The East Carolinian, May 5, 1998






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TUESDAY
MAYS. 1998
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
Board of Governors awards incoming freshmen
Marks for teaching excellence mrget of card scam
Prizes include$7,500,
bronze medallion
Carolyn Robbins Hide
staff writer
Dr. Richard Marks, professor of bio-
chemistry at the ECU School of
Medicine, was presented the Board
of Governors Award for Excellence
in Teaching April 29.
Presenting the
award was UNC-sys-
tem President Molly
Corbett Broad and
Board of Governors
Chairperson C.
Clifford Cameron, Jr.
One faculty mem-
ber from each of the 16
UNC campuses
received a commemo-
rative bronze medal-
lion and a $7,500 cash
prize. The 16 recipi-
ents, representing an array of acade-
mic disciplines, were nominated by
campuses and selected by the
Board of Governors Committee on
Teaching Awards, chaired by G.
Irvin Aldridge of Manteo.
In an interview a few days
before the awards ceremony, Marks
described himself as "over-
whelmed" at receiving the honor.
He received ECU's Teaching
Excellence Award in 1995.
Described by colleagues as a "mas-
ter of clarity Marks has been
praised by current and former stu-
dents for his ability to present bio-
chemistry in a way
that's logical, con-
cise and Interest-
ing.
Cory men-
tioned as assets,
Marks' computer-
assisted learning
programs he has
developed, thor-
ough knowledge of
his field and avail-
ability to students
from those prepar-
ing to enter med-
ical school to those at the graduate
level.
"All of us in the
department are better
because of working
with Dick Marks
Dr. Joseph Cory
Chairperson, department
of biochemistry
Professor Richard Marks was presented the award for
excellence in teaching by the Board of Governors April 29.
PHOTO BY SABRINA THOMAS
special committees on their home Marks has been a member of the
Students
volunteer
with elderly
For more information
www.tec.ecu.edu
9 disciplines
receive experience
ECU faculty since 1976. Marks has
been at the forefront in using com-
puter modules to demonstrate com-
plex concepts and reinforce learn-
attract more
ing, and he willingly
works with other
faculty members to
help them develop
similar approaches.
"The depart-
ment of biochem-
istry does a good job
teaching our materi-
al to our students,
and all of us in the
department are bet-
ter because of work-
ing with Dick
Marks said Dr.
Joseph Cory, chair-
person of the
department of bio-
chemistry.
During the April
29 ceremony, Marks
was lauded for vol-
unteering to tutor
struggling one-on-
one and in small
groups, while his
voluntary weekly
review sessions
than two-thirds of all
SEE MARKS. PAGE 2
Craig D. Ramey
SENIOR WRITER
A campus-wide volunteer project
brings students close to an elderly
community. This is all in an effort
to bring the two generations clos-
er together through hands-on pro-
jects.
The Tillery Learn and Serve
Project helps Tillery, an isolated
rural community outside of Rocky
Mount with a high percentage of
elderly residents. Each semester,
people from the nine different
disciplines involved come togeth-
er and work on a community pro-
ject for Tillery.
"Over 100 ECU students have
received hands-on training and
education through their work
with the concerned citizens of the
Tillery community center said
LaKeshia Ellis, Tillery volunteer.
Eight different disciplines,
including nutrition, health ed. and
exercise and sports science, have
been involved in the Tillery
Learn and Serve Project for over
three years. The ECU Med
School has been a part of the pro-
SEE VOLUNTEERS. PAGE 2
1.5 million phony
cards sold in 1997
Mohamed Hussein
staff writer
A scam has been unveiled dealing
specifically with campus identifica-
tion cards.
A company called the National
College Registration Board
(NCRB) sent out
millions of junk
mail letters to grad-
uating high school
seniors urging
them to purchase a
Campus Card in
preparation for
their entrance into
college.
"What they did
was send out let-
ters all over the
country telling the
incoming college
freshmen that they
could use this card
as a certified col-
lege ID, meal and
bookstore debit
card said Jennifer Sutton, director
of the ECU One Card department.
Approximately 1.5 million cards
were purchased in 1997 at $20
apiece. National colleges and uni-
versities have not acknowledged
the Campus Card, therefore mak-
ing NCRB's card worthless.
Freshmen purchasing the card may
enter college expecting to use their
new card, but will end up having to
obtain a special card for their insti-
tution.
Many college representatives
have filed law suits against NCRB
in petition.
"What has been done is a Cease
and Desist letter has been forward-
ed to the company on April 24
said Ben Irons, university attorney.
"We have asked them to inform us
of the remedial action they arc
going to take to
clear up the
confusion
However,
the web site of
NCRB,
www.campus-
card.org, looks
quite authen-
tic. The main
page is
emblazened
with an intel-
lectual reef
donned with a
book in the
middle of it.
The site also
has a mission
statement that
boasts that the company "endeav-
ors to improve the daily lives of col-
lege students across the country by
providing them with as many
unique benefits and services as pos-
SEE FRESHMEN. PAGE 2
"What they did was send out
letters all over the country
telling the incoming college
freshmen that they could use
this card as a certified college
ID, meal and bookstore debit
card
Jennifer Sutton
Ditecior. One Card Department
Health Promotion continues
alcohol awareness campaign
Students win money,
peer recognition
Seniors buy graduation caps and gowns at the last moment in preparation for the May 16 commencement ceremony. The office of
Student Development, Division of Student Life will also host a ceremony to bid farewell to seniors May 6 in Mendenhall, Room221.
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPE
Office of Student Development, Student Life
division bid seniors farewell with ceremony
Ceremony to help grads
deal with fears
Natasha Phillips
senior writer
The Office of Student
Development, on behalf of the
Division of Student Life, says
goodbye to the class of 1998.
A farewell tribute has been
scheduled for Wednesday from 7-8
p.m. The ceremony will be held in
the Mendenhall Student Center,
Room 221.
"I want as
many seniors as
possible to
attend, espe-
cially those
individuals
who are appre-
hensive about
their future
said Dr. Martha
Wisbey, dean
of student
development.
"It's important
that graduating
Martha Wisbey,
Dean of Student
Development
FILE PHOTO
seniors realize that they're not
alone. Others are also experiencing
the same fears and difficulties
"This program will give seniors
the opportunity to make time to
identify what is important to
them said Dr. Donna Walsh,
director of health promotion and
well-being. "It also helps students
close this particular chapter in their
lives and prepare for the next
According to Walsh, the average
senior is currently experiencing
aloneness, separation anxiety and
an intense fear of the unknown.
SEE SENIORS PAGE 3
Natasha Phillips
senior writer
The Office of Health Promotion
and Well-Being is continuing to
promote campus-wide alcohol
awareness.
"Our goals are to make students
aware that misperceptiots
about alcohol and other
drugs do exist and
decrease the use and
abuse of alcohol and other
drugs on our campus
Laura Derrickson said.
The "What's Really
Happening at ECU" cam-
paign is currently offering
students the opportunity
to win money andor peer
recognition.
"I won $5 for posting
the campaign's purple
flyer, Dbuglas Hoskins
said. "It's always nice winning
money
To further publicize the project,
officials have chosen to use popular
movie characters.
"Agent J, Agent K and the Alien
from Men In Black have been vis-
iting on-campus dining halls and
attracting attention with a boom
box, music and costumes,
Derrikson said. "They will contin-
ue to make appearances until the
end of the semester
The Men In Black characters are
being used to help educate and
inform the student body about the
survey results from last spring's
alcohol and other drug student use
survey.
"I think the program is benefi-
cial because it exposes students to
factual statistics said Agent K,
Antonio Raynor. "Even
if they don't believe
them, they're going to
take notice
ECU has long been
stereotyped as a party
school; however, the
survey's findings indi-
cate that ECU is no dif-
ferent from other
schools in their student
involvement with alcoT
hoi.
"The statistic make
students think about
what's really happen-
ing the Alien said.
The campaign isn't without its
critics. Some students question the .
study's reliability and accuracy.
Skeptics often believe that the sur-
veyed individuals lied.
SEE ALCOHOL. PAGE 4
Donna Walsh.
Health Promotion
and Well Being
FILE PHOTO
TODAY
Thunderstorms
high 77
low 60
TOMORROW
Thunderstorms
high 83
low 56
Opinion
fD Lifestyle
Sports
Go to your
graduation; you
deserve it
Graduate
exhibition shows
high leyel of
talent
EjOnline Survey
Softball drops
conference for
second consecutive
year
www.tec.ecu.edu
'Should Sal Oemarco be fired?"
95 No 4 Yes
the east Carolinian STUDENT PUBLICATION BLDG, GREENVILLE, NC 27858 across from Joyner library - newsroom- 328-6366 advertising 328-2000 fax 328-6558 website www.tec.ecu.edu





2 Twttdn, May 5, 1998
news
The Ent Ctrolinian
.news
briefs
Bush, Aidrin help
rededicate Wright
Brothers Monument
KILL DEVIL HILLS (AP) �
The monument that marks man's
first powered flight was rededicated
Saturday amid fireworks, patriotic
music and speeches by a former
Navy pilot who became president
and an astronaut who walked on
the moon, The relighting of the
beacon atop the Wright Brothers
National Memorial capped a trib-
ute to American ingenuity and the
conquest of air.
Woman charged with
harboring fugitive,
wantedgunman
RALEIGH (AP) � A woman sus-
pected of hiding the surviving gun-
man from a McDonald's restaurant
standoff in Massachusetts has been
charged with harboring a fugitive.
Patricia Faulkner Hodge, 27, was
arrested Wednesday and is being
held in the county jail without bond
pending a court appearance May
21. Police believe she hid Kevin E.
Jackmon, 30, who has been sought
since two gunmen held 13 cus-
tomers and employees hostage
Sunday night at a New Bedford,
Mass McDonald's during a
botched robbery.
across
the
Teen-agers fix problem
cars, drive them
across finish line
DEARBORN, Mich. (AP) �Two
students fixed a car and drove it
across the finish line in 25 minutes
to win this year's FordAAA
Student Auto Skills contest on
Saturday. Scott Guenther and
Matthew Naebeck of Saline High
School successfully identified and
fixed the bugs in a 1998 Ford
. Taurus in 25 minutes, 34 seconds.
' The two won a 1998 Lincoln train-
ing car for their school and will be
able to pick from scholarships
worth $50,000.
DNA tests show
remains are Hitler's
private secretary
FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) �
Genetic tests show that remains
found in Berlin are of Hitler's pri-
vate secretary, Martin Bormann,
who helped organize the Holocaust
and was rumored to have escaped
Germany after World War II. DNA
specialist Wolfgang Eisenmenger
concluded the remains were indeed
Bormann's by matching samples
with those of one of Bormann's liv-
ing relatives, newspaper and maga-
zine reports said Sunday.
13 hacked to death in
tribal violence in
Eastern India
GAUHATI, India (AP) � A mob of
heavily armed tribals ambushed a
bus carrying members of a rival
tribe in a thick forest in India's
northeastern Assam state Sunday,
hacking to death 13 people and
injuring five others, police said.
The Bodo tribals emerged from the
dense Ribu forest in the mountain-
ous Kokrajhar region to surround
the bus, forcing all the 50 travelers
from the Santhal tribe to get down.
At least seven men, five women
and a child were shot and hacked,
Kokrajhar district magistrate S.
Thadou told The Associated Press.
UNC-system President's inauguration
more costly than N.C. Governor's
Boy's suicide linked
to homebrew
AMBLER (AP) � Alaska State
Troopers investigating the hanging
death of a 17-year-old Ambler boy
say alcohol was a factor. Another vil-
lage teen is accused of making
homebrew. Troopers say the appar-
ent suicide occurred Friday.
Another 17-year-old boy, whose
name was not released, was accused
of making alcohol in the Interior
village, where liquor is banned
under local law.
Freshmen
continued from page 1
sible The company promises that
the card can be used to get dis-
counts at participating stores, but
the stores are limited to NCRB's
home state of New Jersey. The
company has added a disclaimer to
the site in response to negative
feedback from universities that it
falsely accepted the card.
According to Irons the university
will not take any action against
NCRB if they make the necessary
to take ECU off of the list of uni-
versities that supposedly support
the card, officials will contact the
Consumer Protection division of
the attorney general and file for an
investigation. Irons said he is still
awaiting a reply from NCRB.
Both Sutton and Irons said that
for now, the main issue is protection
of incoming freshmen. Irons said
that there has been discussion of a
letter mailed out to all incoming
freshmen alerting them of the scam,
and a distribution of information to
local high school seniors.
"What I'm going to do is contact
the guidance counselors at the area
high schools and tell them to inform
their students of the scam going
Doubled price funded,
primarily by donations
Melanie Hackworth
staff writer
The estimated expense' of Molly
Broad's inauguration as UNC-
System president is more than the
cost of the governor's 1997 inaugu-
ration. At an estimated $280,000,
the cost of Broad's inauguration
more than doubles that of the N.C.
governor's $107,258 cost.
Broad's inauguration is funded
partially by private donations. The
Assistant Vice President for
Communications of the UNC-sys-
tem, Joni Worthington, estimates
that about $135,000 of the grand
total is given by private donors.
According to Worthington, the
governor's inauguration and Broad's
inauguration are two different
types of things.
"It is not an apples to apples
comparison to the governor's inau-
guration Worthington said.
Gov. Hunt's spokeswoman, Gina
Arthur, emphasized that the inau-
gurations are not in competition
with each other.
"These are officials that are
working together to promote educa-
tion Arthur said. "They are not in
competition with each other
The components of Broad's
buunc
April 28, 1998
Arrest Warrant � A resident of
Scott Hall was arrested based on a
warrant for arrest for simple assault.
Dispute � A student reported
another student made threatening
statements and gestures to her
while they were working in a com-
puter lab in Austin. The com-
plainant declined prosecution
Intoxicated Subject � Staff mem-
bers in the Student Recreation
Center reported an intoxicated per-
son who refused to leave the build-
ing. Officers escorted the non-stu-
dent from the building and advised
him that Recreational Services had
banned him from the center for one
year.
Suspicious Activity � A staff mem-
ber reported being approached on
the second floor of Austin. The
subject asked the staff member to
pose for photographs.
Assault � A student of Scott Hall
was served an arrest warrant west of
Scott Hall. The arrest stemmed
from an assault that occurred at
Mendenhall Student Center last
Saturday during a dance.
Communicating
ThreatsThreatening Phone Calls
� A resident of Jones Hall reported
a non-student threatened to kill her
at an off-campus location. The
complainant stated that when she
returned to her room, she had two
threatening phone messages from
the non-student. The magistrate
found no probable cause for a war-
rant; however, the accused was
banned from campus.
April 27,1998
Larceny � A resident of Cotten
Hall reported the larceny of a
microwave, jewelry and videocas-
settes from her room.
Driving While Impaired � A stu-
dent was arrested for driving while
impaired. The student was driving
on College Hill Drive at a high rate
of speed when she was stopped.
April 26, 1998
Criminal Damage to Property &
Breaking & Entering a Building �
An officer discovered that person(s)
unknown had attempted to break
into Building C located at the
Quadrangle. A window was broken
on the northwest side of the build-
ing. A window blind was damaged
during the attempted breaking and
entering.
Volunteers
continued from page 1
ject for 10.
"Every third Saturday the Med
School has a clinic Ellis said.
Other projects include a basket-
ball court built by ambulatory
health, and walking trail built by
recreational and leisure studies.
Occupational and physical therapy
is taking an interdisciplinary
approach to rural community ser-
vices. Health education sponsored a
Officials from many campuses attended the inauguration
ceremony of UNC-System President Molly Broad.
PHOTO COURTESY OF NEWS BUREAU
inauguration turned out to be the
most expensive in the entire state.
Worthington attributes a large
amount of the cost to state-wide
public television coverage.
"There was clearly an effort to
make this a state-wide event
Marks
continued from page 1
first-year medical students � a tes-
tament to their usefulness.
Marks believes a good teacher
must be demanding, and not in a
mean-spirited way.
"Most people will tend to live
up (or down) to the expectations
others have of them, and in a stu-
Worthington said.
Several pricey
events ensured a hefty
inauguration price tag.
A private dinner was
funded entirely by pri-
vate donations. The
following day there was
an annual luncheon to
honor teachers. In the
afternoon groups from
most of the campuses
in the UNC-systcm
gave musical perfor-
mances or presented art exhibits. In
addition, events took place across
the state at most of the campuses in
the UNC-system.
dent-teacher situation, if the
teacher has high expectations of
the student, the student is more
likely to be motivated to work hard
to learn Marks wrote in his phi-
losophy of teaching for the awards
committee.
When asked what makes a good
teacher, "I think you have to like
what you are teaching and to enjoy
the interaction and sharing of infor-
mation with the students and
watching them develop as learn-
ers Marks said.
dents recently prepared a luncheon
for a national conference for learn
and serve projects held in Tillery.
The Tillery program also offers an
after-school program for children.
"This program is a link between
the community and the school
said Tracie Smith, Tillery business
manager.
The Tillery Learn and Serve
project is made possible by the
Learn and Serve American Grant.
Although Tillery just began its third
year of grant funding, it recently had
a celebration commemorating the
10 year partnership between ECU
and Tillery.
togratulations
vraduates!
The East Carolina University Honors
Program congratulates the following
1998 graduates on earning General
Education and University Honors:
Carole Elizabeth Corr-University Honors in Nursing
Emily Marlowe Aowcoci-University Honors in Music
Amena Sarvat assaw-University Honors in English
Jennifer Irene Hathaway�Jnxersiy Honors in Education
Emily Kathryn Linnemeier�University Honors in English
Amanda Lynne Staney-University Honors in Math
Ellen Marie H'�ry�University Honors in Psychology
Congratulations to the following 1998
graduates on earning
General Education Honor
Laura Lvnn Beer
Amy Leigh Berry
Richard Thomson Cornwell
Jennifer Elizabeth Emswiler
Betsv J. Folland
Gemma Michelle Foust
Marv Beth Friend
Amber Nicole Gaines
Nicole Denise Gray
Mark Gregory Harritan
Shannon Joy Hooks
Angela Fave Cox Jones
Matthew Stuart Lane
Jennifer Shelton Licko
Bradie Lynn Wood Loeffel
John Marshall Lov
Gena Nicole Max
Alice Hocutt Murray
Jodv Iee Mvers
Christine Anne Northrut
Aneela Marie Parrish
Lisa Marie Pursell
Kathv Wiggins Sheppard
Maria Lynn Tripp
Lisa Kay Trivette
Juliana Leith Whitehurst
Barbara Leigh Wood
Brandy Dale Wood
Honors Students are invited to attend the Honors
Recognition Ceremony on Thursday, May 7, 1998, at 5 p.m.
in the Great Room of Mendenhall Student Center.
The ceremony will also honor Dr. Sanders upon his
retirement from the Honors Program.
"Change is
ducing Walsf
or flight' anim:
create the ener
ever stressors
something nev
The conci
becoming a r
forced to deal
future. Panic
gram may les
strengthen opt
"I encoura
attend Wedn
Wisbey said. "
reflect and shai
primarily focu
dent's feeling
ment to this ca
Past gradual
their mark on c
something to
Make every day
Mother's Day
1-800-COLLECT





3 Tuiidiy. Miy 5, 1998
news
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8, at 5 p.m.
Center.
pon his
Ed Warren runs for state senate, District 9
For more information
www.tec.ecu.edu
Supports tobacco
farmers in NC
TK Jones
STAFF WRITF.R
Ed Warren, incumbent
What are your thoughts concerning
the possible delay of the May
Primary because of the problems
with the 12th Congressional
District?
I'm disappointed that they chose to
Seniors
continued from page 1
your stance on
the hog opera- R) Warren,
tions and your District 9 incumbent
thoughts on ��f hoto
hog waste pol-
lution?
We sent a very comprehensive bill to
Raleigh that was agreed upon by the
House. I think it needs time to work
before we start doing more. This gave
hog operators a two year moratorium
on building more operations unless they
had certain guidelines. Then we attached
the Clean Water Act to that. Right now
we got inspectors investigating these
operations and the water situation; but
it takes time for them to work accord-
ingly.
� Gov. Hunt has proposed a new
child health insurance plan for the
working, low income families. Do
you think it will work?
It must work. The Senate and I
agreed with the governor. But the House
hasn 't been able to work it out. They (the
House) want to spend $200 million
and give tax credits. We in the Senate
agree we need to give some tax credits,
and we 'II do it at the appropriate time.
But this isn't what the conference is
about. Conferees were appointed to come
to a conclusion and this has been going
on for two weeks. Until they come to an
agreement, I've cut off my per diem and
have chosen to not receive it until they
have come to a conclusion and go to vote
on it. Twenty-seven million dollars is a
great exchange for nearly $80 million
worth of insurance.
In light of severalscandals on the
"Change is always anxiety-pro-
ducing Walsh said. "It is the 'fight
or flight' animal reaction that helps
create the energy to deal with what-
ever stressors are involved with
something new
The concept of change is
becoming a reality and some are
forced to deal with an uncertain
future. Participation in this pro-
gram may lessen skepticism and
strengthen optimism.
"I encourage all students to
attend Wednesday's program
Wisbey said. "It allows students to
reflect and share. 'So Long Seniors'
primarily focuses upon the stu-
dent's feeling of personal attach-
ment to this campus community
Past graduating classes have left
their mark on campus by donating
something to the university; this
"Many people pass through
our lives and many events
happen in our lifetime. We
By doing so,
students are indi-
rectly addressing
elements of clo-
sure and saying
goodbye to their
adopted home.
"Closure is
may be done by
seniors this year as
well.
"People like to
leave their mark,
show that they have
'passed this way
Walsh said. "We like
to believe that we don't always have the chance necessary
matter, and make a Walsh said. "We
difference. Maybe to take time to mark the pass- have a beginning,
that urge to write our a middle and an
name in wet cement ing and tie up loose ends. end. Many peo-
is connected to ani- pie pass through
mal behavior of Sometimes loose ends or our lives and
marking our territo- many events
ry unfinished business can get in happen in our
"Many students lifetime. We
want to leave their the way of US moving on to the don't always have
the chance to
take time to
mark the passing
and tie up loose
ends.
Sometimes loose
ends or unfin-
ished business can get in the way of
us moving on to the new parts of
our lives
mark, which is visual
evidence of their
physical presence
Wisbey said. "If stu-
dents are interested
in generating con-
structive possibili-
ties, they should unify, discuss their
options and choose a symbolic rep-
resentation of their class
new parts of our lives
Donna Walsh
Director of Health Promanon and Well Being
Board of Transportation, such as
members resigning because of sus-
pected illegal influence, should a
different way of
selecting board
members be con-
sidered?
think we need
to keep the board,
but I would agree to
some possible
changes. I think the
General Assembly
could come up with
something that's a
good representation
of all the people and
fair. The General
Assembly and the
governor should
both select the mem-
bers.
The State Transportation bud-
get projected a $500 million cut for
Walsh feels that students should
deal with their emotions and find a
way to say good-bye to friends,
peers and professors.
"I suggest that people think
about how they want to say good-
bye to other people, places and
things Walsh said. "Ask 'What is
important? What do I feel I've left
as unfinished?' Then make time to
address those things. It might be as
simple as a last hug, a 'thank you
or time in that favorite place. Be
creative
"Achieving closure signifies an
acknowledgement of an end; how-
ever, it also recognizes the birth of
opportunity Wisbey said.
"College isn't just about earning a
degree. It's about life choices
"ECU values what and who you
are Wisbey said. "After gradua-
tion, you'll leave and achieve suc-
cess. Always remember that you
represent ECU and always know
that you'll be a pirate forever
For additional information about
the scheduled program, please call
Dr. Martha Wisbey at 328-4223.
the Kinston Global TransPark.
What are your thoughts on this?
represent the area of the GTP and
was one of
the ones
who help
get it here. I
think we
need to go
ahead and
get it fund-
ed and get
it off the
ground.
The $500
million is
advanced
planning
money.
That's
what they
were recommending we anticipate over
a length of time. Research Triangle Park
in Raleigh took several years to get off
I think parents should take some
responsibility to protect the chil-
dren, and we should all protect the
children to the extent that we can
without taking the rights away
from everyone else.
Ed Warren
NC Senate
the ground, and now it's one of the best
in the country. GTP is just as capable of
achieving success as RTP was.
Do you foresee a working eco-
nomic plan that can adequately pro-
tect the beleaguered tobacco
farmer?
I'm a tobacco farmer and what I'm
concerned about is the way they target
one product. I think parents should take
some responsibility to protect the chil-
dren, and we should all protect the chil-
dren to the extent that we can without
taking the rights away from everyone
else. Tobacco's a legal product in
America, and farmers in North
Carolina cannot farm any thing else and
make a living. We build centers for alco-
holics and drug addicts, and prisons are
filled with people who have used and
abused these substances, but people are
on a bandwagon to control a legalized
product.
across
other
campuses
UNC-Chapel Hill
makes virtual step
into virtual reality
UNC-Chapel Hill's department of
computer science has made a virtu-
al step in virtual reality.
The department, which is locat-
ed on campus, devotes an entire
floor to the development of virtual
reality.
Computer science Professor
Ken Jeffay said the term "virtual
reality" was coined about ten years
ago, but his department has
researched related technologies for
about 30 years.
Architects can use virtual tech-
nology developed in the depart-
ment's Walkthrough project to view
buildings before they build them.
In the future, surgeons could use
advances from the department's
augmented-reality research to
make biopsies easier.
UNC's researchers are focusing
on enhancing breast biopsies.
Currently, a surgeon can perform a
biopsy by inserting a long needle
into the breast and extracting a tis-
sue sample.
The surgeon would watch the
operation while watching an image
of the inside of the breast on a tele-
vision screen. This image is created
using ultrasound, which shows an
SEE CAMPUSES. PAGE S
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4 ninety, Miv 5. 1988
news
The East Carolinian
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Cot Something to say?
Need somewhere to say it?
8r
Write a Letter to the Editor
and let your view be heard
:SS�
line I � �
eastcarolinian
Bring all letters to
our office which
is located on the 2nd Floor of
The Student Publications Building J
�x
�x
x
'X
'X
'X
X
X
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'X
X
x
Doors open: 7:30 pm
Stage Time: 9:00 pm
SILVER
BULLET
M
'A Touch OfCCcLK
756-6278
TEC SCA
MM, May S, Meeting of Legislation Room 22! Mendenhall
-The new Honor board was sworn in (Jerry Morris Jr Kelly
Williams, Amanda Murer, Marc Whichard, Roshani Shah, Jonathan
Johnson, Robert Nicks, Brian Bullard, Heather Newsome, Michael
McElaah, Marc Crippcn, Karen Rudd, Michael Sanders, Marcus
Fredrick, Armstead Caliber, Will Mullinix )
-Alphabetical seating resolution, for the legislature, passes for the
fall
-Resolution passed to change motorcycle parking, at the bottom of
College Hill, to automobile parking
-Attorney general (Josh Beardsley) and public defender (Joe
Eggleston) were sworn in
LEGISLATOR S SAY
"The new executive officials are excited about the new judicial
branch and ready to start working with them next year Leslie Pulley,
SGA vice-president said. "My friend John Meriac believes they will
make a great addition to the university and will certainly do a good
job
ABSENTEE LEGISLATORS
Allyson Broderick, Carla Cole, Mike Davis, Keisha Fennell, Diane
Hill, Jonathan Huggins, Eddie Ledford, Dana Menture, Timothy
Muller, Said Rashid, Alysun Singletary, Ayana Smalls, Courtney
Snapp, James Sturdivant, Tiffany Thompson, Robin Wilson, Chuck
Windell, Adrian Wright, Laura Benfield, Joe Ramsey, David Bucci,
Michael Rowe, Pete Brotherton, Joe Donlevy, Isaac Everette, Chris
Rey, Chris Strain, Paul Kaplan
Alcohol
continued from page 1
"Regarding the campaign's
message, students often initially
experience a high level of disbe-
lief said Donna Walsh, director of
health promotion and well-being.
"The majority of the student pop-
ulation wants to know who took
the survey, how many people par-
ticipated and whether or not they
told the truth. The tests were ran-
domly dispersed and anonymous;
therefore, the probability of lying is
low
Test results at ECU are consis-
tent with other universities who
participate in taking the same sur-
veys.
"The consistency between our
results and the results from other
universities further supports its
reliability Walsh said- "ECU's
student behavior coincides with
that of thousands of other students
survey across the nation. It is possi-
ble that questioned individuals
lied, but it's also highly unlikely
that over 42,000 other students
lied
13
���
:
1
:
K1
ffrjtK:fiMviflt:tiMXVi�rfMivfK:ni
C UAppPMIMi
enhall Student Center
MSC SuMMEr Hours
Like most departments on campus, Mendenhall Student Center
will change its hours of operation for summer.The new hours will be in
effect from May 18 until August 14.
SUMMER HOURS: MONDAY-THURSDAY 7:30 A.M5 P.M
FRIDAY 7:30 A.M11:30 P.M CLOSED SATURDAY AND SUNDAY

