The East Carolinian, June 3, 1998






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WEDNESDAY
JUNE 3,1998
eastcarolinian
EASTCAROUNAUNtVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
Legislative budget cutbacks hit home
$1.2 million cut second
to Chapel Hill's $14
TK Jones
STAFF WRITER
Beginning the next fiscal year,
ECU will face a cutback of $1.2 mil-
lion, second only in the UNC-sys-
tem to UNC-Chapel Hill's cut of
$1.4 million.
"1 have discussed matters of
ECU funding with members of leg-
islature and I'm sure other
trustees are talking (about the cut)
to members that they know said
Jordan Whichard, chairman of the
trustees' finance committee.
The $1.2 million comes from a
larger cutback of a proposed $6.7
million from the general funds
account of the UNC system.
According to Richard Brown,
vice chancellor for administration
and finance, the money would have
been used to replace older vehicles
and a garbage truck.
The state standard for vehicle
replacement is 10 years or 100,000
miles. A total of 34 vehicles are
approaching their 10-year-old mark.
For garbage trucks, the standard
replacement time is seven years
because they receive more use.
Currently the university owns two
garbage trucks,
one of which
needs to be
replaced. A new
truck costs
approximately
$100,000.
If funds
aren't appropri-
ated to replace
the vehicles,
then mainte-
nance responsi-
bilities fall in
the hands of the
university's
mechanics.
Vehicles less than 10 years old or
under 100,000 miles are serviced
under warranty at a dealership.
As it stands, four mechanics and
one supervisor at the automotive
services garage maintains over 600
"When things are going badly,
I can understand budget cuts.
But when things are going
well, I don't understand
them
Richard Brown
Vice Chancellor lor admimsiraiion and finance
units, including ground equipment
and vehicles. At one time there
were six mechanics and one super-
visor, but that number was reduced
by a previous budget cut in 1989.
1989 brought Hurricane Hugo
and economic hardship to North
Carolina. The state reduced spend-
ing by removing
any vacancies in
positions at acad-
emic institutions.
"When things
are going badly, I
can understand
budget cuts
Brown said. "But
when things are
going well, I
don't understand
them
Of the UNC
system, ECU's
financial losses
are second to
UNC-Chapel Hill, ranking number
one with a $1.4 million cut.
"One of the reasons Chapel
Hill's cut was high was do to a new
building not being completed on
time Brown said.
Due to legislative cutbacks of $1.2 million a total of 34 campus vehicles approaching their 10-year-old mark can not be replaced.
PHOTO BY JASON FEATHER
Funding shortage
cancels Croatan dig
Cost estimated at
wu$ly $13,300
M o H K tit 0 H U s S E I N
STAFF WRITER
Archaeologists won't be "diggin' up
bones" on Hatteras Island this
summer due to a shortage of fund-
ing which has caused a stand still
on an archaeological dig that many
student volunteers were scheduled
to participate in.
The dig, primarily focused on
finding the historic Croatan capital
and some valuable artifacts, is lead
by ECU archaeologist Dr. David
Phelps. Phelps said the funding
shortages have forced him to cancel
the dig which was scheduled for
the end of the spring semester and
early June.
"All of my volunteers are just
thoroughly crestfallen Phelps
said.
The price of the project is
approximately $13,300. But in ref-
erence to the historical and cultural
ramifications that finding any arti-
facts would lead to, the dig is
immensely profitable.
Initially, the project was to be
financed wholly from an account
within ECU's academic founda-
tion. The funds for the Croatan
project were to cover expenses,
salaries for interns and costs related
to scientific processes.
Now, Phelps hopes funding will
come from local donors who see the
SEE CROATAN. PAGE 2
Million dollar diploma
Nance Mize named
"Volunteer of the Year"
Honor presented by
Special Olympics
Natasha Phillips
senior writer
The Director of Recreational
Services, Ms. Nance Mize, was
recently honored by the
Greenville-Pitt County Special
Olympics committee as "Volunteer
of the Year
Mize was named for her dedica-
tion and continuous service to both
the organization and it's members.
TODAY
Thunderstorms
high 95
low 71
TOMORROW
Thunderstorms
high 85
low 69
"I feel that
she deserves
the reward
because of her
commitment
to the Special
Olympians.
Her willing-
ness to help is
evident locally
and regionally.
She's dedicat-
ed to provid-
ing the athletes with quality
events said Alice Keene, director
of Pitt Community Schools and
SEE VOLUNTEER. PAGE 2
Nance Mize,
Recreational Service
PHOTO BY JASON FEATHER
Many students who work hard through their college careers do not realize the worth of
their degree, which can equal $1 million over a lifetime.
PHOTO BY MABC CRIPPEN
4 year degree may earn
$1 million over life span
For more information
www.tec.ecu.edu
Results of 1996
telephone survey
Carolyn Rob bins Hyde
staff writer
Learning is no longer a one-time
event, but a continuous, life-long
process.
When you weigh the net worth
of an undergraduate degree earned
from ECU against the costs
involved, the rewards are colossal.
In the recent publication of
"The East Book: A Guide to
Markets and Purchasing Patterns in
Eastern North Carolina informa-
tion was gathered by students hired
by the Survey Research Laboratory
to conduct telephone interviews.
These interviews took place
between May 5 and June 18, 19.
This survey showed approximately
1,255,413 people live in the 22 east-
ern counties involved in the survey.
Of this amount, 458,554 house-
holds have an average yearly family
income of $34,674.
According to this research, an
undergraduate four-year degree
from ECU may be worth more than
a million dollars over the course of
SEE DEGREE PAGE 2
Transit authority sets
guidelines for drivers
Managers can earn
$13,430 to $18, 710
William L e L i e v e r
STAFF WRITER
The student transit authority
recently set strict guidelines for all
student managers and drivers;
approving a compensation proposal,
setting maximum work hours and
making new job
qualifications.
Managers must
be enrolled for at
least nine hours of
classes and receive a
minimum GPA of
2.3. In addition,
they must have a
valid class 'B' N.C.
drivers license.
Student transit
managers earn
between $13,430 to
$18,710 a year, mak-
ing them the high-
est paid student
employees on cam-
pus. Their salaries,
received as a month-
ly stipend, come in
addition to money for tuition, text
books and housing costs.
"I am about to get a raise said
Dean Wheeler, transit manager. "I
think that most (transit) positions
will not be affected that much by
the changes
Transit Drivers get paid per hour
with a starting pay of eight dollars
per hour. Transit drivers must be
enrolled students who maintain a
2.0 GPA and possess a class 'B' N.C.
driver's license. Drivers may not be
hired if they have previous DWIs or
reckless driving citations.
"I think they set these qualifica-
tions to be self monitored by the
transit said Eric Rivenbark, SGA
president. "If they work 40 hours
or 60 hours, the managers will get
the same monthly stipend. I think
it is important for the drivers and
managers to realize that they are
students and they need to concen-
trate on that first. Transit should be
just a part-time job while they are in
school
The maximum work hours for
transit employees is 40 hours a
week. The
transit
authority rec-
ommends
only 25 hours
a week or
fewer.
Students are
not permitted
to receive
overtime pay
and are not
paid for hours
spent study-
ing.
"It is real-
ly not saying
people can
not work over
25 hours as
long 'ias we
(transit) give more people the
opportunity so as to allow manage-
ment to have enough students to
draw from said Joey Weathington,
transit advisor.
According to Rivenbark, transit
is one of three in the nation that is
student run. He says EtjHBRtransit
may not be the most efficiently run
system because it is student run
and student funded, but it is impor-
tant to know that students are run-
ning the show and doing a good job.
" think it is important for
the drivers and managers to
realize that they are students
and they need to concentrate
on that first. Transit should
be just a part-time job while
they are in school
Eric Rivenbark
SGA president.
Opinion
Lifestyle
Sports
Give back to the
community
Beatty tries to rap;
makes movie crap
Ejo
nline Survey
www.tec.ecu.edu
"Do you prefer Pepsi over Coke?"
Football players
charged with assault
Ahswerin next week's TEC
the east Carolinian STUDENT PUBLICATION BLDG, GREENVILLE, NC 27858 across from Joyner library � newsroom 328-fTS advertising 328-2000 fax 328-6558 website www.tec.ecu.edu
4 M i
I
I





2 Wadnwiiy. Jam 3,1898
news
The East Carolinian
Varner
named
library
director
Will takeover post
August 15
Volunteer
continued from page 1
William LeLiever
staff writer
The Boaid of Trustees has
approved the selection of a new
director of academic library ser-
vices.
