities.
If this is how procrastination is
done, then the majority of college
students are probably grade A pro-
crastinators. I'm right there with ya,
guys. When do I study for a Friday
test? Friday! If you look at that
closely, however, you realize that
the best way to retain the material
is to study it as late as possible
(don't argue with me � I'm unsta-
ble).
Take, for instance, this column.
Had I been competent, I would
have been thinking about it the
entire week before and would have
begun writing sometime around
Saturday. However, being your
faithless and unpredictable servant,
I chose to sleep until two all week-
end and follow that up with a cou-
ple of evenings full of� well, let's
don't talk about what they were full
of. But you get the picture. This is
college. I'm not here to bathe. I'm
here to get an education (sort of)
and stay up all night discussing the
problems of the world and how
vegetarianism can cure them.
Sure, I have "responsibilities
Of course I have a "job But
what's being a few letters short of
legibility compared with experi-
encing the true range of life? I'm
not condoning slackerism. Okay,
I'm kinda condoning slackerism. I
know that there are those among us
who don't believe in not putting
100 percent into everything they
do. If you put that much effort into
everything in your life, you don't
really have time for the stuff that
seems unimportant now. Staying
up all night to watch the sun come
up won't seem so unimportant
when you're 80 and you're looking
back on your life. Which do you
regret more: not getting an A on
that one test in the Principles of
Mexican Line Dancing or missing
the kind of conversation that only
takes place at four in the morning
� the kind where you can see the
meaning of your life flash before
you?
So my room is a little messy. My
cupboard is bare. And I'm still
putting off paying those damned
parking tickets. But I'm happy.
And I know that with my degree
I'll be getting a whole lot more
than just a symbol that I came and
took classes. Some things are more
important than others, no matter
what your advisors tell you. Don't
skip class to play on the internet or
anything. But once in a while, I rec-
ommend cutting to hang out at the
beach. Don't tell your mom I said
that.
"Never be bullied into silence. Never allow yourself to be made a victim.
Accept no one's definition of your life; define yourself
- Harvey Fierstein
"The only real mistake is the one from which we learn nothing
- John Powell
"Destiny is not a matter of chance, it is a matter of choice; it is not a thing to
be waited for, it is a thing to be achieved
- William Jennings Bryan
OPINION
Columnist
Jeff
BERGMAN
Church or state � not both
Teaching one religion in
schools in a church-type man-
ner is akin to brainwashing.
the inclusion of
Christianity without including
opposing viewpoints
is dangerous.
I would first like to say that I have
no problems with religion. If you
want to worship your cat, go right
ahead but respect myself and oth-
ers like me who see most religions
for what they are: an attempt to
keep the ruling class in power and
make others subservient to them.
The problem I have with reli-
gion, especially Christianity, is not
one to explain easily, yet I will try.
Religious followers throughout his-
tory have interpreted the Bible
through whatever means suits
them. I like to call this thought
process religious rationalization.
Most people can rationalize any-
thing and everything they do. The
thief can rationalize the fact that he
is stealing by saying the company
can afford the loss and his family
needs food. The marijuana smoker
might believe that nothing is wrong
with what he is doing because the
laws infringe upon his personal
freedoms. This belief is in spite of
the fact chat the drug is illegal.
Religion is no different.
The Bible has been used
throughout the ages for good and
evil. Earlier in our country's history,
biblical quotes were used in
defense of slavery, "Slavery was
established by decree of Almighty
Godit is sanctioned in the Bible,
in both Testaments, from Genesis
to Revelationit has existed in all
ages, has been found among the
people of the highest civilization,
and in nations of the highest profi-
ciency in the arts said Jefferson
Davis, president of the
Confederate States of America.
Recently the Bible has been
used to keep homosexuals out of
the church and women in their
"proper" place. As to why someone
who is gay would want to join an
organization that wants him dead is
beyond me. "If a man also lie with
mankind, as he lieth with a woman,
both of them have committed an
abomination: they shall surely be
put to death; their blood shall be
upon them as written in
Leviticus 20:13. If you are a true
Christian and believe in the Bible
like you claim, then go kill a homo-
sexual.
A woman's place in society is
neither behind nor beside her man.
Women belong exactly where men
are: wherever the hell they want to
be � unless you happen to be a
true follower of the Bible. "Let the
woman learn in silence with all
subjection. But I suffer not a
woman to teach, nor to usurp
authority over the man, but to be in
silence as written in Timothy
2:11-12.
If you are a Christian how can
you not follow the biblical sayings
above? Some Christians will say
that the Bible has been misinter-
preted and translated wrongly, this
is their reason for not following the
entire Bible. To these people I ask
was it divine intervention that
allowed you such insight into the
Bible or rather did you listen to the
religious leaders, the Pope,
Fallwell, Robertson, or Koresh?
The recent try by the religious
wrong to make a constitutional
amendment, putting for the first
time in 200 years, God in the
Constitution, Bill of Rights and
subsequent amendments, has
scared me. Suppose we teach reli-
gion in school. Will this class be a
thorough study of the Bible, argu-
ing whether or not certain eyents
happened, like how Abraham can
have two sons in one passage and
one son in another passage?
Believe it or not, I am in favor of
this amendment, but not how the
Republicans want it implemented.
Religions such as Islam,
Buddhism, Christianity and other
major religions should be taught in
school. Those doing the teaching
should not try and convert people,
rather they should educate stu-
dents. Intelligent discussions about
the Koran, Talmud, Bible, etc. is
what schools, if they chose to
include religion into the curricu-
lum, should focus upon.
The reason for teaching other
major religions in school is one of
understanding. The argument for
teaching beliefs in this manner is to
learn about other cultures. Think
about how many of our laws are
formed around Christianities'
beliefs. Some very good examples
of "Christian laws" are the recent
lawsuit about adultery and laws
against sodomy (a type of homo-
sexual sex).
Other Nation-States's laws are
influenced by their respective reli-
gions. Learning about these beliefs
will help in the understanding of
the region.
Teaching one religion in schools
in a church-type manner is akin to
brainwashing. Young minds are
very impressionable, and the inclu-
sion of Christianity without includ-
ing opposing viewpoints is danger-
ous.
Religion should be left at home
or in church. Schools that set aside
time for Christianity might find
themselves allocating valuable
classroom time accommodating
other religions. If one person is
Hindu, another Buddhist, Satanist,
Druid, Witch, you get the idea,
then time must be set aside for
them to worship.