Time f o Hif fK Basks
Final exams are looming, and your slacker roommate has the stereo blaring.
Can't concentrate? Then make Mendenhall your study zone. Free coffee and
silent study areas are available to help you ace those finals.
MAY 7-14 MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
JStaxMuatviA, Playing,
Enjoy the stars - under the stars! Films such as LA. Confidential, Booty Call,
and Jackie Brown, among others, will screen this summer - and you can
watch them under the summer sky. On Thursdays at 9 p.m. starting May 21,
a different movie will screen at the outdoor pool at the Student Recreation
Center. Your ECU One Card gets you and a guest in for free. Bring a lawn
chair or blanket, and any non-alcoholic refreshment by the back gate of the
Rec Center. But get there early; space is limited. Call the Student Union
Entertainment Hotline at 328-6004 for a summer movie schedule. Co-
sponsored by the ECU Student Union and Student Recreation Center.
ATTENTION STUceNT OCQNiZATiONS
Check your mailboxes in 109 Mendenhall for Homecoming information, Get
a Clue on Student Life information,and 1998-99 organization forms.
ALL-U-cAU NXGLoW' Soul
GLOBALL AURA�Come to Outer Limitz bowling center every Friday from
7-11 p.m.for exciting theme nights for just $2 per game. Shoe rental is free.
Bring a CD, or dress the part. This week's theme: Punk Craze.
ALL-U-CAN BOWL�Unlimited bowling every 2nd and 4th Saturday of each
month from 8-11 p.m. at the Outer Limitz bowling center for just five bucks
(includes shoe rental).Come hungry for free pizza and drinks from 8-9 p.m.
MONDAY MADNESS� Give your Monday a boost from 1 -6 p.m. with 50-cent
bowling at Outer Limitz (shoe rental included).
ONE-BUCK BOWLING�Make Wednesday and Friday discount days at Outer
Limitz by rolling 10 frames for just $1 (shoe rental included) between1-6 p.m.
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SERVICES: Central Ticket Office � Bowling � Billiards � Video Games � Student Locator Service
� ATMs � Food � Computer Lab � TV Lounge � RidesRiders Board � Art Gallery
HOURS: Mon - Thurs. 8 a.mll p.m Fri. 8 a.m12 a.m Sat. 12 p.m12 a.m Sun. 1 p.m11 p.m.
Ill 5 Mf E:f I 5 5IK!f I Z Mlfc-rrs MHE
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TUESDAY:
WEDNESDAY:
THURSDAY:
FRI. & SAT:
Lingerie Night
Amateur Night and
Silver Bullet Dancers
Country & Western Night
Silver Bullet Exotic Dancers
"Skylar"
10 OR MORE
GIRL DANCERS
EVERY NIGHT!
Located 5 miles West of Greenville on 264 Alt. (Behind Aladdin Services & Limo)
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GRADUATES!
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146 S.W. GREENVILLE BLVD. SUITE 101
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Kroger
Old Fashioned
Bread
20-oz.
(excluding Fun Ricks)
Oscar Mayer
Lunchables
4.1-5.55-oz






TutiJiy, Miy 5, 1988
news
The Ellt Carolinian

x
x-
X-
x
x
X-
13
South Greenville granted
funding for new rec center
For more information
www.tec.ecu.edu
$805,000for
bnd&anted
Laura Lee Hines
STAFF WRITER
South Greenville has recently been
granted funding for a new recre-
ation center.
The Greenville City Council
recently appropriated $805,000 to
purchase 92.2 acres of land south of
Greenville near D.H. Conlcy High
School. This land will be used to
build a recreationcommunity cen-
ter, as well as four baseball fields
and four Softball fields.
"This a rec center is some-
thing that's been needed a long
time in the southern part of the
city said Boyd Lee, director of the
recreation and parks department of
Greenville.
Phase I for the recreation center
includes building a 20,000 square-
foot recreation center, and four
baseball and Softball fields. The
proposed recreation center will
include two basketball gyms with
12 goals each, as well as volleyball
capabilities. Exercise programs,
meeting spaces and multi-purpose
rooms will be offered. Funds for
this phase have not yet been appro-
priated.
Charlie
Vincent,
Superintendent
of Recreation
for Greenville
said a swim-
ming pool may
be built in the
future.
The
Greenville
Recreation and
Parks
Department
currently offers
22 facilities to
the public,
including the
Greenville
Aquatic and
Fitness Center
located on
Stanton Blvd.
near Catalytica.
Vincent said
this new recre-
ation center will
not replace the
Greenville Aquatics and Fitness
Center, but will serve more as a
community center.
The Aquatics and Fitness
Center offers members wellncss
programs, aerobics classes, a six-
lane indoor pool and a basketball
and volleyball gym.
The ECU recreation center
offers all of these services plus a
climbing wall, adventure programs,
racquetbali facilities, an outdoor
pool and other services.
The ECU recreation center is
free to students, though faculty and
Services offere
Greenville Aquatics and Fitness Cent
wellness programs
low-impact aerobics
slide and step aerobics
body shaping class
cardiovascular and weight equipment
6 lane indoor pool
aqua-aerobics
swim lessons
basketball and volleyball gym
ECU Rec Center
lifestyle enhancement programs
various levels of aerobics
step aerobics
weight-training and cardiovascular center
indoor and outdoor pools
water aerobics
basketball, volleyball, and badminton courts
exercise studios
indoor track
climbing wall
racquetbali and squash courts
recent alumni must pay to use the
facilities. Costs for faculty, their
spouses, and recent graduates is
$240year, $100semester, $60 in
the summer, or $5day.
The Aquatics and Fitness
Center offers three enrollment
options and special rates for stu-
dents. Individual rates for non-stu-
dents are $192year or $54 for three
months. Students can join the
Aquatics and Fitness Center for
$157 or $45 for three months. The
Aquatics and Fitness Center also
offers family rates.
YeO
Don't take off for the summer
without a place for the fall Cet
Tar Jiver Estates
give you a place to park your
plane.
We have spacious 1 Z and 3-
bedroom townhomes.
'With amenities like a fitness
center, sand volleyball court and
olympic-size swimming pool you
will want to make us your
permanent hanger.
&&
Z14 Elm St 5
GreenvtUe.NC 27858
(252)752-4225
a NOTCH
above the
TybRM
Nina M. Dry
STAFF WHITER
Or. Elisabeth Heininger, a recre-
ation and leisure studies profes-
sor of four years, has recently
been nominated Faculty
Member of the Week.
Heininger received her
undergraduate degree at the
University of New York at
Cortland in recreational educa-
tion in 1988. She then went on to
Indiana University, where she
received three other degrees.
She received her directorate
specialization degree in 1990,
and in 1993 she received her doc-
torate with a minor in applied
exercise science. With that, she
began looking for a job and spot-
ted ECU.
"I found an interview applica-
tion in the RPA Job Bulletin and
The Chronicle of Higher
Education Heininger said. "I
got the interview in 1994 and
began working in the fall of '94
Some of the classes she teach-
es are Research Methods and
Techniques, Philosophical and
Current Issues in Leisure,
Special Recreation and
Introduction to Leisure Services.
"Working with students is
very important to me
Heininger said. "I enjoy helping
each student expand their indi-
vidual strengths and talents. I
usually teach nine semester
hours each term, but I am only
teaching two sections of philoso-
phy this spring because I
Name
Elisabeth
Heiniger
Department
Recreation and
Leisure Studies
received some reassigned time
for a service project"
According to Heininger, ECU
and the eastern N.C. chapter of
National Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
Society, are working to sponsor
the Jimmie Heuga Center
Satellite Medical Program.
"It's a wellness program for
individuals with multiple sclero-
sis Heininger said. "We're
hoping to have it here at ECU in
the spring of 1999
Heininger, who has MS, does
a lot of research on multiple scle-
rosis.
The research she conducts
consists of exercise in MS and
how that affects the individual's
quality of life.
Heininger also does collabora-
tive research with the human
performance laboratory.
"I'm their connection with
MS Heininger said.
Heininger is also working
with Adapted Recreation and
Intramural Sports Enrichment
(ARISE) program on the advis-
ory committee.
"We discuss and help plan the
programs for the University com-
munities and the Greenville area
at large Heininger said.
"ARISE provides opportunities
for individuals with disabilities
Heininger is also involved in
serving as the co-chair of the
planning committee for eastern
N.C. chapter of National
Multiple Sclerosis Society and
being on the Board of Directors
of therapeutic horseback riding
at the Rockinghorse Ranch at the
Rock Springs Equestrian Center
here in Greenville.
Campuses
continued from page 1
image of the inside of the breast.
Officials say the technology nec-
essary for widespread use of the
operation is still at least 10 years
away because of limitations is
today's technology.
Chapel Hill housing
unit gets drug
prevention funding
Children and adolescents of fami-
lies in public housing now have
someone to talk to about drugs.
The Chapel Hill Housing and
Community Development'
Advisory Board met recently and'
discussed the services the Chapel
Hill public housing unit of the,
police department provided for
drug prevention programs.
The public housing unit was
funded a $5,000 Drug Elimination;
grant to help pay for the counseling;
of youths and various prevention;
and treatment programs. The'
department will have to reapply for
the grant in August.
The unit is a type of referral ser-
vice people use to steer themselves
to the service the would be able to
fulfill their needs.
The grant also pays for an
increased police presence in public i
housing neighborhoods and a!
GED-ABR training program for'
those wanting a high school equiva-
lency degree. Out of four partici-
pants, the program might graduate
one student.
The success rate of the program ;
is typical for this type of program
because of student's lack of trans-
Donation, telephone service, child �
care and funds.
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i
I
I
6 Tutrtty. Miy 8, 1998
news
The Eilt Carolinian
DNSTS
Professor receives national award
Dr. Evelyn Farrior, a professor in the department of nutrition and hos-
pitality management, has received the Outstanding Dietics Educator
Award from the American Dietic Association. The award was presented in
recognition of Farrior's work with the bachelor's degree and dietic intern-
ship programs at ECU as well as her efforts to provide continuing educa-
tion for dietics professionals.
Service Fraternity helps in Relay for Life
Very Otlicuim - Alwtuyt Truk
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CHIKESE FOOD ' Sesame Chkfcen wSteamed Rice i
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Brown & Brown
ATTORNEYS A I
Alpha Phi Omega
participated in the April
24-25 Relay for Life, a
fund raiser sponsored
by the American
Cancer Society in an
effort to raise money for
cancer research and
honor the survivors and
deceased. Alpha Phi
Omega has helped
with this charity for six
years raising approxi-
mately $340,000.
East Carolina
Paintball
For one of call 7848867
the most . r-c�
adrenaline ur Pa9e
pumping,
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Truth,Equality,Justice
123 W.3'dSt.
Greenville
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Drug Charges
�All Criminal Matters
�Free Consultation
752-0952
Members of Alpha Phi Omega pause for a photo
during a Relay for Life fund raiser April 24-25 .
PHOTO COURTESY OF ALPHA PHI OMfGA
Beta Gamma Sigma inducts new members
ECU's chapter of Beta Gamma Sigma, the business national honor
society, inducted new members on April 20,1998. The criterion for mem-
bership is that the individual must be in the top seven percent of the junior
class, the top 10 percent of the senior class or the top 20 of the graduate
class.
Special Ed. professor writes about inclusive classrooms
The education of public school students with diverse learning needs
is the focus of of a new book by Special Education Professor Mary VV.
Schmidt Teaching Strategies for Inclusive Classrooms: Schools, Students,
Strategies, Success, published by Harcourt Brace, contains a variety of class-
room experiences, strategies and photographs contributed by Eastern
North Carolina school teachers. "Inclusive schooling" relates to the rights
of all students to have equal access to an appropriate education in a sup-
portive learning community.
University Apartments
758-7436
2 bedroom,
Ibath
All appliances
On site laundry
J.T.Williams Rental Co.
2901 E. 5th St.
Wyndham Court Apartments
"DOW'T GO HOWE
WITHOUT OWE
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Two bedroom Apts.
�On i:CU b
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JOB FAIR
INTERVIEW WITH CELLULAR PHONE CUSTOMER
SERVICE REPRESENTATIVES
Tuesday, May 12,1998
204 E. Arlington Blvd, Suite E
(Arlington Center, directly across from
Gordans Qolf and Ski Shop)
KELLY
SERVICES
561-RENT
QUALIFICATIONS NEEDED
�1 year customer service background
�Computer keyboard experience
�Telephone Communication experience
�Commitment to long-term
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�Clean local Criminal Background Record (from county courthouse)
Please call for an appointment -919-355-7850
Never an Applicant Feel i
BOBBY H.
HARDVJI
FOR PITT COUNTY
COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 1
"Your Vote For The Future"
VOTE DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY - MAY 5, '98
Paid lor by lh� Committee to Elect Bobby H, Hardy - Atty. Derek K. Brown. Treasurer
Things are really heating up at
Come to the place that celebrates
C'mco de Mayo all month long
We've been spicing up just for you!
You'll say OLBto our roomy apartments
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Grab a sombrero, pack your plnata &
visit us today
B4Jitr�33r lc VifMc Green Ay4titr,otiiS
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(Off Greenville &W UknJi Pluta Inn)
4. Still leaelm for Fall 1995
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Carolina East
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Belk, Brady's, Sears, K&W Cafeteria & 50 shops
Open Monday-Saturday 10-9, Sunday 1-6
Located on Highway Ujust 2 blocks south of Greenville Blvd.
7 Tundly, M
G
haur
GUATEMAL
ghosts of tli
returned to ha
ing many wor
gling Central,
achieve lasting
of bloodletting
It seemei
Guatemala li
� unknown kille
crete block to
Roman Cathol
logued atrocitii
the 36-year cor
Black-clad i
justice and ar
recalling demo
civil war. Rum
circulated, fee
nation would
lence.
"Is this a c
now? I don't
Miguel Vivan
director of
WatchAmcric;
Guatemala to i
op's slaying. "
the peace pr
because cveryi
well
Even if Bis
killing proves
crime, most agi
must show it ii
solve the case
that Guatemala
200,000 peopl
were killed d
between leftis
1
Ca
Fa:
AW
An
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Accelei
toward
Skate tl
LOOK
ST0R
G&
ST





7 Tuitdiy, Miy 5, 1998
news
Thi East Carolinian
M
Ghosts of violent past tetum to
haunt Guatemala long after civil war
GUATEMALA CITY (AP) � The
ghosts of the civil war have
returned to haunt Guatemala, leav-
ing many wondering if the strug-
gling Central American nation can
achieve lasting peace after decades
of bloodletting.
It seemed like the old
Guatemala last Sunday when
� unknown killers used a jagged con-
crete block to crush the skull of a
Roman Catholic bishop who cata-
logued atrocities committed during
the 36-year conflict.
Black-clad marchers demanded
justice and an end to impunity,
recalling demonstrations during the
civil war. Rumors of death threats
circulated, feeding fears that the
nation would slip back into vio-
lence.
"Is this a different Guatemala
now? I don't know said Jose
Miguel Vivanco, the executive
director of Human Rights
WatchAmericas who visited
Guatemala to investigate the bish-
op's slaying. "A lot of people took
the peace process for granted
because everything was going so
well
Even if Bishop Juan Gerardi's
killing proves to be a common
crime, most agree the government
must show it is doing all it can to
solve the case and thereby prove
that Guatemala has changed since
200,000 people disappeared or
were killed during the struggle
between leftist guerrillas and a
series of right-wing governments.
Guatemala's conflict was
Central America's most brutal, with
at least three-fourths of those killed
members of the impoverished
Indian majority.
Tens of thousands of civilians
were slain when the military razed
entire villages during scorched-
earth campaigns of the early 1980s.
Some remain hopeful Guatemala
can overcome its past.
"There is no danger that the
peace process will be reversed
said former rebel commander
Ricardo Ramirez.
But others are less optimistic.
"Nothing will happen to the
killers said Pablo Cancap, a Maya
Indian who traveled from the
northern province of Quiche to
attend Gerardi's funeral.
Solving the slaying is the biggest
challenge President Alvaro Arzu's
government has faced since he and
aging leaders of the insurgency in
December 19 signed agree-
ments ending the war. A 24-year-
old man was picked up for ques-
tioning Thursday, but no formal
charges were immediately filed
against Carlos Enrique Vielman.
"The evolution of the case of
the bishop will allow Guatemalans
to determine if this is really an
authentic peace Vivanco said. "To
see if the government can find the
killers and bring them to justice
Another test case is the the first-
ever trial of army members for a
wartime massacre. Twenty-five sol-
diers are being tried in the 1995
killing of 11 resettled refugees in
the remote northern rainforest of
Xaman.
Things looked bright before the
bishop's slaying.
Since the peace accords were
signed, political crimes have been
almost nonexistent, said Jean
Arnault, head of the U.N. human
rights mission here.
Although no motive has been
established, most believe the mur-
der was committed by former mili-
tary agents warning others not to
bring up past wartime abuses.
The 1,440-page report the bish-
op presented two days before his
killing resulted from more than
6,000 interviews and formed the
most exhaustive account yet of
wartime atrocities. Entitled "Never
Again the report was compiled
primarily for historical reasons.
It identifies places, dates, and in
some cases � names.
Impunity remains a serious
problem here, with criminals �
especially those tied to the military
or government � routinely escap-
ing punishment through connec-
tions, pressure or bribes.
A general amnesty forgave most
political violence during the con-
flict. But it did not forgive atroci-
ties, including massacres and tor-
ture � much of which was detailed
in Gerardi's report.
Astronauts, animals ready for landing
Departments
Faculty & Staff needed to submit
nominations for outstanding
students & faculty members.
Send nominations to: aga0905@mail.ecu.edu
Call 328-6366
Fax 328-6558 a NOTCH
abercpehc
Attention: AORM
Amanda Austin, News Editor 1 y wrviV1
CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida
(AP)�Space shuttle Columbia and
its crew returned to Earth, ending
two weeks of lab work that
advanced brain research despite
unexpected animal casualties. And
the experiments were far from
over.
Within an hour, the crew was
hustled off to medical tests that
were expected to go on for days.
Six of the seven astronauts left on
stretchers; doctors wanted them
reclining to preserve their weight-
less state.
At the same time, NASA rushed
to unload the animals so scientists
could begin dissecting the few
dozen surviving baby rats, as well
as the nearly 2,000 fish, snails,
crickets and older rodents that
flew. Most of the young rats died in
orbit, victims of maternal neglect.
It was a race against gravity: the
sooner the astronauts and animals
could be examined, the greater the
likelihood of observing space-
induced changes in the nervous
system.
"I'm sitting here like a little kid
with ants in my pants said Gay
Holstein, a Mount Sinai School of
Medicine researcher whose rats
flew on Columbia. "I can't wait to
get going on my experiment
To everyone's relief, Columbia
landed right on time Sunday at the
Kennedy Space Center, where
about 200 researchers waited with
scalpels.
Commander Richard Searfoss
had only two functioning hydraulic
power units for most of the hour-
long descent. The cooling system
for the third unit failed to work
Saturday; Searfoss turned that unit
on just minutes before touchdown
so it would not overheat.
As soon as Columbia rolled to a
safe stop, Mission Control congrat-
ulated the astronauts for "a historic
mission that elevated neuroscience
research to record heights
Among the space firsts achieved
during the 16-day Neurolab flight:
first direct nerve recordings, first
joint recording of sleep and breath-
ing, first embalming of animals,
and first surgery on animals meant
to survive.
"The data obtained are really a
precious resource that will help us
to unlock some of the mysteries of
the brain said NASA program sci-
entist Mary Anne Frey. "I wish I
could tell you the results right now
but much remains to be done
Only the rodent researchers
knew for sure what they were get-
ting back.
The astronauts kept close watch
on the 170 rodents that rocketed
into orbit with them on April 17,
especially when the baby rats start-
ed dying. The surrogate mother
rats could not or would not nurse
the young animals in space.
Columbia's veterinarian,
Richard Linnehan, said he and his
crewmates set up an intensive care
unit aboard Columbia and, by sac-
rificing two or three nights of sleep,
managed to save some rats that
otherwise would have died. The
astronauts fed them, warmed
them, washed them and dried
them � one by one.
Despite such heroic efforts, 55
of the 96 baby rats died premature-
ly. Researchers hoped to still
achieve their primary objectives.
Because the containers for the
fish, snails and crickets were inac-
cessible aboard Columbia, the
astronauts did not know how those
animals fared in weightlessness.
A quick inspection after land-
ing, however, revealed that only 25
of 225 baby swordtail fish survived
the mission. Researchers suspect
the water in the shuttle aquarium
was too warm. And although the
number of surviving crickets was
not immediately known more than
1,500 flew � scientists gleefully
counted and observed those that
came back hopping.
The postflight dissection plan
called for the surviving fish -and
crickets to be placed on ice and
frozen to death, the snails to be
doused in alcohol, and the rats to
be decapitated or overdosed with
anesthesia. The work was expect-
ed to take hours.
One scientist hoped to get back
more animals than he sent up.
Michael Wiedcrhold, a researcher
at the University of Texas Health
Science Center at San Antonio,
launched 60 adult snails aboard
Columbia. The last time he flew
snails in space, they yielded 500
offspring. Because this mission was
longer, he was hoping for 700.
Reproduction seems to be easy
for snails in space, Wiedcrhold said,
because there's little in the shutde
aquarium for them to run into and
grab onto� except one another.
The big question, for the astro-
nauts anyway, was whether thcyT
would return to space this summer
and do it again. The National
Aeronautics and Space
Administration said it will decide
this week whether to repeat the
Neurolab mission in August to fill
the flight gap created by the antic-
ipated delay in space station con-
struction.
Police detain former protester before anniversary
BEIJING (AP) � Chinese police
detained a student leader of the
1989 Tiananmen Square democra-
cy protests before he could attend
100th anniversary celebrations for
Beijing University, a human rights
group said Sunday.
Wang Youcai, 31, was last seen at
a Beijing hotel on April 27, shortly
after he arrived in the capital to take
part in festivities for his alma mater,
one of China's most prestigious uni-
versities.
Police notified his wife, Hu
lianexia. on Saturday that Wane
Wang was a graduate student in
physics at Beijing University at the
time of the 1989 protests. He was a
leader of the Beijing students'
Autonomous Federation, one of
several independent student bodies
set up to defy the communist
party's monopoly on power.
After the military quashed the
protest movement, Wang was
placed on the government's list of
21 most-wanted student organizers.
He was sentenced to four years in
prison but was -released early,
reoortedlv for reDentine.
Ten Zhejiang-based dissidents
appealed Saturday to the national
and Beijing police forces to release
Wang, saying his detention violated
China's constitution, according to �
copy of their letter released by the
Information Center.
Beijing University's centennial
climaxes Monday with an address
by Communist Party General
Secretary Jiang Zemin.
Founded by one of China's last
emperors as the nation's first mod-
ern academy of higher learning, the
university has from the start been
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Accelerate
toward graduation-
Skate through a semester of credits.
Contact your adviser.
The Division of Continuing Studies
328-6324
An equal opportunityaffirmative action
university, which accommodates the
needs of individuals with disabilities
!�
"You will encounter many new places
and with the knowledge you've
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you know there's only one place that
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I
I