Carroll Varner, presently associ-
ate dean of university libraries and
associate professor at Illinois State
University, will take over as ECU's
library director August IS. The
Board approved his position with
full tenure, eliminating candidate
Bede Mitchell from the running
The director's responsibilities
will be to serve as senior adminis-
trative officer of Academic Library
Services (ALS), report directly to
the vice chancellor for academic
affairs and serve on the university
administrative council.
The director will also work with
the faculty and staff in developing
and implementing a vision for the
libraries future, help complete the
internal restructuring now in
progress and seek extramural sup-
port.
In addition, the director is
responsible for leading library
development initiatives, providing
technology leadership for the
library and helping to develop
quality collections and services
commensurate with a Doctoral II
institution.
"All the candidates that applied
(including Varner) said that their
primary goal of the library was to
support the students said Pat
Elks, executive assistant to the
director.
According to Keats Sparrow,
head of the nominating commit-
tee, the committee solicited infor-
mation from the faculty senate
libraries committee, from the
deans across campus, department
heads and the library faculty and
staff. Finalists were recommended
to the chancellor, who made the
final decision.
"I feel the library personnel as a
whole voted for the candidates
that the search committee made
the official recommendation for
Elks said.
"Both candidates put a lot of
emphasis on technology when I
met them said Linda Coward,
processing assistant
Recreation.
The "Volunteer of the Year
Award" is distributed based upon
community service and concern for
the special population.
"Nance's long-time commit-
ment and enthusiasm are
admirable. She's as committed
today as she was in 1979 Keene
said.
In addition to actively participat-
ing within organizational functions
in Texas, Kansas and Missouri,
Mize was also involved in the N.C.
State Special Olympics Summer
Games in 1991 and 1992. She
helped organize the event, which
included training hundreds of vol-
unteers.
"The State games were a lot of
fun. I enjoyed working with the
voluntccrs and I made a lot of new
friends said Mize.
During the summer games,
Mize served as a venue director in
her area of expertise: track.
"I had experience coaching
track at a collegic level; therefore, I
believed that I could bring some-
thing positive to the organization. I
hope that I've provided a certain
degree of professionalism and a
sense of commitment said Mize.
The April 23 event, which was
sponsored by the Greenville Parks
and Recreation Department, hon-
ored Mize for her years of service
and devotion.
"It's always nice to be recog-
nized, especially for such a wonder-
ful cause. I have a cherished place
in my heart for Special Olympians.
However, I kept asking myself,
'Why me?' There are so many more
deserving people said Mize.
Mize will continue to serve as a
member of the local steering com-
mittee, which helps with local bud-
geting, programming and fund rais-
ing.
"I enjoy being on the local steer-
ing committee because I believe
that all of us need to assume lead-
ership roles. Giving back to the
community is something everyone
needs to do. I want to help the
Special Olympics program be the
best it can be said Mize.
In 1999, North Carolina will host
the Special Olympics World
Games. The games will include
7,000 athletes, 2,000 coaches,
15,000 family members and an esti-
mated 20,000 volunteers.
"I plan on being a part of the
International games next year. I
always enjoy working with the vol-
unteers and athletes said Mize.
"Working with them helps me put
things into perspective. They work
so hard and have to overcome so
much. They've taught me that it's
the experience that counts, not the
winning or losing. They're what
life is all about
If you would like additional
information regarding the Special
Olympics andor volunteering for
the 1999 event, please call Mize at
328-6858.
Degree
continued (torn page 1
a lifetime.
An average annual income of
$24,728 was reported by those with
a high school diploma. The survey
showed an average annual income
of $33,666 in households in which a
two-year degree was earned from a
community college. An average
income of $48,603 was earned in
households where at least one per-
son had earned a four-year college
degree.
"This data indicates an annual
income increase of $8,938 if at least
one person in the household earned
a community college degree said
Dr. Ken Wilson, associate professor
of sociology and director of the
Survey Research Laboratory.
"PCC offers a two-year degree
at an average cost of $2,000, which
includes tuition, fees and books
said Susan Nobles, director of
external affairs division of Pitt
Community College.
According to Michael P. Balko,
Jr university cashier, a North
Carolina resident could earn a four-
year degree from ECU for roughly
$26,000 (including tuition, fees,
books, room and board).
The data showed that house-
holds where at least one person
earned a four-year degree, the
annual income increased by
$23,875. This investment increases
family income by approximately
$1.1 million over a person's life-
time.
Wilson suggests a college degree
is not only a good investment for
the student, but also for the state of
North Carolina.
"The state currently pays $6,977
per semester for each in-state stu-
dent at ECU, but each graduate
pays extra taxes on the extra
income earned. If the student
remains in North Carolina, over the
course of their lifetime, the state
should collect about $100,000 in
extra taxes
"The East Book" provides
information on the buying habits
and marketing patterns of residents
of the 22 counties which comprise
the center of eastern North
Carolina. Other information col-
lected from this survey included
the typical spending amounts on
such items as groceries, clothing
and other pertinent information
regarding the patterns of spending
in eastern North Carolina.
This survey showed 20 percent
of the households interviewed take
at least one long vacation a year.
Nearly half of the surveyed people
reported eating breakfast away
from home on a typical day. During
the week, this figure jumps to near-
ly 60 percent for lunches outside of
the home. Also noted was the fact
that during the week, this figure
rises to 67 percent for dinner meals.
Primary sources of receiving infor-
mation remains the newspapers,
word-of-mouth and being familiar
with the place of purchase.
To receive an individual copy of
"The East Book" please contact
the ECU Regional Development
Services, Willis Building, 300 E.
First St Greenville, NC 27858, or
call (252) 328-6650.
Croatan
continued from page 1
academic importance of such a pro-
ject.
"I hope to get enough money
for a one week project and a longer
dig in the fall because we don't
want to lose the continuity of the
project Phelps said.
In previous years, the Croatan
excavation team found parts of the
old Croatan capital and a multitude
of priceless artifacts. Some of the
finds connected European settlers
to the Native Americans on the
island of Hatteras for the first time.
Phelps is hopeful that local con-
tributors will see the value of the
project and choose to support it
monetarily.
Friday, May 15 Meeting of the Board of Trustees
�Appointment of Dr. Marilyn Sheerer as professor and
dean of the School of Education
�Appointment with permanent tenure of Dr. Ronald
Nowaczyk, professor and chairman of the department of
psychology
�Approval of Dr. Ronald Newton, professor and chair of
the department of biology
�Approval of Dr. Carroll Varner as library director
�Named the conference room in the School
Administration Suite in honor of Mr. William Cain
�Approved the expansion of the Rivers building
�Approval of renovations to Whichard, Old Cafeteria and
Spilman
Free Pregnancy Test
While You Wait Free And Confidential
Services and Peer Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
Hours Vary as Needed
Appointment Preferred
757-0003

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VAUMM






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3 W�dnnd�y, Juni 3. 1998
opinion
The Em Carolinian
eastiSarolinian
AMV L.Roys l tR Editor
Heather Buroess MtntgingEditor
Amanda Austin Ntwi Editor Travis Barklev Sports Edna
Andv Turner UfatfU Editor Trace Hairr Assistant Sports Editor
Miccah Smith taiium tiftmH Editor Carole Mehle Hnd Copy Editor
Chris Knotts Still iliustrnot
MATT HBOE Advtnuiiig Minogif
BOBBV Toggle Wibmmit
Saying At ECU canrnunrty ma 026 it Eat Cnramtn attaints rl 000 copti Mr, bad aid Trwidt, rh kJ rdnonil m tar. id'tiai it t �w
ion d rht Eatonal Bond the Eat Crrowtwn artcann anas to it idnar. hmtiat to SO wars atari nay br idnrd la dKrncv � tnwly. Thi Eta
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Caraniai. Sudan hataan rWrjao. ECU. GnaMh, 27SSHJS3 Fa Mxruton. ol 919 3216366
oumsw
Summer school classes are in session; class loads are lighter and, quite frankly, we
often find ourselves sitting on our behinds with absolutely nothing to do. But, there is
something to do. This is the perfect time of year to turn off the television set, pull our-
selves away from the downtown scene for a night or two, get our behinds in gear and
volunteer. It doesn't matter where � just do it!
You may be asking yourself, "Why me? What's in this for me?" Well, if you think
hard enough the options are endless. For starters you are taking the time to perform a
selfless act to help someone else. Someone who is need of your services. This some-
one is that someone who will appreciate your graciousness more than you can ever
imagine.