Got something
to say????
Write a letter to the Editor
and let your view be Heard
Bring all letters to the 2nd floor of the
student publications building
or call 328-636
i the
y
eastcarolinian
I






4 warfntidav, Junt 17. 1898
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
So hip
ithurts
Mark Brett
senior white!
Every so often in the last decade,
somebody in the mainstream
media, trying to seem hip, will do a
story about comic books. In these
articles, they'll talk about how
comics aren't made just for children
anymore, how adult themes are
being dealt with in the comic book
medium, or maybe even how
comics in Europe or Japan have
been like this for decades, etc, etc,
etc.
Well, we won't be doing that
here. Everybody's heard it all
before, and it hasn't made an
appreciable difference in the
comics-reading audience. Sure Hate
and Rightball are great comics, but
unfortunately they're hard to find.
Wander down to your local drug-
store or even mainstream bookstore
and all you'll see is the same old
super hero slugfest that's ruled
American comics since the '50s.
The costumes are a little more
bizarre, and there's more blood, but
it's essentially the same thing.
That's because, for the most
part, the comic book industry really
hasn't changed all that much. The
idea that "Comics aren't for kids
anymore" is wildly inaccurate. The
bulk of American comics are still
produced for children; the only dif-
ference is that, instead of being
aimed at eight-year-olds, most
comics today are made with 13-
year-old boys in mind.
That means more violence,
more breasts and more gratuitous
Hey, kids! Comics!
cursing. Any random issue of Spawn
will bear this out, and that's actual-
ly one of the better adolescent
hooks out there.
As a life-long comics fan, this
state of affairs is quite depressing.
Comics showed a lot of promise 10
years ago, and sometimes that
promise seems not to have been
fulfilled. A walk down to the local
comics shop reveals an endless
array of stupidity masquerading as
"mature" reading material, and it
becomes easy to despair.
For every intelligent, character-
driven comic like Optic Nerve, there
are 10 others about half-naked "bad
girls" who chop people's heads off
and lick the blood off their own
impossibly-thin torsos.
But it's not as bad as all that.
Those "hip" comics you read about
in Spin actually are good reading,
once you find them. And here in
Greenville, we're blessed with a
really good comics shop, one that
stocks all those alternative tides as
well as the super heroes available
everywhere else. And some of
those super hero titles are good,
too, if you know what to look for.
Which, finally, brings us around
to the point of this article: knowing
what to look for. Aside from the
comics that get all the media atten-
tion (the aforementioned Hate,
Eightball, Optic Nerve, etc.), there
are a plethora of other titles that
those in the know seek out.
A good example is the work of
Frank Miller. The man who, a
decade ago, redefined Batman in
The Dark Kmght Returns now spends
most of his time producing a hard-
boiled crime comic called Sin City.
Currently, though, he's put his tales
of hard men and devious women on
hold while he tackles a little histor-
ical fiction in the form of 300.
Miller takes his inspiration here
from one of the greatest military
tales in history, the story of the
troop of 300 Spartans who held off
the Persian army and thus saved
Greece from destruction.
As a war comic, 300 is top-notch,
with lusty, well-defined characters
and a roughly beautiful, hand-
painted art style. As a portrait of
another time and a culture alien to
our own, it's also fascinating read-
ing.
On a completely different note
is Charles Burns' Black Hole, which
is set in our own time and a culture
that's too familiar to us all: the
appearance-oriented world of high
school. Using an obvious metaphor,
Burns is telling the story of a com-
munity hit by a venereal disease
that causes strange deformities in
its victims. One girl sheds her skin,
while her boyfriend grows a tiny
second mouth at the base of his
throat An in-depth study of teen
alienation with a grotesque physical
manifestation, Black Holt is both as
disturbing and entertaining as any
David Lynch film. Just don't eat
while you read.
On a more mundane level is Bob
Fingerman's Minimum Wage. This
semi-autobiographical comic is
about two young people trying to
eke out a living in New York while
keeping their relationship afloat. At
turns funny, disturbing and, yes,
even touching, Minimum Wage is
one of the best comics currently on
the market. Fingerman writes flaw-
lessly real characters and dialogue,
and still manages to center each
story around an actual theme. This
gives Minimum Wage the edge of
actually being about something
every issue, a quality too much
modem fiction (comics or prose)
lacks.
Switching gears again, we find
David Mack's Kabuki. Though dis-
missed by many as one of those'
blood-licking bad girl comics,
Kabuki is actually a fascinating por-
trait of a woman whose mind has
been fragmented by the world of
espionage and assassination. Each
page in an issue of Kabuki is an
adventure in storytelling, as the line
between word and image is blurred.
There's really nothing else quite
like it.
Unless, of course, you count The
Invisibles. Written by Scottish
comics wunderkind Grant
Morrison, The Invisibles is a riotous
mixture of the conspiracy culture,
drugs, shamanism, voodoo, quan-
tum physics, cool '60s TV shows
and the unified field theory of sci-
ence and religion. It's a spy comic, a
science fiction comic and a philo-
sophical treatise all at once. It's got
all the violence and sex you could
ever want, and it questions the very
basis of human communication and
existence. Every issue is a mental
apocalypse.
Pulling back to a slightly more
sedate reading experience, we have
Dave Lapham's Stray Bullets. As the
tide implies, this comic focuses on
the accidental victims of violence,
the ordinary people whose lives are
touched by crime.
Finally, no story on alternative
comics would be complete without
a mention of Dave Sim's Cerebus. In
constant publication for over 20
years, Cerebus is the story of a little
gray aardvark with a very compli-
cated life. In past years, Cerebus
has been Prime Minister and Pope,
but lately he's been spending all his
time in a bar (literally; the story has-
n't left the confines of the bar for
over 30 issues now). Funny read-
ing, and a very insightful look at
human nature. Sometimes you
even forget that the main character
is a funny animal.
There are other things to look
for out there, of course, far too
many to review in an article of this
size. Super heroes are getting an
overhaul in the pages of Astro City,
Starman, JLA and the Avengers.
Rock and roll history is being dis-
sected in the pages of Mike Allred's
Red Rocket 7. Mythology is being
reinterpreted for modern times in
Matt Wagner's Mage. Hunter S.