I
I
8 Tlmftfc May 5, 1998
opinion
Tin Etit C�roliniin
east&rolinian
Amy L.ROYSTEB Editor
Heather Buftctss Managing Ediirjr
Amanda Austin NnsEduiv Tracv m. laubach SpoasEdnoi
Hour Harris adi. Dim Editor Steve Losev Asst. SponiEdniH
Andy Turner ulwtyto Editor Carole Mehle Head Copy Editor
John Davis Assnuni Lifestyle Editor John murphy Staff Illustrator
Matt Hege Advertising Manager
Bobby Toggle Webmasiei
Senate. e ECU ajrweurwtY inn 1925. the (Ml Cerelriian Dubhshat n 000 cranes iwv Sjesder ana Trtmdee. If lead Mhtwial in red! etrwrt is H ow
�an el it Editorial Brian! The fan Cnoimm rrilcttrnat lanri ta ihr rd-m Smied to 250 Mnb. erhidi mrrr Be railed lor dacmy orbrrvilr Thai Easi
Carghman reserves the rejrit ro roi or rated letters for pubbcaimn All Inters must he jqned letrers should be addressed ro Opiow editor The Ent
Cembraan. Sttder.1 PuMcrtKsrs SuKkij ECU. Girrtmii, 21858435 For rdornianen cil 919128.6368
m .going to lay low for a while,
bat you 11 aee me soon. Thanks
for everything.
Murphy
oumew
The East Carolinian wants to extend its hearty thanks to the loyal throng of students who
"picked us up" this school year. We are proud to announce that TEC has marvelously
increased in readership, thanks mostly to the crossword puzzles, the crime scene and the
web site. We all know that's what the student body really cares about and we try like fools
to comply.
But aside from those once-in-a-lifetime triumphs, the time has come once again to
remind every graduating senior out there who doesn't already know that it's commence-
ment time. Be there. Go to your graduation. It will occur Saturday, .May 16, right about
the time Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium fills up with parents, well-wishers and alumni. We at
TEC want you to endure the three-hour event because the memories of the blistering sun,
the verbose lecturers and the government-approved guest writer Fred Chappell will
become fond memories 20 years from now. TEC is sure you'll kick yourself if you avoid this
timely event, so go. And be there with bells on.
But don't seriously go with bells on. You are required to wear your black gown and black
cap with the tassel hanging from the right side of the mortar board. And if you must deco-
rate your ceremonial garb according to your department or interests, make sure it isn't
offensive to anyone based on race, religion, creed, gender, age, sex, economic status or sex-
ual orientation. You want people to know that you graduated from a liberal arts university,
and that your education is sophisticated.
TEC reiterates the fact that your graduation from college only ever happens once, and
that missing the event would leave you lacking in your college memories. Imagine getting
married, but not being there for the ceremony. Or imagine dying, but not being there for
your funeral. It's like being in the check out line at the grocery store, and remembering you
forgot your credit cards right next to your car keys, so you have to drive back home to get
them. We at TEC beseech you to attend your graduation. But don't bring beer to drink dur-
ing the ceremony. It's rude and reflects badly on your parents. Save it for the graduation
party, but go to your graduation.
And for those returning in the fall, TEC looks forward to everyone � whether first-
timers or returning veterans � "picking us up" in the summer and fall.
OPINION
Columnist
Britt
HONEYCUTT
Exams need to be spaced out
OPINION!
Ryan
KENNEMUR
Wake up, Lil'Suzy, wake up
Do you realize what you are
missing when you pull down
those shades in your room
and pretend that the clock
says a.m. instead of p.m.?
"I'm so tired, I haven't slept a
wink. I'm so tired, my mind is on
the blink
Many of you Beatles fans out
there recognize those lines from
the song "I'm So Tired" from the
White Album. There is, of course,
another reason for me to start the
column off with Beatles lyrics.
Think about it. How many people
out there arc suffering from sleep
deprivation?
You're probably thinking, "But,
Ryan-DoggDidn't the Beatles
also write a song about Lucy in the
Sky with Diamonds?"
Yes, Billy, they did, but that's not
important right now. What is
important is the fact that students
are sleeping their lives away. I
know quite a few people who will
go to their early morning class, and
then come back to their room and
sleep until mid-afternoon. These
people are missing so much during
the daylight hours, and that is the
inspiration behind this column.
I've heard it all before. You say,
"I'm sleepy because I was up late
typing a paper If you were telling
the truth, you would say, "I'm
sleepy because HBO was running a
marathon of Real Sex 1 through 47
last night
Do you realize what you are
missing when you pull down those
shades in your room and pretend
that the clock says a.m. instead of
p.m.? Well, I'll tell you. Right now,
I can look out my dorm room win-
dow and feast my eyes on many
beautiful things. For instance,
there's a brand new Z-28 Camaro
just below my window, and the
glare from it is almost blinding.
Also, there is a batch of lovely
ladies sunbathing, and because of
all the oil they are using, the glare
from them is almost blinding.
It just kills me to think that so
many people believe that the day
doesn't truly start until beer o'clock
in the afternoon. There are always
at least five people in each one of
my classes who put their heads
down as soon as the professor walks
in. Don't get me wrong. It's good
that these people are coming to
class and all, but I don't think that
the professor should have to con-
sider investing in some of those lit-
tle red and blue fold up mats that
we used in elementary school.
Remember those things? For
some reason, the kindergartners at
my school had to take a nap just
after recess. Contrary to popular
belief, kids don't start to require
mid-afternoon naps until they are
well into their fifties. I remember
we would all just kind of lie there
and think of little kid thoughts,
such as "I can't wait to be seven"
and "The kid next to me smells
like wild onions That was proba-
bly the most boring time of my life.
Sometimes the nerds of the class
would get so bent out of shape that
they would tie their own shoelaces
together. I digress.
In any case, I propose we have a
campus-wide wake-up call on
Wednesday. Just imaginc.we can
all wake up and go outside and be
together and listen to Hendrix play
the National Anthem and we can
all stay away from the brown acid
and then we can alloh wait.
That's been done. Well, I'm sure
we can think of something. Just try
not to sleep through Wednesday,
for your own benefit.
Well, I'd love to keep on writing,
but it's getting close to 10 p.m. and
I have toummwrite a paper.
Yeah, that's it! Write a paper!
If all the exams weren 't at
the same time, maybe we
could even learn something
from them, instead of memo-
rizing the useless facts to
regurgitate onto paper.
Pop quiz, hotshots �- what's more
fun than a busload of Swedish
flight attendants? What cuts into
your social life quicker than halito-
sis? What holes you up in your
room on a sunny day faster than a
crack habit?
You guessed it, kiddies. Exams!
They're back, and they've brought
hell with 'em. We all know the
pain. We're going along, enjoying
the semester, going to class only if
The Price Is Right is a rerun, when
WHAM! Exams start.
It's not the taking of tests that I
mind so much. The occasional test
is to be expected � this is college,
right? But when the last week of
school rolls around and you're con-
fronted with four, five, or even six
major tests (with up to as many as
three on the same day, for an
unlucky few), how is a normal
human of average intelligence sup-
posed to cope?
The only reasonable solution is
to skimp out on studying for select
classes in order to pass more impor-
tant or more difficult ones. And this
way we don't retain as much infor-
mation as would be helpful in our
future lives (or as much as we pay
for) from the neglected classes.
All professors who give compre-
hensive finals must certainly be
sadists, yearning to each an entire
class of seemingly well-adjusted
students writhe, beg, weep, grovel
and try to transport themselves to
another dimension through
telekinesis out of sheer frustration
at the endless barrage of numbing
questions dating back to a period
that you can't even remember what
your wardrobe looked like, much
less what the layers of sediment in
the schizoprepaleodontassive zone
are composed of.
I, personally, have one final that
will determine the course of the
rest of my college career, and thus
my life. Maybe it's my fault for not
paying attention all semester. But
it's so much easier to blame a face-
less exam system, so here's why it
sucks.
Never in our post graduation
lives will there be this many really
huge things going on at once. Let's
take the worst case scenario, for
example. Bbb Bungle gets his
Business Something-or-Other
degree and becomes CEO of a
Fortune 500 company straight out
of college (lucky guy. Bob is). In his
whole career, Bob will most likely
not have six major, life-altering
business projects come to a head
simultaneously. He could, of
course. But as common sense dic-
tates. Bob will choose to space his
projects evenly so that he can con-
centrate more of his energy into
each of them individually, thus
avoiding undue stress and ending
up with much more desirable
results. Smart guy, that Bob.
What exactly is the idea behind
putting us through the unnecessary
hell that is exams? Is it like training
for a 10-mile marathon by running
50 miles twice a year? Because
that's kinda silly.
If all the exams weren't at the
same time, maybe we could even
learn something from them,
instead of memorizing the useless
facts to regurgitate onto paper. We
don't learn the concepts for exams.
We just memorize the junk.
How about we forget about the
archaic exam system and try some-
thing that makes sense? Let's lose
the rule of education that states
"Torture the students as much as
possible, rob them of their tuition
money, and make them squirm in
the process" and .instead, listen to
the voice of reason � one thing at
a time. Please.
LETTER
to the editor
SGA's not all bad
L.ETTER
to the editor
Columnist needs to be enlightened
I am writing in response to Grant
Whitley's column, "Commercials
getting disgusting that was print-
ed April 21. I was drawn to
Whidcy's column for thinking that
I would be exposing myself to an
intellectually argued column. But,
much to my dissappointment, I
wasn't. I found his opinions on
commercials to be ignorant. His
wise-cracked opinions on menstru-
ation, genatalia and venereal dis-
eases only reverberated the kind of
ignorance some American citizens
insist on breeding in the populace.
His non-tolerant attitude on these
intimate subjects only prove how
much more these kinds of commer-
trials should be aired to raise aware-
ness and understanding of subjects
Americans still hold taboo.
I'm sorry that Whitley "does not
wish to think about bleeding geni-
talia if at all possible but it was
that very same cycle that allowed
him to be here. Menstruation has
become a bad word in our society's
vocabulary. Perhaps it is why more
women than men are forced to feel
ashamed and dirty about their bod-
ies over something that they cannot
control. As for his comment on
Anusol, he stated that the name of
the product did not "whet the
appetite Last time I checked, I
thought Anusol was for relief, not a
midnight snack. His annoyance of
undqrwear packaging and his "sci-
entific" claims on the feelings of
admiration or nausea toward the
penis further disturbed me. His
number one complaint about these
commercials was that he often
viewed them while eating.
Maybe it's time for Whitley to
start drink a big glass of reality with
every meal. Tampons, Hanes and
STD's are a part of life; they're real.
They're not some television-mar-
keted idea used to get ratings.
Once Whitley and other people
who share his opinions realize this,
the more enlightened they may
become.
I would like to respond to Britt
Honeycutt's views of our Student
Government Association. Thank
you for a very entertaining and
well-written article. There were
some valid points addressed in the
column, but a few were off the
mark.
The newly-elected Executive
Council has many great ideas to
improve our great school, but park-
ing is not one of them. During cam-
paigning, I spoke out against park-
ing, but never used it as a campaign
issue. Parking is a major problem
on our campus, but it is not a prob-
lem that can be fixed overnight. In
the long-range plans of our univer-
sity, the construction of two parking
decks is included. When will this
happen? Your guess is as good as
mine is, but the bottom line is that
the administration sees it as an
issue and there are plans to correct
this problem.
I was very disappointed with the
voter turnout in the recent election.
Ms. Honcycutt justifies this by say-
ing that she and our fellow students
are an "apathetic bunch I do not
feel that our students are apathetic;
I feel that they are uninformed. I
truly believe that once the students
realize exactly what SGA does,
they will take a more vested inter-
est in the organization. What does
SGA do? The most powerful orga-
nization on this campus does many
things, such as appropriate nearly
$200,000 to over 100 organizations,
address student concerns, such as
the recent moving of Barefoot, and
represent the University at the
local, state and national level. One
of the issues that I did run on this
year is having the students be more
informed and more involved. Our
current Vice President Cliff
Webster has established a web site
to keep the students informed.
The address for the SGA web page
is http:www.sga.ecu.edu. This is
your school as much as it is mine
and it's your right to have your
voice heard. I challenge you to
make a difference. How are we to
know what you feel needs to be
changed if you do not tell us?
East Carolina has many great
things to offer, but there are
changes that need to be made. We,
as a student body, need to work"
together, to make these changes.
The SGA represents every student
here at ECU and although we may
not agree with some of the opinions
out there, wc respect thcmCandy
at the polls? Good idea; might try it
next year. As for the "used car
salesman" stereotype, I could
never sell used cars, only new ones.
L
Eric Rivenbark
SGA President
Diana Kimmel
Secondary English
Education
"We journalists need to be willing to explain ourselves. If we did a little more
of that, maybe there wouldn 't be such a gap between
the publics perception of us and our perception of ourselves "
G. Kelley Hawes, journalist, 1996
9 Tutidtv. Mi
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9 Tutidiv. Miy 5. 1998
opinion
Ttit EM Cirtliniii
OPINION
Grant
WHITLEY
Columnist
Iraq needs to loosen up
Keith
COOPER
Tornadoes deserve respect
History . . . indicates that the
recent tornadoes were kind
compared to the vicious,
top-ten U.S. "killer"
tornadoes predating the
recent catastrophes.
Tornadoes, destructive whirling
winds accompanied by funnel-
haped clouds progress in a narrow
jath often for many miles over the
and, occur in many parts of the
vorld. Tornadoes, the most violent
tmospheric phenomenon on the
)lanet, occur most frequently in
he Central Mississippi Valley, and
re associated with a fall in baro-
netric pressure so rapid that wood-
;n structures are often lifted and
)urst open by the air confined
vithin them. Recently, Alabama,
Tennessee, and Arkansas were tor-
lado-stricken in a seemingly
.engeance indelibly etched in
nany minds. History, however,
ndicates that the recent tornadoes
were kind compared to the vicious,
op-ten U.S. "killer" tornadoes pre-
lating the recent catastrophes. Yet,
:itizens of tornado-prone areas
nust be educated as to how to pre-
)are for the inevitable.
A case in point was a tornado
which occurred in Missouri,
Illinois, and Indiana on March 18,
1925. Around 1:01 p.m. near
Ellington, Missouri, trees snapped,
and for the next three and a half
hours more people would die, more
schools would be annihilated, more
students and farm owners would be
killed, and more deaths would
occur in a single city than from any
other tornado in U.S. history. In
Missouri alone, about 13 people
were killed.
In Gorham, Illinois, 34 people
died while the town was destroyed.
Over half the town's population
was killed or injured.
Murphysboro, however, saw the
largest death toll within a single
city in U.S. history. Of the 234
deaths, at least 25 were in different
schools. Surprisingly, all of the
schools were brick and stone struc-
tures and built with little reinforce-
ment. Yet, many students were
crushed under falling walls. The
losses in Murphysboro alone
totalled about 10,000,000.
Additionally, in nearby Desoto, 69
people were killed, and the 33
deaths at the school were the worst
in U.S. tornado history.
In Indiana, at least 71 people
died. About 150 homes were lost in .
the town of Griffin, and many chil-
dren were killed on their way home
from school. Cumulatively, over
695 people died and over 2027
were injured in the tornadoes that
hit Missouri, Illinois, and Indiana in
1925.
Other states had similar destruc-
tion and horror stories about killer
tornadoes. Nonetheless, between
Louisiana and Mississippi, 317 and
109 people died and were injured,
respectively, on May 7, 1840.
Moreover, since slave deaths gen-
erally were not recorded, the death
toll, on Louisiana plantations was
extremely high during the Pre-
Civil War era.
How would you protect yourself
if a tornado were approaching?
The National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
(NOAA) has issued the following
tips: 1.) In homes or small build-
ings- Go to the basement (if avail-
able) or to an interior room on the
lowest floor, such as a closet or
bathroom. Wrap yourself in over-
coats or blankets to protect yourself
from flying debris; 2.) In schools,
hospitals, factories, or shopping
centers- Go to interior rooms and
halls on the lowest floors. Stay
away from glass- enclosed areas
with wide-span roofs such as audi-
toriums and warehouses. Crouch
down and cover your head; 3.) In
high-rise buildings- Go to interior
small rooms of halls. Stay away
from exterior walls or glassy areas;
4.) In cars or mobile homes-
Abandon them immediately. After
all, most deaths occur in cars and
mobile homes.
Indeed, tornadoes can be very
destructive. Although the size of a
tornado is not necessarily an indica-
tion of its intensity, the U.S. gets
about 1000 recorded tornadoes
every year. About 200 U.S. torna-
does have killed more than 18 peo-
ple. However, improved commu-
nications, forecasting, detection,
and public awareness substantially
have reduced the death figures. In
any event, in the U.S. since May 7,
1840 (when over 317 people were
killed by a tornado in Natchez,
MS), tornadoes have killed more
than 2,400 people and injured more
than 8,900.
Instead of attacking Iraq, let's
try to get Saddam to loosen
up. You can't blame the guy
for being uptight. It's got to be
frustrating to be a militaristic
expanionist and have such a
crappy army.
Baghdad � Today, a disturbing
development in the Crisis With
Iraq(tm). CBS News reports that
the Iraqi army (I use the term
loosely) can buy highly detailed
satellite photographs of United
States military installations in the
Middle East. The companies offer-
ing this service to piss-ant dictators
like Saddam do business over the
Internet, which always adds a
degree of insidiousness to whatev-
er-the-hell-wc're-tal king-about.
These photos will allow the Iraqis
to know the strength and location
of the troops that will inevitably
smash them all over again in a
future war.
Why, you ask, aren't I making
gestures and calling for Strong
Action(tm)? Because I am not a
politician, which is why I know that
the Internet cannot be used for mil-
itary intelligence. Let's envision
the content of the Internet as the
national debt. One cent of that
sum is devoted to satellite photos,
bomb recipes, chicken recipes, and
Puff Daddy. The other
$4,999,999,999,999 is pom. The
Iraqis will get some photos off of
the Internet, all right.
To test my hypothesis, I did a lit-
de searching of my own. An Iraqi
who was ordered to get some satel-
lite photos would most likely have
to use a search engine to find a
website which sold them. I went to
Altavista
(www.altavista.digital.com) and did
a search for the word "photos
The second match it gave me was
(I am NOT making this up)
"Laurie's Nylons and Garters-
Amateur Lingerie Photos and Sexy
Videos The web site says that it
features "amateur shaved exhibi-
tionists Imagine you're an Iraqi
soldier. You're tired and hungry.
You haven't changed your turban in
days. Would you rather look at
blurry photos of American tanks or
amateur shaved exhibitionists?
Inscead of attacking Iraq, let's try
to get Saddam to loosen up. You
can't blame the guy for being
uptight. It's got to be frustrating to
be a militaristic expanionist and
have such a crappy army. Anyone
comparing Saddam to Hitler had
better go read up and find out if any
Germans ever surrendered to Wolf
Blitzer. (Obscure Reference: Wolf
Blitzer is a reporter for CNN. He is
the senior White House correspont,
being on hand to discuss such
"gripping" national issues as oral
sex, oral sex, and oral sex.) The
menace that is Iraq has been blown
completely out of proportion, just
like the President. When asked his
opinion, Pat Buchanan stated "We
should build a thirty foot high wan
along our border with Iraq When
questioned about that statement,
Buchanan replied, "Go back to
Portugal, Jose I've already men-
tioned the fact that the Iraqi army is
the military equivalent of the crap
you get on your hands after eating
Cheetos, but some people are wor-
ried about that Tijuana tap water
that the Iraqis call biological
weapons. U.N. inspectors haven't
been able to pinpoint Iraq's biolog-
ical weapons labs because they are
so unlikely. Mustard gas? Yeah, the
kind you get after eating a hot dog.
The United States needs to
reorient its foreign policy. Instead
of constantly worrying about Iraq
we should be learning more dirty
Spanish words from Madeline
Albright, who did not sound
absolutely ridiculous talking about
cojones. On a related note, a feder-
al judge recently ruled that Bill
Clinton's cojones did not damage
Paula Jones' career, though the
blinding whiteness did impair her
vision for a time. To all the net-
work news heads: I don't want to
hear another word about Iraq until
someone in the military tells
Saddam, "Take this bomb and
shove it"
OPINION
John
DAVIS
Is our chancellor really a tyrannical leader ?
.the Chancellor just seemed
like a harmless coward, not a
tyrant to me. Sure, he seemed
to be a bit oppressive. . .1 did-
n 't figure he actually had
tyrannical moves.
There's a sign posted in a local busi-
ness: "All Hail King Richard of
Eakin: Tyrant of Greenville Up
until the past few weeks, I'd have
been inclined to generally disagree
with that title; the Chancellor just
seemed like a harmless coward, not
a tyrant to me. Sure, he seemed to
be a bit oppressive with the e-mail
thing. You do have to wonder why
the old guy wants so badly to have a
peek at our e-mails, but I had just
figured he was scared of getting
sued.
I didn't figure he actually had
tyrannical motives in the e-mail sit-
uation, but now, with his decision
about Dr. Sal DeMarco, I'm not so
sure anymore. Eakin originally
brought the charges against Dr.
DeMarco, and then did not even
bother to attend the hearings. The
six faculty members who reviewed
DeMarco's case found in his favor,
and yet Eakin, who did not attend
the hearings, decided to fire him
anyway. As if it were his plan all
along.
Of course, there's no way to
know the inner workings of the
Chancellor's mind, but he isn't talk-
ing to the press. Meanwhile, not
only is Dr. DeMarco talking to the
press, he's releasing all the related
materials concerning his case, even
ones that paint him in a bad light.
Now who am I supposed to
believe? The guy who wanted to
fire a tenured professor, didn't con-
sider the hearings important
enough to attend and won't talk to
the press, or the guy who's allowing
the press to see material that paints
his character with "emotional and
credible descriptions of fear?"
It's entirely possible that
DeMarco just knows how to play
the press in his favor, but if the
charges against DeMarco are true,
then I doubt a fellow who suppos-
edly shouted obscenities during
meetings, physically abused col-
leagues and canceled appointments
would have the savvy necessary to
snow the press that way.
It seems much more likely that
the Chancellor, who just recently
staunchly protected his ability to
invade the privacy of every student,
faculty and staff member at the
University, who marched into the
Faculty Senate meeting with his
lawyer and let them know in no
uncertain terms that he wasn't giv-
ing up his peeping privileges, no
way no how, who tried to pass all
this off as "protecting us from false
security" is the guy giving us the
snow-job.
He set out to fire DeMarco, and
that's just what he did. DeMarco
said Eakin is acting as "prosecuting
attorney, judge and jury (Can we
say conflict of interest?) The
Chancellor used (abused?) his
power to ignore the recommenda-
tions of two faculty groups, prefer-
ring instead to continue doing what
he originally planned.
These don't sound like the
actions of a chancellor, which
Webster defines a a "chief execu-
tive i.e an administrator, not a
lawmaker. These sound like the
actions of an autocrat, a monarch or,
perhaps "an absolute ruler unre-
strained by law or constitution who
exercises absolute power oppres-
sively i.e Webster's definition of
a tyrant
Of course, I have no way of
knowing the truth one way or the
other. I'm fully willing to admit that
the Chancellor could have the best
of intentions. He could be genuine-
ly concerned about giving us a false
sense of security. He could have
accurately assessed DeMarco's situ-
ation. But as long as the Chancelloi
isn't playing with all his cards on the!
table, I have no choice but to add
up the facts as I see them. And righi
now, the facts don't make the
Chancellor look so good.
(All quotes taken from the
Friday, April 17 issue of The Daify
Reflector and Webster's Collegia
Dictionary, Tenth Edition.)
I
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11 Tgiidiy. Miy 6, 1998
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
CD
review
Miles Davis Bill Laswell
Panthalassa
9 OUT OF 10
John Davis
assistant lifestyle editor
Back when techno was still just a
glint in Brian Eno's eye, Miles
remarked that he could build the
greatest rock band ever. He was
always trying to push the jazz
envelope, taking the genre kicking
and screaming to new and strange
places.
Most jazz purists (those that
give way too much credit to the
braggadocio that was the bebop
era) ignore Miles's contributions to
jazz in the early '70s on the
grounds that he quit filling his
records with endless chattery
solos. Those purists still try to copy
Clifford Brown; meanwhile, Miles
has gone on to influence not only
jazz, but every other form of mod-
ern American music. Radiohead,
for example, cites Bitches' Brew as a
strong influence on their Grammy-
winning OK Computer.
It's no surprise then, that tech-
no wizard and DJ Bill Laswell
found it appropriate to root around
in Miles outtakes to concoct
Panthalassa. Laswell and countless
other "electronica" artists have no
doubt been heavily influenced by
Miles' exploratory ambient work
of the early 70s.
Panthalassa is not just a remix
album. Rather, it is a synthesis of
several Miles compositions.
Laswell has done a lot more than
scotch tape new fashionable beats
onto old Miles tracks. Instead,
Laswell has included himself in
the actual process of composing,
ex post facto;
What with the Beatles antholo-
gies and other technical wonders,
modern recording has been build-
ing up to this. Miles considered
the recording studio as much a
musical instrument as his own
trumpet, and Laswell obviously
felt the same way and wanted to
"sit in" with Miles.
The result is a darkly exotic,
ambient exploration and synthesis
of the originals. Laswell blends
"In a Silent Way "Shh
"Peaceful" and "It's about Time"
just on the first track. The result is
a gorgeous new piece of music
that's just as fresh and innovative
as the originals.
Track two, a synthesis of "Black
Satin "What If" and "Agharta
Prelude Dub exemplifies
Laswell's skill and personality.
Spiced with tablas and other exot-
ic instrumentation, this song is
loop-heavy and very funky. Miles's
psychotic melody form "Black
Satin" becomes the center of the
loops, and Laswell has carefully
arranged the surrounding decora-
tive sounds expertly.
SEE MILES. PAGE 12
Graduate exhibition largely a success
ART
review
Exhibition runs
thmughendofMay
John Davis
assistant lifestyle editor
There's a lot of talent nestling over
in the Leo Jenkins building. The
Graduate Thesis exhibition has
been up in the Gray Art Gallery for
over a week. If you ever thought it
was weird for art students to go to
grad school, you need to check this
exhibit out.
There is a wide array of media
and styles represented, from Julie
Spivey's graphics-heavy "Body of
Work to the simply elegant
ceramics work of Amy Evans.
There are quirky, kinky sculptures,
mixed media pieces and more than
a few paintings. Pretty much every-
thing in the exhibit is evidence of
the quality of ECU's art program.
For example, Spivey's series of
graphic design banners are some of
the best work in the show.
Centered around the theme of how
women fit into modern American
culture, these gorgeous designs
exemplify all that's great about our
Communication Arts program.
Rather than proselytizing, Spivey
makes her points with a subtlety
and just a bit of tongue-in-cheek
playfulness. One banner simply
points out that in 1920, women
gained suffrage rights in America,
which happens to be the first year
of the Miss America Pageant
Then there's Jodi Hollnagel's
sculptures. These assemblages
resemble the spooky but lovable
toys in Sid's room in the Disney
movie Toy Story. One, "Love cap-
tures all the joy and ecstatic terror
of falling in love, and this without a
snappy or political title.
Amy Evans's ceramic pieces are
Love. Jodi Hollnagel
PHOTO BY JOHN OAVIS
superb. They're really just simple
tea sets and cups; pretty simple
ceramics fare, but boy, oh boy, are
they beautiful. Light, sweeping and
brightly colored, these vessels are
almost too beautiful to actually use.
Almost.
There are some smart, epic
paintings by C. Tanner Jensen and
some lovely mixed media pieces by
Mark Cooley. Cooley's work,
"When the Mechanics of Try Fail
is a little too reliant on the title, but
even so, it manages to capture all
those existentialist angst thingies
that the baby boomers think our
generation is filled with. By and
large, "one of the most refreshing
aspects of the show in general is
that this complaintive whining is
absent. Most of the art reflects
extreme depth of thought and emo-
tion.
Sadly, there is that bad apple in
the bunch.
Although I tried, I
had a hard time
swallowing Kelly
Sheppard's work.
Most of her pieces
were disappoint-
ing, if for no other
reason than they
seem to lack the
depth of thought
and experience of
her classmates. She
has several copper
cut-outs of female
silhouettes that
aren't very well
designed and have
buzz words and
feminist propagan-
da engraved into
them. The text
isn't even artfully
included; it's just
slapped haphazard-
ly on the copper.
The most frus-
trating aspect of
her exhibit- is that
it seems to have
been intended to
be an exploration
of cultural values
concerning physi-
cal image.
Unfortunately, just
like the attitudes
she wants to criti-
cize, Sheppard's
pieces don't get
beyond surface
appearances.
The hingepin of
her exhibit,
"Should we alter
the body or should
we transform our
perception of the
body?" is problem-
atic at best. If the
sculpture was well-
made, I might be able to ignore the
title. But it's just a wax mold of
someone's body with candle wicks
poking out of "problem areas
which are a weak pun on "burning
fat
The logic of the title is fuzzy. I
can envision a companion piece: an
anvil periodically falls from the ceil-
ing at a high rate of speed. The title
of the work reads: "Should we
move out of the way of the anvil
about to squish us or should we
alter our perception of the anvil
about to squish us?" Naturally, the
piece would remove the people
dumb enough to try and alter their
perception from the gene pool.
Should we alter the body Kelly Sheppard
PHOTO BY JOHN DAVIS
The title ignores that fact that,
except in rare cases, obesity is an
alteration of the body already, and
an unhealthy one at that. Apart
fromthc way some insensitive peo-
ple may treat obese people, the fact
Ceramics pieces by Amy Evans
PHOTO IY JOHN DAVIS
remains that obesity leads to heart
failure, skeletal problems, clogged
arteries, aneurysms and a plethora
of other health risks. I would have
to say that a large part of modern
medicine hinges on altering the
body to keep us healthy.
The most frustrating aspect of
Sheppard's exhibit is that it only
serves to do the one thing that she
doesn't want- to draw more atten-
tion to the fact that Sheppard is
overweight. There is no psycholog-
ical depth or interesting explo-
ration, it's just a bunch of complain-
ing that the average American man
isn't attracted to obesity. I kept
waiting for something deeper, some
important idea or insight and all I
got was political diatribe.
Bitterness makes for very shal-
SEE EXHIirrOH. PAGE 14
Art student goes
out with a bang
Student goes where life
takes him
Miccah Smith
senior writer
Senior art student and featured
Rebel artist Brian Buchanan has
some definite ideas about life. He's
witty, intense, knows himself and
knows what he likes: people, for
instance. His paintings often
reflect his own self-image and
knowledge, and a need to connect
with people who are important to
him.
"I would never be anywhere,
where I am right now, without
friends he admitted. Often he
chooses to symbolize his close
friends in his paintings by associ-
ating them with particular objects.
He uses a tooth or the number
"33" to represent himself.
Although the symbols may
seem disconnected from the
things they represent to most casu-
al observers, Buchanan says the
meanings aren't arbitrary. To him-
self, they're clearly defined, once
he decides upon the meaning for
himself. But sometimes the true
personal implications of his paint-
ings take him by surprise.
"It's real cryptic he said. "I
don't really think about it until after
it's done. Whenever I draw, I don't
think about it and stuff just kind of
happens
The 22-year-old has spent five
years working toward his BFA in
the School of Art, and now he's
ready for the next phase of his life,
whatever that may be.
And after that? "I've got focus, I
don't have plans. You know what I
mean?" he said intro.spectively.
"You never know how good you
could have it, so why plan for it?"
An old Puerto Rico t-shirt, pink
plastic mirrored shades and vintage
(translation: "cheap") Pac-Man belt
buckle graced his frame, which
radiates the unconcerned grace of a
true boy of summer, slouched in the
driver's seat of his nondescript col-
lege-student car with one hand
Ska crazies
invade Attic
Reviewers bighat
ridiculed
Caleb Rose
staff writer
Life in the Eye appears in the new Rebel.
PHOTO COURTESY OF BRIAN BUCHANAN
Hopefully, it will include a post-
graduation trip to Europe, where he
looks forward to staying "for an
undisclosed amount of time
draped casually over the wheel.
With the other, he rummages
It was a day for music. The Attic,
following a day long festival of
music and fun we all have come to
know as Barefoot on the Mall, con-
tinued gracing the people of
Greenville with music by hosting a
three band ska show last Thursday
night The spotlight was shining on
local yokels Ska Fu Squirrels,
Chapel Hill's Regatta 69 and head-
lining act Skinnerbox representin'
the NYC.
If you thought the crazies were
out at Barefoot, then you have been
had! The Attic was home to a pleas-
ant conglomeration of old school
punks with leather and Mohawks,
ska fans dressed in suits, cabby hats
and various other black and white
apparel, and last but not least, there
was me in the comer armed with
SEE ART. PAGE 12
New York City's Skinnerbox
PHOTO COURTESY OF MOONSHAKE
pen, notebook and ten gallon cow-
boy hat. To paint a better picture of
this intriguing scene, imagine a
group of Al Capone's finest gang-
sters at a Sex Pistols concert
skankin' their hearts away to the
fine sounds erupting from the
speakers.
No matter the view from the cor-
ner, it was clearly obvious that the
whole crowd was united in a com-
mon interest of music and dancing
SEE SKA. PAGE 1