We know that some of you could care less about helping others and would much
rather sit at home watching everyone else do the work, so let's take this volunteer
thing from a different angle. The incentive you might need is in regards to your
resume Yeah, you heard it right, your resume A few hours a week offering a helping
hand will make a great impact on your resume and it's simple. Just pick up the phone
and call a charitable organization, when they answer just ask one simple question:
What can I do to help? When it comes time to apply for a real job or apply for admis-
sions to graduate school, what you may not realize is that people are looking for a lot
more than dazzling grades and a pretty smile. People want to hire a person or admit
people into their programs who are willing to put forward their time, they want whole-
some, well-rounded individuals.
What could be better than volunteering? It is simple; just get up and go. You don't
even have to apply.
When you put forth a selfless act it is clear that you have grown as a person. When
you volunteer it makes you feel good about yourself and makes others feel good about
you. We may live in a selfish society, surrounded by superficial people, but that does-
n't mean you have to be a part of it. Make the world a nicer place where people can
rely on others for just about anything. Though you may not receive a pay check, you
will receive something more: the love, respect and appreciation of others, of a stranger.
Looking for answers
OPINION
Columnist
Britt
H0NEYCUTT
Students: the new commodity
�wm
1
1I aad i ! 11
.it doesn 't matter what we
Hie to drink, even though
we're the ones paying
hundreds of dollars for the
meal plans that will buy the
sodas, and thousands of
dollars of our tuition for the
salaries of those making our
most minute decisions for us
without even considering what
we think
Big Brother is watching you, my
fellow students. He sees every
move you make, controls every
thing you do, and sometimes what
you think. And now he wants to rob
you of one of the few free choices
you have left: what you quench
your thirst with.
Surprising? Not really.
Infuriating? Most definitely. What
everyone else seems to be con-
cerned with on the cola issue is
whether we should keep our fami-
ly ties with Pepsi or go for the big
money from Coke. That's not the
deal. It's the fact that we are being
robbed of our own free will by a
corporation � and by our own
school. It's not like corporate
America doesn't have a say in
everything that happens through-
out your lifetime anyway. But at
least we're usually allowed to think
we're in control of our own des-
tinies. With this little deal they're
working out, they are taunting us
with our lack of power over our
own thirst.
We are being sold out by our
prestigious, upstanding university.
Sure, they're gonna rake in some
bucks � which will no doubt go
toward building another much
needed novelty clock on the mall
� but what is the price of our free-
dom?
It doesn't matter to me if Coke
or Pepsi wins, although I would
feel like a Nazi drinking Coke in
Minges Coliseum, the house that
Pepsi built. The point is that no
one has asked the students what
they think here. Apparently, it
doesn't matter what we like to
drink, even though we're the ones
paying hundreds of dollars for the
meal plans that will buy the sodas,
and thousands of dollars of our
tuition for the salaries of those
making our most minute decisions
for us without even considering
what we think. But what's the big
deal, right? It's just soda!
Just soda. . . today. Last time it
was just a food service (Aramark)
that was given monopoly over cam-
pus. How happy arc we with that?
Where do we stop it? Next week
ECU will probably give "dressing
rights" to the Gap. We'll all have to
walk around daily in khakis,
pullovers, and skorts. I've seen this
pattern before somewhere. . .
Hmm,was it communism?
We are a nation founded upon
freedom of choice. We all have
individual tastes. Coke and Pepsi
products arc very different. Don't
give us another reason to avoid the
dining hall.
. if a black inner city kid
commits a crime, such as
shooting a good portion of the
student body, it is violence in
the rap industry; if a white
suburban WASP kid does the
same, it is television.
Students of all ages are taking guns
to school and using these weapons
to solve disputes. Violence on the
big screen and on the boob tube is
being blamed for the tragic events
that have become somewhat com-
mon.
Television programs are accused
of showing too much brutality. I
prefer to think'that television has a
lack of showing the consequences
of violence.
People are shown shooting
guns, wielding knives, or even
using bombs. Look at shows like
TheA-Team, crack commandos with
their AK-47's. They fired off more
rounds in one episode then the
Argentines' did during their war
with Britain over the Falkland
Islands, yet they did not hit any-
thing (except for tires).
The volleys of bullets may be
violent acts, but not what I consid-
er violent. Consider what violence
you may have seen. Bullets may
fly through the air, but what impact
is shown?
If television shows were truly
violent then you would see the bul-
let entering the skull and leaving a
softball-sized hole in the back.
What is left of the brain would be
expelled in particles resembling
mush. But we do not see this on
television shows, or do we?
If violence on television is to
blame then the most violent shows
should take the responsibility. The
shows on television that I have
seen the most violence on are the
news programs. MSNBC, along
with many other network channels,
showed a live shot of a some poor
soul committing suicide. Nothing
like a live suicide to draw in more
viewers.
You believe that children do not
watch the news and you would be
right. I never watched the news
when I was a kid, but my parents
did. I can recall sitting on the floor
playing with my Erector set while
my dad watched the news. I heard
of the United States bombing
Libya, the murder of another citi-
zen by OUR government, and
even seeing the occasionally dis-
membered body from some
African, Central American or
Middle Eastern nation.
What of the people who grew up
watching the Vietnam war every
night, on the news, during supper?
This conflict was not only violent,
but also very much real. That gen-
eration did not grow up to be as vio-
lent as we are lead to believe soci-
ety is now.
I watched some pretty disgust-
ing shows when I was younger. I sat
through Halloween, Nightmare on
Elm Street, Patton, and even the
original Lone Ranger and Superman
(not only were guns fired but they
were thrown when the bad guys
were out of bullets).
Now here is the funny part, I
did not get a gun and mow down
my peers. What is the difference
between myself and others like
me, who have the hot tempers, yet
did not go through with the
killings? I wish I could blame the
one-eyed bandit, television.
Television violence is being
blamed but to blame programming
would be to blame the news.
Let us play what if. What if tele-
vision is the root of ail evil? What
then? Banning any programing
because of its content, is a severe
violation of the first amendment
(my belief, not the FCC's). If tele-
vision is to blame, then who is let-
ting these children watch these
programs? Whatever happened to
parental involvement? Even fur-
ther than that, what if movie vio-
lence is also causing these prob-
lems? Who is letting these kids into
the R-rated flicks?
I do not know what caused
these children to kill, and I do not
think the answer is as easy as blam-
ing television.
One last thought � consider
this: if a black inner city kid com-
mits a crime, such as shooting a
good portion of the student body, it
is violence in the rap industry; if a
white suburban WASP kid does the
same, it is television. Just an obser-
vation.
LETTEI
ito the editor
Kudos to Health Center staff
We are always so quick to complain
when things are bad or when peo-
ple perform less than satisfactory. It
is important to recognize when peo-
ple do an excellent job, especially
when people go above and beyond
the call of duty. I am specifically
referring to the ECU Health
Center.
For example, it is wonderful the
way the staff will do their best to
work you in, even if you don't have
an appointment. There have been
several times when I needed urgent
care and the staff worked me in.
During my visits, the staff has
always been friendly and courteous.
Nurses and providers actually take
the time to listen to your problems.
They seem sincere in wanting to
gather as much information before
diagnosing the problem.
The staff also spends time
explaining things thoroughly rather
than rushing patients through the
door. I ahvays felt comfortable dis-
cussing any questions or concerns
with the staff. I never felt like just a
number, instead I felt like I was get-
ting personal care. Wouldn't it be
awesome if every health care facili-
ty offered such care? (Not to men-
tion if the cost of the services were
as reasonable!)
Even though I am excited about
graduating, I am going to miss the
services at the Health Center. It's
easy to take the services for granted
when you are a student while you
are a student. We should not take
these services for granted. Every
staff person there deserves special
attention.
Tracey Hoback
Cash: the real thing
It's obvious what the ECU Board of
Trustees feels is "the real thing
It's NOT appreciation.
The Minges family has con-
tributed generously to ECU over
several years. With both time and
money.
It's NOT loyalty.
The Minges family's form of on-
going, selfless support is one that
t
most institutions would want to cul-
tivate and sustain over the life of an
institution.
It's NOT choice.
Soon when you walk up to the
cooler in the Wright Place to select
a soft drink, your choice will be lim-
ited. You can't buy the soft drink of
your choice. You'll have to select
the soft drink of the board's choice.
1
According to their recent deci-
sion to negotiate an exclusive cola
contract, the Board of Trustees have
loudly and clearly declared:
CASH � it's the real thing.
Paul D. Wright
Media Board Adviser





4 Wein.nHy, June 3, 1988
lifestyle
The Eitt Carolinian
review
Bulworth offers nothing new
Beatty tries to rap,
makes movie crap
Jennifer Leggett
senior writer
4 OUT OF 10
Ever wondered what would happen
if Jesse Helms got a conscience,
stopped being a homophobic racist,
pissed off all his campaign contribu-
tors and then hired a hit man to
bump him off to spare his con-
stituents his scandal filled legisla-
tion? It wouldn't happen. But if it
did, Bulworth, a movie less believ-
able than Godzilla, might reflect
just how shocking that would be.