Thompson meets cyberpunk in
Transmetropolitan. And the list goes
on.
Just remember, when you go in
search of alternative comics, the
vast sea of crap you'll have to wade �
through to find them. Don't get dis- �
couraged, and ask that guy behind
the counter for help. He's only
scary if you let him be.
ra
iflfali
in
This is not a rant. The goal: to
write complete sentences and
hopefully to make some sort of
point fust another ass with an
opinion
Death to pennies
Crabby columnist cries
aboutcopper
Miccah Smith
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Now that our monetary system is
based on little numbers circulating
through cyberspace instead of
REAL GOLD (which I find quite
upsetting), it may be time to
rethink the whole coin system. I
believe the first thing we
could do, for example,
is get rid of pennies.
Urgh! Those
little red dots
that collect on
my counter have
just enough mon-
etary value for me
to feel guilty
about throwing
them away by the
handfuls and not
enough monetary value
for me to wish to collect them in a
jar like I suppose I ought to.
Here's the scene: I walk into the
grocery store with two bucks. I pur-
chase an item that costs $1.01. "Do
you have a penny?" the cashier
inquires.
"No, dangk
I am then handed a jinglin jan-
glin' handful of assorted change,
which includes four pennies. What
can I possibly do with four pen-
nies?! Vending machines won't take
'em! It takes 50 to make a roll, and
who wants to cart them to the bank
anyway?
I mean, sure they were handy
once, back when Big Macs cost 15
cents and Cokes were a nickel. But
now they're about as useful to
American culture as the New Deal.
As far as I can see, pennies are
only useful for the prevention of
the acquisition of more pennies,
because if I'd only had a penny, the
cashier would not have given me
four more! It's this kind of logic that
makes the United States the great
nation that we arc today.
When I was a child,
things were differ-
ent I cherished
the penny col-
lection my
grandfather
had started,
and which he
gave to me. I
collected pen-
nies from my
parents and made
them into rolls,
which, by the way, are
better than Lincoln Logs for build-
ing little houses.
Back then I believed in the
validity of pennies, to a certain
extent. Now I'm older and I have
but one suggestion: we can keep
the pennies, OK? I guess we should
use these for the next 50 years,
until they're worn out But for the
love of all that's decent, let's not
make any more of the little
stinkers!
Big Apple
bound
Jazz Ensemble
takes Manhattan
Miccah Smith
assistant lifestyle editor
Some students this summer will
lounge by the pool, drink beer and
play leisurely games of frisbee golf
in the shade. A few might even
possess the gumption to go out and
get a job.
But the 27 members of Dr.
Carroll Dashiell's Jazz Ensemble A
have a hot gig in the Big Apple �
several gigs, to be exact
These cats are set to play at
New York's prestigious Birdland
Jazz Club and the world-famous
Carnegie Hall, venues through
which musicians could aspire to
perform all their, lives if not given
the opportunity.
Joining the Ensemble will be
George Broussard, an ECU School
of Music faculty member and
trombonist with the North
Carolina Jazz Repertory Band, and
trumpeter Ray Codrington.
Dashiell's careful optimism is
slowly spreading through the ner-
vous ranks of student performers
whose prodigious abilities have
already won international recogni-
tion for the Ensemble at the 19
Jazz Festival in Montreux,
Switzerland, the International
Association of Jazz Educators
Conference in Anaheim, Ca. and
the South East Regional conven-
tion of the Music Educators
National Conference in Savannah,
Ga.
They have even performed on
the Tonight Show with Jay Leno.
But Dashiell thinks the ensem-
ble is ready to go all the way, refus-
ing to be intimidated by such an
opportunity "They're scared to
death right now he admitted, but
also conceded that "I would be
worried if they were not afraid
But he has no doubt that the
band will pull through, as always,
with a memorable performance.
Among the talented musicians
are Brazilian ethnic percussionist
Cissa Borba and female vocalist
Gallic Delano, who auditioned for
Dashiell on a whim by singing
"Amazing Grace
Now, less than a year later, she's
about to stand on two of America's
most famous stages and do her
thing. "I can't believe it" she said.
"I don't think I'll really realize it
'till I get there
Asked if she was nervous, she
replied, "I'm usually OK once I get
onstage and get going
A background in church music
has given Delano the soulful,
expressive voice Dashiell was look-
ing for in a vocalist and although
she had never before been familiar
with jazz, Dashiell helped spark
her interest
"He's so uplifting he makes
you want to play she said of
Dashiell, who has been working for
nine years to make the ECU Jazz
Ensemble one of the best.
Cissa Borba joined the
Ensemble in the fall of 1997 as a
graduate student in percussion.
She will be one of two ethnic per-
cussionists joining the ensemble in
New York.
"I think playing Carnegie Hall
would be the best thing I ever
did she said, and thanked
Dashiell. "I leam every day with
him
In addition to the two sets at
Birdland and a 25-minute spot on
the Carnegie Hall stage, the
Ensemble will perform at the
Duke Ellington School for the
Performing Arts in Washington,
D.C. and host a workshopclinic for
SEE JAZZ PACE I
Liver Shots
This lithal boxing move will lay ya Hat in a second. These tasteless lit-
tle blurbs take quick hits at the world of movies, television, music,
hardcore pornography and whatever the hell else we can think of
"A real friend stabs you in the
front" (Oscar Wilde) Cereal com-
panies started the national "Fun in
the Sun" craze in the '30s by
advocating outdoor exercise as
part of the healthy lifestyle.
Cancerous moles are no longer
part of a nutritious breakfast
Screw those Gallagher brother
wankers and Oasis, the Pernice
Brothers could take the "so-
naughty we're dreadfully boring"
Brits any day. Led by ex-Scud
Mountain Boy Joe Pernice, the
band just released Overcome by
Happiness on Sub Pop. The 13-
track album, mostly abandons the
Mountain Boys' alternatwang in
favor of super-mellow and super-
beautiful pop songs like the tide
track and "Dimmest Star" � com-
plete with an orchestra Steven
Soderberg's Out of Sight, based on
the Elmore Leonard novel, will be
released June 26. Ving Rhames,
Jennifer Lopez, Albert Brooks and
Dennis Farina are in it, but so is the
ever pretty George Clooncy, who
plays an escaped bank robber who
takes Lopez hostage � but you
just know he doesn't score, he did-
n't even bang Tootie on The Facts of
Life Culture Club tickets for their
July 24 at Walnut Creek with
Howard Jones and Human League
June
17 Wednesday
Jimmy Buffctt at Virginia
Beach Ampitheater
Doubting Thomas at The
Cave in Chapel Hill
Garden of Sirens, Sunny
Ledford, Nute at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill
Mercury Project, Smearcase at
Lizard & Snake in Chapel Hill
18 Thursday
The Man Who Knew Too Little at
the Student Rec Center swim-
ming pool at 9 p.m.