12 Tuiiliy, May S. 1S98
lifastyli
The East Carolinian
This is not a rant. The goal- to write
complete sentences and hopefully to make
some sort of point. Just another ass with an
opinion
Campus dining stinky; Wendy's good
Eat cheap; drink toliet
water
Miccah Smith
senior write
This being our last issue and all
until the summer semester, I'd like
to take the opportunity to speak
out about an issue I deal with fairly
frequently: making smart eating
choices.
I'm not referring to counting
calories or fat grams or cholesterol
content This is a different matter
entirely. Eating smart to me is
about getting the most edible food
for the least amount of money.
Do you know where Aramark
and the campus dining halls are on
my list of smart eating choices?
Waaay down there, somewhere
between Ramen noodles and pencil
shavings.
For illustration's sake, let's take a
fixed amount, say five dollars, and
see how far it can go at dinnertime
around here.
Mendenhall and Todd arc out of
the question, seeing as how they
think so highly of their inferior buf-
fets that they charge a wallet-numb-
ing $5.60 for the privilege of entry.
Tray is included.
Can't cat there, but golly gee,
that's what campus cafes are for,
right? With their $1.79 cheeseburg-
ers even McDonald's would sneer
at, overpriced candy bars and pizza
with a crust so close in texture to
human flesh I don't have the heart
to eat it, these cafes require more
than a bit of savvy to negotiate.
The Wright Place, which I have
affectionately dubbed "The Wrong
Place serves decent sandwiches
and bows stiffly to the "meal
combo" concept by offering sand-
wich, drink and chips combos for
around the three dollar range. And
their freshly-baked muffin-loaf-
cake thingies are pretty good for 89
cents.
But trust me, if you've got cash
to blow for dinner, you've got better
things to do with it. At Alfredo's you
can get two huge slices of cheese
pizza and a drink for under a fiver.
Or one one-topping slice, one
cheese slice and a drink. Or two
two-topping slices and drink from
the toilet. Hey, it's better than
Aramark!
There's a Subway a couple of
doors down where they usually
have really cheap specials on six-
inch subs, or you can pick up a foot-
long veggie and a drink for under
five bucks.
Hardee's and McDonald's usual-
ly try to throw big ole burgers at ya
for 99 cents a couple of times a
month, which would render a trip
to one of these fast-food meccas
economical if you can remember
which one is offering which special
at which time, but I've saved the
best for last.
At Wendy's you can get four
things from the 99 cents menu and
still have enough change left over
for a canned drink back on campus.
This, my friends, is truly the
smartest eating choice you could
ever make.
Choose from Jr. Cheeseburgers
or bacon cheeseburgers, double-
stack quarter-pounders, baked
potatoes, Biggie fries, Frosties,
chicken nuggets, salads, oh, the list
just goes on and on.
I'm not even going to begin to
postulate on the combinations that
can be made by choosing four of
these heavenly menu items at a
time, because I have found it to be
a very personal matter.
All I can say is, you don't have to
give Aramark any more of your
daddy's hard-earned cash. Take
heart, there's real food to be gotten
out there if you scavenge hard
enough. I'll see you at Wendy's.
Art
continued from page II
through a cardboard box containing
CDs by Johnny Cash, Radiohead,
the Doobie Brothers, Elvis Presley,
Kenny Rogers, Orbital and the
Squirrel Nut Zippers.
Buchanan would look more at
home on Route 66, over which he
has, in fact, driven, than on the
streets of Greenville.
His car's name, pronounced by
Buchanan with great tenderness, is
Martha. Her floorboard is a work of
art dedicated to American junk
food, done in mixed media. An old
plastic G.I. Joe action figure, a
Cobra tank commander, glares
menacingly from his wedged posi-
tion in the passenger's side air con-
ditioning vent. A Swiss Army knife
dangles from his keychain.
The backseat is cavernous and
strewn with sleeping bags. Bank
statements lie crumpled next to to-
do lists, a tribute to the fact that he
handles his finances with the slap-
dash finesse of one to whom mater-
ial gain is not a primary concern.
Buchanan was excited about his
senior show, which was to be the
first exhibit featured in his friend's
new gallery in Tarboro. "I've got
over 40 pieces in there he said
proudly.
He hoped to sell some of his
paintings at prices near what it cost
to frame them. He reasoned that
low prices would insure the distrib-
ution of his artwork. "I want people
to have my stuff he said.
Also to be featured at the show
was meat, and lots of it. Buchanan's
carnivorous glee is apparendy con-
tagious. "I went out with a vegetar-
ian. She turned into a meat-cater
he recalled.
B's Barbecue, about which
Buchanan continually raved, was
supposed to have catered the non-
vegetarian event. But that would
only be the beginning.
"I'm having a corn dog sculp-
ture he claimed. "You just take
the corn dogs off and eat 'cm
In deference to individuals who
prefer not to eat animal products,
he said he might "have a bag of car-
rotsunopened
continued Irom page II
Track three is an amazing burst
of energy. The pace is somewhere
between a '70s back-alley cop show
chase and a sci-fi crash landing.
Even more amazing is how Laswell
has managed to include his signa-
ture all over the piece without mak-
ing Miles' song sound like a
Laswell original. Track four is the
only track with material culled from
only one song. Essentially, it's a
remix of "He Loved Him Madly"
and Laswell has focused on the
flute solo. The rhythm section has
been slowed down to give to the
song a faux-jungle on depressant;
sound, but combined with the
spikey guitar interjections, it gives
the song a very tranccy feel.
Overall, this record is superb.
There are a few ever so tiny awk-
ward moments, but they're almost
unnoticeable. Laswell has managed
to bring Miles' spirit and his ecu-
menical approach to music into
techno, which is no small feat. The
best thing is that this record sounds
like what Miles himself would have
done if he'd lived into the late '90s.
I
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Carolinian
ary concern,
cited about his
was to be the
I in his friend's
xro. "I've got
here he said
II some of his
ear what it cost
reasoned that
urc the distrib-
"I want people
e said.
ed at the show
f it. Buchanan's
ipparcntly con-
with a vegerar-
i a meat-cater
about which
lly raved, was
itered the non-
kit that would
orn dog sculp-
"You just take
A eat 'cm
ndividuals who
limal products,
ive a bag of car-
et Him Madly"
ocused on the
:hm section has
to give to the
on depressant;
ined with the
actions, it gives
ccy feel.
:ord is superb,
er so tiny awk-
: they're almost
:11 has managed
�it and his ecu-
to music into
small feat. The
is record sounds
self would have
ito the late '90s.
I
13 Tuiidiy, May 5. 1998
LLE:
The Eitt Carolinian
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A Girl and A Gun
David N. Meyer
Andv Turner
lifestyle editor
"All you need to make a film is a
girl and a gun wisely explained
legendary French director Jean Luc
Godard.
Although David N. Meyer uses
those same sentiments to title his
new guide to film noir on video, A
Girl and A Gun, he shows that film
noir is much more than tough guys
with gats and femme fatales aching
to screw them. Film noir, when
done well, offers intelligent, often
subtle, exploration of the dark and
ugly parts of human existence.
In addition to explaining the
usual technical aspects of noir (dark
images, shadowy frames) and what
is noir and whac
is not, Meyer
discusses the
recurring themes
of noir. "no good
deed goes
unpunished
"character deter-
mines fate" and
"crime doesn't
pay, but normal
life is an experi-
entialexistential
straitjacket
It's appropri-
ately ironic,
Meyer argues,
that the very
American art
form was named
by the French.
Noir, Meyer
says, turned the
tables on whom
the good guys
and bad guys
were and what
moral codes (if
any) were appro-
priate. The sto-
ries of noir offer
"powerful
metaphors for
the undercur-
rent of violence in American life
and for a deep dissatisfaction with
widely espoused (though entrap-
ping) middle class values he
writes.
Meyer also analyzes the contra-
dicting characteristics of women
and men in noir. The men are usu-
ally the heroes (or antiheroes) who
live by their own code of conduct in
pursuit of personal freedom (or
maybe just booze and dames). Noir
"Next time, put the cap on the toothpaste
PHOTO COURTESY OF UNITED ARTISTS '
women are often powerful and just
as often treated like the queen of
bitchville because of it.
While not denying their impor-
tance or influence, Meyer explains
why many of the most famous noirs
(Double Indemnity, The Big Sleep) are
SEE BIRL. PACF 14
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14 TuMdiy. Miy 5. 1981
Tht East Carolinian
Exhibition
continued from page 11
low art, and the shallowness just
draws attention to Sheppard's
weight problem. The guest book
even included a comment from an
anonymous patron: "Perhaps Kelly
should just lose some weight" Of
course, that would take work and
pain, and goodness knows we can't
ask anyone to do that.
She can wring out her psycho-
logical insecurities in sculpture if
she wants; it's a free country. I'm
just surprised that her professors
seemed to have encouraged this
banal train of thought. This work
seems more fit in an undergraduate
survey course, not a thesis exhibi-
tion. I found it to be very out of
Girl
continued (torn page 13
Another piece by Jodi Hollnagel
PHOTO BY JOHN DAVIS
place in an otherwise outstanding
display of the hearts and minds of
ECU's art graduates.
certainly not the best noirs. Those
movies, hampered by "big studio
slickness didn't have the power of
low-budget noir gems like Kansas
City Confidential and Gun Crazy.
Meyer is a former music video
critic for the notoriously ass-kissing
Entertainment Weekly, so you may
question his ability to effectively
write about the dirty, stank world of
noir. But A Girl and A Gun adapts
the hard-boiled style of its subject
matter to great effect. He offers
intelligent discourse of noir while
giving straight-foward insight about
movies like the modern noir, After
Dark, My Sweet. After Dark, My Sweet,
based on the novel by pulp-fiction
master Jim Thompson, illustrates
one of the key reasons people love
noir. to watch "fuck-ups fucking
up
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Thanks Again for
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T
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Carolinian
) Of U.B.E.
15 Tueiday. May 5. 1898
lifestyle
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66
Ska
continued from page 11
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J1 Vwr
2 Locations
AND
(Remote Location)
when Greenville natives Ska Fu
Squirrels launched the show into
action for the evening. Ska Fu
Squirrels got the ball rolling with a
cover of the tune "Peter Gun
(more commonly known as the
theme song for the arcade game
Spy Hunter). As they started to
play, the last few members all ven-
tured up onto the stage one by one
to add a piece to the song. The final
member count was eight musi-
cians, with two guitars, bass, drums,
two saxes, trombone and trumpet
in the brass section.
After the intro-song, Ska Fu
exploded and got really wild. The
singerguitarist was dancing his
crazy legs in a frenzy that sparked a
mass of crowd members joining in
to dance as well. From this moment
on, the show was non-stop energy.
They delivered a nine song set of
old school ska that kept the crowd
pleased and the Squirrels dancing.
They added a few instrumental
songs that sounded like the sound-
track to some old '30s gangster
movie as well as new and old songs
from their repertoire.
Following the Ska Fu Squirrels
and a small resting period for the
crowd was Regatta 69, based out of
Chapel Hill. There was no creep-
ing intro with this band. They
erupted like a volcano and they
were extremely powerful. They
were a five piece consisting of gui-
tar Bass and drums and driven by
this piercing brass section of trom-
bone and trumpet. The brass sec-
tion created harmonies that
seemed to sing along with the
music.
An interesting part of their set
was the stories that were told of
being on the road since they have
been on tour of the college scene
for a while. They also dedicated a
song to Chapel Hill brethren
Southern Culture on the Skids
(due to the fact that it was a bit
"country") titled "Skabilly
Regatta 69. are quite praiseworthy
considering their road experience,
and skill of vocal and instrumental
harmonies. The tightness in the
music is as good as it gets and their
stage presence can be compared to
that of a controlled riot. They are
an act worth viewing.
To wrap things up was New
York City's Skinnerbox. Though
they are considered a ska band and
though they do play ska music,
there is a discemable reggae influ-
ence as well as jazz undertones in
their music. They consisted of the
standard rhythm section: guitar,
stand up bass and drums, as well as
the brass section: trombone (who
doubled as the singer), trumpet and
saxophone. They delivered excel-
lent vocal and instrumental har-
monies and had exceptionally
bizarre jazz-style fills on guitar.
They delivered over an hour's
worth of music including old school
ska and reggaeska. One of the
songs, simply introduced as a
"Song about the Stooges" was a
slow jazzy piece that could have
paid homage to the Three Stooges,
or perhaps the band The Stooges
which most know from Iggy Pop's
contributions. Throughout their
set, the fans continued with their
dancing and grooving to the point
that when the set was complete,
they cheered Skinnerbox out for a
one song encore before ending the
night
Watching this show was like
watching the evolution of a ska
band. With each act came a little
more experience that told tales of
the road and showed signs of good
and bad times. These bands can
count on only getting better and
maturing even further as musi-
cians. Aside from all of the pointing
and laughing at my cowboy hat,
overall, it was a hell of a night.
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I
16 Tuttday, May S. 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
Softball team falls short in quest for Big South title
FOR MORE INFORMATION
www.tec.ecu.edu
First-seeded team
upset for second
straigfityear
Isonette Polonius
TRAVIS BARKLEY
SENIOR WRITER
For the second year in a row, the
ECU Softball team fell short in its
bid for the Big South Conference
championship.
Despite having the number
one seed as regular season
champions, ECU was knocked
out of the tournament on
Saturday.
The Pirates got off to a good
start on Friday, winning their first
fime against Liberty 3-1. Denise
eagan got her 18th win of the
year, allowing only two hits and
one unearned run. Reagan struck
out four and walked none in the
complete game victory.
Liberty scored their lone run in
the top of the fourth to break a
scoreless tie. ECU responded
with two runs of their own in the
bottom half
of the
inning.
Catcher
Jennifer
H a 1 p e r n
singled with
one outj and
scored on
Dawn
Conrad's
single to
center. Two
batters later, Harmn
Conrad
scored on a triple by Jessica
Critcher. Amy Hooks hit her first
home run of the season in the fifth
to provide the final score.
On Saturday, ECU faced ofT
against Coastal Carolina, a team
they defeated twice in the regular
season.
Coastal jumped out to a 2-0
lead in the first inning on a two-
run single by Brooke Weisbrod.
ECU answered with single runs in
the first three innings to take a 3-
2 lead. Coastal reclaimed the lead
5-3 with two runs in the fifth and
one in the seventh.
In the bottom of the seventh,
ECU loaded the bases and tied
the game on Halpern's two-out,
two-run single.
However, Coastal would score
three times in the eighth and hold
on to win 8-5.
The loss prevented ECU from
advancing to Sunday's
championship game. Instead,
ECU was forced to play another
game against Liberty.
Second baseman Keisha
Shepperson hit her fifth home run
of the season in the first, giving
ECU a quick 1-0 lead. The Pirates
added two in the fourth and
seemed to be cruising along until
the top of the fifth. Liberty
exploded for six runs in the inning
and added three more in the sixth
for the 9-3 upset. Coastal scored
their runs on just six hits. Starter
Lisa Paganini took the loss,
pitching 4 13 innings before
being replaced by Jami Bendle.
Paganini finished the season with
a 10-7 mark. Going into the game,
Coastal had an 0-9 record against
ECU.
Junior slugger Isonette
Polonius
said that
going into
t h e
tournament,
the team felt
their
chances
were good of
coming away
with a tide.
"I was
pretty
confident
that we
would come
back home
Polonius said.
Keisha Shepperson
FILE PHOTO
with the win
"I can't really tell
you what happened, because I
don't know myself
When asked if the team was
overconfident after dominating
the Big South regular season,
Shepperson disagreed.
"I think some people might
have been overconfident, but as
a team we were ready to play
Shepperson said. "We got off to a
good stan. We were pumped after
the first game
Shepperson cited crowd noise
as a factor in ECU's upset
"A lot of it had to do with the
crowd Shepperson said. "We
had our share of fans, but they had
more
ECU's loss in the tournament
spoiled an otherwise exciting
week for several Pirate players
who made the Big South all-
conference teams. Polonius won
the league's Most Valuable Player
as well as the Scholar Athlete of
the Year.
"It feels pretty good, but I'm
not thinking about it right now
Polonius said.
Polonius ended the year with a
25-game hitting streak and led the
team in 10 offensive categories.
Her .476 average, 15 home runs
and 62 RBIs ranked among the
national leaders.
Shepperson was named to the
all-conference second team and
won the Big South Rookie of the
Year Award.
"I was excited Shepperson
said. "I didn't expect to win
SEE SOFTBALL PAGE II
Nationally ranked ultimate frisbee team
qualifies for national tournament
ECU's I rates to
compete against
nations best teams
STEVE L0SEV
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
ECU's ultimate frisbee team took
second at the Mid-Atlantic
regionals the weekend of April
25th and 26th. The (rates' wins
qualified them for the national
ultimate frisbee tournament later
this month.
"We're ranked 10th in the
nation right now senior co-
captain Josh Poucher said.
The regionals were played as a
double elimination bracket. The
Irates lost in the third round semi-
finals against NC State and
dropped to the losers bracket,
where they were able to take
second. NC State took first place.
"The only team that gave us
any trouble was NC State senior
Pete Gutowski said.
The Irates pulled off a
comeback against Haverford
College. At one point, the Irates
were losing 6-1, but they came
back and beat them 15-7.
"I felt like the first day we
were slow getting started senior
Mark Ihnot said, "but then we
stepped up and took control when
we needed to. Sunday we
couldn't afford to lose at all
The Irates also played Navy,
UNC-Chapel Hill, U. Penn, and
Lee High.
"It was the first time all season
we had true teamwork and a lot of
the rookies stepped up Ihnot
said.
The national competition will
be played in Blane, Minnesota on
the 29th. 30th and the 31st of
May. The first two days will be
pool play.
The Irates will be assigned to
one of two pools. Each team will
play twice on the 29th and three
times on the 30th. The top two
teams in each pool will advance to
the semifinals. The semifinals
and finals will be held Sunday the
31st.
"I'm pumped up Ihnot said.
"We got as good a chance as
anyone there
"I felt lite the first day we
were slow getting started, but
then we stepped up and took
control when we needed to
Mark Ihnot
Senior, ECU Ultimate Eiisbee
Rice University, Louisiana
State University, Carleton
College, Iowa and University of
Colorado have already qualified
for the nationals. The western
teams haven't played yet, but
Poucher expects Stanford and s
Santa Barbara, last year's
champion, to make a strong
showing.
The Irates lost to Colorado in a
close game earlier this year and
lost to Stanford by two.
Josh Poucher reaches high for a frisbee heading in his way.
PHOTO COURTESY OF JOSH POUCHER
"It'll be
tough
Gutowski
said. "There's
a lot of good
teams. We'll
have to work
hard to
accomplish
our goal,
which is to
win. If we
play to the
pinnacle of
our abilities,
we should do
well
The
victory at
regionals
came only a
few days after
the April 24th
issue of the
Wail Street
Journal carried
an article that
embarrassed
many of the
Irates. The
article
described
ultimate
frisbee as "a
sport where
breaks for beer
are still
common" and
quoted one
Boston player
who said the
behavior of
some of the . . , , � .
other players was "sociopathic According to the Journal, Genes
The article went into great sPat on �PPonents and shouted
detail about the actions of Mike � �,�� �.�r�
Gerics, former coach of the Irates. SE� F"ISBEE PAGE �
Pete Gutowski works his way around his opponents
for the catch.
PHOTO COURTESY OF JOSH POUCHER
Baseball team recovers from Friday loss to
pick up two wins Saturday against JMU
CM tournament to
begnMayl2
Paul Kaplan
SENIOR WRITER
Antainc Jones led the Pirates last
weekend as they beat James
Madison University three games
to two in the series. In Saturday's
double header Antaine Jones
followed up his stellar Friday
night 4-6 hitting performance by
hitting 4-6 again in the first game
and 3-4 in the second. Jones
started off Saturdays second game
at the lead off position where he
destroyed the bail over the right-
center field wall to complement
his seventh inning home run in
the first game. Then two batters
later, still in the first. Junior Steve
Salargo cleared the out field fence
for his seventh home run of the
season to give the Pirates a 2-0
lead early in the game.
"I'm just trying to get out on a
good note, I was hitting the ball
really well all season, they just
finally started falling for me
Jones said after Saturdays
victories.
In the second and third innings
everybody got a chance to hit as
the pirates batted
around in both
innings scoring
nine runs and six
hits, which upped
the lead to 11-0 by
the end of the third
inning. JMU had a
small rally in the
top of the sixth
inning, but it was
not enough as the
Pirates took the W
in Saturday's
second game with a final score of
14-4.
"I think the whole team is
swinging the bat well and the
pitchers are doing their job, it's all
coming together Steve Salargo
said. "This weekend definitely
helps us out, we've got a lot of
momentum going with us and
we're ready to roll right into the
weekend.
i
In Friday night's game the
Pirates fell to JMU in an 11 inning
heart breaker. Although they did
get off to a good start in the
bottom of the first inning when
John Williamson got the Pirates
on the board
with his
thirteenth
home run of
the season
and the
Pirates a 1-0
lead. Then
Senior Ryan
Massimo hit
an RBI single
which was
followed up
by a two RBI
Jason Howard single to up the
Pirates first inning lead to 4-0.
Brooks Jernigan came down off
the mound after pitching eight
and 13 innings with ECU leading
8-6 and throwing seven strike outs
while giving up only three earned
runs. But it was in the top of the
ninth when the Pirates let the
game slip through their fingers, by
giving up two runs to tie up the
game and send it into extra
" think the whole team is
swinging the bat well and
the pitchers are doing their
job, it's all coming
together
Steve Salargo
Junior. ECU baseball
innings where Jeremy
Schumacher took the loss on the
Pamc to make him 0-1. The
irates accumulated six errors in
their 9-8 loss on Friday, which
may have made the difference in
the game.
In Saturday's first game the
Pirates were down 11-7 going into
the sixth inning when ECU
capitalized on two Duke errors to
come with in one run of the lead.
Then in the seventh inning with
two outs and down one run
Antaine Jones hit a solo home run
which tied the game at 11. Then
in the top of the eighth inning
Conrad Clark managed to hold
the Dukes to no runs in the top of
the ninth enabling who else, but
Antaine Jones to hit in pinch
runner Kidah Snev-d for the game
winning run.
"I thought today 'as our best
effort all year, I thought we were
able to come back after a tough
loss yesterday and put it behind
us and come out and play
probably our best ball game of the
year Head Coach Keith LeClair
SEE BASEBALL, PAGE II
Isonette Polonius was named the Big South conference's Most Valuable Player and
also Scholar Athlete of the Year.
VanSant shares
thoughts with TEC
Associate athletic
director predicts future
of success for ECU
RACY H.URR
STAFF WRITER
As the school year winds down,
TEC looked to associate athletic
director Henry VanSant for his
comments on the past year of
ECU athletics and also the future
of the program.
Q: What are some of your
comments on ECU athletics this
year?
A: Well, you know, the 1997-98
year in athletics has honestly not
been one of our better years. We
had our football season, which
was certainly not disastrous, but
with a 5-6 record, we are looking
forward to better things in the
future. Basketball�of course, we
had, you know a 10-17 year there,
which is our first losing season in
the last three years. And Coach
Dooley had two winning seasons
the two previous years and of
course in those two years won
more games than any coach had
won since the late 1950s and 60s.
We finished 2nd in Swimming,
with our women in the
conference, and last year we won
the championship. Our baseball is
struggling a little bit this year, but
they're going to be very good. We
have had a lot of good things, of
course: we've had facility
upgrades and set new records for
season ticket sales and new
records for Pirate Club members.
We do have a lot of good things
that are going on in the athletics
department and we think that the
future of ECU athletics is very
bright.
Q: What is the current
women's basketball coach status
and program predictions?
A Well, very recently we had a
resignation. Our women's
basketball coach resigned, and we
of course were certainly a little
remorseful to see that happen.
Anne Donovan was with us for
three years and we thought that
she was an outstanding coach and
certainly an outstanding person in
the sport of women's basketball,
having been a three-time
Olympian, having two Olympic
gold medals, and playing
professional basketball in both
Japan and Italy. So she really was
an outstanding coach. Coach
Donovan resigned her position as
the head coach here at East
Carolina to take a position in the
women's professional league, the
ABL, as head coach in
Philadelphia. We are, of course,
currently advertising and are
working toward filling the
position of head women's
basketball coach and we
anticipate finding a very good
person to lead that program and
get our women's basketball where
we'd like for it to be. Our goals
and ambitions for women's
basketball are to make them a
nationally competitive program.
We certainly want to get to the
point in the Colonial Athletic
Association that we are competing
for championships with the
currently dominant team, Old
Dominion.
Q: Do you have any
predictions for the 1998 football
Henry VanSant
FILE PHOTO
season?
A: Everything right now is very
optimistic. We've finished spring
practice with our football team. Of
course, Coach Logan and his staff
are very excited about the 1998
season. We
anticipate
having
another good
team. We
have had
very good
football
teams here.
We were 5-6
last year, but
of course in
the year
before that, a
very
outstanding
season. We feel like we can get
our program back to where we can
win the conference USA
championship and qualify for a
bowl game, and certainly have an
opportunity to go back to the
Liberty Bowl. We played in the
Liberty Bowl two years ago and
beat Stanford, which was a really
big feather in the athletic cap here
at East Carolina. So we feel that
next year is going to be another
good year. We have a lot of very
fine talent, had a really good
recruiting class for 1997 and
another good recruiting class in
1998. So 1 feel that football
certainly will head back to success
in 1998.
Q: What are a few comments
about the new upper deck of the
stadium?
A The upper deck is nearing
completion. We are scheduled for
final inspection on that in the
middle of May, but it is, for all
practical purposes completed.
The upper deck�of course what
they're doing right now is what
they call a punch-list, which are a
lot of minor corrections, some
water sealing, some painting, a
little bit of grinding, mostly
cosmetic work, aesthetic things,
of course little mistakes that are
made here and there, and it is, as
I said, completed except for these
few minor details. I'm very
anxious for us to get that open,
and we do plan on having some
sort of Open House up there in
the middle of the summer, maybe
June or early July. We do want to
have an Open House and let
people go up there because it's an
absolutely fine facility�8,000
seats in the upper deck and a
concourse that actually will hold
SEE VANSANT, PAGE 20