Set around the 19 elections,
California Senator Jay Bulworth
(played by Warren Beatty) becomes
overwhelmed by the expectations
of campaign fundraising.
Disenchanted with his role in shady
legislation, Bulworth takes a $10
million life insurance bribe and
hires a hit man to bump himself off.
Showing the stress of the job and
feeling he only has a short time left
to live, Bulworth loosens up his lips
and lets the truth about California
politics fly.
The re-election campaign trail
brings Bulworth into the hoods of
South Central Los Angeles
where he meets seductive, mys-
terious Nina (played by Halle
Berry), the daughter of an ex-
Panther. A few blunts, some
booty shakin' music, and a
bucket of KFC later, Bulworth
finds himself blurting out the
problems with rich white
America and poor blacks in
rhyming couplets.
That's right. He raps.
Whitey-style. Beatty sounds
more like Rico Suave than
Chuck D with his embarrassing
Mother Goose flow and his
shocking lack of rhythm. Think
Bob Saget on Soul Train. The
saggy pants and hip-hop gear
aren't very convincing either.
Bulworth goes around in circles.
It is yet another scream at the sys-
tem that gets nowhere. Beafyy,
Berry and Oliver Plat,t as well as a
large cast of familiars, deliver a
few funny moments. However,
this flick is more of a side show
than anything else. Full of racial
insults disguised as lighthearted
humor, Bulworth abuses cliches
about blacks, WASPs, Jews, cops
and anyone else you could throw
into the mix. A drug dealer gone
good, a chicken and rib joint in the
hood, racist cops and an overanx-
ious coke snorting campaign man-
ager are just a few of the hack-
neyed portrayals Bulworth pre-
tube
BOOB
Yep, it's hot; try summer TV
tou watch TV? Of course you do � you're an
American. You watch TV. speak TV live TV.
become TV. Ereryone knows that. What you
don't know is that TV is watching you
You don yteven have to
leave your couch
Mark Brett
senior writer
Ah, summer. The weather's warm,
the air is sweet, and there's so much
to do
Wait! What am I talking about?
This is Greenville! It's nasty hot,
the air's too thick to force down
your lungs, and there's absolutely
nothing going on! You might as well
stay inside and watch television all
summer!
And, as long as you're parked on
the couch, you might as well watch
something good. Not that everyone
watches crap all the time (in spite of
what the Nielsen ratings indicate),
but there are always a few shows
out there that deserve more atten-
tion. Shows that have the quality,
but not the audience. Shows that
just get no respect.
So, since all your faves are in
repeats, expand your horizons a bit.
Check out these Rodney
Dangerfields of the TV world, and
give them the respect they crave.
Homicide: Despite the fact that it
never wins or even gets nominated
for an Emmy.or even a lousy
Golden Globe, Homicide is consis-
tently the best dramatic hour on
television. A police procedural that
takes a close look inside the
Baltimore Homicide division, this
show consistently delivers intelli-
gent and compelling scripts, with
complex characters to boot.
It also features (for now) the tal-
ents of Andre Braughcr, generally
considered to be the finest actor
working in television today.
Braugher's character quit the force
in the gripping season finale, and he
won't be back in the fall. But in this
summer's repeats you can see him
in all his glory. So watch him now,
while you can.
Not that the rest of the cast is
bad. Homicide also features fine per-
formances from Yaphet Korto
(Alien) and underground TV veter-
an Richard Belzer. If you like
NYPD Blue, and you're not watch-
ing Homicide, what the hell's wrong
with you? Get your head out of
Bochcoland and check out some-
thing even better.
liw and Order: In a similar vein,
we have the other great cop show
that nobody's watching. Every
week, Law and Order follows a
crime from the beginning of the
police investigation to the final
judgement in the courtroom.
Another strong cast, more com-
pelling stories and an even smaller
audience than Homicide. Somebody
watch this so I can shut up about it!
Buffy the Vampire Slayer. I know
what you're thinking. Isn't this that
show based on that stupid movie
with Pee Wee Herman and that
90210 guy? Well, yes. But the
movie's not so stupid, and both the
movie and the show are the brain-
children of Joss Whedon, the man
who brought us Heathers. While
they don't let him be quite as cruel-
ly twisted here as they did in that
teen movie classic, it comes pretty
close.
Buffy, at its best, is a slick parody
of high school life and horror
movies. If you liked Scream (and I
cringe at that comparison), Buffy is
generally better. It does have its off
weeks, but its strong ensemble cast
of characters (including Buffy's
vampire boyfriend and another high
school kid who's a werewolf) tends
to save all but the worst scripts.
Remember, though, the one
unchangeable rule of the series:
anybody can die, at any time. Buffy
herself has already gone through
death's door once, so be prepared
for any number of nasty ends.
Star Tret: Deep Space Nine:
Sometimes I feel like I'm the only
Trekkie in the world who likes this
show. But because of its strong act-
ing and fine scripts, I still consider it
SEE TV. PAGE 5
"The King of Cool"
This is the column where we
facus on (he stuff we miss and the
stuff you missed. We will examine
the books, albums, movies and tele-
vision shows we feel deserve further
exploration. That stuff we dug back
in the day
Siherscreen
misses McQueen
Andy Turner
lifestyle editor
He's the "coolest goddurn mothcr-
scratcher on the silver screen
according to the song "Steve
McQueen" by the Athens, Ga.
band, Drive-By Truckers. Indeed,
whenever Steve McQueen is men-
tioned, the word "cool" is sure to
follow. A recent television docu-
mentary sums it up nicely: Steve
McQueen: The King of Cool.
Eighteen years ago the "King of
Cool" took the big dirt nap down in
Mexico after a bout with cancer.
The Indiana native was the highest
paid star of the '60s. Before his
death at age 50, McQueen had
starred in close to 30 movies includ-
ing Bulitt, The Blob, The Getaway
Junior Banner and The Great Escape.
He was awarded the Golden Globe
twice, in 1967 and 1970, for World
Film Favorite and his performance
in The Sand
Pebbles
earned him a
Best Actor
Oscar in 1967.
He often
had roles simi-
lar to those
played by
Paul Newman
or Clint
Eastwood: the
alienated out-
sider who
lives by his
own moral
code. That
sort of role by
now has
become
cliche, but
McQueen's
performances
were anything
but cliche.
That type of
hardened
"outsider"
character has
to be able to
be lie vably
suggest
inward "softness Anybody can be
a bad ass, but it requires something
more to get across the sense of a tor-
tured soul without it coming off as
total sentimental crap.
McQueen had the "something
more You see it in his face with its
hard-earned lines. You sec it in
"He never had an empty bottle or an empty bed
PHOTO COURTESY OF STEVE MCQUEEN TRIBUTE PAGE
Junior Banner, his second film (along
with The Getaway) with Sam
Peckinpah. He stars as a has-been
rodeo star who returns home to his
family. His parents have split up,
and his brother is going to turn his
father's ranch into a trailer park.
Junior has to ride the toughest bull
!
in town so he can win money to buy
his father a new ranch down under.
His brother, played by Joe Don
Baker, tells him, "I'm working on
his fijstrnillion-whHe�your' still
working'On eight seconds It's the
type of part that McQueen plays
perfectly: the fool who should have
quit a long time ago, but can't
because that's who he is.
By the way, if you've seen the
original The Getaway and compared
it to the remake, you too are likely
part of the National Coalition to
Kick Alec Baldwin In the Ass.
SEE KIMS. PAGE 5
sents.
Bulworth finally decides near
the end of the movie that he does-
n't want to die after all. In true
Hollywood fashion, even after all of
his off-hand remarks on national
television, he still carried the elec-
tion. Yeah, that would happen.
Bulwoith has its moments. The
rhymes are bad; the dancing is
embarrassing. But when Beatty
offers up his solution to economic
distress between the classes, "We
should all keep fucking until we're
all the same color for a few
moments it wasn't embarrassing to
be one of the only people in the
theater.
Questions
remain in
comedian's
death
Wife allegedly shot
Hartman while he slept
LOS ANGELES (AP) � Phil
Hartman's wife left his body on
their bloody bed and went to a
friend's house to confess the killing
before returning home to kill her-
self, newspapers reported Saturday.
After shooting the comedian as
he slept around 2 a.m. Thursday,
B r y n n
Hartman
went to the
home of a
male friend,
the Los
Angeles Times
and the
Daily News
of Los
Angeles
reported,
citing
sources
they did not
identify.
The friend was not identified.
Nearly incoherent, Mrs.