The Grandsons at The Cave
in Chapel Hill
Jolene, Pernice Brothers,
Glory Fountain at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill
Cigar Store Indians,
Truckadelic at Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro
SEE SHOWTIME. PAGE I
are still available. First 500 people
to buy tickets for the show don't
have to have sex with Boy George
A hellish brew of teen idols from
the '70s and '80s will appear on a
VHl special hosted by Danny
Bonaduce this Friday at 11 a.m.
Featured among the abysmal
assortment will be David Cassidy, j
the New Kids on the Block, Leif ;
Garrett, Rick Springfield and �
Menudo. All participants are
rumored to be really, really dumb �
r
!?





� Eut Carolinian
5 Wedneaday. June 17. 1998
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
H '
sex you could
:stions the very
nunication and
ue is a mental
i slightly more
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pending all his
the story has-
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. Funny rcad-
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things to look
)urse, far too
i article of this
trc getting an
s of Astro City,
the Avengers.
' is being dis-
MikeAllred's
'logy is being
dern times in
t. Hunter S.
yberpunk in
i the list goes
len you go in
comics, the
have to wade
Don't get dis- �
it guy behind
p. He's only
J t s
stalest lit-
. music,
link of
:kets for their
Creek with
iman League
t 500 people
: show don't
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:n idols from
appear on a
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eastcarolinian
Advertising Department
Looking for a fast paced job that
can help you prepare for your
career goals?
You Will Gain Experience in:
� Calling on local advertising clients
� Helping to develop creative advertising
� Develop and coordinate advertising campaigns
� Local advertising account servicing
Now taking
Applications for
Summer and Fall
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Applications are available at The East
Carolinian, second floor of the Student
Publications Building or call
328-2000 for more info
The East Carolinian Advertising Department Can Help
You Get The Needed Experience Before you Graduate.
continued from page 4
19 Friday
Spacchog Big Wreck, House of
Dreams at The Attic
Cameo at Walnut Creek
Ampithcater in Raleigh
David Lee Murphy, at The
Longbranch in Raleigh
Elmo Williams, Fat Possum
Mississippi Juke Caravan, Hasil
Adkins, Robert Cage, T-Model
Ford at Berkeley Cafe in Raleigh
The Eye Scratches and Ball Kickers tour makes its
way to Raleigh Friday Night at the Berkley Cafe.
Fat Possum artists Elmo Williams, Robert Cage, T-
Model Ford & Hasil Adkins perform. .
PHOTO C0UBTESY Of FAT POSSUM RECORDS
& Snake in Chapel Hill
20 Saturday
Mondo Topless,
Gam, Transistor 7 at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill
TBA at The Cave in
Chapel Hill
Jennyanykind at The
Lizard & Snake in
Chapel Hill
Dear Enemy, Grace Braun at
The Cave in Chapel Hill
Mike Shupp at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill
Norbert Festival at Cat's Cradle
in Carrboro
Tilt, Teen Idols at The Lizard
21 Sunday
Angry Johnny & The
Killbillies at Sadlacks in Raleigh
Carrie Newcomer at
Irregardless Cafe in Raleigh
The Comas at The Cave in
Chapel Hill
The Onlys, Countdown
Quartet at Local 506 in Chapel
Jazz
continued from page 4
youth jazz ensembles in the New
York area. �
The list of scheduled songs
includes Ellington's "Things Ain't
What They Used to Be Bart
Howard's "Fly Me to the Moon
Young and Washington's "Stella By
Starlight" and a specially commis-
sioned piece by Bob Mintzer called
"New Rochellc
The performances will be per-
fect opportunities for the ensem-
ble to be heard by representatives
from record companies and well-
known jazz musicians, a fact of
which Dashiell is well aware. "I
just hope I don't lose all the mem-
bers to gigs he laughed.
Faculty member George
Broussard agrees. "In those
venues you never know who'd
show up he said. He hopes that
the Ensemble can forge strong
connections to the jazz industry
and promote ECU's School of
Music.
He also knows that the experi-
ence will build confidence in the
jazz students and will enable them
to impart the same confidence to
their future students.
As for his own share in this
opportunity of a lifetime,
Broussard tries to keep it all in
perspective. "You take what
comes when it does he said. "It's
going to be a great time
VISITING PROFESSOR from
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beginning August 22nd
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or email: al@coe.uga.edu
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I
6 Widnndiy. Jam 17, 1998
Ultimate Frisbee
Summer League
starts soon
sports
The East Carolinian
All who are interested
welcome to participate
Jim Phelps
staff writer
field at a time and for co-ed, at least
two girls must be on the field at all
times.
'This is a good chance for girls
to learn how to play Wilhclm said.
The ECU Ultimate Frisbee
Team won national titles in 1994-
1995. In 1997 they were third in
The ECU Ultimate Frisbee
Team is a club team offered at
ECU during the school year and
sponsored by Recreational
Services. Men and women play
respectively as the Irates and
Helios. During the summer, how-
ever, both get together and play
on a c�-cd team.
Participants don't have to be in
summer school and the league is
useful for anyone interested in
the game.
"It is like a workshop for
beginners where they can come
out and play and learn the basic
fundamentals of the game and
have fun, and it is very laid back
said Jeff Wilhelm, a contact for
the team.
The Irates, the men's ultimate
frisbee team, invites old team-
mates called X-Rates to come play
and bring valuable experience dur-
ing the summer. Regardless of the
worth placed on experienced play-
ers, there is no age limit for ex-
players.
"People of all ages can come
and play Wilhelm said. "We have
some people that are 35
years old
The games are played on
Tuesdays and Thursdays at
Eppes Middle School. Two
games per night are usually
played. The competitions
start today and last for two
weeks. This gives people
enough time to come and
check it out. On June 29th
and 30th the teams hold a
draft. Four pre-selected cap-
tains choose players. Four
teams consisting of guys and
girls play through the sum-
mer. In August they have a
small party and play a four
team tournament.