17 Tundiy, May 5. 1898
sports
The Eatt Carolinian
Pirate Club extends benefits
K
X
y, MCMurphy'e
BAB & GBILII M
3TV�3
YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD
RESTAURANT
Featuring appetizers, salads, sandwiches,
and freshly made soups and desserts. Grilled
entrees including steaks, seafood, pork,
chicken, and also unique pasta dishes.
WATCH YOUR FAVORITE
SPORTS EVENT
Bring your family, office group, dinner date,
or just meet friends for neighborhood
hospitality and the easy side of life.
Full service catering and banquet
facilities available
Gall for Details 355-7956
Turnbury Square Shopping Center
to members, fans, athletes
66 percent of adiletic
scholarships donated
by organization
Damon Stafford
SENIOR WRITER
The ECU Pirate Club provides
an opportunity for students and
fans to get the most out of ECU
athletics.
There are eight different
membership levels that start as
low as $25 for a student
membership. Student members
receive a crew level membership
for one-third the price at a $50
discount. By starting their Pirate
Club memberships early, students
can start building priority for
tickets, parking and other benefits
in the future.
A student Pirate Club member
has the opportunity to pick up
their season tickets for basketball,
football and baseball two weeks
before the season starts instead of
having to pick up their tickets for
each individual game. Crew level
members also gain from their
priority to buy bowl game and
away game tickets. Other benefits
include: 20 issues of the Pirate's
Chest newsletter, Pirate Club
bumper stickers, window decals,
membership cards and the
opportunities for away game road
trips. The Pirate Club also hosts
many social events such as
pregame socials and cookouts as
well as many opportunities for the
Pirate Club fans to meet the
coaches on a social basis.
"We need the student body
behind us Assistant Pirate Club
Director Mark Wharton said. "We
feel that across the nation a
successful athletic program is
attributed to student support
In 1997 there were 158 student
Pirate Club members and a goal
of 300 student members has been
set for 1998.
The Pirate Club plays an
astonishing role in the
scholarships handed out at ECU.
Sixty-six percent of the total
scholarships handed out each year
for athletics is donated by the
Pirate Club. In 1997, the 6,050
members donated and raised just
over $2 million. In 1998, the
Pirate Club plans to donate! 1.7
million dollars to ECU athletics
from the $2.27 million they plan
to raise.
"Any athletic program can't
succeed without the support from
the students and fans, student
Lee Pierce said. "With great
support we can continue to grow
and succeed as a great athletic
program
The Pirate Club raised another
$100,000 from the Trade Mart
Golf Classic, Pirate Club Auction
and the Great Pirate PurpleGold
Pigskin Pig-Out Party, which
were all held on Pirate Club
weekend.
After students graduate, the
Pirate Club also offers the young
alumni program for the first three
years which provides membership
at the $150 membership level for
only $25 the first year, $50 the
next and $100 the third.
For more information on the
Pirate Club and student Pirate
Club memberships, contact Mark
Wharton at 328-4540.
Student
Club Benefits
'Pirate Club Membership at the Crew Level
"Opportunity to pick up season tickets for basketball, baseball, and football two
weeks before the season begins
20 issues of the Pirate Chest Newsletter
'Pirate Club Bumper-stickers and window decals
"Invitation to Pirate Club Social Events; pregame socials, cookouts, meet the
coaches socials, and away game road trips
'Priority in purchasing bowl game and away game tickets
'Pirate Club membership cards
Support student-run media
Mst'carolinian
To receive TEC,
check the subscription desired
complete your name, address,
and send in a check or money
order to: circulation dept.
LI First class mail$40
� Student Pubs Bldg
UJ Second class mail$110.00 ECU
Greenville, NC 27858
Subscription! begin with tha first paper tent and run
(or one Ut year
CHECK (TOUT
ontheWEB.
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$400 CASH BONUS
toward purchase or lease
The
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Cigar Lounge DartRoom FmeMetfsGis
Conveniently Located at 642 Arlkigtou VtUap
f( phone 252)359.2023 fax 2S2) 3$3-2
s
w
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or lease your new vehicle between 1498 and 15799. Some customer and vehicle eUgtoUtty restrictions appry. See your dealer tor details
WEEKEND
UNIVERSITY
An experience to last a lifetime.
Summer Session 1998
May 15-August 1
ENGL 1200-005Friday 6:00-10:00 pm
FINA 2244-099Saturday 8:00-12:00 noon
ITEC 2090-099Friday 6:00-10:00 pm
MANF 3300-099Saturday 8:00-12:00 noon
MATH 2283-003Saturday 8:00-12:00 noon
NURS 4000-001Saturday 8:00-12:00 noon
NURS 4001-001002. . Friday 8:00 am-5:00 pm
SOCI 2110-090Saturday 8:00-12:00 noon
Summer weekend classes are open to all ECU
students. See your adviser for approval, then con-
tact the Weekend University. 102 Erwin building.
�������bbi The Weekend University
aaaffl Division of Continuing Studies
East Carolina University
I Greenville, NC 27858 4353
east Telephone: 252 328 4696 or 800 328 6567
Carolina Fax. 252 328 6540
UNIVERSITY f mjo, i
tmmmmmmm E-mail: ceweeknd@mail.ecu.edu
Visit our website at http:www.dcs.ecu.edu
An equal opportunityAffirmative action univereity.
which accommodates the needs of individual with disabilities.






18 Tuttdiy. May 5. 1998
s
The Eilt Carolinian
19 Tutsdi
Football
ready to roll!
New signees look
promising for season
JIM PHELPS
STAFF WHITE
Pirate football is right around the
corner and excitement is in the
air, especially since a good group
has signed to play for the Pirates.
"We have a good, solid class
Offensive Coordinator Doug
Martin said.
All of the new recruits will be
redshirted for the 1998 season.
"We feel good about Troy
Smith, who played Larry
Shannon's position last
season and broke records,
and we have good running
backs in Jamie Wilson and
Leonard Henry
Doug Martin
Offensive Coordinator
"The only way they would
play would be if a starter was
injured Martin said.
. According to Martin, if any of
the new recruits were to see any
playing time this season it would
be at the defensive back position.
The recruiting process for
Pirate football involves the
regional area of the east coast,
from New Jersey down to
Georgia. Some visits to the
homes of prospective players are
made. All the coaches take part
in the recruiting process, and
there are four N.C. recruiting
coaches.
ECU will be playing big
name, tough teams like Alabama
and Virginia Tech this season.
"We look forward to playing
these schools Martin said.
"That's what kids come to school
for, to play big teams
The Pirates finished 4-2 in
Conference USA last season, and
with new recruits like linebacker
Ivan Butler, defensive lineman
Josiah James, and running back
Reggie Hamphill, they are well
on their way to having another
successful season.
ECU lost some great players
to graduation, but there is still a
lot of talent left on the team.
"We feel good about Troy
Smith, who played Larry
Shannon's position last season
and broke records, and we have
good running backs in Jamie
Wilson and Leonard Henry
Martin said.
The Pirates are looking
forward to taking the field in
1998 and are excited about
welcoming their new recruits to
the team.
Baseball
continued from page 16
said after Saturdays games.
This weekend the Pirates will
take on Wake Forest University
Saturday at 5:00 and then Duke
University at 4:00 both games are
at home.
"Were trying to fine tune all
our abilities and be ready to go
into the tournament playing our
best baseball. We're trying to rap
it up playing the best we can, and
go into the tournament on a
high Salargo said.
The CAA Tournament starts
May 12th and runs through the
16th in Kinston, NG.
"I think it's kind of a wide
open tournament, I think any
particular team can win. There is
not one team in the conference
that is not capable of winning the
tournament LeClair said. I
think it is going to come down to
the team that plays the best and
most consistent baseball over a
four of five day period
In Friday night's game Senior
Randy Rigsby surpassed the
career most hits record in the
bottom of the eighth inning with
his 235 hits. Also in the bottom of
the eighth as Rigsby stole second
base he ran through the ECU
mark for most stolen bases in a
season with 67. Rigsby is also just
two games away from breaking
the record for most games played
in a career. With eight stolen
bases on Friday night, the Pirates
surpassed the most stolen bases
record in a game. In Saturday's
games Conrad Clark(l-O) took
the win in the first game after
pitching two 23 innings, giving
up one hit with three K's. In the
second gamethe W wen to Travis
Thompson.
Frisbee
continued (torn page 16
obscenities at opposing coaches.
"GericsJ coached us two years
ago Poucher said. "We sort of
fired him because of) a lack of
leadership abilities, a difference of
opinion, and because a lot of us
played with him and it didn't
work out
Poucher and his teammates
had seen Gerics behave in
manners similar to what the
Journal described.
"I wasn't there to witness the
spitting incident Poucher said,
"but I did see him strike another
player. He actually hit me when
he was playing on another team
According to Poucher, an
argument about questionable
calls escalated. Many people
"ganged up on" Gerics and were
yelling at him.
"He said he thought I was
going to hit him, which was, no
way impossible Poucher said.
The Irates had to forget what
the Journal had said and
concentrate on the regionals.
"We just tried to put the
article out of our minds
Gutowski said. "It described the
state of things and the way Mike
Gerics plays, but that shouldn't be
used as a measuring stick for the
ECU ultimate team, the Irates,
and ultimate in general
The Journal reported that
more players of ultimate frisbee
are calling for officials to be
present at more games. Ultimate
frisbee is a sport that is usually
played without officials. The only
time referees, which ultimate
players call "observers are used
are during high level tournament
games.
"I don't think there's a strong
need for observers Poucher said.
"The way ultimate's played, you
make your own calls. If the
players can't come to an
agreement, it's just, like, a do-
over
Poucher said that observers
will be at nationals.
Softball
continued from page 16
Both players will be returning
next year and both say that ECU
will have a strong team.
"The freshmen had a lot of
experience this year Polonius
said of ECU's six first year
players. "It will be tough, but I
think we will be able to bring
home the trophy next year
Shepperson agrees that the
future looks promising for this
young team.
"I think we'll be just as good
next year, if not better
Shepperson said.
For more information, visit our
Web site at www.tec.ecu.edu.
Rules of Ultimate Frisbee
�Each team has seven players.
� The object of the game is to pass the frisbee down the field across
the opponents goal line.
�The field is 70 yards long.
�Running with the frisbee is not allowed.
� After a player catches the frisbee. it must be passed to another player
before he or she can move.
�The frisbee has to be thrown within a 10 second "stall count' that is
called by defenders.
� Possession switches when the frisbee is intercepted, thrown out of
bounds, or touches the ground.
�Tackling and stripping the frisbee is not allowed.
� Matches are usually played to a score of 15 or 21 and usually last 90
minutes.
�The overhand toss is called the "hammer" and a long bomb is called a
'huck
Checkout
our new web address
K�
WWW.TEC.ECU.EDU
1998 Big South Conference
Softball All-Conference Team
First Team
First Base:
Third Base:
Outfield:
Pitcher:
Jennifer Halpern
Isonette Polonius
Amy Hooks
Denise Reagan
Second Team
Second Base:
Short Stop:
Pitcher:
Keisha Shepperson
Marnie Oursler
Jami Bendle
Individual Awards
Most Valuable Player
Isonette Polonius
Rookie of the Year
Keisha Shepperson
$
$

$
;
$ v � $
, Bonus Bucks,
REE thirtT,
Top Ten Reasons to Sell Your Books
Back to Dowdy Student Stores
$

$
$. $
$ $
10. I'm sure that I have something left to pierce.
9. Those books aren't in my major, are they?
8. I'm still broke from SPRING BREAK!
7. What was that class anyway?
6. I'd like hamburger in my hamburger helper, please.
5. What summer job?
4.1 want to test the theory that
"money can't buy happiness
3. Hello, Saturday Night!
2. It's Tattoo season
1. THREE WORDS
RENT, PHONE, UTILITIES!
-X
Simply sell back four or more books to
ECU-Dowdy Student Stores and receive a FREE
promotional t-shirt. Starts Tuesday, May 5. Limited to first 500 students.
aw a - � -� �� � � � �
New Policy
ECU Student ID required
for buyback transaction.