Hartman confessed to the killing
but the friend did not believe her,
the Times said. However, after she
fell asleep he checked her purse
and found a handgun that he con-
fiscated, the newspaper said.
Mrs. Hartman, 40, awoke several
hours later, returned to her home
with the friend and locked herself
in the bedroom with the body of
her 49-year-old husband, the Times
said.
The friend called 911 about 6:20
a.m. and was escorting the
Hartmans' nine-year-old son, Sean,
out of the house when police
arrived.
As the officers took the couple's
six-year-old daughter, Birgen, out of
the home, Mrs. Hartman shot her-
self in the head. .
Police would not confirm the
newspaper reports.
"That is not information that has
come out of our office. 1 cannot ver-
ify that as being accurate police
spokesman Mike Partain said.
A coroner's official said Saturday
she could not confirm the time
Hartman was shot.
"In the first 24 hours (after
death) we can guesstimate within
about two hours. We can't deter-
mine Lt. Cheryl MacWillie said.
"The only witness is dead
Hartman, co-star of the NBC sit-
SEE HARTMAN. PAGE S
Phil Hartman
PHOTO COURTESY OF PHIl
HARTMAN WEB PASE
� �






5 Wtdntidiy. Jum 3, 1898
�L
Thi East Cirolinim
The East Carolinian
lly decides near
ivie that he does-
jfter all. In true
), even after all of
arks on national
carried the elec-
mld happen,
s moments. The
the dancing is
it when Beatty
cion to economic
the classes, "We
eking until we're
lor for a few
t embarrassing to
ly people in the
tions
in in
dian's
ith
edlyshot
hile he slept
I (AP) � Phil
:ft his body on
and went to a
jnfess the killing
ome to kill her-
ported Saturday,
the comedian as
a.m. Thursday,
'hit Hartman
0 COURTESY OF PHIL
RTMAN WFIi PAGE
not identified,
herent, Mrs.
A to the killing
not believe her,
wever, after she
eked her purse
;un that he con-
aper said.
0, awoke several
:d to her home
i locked herself
ith the body of
band, the Times
d 911 about 6:20
escorting the
jr-old son, Sean,
S when police
ook the couple's
cr, Birgen, out of
irtman shot her-
iot confirm the
rmation that has
ce. I cannot ver-
ccurate police
'artain said,
ial said Saturday
nfirm the time
14 hours (after
sstimate within
We can't deter-
MacWillie said,
s dead
oftheNBCsit-
1. PAGE 6
Check out .
our new web address
WWW.TEC.ECU.EPU
NEWMAN
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
Would Like to Welcome
All Future Students and Parents
and Invite You to Join us in Worship
Summer and Fall Campus Mass Schedule
Sundays at 11:30am and 8:30pm at the Newman Center
All Orientation Guests are Welcome
to Visit Our New Facility
953 EAST 10TH STREET (AT THE FOOT OF COLLEGE HILL DRIVE)
Fr. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain and Campus Minister 757-3760 757-1991
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continued from page 4
the best Star Trek series ever.
Unlike the other series, which are
about finding neat solutions to
problems, DS9 recognizes that life
seldom gives us an easy out. If
you're really going to fix a problem,
somebody's going to have to make a
sacrifice, and it's in the making of
those tough decisions that this
show's brilliance lies. While it also
has its off weeks, it's nice to see
somebody in Starfleet get a bloody
nose every now and again.
Plus, it features the Reanimator
himself, Jeffrey Combs, in no less
than two recurring roles! Any Star
Trek series hip enough to hire this
guy (and Candyman's Tony Todd) is
aces in my book. Hell, Tony
Bennett even made a guest appear-
ance a couple of weeks ago. He's
the hippest cat in the Federation!
Babylon 5: I can't mention one
space station show without bringing
up the other one. Though not as
well-acted or as well-written as
DS9, Babylon 5 makes up for its
shortcomings with a continuing sto-
ryline that actually manages to be
epic (something Trek always fails at
so miserably). At its best, Babylon 5
makes you feel like you're seeing
Great Events of History unfold. At
its worst, it makes you long for the
days of Buck Rogers at the space
casino. But it's seldom at its worst.
And since it's running nightly on
TNT, you can sec the whole thing
from the beginning, so you don't
get lost in all the
NarnCentauriVorlonMinbariSha
dows references that get thrown
around in the later episodes.
Okay, that's all we have time for
this week, kids. I'm sure there are
other shows out there worthy of
more attention, but you can seek
them out on your own. It's hot, and
there's plenty of time
Hartman
continued from page 4
com NewsRttdio.was
covered by blood-
Mrs. Hartman was
him, leaning against
Craig Harvey, chief
the coroner's office,
News.
Two revolvers
found partially
soaked sheets,
found next to
the headboar'd,
investigator for
told the Daily
were nearby,
Harvey said.
Mrs. Hartman had become dis-
traught the night before when she
read a note from her husband that
implied he wanted to end the mar-
riage, the Daily News said, citing a
source close to the investigation. It
did not detail the note's contents.
Family and friends have given
conflicting accounts of the 11-year
marriage.
"They had a pattern of arguing
at night, and he would go to sleep
and everything would be OK in the
morning said Steven Small, a
lawyer and close friend who repre-
sented the actor in his two divorces.
Small said that when he asked
about the marriage earlier this
month, Hartman, a former cast
member of Saturday Nigfit Live, told
him: "It's as good as it's been. It's
working fine.�
"He was in therapy Small said.
"He was enjoying it and getting
value out of it. He was more com-
municative, coming out of his
shell
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King
continued from page 4
McQueen is the only Doc as far as
I'm concerned. Jim Thompson,
who wrote The Getaway, could kick
Alec Baldwin's ass, and he's been
dead for 20 years.
As the Drive-Truckers put it,
Steve McQueen "never had an
empty bottle or empty bed He
was a hard, soft, cool sonofabitch
and the silver screen hasn't been
the same without him.
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8 Wednesday, June 3. 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
Football players accused of assaulting student
7 Wedniid
Athletes'fature in
ECU athletic program
in doubt
Patrick Giovinazzo
staff writer
Two ECU football players were
recently charged with assaulting
another student. Kevin Ward, of
215-C Scott Hall, and Travis
Mazyck, of 213-D Scott Hall, were
accused of physically assaulting
another student at a Mendenhall
fraternity party.
Apparently Ward saw the stu-
dent arguing with a female friend at
the party. Ward allegedly came up
to the student and pushed him in
the face. The student responded by
pushing back, and Mazyck jumped
in to defend his teammate. Ward is
accused of then hitting the student
in the face, knocking him to the
ground, where both athletes report-
edly kicked him several times. The
student has
visited a doctor
since sustain-
ing the
injuries.
Ward, a
defensive
back, and
Mazyck, a
wide receiver
for ECU, are
unsure what
this incident
will mean for
their futures as
ECU athletes. Sports Information
Director Norm Reilly, is not mak-
ing a definite prediction. "This will
be a decision between our athletic
director and head coach, but it will
be dealt with internally Reilly
said. Neither of the players were
available for comment on the situa-
tion.
"This will be a decision
between our athletic director
and head coach, but it will be
dealt with internally
Norm Reilly
Spoils infoimaiion director
The arrest was made on April "28
by campus police after a warrant,
had been
secured from the
magistrate's
office. "We did,
in fact, arrest
them. We served
warrants for sim-
ple assault on
each of them
Sergeant Benson
of the ECU
Police
Departme n t
said. Both Ward
and Mazyck
were charged With simple assault,
and then released from the Pitt
County Detention Center on unse-
cured bonds. A preliminary court
date had been set for May 27 in the
Pitt County District Court. At that
time, the court granted a continu-
ance on the case to July 1.
ECU track member
dismissed from team
North no longer part of
athletic department
TRACV HA 1R R
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
Following a conviction on prop-
erty damage charges on April 30,
Ramondo North, a Charlotte native
and sprinter for ECU track was dis-
missed from the team.
North was convicted and found
guilty of causing property damage
on February 26. North was alleged-
ly found slashing the tires and
breaking the windows of a vehicle
that belonged to a former girlfriend.
The victim summoned help from
the Greenville City Police, who
then directed her to the
Magistrate's office. A warrant for
North's arrest was soon issued.
Prior to this offense,
North was released from
the football team as
well, following allega-
tions that he insulted a
woman at a post-game
party by soaking her
with beer. It was also
reported that he struck
this same woman that
night.
Convicted of this
charge in Pitt County
District Court, North appealed his
case to a local superior court where
the jury found him not guilty.
District Court Judge David
Leech delayed the sentencing
process until August 7 of this year
during which Defense Attorney
Cherry Stokes intends on seeking a
Ramondo North
FIIE PHOTO
prayer-for-judgment for North.