There are seven people
per team allowed on the
This in-line hockey rink located in Jaycee Park is one of two facilities being constructed for local players by the City of Greenville.
Baseball
players
signed
JASON FEATHEB
GREENVILLE BUILDS
IN-LINE HOCKEY RINK
Josh Poucher jumps to make a catch.
FILE PHOTO
the nation and are currently in sev-
enth this year.
The team is really encouraging
people to come out and play.
"This summer league is a way
to make people feel better about
participating said Mike Wegan,
an adviser to the club. "People
shouldn't be hesitant to come out
because it's very laid back and a lot
of fun
ILTIMATE HUfTRISBEE
:
Mil Seventh Nationally
(Ptay at En� M�i4JtfdHDIHH
Jurrc id; 1.1 y begin
mtghthcaw
Seven putyer per tetun ttt mli 1
Second court to be
built on Elm Street
Christopher R.
Farnsworth
STAFF WRITER
Hockey players rejoice. Where
there was previously little to no
opportunity, that commodity is
now in abundance.
The Greenville Recreation
and Parks Department has just
completed construction on an out-
door, full-court regulation in-line
hockey rink at Jaycee Park on
Cedar Street. Unfortunately,
league play has not been orga-
nized as yet, but as long as one is
registered with the Recreation and
Parks Department and has all the
necessary equipment, pick-up
games can be arranged easily, for
$2 a day. The equipment that is
mandatory is a hockey helmet,
elbow pads, hockey or lacrosse
gloves and knee and shin protec-
tion. For players under 17 years of
age, a full face mask and an inter-
nal mouth guard are also mandato-
ry, and for those 18 and over, they
are highly recommended. If pick-
up games will not be satisfactory
for those anxious to play, never
fear, league play is definitely in
the works.
"We will certainly establish a
league coordinator Ben James
stated. "We're looking at the fall
right now as a definite. We haven't
made guidelines and rules yet,
much less begun to organize regis-
tration
James also plans to have various
age' groups for the league, though
what ages and how many remains
to be seen.
An alternative and a possibly
quicker route to league play is
Sportsworld, the skating complex
on Red Banks Road. Though the
availability of the rinks for in-line
hockey is limited to just two nights
a week, a league is being estab-
lished presently, with Sportsworld
taking registration from all inter-
ested immediately. If one is look-
ing for a hockey league to play in
in the near future, Sportsworld is"
the best bet, but once the
Recreation and Parks
Department's league is organized,
it is likely that many more games
will be played there.
Still, for hockey-hungry people,
the sudden emergence of these
two sources can only be received
as good news, along with the con-
struction of another rink at the
Elm St. Gym, where a league will
also be set up in the future.
Perhaps that means that tennis
courts around Greenville can final-
ly be used for their true purpose.
hockey
hangouts
Greenville Recreation
'EPARTMEr
hours
Monday - Sunday, 1:00p.m. to
7:30p.m.
price
$2, daily (equipment self-supplied)
league
Beginning in the Fall of 1998
size
One rink, full-size
Sportswobuj
hours
Monday (7:00 p.m.), Thurs
(9:30 p.m.)
price
$3 a day
(skates available for rent)
league
Being organized now
size
Rinks in Greenville, Rocky Mount
and Raleigh
Kor information on registration, call
Sportsworld at (252)756-6000
Jason Colquitt
FILE PHOTO
Ti K J -
kjr
3 former Pirates to
begin pro careers
Patrick Giovinazzo
staff writer
Three ECU
baseball play-
ers have
recently
signed with
professional
teams. Jason
Colquitt was
drafted by the
Detroit Tigers
in the 27th
round, Randy
Rigsby was
chosen by the Florida Marlins in
the 32nd round, and Ryan
Massimo jumped into the league as
a free agent with the Atlanta
Braves.
"Hopefully they'll go out and
play pro and
do real well
ECU Head
Coach Keith
LeClair said.
For the
past two
years,
Colquitt has
claimed the
team's starting
catcher posi-
tion. This
year he also batted .240, posting
five home runs and 20 RBIs. His
sensational defensive numbers
have continued as well. Colquitt
finished the year with 352 putouts
and an extraordinarily high fielding
percentage of .982.
Rigsby finished his career as a
Pirate with a bang, breaking nearly
every ECU career record this sea-
son. Rigsby now owns the title for
most games played (213), at-bats
(800), hits (246), doubles (49), runs
SEE DRAFT PAGE 7
Randy Rigsby
FILE PHOTO
Why doesn't the public get
tired of Michael Jordan?
Bulk star never out
ofspotliit
Tracy Hairr
assistant sports editor
After being named the NBA and
season MVP six times, earning sev-
eral humanitarian awards, setting
one basketball record after another
and having a wide range of
endorsements from his own line of
athletic clothing to Ball Park
Franks, why has Michael Jordan's
name not been exhausted through
conversation? And why have fans
been so supportive of the Bulls dur-
ing the NBA finals when their
place as champions seemed to
some people worthy of recognition,
but without a doubt, sometimes too
predictable?
Aside from the gambling
rumorsostentatious money han-
dling that attempted to corrupt
Jordan a few years ago, nothing par-
ticularly negative appears to be
connected with this legendary bas-
ketball hero. Whether or not it's his
association with beneficial organi-
zations, his charming smile, or love
for playing that excites such ardent
devotees remains questionable,
though.
But the impact Jordan's made
comes more from his acquired
position where he, loaded with
money, skill, and a sincere love
for a sport, is capable of
appealing to people of all ages.
Tracy Hairr
Assistant Sports Ediioi
Consider Barney. Yes, that
ridiculous purple dinosaur shares
similar characteristics with Jordan,
but even though Barney loves you
and you're supposed to love him,
his image has become boring.
But not Michael Jordan's.
There are, nor could there ever

be, any distinct answers as to why a
professional athlete has become so
renowned, but much of Jordan's
widely acclaimed fame may reach
deeper than his ability to score 45
points in a game that the Bulls won
87-86.
In modern society, people want
something to believe in, and often
need, in fact, the ability to have
faith that something close to super-
human is not so intangible as is the
product of dreams and abstract art.
It's comforting, more or less, to
realize that Jordan brought to life
the unbelievable, and made it more
logical to assume that maybe no
goal is necessarily far-fetched.