Spring 1998 Book Buyback Hours and Locations: Tuesday, May 5 - Thursday, May 14
Wright Building:
Monday - Friday: 8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. Saturday, May 9:9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Remote Buyback Trailers: 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Tuesday - Friday, May 5-8 & Monday - Thursday, May 11-14
On the Hill $�0$ Speight Bus Stop $G3$ Mendenhall Bus StopSouth of Greene Hall
Ronald E. Dowdy
YF
fenttfto
.ere your dollars support scholars!
PI , i" a t , �
s
$
O & O IJv
BE ON THE LOOKOUT! Bookbag and textbook thefts tend to increase
around buyback time. Keep a watchful eye on your stuff! ECU-Dowdy
Student Stores will provide bookbag check-in service, May 4 through
exams for your protection while shopping.
tt
h
Duke
ba
RALEIGH
hit a two-ru
Reid went
in a 4-2
Carolina St;
Duke (37-1
Conference
first inning,
with a dou
single by
followed wi
The Blu
Michael Fl
walk in the
State (34-1
board in the
Craig Lee 1
on a groun
added anotl
a wild pitch.
Reid (9
gave up one
Grant Dc
giving up fo
Bulls
DURHAM i
second homi
solo shot to!
Broi
GUARAI
one kno
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writing. i
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Power Window. &
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Wright Building 328-6731 www.studentstores.ecu.edu Hours: Monday - Friday: 7 am - 7 pm & Saturday: 9 am - 3 pm





19 TwsiUy, May 5. 1998
The Ettt Carolinian
Duke tops State on
baseball field
RALEIGH (AP) � Ed Conrey
hit a two-run home run and Brent
Reid went eight innings for Duke
in a 4-2 victory over North
Carolina State on Saturday night.
Duke (37-17, 8-15 Atlantic Coast
Conference) took a 3-0 lead in the
first inning. Vaughn Schill led off
with a double and scored on a
single by J.D. Alleva. Conrey
followed with a homer to left.
The Blue Devils led 4-0 after
Michael Fletcher's bases-loaded
walk in the fifth. North Carolina
State (34-19, 12-9) got on the
board in the eighth inning, when
Craig Lee hit a triple and scored
on a groundout. The Wolfpack
added another run in the ninth on
a wild pitch.
Reid (9-3) struck out four and
gave up one run on nine hits.
Grant Dorn (1-2) took the loss,
giving up four runs on six hits.
Bulls beat Toledo
DURHAM (AP) � Greg Blosser's
second home run of the game � a
solo shot to start the bottom of the
fifth inning � proved to be the
difference as the Durham Bulls
beat Toledo 6-4 Sunday in the
International League.
The Bulls have won nine of
their last 10 games.
Blosser hit his first homer in
the opening inning off Mud Hens
pitcher Seth Greisinger (2-1) as
Durham jumped out to a 4-0 lead.
Toledo scored two times in the
fourth on a home run by Ira Smith
and an RBI single by Jesse Ibarra.
Blosser's second blast of the game
extended Durham's lead to 5-2.
Toledo added single runs in the
sixth and in the seventh, when
Del Marine hit a solo homer.
Scott Aldred (2-3) gave up five
hits in six innings of work to earn
the victory for Durham. Mark
Eichhom retired all four batters
he faced to record his fifth save
this year.
Hornets tickets for playoff
game with Bulls on sale
CHARLOTTE (AP) � Tickets
for the fourth game of Charlotte's
playoff series with the Chicago
Bulls go on sale Monday morning
at 10 a.m.
The third game of the series
has already sold out the Charlotte
Coliseum.
Team officials say tickets for
the fourth game on May 10 are
available in all price categories.
There will be a limit of four
tickets per customer.
Purchases can be made
through the Coliseum box office
or through TicketMaster outlets.
Game times have yet to be
announced.
Pennington resigns as
athletic director at
UNC-Pembroke
PEMBROKE, N.C. (AP) �
Raymond Pennington announced
his retirement Saturday after 14
years as athletics director at the
University of North Carolina at
Pembroke. Pennington first
joined Pembroke as head baseball
coach in 1964 and led the Braves
to a 114-32 record, still the best
winning percentage in school
history among baseball coaches.
"Over the past five years, we
have been able to increase our
athletic scholarships; however,
there is still a lot more needed to
be done he said in a release. I
think the time is right for me to
step down and bring in new
leadership.
Pennington's retirement will
take effect July 31, and the school
says it has already formed a search
committee to find a successor.
The Greensboro, N.C, native led
the athletics program from the
National Association of
Intercollegiate Athletics level to
its current Division II status with
the National Collegiate Athletic
Association.
UNC-Greensboro to meet
Citadel on diamond,
Davidson eliminated
CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) �
Lance Surridge batted 4-for-6 and
drove in three runs as top-seeded
UNC-Greensboro defeated
Furman 14-2 in the Southern
Conference tournament. With
Friday's win, the Spartans
advanced to meet second-seeded
Citadel, a 5-0 winner over
Western Carolina on Friday.
Western Carolina meets Wofford
in the losers bracket. Surridge
gave up six hits and two earned
runs in the win, while Jason
Parsons pitched three shutout
innings for the save. Furman took
a 1-0 lead, but the Spartans
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answered in the fourth. They
broke the game open with four
runs in the top of the sixth and
tacked on three more, runs in the
eighth and five in the final inning.
Toby David took the loss for the
Paladins, who were to play
Georgia Southern today. Georgia
Southern advanced by defeating
Davidson 6-3 Friday behind the
pitching of Danny Washburn, who
struck out 12 Wildcats. Washburn
gave up eight hits and two earned
runs. Wes Self took the loss as the
Wildcats ended their season at 12-
38.
Ammaccapane takes
women's Masters
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla.
(AP) � One of the first things
Danielle Ammaccapane did after
winning the Titleholders
Championship was to cancel her
flight home to Phoenix so she
could celebrate without feeling
rushed.
She also figured it was time to
readjust her goals.
Her confidence was so low at
the start of the season that
Ammaccapane was simply striving
to play on the weekend.
Now, she might even allow
herself a peak at the Solheim Cup.
"I'm not just trying to make
cuts anymore the golfer said
Sunday evening. "I want to go
win some golf tournaments now
If she can play the way she did
Sunday, shooting a 1-undcr 71 in
tough scoring conditions to win
the Titleholders by one stroke
over Michelle Estill, that
shouldn't be a problem.
"All I can say is, 'I'm back
said Ammaccapane, who finished
at 12-under 276.
Tied with LPGA player of the
year Annika Sorenstam and Carin
Koch, Ammaccapane scrambled
for pars early to stay in the hunt
and-then made steady pars down
the stretch to stay in the lead.
Sorenstam, still looking for her
first victory of the year, fell out of
contention with back-to-back
bogeys and was alone in third at
278.
Koch played in the last group
with Ammaccapane, and had a
chance to get within one of the
lead until she missed a short putt
for bogey on No. 16. She wound
up fourth at 279.
Ammaccapane won $150,000
from the $1 million purse and also
gets a green jacket that goes to the
winner of the Titleholders,
regarded as the women's version
of The Masters when it started in
1937 at Augusta Country Club,
next door to Augusta National.
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I





I
20 Twidiy, M�y 5. 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
VanSant
continued from page 16
those 8,000 people. We also have
men's and women's restrooms up
there with automatic fixtures,
hand washers, and toilets also
have automatic flushers.
Concession stands are very nice,
extremely convenient to the
seating area. We also have a
souvenir shop up there, and the
seats arc absolutely fantastic. Any
seat in the upper deck is a good
scat and makes the playing field
and the game very visibly
accessible. It's completely and
totally handicapped accessible
with fine facilities and seats for
our disabled fans. We certainly
want to encourage people with
disabilities to come to our football
games and they will have some
really first class facilities up there
and will be well taken care of. I
really think that people who visit
the upper deck and who take
advantage of sitting in the upper
deck arc going to find that it is
probably one of the finest upper
decks that you will ever go into. It
is extremely nice.
Q:What are some comments
on the new athletic facility that is
being planned?
A: We are planning a new
athletic facility which will go
between Minges Coliseum and
Dowdey- Ficklen Stadium, and it
will actually house a strength
training facility and will have a
multi-purpose room or! the
second floor which will have a
banquet hall and will serve many
purposes like conventions or
whatever. Of course it will be
used for pre-game and post-game
entertainments. It's a total of
52,000 square feet. at a cost of
slightly 10 million dollars. Dennis
Young, who is our executive
director of the Pirate Club here is
putting together right now the
campaign to go out and raise
money, and that will be built with
donations from the East Carolina
Constigency, through our Pirate
Club.We are working on that and
hope that it will be started within
the next 18 months to two years.
But that is going to be a very fine
facility and a great addition to the
campus, which will also give us
some banquet and meeting
facilities that we have not had on
this campus that will serve many
of the different components that
go to make up the university.
Q: What are some of your
predictions for ECU athletics in
the future?
A: We really feel like the future
of ECU athletics is very bright. Of
course, the younger students who
are here now really do not realize
where we have come from. But I
have been privileged to have
been on the East Carolina
University campus since 1957,
which is getting close to 41 years
now. I did have an absence which
kept me away for a few years, but
I have seen the growth and
development of East Carolina
University, and we have had so
many things that have happened
on this campus. Of course, on the
main campus there's the new
General Classroom building and
the new student recreation center
is something I think students
should be very proud of and
happy about. I use that myself. I
go over there and walk on the
. track and it's just an absolutely
fantastic facility. The new library
has been one of the big
contributors to East Carolina
University gaining Doctoral II
status. We here in athletics have
seen the development of the
Williams arena of Minges
Coliseum,the development of
Harrington Field, our baseball
field, our practice facilities,
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium. And I
happen to have been here when
we dedicated the original Ficklen
Stadium as it was known at that
time. It was a 17,000 seat facility
and we dedicated that in 1963 in a
game against Wake Forest
University, which East Carolina
won 20-10. I have seen all these
things and now, I think it's the
third expansion of the stadium.
We have grown to really being a
major Division I athletic program
and I see this as the cause of a
very bright future. This is
basically because of our alumni
and our supporters and the large
number of people we have now in
the community and in those
surrounding ones attending our
athletic contests. They have all
done a great job and I think we
are going to continue to grow at a
very rapid rate here. East Carolina
University is going to be a major
player on the national athletic
scene.
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British boxer in critical condition following surgery
LONDON (AP) � British boxer
Spencer Oliver was in critical
condition Sunday following brain
surgery to remove a blood clot
suffered in his European super-
bantamweight title fight against
Ukrainian Sergei Devakov.
The 22-ycar-old Oliver, who
was on a ventilator following
three-hour operation to remove
the clot, was knocked down for
the second time in the Saturday
bout in the 10th round. It was his
fourth defense of his European
title.
"The operation lasted three
hours and he is now in a critical
but stable condition in intensive
care where he is on a ventilator
said a spokesman of the National
Hospital in London.
Oliver had won his previous 14
fights and was ahead on points
when Devakov floored him with a
right hand in the fight at Royal
Albert Hall in west London.
The champion staggered back,
crashed to the floor and pulled
himself up at the nine count
before French referee Alfred
Azaro stopped the fight.
He was also knocked down in
the first round by a left hook.
Oliver, nicknamed the Omen,
was a silver medalist at the
Commonwealth Games in
Canada in 1994.
The incident comes two weeks
after fellow British boxer Chris
Eubank was treated in hospital
following his defeat in a punishing
12-round championship bout.
Searching for Student Living
That's Out of this World?
21 Tuesda'
Las
H
CHARLOI
of the ori
retiring.
Since
Bailey has
pranced am
the Chariot!
pull out i
thousands
Charlotte C
She out
Johnson,
Mourning ;
Bogues. Bai
when thi
struggled ti
playoff con
was there
Honeybees
identity as
ambassador:
Juggling
home-healtl
graduate
Honeybees'
much, she n
But she i
the Hornets
this year.
"The Grandaddy of All Beach Music Festivals"
Saturday, May 16th, 1998 � 9:30am - 5:00pm
ARROW
drinking water
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No an