This seems relatively possible since
North was convicted on a
misdemeanor charge. If
Stokes is successful,
North's criminal record
will remain untinged,
however, his career as an
ECU athlete has officially
ended.
Norm Reilly, sports
information director,
wished to refrain from
offering many comments,
though he did suggest that
North is looking into transfer
opportunities with NCA&T
"As far as being a part of ECU
though, Ramondo has definitely
left the athletic department and the
university, too Reilly said.
Men's cross country team
announces newest recruits
Coaches pleased with
incoming class
Jim P ii k l p s
STAFF WRITER
The ECU cross-country team has
picked up some outstanding fresh-
men for the upcoming season.
Assistant Coach Mike Ford, is
pleased with the incoming class.
"They are the strongest class
coming in the history of ECU cross
country Ford said. "We are not
losing any top runners and are
adding six freshmen. It will be a
very strong team
The new runners have all
achieved honorable accomplish-
ments. Craig Littlefield of Raleigh,
N.C who was an all-state per-
former at Leesville Road High
School, helped them to win the
1997 N.C. Cross Country
Championships. His best time was
15:48 in the 5,000 meters.
Justin Poretti of Wilmington,
N.C. was team captain of Laney
High School cross country team and
a second in-state recruit. His best
time in high school was 16:07.
Scott Wolfe of Hurdle Mills,
N.C, comes from Brcvard Junior
College which is known to produce
great distance runners. He is
to
SK
expected to add a great deal of lead-
ership to the team.
James Trant of
Fredricksburg, Va. will
run the 10,000 meters
next year. "The longer
he goes, the better he is
Ford said.
Derrick Burrows of
Woodbridge, Va. will run
track and cross country at
ECU and was an all-state
selection in the mile and
two-mile events.
Charlie Nikum of
Clifton, Va. from Robinson High
School will run for ECU this season
and had times
of 15:50
16:00
races.
From
Elmira Heights
N.Y Ryan
Bennett will
also join the
Pirates. He was
team captain, at
Thomas
Edison High
School, a
steeplechaser
in track com-
petitions and a
recipient of the
Interscholastic
Athletic Conference sportsmanship
award.
According to Coach Ford, certain
players have entered and encour-
i
Mike Ford
FILE PHOTO
"They are the strongest class
coming in the history of ECU
cross country. We are not losing
any top runners and are
adding six freshmen. It will be
a very strong team
Mike Ford
Assistant cross country coach
aged high expectations for the
upcoming season.
"I'm expecting
Derrick Burrows to do
great things and to be a
top-seven runner by
mid-season F'ord said.
"Justin Poretti will
add half-mile and mile to
our track season and
should do a good job for
our team. Craig
Littlefield should be a
top-seven runner by mid-
season and Bennett,
Trant and Nikum will add to the
depth but will probably not be scor-
ers. By mid-sea-
son they should
be adjusted to
the five miles
The recruits
arrive on August
15. They started
their training, a
critical period
for the runners,
on June 1. I
The coaches
are expecting
nine of the run
ners to break-
the nine minute
mark this sea-
son.
ECU
cross
country is very excited and feeling
very positive about the upcoming
SEE RECRUITS PAGE 7
Two members of the ECU football team were accused of assaulting a student at a fraternity party inside the Menenhall Student Center.
Their future in ECU athletics is still in doubt and will be decided by the Athletics Director, Mike Hamrick and Head Coach Steve Logan.
PHOTO BY JASON FEATHER
Basketball coaching
positions remain unfilled
Search on, should
endsoon
Travis Barki,kv
sports editor
Three vacant coaching positions on
the men's and women's basketball
staffs here at ECU have yet to be
filled.
The women's head coaching
position has been open since April
15, when Anne Donovan resigned.
Donovan left ECU to accept the
head job with the Philadelphia
Rage, a professional team playing in
the American Basketball League.
On the men's team, Head Coach
Joe Dooley remains, but two of his
assistants have moved on. Lew Hill
and Lane Odom both left the Pirate
program in late April.
Hill accepted an assistant's job at
Texas A&M, while
Odom accepted a simi-
lar position at UNC
Charlotte.
A search committee
has been named to find
a new coach for the
women's team, but
there is no word on
when a coach will be
hired.
Assistant Athletics
Director Norm Reilly said th
committee is making
progress.
"The process is ongo-
ing Reilly said.
"There's not a specif-
ic deadline to hire a
coach by, but the dead-
line to apply for the job
has already passed
The search commit-
tee consists of Athletics
Director Mike Hamrick,
co-chair of the Shared
Visions Capital Campaign
Anne Donovan
FILE PHOTO
at the
Joe Dooley
FILE PHOTO
Bob
Ward, ECU Faculty
Athletics Chairman Ernie
Schwarz, Assistant Sports
Information Director
Joanna Sparkman, former
women's coach Rosie
Thompson and current
ECU! player Danielle
Melvin.
The decisions on the
men's team will be made
by Dooley.
"I think he's getting closer
Reilly said.
"Hopefully within a
week we will have those
positions filled
Dooley says that he
has received several
applications and will
make his decisions soon.
"There is a 30-day
mandate from the state to
advertise and hire for the
jobs Dooley said.
"I would say within
the next week to ten days
June 12 regionals kick off
State Games competition
Event amateur
equivalent to Olympics
Christopher R.
Farnsworth
staff writer
The amateur equivalent to the
Olympics for North Carolina is tak-
ing place this June. The 1998 State
Games of North Carolina are begin-
ning with regionals June 12-14 in
Morganton, High Point, Dunn and
Roanoke Rapids. Youth baseball,
youth basketball and youth soccer
are the events being held, along
with mountain biking and Softball
competition exclusively in
Roanoke Rapids.
From there, the games move to
the championships in Greensboro
June 19-28. There, teams and indi-
viduals will compete for a medal,
first taking gold, second silver, and
third place taking home the bronze,
a system identical to the Olympics.
The Games' coordinators and orga-
nizers feel the medal system creates
a more memorable and rewarding
award than a trophy or plaque,
especially for the younger partici-
pants.
A wide variety of sports are
offered including, baseball, basket-
ball, soccer, tennis, volleyball,
karate and tae kwon do, ice hockey
and in-line hockey, boys and girls
gymnastics,
archery and
many more.
Even disc golf
and shooting are
available. The
games offer ath-
letic competition
in a wide variety
of sports to most
ages and physical
and personal
development,
the organizers
feel.
One of those
coordinating the
event is Mick" Kulikowski.
Kulikowski believes that the
Games promote health and physical
fitness, along with a fair sense of
competition, as each sport has a dif-
ferent level of skill.
"Whether you're a coach potato
or a skilled athlete, you can com-
pete Kulikowski says. 'There are
different levels of skill, all of them
?
������ �'
providing health and physical
awareness
Another positive attribute to the
State Games is no age limitation.
Everyone, no matter their age or
experience, is able to play in any
sport.
"Last
year our
youngest
athlete was
four
Kulikowski
explains,
"and our
oldest was
84. Both
competed
in track and
field
Though
it is too late
to register
for most of
the sports for this year's Games,
some sports have on-site registra-
tion. Those sports are archery, disc
golf, karate, sailing, track and field
and wrestling. If interested in next
year's events, entry forms and infor-
mation may be obtained by writing
the State Games of North Carolina,
SEE GAMES. PAGE 7
"Whether you're a coach potato or
a skilled athlete, you can compete.
There are different levels of skill,
all of them providing health and
physical awareness
Mick Kulikowski.
Event coordinaioi
Murray
Tenness
named
BRENTWC
Murray St
De'Teri M
Tech two-sp
were nam�
Conference
Monday.
Mayes ed
terbacks in
State's Jonat
Fuentes of
win the men
eight first-pl
by the leag
and sports in
Mayes ai
21.5 points p
leading Mur
regular-seasc
titles. The R
son with a 25
ranking in
poll-
Seng beat
runner Jamie
the league's
country and
track.