Besides, isn't is always beyond the
horizons where people have only
looked before? Jordan has shown
this far distance is accessible.
So what exactly will the longevi-
ty of his career encourage people to
remember? It certainly won't be all
the fouls he wasn't penalized for,
nor the numerous times he shuf-
fled his feet before deciding to
dribble. Instead, caressing most
memories about the Chicago Bulls
is and probably always will be the
dramatic impact Jordan has had on
society.
What this insinuates for most of
his fans is that they've been blind-
ed by descriptive terms such as
"amazing and "incredible" attrib-
SEE BULLS. PAGE 7
f
Jernigan, Williamson receive
post-season all-star honors
Players place on All-
East Re�on,
All-America teams
Patrick Giovinazzo
staff writer
Brooks Jernigan, a pitcher, and
John Williamson, an ECU slugger,
have both been named to all-star
teams. Jernigan was selected for
the All-East Region second team
and Williamson was chosen for an
All-America team.
"I don't think you expect any-
thing like this Head Coach Keith
LeClair said. "It's just a tribute to
the years they had and the hard
work and time they put into it
Jernigan, a left-hander, played
in 14 games for the ECU Pirates
this year. He started 13 games
and pitched 96.1 innings with a
team-high two complete
games. During the sea-
son, Jernigan posted a
3.74 earned run average. This
earned run average scored him a
sixth-best in the entire conference.
Jernigan also filed a 7-4 record that
led the Pirates for the second
straight year.
Jernigan's pitching stats have
impressed many throughout the
Colonial Conference. He again led
the Pirates with 105 strikeouts.
This was his second 100 strikeout
season and it placed Jernigan sec-
ond in the conference. This, com-
bined with only 26 walks, has left
Jernigan in a position to beat the
ECU strikeout record. Only 103
more K's will push him past the
mark of 319, held by Johnny Beck.
"I just feel fortunate to have
pitched well this year Jernigan
said.
"Every year
one produced for ECU like
Williamson. Williamson was the
first freshman in school history to
be named to an All-America team.
He has also earned several other
honors this season including a first-
team All-Colonial Athletic
Association selection and a nomina-
tion to a Freshman All-America
team. Williamson started slowly
this season with an opening 0 -10 at
bat, followed by a pulled hamstring
that forced him to miss seven
games. Since then, however,
Williamson has broken many of the
I play, I MfhESHMEN RECORDSmiW
improve a iw
little bit. WBROKEN BY
If I Wr-fN WILLIAMSON M
J
m Rat-1-inn Awranp.340 W
At-Bats194 J ECU freshman
F Hits 6 6 r records. He near-
F Doubles 15M ly broke the RBI
P Runs 50m record with 38, and
F Hare Runs 13J he did break the single
J'Votal Bases XiOW game record for doubles.

doubles in one game. His"
performance this year is a sign of
hard in the off-season I'll be able tothe success he is capable of bring-
go out next year and perform welling to the team. Pirate fans can look
againforward to several mote years of
In the hitting department, noWilliamson's dominant play.
� i�T �
7 Widnesday, Jut
tAKULlNA
(jNivEitsrrY
The School (
and Professit
reports to lh(
� I
� (
Qualificatio
� t
Screening b
ECU it an Eqmil 0
the ImmiKmtum an






ft Carolinian
ball
rers
ted
Hratesto
careers
3VINAZZ0
LITER
Jason Colquitt
FILE PHOTO
rida Marlins in
I, and Ryan
ito the league as
h the Atlanta
,r'll go out and
Randy Rigsby
d .240, posting
i 20 RBIs. His
sive numbers
well. Colquitt
ith 352 putouts
ily high fielding
his career as a
breaking nearly
record this sea-
ms the title for
1 (213), at-bats
ubles (49), runs
PAGE 7
ive
rs
r ECU like
nson was the
100I history to
America team,
several other
eluding a first-
al Athletic
and a nomina-
i All-America
itarted slowly
aeningO-lOac
lied hamstring
miss seven
:n, however,
:n many of the
7
CU freshman
irds. He near-
ukc the RBI
with 38, and
eak the single
d for doubles,
nson hie three,
e game. His'
u is a sign of
able of bring-
: fans can look
nore years of
it play.
7 Wadnatday, June 17. 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
Draft
continued from page 6
directions to site
unit plan -1230 sq. ft.
1
faTT
STUDENT HOUSING
GETS NO BETTER!
NEW STUDENT
CONDOMINIUMS FOR SALE
YOU GET THESE FEATURES
AND MANY MORE:
�3 BEDROOMS
�3 BATHROOMS
�3 WALK IN CLOSETS
�WALKING DISTANCE FROM CAMPUS
�5ELECT YOUR OWN ROOMMATES
�SAVE THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS
DON'T MAKE THE MISTAKE OF NOT
DISCUSSING THIS WITH YOUR PARENTS.
CHECK THESE NUMBERS:
UNITS AVAILABLE24
PRECONSTRUCTION PRICEIisr 12 units)$91,500'
DOWN PAYMENT & CLOSING COSTS: (could be less than S5,000
MONTHLY HOUSING EXPENSE:(could be less than)SlOO"
IWPTH 2 ROOMMATES � EXCLUDING UTILITIES COST:
COST SAVINGS TO PARENTS FOR 4 YEARSCOUlD BE MORE THAN) .521,000"
(ESTIMATED 3 ANNUAL APPRECIATED VALUE PLUS RENTAL SAVINGSj
scored (173) and stolen bases (71).
After playing first base for most of
his years, Rigsby has also claimed
the ECU record for career putouts
with 1,592. This year Rigsby fin-
ished third on the Pirate team with
a .335 batting average, and he led
ECU with- 81 hits and 23 stolen
bases.
Massimo has been ECU's start-
ing shortstop for the last two years.
He also led the Pirates this season
with a .357 batting average.
Massimo ranked fourth in the
Colonial Athletic Association in
1998 for both RBIs (60) and home
runs (13). His 139 bases, 17 dou-
bles and 81 hits set another high
record. Massimo also had an out-
standing performance against the
College of Charleston on May 26
when he went 6 for 6 at the plate,
scoring three doubles, a home run
and two singles. Massimo has
reported to the Brave's rookie
league team in Danville, Va.
All three players have already
reported to their new teams and
were unavailable for comment.