Carolinian
:heck
is out
Elates
und
iville
torage
per Drive
(190, Ask
borah
�g
21 Tmtd.y, Miy 6, 1898
sports
Thi Eilt Ctroliniin
Last of original Hornet
Honeybees to tetire
CHARLOTTE (AP) �The last
of the original Honeybees is
retiring.
Since 1991, Kim �
Bailey has danced and
pranced and pleaded for
"Every time I go out there
now, I'm like 'I've got to live this
one up. This may be the
very last game, Bailey
"There's sa'c " 'ot �f Pf�P'c don't
1 They don't
understand,
the Charlotte Hornets to nothing like two know how much it's been
SusanTTtr 'othreettmesa Jgtf �
Charlotte Coliseum. week, getting the cheerleader
She outlasted Larry . The Hornets don't.
Johnson, Alonzo yuugei Lagt Saturday they had
Mourning and Muggsy from dancing in her ride on the back of the
Bogues. Bailey was there
when the Hornets
struggled to become a
playoff contender. She
was there when the
Honeybees found their
identity as the team's
ambassadors.
Juggling work as a
home-health nurse,
graduate school and
Honeybees' schedule is
much, she now says.
But she is making the most of
the Hornets' playoff appearance
this year.
front of
thousands of
people
Kim Bailey
Dancer for Ihe Charlotte
Hornets
the
too
Harley-Davidson with
team mascot Hugo during
player introductions. And
in the fourth quarter, the
big screen flashed a
message saying that
Bailey was retiring.
The crowd applauded.
She cried.
"There's nothing that will
ever take the place of this Bailey
said.
"There's nothing like two to
three times a week, getting the
rush you get from dancing in front
of thousands of people
Baseball issue becomes heated as vote nears
GREENSBORO (AP) � In
Forsyth and Guilford counties, it
won't be a political candidate who
gets the most
number of absentee ballots cast
by Friday, officials in the two
counties said they expect a
turnout of more than
30 percent of
voters
attennon on pnmary tf ,� Ope
Voters there will where the traffic is at. Tuesday, rather than
decide whether to Ti Jnm� an,�rnm,tthe 1S t0 20 percent
spend tax dollars to I he damn government that js usua1)or a
build a stadium for a does not have the right primary election.
h�tL JSSSf c�me in here and tellPiously it's not the
baseball stadium. primary (driving the
Just a day before the us what to do " high absentee vote) �
it's baseball said
Tome Durham George Gilbert,
A resident of Greensboro Guilford County's
elections director.
Anger boiled over into
a verbal confrontation
between opponents and
supporters Saturday at an
informational meeting at the
Piedmont Triad Farmers Market
for an informational event
sponsored by the League of
Women Voters. Volunteers from
election, the stadium
battle had reached a
pitch rarely seen in
races for political
office.
The proposal on
the ballot calls for levying a tax of
1 cent on the dollar on prepared
foods and a 50-cent tax on
stadium tickets to pay no more
than two-thirds of the cost of a
stadium.
Based on the unusually large
both Vote Yes for Major League have not been typical during the
Baseball and Citizens Against Triad's most hotly debated issue
Unfair Taxes in years,
attended the event. ' "It's unfortunate
JSfiSS! ��mi5h. "of Z
began to wind down, tempers got a little out thoughtful questions
' that all kinds of people
A group of residents
who live in an area
where the stadium, if
approved, may be
built, crowded
around Vote Yes
campaign director
Walt Klein, firing
questions.
"You're not going
to be where the
crime is at shouted
Tom Durham, a resident of the
area. "You're not going to be
where the traffic is at. The damn
government does not have the
right to come in here and tell us
what to do.
Klein said such exchanges
of hand, but 1 guess if t
it were my property the past six or eight
and land, I might get J� �� ��
that way, too League Baseball
proposal Klein said.
Karen Michailo of
Citizens Against
Unfair Taxes said she
regretted but
understood the
incident.
"It's unfortunate that tempers
got a little out of hand, but I guess
if it were my property and land, I
might get that way, too Michailo
said.
Karen Michailo
A member ofCimtns Against
Unfair bias
SOtP
ostf
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TuwUy. May S, 1998
Tht East Carolinian
t
FOR RENT
R1NGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE NEEDED IN house
next to campus ASAP. $200 a month
plus utilities. Call Jeff or Shawn at
757-8738.
ROOMS FOR RENT- available im-
mediately. No security deposit.
Large house close to campus. Vol-
leyball court and fenced in yard. Very
cheap. $25 utilities and $175 rent.
Call Dennis @ 328-8203.
NEED A PLACE TO STAY??? 2
spaces are available in a nice 3 bed-
room, 2 bath apartment 2 blocks
from campus. $187.00 per month &
13 utilities, free watersewer &
basic cable. Call now 931-9005, ask
for Kim or Tamika.
DUPLEX FOR RENT: 2 bedrooms.
1 bath. 1204 Forbes St. (close to
campus). $300 per month. Pets OK.
($100 deposit). Call 752-3333.
SOMEONE NEEDED TO take over
lease of one bedroom, one bath apt.
Heatair, washerdryer hookup, on
bus route. Available May 17th. Call
754-2604.
DUPLEX FOR RENT, freshly
painted 3 bedroom, 1 bath, kitchen
with stove and refrigerator, washer
dryer hookup, almost 1200 square
feet. $475month. One year lease,
security deposit. Call Taylor Rentals,
LLC 752-3850.
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO share
two bdrm. townhouse on ECU bus
route. $200 a month 12 phone,
utilities. Call 752-3855, leave mes-
sage.
ECU AREA, NICE, CLEAN, two
bedroom. Quiet neighborhood, cen-
tral heat, window air. Off street park-
ing, small pets OK. Call 830-9502.
WILSON ACRES, SECOND sum-
mer roommate needed, male or fe-
male. Swimming pool and free ten-
nis lessons. Call Justin, 328-3135.
SEEKING STUDIOUS, MALE or fe-
male student to share 2 bedroom, 1
12 bath apt. Washerdryer, dish-
washer, watersewer, cable in-
cluded. $187.50 plus 12 utilities.
Call Patrick, 758-8441
SEEKING STUDIOUS
UPPERCLASSgrad student to
share 2 bedroom apt. 1 12 bath,
washerdryer, dishwasher, water
sewer, cable. $187.50 plus T2 utili-
ties. Call Patrick 758-8441.
1 OR 2 ROOMMATES needed
ASAP. Nice 3 bedroom house on Elm
Street 1 block from campus. Cheap
rent. Call Josh for more details. 752-
2560.
NEED TO SUBLEASE two bedroom
one bath apartment for the summer.
Call 757-3598.
THREE BEDROOM DUPLEX East
3rd Street available June 1 to share
with one other person. Call Alice
561-7981.
ONE BEDROOM FOR RENT at Tar
River Estates. $350month through
July plus option to stay. Free water
sewer; next to pool. Call Jenny 413-
0864.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
share three bedroom 2 12 bath
townhouse $225. 12 phone and
utilities on ECU bus route. Call 919-
335-4917 Leave message. Needed
July or August 1 st.
ROOMMATE NEEDED JUNE 1 to
share 3 bedroom house. $200 a
month plus 13 utilities. Contact
Greg 758-1686.
SEEKING STUDIOUS, CONSID-
ERATE, responsible individual, fe-
malegrad student preferred, duplex,
Wyndham Circle on bus route or
short walk to ECU. No pets, non-
smoker. Call JC, 931-9090.
FREE CABLE, NO DEPOSIT. Room-
mate needed starting Aug. '98. 2
story townhouse. W0, 3 bdrms 2
12 baths. Great location. 13 utili-
ties, $225mo. Call Ashley 9 353-
1286.
"EL ROLANDO" ELEGANT, spa-
cious example of Frank Lloyd Wright
architecture, 4 bedrooms, 3 baths,
3 fenced yards, washer, dryer, pretty
foliage, near ECU 8- PCMH.
$999.00month, 524-5790.
3 BEDROOM, 2.5 BATH town-
house in quiet neighborhood.
Washer and dryer. Availability is ne-
gotiable. If interested please call 353-
6505.
MOVING TO GREENVILLE for
school or work? Home Relocation
and Referral Service can make that
move easier! Relocation packets with
rental listings, guided tours of
Greenville and area rental properties,
plus much more. Call 919-830- 5559
or visit http:
wwwrelocatetogreenvillenc.com for
more information.
PEONY GARDENS TWO bedroom
1 12 bath apartments $375. Stove,
Refrigerator, Dishwasher, Washer &
Dryer. Free Cable. Water & Sewer,
Wainright Property Management
LLC 756- 6209
CANNON COURT & CEDAR
COURT. Two bedroom 1 12 bath
Townhouses. On ECU Bus Route,
Stove, Refrigerator. Dishwasher,
Washer 8- Dryer Connections.
Wainright Property Management
LLC 756-6209
FOR RENT: 1 BEDROOM, 1 bath
apartment $275.00 per month. Free
watersewer, range, refrigerator,
pets OK. Call 758- 1921 ask for Ken.
WALK TO ECU, 1, 2. 3.4, & 5 bed-
room unitshouses; Available June,
July, or Aug. Call 321-4712.
RENT REDUCED FOR summer!
Sublease two bedroom apartment,
washerdryer available with deposit.
Call 754-1939.
COLLEGE VIEW 2 bedroom apart-
ments. Newly remodeled. Free
cable, stove, refrigerator, washer
dryer hookups, ground floor, ECU
bus line. Affordable. 931-0790.
SUMMER ROOMMATE, CUTE
apartment, your own bedroom and
bathroom, washerdryer in apart-
ment, very close to campus. Call
Kathleen 752-2705.
HOUSING FOR FALL SEMESTER!
Three bedroom, 2 12 bath 2- story
townhome, overlooks pool, Twin
Oaks, 1800 square feet. 1.5 miles
from ECU off 14th Street. No pets.
Available August. $595 monthly.
Large kitchen and fenced patio with
storage. Rusty. 355-3620.
SPACIOUS ONE BEDROOM apart-
ment available end of May to sub-
lease June. July and August with
option to extend lease. On-site laun-
dry and pool. Near campus. Call
Amber 413-0891.
TWO BEDROOM, TWO bath in
Dockside for rent. If interested,
please call 551-3455.
ONE BLOCK FROM CAMPUS, 2
female roommates needed to sub-
lease 4 bedroom house for summer.
$135 rent 14 utilities. W&D. Must
like pets. Call 757-1467.
CHRISTIAN NURSERY
WORKERS NEEDED
SUNDAY MORNINGS
9:15- 12:15
Additional hours available.
Jarvis Memorial United Methodist Church.
510 S.Washington St.
Apply at church office.
Office hours - Bam - 12 noon,
and 1:30 - 5:00 pm.
Attention
College Students!
We want reliable honest,
high energy, people to
scout cotton.
McLawhorn Crop Services
PO. Box 370
Cove City, 28523
Mail or Fax Resume, ASAP
Fax: 252 637 2125
(Near Greenville, Kinston,
New Bern)
3 OR 4 BEDROOM HOUSE for
rent. 5 blocks from campus, fenced
in backyard, central heat & AC. Avail-
able August. Call 551- 5025.
FORREST ACRES ONE & two bed-
room $300-$345. Stove, refrigera-
tor, free water & sewer, on ECU bus
route. Wainright Property Manage-
ment LLC 756-6209.
1 OR 2 ROOMMATES needed
ASAP. Nice 3 bedroom house on Elm
Street 1 block from campus. Cheap
rent. Call Josh for more details, 752-
2560.
S BEDROOM, 2 BATH house for
rent. 12 acre wooded lot com-
pletely fenced in. Central heat & AC,
built in brick patio, next to Pi Kappa
Phi fraternity house. Available Au-
gust. Call 551-5025.
DUPLEX FOR RENT 2 blocks from
campus. Inside completely remod-
eled, central heat & AC. large back-
yard. One available now, one avail-
able August. Call 551-5025.
3 BEDROOM HOUSES IN Univer-
sity Area beginning May- Septem-
ber. $60O-$700. Also one bedroom
apartmentswalking distanceutili-
ties included for $305. 757-9387
ECU AREA 3 BEDROOMS, 1 bath,
central gas heat and window AC
unit. Washer, dryer included, pets
OK. $550.00 month, yard work in-
cluded. Call 830-9502.
ECU AREA 6 BEDROOMS, 2 baths
house. Central heat and air down-
stairs. Huge rooms, pets OK. Avail-
able June 1st for $950.00 a month.
Call 830-9502.
HELP WANTED
SUMMER JOB: CAMP Caroline is
hiring summer staff. Located near
beach in Pamlico County. Call John
Latham. Caretaker at 919-249-0848
for more information.
VAN'S HARDWARE HAS opening
for a person with sales experience
and hardware knowledge and who
is able to load and unload merchan-
dise. Lifting is involved. Must be per-
sonable and hard working. Serious
inquiries only. See Van or Cynthia
Everett at 1300 N. Greene St M-F
7:30-5:30, Saturday 7:30 to 3:00.
Phone 758-2420.
STOCKPERSON NEEDED. 20-25
hours per week. Duties to include
delivery and warehousestore main-
tenance. Applicants must have a
valid driver's license and excellent
driving record. Experience driving a
box delivery van is necessary. Posi-
tion requires heavy lifting. Applicant
chosen will be energetic, enthusias-
tic, honest, outgoing, and drug free.
Apply in person at Trader Kate's, The
Plaza Mall, 714 East Greenville Bou-
levard. 355-5283.
Port-Time Jobs
Earn Mone, -
KesjT Experience
jfkma Fo'
ON LINE
COLLECTIONS
MAILROOM ASSISTANT 3:45-
5:46 p.m. M-F, file clerk 5-8 p.m. M-
F. Respond in writing to Recruiting
Coordinator, PO Box 1246,
Greenville. NC 27835-1246.
Summer Childcare wanted - Look-
ing for mature non-smoking student
with previous childcare experience
to supervise two children, ages 8
and 13. from 8:30-1:30, Mondays
through Fridays, June-August. Must
have own transportation and strong
references. Call evenings: 752-6372.
SUMMER AT THE BEACH.
Wanted: 3 or 4 students to help op-
erate The Maze of Atlantic Beach
and Emerald Isle. Full or part-time,
day or night. Call 919-354-3827,
Emerald Isle, after 7:00 p.m.
SUMMER CHILDCARE NEEDED
for two children (36-7) Monday
through Thursday, possible some
Fridays 8am until 6pm June 8 to
August 14. Own transportation and
references required. Call 758-5806
or 707-2822.
FULL TIME SUMMER employment
available. Maintenance person
needed May 1st through August
18th for apartment community. Pre-
fer persons experienced in general
maintenance and plumbing. Apply
in person at 214 Elm St. 5
Greenville, N.C.
SUMMER WORK: FULL and part-
time available.11.15 to start. Schol-
arships awarded. Great resume ex-
perience. Call for info, 353-0025.
WANTED: FULL-TIME CHILD care
provider to care for infant in our resi-
dence 8:00 am to 6.00 pm begin-
ning late July. Requires 10 month
minimum work commitment, safe
driving record, own transportation,
non-smoker, swimming skills, & CPR
certification. Experience necessary.
Salary: $300 weekly, social secu-
rity 6- paid vacation. Please send let-
ter specifying qualifications with
phone no. to "Nanny Post Office
Box 8088, Greenville. NC 27835.
GET ON BOARD NOW. the areas
top adult entertainment is once
again searching for beautiful ladies.
If you have what it takes to be a Play-
mate, call 747-7686. Snow Hill.
WORK OUT WE St Live like a
gypsy. Work your butt off & get paid
for it. Must have 2.75 GPA. Call 919-
933-7716.
CAROLINA POOL.MANAGE-
MENT, Inc. Now hiring for Summer
1998. Pool Managers, Lifeguards,
Swim Instructors. Charlotte: Raleigh;
Greensboro; NC. Greenville; Colum-
bia, SC. For Information (704) 889-
4439
AIM HIGH AIR FORCE Put your sci-
ence of engineering degree to work
for an aerospace leader. Consider
being an Air Force officer. Excelling
training and benefits. For a free in-
formation package call 1-800-423-
USAF
AIRLINE EMPLOYMENT- ENTRY
levelskilled. Excellent travel ben-
efits. Ask us how! 517-336-0968 Ext.
L53621
CRUISE SHIP ft LAND-Tour Jobs-
Excellent benefits. World Travel. Ask
us how! 517-324-3090 ext. C53624
MorvFrtto 9 p in
S�l tin to Noon
ONLINE Collodions s - ,
lor tfe 10 mos! agj-eos
paopie or. HCu scarrs tc wwk
asleiepoecoiiecici Th
perfectparMimeioc Exieiien:
pay. Our gracis ges hired based en
on tn�if experience wpriartjjj for
y$ We also have a tev. �.
oper �you have
alterncorj wK
Murphy at 754-161 5 c Pat
Hutch n� A! 757-2130
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
C919) 496-2X24
A
CAMPPIXHWOOD
COUNsSoTrlUCTOFtS
for private Co-ed
youth camp located in the beautiful
mountains of Western North Carolina.
Over 25 activities, including All sports,
water skiing, heated pool, tems, art
616 to 817Eam $1300-1700 plus
room, meals, laundry & great fun!
Non-smokers calltor
applicationbrochure:
800-832-5539 anytimel
Summer Camp Counselors!
Over 50 positions open in Tennis,
Waterskiing, Sailing, Swim, Boating,
Landsports,Wilderness and More
Wicosuta for girls in NH & Cedar for boys in Maine
Excellent SalaryTravel, RoomBoard
Wicosuta (girfc) 800-846-9476
Email: wicocartip@ultranetcom
Cedar (Boys): 888-844-8080
Email: campcedar@aol.com
DISABLED MAN SEEKS physical
assistance. Flexible hours mornings
afternoonsevening. Lifting, bath-
ing, domestic chores, driving. Excel-
lent opportunity for helping profes-
sional. $6hour. Call 830-6028.
GREENVILLE RECREATION AND
Parks looking for part-time tennis in-
structors. Experience required. Pay
is $5.15hr. 16-20 hoursweek.
Work hours vary. Needed June thru
early August. Call 830-4559.
SUMMER JOBS IN RALEIGH.
Clothing wholesaler is seeking to fill
full and part-time positions this sum-
mer. We offer flexible schedules and
regular pay raises. Must be able to
lift 70 lbs. and have dependable
transportation. Call 1-800-849-9949
and leave name and number.
NOW HIRING FOR Summer- Pool
managers and lifeguards to work at
prestigious clubs in Cary, Chapel Hill,
Durham, Goldsboro, Holly Springs,
Greenville, Wilson and Rocky Mount.
Call 1-800-929-1214 for more infor-
mation.
BARTENDERS NEEDED. MUST be
21. Apply at Pastime Billiards in
Kinston. 527-7828
WANTED: SUMMER CHILDCARE
for two boys, ages 8 and 10. Need
energetic, nurturing person who
likes to play with children. Duties will
include transporting children to and
from activities, such as the pool.
Hopefully in the Fall will continue as
part-time caregiver as well as office
work. Call 756-0684.
SUMMER JOBS AVAILABLE.
Joan's Fashions, a local Women's
Clothing Store, is now recruiting for
summer positions. Employees are
needed for Saturdays and weekdays
between 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
The positions are for between 7 and
20 hours per week, depending on
your schedule and on business
needs. The jobs are within walking
distance of the university and the
hours are flexible. Pay is commen-
surate with your experience and job
performance and is supplemented
by an employee discount. Apply in
person to Store Manager, Joan's
Fashions, 423 S. Evans Street,
Greenville (on the Downtown Mall).
SUMMER CAMP STAFF NEEDED
for Girl Scout camps in coastal NC.
Positions include administrative staff,
counselors, nurse, lifeguards, boat-
ing instructors, and kitchen staff. Call
1-800-558-9297 ext. 113 for more
information and application.
BABYSITTER NEEDED FOR sum-
mer. Monday thru Friday daytime
hours. Must provide own transpor-
tation. No housework or cooking re-
quired. If interested call Cindy at
355-3476 after 5:00.
WORK ON YOUR TAN and get
paid too. Easy PT work at Greenville
and outer banks area golf courses.
Call Steve at 919859-9233 for de-
tails.
FOR SALE
POOL TABLE, 4 FT. x 8 ft $600
nego. Weight bench with 260 lbs.
of weights, $225 nego. Five-drawer
dresser, $35. Ask for Matt. 754-
2829.
BEDROOM FURNITURE. 5-piece;
desk and wall unit set, $125 or best
offer. Must go. Perfect for student.
Other furniture available as well. Call
830-9385.
TREK 7000, MANITOU shock.
Deare components, Vetta Speedo
$550, Cerwin-Vega 15 inch, great
condition, $500. Dorm fridge, $40.
For info call 830-2870.
SELLING EVERYTHING! DESKS,
couches, tables, entertainment sys-
tem, etc. Call 752-9319 for more info.
SCUBA GEAR: ENDURO BC,
Quantum Regulator with XP
Octupus, Console with depth (w
mdi) and pressure gauges and com-
pass, Orca Skinny Dipper Computer
and large dive bag. Equipment in
excellent condition and serviced
annually. Original manuals. Package
price $550. Call Tom Younce 328-
4390.
1986 KAWASAKI NINJA. Low
mileage, one owner-female. All ac-
cessories included. $2000.00. Call
Kristin, 752-4522.
Need to sublease
your apartment for
summer?
Need to find a
roommate to share
your apartment?
Need to unload the
manual typewriter
your parents gave
you?
You've come to the right spot. The
East Carolinian classifieds are the
perfect place to sublease your apart-
ment, find a roommate, or sell your
useless stuff.
But now you'll have to
wait until our first sum-
mer issue on May 27.
4
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rha East Carolinian
P STAFF NEEDED
mps in coastal NC.
administrative staff,
e, lifeguards, boat-
id kitchen staff. Call
ext. 113 for more
application.
EEDED FOR sum-
ru Friday daytime
ride own transpor-
vork or cooking re-
sted call Cindy at
:00.
JR TAN and get
" work at Greenville
area golf courses.
Z859-9233 for de-
FT. x 8 ft $600
ich with 260 lbs.
nego. Five-drawer
k for Matt. 754-
NITURE, 5-piece;
t set, $125 or best
irfect for student,
lilable as well. Call
ANITOU shock,
ts, Vetta Speedo
ja 15 inch, great
3orm fridge, $40.
!870.
THING! DESKS,
ntertainment sys-
9319 for more info.
: ENDURO BC.
ilator with XP
( with depth (w
gauges and corn-
Dipper Computer
ag. Equipment in
on and serviced
nanuals. Package
Tom Younce 328-
Kl NINJA Low
er-female. All ac-
I. $2000.00. Call
' Tmtdiy, Miy 5, 1888
rlaifipH.
Tht tut Carolinian
se
for
a
ire
t?
the
ter
tve
The
i the
apart-
your
to
mm-
1981 DAT8UN 280ZX. 1 owner,
good tires, engine has excellent com-
pression, new exhaust system. For
parts or needs body work. $500.00.
Call Kristin. 752-4522.
MOVINQ-EVERYTHING MUST
go??? Loveseat with pull-out bed,
$100. Entertainment center, $40.
Wood Adirondack-style chair, $15.
Ten-speed bicycle. $55. Two halogen
floor lamps, $15.00 each. 830-8970.
125 GALLON REEF aquarium sys-
tem. Black contemporary cabinet
with acrylic tank. State of the art fil-
tration system. All accessories in-
cluded. $2000.00. Call Kristing 752-
4522.
WASHERDRYER, STACKABLE
white Westinghouse. 3 years old.
Great condition, rarely used.
$375.00. Call Kristin, 752-4522.
GATEWAY 2000 PENTIUM with
17" Trinitron Monitor and HP
LaserJet 5L. $850. 355-9114.
ENSONIC ESQ1 KEYBOARD with
stand, sustain pedal, all literature.
$500 OBO. Call 757-8770.
GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPPIES
AKC, adorable; price includes first
shots and worming. $250 00 each,
Ph. 355-6947.
1989 DODGE RAM 350 work van
Complete with cage. Good cond.
Asking $3200. Call Chris 758-5930.
FOR SALE: BLUE COUCH only 2
years old in great condition. Perfect
for first apartment. $150 or best of-
fer. Call John 561-7456.
'91 PLYMOUTH ACCLAIM with
AC AT V6 CD-player. Excellent con-
dition. Only 53.000 miles. $5,200
or best offer. Call 757-2268.
12 INCH RECORDS for sale. Rap.
Hip-Hop, Reggae, Booty. Bass. Great
for D.Js. Call John at 752-4716 and
leave message. Serious inquiries
only.
DESK WITH ATTACHED book-
case, two dressers, pull-out sofa, and
two twin bed mattresses. Sold as a
set or separately. All very cheap.
Must go! Ask for Jen, 830-2661.
FREE CATALOG & PRICE LIST
Distributor Direct don't pay retail
anymore! Nor-Androstene - $45 Cre-
atine - $35. Get big! Call 919-233-
173!
1991 MERCURY CAPRI conv. 73K.
PS. CC. AC. PW. Pioneer CD player!
Four Pioneer speakers! New Pirelli
P6000 SportVeloce tires! $3600.
Call Derek at 413-0744.
2 BEDROOM, 1 12 BATH
townhouse, close to ECU campus
and medical school. $41,000. Please
call 355-4895 after 5:30 p.m. Moti-
vated seller; planning to buy a larger
home.
GREEK PERSONALS
THETA CHI � THANKS for being
our adopt-a-fraternity last week!
Love, the sisters of Zeta Tau Alpha.
CONGRATULATIONS KELLY
GOODMAN on your lavalier from
Steve and your engagement. We
love you a bunchl Love, your Pi Delta
sisters.
PI KAPPA PHI would like to thank
all the sororities for their support dur-
ing our money race for P.U.S.H.
America. A special congrats to the
sisters of Alpha Xi Delta for raising
the most money.
DELTA SIGMA PHI: We also appre-
ciate all your support with our towel
contest. We didn't mean to leave you
out! Love, the sisters of Pi Delta.
CONGRATULATIONS SARAH
MCCONNELL on the success of the
ECO bike rally. All your hard work
really paid off! Love, the sisters of
Zeta Tau Alpha.
CONGRATULATIONS GOES TO
Tyler Blackwelder and Ami Brasure
for being selected as Resident Advi-
sors for next school year! We love
you, your Pi Delta sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS SHANNON
ON your engagement to Gregg! We
love you guys. Love, your Chi Omega
sisters.
PI DELTA WOULD LIKE to con-
gratulate our graduating seniors:
Ami Brasure and Jennifer Thomp-
son. We are proud of you two! We
love you, you sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS AND
GOOD LUCK to the senior sisters
in Epsilon Sigma Alpha. We are be-
hind you all the way. Love, your sis-
ters.
TO THE SISTERS OF Delta Zeta.
everyone had a great time at our
social on Tuesday. Hope to have
many more next fall. Thank you! Pi
Kappa Alpha.
PI DELTA WISHES everyone good
luck on their exams and hopes ev-
erybody has a great summer!
TO ALL THE GUYS who attended
Sigma's Cocktail on Saturday, we
hope you had a blast. Love, the sis-
ters and new members of Sigma
Sigma Sigma.
ALPHA PHI: THANKS for a great
Softball game last week. Congratu-
lations on your win! Love, the sis-
ters of Pi Delta.
ZETA TAU ALPHA wishes every-
one good luck on exams!
ZETA TAU ALPHA - congratula-
tions on your wins in the water polo
and playoff Softball games last week.
Good luck in the championship
game this week! Love, your sisters.
PI DELTA WISHES to congratulate
the winners of our first Wild N Crazy
Towel Contest. First Place - J. Barrett
of Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Second
Place - Bryce Wagoner of Phi Kappa
Psi. Third Place - Joe Grates of Sigma
Alpha Epsilon. Thanks guys for a
great job! We love you The sisters
of Pi Delta.
THANKS TO ALL the girls who
came out for the lemonade social
last week! Love, Zeta Tau Alpha.
SIGMA PI WOULD LIKE to con-
gratulate our newest members:
Herbie Abernathy, Patrick Atkins, Joe
Kyson, Kelly Bray, Tony Sipe, Cole
Steffy. Good job guys. Your broth-
ers at Sigma Pi.
TO ALL THE GIRLS who attended
Sigma's Kentucky Derby on Friday,
we hope you had a great time. Love,
the sisters of Sigma Sigma Sigma
CHI OMEGA: CONGRATULA-
TIONS on your win at Softball two
weeks ago. We had a great time
iplaying you guys. Love, the sisters
of Pi Delta.
CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL our
graduating seniors! We are so proud
of you. Are you looking forward to
your senior roast tomorrow night?
Love, the sisters of Zeta Tau Alpha.
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA hopes ev-
eryone had a great time at Barefoot
on Thursday.
SIGMA NU: THANKS for the so-
cial last Friday! We had a blast! Until
next time - Love, the sisters of Zeta
Tau Alpha.
CONGRATULATIONS CARA
SMITH on your acceptance into the
Professional Acting Schooll We are
so proud of you. Love, the sisters of
Zeta Tau Alpha.
TO THE NEW SISTERS of Epsilon
Sigma Alpha, congratulations and
good luck to all sisters on exams!
from LeAnne and Victoria.
BRYCE FROM PHI PSI: We have a
big bottle of Herbal Essences just
for you! (since you seem to enjoy it.)
Love, the sisters of Pi Delta.
THANK YOU TRACY SCOTT from
the Real Life Crisis Center for com-
ing out and talking to us. It was fun.
Your friends at Sigma Pi.
RUGBY TEAM: GREAT SOCIAL
Thursday before last. We had a su-
per time as always! You guys are
great Love, the sisters of Pi Delta.
KAPPA SIGMA, ONCE again
Bahama Mama was a great success.
We can't wait for next year. Love,
the sisters and new members of
Sigma Sigma Sigma.
THANKS TO ALL the Pi Delta sis-
ters who raised money andor par-
ticipated in Relay for Life Saturday
before last.
PERSONALS
LADIES: LEND ME your sore ach-
ing muscles. Amateur masseur
needs your back to practice on. Call:
Kyle 1-800-484-8646 (code 2466)
or POB 8663. Greenville. NC 27836.
OVERWEIGHT??? I LOST 16 lbs.
in 3 weeks and I'm still losing! 100
safe and natural Dr. recommended.
Money back guarantee. Call 830-
2447. Free samples
SERVICES
OYSTERS! SHRIMPI CRABLEGSI
Clams! Come out to Tripp's Seafood
and enjoy our freshmarket and res-
taurant. Located 14 mile past Bells
Fork Square. Take-out welcome. 353-
0011.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
AMERICAN MARKETING ASSO-
CIATION will hold Officer Elections
at the general meeting on Wednes-
day. April 29th at 2:00 p.m. in GCB
1024. Interested in running for of-
fice? Be there! All majors welcome
to attend. Free Papa John's Pizza!
Come see what we're doing!
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
WORKSHOP: Tuesday 3:304:30.
The Center for Counseling and Stu-
dent Development is offering the
following workshop April 28th. If you
are interested in this workshop, call
328-8661.
CHOOSING A MAJOR or a Career
Workshop: Tuesday 3:30-6:00. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop April 28th. If inter-
ested, call the Center at 328-6661.
BECOMING A SUCCESSFUL Stu-
dent Workshop-Test-Anxiety:
Wednesday 11:00-12:00. The Cen-
ter for Counseling and Student De-
velopment is offering this workshop
April 29th. If you are interested in
this workshop, call 328-6661.
BECOMING A SUCCESSFUL Stu-
dent Workshop-Test-Anxiety: Thurs-
day 3:304:30. The Center for Coun-
seling and Student Development is
offering this workshop April 30th. If
you are interested in this workshop,
call the Center at 328- 6661.
STRESS MANAGEMENT WORK-
SHOP: Thursday 3:30-5:00. The
Center for Counseling and Student
Development is offering the follow-
ing workshop April 23rd. If you are
interested, call 328-6661.
GAMMA BETA PHI will meet Tues-
day, April 28 in Mendenhall Room
244 at 5:30 PM.
OTHER
FEMALE SINGER SEEKING band
guitarist for possible performance.
Influences include Indigo Girls, Sis-
ter Gwen, Alanis, etc. Please call
757-8770 anytime.
FREE CASH GRANTSI College
Scholarships. Business. Medical
bills. Never repay. Toll Free 1-800-
218-9000 ext. G-3726.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175
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1-800-COLLECT RECREATIONAL SPORTS

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INTRAMURALS
May 26 Softball Registration Meeting 4:00 pm SRC 202
May 26
May 27
5-0N-5 Basketball
4:30 pm SRC 202
5:00 pm SRC 128
Tennis Singles Deadline
June 2 4 on 4 Volleyball Registration 4:00 pm SRC 202
June 10 Basketball Shooting Challenge 4:00 pm SRC 202
June 17-18
Frisbee Golf
3-6 pm Frisbee
Golf Course
SIGN UP TODAY!
East Carolina University
Remember, you can receive $9 in collect calls, visit www.180OCOLLECT.com
RECREATIONAL
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CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY






m j 1 6 r 4 -f-D �gysCfoUrAia.h
ORADuation

spring
1998





�Jt
Seven novels, 14
volumes poetry
to credit
IMC Post Laureate to give
commencement address
Amer t�tum
STAFf WRITER
This spring's commencement address will be
given by the poet laureate of North Carolina,
Fred Chappell.
"Fred is an absolutely fascinating poet and a
charming individual said Dr. Patrick Bizzaro
of the ECU English department.
Chappell has worked as a professor at the
University of North Carolina at Creensboro
since 1964; he teaches advanced composition,
poetry and fiction. He is the author of seven
novels, 14 volumes of poetry, a book of essays
and two boob of short stories.
"We are honored that the poet laureate of
North Carolina will address our graduates
Chancellor Richard Eakin said. "Fred Chappell
is known and recognized throughout the state
and nation not only for his writing but for his
leaching and encouragement of future genera-
tions ofauthors and poets. We look'forward to
welcoming him to our campus
Bizzaro has been editing one of Chappell's
books, Dream Carden: The Poetry of Fred
Chappell, since 1987. He said that he's not sur-
prised to see all the attention Chappell has
been receiving.
"He Chappell behaves like he doesn't
deserve all the attention Bizzaro said.
Chappell also has a series out that will con-
sist of four novels when finished. The third and
most recently published book is Farewell, I'm
Bound to Leave You. It is about independent,
strong women of the Appalachian Mountains.
"Chappell gives us a collection that is bril-
liant and fanciful, contemplative and humor-
ous said the Louisiana State University
Press. '
Chappell's work can be found in any pub-
lic library, including Jovner.
A variety of Chappell's works will also be
published in the seventh addition of the
North Carolina Literary Review, a journal
published yearly by ECU's own English
Department.
This spring's commencement is on May
16th. More than 2,000 degree candidates
are expected to attend this 89th celebration,
and the public is invited.
Career Services prepares
grads for work world
�s
Counselors help
with workshops,
contacts
academic year Swartout said. "They
can also register with us and be enrolled
To register with
Scott Smith
focus section writer
Each year, students graduate and go
searching for jobs. For many, that search
begins right here on campus at Career
Services.
Career Services offer workshops on
such things as preparing for the job
interview, resume.writing and business
etiquette. Counselors also help students
who are graduating make contacts with
employers.
'We can help them facilitate connec-
tions with employers said Margie
Swartout, assistant director of Career
Services.
According to Swartoul, students
should start looking for a job during
their senior year. "We do encourage stu-
dents to start looking and making con-
tacts with employers during their last
in our database
Career Services
you must attend
an orientation
registration
meeting at the
Career Services
building during
your last acade-
mic year.
The Career
Services data-
base has infor-
mation on jobs
and is constant-
ly updated with
new openings.
Students who
register will
receive a
newsletter which has information about
workshops and various employers. Il
also has the schedule of career davs and
interview schedules which Career
Services organizes.
"We receive hundreds of jobs every
week and the entire list is posted wilhin
our building Swartout said. Job list-
ings that can be found at Career
Services range
from banking to
multimedia jobs.
If you have a
major, Career
Services most
likely has a job
listing in that
field.
At Career
Services there is a
room with all
types of job infor-
mation from com-
pany statistics,
job openings, and
basic company
information.
There is also
information supplied by employers on
what they expect from an applicant.
This information helps prepare stu-
dents for an interview. An interview
room is provided where students can
practice taking an interview. The inter-
v- ��,
"We can help them
facilitate connections
with employers. We
do encourage students
to start looking and
making contacts with
employers during their
last academic year
Margie Swartout
assistant director of Career Services
Career Services building is located on 5th street and provides a newsltter which has information
about workshops and various employers and many other options for graduates.
PHOTO BY SABRINA THOMAS
view can be taped upon request so students
can see the way they presented themselves
throughout the interview.
The Internet is also a good way to look for a
job or to do research on jobs.
"The Internet is a very important tool to
use Swartoul said. "We are also doing a
workshop on Internet job searching
Man) companies post their jobs openings
and the qualifications needed on their web
sites. This is becoming more common because
it is the cheapest way to advertise'job open-
ings. A dalabase of information can be found
in a special S1G1 computer thai is located al
Career Services.
You can visit Career Services for more
information anytime during the week.
"We also have career advisement meetings
by appointment with students who have ques-
tions of any kind Swartoul said.
For an up-to-date schedule of workshops
and things going on al Career Services, visil
ihem online al
htlp7www 1. ecu.edusludlifecareer
index.htm.
Graduate school offer more education
Over 200 grad
students attend ECU
Lucas 8errini .
focus section whiter
Although graduation signals the end of
classes and exams, for many students il
also signifies the beginning of the next
slep on the academic ladder: graduate
school.
For some ECU students, that means
another one or Iwo years in Creenville. For
those of you thinking of moving to Chapel
Hill or Raleigh to get a graduate degree,
you might want to head over to the gradu-
ate school office located in 131 Ragsdale
and see what ECU's graduate school has
to offer.
With an enrollment of 2,815 students
The East Carolinian
including 303 pursuing Ph.D.s through
the School of Medicine, the graduate
school at ECU is
currently ranked
third in the stale
behind UNC-CH
and N.C. State
respectively. The
medical school con-
sistently places
among the top
teaching hospitals
in the country and
continues to
increase in both
enrollment and cal-
iber of instruction
as more professors
are drawn to
Creenville and ECU from all over the
country and the world.
Applications can
be picked up from
the Graduate
School office in
Ragsdale Hall or
on the Internet at
www. research, ecu.
edugrad
With
ECU offers more than 60 degrees at the
master's and post-master's level. Degrees
are offered through 10 pro-
fessional schools as well as
the School of Medicine,
which offers Ph.D.s in eight
disciplines.
According to Dr. Vm
Tscheller, associate dean of
the graduate school, the
first step in applying to the
graduate program is to talk
to the chair of the depart-
ment to which you want to
apply
"We ECU use a self-
managed application for
admission to the graduate
school Tschetter said,
self-managed application
process, the student is responsible for
gathering all requirements for admission,
including transcripts and letters of refer-
ence. It is up to the applicant to make
sure all the various pieces of the applica-
tion arrive in the graduate office by the
deadline. The deadline for regular admis-
sion is June 15 for the fall semester and
Oct. 15 for the spring semester. Some
schools such as the School of Art have ear-
lier deadlines.
Applications can be picked up from the
graduate office or downloaded off the
Internet mm
(http:www.research.ecu.edugrad).
The graduate office works with the var-
ious academic departments in choosing
qualified applicants. For each school, the
requirements differ, although all have
basic standards for admission which
include a baccalaureate degree, prefer-
ably in the subject in which the applicant
plans to pursue a degree. Some schools
will make exceptions if the student agrees
to take remedial classes. A senior year
GPA of 3.0 or an overall CPA of 2.5 and a
satisfactory score on the GRE are also
required.
For most programs, the admission stan-
dard is much more competitive. Students
from universities worldwide apply to pro-
grams at ECU.
"Business, Physical Therapy and
Occupational Therapy are always very
competitive Tschetter said.
"Psychology and maritime history are also
verypopular majors here
There is still time to apply for the fall
semester. Anyone interested in applying,
should come by Ragsdale 131 or contact
the chair of the department for the school
to which you want to apply.
I
L





JENNIFER LYNNE CROWELL
Were so proud of
all you have done
and of the special
person you have
become.
Mom, Dad, Beth &
Madison
OLIVER AUSTIN THOMAS
CONGRATULATIONS
AUSTIN!
We're bursting
with pride!
May God continue to
bless your life as He
nas blessed our life
with you!
Love, Mama & Daddy
MELANIE CATHERINE HUNNELL
DONDA UNDERWOOD
Congratulations
We could not be more
proud of you.
You will be a wonderful
teacher.
YEAH!
Donda, we're proud of
you and we love you!
Len, John, Jordan &Anne
(
ir �?� i
mi ft sum
iiortGRflTULanons,
Yl'RMUPTES!
LIVE JAZZ sat.
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The East Carolinian