Seng hel
Tech volley!
tournament t
tournament
led the Gold
ball team in
The team sh
lar-season titl
Mayes an
their award:
league's hot
Girardeau, M
I
RAMAH, La.
with any old
Rouge, and "
first places tl
memories spe
south Louisiai
Ramah? Tl
No this pi
removed from
Bible, but ca
take on biblic
the old time
stretch of road
Before his
fishing hole in
"Dub" Robir
levees and ba
home. When I
held its s
Robinson led
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mile long exp;
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nt
II Student Center.
ach Steve Logan.
led
CV Faculty
hairman Krnie
ssistant Sports
n Director
rkman, former
coach Rosic
and current
yer Danielle
.isions on the
will be made
;tting closer
ully within a
vill have those
lied
says that he
ived several
is and will
ecisions soon.
is a 30-day
om the state to
rid hire for the
ey said,
lid say within
days
)ff
n
and physical
ittribute to the
ige limitation,
r their age or
:o play in any
"Last
year our
youngest
athlete was
four
Kulikowski
explains,
"and our
oldest was
84. Both
competed
in track and
field
hough
it is too late
to register
for most of
year's Games,
l-site registra-
e archery, disc
rack and field
:rested in next
rms and infor-
led by writing
lorth Carolina,
AGE 7
7 Wednesday. June 3, 1998
sports
The Elit Carolinian
oTsrnr
Murray State's Mayes,
Tennessee Tech's Seng
named OVC's athletes
of year
BRENTWOOD, Tcnn. (AP) �
Murray State basketball star
De'Teri Mayes and Tennessee
Tech two-sport athlete Diane Seng
were named the Ohio Valley
Conference's athletes of the year
Monday.
Mayes edged out a pair of quar-
terbacks in Middle Tennessee
State's Jonathan Quinn and Simon
Fuentes of Eastern Kentucky to
win the men's award. He picked up
eight first-place votes in balloting
by the league's athletic directors
and sports information directors.
Mayes averaged a league-best
21.5 points per game last season in
leading Murray State to the OVC
regular-season and tournament
titles. The Racers finished the sea-
son with a 29-4 record and a No. 25
ranking in The Associated Press
poll.
Seng beat out Eastern Kentucky
runner Jamie King, who was named
the league's top runner in cross
country and indoor and outdoor
track.
Seng helped the Tennessee
Tech volleyball team to the OVC
tournament title and its first NCAA
tournament appearance. She also
led the Golden Eaglettes' basket-
ball team in scoring at 17.7 points.
The team shared the OVC's regu-
lar-season title.
Mayes and Seng will receive
their awards Thursday at the
league's honors lunch in Cape
Girardeau, Mo.
West Va. State names
new tennis coach
INSTITUTE, W.Va. (AP) � Scan
McAndrews has been named head
coach of both men's and women's
tennis teams for West Virginia State
College's 1998-99 season, school
officials announced.
McAndrews, who is the college's
director of compliance, academics
and sports information, will give up
his job as assistant coach of the col-
lege's women's basketball team.
The Weirton native replaces
Tom McClure who had coached
both teams since the 1995- sea-
son. McAndrews' previous experi-
ence with tennis came during grad-
uate school when he served as a
graduate assistant with West
Virginia University's intramural
department
Keebler resigns from
Alabama State, takes
job at Montevallo
MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) �
Peggy Keebler resigned Friday as
the interim coach of Alabama
State's women's basketball team
and said she was accepting the top
position at Montevallo.
Keebler, who was an assistant to
former coach Ron Mitchell for six
years before taking over the pro-
gram in March, is a graduate of
Montevallo.
Keebler was captain of the bas-
ketball team for two years and had
her number retired by the school
when her playing career ended in
1990.
"The opportunity to go back
and be the head coach of my alma
mater is a dream come true
Keebler said.
Pembroke names new
women's head tennis
coach, assistant
basketball coach
PEMBROKE, N.C. (AP) � The
University of North Carolina at
Pembroke has named Sandi
Mitchell head women's tennis
coach and assistant coach of the
women's basketball team.
Mitchell, a native of Ardmore,
Okla served as head women's bas-
ketball coach last year at Dana
College in Blair, Neb.
She assumes the dual role fol-
lowing the resignation of tennis
coach Brenda Burgess and the pro-
motion of assistant basketball coach
Beverly Justice to the head coach-
ing position.
Athletics Director Ray
Pennington announced the hiring
on Friday.
Four Gamecocks test
positive for marijuana
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) � Four
athletes and one nonathlete tested
positive for drug use in tests done
by the South Carolina athletic
department during the last school
year.
Results of the tests were
obtained by The Greenville News
on Monday under the state's
Freedom of Information Act.
Four athletes tested positive for
marijuana use and one person test-
ed positive for steroid use. South
Carolina- tests managers, trainers
Fishing spot still has
secluded charm, fish
RAMAH, La. (AP) � Talk fishing
with any old timer around Baton
Rouge, and "Ramah" is one of the
first places that come from long
memories spent on the hundreds of
south Louisiana waterways.
Ramah? The biblical place?
No this place is a half a world
removed from its description in the
Bible, but catches from the area
take on biblical proportions when
the old timers talk about this
stretch of road with reverence.
Before his passing to the great
fishing hole in the sky, tennis coach
"Dub" Robinson made Ramah's
levees and barrow pits his second
home. When the Atchafalaya River
held its spring floodwaters,
Robinson led expeditions of close
friends to a place where he could
wade the levees. He used a bateau
when he fished the pits, 20-plus-
mile long expanse of water on the
east side of the Atchafalaya
Floodway's East Guide Levee. The
pits were dug to provide the dirt
needed to construct the
Atchafalaya's massive levees.
Into the 1970s, only the most
adventuresome found a way to
Ramah. When I-10's concrete
stretched west of Baton Rouge,
Ramah was opened to the masses.
The area runs for at least 15 miles
south of the 1-10 exit and road-
accessible areas stretch about six
miles to the north of the shelled,
dirt road that runs at the foot of the
levee.
"I can remember trips in there
when I was a kid, and it was great
Lionel Kleinpeter recalled. "We fly
fished for bream and bass, and spin-
nerbaits caught bass you wouldn't
believe. I guess I learned to fish at
Ramah.
"It's not as good now, but I still
go there and still catch bass.
Sometimes I use a small boat to get
into small lakes off the bar pits and
have some great days there
Like Robinson, Kleinpeter rev-
eled in the days of high springtime
floods.
Taking his old DeSoto over the
levee, Robinson waded the flooded
levee banks. Bass and choupique
move into the flooded cockleburs
and clover to gorge on earthworms,
grubs and the shiners.
The problem for fishermen
these days is that the road leading
to the top of the levee is posted,
which leaves only the bar pits open
to bank fishermen. There are sever-
al primitive launching spots for
small boats along the pits. You can
also get to the pits from the east by
launching at Jack Miller's Landing,
which is west of Plaquemine.
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and cheerleaders as well as athletes.
The school did not identify those
who tested positive or the sports
they played.
South Carolina administered 743
random tests for alcohol and drug
use during the 1997-98 academic
year and 82 tests for steroids.
Last year there were 643 random
tests, with four positives for mari-
juana and one for a prescription
drugs. None of the 54 tests for
steroids was positive.
Agency seeks larger
bass
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) The
Tennessee Wildlife Resources
Agency is experimenting by stock-
ing Florida largemouth bass in
state-run lakes.
The agency hopes the northern
largemouth, which inhabits most of
the state's waters, will cross with
the Florida fish.
"This is going to be something
that takes time said biologist
Danny Scott.
Bill Reeves, chief of fisheries
who came to Tennessee from
Alabama, has had experience with
stocking Florida bass.
"Our objective is to increase the
catch of largemouth bass in the 8- to
13-pound range he said.
Tennessee's largemouth record
is 14 pounds 8 ounces, caught in
1954.
A similar stocking program in
Virginia has produced bass weigh-
ing 16 pounds.
Games
continued from page 6
PO Box 12727, Research
Triangle Park, NC 27709. They
can also be reached by calling
North Carolina Amateur Sports at
1-800-277-8763, e-mail
ncas@interpath.com, or on the
internet at www.ncsports.org.
The Games are also looking for
volunteers for office duties, data
entry, ticket 'taking, merchandise
sales, score keeping and coordi-
nating one of the 23 sports. If
interested, contact Linda Smith
at 1-800-277-8763 or (919) 361-
1133.
Have an Escape
BE FIRE-SAFE
Prepare and practice fire escape
plans with your family.
United States file Administration
federal Emergency Monogement Agency
http:www.gifa.faaH.aav
Recruits
continued from page 6
season. They are in contention for
the conference and are hoping to
win the state championship which
they are hosting.
"Hosting the championship
puts it at a different intensity
Ford said.
For the first time ECU cross
country is representing each class.
There are freshmen, sophomore,
junior and senior runners. All in all,
ECU cross country expects to have
a good year full of potential runners
waiting to be developed.
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8
Wtjntiiiy, Jum 3, 1998
The East Carolinian
FOR RENT
ROOM FOR RENT: CLEAN, re-
sponsible person needed to share
new 3 bedroom house. $225 plus
utilities. 2 miles from campus. Up-
perclassman or grad student
preferred. Available July 1st. 752-
2116.
ROOMMATE WANTED: 2 respon-
sible students looking for 1 room-
mate to share nice 3 BR duplex.