Fans should keep their eyes on
the big leagues as ECU players
continue to sign up with profes-
sional teams.
For more information visit our
website @ www.tec.ecu.edu
Bulls
continued from page 6
AVAILABLE AUGUST 1, 1998!
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-440-5378
ONLY 24 UNITS
PRECONSTRUCTION PRICE MAT
BE CHANGED WITHOUT NOTICE
"ABOVE CALCULATIONS ARE NOT
GUARANTEED BUT BELIEVE TO BE RELIABLE
SPECIAL FINANCING AVAILABLE
School of Education
Associate Dean for research, Graduate Studies,
and Professional Development
Internal Search
m
t, A ar
CAKlfLiraA
oNivKitwnr
The School of Education is seeking applicants for the position of Associate Dean for Research, Graduate Studies,
and Professional Development available Fall Semester 1998. This is a full-time, twelve-month position which
reports to the Dean of the School of Education and is responsible for:
� Developing and implementing a school-wide research agenda, with emphasis on action research tied to
real-world contexts;
� Coordination of graduate programs and graduate assistants within the SOE;
� Program Development, including diversity initiatives (recruitment and curriculum);
� Faculty Development, including mentoring programs;
� BellSouth and other partnership initiatives; and
� Coordination with Continuing Education.
Qualifications of the successful candidate should include the following:
� An earned doctorate from an accredited institution in a field appropriate to the School;
� A record of excellence in teaching, research, and scholarly achievements, and service;
� A demonstrated record of ongoing activity in professional organizations;
� An ability to organize, manage, and communicate effectively;
� A demonstrated commitment to facilitating a strong tradition of working in partnership with
school districts, community agencies, and area businesses; and
� Full Graduate Faculty Status
Interested individuals should submit a letter of application and curriculum vitae to:
Dr. John T. Richards, Chair
Associate Dean's Search Committee
School of Education
Department of Special Education
134 Speight Building
Campus
Screening begins July 17, 1998. and continues until position is filled.
ECU is an Equal OpportunityAffirmative Action Employer and accommttdales individuals with disabilitits. Applicants must comply with prm-isions of
irs
GIGANTIC!
CRUISE DOWN TO CHICO'S FOR A
HUNGRY PIRATE for only $3!
(SUN-THURS 2-5 SAT & SUN 11-5)
ITS THE BIGGEST BURRITO
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YOU CAN SINK THIS ONE!
DOWNTOWN
GREENVILLE
757-1666
uted to Jordan that have really
become overrated.
Of course he's talented. Not
many could deny this. But the
impact Jordan's made comes more
from his acquired position where
he, loaded with money, skill, and a
sincere love for a sport, is capable
of appealing to people of all ages.
True, Dennis Rodman should also
be a possible contender with such
an illustrious personality. He colors
his hair, wears dresses, and kicks
photographers, so why don't you
hear of a team playing against
"Dennis Rodman and the Chicago
Bulls?" Well, his character and bas-
ketball skills are usually more falla-
cious than are those of Jordan,
whose personality is less eccentric,
but shots still more outstanding.
While Michael Jordan's future
career is at present a contingency,
he has nonetheless created a histo-
ry in the world of sports that com-
bines the unconquerable with the
mundane.
Thus, the devoted fans who
never tire of him or his team receiv-
ing honors have undoubtedly
accepted that when someone so
passionate about a game can influ-
ence so many by encouraging
young people to stay in school,
then it's perhaps not so bad to want
to "Be like Mike
9:00 p.m.
Student Rcc Center Outdoor Fool
Wear your swim suit � bring your lawn chain and blankets!
(Rain Site - REC Indoor Pool)
Bill MUHflAY IS
the Man who
Knew ton
little
He's on a mission so secret
even he doesn't know about it.
328-64436387
June 18
Free admission with valid ECU One Card or valid
SRC membership card. One guest per ID. V5V!P
Coolers Welcome - NO ALCOHOL ALLOWED! 328-60044715
I
"The Undefented Best
Place to Hear Live
Music in Greenville
-Greenville Times
752-7303
WEDNESDAY
L508USCHU6HT.COMfiuY DlCfefeAVliw
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FRIDAY, JUNE 20
? j�. MAMMOTH RECORDING ARTISTS -
? ff SPECIAL GUEST:
t MIKE C0RAD0 BANI
SATURDAY, JUNE 27
C R A V I If
MELON
special guest Ultraviolets I






I
I
a Wednesday. June 17.1998
FOR RENT
WALK TO ECU. 1 bed apt $275
mo avail, now. Tanglewood Apts
125 Avery St Greenville. 758-6596
2 MALE ROOMMATES NEEDED
for Fall to share 3400 sq. ft. home
near campus, $250 per month, 15
utilities. Ask for Tim. 931-9165.
HOUSE FOR RENT: 302 Lewis St
3 BR, LR. DR, kitchen, central AC.
garage. 5 min. walk from campus.
No pets. $750mo. 919-504-2052,
leave message.
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
wanted to fill 6 bedroom house.
$225 per month. Split food and utili-
ties. Two blocks from campus. Call
919-43&4427.
SUMMER ROOMMATE, CUTE
apartment, your own bedroom and
bathroom, washerdryer in apart-
ment, very close to campus. Call
Kathleen 752-2705.
2000 SQ.FT. HOME, 4 bedrooms.
3 baths, extra large fenced-in back-
yard, washer & dryer, near ECU &
PCMH. $800 per month, purchase
available. 524-6790.
2 BR. AFT. AVAILABLE now above
Percolator Coffeehouse, $450 a
monthl Please call 758-2616, ask for
Yvonne.
ROOM FOR RENT: clean, respon-
sible person needed to share new 3
bedroom house. $225 plus utilities.
2 miles from campus. Upperclass-
man or grad student preferred. Avail-
able July 1st. 752-2116.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Georgetown Apts. across from REC
center, 1 12 bath, WD, large room
for rent. Call April 752-2209, leave a
messagel Need ASAPI
rtlNGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiencey Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED: WANT to
get a lot for your money? MF
needed to fill 3 bedroom house.
Central heatair, large yarddeck.
$217mo. 13 utilities. Available
July 1. Call 561-7710.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED,
share 2 bedroom, 1 12 bath
townhouse $225, 12 phoneutili-
ties, on ECU bus route. Call 756-
7128. leave message. Need ASAP.