�� ' . ��'
Kevin Williamson, outstanding alumnus
MICCAH SMITH
SEN 1011 UKSm.ES WHITES
Kevin Williamson, author of such wildlv successful
screenplays as Scream, Know What You Did Last
Summer and Scream , is one of the most famous
ECU alumni, and his reputation keeps growing with
each passing year
The 33-year-old New Bern native was heavily
influenced as a teenager by such movies as John
Carpenter's Halloween and John Hughes's fluffy com-
ing-of-age teen flicks like Sixteen Candles, The
Breakfast Club and Pretty in Pink.
Williamson had dreamed of becoming a writer,
perhaps even a director on the scale of Steven
Spielberg, but was discouraged by a teacher in high
school who told him he'd never make it.
Thinking he'd found his niche at the ECU School
of Acting, he attended college here before seeking his
fortune in New York City. Instead of a glamorous
career in stage and film acting, however, be only
found bit parts on stage and television.
Williamson moved to Los Angeles for a change
and found himself walking dogs for money, working
out of a temp agency and even assisting a music video
director.
It was during this time that he began working on
his first script, Killing Mrs. Tingle, a buck comedy
(think Heathers) about a determined schoolgirl and a
group of friends who wouldn't mind seeing their evil
teacher dead. He sold the script soon after its com-
pletion to an agency that never used it.
Although Killing Mrs. Tingle was not Williamson's
big break, the money he made from the script allowed
him to pay off some student loans and put down a
payment for a car.
Scream was written after a scary experience
Williamson had while house-sitting for his fnend Cil,
and he sold it to Miramax, the second-highest bidder
The movie made $103 million, reviving the languish-
ing horror genre and assuring Williamson of a Future
in show buisiness.
Miramax pounced on the successful writer, offer-
ing him to join the likes of Robert Rodriguez and
Quentin Tarandno in a three-year contract with the
film company.
Williamson had planned for Scream to be a trilogy
all along, but Scream III had been put on hold so that
he can work on several other projects.
His drama series called Damson's Creek, which
airs Tuesday nights on the WB network, is somewhat
autobiographical, with characters loosely based on
himself and the friends of his adolescence in a town
near his own hometown.
Williamson is also working on another series
based on a group of LA. Gen-Xers called Wasteland.
Both television series feature Williamson's patented
snappy dialogue which has made the teenage charac-
ters in his movies so much fun for audiences to watch.
In the future, Williamson intends to attack action
movies and romantic comedies, to put his own spin on
them much the same way he did the horror genre.
Williamson is also collaborating with Robert
Rodriguez on a sci-fi film called The Feelers, slated
for release in late 1998 or early 1999. He has written
a treatment (basic plot line) for Halloween VII and is
finally directing his first baby, Killing Mrs. Tingle.
Looking for a summer
What about working with us!
The East Carolinian is now accepting
You must be an registered ECU studept
with at least a 2.0 GPA.
Apply at our office on the second floor of the Sthdt
L
"You will encounter many new
places and with the knowledge
you've acquired at East Carolina
University, you know there's only
one place that will brighten your
future - CHICO'S
The Place
Where
Alumni Meet!
All ABC Permits
DOWNTOWN
GREENVILLE
(You Know Where That Is!)
757-1666
The East Carolinian
I J .T 1 �: I





CaUkA
Oh Spuing!
Carolina East
MALL
Belk, Brody's, Sears, K&W Cafeteria, plus 50 Shops
Open Mon. - Sat 10-9, Sun. 1-6
Located on Highway 11,
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� �������lllllllllll
MARIAH A. CHEEK
Mariah,
You've worked diligently
and accomplished a
great deal.
Enjoy the future and all
it holds for you.
Love, Mom
DANIEL JOSEPH DILEO
YOU DID IT, DANNY!
We're so very proud
of you!
Always follow your
dreams.
Love, Mom, Dad,
Vicki&Chrissy
NICOLE CLARK
Coterafolvtioifc, Nicole!
You hsvo worked So hard.
We- wo So proud of tjou.
look, forward, life HaS
woniorfvl things for ijou.
Uvfc, Mom, Pad (
Kcboocd
JENNIFER ANN GANZEL
IS THE WORLD READY
FOR HER?
JENNIFER'S CERTAINLY
READY FOR THE WORLD!
CONGRATULATIONS.
SWEETIE!
I'M PROUD OF YOU!
MOM
I
The East Carolinian





�MWfRMi
in�iwiiium
s
TONYA LUANA OXENDINE
t Winston-Salem NC Tonya's graduating Yous've, anu a, Long way baby, atulyousfUudly huuU it. WeSrproud ofyou, and, unlovtyoul Mono & Clint
jjyWSPPiflv "
����
TANYA LYNN MATTHEWS
Tanya, we are proud ofyou!
Be the best, commit, be
honest and you will have
opportunities.
We love you!
Mom & Your Dad "Neil"
SHELLY ANNE BRANCH
LEO GILES ELVINGTON
J
I
Shelly Pellie's Finally
GRADUATING!
May your future be full of
success, fun, excitement
and fullfillment.
I'm so proud!
Much love my baby girl!
Mama
ALBERT EUGENE SAUNDERS
"Little Gene"
You will always be mama's
"Little Gene
You are our precious son
and Courtney's only brother.
What a fine man you have
become!
We love you dearly!
Mama, Daddy & Courtney
AARON C. JACOBS
ONE SMALL STEP FOR
MANKIND - ONE GIANT LEAP
FOR MAN.
CONGRATULATIONS
ROUND ONE OVER - ROUND
PWOMBA
GOOD LUCK.
LOVE. MOM Sr DAD
What will ECU do
without you?
Gil's graduating!
We're all proud ofyou and
love you! You'll make a
difference!
Mother, Jimmy, Kenai
& the gang
CRAIG ALLAN BROWN
hVg&Aft
Yoj finaft msdo it.
Wore provd of mi
and wo ovo mov'
MomPact
KAREN MARIE SATTERFIELD
Kare Bear - our
purple and gold hero!
We are so proud
ofyou!
Look out world!
Love, Mom, Dad,
Petula& Bruce
6 The East Carolinian





ALICIA MARIE TALMADGE
PITA
Congratulations!
Remember to always
strive not just settle.
We love you and are
proud of you.
Mom & Dad
MARY ELIZABETH EGBERT
Xo'e Mdck l$ VOVM pKDld
� we- loVo hou So mtch.
Pad, Mom, Mite � 6'tll
I
REBECCA GOMEZ
Dear BeSita:
Congratulations!
Your graduation brings
joy to our hearts.
We're proud of you.
May God bless you.
Love, Mom and Dad
VANESSA RAE CULLERS
YOU WILL NEVER KNOW
HOW PROUD WE ARE
OF YOU.
YOU ARE A BEAUTIFUL
YOUNG WOMAN.
WE LOVE YOU DEARLY
BARRY AND MOM
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The East Carolinian





DEREK R. CASSESE
Derek!
Congratulations!
We love you
We're proud of you
Dad & Brenda
KIMBERLY ANITA BAILEY
NICOLE ANNETTE HOLDER
tyou started this ttip
yeazs a$o. 3t was Lon$
and sometimes datd but
ifou made it.
TOaif to ol
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Congratulations!
Yum
Wei
ove you
dearh
Dad, Mom, Angie
& Trae
NEAL RICHARD COLE
YeahNeal
We are soooo
proud of you!
Love,
Mom, Steve,
BC & G-ma
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8 The East Carolinian





!i
CHARLIE MOORE
To a very special son
who we're proud of
and love very much.
The time has arrived!
Congratulations
(ih Charlie on graduating.
Love,
Mom & Dad
AMANDA RODILL
mm M 7itcfl a white fou team
to build ifoul loads on
v� �? vmtoda. �o you plant ifoui
ST � A 1i ijfown $aiden and decotate tfoul own soul. yHnd ou Learn, fou did.
H�dm �? ;Hove, Hoyn

ERIC A. MCMILLIAN
:ric,
You finally made it.
We're proud or you and
we love you!
I know your Dad would
be very proud of you.
Mom & Ronnie
ELIZABETH PAIGE BARNES
s
Congratulations!
We knew you
could do it.
We're proud of you
and we love you!
Mom & Dad
MARY MEGAN SIMPSON
CONGRATULATIONS
MEGAN!
WE ALL LOVE YOU
AND ARE SO PROUD
OF YOU.
MOM, DAD, ANDY,
KATIE, MATT &
MOLLY
JAIME ALLISON LANG
TOe ate vetif
proud ofi ifou
and we love
fOU!
I
Horn & rZ)ad
RYAN THOMAS HUNT
Congratulations Ryan
and nest wishes for your
future happiness and
success!
We love you,
Mom & Dad
REBECCA SHAYNE-HYE RENKIN
We're proud Rebecca!
You worked hard
each class
?Surpassed dancing skills
Graduating in 4 years
Congrat! Cheers!
Love, Mom, Dad, Grandma,
Matthew, Susie, Beaux,
Bally, Bauer
The East Carolinian





JASON A. BELLOTTO
LAURIE ANNE BUCHELE
Choose to chance the
rapids. Dare to dance the
tides til the river runs
dry.
Love you,
Mom, Dad,
Matt, Abby
ylo are- �o
provd oj- 40)
Mom f Pad
TIMOTHY EDWARD RICHARDS
Congratulations!
We're so proud
ofyou
We love you!
Mom, Dad,
Grandma & Precious
JILL PATRICE ALTFEDER
Congratulations, Jill.
We are so proud ofyou!
You are a wonderful
daughter.
We love you very much.
Mom & Dad
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10 The Eat Carolinian





�!
j
HEATHER DIANNE BORUM
Heather B
There was never
a doubt!
I'm very proud
of you and always
will be.
Love ya, Dad
Jill.
you!
�ful
mch.

THERESA G. KRAMER
From student to teacher
you have went.
Our love and pride we
have sent.
You did it Theresa.
Love,
Mom, Dad & Merrie
CHARLES LARRY WILLIAMS II
Congratulations Larry!
Your hard, work is paying
orr. You're a college gradu-
ate! We love you and we're
proud or you!
Love, Mom, Dad & Robin
TAMMY HARDISON MURPHY
fc
Congratulations
on your future new
goals
Love,
Mom, Dad,
Greg & Taffi
Congratulations!
We knew you could do
it - and in 4 years!
We're so proud of you!
We love you!
Mom, Dad & Ross
RACHEL SUZANNE OWENS
The pride we feel
today overwhelms us!
Your aspirations for the
future will be realized
with those gifts God
entrusted you with.
Love,
Yourfamily
TONIKA ANTOINETTE WARD
Chocom nity
Tonika is graduating again!
We look forward to one more
graduation. We're proud of you.
Hard work brings forth good fruit.
God Bless You.
Mom & Dad
HOWARD PHIL ASBY
Congratulations
Phil Asby on finishing
your master's.
We are very proud of you
and your hard work!
Love you,
Aliceson, Jason,
Jessica and Toto
The East Carolinian 11





MWxxWW ��.��
SHELLEY TEACHEY
Shelley has finally
gotten this education
thing "licked
We love you bunches and
are extremely proud of
you!
Love, Mom & Dad
DAWN MICHELLE RICHARD
Congratulations!
Graduating cum laude,
serving as president of
Gamma Beta Phi Honor
Society, and working.
We are so proud of you!
Love,
Mom & Dad
BELINDA GAIL BURKETT
IT'S TrtVT T1M�'
Wore- down o
ow fast oirvic
Yoj arddvatcl
Wc ovc- mi and arc oroid
of iaoj.
MoMsPad, &lcnda (
Michael
AMANDA CARROLL BROCKMAN
Amanda:
To our daughter.
We're so very proud
of you.
We knew you could do
this & anything you
want to do.
We love you!
Mom & Dad
UNIVERSITY
HAIRCUTTERS
WALK-INS WELCOME,
OR CALL FOR APPT.
752-0559
$8.00
haircut with
Student I.D.
Phil's
University
Haircutters
Charles Blvd. in
SERVICE EXCELLENCE
CHANGE
$.�95
Motorcraft Ford
I QUALITY PARTS FOR QUALITY CARS
I Includes up to 5 quarts of oil and tiller lor your lain
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12 The East Carolinian





SYLVIA-CHRISTINE GRAEF
You worked very hard!
We, are, happy to haw you,
btuk Uv QermAjny!
Alexander &. Vorit
AMY RENEE' SUTTON
RICHMOND
Amy's graduating!
We're so proud of you
for your hard work
and achievements.
We love you very much!
Mom & Dad
JENNIFER JULIE MARVA
(leach fart, tUe State!
We. watched you
take ucHrt. fanAt iteft
Ho4jm we watch with ftsuae
aA, uou cyiaduate.
We lave you,
Mom and 3ad
NISHA KIM COFFEY
NI9HA
Congratulations on all
your bard work and dedi-
cation from two very
proud parents
Love,
hfom�rPop
SUSI ANN WALL
Susi,
We have always loved you,
have supported you as
parents, people and
friends.
We'll always cherish you.
So proud of you
Mom and Dad
LEIGH ANN WALKER
what an outstanding
college career
Chancellors List
Dean's List
Guest Lecturer
Winner ASED Student Design
Honor Societies
Mom, Dad, Alica & Chris
COURTNEY R. STURGES
Precious �
Congratulations on a
job well done!
And now-on
to graduate school.
You are an exceptional
young woman and we are proud of you.
Love - your family
DAVE A. DESAI
Vk llnMy tuide ft.
rft Ate. ptonA ' yon
inA tve. Cove yon.
The East Carolinian 13





BRANDON WYATT HAINES
Your steps from me were shakey
but determined.
Your steps from ECU are strong
and self assured.
Step through life with purpose,
honesty and God.
Love, Mommie, Bobby, J.J. 8 Pa Paw
EMILY KATHRYN LINNEMEIER
TOe ate so ptoud
of you, out
Sckotatltktete.
YOe Love oul
Congratulations
Megan!
You've always been a
source of pride and joy -
graduation is tke test yet!
We love you,
Mom & Dad
VIRGINIA SUMMERRAIN ANPERSOl
You've accomplished
something most of us
only dream about
We're very proud ofyoul
love, Adorn & Claude
Grandma. &: Grandpa.
congratulations
Graduates!
�r�
GRADUATES GET $400 OFF
From GM
Eligible grads receive a $400 certificated good toward any new Chevrolet,
Pontiac or GMC vehicle purchased or leased from a participating dealer,
when you qualify and finance through your Chevrolet, Pontiac or GMC
dealer and GM AC.
Best of all, this special discount is available in addition to most other
rebates and incentives.
You are eligible for this offer if you are within six months of graduating or
graduated within the past two years from a two.year or four-year college.
Graduate students are also eligible whUe they are enrolled or if they have
graduated within the last two years.
Financing Benefits That Are
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Once you've selected the vehicle thafs right for you, GMAC helps make it
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14 The East Carolinian





ECU ranks 25th
"Most Wired"
Only public
University in NC to
receive ranking
Uu�� In Hikes
STAFF WHITEN
ECU ranks 25th in the nation as one of
America's "most wired" colleges. The uni-
versity is the onlv public university in
North Carolina included in Yahoo! Internet
Life magazine's listings.
Rankings are based on 22 factors in
four categories � general services, acad-
emics, social life and computer statistics.
ECU moved from 93rd last year to 25th
this year, outranking Duke and Wake
Forest � the only other N.C. universities
included in the list.
"ECU continues to make great strides
in raising the information technology (IT)
bar in education said Ernest Marshburn,
director of academic computing.
"Beginning with a commitment to upgrade
the campus networking system with fiber
optics and just this year becoming the
'first' university in the nation to imple-
ment Microsoft Exchange 5.0, ECU con-
tinues to make steady progress in educa-
tional IT
Chancellor Richard Eakin attributes
ECU's technological achievements to
three main factors: the installation of a
$14 million asynchronous transfer mode
(ATM) fiber optic network, the informa-
tion-technology fee included in student
tuition and ECU's commitment to equip
faculty with up-to-date technologies
including new computers for faculty every
three years.
The ATM fiber optic network enabled
ECU to be the first university to imple-
ment Microsoft Exchange 5.0 as its cam-
pus-wide messaging system. This svstems
was chosen after an 18 month evaluation
period of five messaging systems. It
proved to be the most effective means for
nomadic user" access, providing world-
wide e-mail accessibility, attachments
capabilities
and other
assets.
Exchange
was also the
most cost
effective
plan avail-
"Beginning with a
commitment to upgrade
the campus networking
system with fiber optics
and just this year becoming
the first'university in the
nation to implement
Microsoft Exchange 5.0,
ECU continues to make
steady progress in
educational IT
Ernest Marshburn
director of academic computing
T h e
information-technology fee allows funds
exceeding $700,000 a year to be spent on
technological equipment to benefit stu-
dents.
"We want our students to graduate with
more than just 'computer literacy said
Richard Brown, vice chancellor for admin-
istration and
finance.
"Employers
look for peo-
ple who know
now to func-
tion in the
'information
age' and our
graduates are
becoming more and more attractive
because of the hands-on experience they
have gained at ECU
Marshburn said ECU is not resting with
this achievement, but will continue to
maintain the advances and recognition
earned.
x
The East Carolinian wishes luck
to the following graduates:
Amy Royster
John Davis
John Murphy
Jonathan Green
Carla Cole
Pat Reid
Joey Campbell
Allison Olweiler
Rhonda Crumpton
Jennifer Tafe
Catoe
Jennifer Newman
miss turns ma
�w w ma
East brook 6
Village Green
Apartments
saw�
mm womam
to
3Q I
asm
(BABStt
The East Carolinian 15





Computer, engineering, medical work hot
careers: manufacturing cooling down
Computer engineers
salaries highest
Pat wTirTi
FOCUS SECTION WHITER
For today's college graduate, the path to a successful career
begins with computers. Most hot careers involve computers.
While jobs in other industries such as manufacturing are on the
decline, computer jobs are plentiful.
According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, computer
jobs offer the possibility of advancement, high starting salary,
benefits and personal fulfillment.
"Computer engineering and computer accounting are two
very hot careers right now, said Judy Davis, assistant creden-
tial secretary with ECU's Career Services. "Basically any career
that involves computers is hot right now
The hottest fields for college graduates include engineering,
accounting, computer science, education, medicine and health
sciences. At ECU, majors offered that involve some sort of com-
puter technology include education, occupational therapy,
industrial technology and business. According to ECU's Career
Services, these fields show up in a list of the most popular
majors at ECU.
Even more specifically, there are hot careers within each
field. U.S. News and World Report reported that in the field of
accounting, a business evaluator is in great demand and has the
possibility of advancement. In engineering, a computer engi-
neer has the highest starting salary out there right now. In trie
field of health care, a physician's assistant is second only to a
computer engineer in starting salary and is in great demand.
Hot and cold careers can also be broken down into gender
categories as well. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor
Statistics, men are rapidly acquiring jobs in the fields of engi-
neering and computer science. On the other hand, women are
rapidly taking jobs in the fields of education and health science.
According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, health
care will account for almost one-fifth of all job growth until the
year 2005. Another profession, personnel supply services, or
temporary agencies, will be adding 1.3 million jobs by the year
2005. In addition, business health and education will account
for 70 percent growth by the year 2005.
This directly relates to graduates of ECU, according to a sur-
vey done by Career Services.
"The top four careers entered by graduates were educa-
tionnon-profit organization, health care, merchandising ser-
vices and government said Lamar Bell, assistant director of
language arts for Career Services.
Most of the careers that are currently cold are manufacturing
careers such as factory and assembly line workers. This is
because products are no longer being manufactured by hand
and machines are taking over. According to the Occupational
Outlook Handbook, the manufacturing industry will lose 1.3
million jobs by the year 2005.
Other career fields that are cold right now are the fields that
were highly in demand 10 years ago and are seriously competi-
tive right now. Careers such as physical and occupational ther-
apy, geriatrics and science.
"One of the most competitive careers today is occupational
therapy Bell said, "while business careers, on the other hand,
are in great demand
More information can be found at ECU's Career Services Center on the
corner of 5th Street and Jarvis Street just outside of campus.
Fastest growing occupations covered in the
1998-99 Occupational Ouuook Handbook, 1996-2002
(Numbers in thousands of jobs)
Occupation
Database
administrators,
computer support
specialists, and all
other computer
scientists
Computer engineers
Systems analysts
Physical and
corrective therapy
assistants and aides
Medical assistants
Medical records
technicians
Respiratory therapists
Engineering, science,
and computer
systems managers
Emergency medical
technicians
Source: URL: http:stat8.bU.gOTdoh.tablel.htm
Employment
change, 1996-2006
Number Percent
249
118
22L
1Q2
520
103
66
79
166
74
44
51
37
46
155
45
67
45
Most significantsource
of training
Bachelor's degree
Bachelor's degree
Bachelor's degree
Moderate-term
on-the-job
training
Moderate-term
on-the-job
training
Associate's degree
Associate's degree
Work experience
plus bachelor's
andor higher
degree
Postsecondary
vocational
training
An
ECl
bee
this
Prof
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16 The East Carolinian





THE
SONIC
PLAZA
Sonic Plaza nearing
completion
Cahoiih Roiiins Hyde
STAFF WHITE
A new work of public art is nearing completion at
ECU. The one of a kind Sonic Plaza is targeted to
be completed by the end of May 1998.
"The North Carolina Arts Council commissioned
this project under the Artworks for Stale Buildings
Program said Bruce Flye, director of facilites ser-
vices.
It is through this program that artworks are com-
missioned for new public buildings using .05 percent
of a building's construction budget. An example of
such artwork can be seen at the Educational Budding
in Raleigh where they have a mural on the mall.
There is another such work, a sound sculpture, at the
Revenue Building.
The project artist for the Sonic Plata, Christopher
Janney, is an internationally known sound artist who
has created interactive soundarchitecture installa-
tions in Rome, Paris, Boston and New York.
Upon completion, the Sonic Plaza will consist of
four elements: the ground cloud, a media glocken-
spiel, a percussive water wall and sonic gates. The
ground cloud is a 12-foot circle of water mist over a
gate designed to "dance according to the whim of the
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wind, at times static, at times furi-
ous Janney said.
The media glockenspiel is the
clock tower. Inside the face of this
clock tower is an circular ring of a
dozen, 20-inch video monitors cen-
tered around a set of three front
doors from which various icons will
emerge four times a day. At dawn, a
rooster will appear, crowing. At
noon, a steam whistle with smoke and at the end of
the day the sound of cannon Fire, as if from a pirate
ship.
Each night at midnight, a surprise object and
sound will be seen and beard. ECll music and art
students, along with faculty supervision, will deter-
mine the sight and sound. As you near the new
entrance into Joyner Library, there will be a 15-foot
x 40-foot percussion water wall. Within this wall will
be 64 water jets arranged to play a series of constant
Upon completion, the "Sonic
Plaza will consist of four
elements: the ground cloud, a
media glockenspiel, a
percussive water wall and
sonic gates. The ground cloud
is a 12-foot circle of water
mist over a gate designed
to "dance according to the
whim of the wind, at times
static, at times furious
Christopher Janney
project artist for the Sonic Plaza
changing patterns
of water mist,
janney designed
the fountain lo
respond to activi-
ty, using proxim-
ity sensors.
"When no one
is there, the foun-
tain will be quiet,
asleep Janney said. "As people pass by, it will wake
up and start to dance
The sonic gales are the classical columns from the
original Joyner Library structure. The difference is,
they will be equipped with photo-eleclric cells to
emit a tone from a speaker overhead whenever move-
ment is sensed.
"The great thing is all this equipment is program-
mable Flye saidT "The idea of interactive art is
almost a reality for ECU
n
�A
GRALTUATION
?
Tar'Xtofl Estates
would like to extend our most
sincere wishes for the best of luck
in the future to the
1PPS ECU Graduates
including our leasing consultant
I
The East Cumliniim 17





To all of the
graduates
in the
Student Media
18 The East Carolinian





Catch A
Bxeotft
Ofc Spnwql
I
Carolina East
M A I L
Belk, Brody's, Sears, K&W Cafeteria, plus 50 Shops
Open Mon. - Sat 10-9, Sun. 1-6
Located on Highway 11,
just 2 blocks South of Greenville Blvd.
JOSEPH SCOTT ELKINS
'�JfryS
Congratulations!
We arc voym provd of
mi and Movr mam
acoomvWchmov&c &od
bc mou in all that moi
do. Wc lovt- aoi
MomPad
BRIAN DAVID BROOKS
I'm spreading
the news.
I really did it this time.
I graduated
My family is very
proud.
WILLIAM ROBERT ANDERSON
1Wanted:
�i Diploma for 1 "Billy the Kid" You've earned it and I
5am very proud or you! Love, C
JENNIFER LYNN BRITT
We'll always be the wind
beneath your wings as you
soar to new heights. We're
very happy for you
Your proud Vad & Adorn
The East Carolinian !�





I
25 Off Your Entire Check At Darryl's
Just show your ECU student ID at the Darryl's
across from campus and get a 25 discount on your
entire dinner check. Try our famous Saucy Barbecued
Pork Ribs. Award Winning Fajitas Grande, New Wood-
Fire Grilled Steaks, Fresh Vegetable Pasta, Roadside
RESTAURANT & BAR
xixsnimiMi
Chicken Sandwich, Steak and Cheese Sandwich,
Spicy Buffalo Wings, or any of our Delicious Desserts.
It's all specially priced for ECU students. So stop by
tonight and enjoy East Carolina's favorite place for
food and fun! � Does not include Alcoholic Beverages
800 East 10th Street � 752-1907
UUh


Title
The East Carolinian, May 5, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
May 05, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1273
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/58778
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