Fenced in yard, back deck, WD.
dishwasher, central heat and air.
Great location) Available now! 830-
692I.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bed apt $295
mo avail, now. Tanglewood Apts
125 Avery St Greenville. 758-6596
TRAILER ON PRIVATE LOT behind
home, to responsible individual,
$150. Contact Maggie at 756-0438.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED,
share 2 bedroom, 1 12 bath
townhouse, $225, 12 phoneutili-
ties, on ECU bus route. Call 766-
7128, leave message. Need ASAP.
2 MALE ROOMMATES NEEDED
for Fall to share 3400 sq. ft. home
near campus, $250 per month, 15
utilities. Ask for Tim, 931-9165.
HOUSE FOR RENT: 302 Lewis St
3 BR, LR, OR. kitchen, central AC,
garage. 5 min. walk from campus.
No pets. $750mo. 919-504-2052.
leave message.
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
wanted to fill 6 bedroom house.
$225 per month. Split food and utili-
ties. Two blocks from campus. Call
919-438-4427.
ECU AREA, CLEAN, two bedroom.
Quiet neighborhood, central heat,
window air. Off street parking, small
pets OK. Call 830-9502.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED,
share three bedroom. 2 12 bath
townhouse $225, 12 phone and
utilities on ECU bus route. Call 919-
3354917. Leave message. Needed
July or August 1st.
SUMMER ROOMMATE. CUTE
apartment, your own bedroom and
bathroom, washerdryer in apart-
ment, very close to campus. Call
Kathleen 752-2705.
TWO BEDROOM, 2 BATH in
Dockside for rent. If interested,
please call 551-3455.
ECU AREA, 3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
central gas heat and window AC
unit. Washer, dryer included, pets
OK. $550.00 month, yard work in-
cluded. Call 830-9502.
ROOMMATE WANTED: ONE FE-
MALE, non-smoker, studious. 4 bed-
room, 2 bath house, $215 monthly
plus utilities, near ECU bus stop.
ASAP contact 752-0281.
DOCKSIDE: 2 ROOMMATES
needed, M or F to share 3 bedroom
apt. Dishwasher, washerdryer, AC,
storage, rear patio, close to campus
bus $250 13 utilities. Amy, 757-
8781.
2000 SQ.FT. HOME, 4 bedrooms.
3 baths, extra large fenced-in back-
yard, washer �r dryer, near ECU &
PCMH, $800 per month, purchase
available. 524-5790.
HELP WANTED
BARMAID FOR COUNTRY pool
room and bar. Players Retreat, call
after 3:00 p.m. 758-6856.
HIRING - MUST HAVE car and driv-
ers license, yard sign delivering for
a local company - Good pay, flexible
schedule, steady work, yard signs
are easy to handle, take from one
job-site to the next. Paid per sign.
Page Tim at 551-7156 (Handy Help-
ers, Inc.). 2 positions available.
NEEDEDI SOMEONE TO do
teleservicing and selling of office
furniture. Must be enthusiastic, posi-
tive and willing to work. Call 931-
6904 and leave a message.
OFFICE WORK � GOOD PHONE
communication skills and computer
experience needed. Quickbooks Pro,
Excel, Word. Good pay, flexible
schedule, casual dress work environ-
ment. Call Tim at pager 551-7156
andor send your resume tobPO Box
3166, Greenville. NC 27836 or fax to
756-6632. (Handy Helpers, Inc.) 2-3
positions available.
AIM HIGH - AIR FORCE - Put your
science of engineering degree to
work for an aerospace leader. Con-
sider being an Air Force officer. Ex-
cellent training and benefits. For a
free information package, call 1-800-
423-USAF.
GREENVILLE RECREATION &
PARKS Department Gymnastics In-
structor needed for 3-7 year olds.
Basic tumbling and floor exercises -
June 15 to July 10, 4:007:00 p.m.
Call 8304542 to apply immediately.
STUDENTS: LOOKING FOR part-
time work with flexible hours so you
can still enjoy your Summer vaca-
tion. The ECU TeleFund is now hir-
ing for Summer and Fall. $5.60 per
hour plus bonus. Contact the
Telefund Office between 2 and 5 M-
Th at 32B-4212.
DJ'S WANTED: MUST KNOW va-
riety in music: alternative, classic
rock, techno, top 40, strong influ-
ence in dance. Call The Cellar, 762-
4668.
FOR SALE
'89 DODGE RAM 350 work van.
Complete with cage. Good condi-
tion. Asking $3200. Call Chris at
768-5930.
SWEET DREAMS still remaining in
this queen size mattress and box
springs. Good condition, excellent
appearance. Only $40! Leave mes-
sage at 752-3470.
OTHER
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(9X9) 496-2X24
MY NAME IS GIDGET. I am a
sweet, black lab mix, approx. 6 mos.
Dapper
Dan's
Big Summer Sate
10-75 OFF
old (female). I was found abandoned
near a trailer in New Bern with no
food or water. I have been taken in
temporarily but I need to find a lov-
ing home. If you'd like tohelp me,
please call 252-638-6617.
GOV'T. FORECLOSED HOMES
from pennies on $1. Delinquent tax,
repo's. REO's. Your area. Toll Free 1-
800-218-9000 ext. H-3726 for cur-
rent listings.
FREE CASH GRANT8I College
scholarships. Business. Medical bills.
Never repay. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000, ext. G-3726.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175.
Porsches, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMWs,
Corvettes. Also Jeeps, 4WDs. Your
area. Toll free 1-800-218-9000, ext.
A-3726.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
DO YOU WANT TO know how to
soar like an eagle? Do you want to
know how to resurrect your God
given dream? Do you want to know
how to reach your fullest potential
in life? Then attend Community
Christian Church Achiever Fellow-
ship Breakfast, Saturday. June 13 at
9AM at Community Christian
Church, located at 1104 N. Memo-
rial Drive. Pastor James Corbett will
be sharing biblical principles that
will transform your life. Call 551-
9143 for more information.
GREENVILLE RECREATION &
PARKS Summer Tennis Programs,
8304559. Registration thru May
June. Programs run 616-731.
Youth: 5 year-olds TuTh 8 a.m.9
a.m 6-10 year-olds MWF 8910
11 a.m 11-18 IntermediateAd-
vanced TWTh 10 a.m 11-15 Be-
ginners TuTh 5:30 p.m Adult: be-
ginner MW 6 p.m Intermediate
MW 7 p.m.
TESTTAKINQ: Tuesday 3:304:30.
The Center for Counseling and Stu-
dent Development is offering this
workshop June 9th. If you are in-
terested, contact the Center at 328-
6661.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STU-
DENT Center wishes to welcome
Summer Students and invite you to
worship with us. Sunday Mass
schedule: 11:30 a.m. and 8:30 p.m
Wednesdays: 5:30 p.m. The
Newman Catholic Center is located
at 953 E. 10th Street, two houses
form Fletcher Music Building. Call
757-1991.
cartoonists
cartoonists
CARTOONISTS!
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
$100 OFF
curity Deposit
Secur
1 f
with prtwnlation ef this coupon, ottw ��piras
arat98 not vaM with any ottw coupon :
-WE6UY COMMON SOUTH: totj b�droorn$,
1 bath, range, refrigerator, trae watersewer,
washerdryer hookups, tree basic cable in
some units, laundry facilities, 5 blocks Irom
campus, ECU bus services.
-LANG8TON PARK: 2 Bedrooms. 1 bath
range, refrigerator dishwasrmr, free
watersewer, and basic cable, approx. 900 sq.
ft wisherdryer hookups, central heatafr, 6
blocks'lrom campus,
COMPLETStV flENOWED UNITS AVAILABLE.
-All Properties nave 24 hr. emergency maintenance-
rropemj f I
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Need iMvtntBd boott
and uhoaaf Good jeans, i
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00,2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door & ring buzzer.
comics
BE A CARTOONIST
GET YOUR STRIP PUBLISHED
GET A PAYCHECK
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR SUMMER CARTOONISTS.
APPLY IN PERSON AT THE OFFICES OF
eastcarolinian
in the Student Pubs Building
Uf� 0nTcK25dOJ)
Chris knotts XjMdlrWg
kl Mites
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Orfc Knott5 Traoc�
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WEDNESDAY
JUNE 10,1998
Ser
$3millio
forsrierwe,
WlLI
Senator Ed Wai
bills to appropri
ty's Science am
multipurpose i
Pri
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PCMH was o
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But only a wee
against the decis
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ical centers such
Doug Boyd, hos
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herself, and
Affordable Com
ence on May 4-9

the east


Title
The East Carolinian, June 3, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 03, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1275
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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