HELP WANTED
NEEDED: SOMEONE TO do
teleservicing and selling of office
furniture. Must be enthusiastic, posi-
tive and willing to work. Call 931-
6904 and leave a message.
STUDENTS: LOOKING FOR part-
time work with flexible hours so you
can still enjoy your Summer vaca-
tion. The ECU TeleFund is now hir-
ing for Summer and Fall. $5.50 per
hour plus bonus. Contact the
Telefund Office between 2 and 5 M-
Th at 328-4212.
OFFICE WORK - GOOD PHONE
communication skills and computer
experience needed. Quickbooks Pro,
Excel, Word. Good pay, flexible
schedule, casual dress work environ-
ment. Call Tim at pager 551-7156
andor send your resume to PO Box
3166, Greenville, NC 27836 or fax
to 756-6632. (Handy Helpers, Inc.)
2-3 positions available.
HIRING - CONSTRUCTION ALL
trades. Must have experience and
valid drivers license. Flexible hours
andor full-time Summer and Fall
work available. Page Tim at 551-
7156. Handy Helpers, Inc.
$100 OFF
icurity d�j�i
Securi
eposit
with piranllllM t this coupon, ollw Mpirsa
6319B not v�M with any other coupon :
-WESLEY COMMON SOUTH: 1or i Bedroom
1 bath, range, rMgerator, free watarsewar,
wasrterdryer hookups, tree basic cable in
some units, laundry facilities, 5 blocks from
campus, ECU bus services.
-LANG6TON park: 2 Bedrooms, t bath
rfingfc- refrigerator, dishwasher, free
wniiewer, and basfe cable, appro. 900 so,
? ABherdry�r hookups, central hearair. 6
clrckSilfom campus.
COMPLETSIY RENOVATED UNITS AVAILABLE.
V; Properties have 24 tir. emergency maintenance-
rfopartu, I i
onoQament
classifieds
AIM HIGH, AIR FORCE- Put your
science of engineering degree to
work for an aerospace leader. Con-
sider being an Air Force officer. Ex-
cellent training and benefits. For a
free information package, call 1-800-
423-USAF.
AEROBIC INSTRUCTORS
WANTED. Certification classes also
forming. Call 827-1781 between
4:00-8:00 p.m. Mon. thru Thurs.
FOR YARD AND GARDEN work for
the rest of the Summer in
Chocowinity 6 to 16 hours per week,
$6.00 per hour, must have car. 975-
3638 or 328-6347.
BABYSITTER NEEDED FOR 6 year
old boy Monday-Thursday 8:00a.m
4:00 p.m. Must provide own trans-
portation and be a non-smoker.
Please call Sherrie at 328-2009 or
after 5 call 355-7597.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: TUBULAR METAL,
frame bunk bed (royal blue) in exceig
lent condition. Assembly required):
Needs twin mattress on top bunk
bed. Double mattress provided on
bottom bed. $175 with double mat-
tress,150 without double mattress.
Call 756-9642 on Tuesday or Thurs-
day mornings between 9:30 AM and
12:45 or weekday evenings. Also
computer chair and parakeet cage,
each $10. Like new 24 inch girl's
bicycle, blue with pinkyellow trim,
$40. Car bike rack. $15.
OTHER
MATURE SCHOOL TEACHER go-
ing to 2nd Summer School looking
for apt. or house sitting job. Call 1-
910-791-3296.
NEED SOMEONE TO TUTOR 5-6th
grade level for an eleven year old.
Provide own transportation. 752-
4525. if no answer, leave message.
GOV'T. FORECLOSED HOMES
from pennies on $1. Delinquent tax,
repo's. REO's. Your area. Toll Free 1-
800-218-9000 ext. H-3726 for cur-
rent listings.
FREE CASH GRANTSI College
scholarships. Business. Medical bills.
Never repay. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000. ext. G-3726.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175.
Porsches, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMWs,
Corvettes. Also Jeeps. 4WDs. Your
area. Toll free 1-800-218-9000, ext.
A-3726.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(919) 496-12X4
Dapper
Dan's
Big Summer Sale
10-75 OFF
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Nted Itadwrbud boots
and .hoo.1 Good fcana.
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also taken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00, 2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door It ring buzzer.
The East Carolinian
PERSONALS
LADIES: LEND ME your sore ach-
ing muscles. Amateur masseur
needs your back to practice on. Call:
Kyle 1-800484-8646 (code 2465)
or POB 8663. Greenville, NC 27835.
SERVICES
WILL TYPE YOUR PAPERS or the-
sis for you. 10 yrs. typing experience.
Excellent quality. $2.00 per page.
321-0668.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
invites you to attend a Women Fel-
lowship Friday. June 19 at Commu-
nity Christian Church at 7:00 p.m.
Dinner will be served. Men are in-
vited to attend a Men Fellowship
Saturday, June 10, 9:00 a.m. Break-
fast will be served. Also on Monday,
June 22 at 7:00 p.m. the church will
host a Business Fellowship, which
is designed to minister the word of
God and provide interaction among
business owners. Representatives
from Small Business Administration
will be present. The church is lo-
cated at 1104 North Memorial Drive.
Greenville. NC. For more informa-
tion call 551-9143.
Type this address into your
browser and visit us on the
web
m
mi '
www.tec.
ecu.edu
WJllfaWKWW'
then bookmark it and come
i back frequently, a-
We constantly improve it
to better serve you.
comics
Life on Tuesday
Chris Knotts
France
Rafael Santos
6EE GRMWAAM
OTHER 5HPRses i
SHomi KNovJ ABOWT?
Life on Tuesday
Chris Knotts
Wild Thing
WHATSUP.guYS?) YEAH, But DiDN-TYou
HOLD IT THOUGHT Wow T�T CATS HAVE
You DIED Of A N)NE tvES?
HEART ATTACK IN
LAST WEEK'S STRIP
Hw ' MY TV
TMAT'3 MY COUCH t
AILTHE STUFF IN HERE
IS FROM MY Rootf.
1v
N. Miles
HCY� W� THOUGHT
YOU WERE DEAD, MAWL
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WHAT? WRE ONLY
22 YRS OLD, HOWV You
LOSE UvES ALREWY?
WELL, LET'S l&.�
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HEART Attacks


Title
The East Carolinian, June 10, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 10, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1276
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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